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Sample records for molecule inhibitor qlt0267

  1. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  2. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  3. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  4. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Urea Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Anderson, Marc O.; Li, Fei; Li, Min; Lei, Tianluo; Ren, Huiwen; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-01-01

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, which include isoforms of UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta endothelia and erythrocytes, facilitate urinary concentrating function. Inhibitors of urea transporter function have potential clinical applications as sodium-sparing diuretics, or ‘urearetics,’ in edema from different etiologies, such as congestive heart failure and cirrhosis, as well as in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). High-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules has identified UT-A and UT-B inhibitors with nanomolar potency. Inhibitors have been identified with different UT-A versus UT-B selectivity profiles and putative binding sites on UT proteins. Studies in rodent models support the utility of UT inhibitors in reducing urinary concentration, though testing in clinically relevant animal models of edema has not yet been done. PMID:25298345

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitor of AICAR Transformylase Homodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Spurr, Ian B.; Birts, Charles N.; Cuda, Francesco; Benkovic, Stephen J; Blaydes, Jeremy P.; Tavassoli, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (ATIC) is a bifunctional homodimeric enzyme that catalyses the last two steps of de novo purine biosynthesis. Homodimerization of ATIC, a protein-protein interaction with an interface of over 5000 Å2, is required for its aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase activity, with the active sites forming at the interface of the interacting proteins. Here, we report the development of a small-molecule inhibitor of AICAR transformylase that functions by preventing the homodimerization of ATIC. The compound is derived from a previously reported cyclic hexa-peptide inhibitor of AICAR transformylase (with a Ki of 17 μM), identified by high-throughput screening. The active motif of the cyclic peptide is identified as an arginine-tyrosine dipeptide, a capped analogue of which inhibits AICAR transformylase with a Ki of 84 μM. A library of non-natural analogues of this dipeptide was designed, synthesized, and assayed. The most potent compound inhibits AICAR transformylase with a Ki of 685 nM, a 25-fold improvement in activity from the parent cyclic peptide. The potential for this AICAR transformylase inhibitor in cancer therapy is assessed by studying its effect on the proliferation of a model breast cancer cell line. Using a non-radioactive proliferation assay and live cell imaging, a dose-dependent reduction in cell numbers and cell division rates was observed in cells treated with our ATIC dimerization inhibitor. PMID:22764122

  6. Small molecule phagocytosis inhibitors for immune cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Neschadim, Anton; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Branch, Donald R

    2016-08-01

    Immune cytopenias are conditions characterized by low blood cell counts, such as platelets in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and red blood cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Chronic ITP affects approximately 4 in 100,000 adults annually while AIHA is much less common. Extravascular phagocytosis and massive destruction of autoantibody-opsonized blood cells by macrophages in the spleen and liver are the hallmark of these conditions. Current treatment modalities for ITP and AIHA include the first-line use of corticosteroids; whereas, IVIg shows efficacy in ITP but not AIHA. One main mechanism of action by which IVIg treatment leads to the reduction in platelet destruction rates in ITP is thought to involve Fcγ receptor (FcγR) blockade, ultimately leading to the inhibition of extravascular platelet phagocytosis. IVIg, which is manufactured from the human plasma of thousands of donors, is a limited resource, and alternative treatments, particularly those based on bioavailable small molecules, are needed. In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of ITP, the role of Fcγ receptors, and the mechanisms of action of IVIg in treating ITP, and outline the efforts and progress towards developing novel, first-in-class inhibitors of phagocytosis as synthetic, small molecule substitutes for IVIg in ITP and other conditions where the pathobiology of the disease involves phagocytosis.

  7. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Anthrax Lethal Factor Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Peet, Norton P.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the preparation of new small molecule inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Our starting point was the symmetrical, bis-quinolinyl compound 1 (NSC 12155). Optimization of one half of this molecule led to new LF inhibitors that were desymmetrized to afford more drug-like compounds. PMID:24290062

  8. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  9. FDA-approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas E; Clausen, Mads H

    2015-07-01

    Kinases have emerged as one of the most intensively pursued targets in current pharmacological research, especially for cancer, due to their critical roles in cellular signaling. To date, the US FDA has approved 28 small-molecule kinase inhibitors, half of which were approved in the past 3 years. While the clinical data of these approved molecules are widely presented and structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been reported for individual molecules, an updated review that analyzes all approved molecules and summarizes current achievements and trends in the field has yet to be found. Here we present all approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors with an emphasis on binding mechanism and structural features, summarize current challenges, and discuss future directions in this field.

  10. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mullarky, Edouard; Lairson, Luke L; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A

    2016-07-01

    Serine metabolism is likely to play a critical role in cancer cell growth. A recent study reports the identification of a novel small-molecule inhibitor of serine synthesis that targets 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), the first enzyme of the serine synthesis pathway, and selectively abrogates the proliferation of PHGDH overexpressing breast cancer cells. PMID:27652319

  11. A new small molecule inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Filipa; Gane, Paul; Hampden-Smith, Kathryn; Allerston, Charles K.; Garthwaite, John; Selwood, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a haem containing enzyme that regulates cardiovascular homeostasis and multiple mechanisms in the central and peripheral nervous system. Commonly used inhibitors of sGC activity act through oxidation of the haem moiety, however they also bind haemoglobin and this limits their bioavailability for in vivo studies. We have discovered a new class of small molecule inhibitors of sGC and have characterised a compound designated D12 (compound 10) which binds to the catalytic domain of the enzyme with a KD of 11 μM in a SPR assay. PMID:26264842

  12. Synthetic Small-Molecule Prohormone Convertase 2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Dorota; Liu, Jin; Appel, Jon R.; Ozawa, Akihiko; Nefzi, Adel; Mackin, Robert B.; Houghten, Richard A.; Lindberg, Iris

    2009-01-01

    The proprotein convertases are believed to be responsible for the proteolytic maturation of a large number of peptide hormone precursors. Although potent furin inhibitors have been identified, thus far, no small-molecule prohormone convertase 1/3 or prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) inhibitors have been described. After screening 38 small-molecule positional scanning libraries against recombinant mouse PC2, two promising chemical scaffolds were identified: bicyclic guanidines, and pyrrolidine bis-piperazines. A set of individual compounds was designed from each library and tested against PC2. Pyrrolidine bis-piperazines were irreversible, time-dependent inhibitors of PC2, exhibiting noncompetitive inhibition kinetics; the most potent inhibitor exhibited a Ki value for PC2 of 0.54 μM. In contrast, the most potent bicyclic guanidine inhibitor exhibited a Ki value of 3.3 μM. Cross-reactivity with other convertases was limited: pyrrolidine bis-piperazines exhibited Ki values greater than 25 μM for PC1/3 or furin, whereas the Ki values of bicyclic guanidines for these other convertases were more than 15 μM. We conclude that pyrrolidine bis-piperazines and bicyclic guanidines represent promising initial leads for the optimization of therapeutically active PC2 inhibitors. PC2-specific inhibitors may be useful in the pharmacological blockade of PC2-dependent cleavage events, such as glucagon production in the pancreas and ectopic peptide production in small-cell carcinoma, and to study PC2-dependent proteolytic events, such as opioid peptide production. PMID:19074544

  13. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  14. Effect of Chirality of Small Molecule Organofluorine Inhibitors of Amyloid Self-Assembly on Inhibitor Potency

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Abha; Abid, Mohammed; Hailemichael, Samson; Foster, Michelle; Török, Béla

    2009-01-01

    The effect of enantiomeric trifluromethyl-indolyl-acetic acid ethyl esters on the fibrillogenesis of Alzheimer's amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is described. These compounds have been previously identified as effective inhibitors of the Aβ self-assembly in their racemic form. Thioflavin-T Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy were applied to assess the potency of the chiral target compounds. Both enantiomers showed significant inhibition in the in vitro assays. The potency of the enantiomeric inhibitors appeared to be very similar to each other suggesting the lack of the stereospecific binding interactions between these small molecule inhibitors and the Aβ peptide. PMID:19880318

  15. Small molecule glutaminase inhibitors block glutamate release from stimulated microglia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; O'Driscoll, Cliona M; Bressler, Joseph; Kaufmann, Walter; Rojas, Camilo J; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase plays a critical role in the generation of glutamate, a key excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Excess glutamate release from activated macrophages and microglia correlates with upregulated glutaminase suggesting a pathogenic role for glutaminase. Both glutaminase siRNA and small molecule inhibitors have been shown to decrease excess glutamate and provide neuroprotection in multiple models of disease, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis and ischemia. Consequently, inhibition of glutaminase could be of interest for treatment of these diseases. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetimido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) and 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), two most commonly used glutaminase inhibitors, are either poorly soluble or non-specific. Recently, several new BPTES analogs with improved physicochemical properties were reported. To evaluate these new inhibitors, we established a cell-based microglial activation assay measuring glutamate release. Microglia-mediated glutamate levels were significantly augmented by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands coincident with increased glutaminase activity. While several potent glutaminase inhibitors abrogated the increase in glutamate, a structurally related analog devoid of glutaminase activity was unable to block the increase. In the absence of glutamine, glutamate levels were significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the in vitro microglia assay may be a useful tool in developing glutaminase inhibitors of therapeutic interest. PMID:24269238

  16. Novel Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arnab; Mills, Debra M.; Mitchell, Daniel; Ndungo, Esther; Williams, John D.; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Moir, Donald T.; Chandran, Kartik; Patterson, Jean L.; Rong, Lijun; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The current Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak has highlighted the troubling absence of available antivirals or vaccines to treat infected patients and stop the spread of EBOV. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) plays critical roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, making it a potential target for the development of anti-EBOV drugs. We report the identification of 2 novel EBOV inhibitors targeting viral entry. Methods. To identify small molecule inhibitors of EBOV entry, we carried out a cell-based high-throughput screening using human immunodeficiency virus–based pseudotyped viruses expressing EBOV-GP. Two compounds were identified, and mechanism-of-action studies were performed using immunoflourescence, AlphaLISA, and enzymatic assays for cathepsin B inhibition. Results. We report the identification of 2 novel entry inhibitors. These inhibitors (1) inhibit EBOV infection (50% inhibitory concentration, approximately 0.28 and approximately 10 µmol/L) at a late stage of entry, (2) induce Niemann-Pick C phenotype, and (3) inhibit GP–Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein interaction. Conclusions. We have identified 2 novel EBOV inhibitors, MBX2254 and MBX2270, that can serve as starting points for the development of an anti-EBOV therapeutic agent. Our findings also highlight the importance of NPC1-GP interaction in EBOV entry and the attractiveness of NPC1 as an antifiloviral therapeutic target. PMID:26206510

  17. Unique small molecule entry inhibitors of hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew M; Rojek, Jillian M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Gundersen, Anette T; Jin, Wei; Shaginian, Alex; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H; Boger, Dale L; Oldstone, Michael B A; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-07-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers caused by the arenaviruses Lassa virus in Africa and Machupo, Guanarito, Junin, and Sabia virus in South America are among the most devastating emerging human diseases with fatality rates of 15-35% and a limited antiviral therapeutic repertoire available. Here we used high throughput screening of synthetic combinatorial small molecule libraries to identify inhibitors of arenavirus infection using pseudotyped virion particles bearing the glycoproteins (GPs) of highly pathogenic arenaviruses. Our screening efforts resulted in the discovery of a series of novel small molecule inhibitors of viral entry that are highly active against both Old World and New World hemorrhagic arenaviruses. We observed potent inhibition of infection of human and primate cells with live hemorrhagic arenaviruses (IC(50)=500-800 nm). Investigations of the mechanism of action revealed that the candidate compounds efficiently block pH-dependent fusion by the arenavirus GPs (IC(50) of 200-350 nm). Although our lead compounds were potent against phylogenetically distant arenaviruses, they did not show activity against other enveloped viruses with class I viral fusion proteins, indicating specificity for arenavirus GP-mediated membrane fusion.

  18. Single-molecule enzyme kinetics in the presence of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saha, Soma; Sinha, Antara; Dua, Arti

    2012-07-28

    Recent studies in single-molecule enzyme kinetics reveal that the turnover statistics of a single enzyme is governed by the waiting time distribution that decays as mono-exponential at low substrate concentration and multi-exponential at high substrate concentration. The multi-exponentiality arises due to protein conformational fluctuations, which act on the time scale longer than or comparable to the catalytic reaction step, thereby inducing temporal fluctuations in the catalytic rate resulting in dynamic disorder. In this work, we study the turnover statistics of a single enzyme in the presence of inhibitors to show that the multi-exponentiality in the waiting time distribution can arise even when protein conformational fluctuations do not influence the catalytic rate. From the Michaelis-Menten mechanism of inhibited enzymes, we derive exact expressions for the waiting time distribution for competitive, uncompetitive, and mixed inhibitions to quantitatively show that the presence of inhibitors can induce dynamic disorder in all three modes of inhibitions resulting in temporal fluctuations in the reaction rate. In the presence of inhibitors, dynamic disorder arises due to transitions between active and inhibited states of enzymes, which occur on time scale longer than or comparable to the catalytic step. In this limit, the randomness parameter (dimensionless variance) is greater than unity indicating the presence of dynamic disorder in all three modes of inhibitions. In the opposite limit, when the time scale of the catalytic step is longer than the time scale of transitions between active and inhibited enzymatic states, the randomness parameter is unity, implying no dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway.

  19. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  20. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling.

  1. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from pomegranate.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and'no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications. PMID:24958333

  2. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  3. Nox Inhibitors & Therapies: Rational Design of Peptidic and Small Molecule Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Pagano, M Eugenia; Meijles, Daniel N; Pagano, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress-related diseases underlie many if not all of the major leading causes of death in United States and the Western World. Thus, enormous interest from both academia and pharmaceutical industry has been placed on the development of agents which attenuate oxidative stress. With that in mind, great efforts have been placed in the development of inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (Nox), the major enzymatic source of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in many cells and tissue. The regulation of a catalytically active Nox enzyme involves numerous protein-protein interactions which, in turn, afford numerous targets for inhibition of its activity. In this review, we will provide an updated overview of the available Nox inhibitors, both peptidic and small molecules, and discuss the body of data related to their possible mechanisms of action and specificity towards each of the various isoforms of Nox. Indeed, there have been some very notable successes. However, despite great commitment by many in the field, the need for efficacious and well-characterized, isoform-specific Nox inhibitors, essential for the treatment of major diseases as well as for delineating the contribution of a given Nox in physiological redox signalling, continues to grow.

  4. Nox Inhibitors & Therapies: Rational Design of Peptidic and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Pagano, M. Eugenia; Meijles, Daniel N.; Pagano, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-related diseases underlie many if not all of the major leading causes of death in United States and the Western World. Thus, enormous interest from both academia and pharmaceutical industry has been placed on the development of agents which attenuate oxidative stress. With that in mind, great efforts have been placed in the development of inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (Nox), the major enzymatic source of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in many cells and tissue. The regulation of a catalytically active Nox enzyme involves numerous protein-protein interactions which, in turn, afford numerous targets for inhibition of its activity. In this review, we will provide an updated overview of the available Nox inhibitors, both peptidic and small molecules, and discuss the body of data related to their possible mechanisms of action and specificity towards each of the various isoforms of Nox. Indeed, there have been some very notable successes. However, despite great commitment by many in the field, the need for efficacious and well-characterized, isoform-specific Nox inhibitors, essential for the treatment of major diseases as well as for delineating the contribution of a given Nox in physiological redox signalling, continues to grow. PMID:26510437

  5. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein is among the most attractive of cancer targets given that is deregulated in the majority of tumors and that its inhibition profoundly affects their growth and/or survival. However, its role as a seldom-mutated transcription factor, its lack of enzymatic activity for which suitable pharmaceutical inhibitors could be crafted and its expression by normal cells have largely been responsible for its being viewed as “undruggable”. Work over the past several years, however, has begun to reverse this idea by allowing us to view Myc within the larger context of global gene regulatory control. Thus, Myc and its obligate heterodimeric partner, Max, are integral to the coordinated recruitment and post-translational modification of components of the core transcriptional machinery. Moreover, Myc over-expression re-programs numerous critical cellular functions and alters the cell’s susceptibility to their inhibition. This new knowledge has therefore served as a framework upon which to develop new pharmaceutical approaches. These include the continuing development of small molecules which act directly to inhibit the critical Myc-Max interaction, those which act indirectly to prevent Myc-directed post-translational modifications necessary to initiate productive transcription and those which inhibit vital pathways upon which the Myc-transformed cell is particularly reliant. PMID:24657798

  6. Identification of a small molecule [beta]-secretase inhibitor that binds without catalytic aspartate engagement

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Thomas G.; Hills, Ivory D.; Nomland, Ashley A.; de León, Pablo; Allison, Timothy; McGaughey, Georgia; Colussi, Dennis; Tugusheva, Katherine; Haugabook, Sharie J.; Espeseth, Amy S.; Zuck, Paul; Graham, Samuel L.; Stachel, Shawn J.

    2010-09-02

    A small molecule inhibitor of beta-secretase with a unique binding mode has been developed. Crystallographic determination of the enzyme-inhibitor complex shows the catalytic aspartate residues in the active site are not engaged in inhibitor binding. This unprecedented binding mode in the field of aspartyl protease inhibition is described.

  7. Small molecule inhibitors of IRES-mediated translation

    PubMed Central

    Vaklavas, Christos; Meng, Zheng; Choi, Hyoungsoo; Grizzle, William E; Zinn, Kurt R; Blume, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    Many genes controlling cell proliferation and survival (those most important to cancer biology) are now known to be regulated specifically at the translational (RNA to protein) level. The internal ribosome entry site (IRES) provides a mechanism by which the translational efficiency of an individual or group of mRNAs can be regulated independently of the global controls on general protein synthesis. IRES-mediated translation has been implicated as a significant contributor to the malignant phenotype and chemoresistance, however there has been no effective means by which to interfere with this specialized mode of protein synthesis. A cell-based empirical high-throughput screen was performed in attempt to identify compounds capable of selectively inhibiting translation mediated through the IGF1R IRES. Results obtained using the bicistronic reporter system demonstrate selective inhibition of second cistron translation (IRES-dependent). The lead compound and its structural analogs completely block de novo IGF1R protein synthesis in genetically-unmodified cells, confirming activity against the endogenous IRES. Spectrum of activity extends beyond IGF1R to include the c-myc IRES. The small molecule IRES inhibitor differentially modulates synthesis of the oncogenic (p64) and growth-inhibitory (p67) isoforms of Myc, suggesting that the IRES controls not only translational efficiency, but also choice of initiation codon. Sustained IRES inhibition has profound, detrimental effects on human tumor cells, inducing massive (>99%) cell death and complete loss of clonogenic survival in models of triple-negative breast cancer. The results begin to reveal new insights into the inherent complexity of gene-specific translational regulation, and the importance of IRES-mediated translation to tumor cell biology. PMID:26177060

  8. Next Generation of Targeted Molecules for Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Intracellular Targets and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hannah; Ruan, Jia

    2016-09-15

    Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma have guided the development of targeted therapies that disrupt aberrant signaling pathways important for communication within lymphoma cells and for their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. This has led to unprecedented therapeutic progress, with biologic agents that have begun to transform the care of patients with lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This review discusses the mechanisms of action, clinical development, and emerging applications of small-molecule inhibitors that target B-cell receptor signaling pathways, B-cell lymphoma-2 inhibitors, selective inhibitors of nuclear export, and epigenetic modifiers. PMID:27633417

  9. Small-molecule inhibitors of NADPH oxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Borbély, Gábor; Szabadkai, István; Horváth, Zoltán; Markó, Péter; Varga, Zoltán; Breza, Nóra; Baska, Ferenc; Vántus, Tibor; Huszár, Mónika; Geiszt, Miklós; Hunyady, László; Buday, László; Orfi, László; Kéri, György

    2010-09-23

    NOX enzymes are the major contributors in many oxidative damage related diseases. Unfortunately, at present no specific NOX inhibitor is available. Here, we describe the discovery and development of novel NOX4 inhibitors. Compound libraries were tested in a cell-based assay as a primary screen, monitoring H2O2 production. Twenty-four compounds inhibited Nox4 activity with low-micromolar IC(50) values of which three were selected for further drug development.

  10. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  11. Large negatively charged organic host molecules as inhibitors of endonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tauran, Yannick; Anjard, Christophe; Kim, Beomjoon; Rhimi, Moez; Coleman, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    Three large negatively charged organic host molecules; β-cyclodextrin sulphate, para-sulphonato-calix[6]arene and para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene have been shown to be effective inhibitors of endonuclease in the low micromolar range, additionally para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene is a partial inhibitor of rhDNase I.

  12. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  13. Determination of the inhibitor dissociation constant of an individual unmodified enzyme molecule in free solution.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeremie J; Hollett, Joshua W; Craig, Douglas B

    2016-08-01

    Single enzyme molecule assays on E. coli β-galactosidase were performed using a capillary electrophoresis-based method. Three types of assays were performed. The catalytic rate of 20 individual molecules was assayed in duplicate in the presence of 50 μM substrate. The ratio of rates for the second incubation relative to the first was 0.96 ± 0.03, showing the reproducibility of the method. In the second assay, the rates were determined in the absence and presence of 210 μM L-ribose, a competitive inhibitor. The ratio of the rate in the presence of inhibitor to that in its absence for 19 individual molecules was 0.44 ± 0.23. This large relative standard deviation suggests that each individual enzyme molecule was affected to a different extent by the presence of the inhibitor, which is consistent with KI being heterogeneous. To estimate KI for individual molecules, a third assay was performed. Each molecule was incubated in the presence of 30 and 50 μM substrate and then in the presence of 50 μM substrate plus 210 μM inhibitor. Comparison of the rates in the two substrate concentrations allowed for the determination of the individual Km of each molecule. From this value and the difference in rates in the presence and absence of inhibitor, the individual molecule KI values were determined. This value was found to differ between individual molecules and was found to increase with an increase in Km . Modeling showed that a heterogeneity in KI results in an alteration in the Michaelis-Menten curve for a population of enzymes in the presence of a competitive inhibitor. PMID:27271375

  14. Identification of Small-Molecule Scaffolds for P450 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    von Kries, Jens P.; Warrier, Thulasi; Podust, Larissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450, CYP) attract ongoing interest for their pharmacological development potential, as evidenced by the activity of antifungal azole drugs that inhibit sterol 14α-demethylase CYP51 in fungi, tightly bind M. tuberculosis CYP enzymes, and display inhibitory potential against latent and multi drug resistant forms of tuberculosis both in vitro and in tuberculosis-infected mice. Although “piggy-backing” onto existing antifungal drug development programs would have obvious practical and economic benefits, the substantial differences between fungal CYP51 and potential CYP targets in M. tuberculosis are driving direct screening efforts against CYP enzymes with the ultimate goal of developing potent CYP-specific inhibitors and/or molecular probes to address M. tuberculosis biology. The property of CYP enzymes to shift the ferric heme Fe Soret band in response to ligand binding provides the basis for an experimental platform for high throughput screening (HTS) of compound libraries to select chemotypes with high binding affinities to the target. Newly discovered compounds can be evaluated in in vitro assays or in vivo disease models for inhibitory/therapeutic effects. The best inhibitors in complex with the target protein can be further characterized by x-ray crystallography. In conjunction with knowledge about compound inhibition potential, detailed structural characterization of the protein-inhibitor binding mode can guide lead optimization strategies to assist drug design. This unit includes protocols for compound library screening, analysis of inhibitory potential of the screen hits, and co-crystallization of top hits with the target CYP. Support protocols are provided for expression and purification of soluble CYP enzymes. PMID:20131225

  15. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing with Nonpeptidic Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of 3-oxo-C12-HSL, tetramic acid, and tetronic acid analogues were synthesized to gain insights into the structural requirements for quorum sensing inhibition in Staphylococcus aureus. Compounds active against agr were noncompetitive inhibitors of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) activated AgrC receptor, by altering the activation efficacy of the cognate AIP-1. They appeared to act as negative allosteric modulators and are exemplified by 3-tetradecanoyltetronic acid 17, which reduced nasal cell colonization and arthritis in a murine infection model. PMID:24592914

  16. Targeting PTPs with small molecule inhibitors in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a major role in cellular signaling. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Disturbance of the normal balance between PTK and PTP activity results in aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation, which has been linked to the etiology of several human diseases, including cancer. A number of PTPs have been implicated in oncogenesis and tumor progression and therefore are potential drug targets for cancer chemotherapy. These include PTP1B, which may augment signaling downstream of HER2/Neu; SHP2, which is the first oncogene in the PTP superfamily and is essential for growth factor-mediated signaling; the Cdc25 phosphatases, which are positive regulators of cell cycle progression; and the PRL phosphatases, which promote tumor metastases. As PTPs have emerged as drug targets for cancer, a number of strategies are currently been explored for the identification of various classes of PTP inhibitors. These efforts have resulted many potent, and in some cases selective, inhibitors for PTP1B, SHP2, Cdc25 and PRL phosphatases. Structural information derived from these compounds serves as a solid foundation upon which novel anti-cancer agents targeted to these PTPs can be developed. PMID:18259840

  17. Azastilbene Analogs as Tyrosinase Inhibitors: New Molecules with Depigmenting Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Larissa Lavorato; Lima, Rebeca Mól; da Silva, Annelisa Farah; do Carmo, Antônio Márcio Resende; da Silva, Adilson David; Raposo, Nádia Rezende Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    This research has been an effort to develop synthetic resveratrol analogs in order to improve the depigmenting potential of natural resveratrol. Six resveratrol analogs were synthesized and tested for tyrosinase inhibitory activity in vitro, by qualitative and quantitative steps. The results showed the analog C as being the most powerful tyrosinase inhibitor (IA50 = 65.67 ± 0.60 μg/mL), followed by the analogs B, E, F, A, and D, respectively. The analog C presented a tyrosinase inhibition potential better than natural resveratrol (P < 0.001). The best depigmenting activity was provided by the presence of hydroxyl in the orthoposition on the second phenolic ring. PMID:23476126

  18. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  19. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    PubMed

    Ng, Wai-Leung; Perez, Lark; Cong, Jianping; Semmelhack, Martin F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives. PMID:22761573

  20. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  1. Small molecule inhibitor screen identifies synergistic activity of the bromodomain inhibitor CPI203 and bortezomib in drug resistant myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Matthew B.; Liu, Selina Qiuying; Davare, Monika A.; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite significant therapeutic progress in multiple myeloma, drug resistance is uniformly inevitable and new treatments are needed. Our aim was to identify novel, efficacious small-molecule combinations for use in drug resistant multiple myeloma. Experimental Design A panel of 116 small molecule inhibitors was used to screen resistant myeloma cell lines for potential therapeutic targets. Agents found to have enhanced activity in the bortezomib or melphalan resistant myeloma cell lines were investigated further in combination. Synergistic combinations of interest were evaluated in primary patient cells. Results The overall single-agent drug sensitivity profiles were dramatically different between melphalan and bortezomib resistant cells, however, the bromodomain inhibitor, CPI203, was observed to have enhanced activity in both the bortezomib and melphalan resistant lines compared to their wild-type counterparts. The combination of bortezomib and CPI203 was found to be synergistic in both the bortezomib and melphalan resistant cell lines as well as in a primary multiple myeloma sample from a patient refractory to recent proteasome inhibitor treatment. The CPI203-bortezomib combination led to enhanced apoptosis and anti-proliferative effects. Finally, in contrast to prior reports of synergy between bortezomib and other epigenetic modifying agents, which implicated MYC downregulation or NOXA induction, our analyses suggest that CPI203-bortezomib synergy is independent of these events. Conclusion Our preclinical data supports a role for the clinical investigation of the bromodomain inhibitor CPI203 combined with bortezomib or alkylating agents in resistant multiple myeloma. PMID:26254279

  2. Identification of small molecule sulfonic acids as ecto-5'-Nucleotidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Raza, Rabia; Saeed, Aamer; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2012-11-01

    Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase inhibitors have great potential as anti-tumor agents. We have investigated biochemical properties of human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidases and characterized 19 small molecule sulfonic acid derivatives as potential inhibitors of ecto-5'-Nucleotidases. We identified 11 potent inhibitors of human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidases and checked their selectivity. Compound 10 (Sodium 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonate) with K(i) value of 0.66 μM and 19 (N-(4-sulfamoylphenylcarbamothioyl) pivalamide) with K(i) value of 0.78 μM were identified as the most potent inhibitors for human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidase, respectively. The present compounds have low molecular weights, water solubility and equal potency as compared to the reported inhibitors.

  3. Development of Small-molecule HIV Entry Inhibitors Specifically Targeting gp120 or gp41

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Cai, Lifeng; Debnath, Asim K.; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41 play important roles in HIV-1 entry, thus serving as key targets for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. T20 peptide (enfuvirtide) is the first U.S. FDA-approved HIV entry inhibitor; however, its clinical application is limited by the lack of oral availability. Here, we have described the structure and function of the HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 subunits and reviewed advancements in the development of small-molecule HIV entry inhibitors specifically targeting these two Env glycoproteins. We then compared the advantages and disadvantages of different categories of HIV entry inhibitor candidates and further predicted the future trend of HIV entry inhibitor development. PMID:26324044

  4. Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Voronkov, Andrey; Krauss, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a branch of a functional network that dates back to the first metazoans and it is involved in a broad range of biological systems including stem cells, embryonic development and adult organs. Deregulation of components involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in a wide spectrum of diseases including a number of cancers and degenerative diseases. The key mediator of Wnt signaling, β-catenin, serves several cellular functions. It functions in a dynamic mode at multiple cellular locations, including the plasma membrane, where β-catenin contributes to the stabilization of intercellular adhesive complexes, the cytoplasm where β-catenin levels are regulated and the nucleus where β-catenin is involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin interactions. Central effectors of β-catenin levels are a family of cysteine-rich secreted glycoproteins, known as Wnt morphogens. Through the LRP5/6-Frizzled receptor complex, Wnts regulate the location and activity of the destruction complex and consequently intracellular β- catenin levels. However, β-catenin levels and their effects on transcriptional programs are also influenced by multiple other factors including hypoxia, inflammation, hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling, and the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The broad implications of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in development, in the adult body and in disease render the pathway a prime target for pharmacological research and development. The intricate regulation of β-catenin at its various locations provides alternative points for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23016862

  5. Testing synthetic amyloid-β aggregation inhibitor using single molecule atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hane, Francis T; Lee, Brenda Y; Petoyan, Anahit; Rauk, Arvi; Leonenko, Zoya

    2014-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disease with no known cure and few effective treatment options. The principal neurotoxic agent is an oligomeric form of the amyloid-β peptide and one of the treatment options currently being studied is the inhibition of amyloid aggregation. In this work, we test a novel pseudopeptidic aggregation inhibitor designated as SG1. SG1 has been designed to bind at the amyloid-β self-recognition site and prevent amyloid-β from misfolding into β sheet. We used atomic force spectroscopy, a nanoscale measurement technique, to quantify the binding forces between two single amyloid peptide molecules. For the first time, we demonstrate that single molecule atomic force spectroscopy can be used to assess the effectiveness of amyloid aggregation inhibitors by measuring the experimental yield of binding and can potentially be used as a screening technique for quick testing of efficacy of inhibitor drugs for amyloid aggregation.

  6. Molecular Dynamics simulations of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins and identification of potential small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Jayanthi; Anishetty, Sharmila

    2014-05-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance due to over expression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) XIAP, survivin and livin has been observed in various cancers. In the current study, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for all three IAPs and a common ligand binding scaffold was identified. Further, a novel sequence based motif specific to these IAPs was designed. SMAC is an endogenous inhibitor of IAPs. Screening of ChemBank for compounds similar to lead SMAC-non-peptidomimetics yielded a cemadotin related compound NCIMech_000654. Cemadotin is a derivative of natural anti-tumor peptide dolastatin-15; hence these compounds were docked against all three IAPs. Based on our analysis, we propose that NCIMech_000654/dolastatin-15/cemadotin derivatives may be investigated for their potential in inhibiting XIAP, survivin and livin.

  7. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  8. Computational Analysis and Predictive Cheminformatics Modeling of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Epigenetic Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Background The dynamic and differential regulation and expression of genes is majorly governed by the complex interactions of a subset of biomolecules in the cell operating at multiple levels starting from genome organisation to protein post-translational regulation. The regulatory layer contributed by the epigenetic layer has been one of the favourite areas of interest recently. This layer of regulation as we know today largely comprises of DNA modifications, histone modifications and noncoding RNA regulation and the interplay between each of these major components. Epigenetic regulation has been recently shown to be central to development of a number of disease processes. The availability of datasets of high-throughput screens for molecules for biological properties offer a new opportunity to develop computational methodologies which would enable in-silico screening of large molecular libraries. Methods In the present study, we have used data from high throughput screens for the inhibitors of epigenetic modifiers. Computational predictive models were constructed based on the molecular descriptors. Machine learning algorithms for supervised training, Naive Bayes and Random Forest, were used to generate predictive models for the small molecule inhibitors of histone methyl-transferases and demethylases. Random forest, with the accuracy of 80%, was identified as the most accurate classifier. Further we complemented the study with substructure search approach filtering out the probable pharmacophores from the active molecules leading to drug molecules. Results We show that effective use of appropriate computational algorithms could be used to learn molecular and structural correlates of biological activities of small molecules. The computational models developed could be potentially used to screen and identify potential new biological activities of molecules from large molecular libraries and prioritise them for in-depth biological assays. To the best of our knowledge

  9. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat: the small-molecule with promising activity against therapeutically challenging haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    Histone acetyl transferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are counteracting epigenetic enzymes regulating the turnover of histone acetylation thereby regulating transcriptional events in a precise manner. Deregulation of histone acetylation caused by aberrant expression of HDACs plays a key role in tumour onset and progression making these enzymes as candidate targets for anticancer drugs and therapy. Small-molecules namely histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) modulating the biological function of HDACs have shown multiple biological effects including differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumour models. HDACi in general have been described in plethora of reviews with respect to various cancers. However, no review article is available describing thoroughly the role of inhibitor givinostat (ITF2357 or [6-(diethylaminomethyl) naphthalen-2-yl] methyl N-[4-(hydroxycarbamoyl) phenyl] carbamate) in haematological malignancies. Thus, the present review explores the intricate role of novel inhibitor givinostat in the defined malignancies including multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous leukaemia, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma apart from myeloproliferative neoplasms. The distinct molecular mechanisms triggered by this small-molecule inhibitor in these cancers to exert cytotoxic effect have also been dealt with. The article also highlights the combination strategy that can be used for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of this inhibitor in the upcoming future. PMID:27121910

  11. Accelerated exchange of a buried water molecule in selectively disulfide-reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Denisov, Vladimir P; Peters, Jörg; Hörlein, Hans Dietrich; Halle, Bertil

    2004-09-28

    Using magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD), we have previously shown that the four internal water molecules in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) exchange with bulk water on time scales between 10(-8) and 10(-4) s at room temperature. Because this exchange is controlled by the protein structure, internal water molecules can be used to probe rare conformational fluctuations. Here, we report (2)H and (17)O MRD data at three temperatures for wild-type BPTI and two BPTI variants where the 14-38 disulfide bond has been cleaved by a double Cys --> Ser mutation or by disulfide reduction and carboxamidomethylation. The MRD data show that the internal water molecules are conserved on disulfide cleavage. However, the exchange rate of the water molecule buried near the disulfide bond is enhanced by 2-4 orders of magnitude. The relation of water exchange to other dynamic processes in BPTI is discussed.

  12. p53 Small Molecule Inhibitor Enhances Temozolomide Cytotoxic Activity against Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Eduard B.; Lu, Kan V.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Pieper, Russell O.; Prados, Michael D.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; VandenBerg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated corresponding precursor and active forms of a p53 small molecule inhibitor for effect on temozolomide (TMZ) anti-tumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when GBMs with wild-type p53 were co-treated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased PARP cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, that is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: i.e., TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor co-treatment, of three distinct wild-type p53 GBM xenografts, resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ anti-tumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (p < 0.001 for co-treatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53 null GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhance TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:19074867

  13. p53 Small-molecule inhibitor enhances temozolomide cytotoxic activity against intracranial glioblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Eduard B; Lu, Kan V; Sarkaria, Jann N; Pieper, Russell O; Prados, Michael D; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Vandenberg, Scott R; Berger, Mitchel S; James, C David

    2008-12-15

    In this study, we investigated the precursor and active forms of a p53 small-molecule inhibitor for their effects on temozolomide (TMZ) antitumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when p53 wild-type (p53(wt)) GBMs were cotreated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, which is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor cotreatment of three distinct p53(wt) GBM xenografts resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ antitumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (P < 0.001 for cotreatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53(null) GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhances TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner.

  14. Antitumor activity of a small-molecule inhibitor of the histone kinase Haspin

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, D; Soler, M; Moreto, J; Villanueva, A; Martinez, A; Vidal, A; Charlton, M; Moffat, D; Patel, S; McDermott, J; Owen, J; Brotherton, D; Krige, D; Cuthill, S; Esteller, M

    2012-01-01

    The approval of histone deacetylase inhibitors for treatment of lymphoma subtypes has positioned histone modifications as potential targets for the development of new classes of anticancer drugs. Histones also undergo phosphorylation events, and Haspin is a protein kinase the only known target of which is phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 residue (H3T3ph), which is necessary for mitosis progression. Mitotic kinases can be blocked by small drugs and several clinical trials are underway with these agents. As occurs with Aurora kinase inhibitors, Haspin might be an optimal candidate for the pharmacological development of these compounds. A high-throughput screening for Haspin inhibitors identified the CHR-6494 compound as being one promising such agent. We demonstrate that CHR-6494 reduces H3T3ph levels in a dose-dependent manner and causes a mitotic catastrophe characterized by metaphase misalignment, spindle abnormalities and centrosome amplification. From the cellular standpoint, the identified small-molecule Haspin inhibitor causes arrest in G2/M and subsequently apoptosis. Importantly, ex vivo assays also demonstrate its anti-angiogenetic features; in vivo, it shows antitumor potential in xenografted nude mice without any observed toxicity. Thus, CHR-6494 is a first-in-class Haspin inhibitor with a wide spectrum of anticancer effects that merits further preclinical research as a new member of the family of mitotic kinase inhibitors. PMID:21804608

  15. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

  16. The development and use of small molecule inhibitors of glycosphingolipid metabolism for lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shayman, James A.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid (GSL) storage diseases have been the focus of efforts to develop small molecule therapeutics from design, experimental proof of concept studies, and clinical trials. Two primary alternative strategies that have been pursued include pharmacological chaperones and GSL synthase inhibitors. There are theoretical advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches. Pharmacological chaperones are specific for an individual glycoside hydrolase and for the specific mutation present, but no candidate chaperone has been demonstrated to be effective for all mutations leading to a given disorder. Synthase inhibitors target single enzymes such as glucosylceramide synthase and inhibit the formation of multiple GSLs. A glycolipid synthase inhibitor could potentially be used to treat multiple diseases, but at the risk of lowering nontargeted cellular GSLs that are important for normal health. The basis for these strategies and specific examples of compounds that have led to clinical trials is the focus of this review. PMID:24534703

  17. Identification and Characterization of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Formin-Mediated Actin Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed A.; Neidt, Erin M.; Cui, Jiayue; Feiger, Zach; Skau, Colleen T.; Gardel, Margaret L.; Kozmin, Sergey A.; Kovar, David R.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Formins stimulate actin filament assembly for fundamental cellular processes including division, adhesion, establishing polarity and motility. A formin inhibitor would be useful because most cells express multiple formins whose functions are not known, and because metastatic tumor formation depends upon the deregulation of formin-dependent processes. We identified a general small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains (SMIFH2) by screening compounds for the ability to prevent formin-mediated actin assembly in vitro. SMIFH2 targets formins from evolutionarily diverse organisms including yeast, nematode worm and mice, with a half-maximal inhibitor concentration of ~5 to 15 μM. SMIFH2 prevents both formin nucleation and processive barbed-end elongation, and decreases formin’s affinity for the barbed end. Furthermore, low micromolar concentrations of SMIFH2 disrupt formin-dependent, but not Arp2/3 complex-dependent, actin cytoskeletal structures in fission yeast and mammalian NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. PMID:19942139

  18. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors of autotaxin that inhibit melanoma cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Lauren P; Ouellette, Amy; Bandle, Russ; Chang, William Chozen; Zhou, Hongwen; Misra, Raj N; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Braddock, Demetrios T

    2008-10-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a prometastatic enzyme initially isolated from the conditioned medium of human melanoma cells that stimulates a myriad of biological activities, including angiogenesis and the promotion of cell growth, survival, and differentiation through the production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX increases the aggressiveness and invasiveness of transformed cells, and ATX levels directly correlate with tumor stage and grade in several human malignancies. To study the role of ATX in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma, we developed antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors against recombinant human protein. Immunohistochemistry of paraffin-embedded human tissue shows that ATX levels are markedly increased in human primary and metastatic melanoma relative to benign nevi. Chemical screens identified several small-molecule inhibitors with binding constants ranging from nanomolar to low micromolar. Cell migration and invasion assays with melanoma cell lines show that ATX markedly stimulates melanoma cell migration and invasion, an effect suppressed by ATX inhibitors. The migratory phenotype can be rescued by the addition of the enzymatic product of ATX, LPA, confirming that the observed inhibition is linked to suppression of LPA production by ATX. Chemical analogues of the inhibitors show structure-activity relationships important for ATX inhibition and indicate pathways for their optimization. These studies suggest that ATX is an approachable molecular target for the rational design of chemotherapeutic agents directed against malignant melanoma.

  19. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, is found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppresses SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibits SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity. PMID:25455859

  20. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1.

    PubMed

    Evelyn, Chris R; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-12-18

    Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, was found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppress SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibit SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity.

  1. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to target serine biosynthesis in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mullarky, Edouard; Lucki, Natasha C.; Beheshti Zavareh, Reza; Anglin, Justin L.; Gomes, Ana P.; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Wong, Jenny C. Y.; Christen, Stefan; Takahashi, Hidenori; Singh, Pradeep K.; Blenis, John; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Asara, John M.; DeNicola, Gina M.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Lairson, Luke L.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to promote growth and proliferation. The genetic evidence pointing to the importance of the amino acid serine in tumorigenesis is striking. The gene encoding the enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), which catalyzes the first committed step of serine biosynthesis, is overexpressed in tumors and cancer cell lines via focal amplification and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated up-regulation. PHGDH-overexpressing cells are exquisitely sensitive to genetic ablation of the pathway. Here, we report the discovery of a selective small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH, CBR-5884, identified by screening a library of 800,000 drug-like compounds. CBR-5884 inhibited de novo serine synthesis in cancer cells and was selectively toxic to cancer cell lines with high serine biosynthetic activity. Biochemical characterization of the inhibitor revealed that it was a noncompetitive inhibitor that showed a time-dependent onset of inhibition and disrupted the oligomerization state of PHGDH. The identification of a small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH not only enables thorough preclinical evaluation of PHGDH as a target in cancers, but also provides a tool with which to study serine metabolism. PMID:26831078

  2. A Small-Molecule Screening Platform for the Discovery of Inhibitors of Undecaprenyl Diphosphate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Tomasz L; Brown, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    The bacterial cell wall has long been a celebrated target for antibacterial drug discovery due to its critical nature in bacteria and absence in mammalian systems. At the heart of the cell wall biosynthetic pathway lies undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P), the lipid-linked carrier upon which the bacterial cell wall is built. This study exploits recent insights into the link between late-stage wall teichoic acid inhibition and Und-P production, in Gram-positive organisms, to develop a cell-based small-molecule screening platform that enriches for inhibitors of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UppS). Screening a chemical collection of 142,000 small molecules resulted in the identification of 6 new inhibitors of UppS. To date, inhibitors of UppS have generally shown off-target effects on membrane potential due to their physical-chemical characteristics. We demonstrate that MAC-0547630, one of the six inhibitors identified, exhibits selective, nanomolar inhibition against UppS without off-target effects on membrane potential. Such characteristics make it a unique chemical probe for exploring the inhibition of UppS in bacterial cell systems. PMID:27626101

  3. A novel mechanism by which small molecule inhibitors induce the DFG flip in Aurora A

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mathew P.; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Pireddu, Roberta; Luo, Yunting; Alam, Riazul; Ozcan, Sevil; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Most protein kinases share a DFG (Asp-Phe-Gly) motif in the ATP site which can assume two distinct conformations, the active DFG-in and the inactive DFG-out states. Small molecule inhibitors able to induce the DFG-out state have received considerable attention in kinase drug discovery. Using a typical DFG-in inhibitor scaffold of Aurora A, a kinase involved in the regulation of cell division, we found that halogen and nitrile substituents directed at the N-terminally flanking residue Ala273 induced global conformational changes in the enzyme, leading to DFG-out inhibitors that are among the most potent Aurora A inhibitors reported to date. The data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of action, in which induced-dipole forces along the Ala273 side chain alter the charge distribution of the DFG backbone, allowing the DFG to unwind. As the ADFG sequence and three-dimensional structure is highly conserved, DFG-out inhibitors of other kinases may be designed by specifically targeting the flanking alanine residue with electric dipoles. PMID:22248356

  4. A SMALL MOLECULE SCREEN IDENTIFIES SELECTIVE INHIBITORS OF UREA TRANSPORTER UT-A

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Urea transporter (UT) proteins, including UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta microvessels, facilitate urinary concentrating function. A screen for UT-A inhibitors was developed in MDCK cells expressing UT-A1, water channel aquaporin-1, and YFP-H148Q/V163S. An inwardly directed urea gradient produces cell shrinking followed by UT-A1-dependent swelling, which was monitored by YFP-H148Q/V163S fluorescence. Screening of ~90,000 synthetic small molecules yielded four classes of UT-A1 inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 that fully and reversibly inhibited urea transport by a non-competitive mechanism. Structure-activity analysis of >400 analogs revealed UT-A1-selective and UT-A1/UT-B non-selective inhibitors. Docking computations based on homology models of UT-A1 suggested inhibitor binding sites. UT-A inhibitors may be useful as diuretics (‘urearetics’) with a novel mechanism of action that may be effective in fluid-retaining conditions in which conventional salt transport-blocking diuretics have limited efficacy. PMID:24055006

  5. Urearetics: a small molecule screen yields nanomolar potency inhibitors of urea transporter UT-B.

    PubMed

    Levin, Marc H; de la Fuente, Ricardo; Verkman, A S

    2007-02-01

    Functional studies in knockout mice indicate a critical role for urea transporters (UTs) in the urinary concentrating mechanism and in renal urea clearance. However, potent and specific urea transport blockers have not been available. Here, we used high-throughput screening to discover high-affinity, small molecule inhibitors of the UT-B urea transporter. A collection of 50,000 diverse, drug-like compounds was screened using a human erythrocyte lysis assay based on UT-B-facilitated acetamide transport. Primary screening yielded approximately 30 UT-B inhibitors belonging to the phenylsulfoxyoxazole, benzenesulfonanilide, phthalazinamine, and aminobenzimidazole chemical classes. Screening of approximately 700 structurally similar analogs gave many active compounds, the most potent of which inhibited UT-B urea transport with an EC50 of approximately 10 nM, and approximately 100% inhibition at higher concentrations. Phenylsulfoxyoxazoles and phthalazinamines also blocked rodent UT-B and had good UT-B vs. UT-A specificity. The UT-B inhibitors did not reduce aquaporin-1 (AQP1)-facilitated water transport. In AQP1-null erythrocytes, "chemical UT-B knockout" by UT-B inhibitors reduced by approximately 3-fold UT-B-mediated water transport, supporting an aqueous pore pathway through UT-B. UT-B inhibitors represent a new class of diuretics, "urearetics," which are predicted to increase renal water and solute clearance in water-retaining states.

  6. Optimization of important early ADME(T) parameters of NADPH oxidase-4 inhibitor molecules.

    PubMed

    Borbély, Gábor; Huszár, Ménika; Varga, Attila; Futosi, Krisztina; Mócsai, Attila; Orfi, László; Idei, Miklós; Mandl, József; Kéri, György; Vántus, Tibor

    2012-03-01

    Through their reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing function, NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes have been linked to several oxidative stress related diseases. In our recently published paper [1] we have already shown the NOX4 inhibitory effect of diverse, molecule sub-libraries and their biological importance. We also presented our work connected to potential anti-tumour molecules and the relationship between their biological activity and physico-chemical properties [2]. As an extension of these studies further physico-chemical and biological investigation has been carried out on a molecule group included NOX4 inhibitory chromanone compounds. Here we describe the optimization of early ADME(T) parameters determining lipophilicity, phospholipophilicity and permeability linked to structure-activity relationship. We prove that optimal lipo- and phospholipophilicty can be also determined in case of NOX4 inhibitors and a comparison will be made between the chemically similar isochromanone and chromanone molecular libraries. It will be also shown how to predict the effect of different substituents on permeability, lipo- and phospholipophilicity and also the biological differences between anti-tumour molecules and NOX4 inhibitors according to their penetration ability.

  7. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes’ biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme–cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors – especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen (1O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting 1O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  8. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-09-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes' biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme-cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors - especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting (1)O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  9. Structure of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of a DNA Polymerase Sliding Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, R.; Yurieva, O; Kim, S; Kuriyan, J; Kong, X; O'Donnell, M

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerases attach to the DNA sliding clamp through a common overlapping binding site. We identify a small-molecule compound that binds the protein-binding site in the Escherichia coli ?-clamp and differentially affects the activity of DNA polymerases II, III, and IV. To understand the molecular basis of this discrimination, the cocrystal structure of the chemical inhibitor is solved in complex with ? and is compared with the structures of Pol II, Pol III, and Pol IV peptides bound to ?. The analysis reveals that the small molecule localizes in a region of the clamp to which the DNA polymerases attach in different ways. The results suggest that the small molecule may be useful in the future to probe polymerase function with ?, and that the ?-clamp may represent an antibiotic target.

  10. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  11. Rational design and applications of a Rac GTPase-specific small molecule inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Huzoor; Cancelas, Jose; Williams, David A; Zheng, Jie; Zheng, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Rac GTPases are involved in the regulation of multiple cell functions and have been implicated in the pathology of certain human diseases. Dominant negative mutants of Rac have been the tool of choice in studying Rac function in cells. Given the difficulty of introducing high concentrations of the Rac mutants into primary cells and nonspecific effects of the mutants on Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activities, it is desirable to develop small molecule inhibitors that could specifically inhibit Rac activities. Here we describe the rational design, characterization, and applications of a first-generation Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor. On the basis of the structure-function information of Rac interaction with GEFs, in a computer-based virtual screening we have identified NSC23766, a highly soluble and membrane permeable compound, as a specific inhibitor of a subset of GEF binding to Rac and, therefore, Rac activation by these GEFs. In fibroblast cells, NSC23766 inhibited Rac1 GTP-loading without affecting Cdc42 or RhoA activity and suppressed cell proliferation induced by a Rac GEF Tiam1. It has little effect on cell growth induced by a constitutively active Rac1 mutant. In addition, NSC23766 inhibited: (1) the anchorage-independent growth and invasion phenotypes of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells; (2) Rac activation and Rac-dependent aggregation of platelets stimulated by thrombin; and (3) Rac1 and Rac2 activities of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and induced their mobilization from mouse bone marrow to peripheral blood. Thus, NSC23766 is a lead small molecule inhibitor of Rac activity and could be useful for studying Rac-mediated cellular functions and for modulating pathological conditions in which Rac-deregulation may play a role.

  12. Discovery of GSK2795039, a Novel Small Molecule NADPH Oxidase 2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Kazufumi; Chen, Woei Shin; Chueng, Adeline L.W.; Dunne, Angela A.; Seredenina, Tamara; Filippova, Aleksandra; Ramachandran, Sumitra; Bridges, Angela; Chaudry, Laiq; Pettman, Gary; Allan, Craig; Duncan, Sarah; Lee, Kiew Ching; Lim, Jean; Ma, May Thu; Ong, Agnes B.; Ye, Nicole Y.; Nasir, Shabina; Mulyanidewi, Sri; Aw, Chiu Cheong; Oon, Pamela P.; Liao, Shihua; Li, Dizheng; Johns, Douglas G.; Miller, Neil D.; Davies, Ceri H.; Browne, Edward R.; Matsuoka, Yasuji; Chen, Deborah W.; Jaquet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of enzymes catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NOX enzymes not only have a key role in a variety of physiological processes but also contribute to oxidative stress in certain disease states. To date, while numerous small molecule inhibitors have been reported (in particular for NOX2), none have demonstrated inhibitory activity in vivo. As such, there is a need for the identification of improved NOX inhibitors to enable further evaluation of the biological functions of NOX enzymes in vivo as well as the therapeutic potential of NOX inhibition. In this study, both the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profiles of GSK2795039, a novel NOX2 inhibitor, were characterized in comparison with other published NOX inhibitors. Results: GSK2795039 inhibited both the formation of ROS and the utilization of the enzyme substrates, NADPH and oxygen, in a variety of semirecombinant cell-free and cell-based NOX2 assays. It inhibited NOX2 in an NADPH competitive manner and was selective over other NOX isoforms, xanthine oxidase, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzymes. Following systemic administration in mice, GSK2795039 abolished the production of ROS by activated NOX2 enzyme in a paw inflammation model. Furthermore, GSK2795039 showed activity in a murine model of acute pancreatitis, reducing the levels of serum amylase triggered by systemic injection of cerulein. Innovation and Conclusions: GSK2795039 is a novel NOX2 inhibitor that is the first small molecule to demonstrate inhibition of the NOX2 enzyme in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 358–374. PMID:26135714

  13. Evaluation of small molecule SecA inhibitors against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinshan; Cui, Jianmei; Chaudhary, Arpana Sagwal; Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Damera, Krishna; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C

    2015-11-01

    Due to the emergence and rapid spread of drug resistance in bacteria, there is an urgent need for the development of novel antimicrobials. SecA, a key component of the general bacterial secretion system required for viability and virulence, is an attractive antimicrobial target. Earlier we reported that systematical dissection of a SecA inhibitor, Rose Bengal (RB), led to the development of novel small molecule SecA inhibitors active against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. In this study, two potent RB analogs were further evaluated for activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains and for their mechanism of actions. These analogs showed inhibition on the ATPase activities of S. aureus SecA1 (SaSecA1) and SecA2 (SaSecA2), and inhibition of SaSecA1-dependent protein-conducting channel. Moreover, these inhibitors reduce the secretion of three toxins from S. aureus and exert potent bacteriostatic effects against three MRSA strains. Our best inhibitor SCA-50 showed potent concentration-dependent bactericidal activity against MRSA Mu50 strain and very importantly, 2-60 fold more potent inhibitory effect on MRSA Mu50 than all the commonly used antibiotics including vancomycin, which is considered the last resort option in treating MRSA-related infections. Protein pull down experiments further confirmed SaSecA1 as a target. Deletion or overexpression of NorA and MepA efflux pumps had minimal effect on the antimicrobial activities against S. aureus, indicating that the effects of SecA inhibitors were not affected by the presence of these efflux pumps. Our studies show that these small molecule analogs target SecA functions, have potent antimicrobial activities, reduce the secretion of toxins, and have the ability to overcome the effect efflux pumps, which are responsible for multi-drug resistance. Thus, targeting SecA is an attractive antimicrobial strategy against MRSA.

  14. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the MDM2–p53 Protein–Protein Interaction (MDM2 Inhibitors) in Clinical Trials for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Design of small-molecule inhibitors (MDM2 inhibitors) to block the MDM2–p53 protein–protein interaction has been pursued as a new cancer therapeutic strategy. In recent years, potent, selective, and efficacious MDM2 inhibitors have been successfully obtained and seven such compounds have been advanced into early phase clinical trials for the treatment of human cancers. Here, we review the design, synthesis, properties, preclinical, and clinical studies of these clinical-stage MDM2 inhibitors. PMID:25396320

  15. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  16. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  17. Enzyme- and transporter-mediated drug interactions with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Markowitz, John S; Bei, Di; An, Guohua

    2014-12-01

    Among the novel and target-specific classes of anticancer drugs, small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) represent an extremely promising and rapidly expanding group. TKIs attack cancer-specific targets and therefore have a favorable safety profile. However, as TKIs are taken orally along with other medications on a daily basis, there is an elevated risk of potentially significant drug-drug interactions. Most TKIs are metabolized primarily through CYP3A4. In addition, many TKIs are also CYP3A4 inhibitors at the same time. In addition to drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), another determinant of TKI disposition are drug transporters. There is accumulating evidence showing that the majority of currently marketed TKIs interact with ATP-binding cassette transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein as well as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein and serve as both substrates and inhibitors. Considering the dual roles of TKIs on both DMEs and drug transporters, and the importance of these enzyme and transporters in drug disposition, the potential for enzyme- and transporter-mediated TKI-drug interactions in patients with cancer is an important consideration. This review provides a comprehensive overview of drug interactions with small molecule TKIs mediated by DMEs and drug transporters. The TKI-drug interactions with TKIs being victims and/or perpetrators are summarized.

  18. Targeting insulin amyloid assembly by small aromatic molecules: toward rational design of aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Levy-Sakin, Michal; Shreberk, Michal; Daniel, Yael; Gazit, Ehud

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a common event in more than twenty human diseases and in some normal physiological processes. The mechanism of this ordered aggregation process and the molecular forces driving it are therefore of great importance. One of the strategies used in this field is targeting the fibrillization process by different factors, like, short peptides, organic molecules, etc. Here, we targeted insulin fibril formation by a range of small aromatic molecules, with different numbers of aromatic rings and various substituent groups. Using Thioflavin T fluorescence assay and transmission electron microscopy, we found that all dicyclic and tricyclic compounds in our screen were efficient inhibitors of insulin fibril formation. A common notion regarding amyloid inhibitors is that two functional groups are essentials for interfering with the amyloid formation process; a recognition motif and a bulky group for inducing a steric interference. However, here, we showed that some monocyclic compounds as small as toluene were also found to inhibit fibrillization. In addition, we found that substituent of benzene ring have a great influence on the inhibitory potency. Specifically, cyano, methyl and nitro groups increased the inhibitory potency. The results introduced here may contribute to future rational design of amyloid inhibitors.

  19. Aryl amide small-molecule inhibitors of microRNA miR-21 function.

    PubMed

    Naro, Yuta; Thomas, Meryl; Stephens, Matthew D; Connelly, Colleen M; Deiters, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single stranded RNA molecules of ∼22 nucleotides that negatively regulate gene expression. MiRNAs are involved in fundamental cellular processes, such as development, differentiation, proliferation, and survival. MiRNA misregulation has been linked to various human diseases, most notably cancer. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21), a well-established oncomiR, is significantly overexpressed in many types of human cancers, thus rendering miR-21 a potential therapeutic target. Using a luciferase-based reporter assay under the control of miR-21 expression, a high-throughput screen of >300,000 compounds led to the discovery of a new aryl amide class of small-molecule miR-21 inhibitors. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies resulted in the development of four aryl amide derivatives as potent and selective miR-21 inhibitors. The intracellular levels of various miRNAs in HeLa cells were analyzed by qRT-PCR revealing specificity for miR-21 inhibition over other miRNAs. Additionally, preliminary mechanism of action studies propose a different mode of action compared to previously reported miR-21 inhibitors, thus affording a new chemical probe for future studies.

  20. The identification of GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394; the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas; Elster, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Søren Møller; Poda, Suresh Babu; Loechel, Frosty; Volbracht, Christiane; Klewe, Ib Vestergaard; David, Laurent; Watson, Stephen P

    2014-11-15

    The identification of the novel and selective GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394, the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function, is described. Structure activity relationships and syntheses based around AF64394 are reported.

  1. Computer-assisted identification of novel small molecule inhibitors targeting GLUT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhining; Li, Xin; Sun, Rong; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Xinru; Rong, Li; Shi, Zheng; Bao, Jinku

    2015-12-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) are the main carriers of glucose that facilitate the diffusion of glucose in mammalian cells, especially GLUT1. Notably, GLUT1 is a rate-limiting transporter for glucose uptake, and its overexpression is a common characteristic in most cancers. Thus, the inhibition of GLUT1 by novel small compounds to lower glucose levels for cancer cells has become an emerging strategy. Herein, we employed high-throughput screening approaches to identify potential inhibitors against the sugar-binding site of GLUT1. Firstly, molecular docking screening was launched against the specs products, and three molecules (ZINC19909927, ZINC19908826, and ZINC19815451) were selected as candidate GLUT1 inhibitors for further analysis. Then, taking the initial ligand β-NG as a reference, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were applied to evaluate the binding stability and affinity of the three candidates towards GLUT1. Finally, we found that ZINC19909927 might have the highest affinity to occupy the binding site of GLUT1. Meanwhile, energy decomposition analysis identified several residues located in substrate-binding site that might provide clues for future inhibitor discovery towards GLUT1. Taken together, these results in our study may provide valuable information for identifying new inhibitors targeting GLUT1-mediated glucose transport and metabolism for cancer therapeutics.

  2. Small-molecule inhibitors of cathepsin L incorporating functionalized ring-fused molecular frameworks.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangli; Jones, Lindsay M; Chavarria, Gustavo E; Charlton-Sevcik, Amanda K; Jantz, Adam; Johansen, Audra; Bayeh, Liela; Soeung, Victoria; Snyder, Lindsey K; Lade, Shawn D; Chaplin, David J; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G

    2013-05-01

    Cathepsin L is a cysteine protease that is upregulated in a variety of malignant tumors and plays a significant role in cancer cell invasion and migration. It is an attractive target for the development of small-molecule inhibitors, which may prove beneficial as treatment agents to limit or arrest cancer metastasis. We have previously identified a structurally diverse series of thiosemicarbazone-based inhibitors that incorporate the benzophenone and thiochromanone molecular scaffolds. Herein we report an important extension of this work designed to explore fused aryl-alkyl ring molecular systems that feature nitrogen atom incorporation (dihydroquinoline-based) and carbon atom exclusivity (tetrahydronaphthalene-based). In addition, analogues that contain oxygen (chromanone-based), sulfur (thiochroman-based), sulfoxide, and sulfone functionalization have been prepared in order to further investigate the structure-activity relationship aspects associated with these compounds and their ability to inhibit cathepsins L and B. From this small-library of 30 compounds, five were found to be strongly inhibitory (IC50 <500 nM) against cathepsin L with the most active compound (7-bromodihydroquinoline thiosemicarbazone 48) demonstrating an IC50=164 nM. All of the compounds evaluated were inactive (IC50 >10,000 nM) as inhibitors of cathepsin B, thus establishing a high degree (>20-fold) of selectivity (cathepsin L vs. cathepsin B) for the most active cathepsin L inhibitors in this series.

  3. Experimental Evaluation of Proposed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Water Channel Aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Jin, Byung-Ju; Lee, Sujin; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    The aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channel is a potentially important drug target, as AQP1 inhibition is predicted to have therapeutic action in edema, tumor growth, glaucoma, and other conditions. Here, we measured the AQP1 inhibition efficacy of 12 putative small-molecule AQP1 inhibitors reported in six recent studies, and one AQP1 activator. Osmotic water permeability was measured by stopped-flow light scattering in human and rat erythrocytes that natively express AQP1, in hemoglobin-free membrane vesicles from rat and human erythrocytes, and in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from AQP1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures. As a positive control, 0.3 mM HgCl2 inhibited AQP1 water permeability by >95%. We found that none of the tested compounds at 50 µM significantly inhibited or increased AQP1 water permeability in these assays. Identification of AQP1 inhibitors remains an important priority. PMID:26993802

  4. Automated approach for the identification of functionally-relevant small molecule inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D M III

    2000-02-16

    Radiation induces the formation of DNA damages via direct ionization or through the production of reactive oxygen intermediates that chemically modify DNA. Radiation is thought to elicit its cytotoxicity by inducing the formation of lethal DNA damage, including modified bases, baseless sites and strand breaks. To avert the deleterious effects of radiation and chromosomal modifications, cells are equipped with DNA repair systems and cellular responses that function to amend genetic imperfections and to prevent the replication of damaged DNA. The focus of this proposal is to develop a novel, function-based technology for isolating inhibitors of proteins involved in radiation-protection. Such inhibitor molecules represent potential radiosensitizing agents, which could be used to increase the biological effectiveness of a given radiation dose in anti-cancer treatment schemes. This project combines unique laboratory expertise in robotics, computational modeling, combinatorial chemistry, and DNA repair enzymology from the Biology & Biotechnology Research Program and the Chemistry and Material Science Directorate. The screening technique will utilize a simple flow-based filter system operated by robotics. Commercial laboratory instrumentation and automation are available for creating a nearly hands-off system for inhibitor molecule screening. Specifically, a general purpose dispensing instrument (i.e. the Packard Multiprobe II), using opaque, filter-backed microtiter plates, will be combined with on-deck vacuum extraction to generate a rapid screening technology. System integration tools and experience from the LLNL Human Genome Project will be leveraged. This screening capability will be applied to current lab research on proteins involved in the repair of radiation damaged DNA. Inhibitors of proteins involved in cellular resistance to radiation have potential value as co-therapeutics in anti-cancer treatments and would be licensed to pharmaceutical companies for further

  5. Pyrimidine-based tricyclic molecules as potent and orally efficacious inhibitors of wee1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yunsong; Torrent, Maricel; Florjancic, Alan S; Bromberg, Kenneth D; Buchanan, Fritz G; Ferguson, Debra C; Johnson, Eric F; Lasko, Loren M; Maag, David; Merta, Philip J; Olson, Amanda M; Osterling, Donald J; Soni, Nirupama; Shoemaker, Alexander R; Penning, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    Aided by molecular modeling, compounds with a pyrimidine-based tricyclic scaffold were designed and confirmed to inhibit Wee1 kinase. Structure-activity studies identified key pharmacophores at the aminoaryl and halo-benzene regions responsible for binding affinity with sub-nM K i values. The potent inhibitors demonstrated sub-μM activities in both functional and mechanism-based cellular assays and also possessed desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. The lead molecule, 31, showed oral efficacy in potentiating the antiproliferative activity of irinotecan, a cytotoxic agent, in a NCI-H1299 mouse xenograft model.

  6. Identification of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the capsid hexamer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimmy P; Branson, Jeffrey D; Lawrence, Rae; Cocklin, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The HIV-1 CA protein is an attractive therapeutic target for the development of new antivirals. An inter-protomer pocket within the hexamer configuration of the CA, which is a binding site for key host dependency factors, is an especially appealing region for small molecule targeting. Using a field-based pharmacophore derived from an inhibitor known to interact with this region, coupled to biochemical and biological assessment, we have identified a new compound that inhibits HIV-1 infection and that targets the assembled CA hexamer. PMID:26747394

  7. Discovery of potent, orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitors of the human CCR2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Julien; Coesemans, Erwin; Boeckx, Staf; Buntinx, Mieke; Hermans, Bart; Van Wauwe, Jean P; Gilissen, Ron A H J; De Groot, Alex H J; Corens, David; Van Lommen, Guy

    2008-04-01

    We recently reported the discovery of a series of 2-thioimidazoles as CCR2 antagonists. The most potent molecules of this series, the 4,5-diesters, were rapidly hydrolyzed to the inactive acids and were found to be metabolically unstable. Herein we describe the synthesis of a number of analogues with heterocyclic bioisosteric replacements of the ester group(s). Small 5-membered heterocyclic substituents at the 4-position gave highly potent CCR2 antagonists. Hydrolysis of the 5-ester is diminished, thus imparting these compounds with sufficient stability and systemic exposure after oral administration to warrant further study of the in vivo pharmacology of these functional CCR2 inhibitors.

  8. A high throughput screening assay system for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of gsp.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Hu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Neumann, Susanne; Northup, John K; Ferrer, Marc; Collins, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT) or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H). Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT) or higher (R201C and R201H) cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses.

  9. A High Throughput Screening Assay System for the Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of gsp

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Hu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z.; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Marugan, Juan J.; Southall, Noel; Neumann, Susanne; Northup, John K.; Ferrer, Marc; Collins, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT) or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H). Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT) or higher (R201C and R201H) cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)–based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses. PMID:24667240

  10. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2.

    PubMed

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E; Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M; Ogilvie, Donald J; Ward, Simon E; Atack, John R; Pearl, Laurence H; Caldecott, Keith W; Oliver, Antony W

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a 'humanized' form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2.

  11. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M.; Ogilvie, Donald J.; Ward, Simon E.; Atack, John R.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5′-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a ‘humanized’ form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  12. Small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions: progressing towards the reality

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, Michelle R.; Tang, Yinyan; Wells, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The past twenty years have seen many advances in our understanding of protein-protein interactions (PPI) and how to target them with small-molecule therapeutics. In 2004, we reviewed some early successes; since then, potent inhibitors have been developed for diverse protein complexes, and compounds are now in clinical trials for six targets. Surprisingly, many of these PPI clinical candidates have efficiency metrics typical of ‘lead-like’ or ‘drug-like’ molecules and are orally available. Successful discovery efforts have integrated multiple disciplines and make use of all the modern tools of target-based discovery - structure, computation, screening, and biomarkers. PPI become progressively more challenging as the interfaces become more complex, i.e., as binding epitopes are displayed on primary, secondary, or tertiary structures. Here, we review the last ten years of progress, focusing on the properties of PPI inhibitors that have advanced to clinical trials and prospects for the future of PPI drug discovery. PMID:25237857

  13. Towards Development of Small Molecule Lipid II Inhibitors as Novel Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Jamal; Cardinale, Steven; Fang, Lei; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M.; Pennington, M. Ross; Basi, Kelly; diTargiani, Robert; Capacio, Benedict R.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Fletcher, Steven; de Leeuw, Erik P. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently we described a novel di-benzene-pyrylium-indolene (BAS00127538) inhibitor of Lipid II. BAS00127538 (1-Methyl-2,4-diphenyl-6-((1E,3E)-3-(1,3,3-trimethylindolin-2-ylidene)prop-1-en-1-yl)pyryl-1-ium) tetrafluoroborate is the first small molecule Lipid II inhibitor and is structurally distinct from natural agents that bind Lipid II, such as vancomycin. Here, we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of 50 new analogs of BAS00127538 designed to explore the structure-activity relationships of the scaffold. The results of this study indicate an activity map of the scaffold, identifying regions that are critical to cytotoxicity, Lipid II binding and range of anti-bacterial action. One compound, 6jc48-1, showed significantly enhanced drug-like properties compared to BAS00127538. 6jc48-1 has reduced cytotoxicity, while retaining specific Lipid II binding and activity against Enterococcus spp. in vitro and in vivo. Further, this compound showed a markedly improved pharmacokinetic profile with a half-life of over 13 hours upon intravenous and oral administration and was stable in plasma. These results suggest that scaffolds like that of 6jc48-1 can be developed into small molecule antibiotic drugs that target Lipid II. PMID:27776124

  14. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of GSK-3: Structural Insights and Their Application to Alzheimer's Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Thomas; Schmidt, Boris; Lo Monte, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The world health organization (WHO) estimated that 18 million people are struck by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The USA, France, Germany, and other countries launched major programmes targeting the identification of risk factors, the improvement of caretaking, and fundamental research aiming to postpone the onset of AD. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is implicated in multiple cellular processes and has been linked to the pathogenesis of several diseases including diabetes mellitus, cancer, and AD. Inhibition of GSK-3 leads to neuroprotective effects, decreased β-amyloid production, and a reduction in tau hyperphosphorylation, which are all associated with AD. Various classes of small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors have been published in patents and original publications. Herein, we present a comprehensive summary of small molecules reported to interact with GSK-3. We illustrate the interactions of the inhibitors with the active site. Furthermore, we refer to the biological characterisation in terms of activity and selectivity for GSK-3, elucidate in vivo studies and pre-/clinical trials. PMID:22888461

  15. Small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor protease activity protect against anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Crown, Devorah; Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Johnson, Alan; Leysath, Clinton; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, manifests its pathogenesis through the action of two secreted toxins. The bipartite lethal and edema toxins, a combination of lethal factor or edema factor with the protein protective antigen, are important virulence factors for this bacterium. We previously developed small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor proteolytic activity (LFIs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy in a rat lethal toxin challenge model. In this work, we show that these LFIs protect against lethality caused by anthrax infection in mice when combined with subprotective doses of either antibiotics or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that target edema factor. Significantly, these inhibitors provided protection against lethal infection when administered as a monotherapy. As little as two doses (10 mg/kg) administered at 2 h and 8 h after spore infection was sufficient to provide a significant survival benefit in infected mice. Administration of LFIs early in the infection was found to inhibit dissemination of vegetative bacteria to the organs in the first 32 h following infection. In addition, neutralizing antibodies against edema factor also inhibited bacterial dissemination with similar efficacy. Together, our findings confirm the important roles that both anthrax toxins play in establishing anthrax infection and demonstrate the potential for small-molecule therapeutics targeting these proteins.

  16. A molecular-beacon-based screen for small molecule inhibitors of miRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Bose, Debojit; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Kumar, Santosh; Maiti, Souvik

    2013-05-17

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate about 60% of mammalian genes by modulating their transcript levels. Network scale studies of miRNA-mediated regulatory circuits demonstrate the central importance of this class of small RNA in the maintenance of biological robustness. More recently, several reports have described the deregulation of numerous miRNA to be causally associated with many diseases, including cancer. These studies have highlighted the potential for development of therapeutic modalities against miRNA. Previous screening protocols, for small molecules targeting miRNA function, are either costly or technically too complex to be applied in a high-throughput manner in standard chemical laboratories. We describe a simple in vitro screening method using a DNA-based molecular beacon that overcomes the limitations associated with earlier screens. We used this method to identify inhibitors of miR-27a function from a library of 14 aminoglycosides as a pilot study. Inhibitory molecules identified were further scrutinized to identify the validity of screen. With this proof of concept we illustrate the utility of a scalable molecular-beacon-based screening strategy for miRNA inhibitors.

  17. Identification and characterization of potent small molecule inhibitor of hemorrhagic fever New World arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Bolken, Tove C; Laquerre, Sylvie; Zhang, Yuanming; Bailey, Thomas R; Pevear, Daniel C; Kickner, Shirley S; Sperzel, Lindsey E; Jones, Kevin F; Warren, Travis K; Amanda Lund, S; Kirkwood-Watts, Dana L; King, David S; Shurtleff, Amy C; Guttieri, Mary C; Deng, Yijun; Bleam, Maureen; Hruby, Dennis E

    2006-02-01

    Category A arenaviruses as defined by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are human pathogens that could be weaponized by bioterrorists. Many of these deadly viruses require biosafety level-4 (BSL-4) containment for all laboratory work, which limits traditional laboratory high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of small molecule inhibitors. For those reasons, a related BSL-2 New World arenavirus, Tacaribe virus, 67-78% identical to Junín virus at the amino acid level, was used in a HTS campaign where approximately 400,000 small molecule compounds were screened in a Tacaribe virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) assay. Compounds identified in this screen showed antiviral activity and specificity against not only Tacaribe virus, but also the Category A New World arenaviruses (Junín, Machupo, and Guanarito). Drug resistant variants were isolated, suggesting that these compounds act through inhibition of a viral protein, the viral glycoprotein (GP2), and not through cellular toxicity mechanisms. A lead compound, ST-294, has been chosen for drug development. This potent and selective compound, with good bioavailability, demonstrated protective anti-viral efficacy in a Tacaribe mouse challenge model. This series of compounds represent a new class of inhibitors that may warrant further development for potential inclusion in a strategic stockpile.

  18. High throughput screen identifies small molecule inhibitors specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoserine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  19. Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors against Meso-2, 6-Diaminopimelate Dehydrogenase from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Victoria N.; Parikh, Hardik I.; El-rami, Fadi; Ge, Xiuchun; Chen, Weihau; Zhang, Yan; Kellogg, Glen E.; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Species-specific antimicrobial therapy has the potential to combat the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance and alteration of the human microbiome. We therefore set out to demonstrate the beginning of a pathogen-selective drug discovery method using the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis as a model. Through our knowledge of metabolic networks and essential genes we identified a “druggable” essential target, meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase, which is found in a limited number of species. We adopted a high-throughput virtual screen method on the ZINC chemical library to select a group of potential small-molecule inhibitors. Meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase from P. gingivalis was first expressed and purified in Escherichia coli then characterized for enzymatic inhibitor screening studies. Several inhibitors with similar structural scaffolds containing a sulfonamide core and aromatic substituents showed dose-dependent inhibition. These compounds were further assayed showing reasonable whole-cell activity and the inhibition mechanism was determined. We conclude that the establishment of this target and screening strategy provides a model for the future development of new antimicrobials. PMID:26544875

  20. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  1. Identification of an Allosteric Small Molecule Inhibitor Selective for Inducible Form of Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Matthew K.; Bodoor, Khaldon; Carlson, David A.; Hughes, Philip F.; Alwarawrah, Yazan; Loiselle, David R.; Jaeger, Alex M.; Darr, David B.; Jordan, Jamie L.; Hunter, Lucas M.; Molzberger, Eileen T.; Gobillot, Theodore A.; Thiele, Dennis J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Spector, Neil L.; Haystead, Timothy A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Inducible Hsp70 (Hsp70i) is overexpressed in a wide spectrum of human tumors and its expression correlates with metastasis, poor outcomes, and resistance to chemotherapy in patients. Identification of small molecule inhibitors selective for Hsp70i could provide new therapeutic tools for cancer treatment. In this work, we used fluorescence-linked enzyme chemoproteomic strategy (FLECS) to identify HS-72, an allosteric inhibitor selective for Hsp70i. HS-72 displays the hallmarks of Hsp70 inhibition in cells, promoting substrate protein degradation and growth inhibition. Importantly, HS-72 is selective for Hsp70i over the closely related constitutively active Hsc70. Studies with purified protein show HS-72 acts as an allosteric inhibitor, reducing ATP affinity. In vivo HS-72 is well-tolerated, showing bioavailability and efficacy, inhibiting tumor growth and promoting survival in a HER2+ model of breast cancer. The HS-72 scaffold is amenable to resynthesis and iteration, suggesting an ideal starting point for a new generation of anticancer therapeutics targeting Hsp70i. PMID:25500222

  2. Structure-Based Drug Design of Small Molecule Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors to Treat Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Wang, Tao; Qiu, Shengzhi; Zhu, Yasheng; Liang, Li; Zheng, Youguang

    2016-01-01

    Human peptide deformylase (HsPDF) is an important target for anticancer drug discovery. In view of the limited HsPDF, inhibitors were reported, and high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS) studies based on HsPDF for developing new PDF inhibitors remain to be reported. We reported here on diverse small molecule inhibitors with excellent anticancer activities designed based on HTVS and molecular docking studies using the crystal structure of HsPDF. The compound M7594_0037 exhibited potent anticancer activities against HeLa, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50s of 35.26, 29.63 and 24.63 μM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggested that M7594_0037 and its three derivatives could interact with HsPDF by several conserved hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties of M7594_0037 and its derivatives were predicted using the OSIRIS property explorer. Thus, M7594_0037 and its derivatives might represent a promising scaffold for the further development of novel anticancer drugs. PMID:27023495

  3. Pharmacology of novel small-molecule tubulin inhibitors in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling.

    PubMed

    Phoa, Athena F; Browne, Stephen; Gurgis, Fadi M S; Åkerfeldt, Mia C; Döbber, Alexander; Renn, Christian; Peifer, Christian; Stringer, Brett W; Day, Bryan W; Wong, Chin; Chircop, Megan; Johns, Terrance G; Kassiou, Michael; Munoz, Lenka

    2015-12-15

    We recently reported that CMPD1, originally developed as an inhibitor of MK2 activation, primarily inhibits tubulin polymerisation and induces apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. In the present study we provide detailed pharmacological investigation of CMPD1 analogues with improved molecular properties. We determined their anti-cancer efficacy in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling, as deregulated EGFR often leads to chemoresistance. Eight analogues of CMPD1 with varying lipophilicity and basicity were synthesised and tested for efficacy in the cell viability assay using established glioblastoma cell lines and patient-derived primary glioblastoma cells. The mechanism of action for the most potent analogue 15 was determined using MK2 activation and tubulin polymerisation assays, together with the immunofluorescence analysis of the mitotic spindle formation. Apoptosis was analysed by Annexin V staining, immunoblotting analysis of bcl-2 proteins and PARP cleavage. The apoptotic activity of CMPD1 and analogue 15 was comparable across glioblastoma cell lines regardless of the EGFR status. Primary glioblastoma cells of the classical subtype that are characterized by enhanced EGFR activity were most sensitive to the treatment with CMPD1 and 15. In summary, we present mechanism of action for a novel small molecule tubulin inhibitor, compound 15 that inhibits tubulin polymerisation and mitotic spindle formation, induces degradation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 proteins and leads to apoptosis of glioblastoma cells. We also demonstrate that the enhanced EGFR activity does not decrease the efficacy of tubulin inhibitors developed in this study.

  4. Identification of alsterpaullone as a novel small molecule inhibitor to target group 3 medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Claudia C.; Agnihotri, Sameer; Mack, Stephen C.; Golbourn, Brian J.; Diaz, Roberto J.; Olsen, Samantha; Bryant, Melissa; Bebenek, Matthew; Wang, Xin; Bertrand, Kelsey C.; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Clark, Ian; Dirks, Peter; Smith, Christian A.; Taylor, Michael D.; Rutka, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of medulloblastoma revealed four genetically and clinically distinct subgroups. Group 3 medulloblastomas are characterized by frequent amplifications of the oncogene MYC, a high incidence of metastasis, and poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. We investigated several potential small molecule inhibitors to target Group 3 medulloblastomas based on gene expression data using an in silico drug screen. The Connectivity Map (C-MAP) analysis identified piperlongumine as the top candidate drug for non-WNT medulloblastomas and the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor alsterpaullone as the compound predicted to have specific antitumor activity against Group 3 medulloblastomas. To validate our findings we used these inhibitors against established Group 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. The C-MAP predicted drugs reduced cell proliferation in vitro and increased survival in Group 3 medulloblastoma xenografts. Alsterpaullone had the highest efficacy in Group 3 medulloblastoma cells. Genomic profiling of Group 3 medulloblastoma cells treated with alsterpaullone confirmed inhibition of cell cycle-related genes, and down-regulation of MYC. Our results demonstrate the preclinical efficacy of using a targeted therapy approach for Group 3 medulloblastomas. Specifically, we provide rationale for advancing alsterpaullone as a targeted therapy in Group 3 medulloblastoma. PMID:26061748

  5. Development of A Cell-Based Assay to Identify Small Molecule Inhibitors of FGF23 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Diener, Susanne; Schorpp, Kenji; Strom, Tim-Matthias; Hadian, Kamyar; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a bone-derived endocrine key regulator of phosphate homeostasis. It inhibits renal tubular phosphate reabsorption by activating receptor complexes composed of FGF receptor 1c (FGFR1c) and the co-receptor Klotho. As a major signaling pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is employed. In this study, we established an FGF23-inducible cell model by stably expressing human Klotho in HEK293 cells (HEK293-KL cells) containing endogenous FGF receptors. To identify novel small molecule compounds that modulate FGF23/FGFR1c/Klotho signaling, we developed and optimized a cell-based assay that is suited for high-throughput screening. The assay monitors the phosphorylation of endogenous extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 in cellular lysates of HEK293-KL cells after induction with FGF23. This cell-based assay was highly robust (Z' factor >0.5) and the induction of the system is strictly dependent on the presence of FGF23. The inhibitor response curves generated using two known MAPK pathway inhibitors correlate well with data obtained by another assay format. This assay was further used to identify small molecule modulators of the FGF23 signaling cascade by screening the 1,280 food and drug administration-approved small molecule library of Prestwick Chemical. The primary hit rate was 2% and false positives were efficiently identified by retesting the hits in primary and secondary validation screening assays and in western blot analysis. Intriguingly, by using a basic FGF (bFGF)/FGFR counterscreening approach, one validated hit compound retained specificity toward FGF23 signaling, while bFGF signaling was not affected. Since increased plasma concentrations of FGF23 are the main cause of many hypophosphatemic disorders, a modulation of its effect could be a potential novel strategy for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, this strategy may be valuable for other disorders affecting phosphate homeostasis. PMID:26461432

  6. Small Molecules, Inhibitors of DNA-PK, Targeting DNA Repair, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Panasci, Lawrence; Aloyz, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining a major mechanism for the repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA-PK. Computer based drug

  7. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  8. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  9. Virtual Ligand Screening of the p300/CBP Histone Acetyltransferase: Identification of a Selective Small Molecule Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Erin M.; Yan, Gai; Mukherjee, Chandrani; Orry, Andrew; Wang, Ling; Holbert, Marc A.; Crump, Nicholas T.; Hazzalin, Catherine A.; Liszczak, Glen; Yuan, Hua; Larocca, Cecilia; Saldanha, S. Adrian; Abagyan, Ruben; Sun, Yan; Meyers, David J.; Marmorstein, Ronen; Mahadevan, Louis C.; Alani, Rhoda M.; Cole, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300/CBP is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in many gene regulatory pathways and protein acetylation events. While p300 inhibitors have been reported, a potent, selective, and readily available active-site directed small molecule inhibitor is not yet known. Here we use a structure-based, in silico screening approach to identify a commercially available pyrazolone-containing small molecule p300 HAT inhibitor, C646. C646 is a competitive p300 inhibitor with a Ki of 400 nM and is selective versus other acetyltransferases. Studies on site-directed p300 HAT mutants and synthetic modifications of C646 confirm the importance of predicted interactions in conferring potency. Inhibition of histone acetylation and cell growth by C646 in cells validate its utility as a pharmacologic probe and suggest that p300/CBP HAT is a worthy anti-cancer target. PMID:20534345

  10. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  11. Functional characterization of a SUMO deconjugating protease of Plasmodium falciparum using newly identified small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Albrow, Victoria E.; Leader, Brittany A.; Békés, Miklós; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Fonović, Urša Pečar; Shen, Aimee; Drag, Marcin; Xiao, Junpeng; Deu, Edgar; Campbell, Amy J.; Powers, James C.; Salvesen, Guy S.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is implicated in the regulation of numerous biological processes including transcription, protein localization, and cell cycle control. Protein modification by SUMO is found in Plasmodium falciparum; however, its role in the regulation of the parasite lifecycle is poorly understood. Here we describe functional studies of a SUMO-specific protease (SENP) of P. falciparum, PfSENP1 (PFL1635w). Expression of the catalytic domain of PfSENP1 and biochemical profiling using a positional scanning substrate library demonstrated that this protease has unique cleavage sequence preference relative to the human SENPs. In addition, we describe a novel class of small molecule inhibitors of this protease. The most potent lead compound inhibited both recombinant PfSENP1 activity and P. falciparum replication in infected human blood. These studies provide valuable new tools for the study of SUMOylation in P. falciparum. PMID:21700207

  12. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Evan R.; Yang, Jing; So, Juhoon; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Kahn, Michael; Ishitani, Tohru; Shin, Donghun; Mustata Wilson, Gabriela; Monga, Satdarshan P.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, lacks effective medical therapy. Large subsets of HCC demonstrate Wnt/β-catenin activation, making this an attractive therapeutic target. We report strategy and characterization of a novel small-molecule inhibitor, ICG-001, known to affect Wnt signaling by disrupting β-catenin–CREB binding protein interactions. We queried the ZINC online database for structural similarity to ICG-001 and identified PMED-1 as the lead compound, with ≥70% similarity to ICG-001. PMED-1 significantly reduced β-catenin activity in hepatoblastoma and several HCC cells, as determined by TOPflash reporter assay, with an IC50 ranging from 4.87 to 32 μmol/L. Although no toxicity was observed in primary human hepatocytes, PMED-1 inhibited Wnt target expression in HCC cells, including those with CTNNB1 mutations, and impaired cell proliferation and viability. PMED-1 treatment decreased β-catenin–CREB binding protein interactions without affecting total β-catenin levels or activity of other common kinases. PMED-1 treatment of Tg(OTM:d2EGFP) zebrafish expressing GFP under the β-catenin/Tcf reporter led to a notable decrease in β-catenin activity. The PMED effect on β-catenin signaling lasted from 12 to 24 hours in vitro and 6 to 15 hours in vivo. Thus, using a rapid and cost-effective computational methodology, we have identified a novel and specific small-molecule inhibitor of Wnt signaling that may have implications for HCC treatment. PMID:24819961

  14. Structure-Function Correlation of G6, a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor of Jak2

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Anurima; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Magis, Andrew; Kiss, Róbert; Polgár, Tímea; Baskin, Rebekah; Allan, Robert W.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Reuther, Gary W.; Keserű, György M.; Bisht, Kirpal S.; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the Jak2 protein, such as V617F, cause aberrant Jak/STAT signaling and can lead to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms. This discovery has led to the search for small molecule inhibitors that target Jak2. Using structure-based virtual screening, our group recently identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of Jak2 named G6. Here, we identified a structure-function correlation of this compound. Specifically, five derivative compounds of G6 having structural similarity to the original lead compound were obtained and analyzed for their ability to (i) inhibit Jak2-V617F-mediated cell growth, (ii) inhibit the levels of phospho-Jak2, phospho-STAT3, and phospho-STAT5; (iii) induce apoptosis in human erythroleukemia cells; and (iv) suppress pathologic cell growth of Jak2-V617F-expressing human bone marrow cells ex vivo. Additionally, we computationally examined the interactions of these compounds with the ATP-binding pocket of the Jak2 kinase domain. We found that the stilbenoid core-containing derivatives of G6 significantly inhibited Jak2-V617F-mediated cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. They also inhibited phosphorylation of Jak2, STAT3, and STAT5 proteins within cells, resulting in higher levels of apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Finally, the stilbenoid derivatives inhibited the pathologic growth of Jak2-V617F-expressing human bone marrow cells ex vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that G6 has a stilbenoid core that is indispensable for maintaining its Jak2 inhibitory potential. PMID:20667821

  15. Interaction of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry with CCR5

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, Christoph . E-mail: seiberc@mail.rockefeller.edu; Ying Weiwen; Gavrilov, Svetlana; Tsamis, Fotini; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Palani, Anandan; Tagat, Jayaram R.; Clader, John W.; McCombie, Stuart W.; Baroudy, Bahige M.; Smith, Steven O.; Dragic, Tatjana; Moore, John P.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2006-05-25

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the major coreceptor for macrophage-tropic (R5) HIV-1 strains. Several small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 that block chemokine binding and HIV-1 entry are being evaluated as drug candidates. Here we define how CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, AD101 (SCH-350581) and SCH-C (SCH-351125), which inhibit HIV-1 entry, interact with CCR5. Using a mutagenesis approach in combination with a viral entry assay to provide a direct functional read out, we tested predictions based on a homology model of CCR5 and analyzed the functions of more than 30 amino acid residues. We find that a key set of aromatic and aliphatic residues serves as a hydrophobic core for the ligand binding pocket, while E283 is critical for high affinity interaction, most likely by acting as the counterion for a positively charged nitrogen atom common to all three inhibitors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding how specific antagonists interact with CCR5, and may be useful for the rational design of new, improved CCR5 ligands.

  16. A Novel, Potent, Small Molecule AKT Inhibitor Exhibits Efficacy against Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dinavahi, Saketh S.; Prasanna, Rajagopalan; Dharmarajan, Sriram; Perumal, Yogeeswari; Viswanadha, Srikant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anomalies of Akt regulation, including overexpression in lung cancer, impart resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiation, thereby implicating this kinase as a therapeutic intervention point. A novel scaffold of Akt inhibitors was developed through virtual screening of chemical databases available at Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Hyderabad, based on docking studies using Maestro. A benzothienopyrimidine derivative (BIA-6) was identified as a potential lead molecule that inhibited Akt1 enzyme activity with an IC50 of 256 nM. Materials and Methods BIA-6 was tested for in vitro Akt1 inhibition using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer kit. Anti-proliferative activity was tested in NCI-H460, A549, NCI-H1975, and NCI-H2170 cell lines. The effect of the compound on p-Akt (S473) was estimated. Results BIA-6 allosterically caused a dose dependent reduction of growth of cell lines with a half maximal growth inhibition (GI50) range of 0.49 μM to 6.6 μM. Cell cycle analysis indicated that BIA-6 caused a G1 phase arrest at < 100 nM but led to apoptosis at higher doses. BIA-6 also exhibited synergism with standard chemotherapeutic agents. Conclusion BIA-6 is a novel, allosteric Akt inhibitor with potent anti-cancer activity in lung cancer cell lines, that effectively blocks the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway with a high margin selectivity towards normal cells. PMID:25687876

  17. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M; Wang, Charles X; An, W Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V

    2016-05-19

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  18. Phenylphthalazines as small-molecule inhibitors of urea transporter UT-B and their binding model

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jian-hua; Li, Min; Tou, Weng-Ieong; Lei, Tian-luo; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian; Yang, Bao-xue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Urea transporters (UT) are a family of transmembrane proteins that specifically transport urea. UT inhibitors exert diuretic activity without affecting electrolyte balance. The purpose of this study was to discover novel UT inhibitors and determine the inhibition mechanism. Methods: The primary screening urea transporter B (UT-B) inhibitory activity was conducted in a collection of 10 000 diverse small molecules using mouse erythrocyte lysis assay. After discovering a hit with a core structure of 1-phenylamino-4-phenylphthalazin, the UT-B inhibitory activity of 160 analogs were examined with a stopped-flow light scattering assay and their structure-activity relationship (SAR) was analyzed. The inhibition mechanism was further investigated using in silico assays. Results: A phenylphthalazine compound PU1424, chemically named 5-(4-((4-methoxyphenyl) amino) phthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylbenzene sulfonamide, showed potent UT-B inhibition activity, inhibited human and mouse UT-B-mediated urea transport with IC50 value of 0.02 and 0.69 μmol/L, respectively, and exerted 100% UT-B inhibition at higher concentrations. The compound PU1424 did not affect membrane urea transport in mouse erythrocytes lacking UT-B. Structure-activity analysis revealed that the analogs with methoxyl group at R4 and sulfonic amide at R2 position exhibited the highest potency inhibition activity on UT-B. Furthermore, in silico assays validated that the R4 and R2 positions of the analogs bound to the UT-B binding pocket and exerted inhibition activity on UT-B. Conclusion: The compound PU1424 is a novel inhibitor of both human and mouse UT-B with IC50 at submicromolar ranges. Its binding site is located at the So site of the UT-B structure. PMID:27238209

  19. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  20. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors enable freezing of human red blood cells with reduced glycerol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Kurach, Jayme D R; Turner, Tracey R; Mancini, Ross S; Acker, Jason P; Ben, Robert N

    2015-04-08

    In North America, red blood cells (RBCs) are cryopreserved in a clinical setting using high glycerol concentrations (40% w/v) with slow cooling rates (~1°C/min) prior to storage at -80°C, while European protocols use reduced glycerol concentrations with rapid freezing rates. After thawing and prior to transfusion, glycerol must be removed to avoid intravascular hemolysis. This is a time consuming process requiring specialized equipment. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) such as β-PMP-Glc and β-pBrPh-Glc have the ability to prevent ice recrystallization, a process that contributes to cellular injury and decreased cell viability after cryopreservation. Herein, we report that addition of 110 mM β-PMP-Glc or 30 mM β-pBrPh-Glc to a 15% glycerol solution increases post-thaw RBC integrity by 30-50% using slow cooling rates and emphasize the potential of small molecule IRIs for the preservation of cells.

  1. Small Molecule Ice Recrystallization Inhibitors Enable Freezing of Human Red Blood Cells with Reduced Glycerol Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J.; Kurach, Jayme D. R.; Turner, Tracey R.; Mancini, Ross S.; Acker, Jason P.; Ben, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    In North America, red blood cells (RBCs) are cryopreserved in a clinical setting using high glycerol concentrations (40% w/v) with slow cooling rates (~1°C/min) prior to storage at −80°C, while European protocols use reduced glycerol concentrations with rapid freezing rates. After thawing and prior to transfusion, glycerol must be removed to avoid intravascular hemolysis. This is a time consuming process requiring specialized equipment. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) such as β-PMP-Glc and β-pBrPh-Glc have the ability to prevent ice recrystallization, a process that contributes to cellular injury and decreased cell viability after cryopreservation. Herein, we report that addition of 110 mM β-PMP-Glc or 30 mM β-pBrPh-Glc to a 15% glycerol solution increases post-thaw RBC integrity by 30-50% using slow cooling rates and emphasize the potential of small molecule IRIs for the preservation of cells. PMID:25851700

  2. Small Molecule Growth Inhibitors of Human Oncogenic Gammaherpesvirus Infected B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dzeng, Richard K.; Jha, Hem Chandra; Lu, Jie; Saha, Abhik; Banerjee, Sagarika; Robertson, Erle S.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are two human gammaherpesviruses associated with a broad spectrum of B-cell lymphomas, most acutely in immuno-compromised populations. However, there are no drugs which specifically target KSHV or EBV-associated lymphomas. To identify small molecules which selectively inhibit the growth of EBV or KSHV-associated B-cell lines, we performed a fluorescence based high-throughput screen on multiple stable GFP expressing virus-infected or uninfected B-cell lines. We identified 40 initial compounds with selective growth inhibition and subsequently determined the 50% growth inhibitory concentrations (GI50) for each drug. We further examined compounds with higher specificity to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms using transcription factor analysis, as well as a sh-RNA based knockdown strategy. Our data identified ten compounds with relatively high efficacy for growth inhibition. Two novel small molecules, NSC#10010 and NSC#65381 were potent growth inhibitors for gammaherpesvirus-associated B-lymphomas through activation of both the NF-κB and c-Myc- mediated signaling pathways. These drugs can serve as potential lead compounds to expand the current therapeutic window against EBV or KSHV associated human B-cell malignancies. PMID:25306391

  3. Small‐Molecule and Peptide Inhibitors of the Pro‐Survival Protein Mcl‐1

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ability of protein–protein interactions to regulate cellular processes in both beneficial and detrimental ways has made them obvious drug targets. The Bcl‐2 family of proteins undergo a series of protein–protein interactions which regulate the intrinsic cell‐death pathway. The pro‐survival members of the Bcl‐2 family, including Bcl‐2, Bcl‐xL, and Mcl‐1, are commonly overexpressed in a number of human cancers. Effective modulators of members of the Bcl‐2 family have been developed and are undergoing clinical trials, but the efficient modulation of Mcl‐1 is still not represented in the clinic. In addition, Mcl‐1 is a major cause of resistance to radio‐ and chemotherapies, including inhibitors that target other Bcl‐2 family members. Subsequently, the inhibition of Mcl‐1 has become of significant interest to the scientific community. This review covers the progress made to date in modulating the activity of Mcl‐1, by both stapled peptides and small molecules. The development of peptides as drug candidates, and the advancement of experimental and computational techniques used to discover small molecules are also highlighted. PMID:26696548

  4. High-throughput small molecule screen identifies inhibitors of aberrant chromatin accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Pattenden, Samantha G.; Simon, Jeremy M.; Wali, Aminah; Jayakody, Chatura N.; Troutman, Jacob; McFadden, Andrew W.; Wooten, Joshua; Wood, Cameron C.; Frye, Stephen V.; Janzen, William P.; Davis, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in chromatin-modifying proteins and transcription factors are commonly associated with a wide variety of cancers. Through gain- or loss-of-function, these mutations may result in characteristic alterations of accessible chromatin, indicative of shifts in the landscape of regulatory elements genome-wide. The identification of compounds that reverse a specific chromatin signature could lead to chemical probes or potential therapies. To explore whether chromatin accessibility could serve as a platform for small molecule screening, we adapted formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE), a chemical method to enrich for nucleosome-depleted genomic regions, as a high-throughput, automated assay. After demonstrating the validity and robustness of this approach, we applied this method to screen an epigenetically targeted small molecule library by evaluating regions of aberrant nucleosome depletion mediated by EWSR1-FLI1, the chimeric transcription factor critical for the bone and soft tissue tumor Ewing sarcoma. As a class, histone deacetylase inhibitors were greatly overrepresented among active compounds. These compounds resulted in diminished accessibility at targeted sites by disrupting transcription of EWSR1-FLI1. Capitalizing on precise differences in chromatin accessibility for drug discovery efforts offers significant advantages because it does not depend on the a priori selection of a single molecular target and may detect novel biologically relevant pathways. PMID:26929321

  5. Small molecule inhibitors of Clostridium difficile toxin B-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Tam, John; Beilhartz, Greg L; Auger, Anick; Gupta, Pulkit; Therien, Alex G; Melnyk, Roman A

    2015-02-19

    Clostridium difficile causes life-threatening diarrhea through the actions of its homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on human colonocytes. Therapeutic agents that block toxin-induced damage are urgently needed to prevent the harmful consequences of toxin action that are not addressed with current antibiotic-based treatments. Here, we developed an imaging-based phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that protected human cells from TcdB-induced cell rounding. A series of structurally diverse compounds with antitoxin activity were identified and found to act through one of a small subset of mechanisms, including direct binding and sequestration of TcdB, inhibition of endosomal maturation, and noncompetitive inhibition of the toxin glucosyltransferase activity. Distinct classes of inhibitors were used further to dissect the determinants of the toxin-mediated necrosis phenotype occurring at higher doses of toxin. These findings validate and inform novel targeting strategies for discovering small molecule agents to treat C. difficile infection. PMID:25619932

  6. A bead-based activity screen for small-molecule inhibitors of signal transduction in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Juliesta E.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia is characterized by the presence of the chimeric BCR-ABL gene, which is expressed as the constitutively active Bcr-Abl kinase. Although kinase activity is directly responsible for the clinical phenotype, current diagnostic and prognostic methods focus on a genetic classification system where molecularly distinct subcategories are used to predict patient responses to small-molecule inhibitors of the Bcr-Abl kinase. Point mutations in the kinase domain are a central factor regulating inhibitor resistance; however, compensatory signaling caused by the activation of unrelated kinases can influence inhibitor efficacy. Kinase activity profiling can be used as a complementary approach to genetic screening and allows direct screening of small-molecule inhibitors. We developed a quantitative assay to monitor tyrosine kinase activities and inhibitor sensitivities in a model of chronic myelogenous leukemia using peptide reporters covalently immobilized on Luminex beads. Kinase activity is quantified by non-linear regression from well-specific internal standard curves. Using optimized synthetic substrates and peptides derived from native substrates as probes, we measured kinase inhibition in cell lysates by the signal transduction inhibitors imatinib and dasatinib. Taking advantage of a convenient 96-well plate format, this assay also allows a straightforward and quantitative analysis of the differential effects of ATP and inhibitors on kinase activity. This method for analyzing a focused signaling network benefits from rigorous statistical analysis and short processing times, thereby offering a powerful tool for drug discovery and clinical testing. PMID:20423990

  7. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  8. Ani9, A Novel Potent Small-Molecule ANO1 Inhibitor with Negligible Effect on ANO2.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yohan; Lee, Ho K; Park, Jinhong; Jeon, Dong-Kyu; Jo, Sungwoo; Jo, Minjae; Namkung, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Anoctamin1 (ANO1)/transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A), a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC), is involved in many physiological functions such as fluid secretion, smooth muscle contraction, nociception and cancer progression. To date, only a few ANO1 inhibitors have been described, and these have low potency and selectivity for ANO1. Here, we performed a high-throughput screening to identify highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of ANO1. Three novel ANO1 inhibitors were discovered from screening of 54,400 synthetic small molecules, and they were found to fully block ANO1 channel activity with an IC50 < 3 μM. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that the most potent inhibitor, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methylideneamino]-acetamide (Ani9), completely inhibited ANO1 chloride current with submicromolar potency. Notably, unlike previous small-molecule ANO1 inhibitors identified to date, Ani9 displayed high selectivity for ANO1 as compared to ANO2, which shares a high amino acid homology to ANO1. In addition, Ani9 did not affect the intracellular calcium signaling and CFTR chloride channel activity. Our results suggest that Ani9 may be a useful pharmacological tool for studying ANO1 and a potential development candidate for drug therapy of cancer, hypertension, pain, diarrhea and asthma. PMID:27219012

  9. Ani9, A Novel Potent Small-Molecule ANO1 Inhibitor with Negligible Effect on ANO2

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yohan; Lee, Ho K.; Park, Jinhong; Jeon, Dong-kyu; Jo, Sungwoo; Jo, Minjae; Namkung, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Anoctamin1 (ANO1)/transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A), a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC), is involved in many physiological functions such as fluid secretion, smooth muscle contraction, nociception and cancer progression. To date, only a few ANO1 inhibitors have been described, and these have low potency and selectivity for ANO1. Here, we performed a high-throughput screening to identify highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of ANO1. Three novel ANO1 inhibitors were discovered from screening of 54,400 synthetic small molecules, and they were found to fully block ANO1 channel activity with an IC50 < 3 μM. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that the most potent inhibitor, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methylideneamino]-acetamide (Ani9), completely inhibited ANO1 chloride current with submicromolar potency. Notably, unlike previous small-molecule ANO1 inhibitors identified to date, Ani9 displayed high selectivity for ANO1 as compared to ANO2, which shares a high amino acid homology to ANO1. In addition, Ani9 did not affect the intracellular calcium signaling and CFTR chloride channel activity. Our results suggest that Ani9 may be a useful pharmacological tool for studying ANO1 and a potential development candidate for drug therapy of cancer, hypertension, pain, diarrhea and asthma. PMID:27219012

  10. A SMYD3 Small-Molecule Inhibitor Impairing Cancer Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Peserico, Alessia; Germani, Aldo; Sanese, Paola; Barbosa, Armenio Jorge; di Virgilio, Valeria; Fittipaldi, Raffaella; Fabini, Edoardo; Bertucci, Carlo; Varchi, Greta; Moyer, Mary Pat; Caretti, Giuseppina; del Rio, Alberto; Simone, Cristiano

    2015-10-01

    SMYD3 is a histone lysine methyltransferase that plays an important role in transcriptional activation as a member of an RNA polymerase complex, and its oncogenic role has been described in different cancer types. We studied the expression and activity of SMYD3 in a preclinical model of colorectal cancer (CRC) and found that it is strongly upregulated throughout tumorigenesis both at the mRNA and protein level. Our results also showed that RNAi-mediated SMYD3 ablation impairs CRC cell proliferation indicating that SMYD3 is required for proper cancer cell growth. These data, together with the importance of lysine methyltransferases as a target for drug discovery, prompted us to carry out a virtual screening to identify new SMYD3 inhibitors by testing several candidate small molecules. Here we report that one of these compounds (BCI-121) induces a significant reduction in SMYD3 activity both in vitro and in CRC cells, as suggested by the analysis of global H3K4me2/3 and H4K5me levels. Of note, the extent of cell growth inhibition by BCI-121 was similar to that observed upon SMYD3 genetic ablation. Most of the results described above were obtained in CRC; however, when we extended our observations to tumor cell lines of different origin, we found that SMYD3 inhibitors are also effective in other cancer types, such as lung, pancreatic, prostate, and ovarian. These results represent the proof of principle that SMYD3 is a druggable target and suggest that new compounds capable of inhibiting its activity may prove useful as novel therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. PMID:25728514

  11. A SMYD3 Small-Molecule Inhibitor Impairing Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Armenio Jorge; Di Virgilio, Valeria; Fittipaldi, Raffaella; Fabini, Edoardo; Bertucci, Carlo; Varchi, Greta; Moyer, Mary Pat; Caretti, Giuseppina; Del Rio, Alberto; Simone, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    SMYD3 is a histone lysine methyltransferase that plays an important role in transcriptional activation as a member of an RNA polymerase complex, and its oncogenic role has been described in different cancer types. We studied the expression and activity of SMYD3 in a preclinical model of colorectal cancer (CRC) and found that it is strongly upregulated throughout tumorigenesis both at the mRNA and protein level. Our results also showed that RNAi-mediated SMYD3 ablation impairs CRC cell proliferation indicating that SMYD3 is required for proper cancer cell growth. These data, together with the importance of lysine methyltransferases as a target for drug discovery, prompted us to carry out a virtual screening to identify new SMYD3 inhibitors by testing several candidate small molecules. Here we report that one of these compounds (BCI-121) induces a significant reduction in SMYD3 activity both in vitro and in CRC cells, as suggested by the analysis of global H3K4me2/3 and H4K5me levels. Of note, the extent of cell growth inhibition by BCI-121 was similar to that observed upon SMYD3 genetic ablation. Most of the results described above were obtained in CRC; however, when we extended our observations to tumor cell lines of different origin, we found that SMYD3 inhibitors are also effective in other cancer types, such as lung, pancreatic, prostate, and ovarian. These results represent the proof of principle that SMYD3 is a druggable target and suggest that new compounds capable of inhibiting its activity may prove useful as novel therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. PMID:25728514

  12. Tripolin A, a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Aurora A Kinase, Reveals New Regulation of HURP's Distribution on Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Kesisova, Iliana A.; Nakos, Konstantinos C.; Tsolou, Avgi; Angelis, Dimitrios; Lewis, Joe; Chatzaki, Aikaterini; Agianian, Bogos; Giannis, Athanassios; Koffa, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic regulators exhibiting gain of function in tumor cells are considered useful cancer therapeutic targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors. The human Aurora kinases are a family of such targets. In this study, from a panel of 105 potential small-molecule inhibitors, two compounds Tripolin A and Tripolin B, inhibited Aurora A kinase activity in vitro. In human cells however, only Tripolin A acted as an Aurora A inhibitor. We combined in vitro, in vivo single cell and in silico studies to demonstrate the biological action of Tripolin A, a non-ATP competitive inhibitor. Tripolin A reduced the localization of pAurora A on spindle microtubules (MTs), affected centrosome integrity, spindle formation and length, as well as MT dynamics in interphase, consistent with Aurora A inhibition by RNAi or other specific inhibitors, such as MLN8054 or MLN8237. Interestingly, Tripolin A affected the gradient distribution towards the chromosomes, but not the MT binding of HURP (Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein), a MT-associated protein (MAP) and substrate of the Aurora A kinase. Therefore Tripolin A reveals a new way of regulating mitotic MT stabilizers through Aurora A phosphorylation. Tripolin A is predicted to bind Aurora A similarly but not identical to MLN8054, therefore it could be used to dissect pathways orchestrated by Aurora kinases as well as a scaffold for further inhibitor development. PMID:23516487

  13. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  14. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  15. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  16. Effect of a Small Molecule BCL-2 Inhibitor on Immune Function and Use with a Recombinant Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Farsaci, Benedetto; Sabzevari, Helen; Higgins, Jack P; Di Bari, Maria Giovanna; Takai, Shinji; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Small molecule BCL-2 inhibitors are being examined as monotherapy in phase I/II clinical trials for several types of tumors. However, few data are available about the effect of BCL-2 inhibitors on immune function. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of a small molecule BCL-2 inhibitor on immune function and determine the most effective way of combining this inhibitor with a recombinant vaccine to treat tumors. The in vitro effect of the pan-BCL-2 inhibitor GX15-070 was assessed in mouse CD8 T lymphocytes at two different stages of activation as well as regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg). The in vivo effect of GX15-070 after recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox CEA-TRICOM vaccination was analyzed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and in splenocytes of mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. The therapeutic efficacy of such sequential therapy was measured as a reduction of pulmonary tumor nodules. Activated mature CD8 T lymphocytes were more resistant to GX15-070 as compared to early-activated cells. Treg function was significantly decreased after treatment with the BCL-2 inhibitor. In vivo, GX15-070 was given after vaccination so as to not negatively impact the induction of vaccine-mediated immunity, resulting in increased intratumoral activated CD8:Treg ratio, and significant reduction of pulmonary tumor nodules. This study is the first to show the effect of a small molecule BCL-2 inhibitor on the immune system and following a vaccine. It is also the first to demonstrate the efficacy of this sequence in reducing tumors in mouse models, providing a rationale for the design of combinational clinical studies. PMID:20091862

  17. ETV6-NTRK3 as a therapeutic target of small molecule inhibitor PKC412

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Hoang Thanh; Ly, Bui Thi Kim; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tojo, Arinobu; Sato, Yuko

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETV6-NTRK3 is an oncogene with transformation activity in multiple cell lineages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC412 could block ETV6-NTRK3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ETV6-NTRK3 phosphorylation leads to inactivation of its downstream signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of ETV6-NTRK3 activation by PKC412 could be a novel strategy for the treatment. -- Abstract: The ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) fusion gene which encodes a chimeric tyrosine kinase was first identified by cloning of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation in congenital fibrosarcoma (CFS). Since then, EN has been also found in congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN), secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Using IMS-M2 and M0-91 cell lines harboring the EN fusion gene, and Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with EN, we demonstrated that PKC412, also known as midostaurin, is an inhibitor of EN. Inhibition of EN activity by PKC412 suppressed the activity of it downstream molecules leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Our data for the first time suggested that PKC412 could serve as therapeutic drug for treatment of patients with this fusion.

  18. Structure–activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]–N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure–activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency. PMID:25987836

  19. A Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting the IL-6 Receptor β Subunit, Glycoprotein 130.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soon-Sun; Choi, Jung Ho; Lee, Sung Yoon; Park, Yeon-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Yeon; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Juyoung; Gajulapati, Veeraswamy; Goo, Ja-Il; Singh, Sarbjit; Lee, Kyeong; Kim, Young-Kook; Im, So Hee; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Rose-John, Stefan; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Choi, Yongseok

    2015-07-01

    IL-6 is a major causative factor of inflammatory disease. Although IL-6 and its signaling pathways are promising targets, orally available small-molecule drugs specific for IL-6 have not been developed. To discover IL-6 antagonists, we screened our in-house chemical library and identified LMT-28, a novel synthetic compound, as a candidate IL-6 blocker. The activity, mechanism of action, and direct molecular target of LMT-28 were investigated. A reporter gene assay showed that LMT-28 suppressed activation of STAT3 induced by IL-6, but not activation induced by leukemia inhibitory factor. In addition, LMT-28 downregulated IL-6-stimulated phosphorylation of STAT3, gp130, and JAK2 protein and substantially inhibited IL-6-dependent TF-1 cell proliferation. LMT-28 antagonized IL-6-induced TNF-α production in vivo. In pathologic models, oral administration of LMT-28 alleviated collagen-induced arthritis and acute pancreatitis in mice. Based on the observation of upstream IL-6 signal inhibition by LMT-28, we hypothesized IL-6, IL-6Rα, or gp130 to be putative molecular targets. We subsequently demonstrated direct interaction of LMT-28 with gp130 and specific reduction of IL-6/IL-6Rα complex binding to gp130 in the presence of LMT-28, which was measured by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that LMT-28 is a novel synthetic IL-6 inhibitor that functions through direct binding to gp130. PMID:26026064

  20. Characterization of Two Classes of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Arp2/3 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, B.; Tomasevic, N; Russell, A; Pierce, D; Jia, Z; McCormick, C; Hartman, J; Sakowicz, R; Pollard, T

    2009-01-01

    Polymerization of actin filaments directed by the actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 complex supports many types of cellular movements. However, questions remain regarding the relative contributions of Arp2/3 complex versus other mechanisms of actin filament nucleation to processes such as path finding by neuronal growth cones; this is because of the lack of simple methods to inhibit Arp2/3 complex reversibly in living cells. Here we describe two classes of small molecules that bind to different sites on the Arp2/3 complex and inhibit its ability to nucleate actin filaments. CK-0944636 binds between Arp2 and Arp3, where it appears to block movement of Arp2 and Arp3 into their active conformation. CK-0993548 inserts into the hydrophobic core of Arp3 and alters its conformation. Both classes of compounds inhibit formation of actin filament comet tails by Listeria and podosomes by monocytes. Two inhibitors with different mechanisms of action provide a powerful approach for studying the Arp2/3 complex in living cells.

  1. Structural elements that govern Sec14-like PITP sensitivities to potent small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khan, Danish; McGrath, Kaitlyn R; Dorosheva, Oleksandra; Bankaitis, Vytas A; Tripathi, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) play important biological functions in integrating multiple aspects of intracellular lipid metabolism with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate signaling. As such, these proteins offer new opportunities for highly selective chemical interference with specific phosphoinositide pathways in cells. The first and best characterized small molecule inhibitors of the yeast PITP, Sec14, are nitrophenyl(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methanones (NPPMs), and a hallmark feature of NPPMs is their exquisite targeting specificities for Sec14 relative to other closely related Sec14-like PITPs. Our present understanding of Sec14::NPPM binding interactions is based on computational docking and rational loss-of-function approaches. While those approaches have been informative, we still lack an adequate understanding of the basis for the high selectivity of NPPMs among closely related Sec14-like PITPs. Herein, we describe a Sec14 motif, which we term the VV signature, that contributes significantly to the NPPM sensitivity/resistance of Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer proteins. The data not only reveal previously unappreciated determinants that govern Sec14-like PITP sensitivities to NPPMs, but enable predictions of which Sec14-like PtdIns/PtdCho transfer proteins are likely to be NPPM resistant or sensitive based on primary sequence considerations. Finally, the data provide independent evidence in support of previous studies highlighting the importance of Sec14 residue Ser173 in the mechanism by which NPPMs engage and inhibit Sec14-like PITPs.

  2. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: role in cancer pathogenesis and small-molecule inhibitor development for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Thomas R; Slavish, Jake; George, Rani E; Look, A Thomas; Xue, Liquan; Jiang, Qin; Cui, Xiaoli; Rentrop, Walter B; Morris, Stephan W

    2009-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a receptor tyrosine kinase in the insulin receptor superfamily, was initially identified in constitutively activated oncogenic fusion forms – the most common being nucleophosmin-ALK – in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, and subsequent studies have identified ALK fusions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, systemic histiocytosis, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and non-small-cell lung carcinomas. More recently, genomic DNA amplification and protein overexpression, as well as activating point mutations, of ALK have been described in neuroblastomas. In addition to those cancers for which a causative role for aberrant ALK activity is well validated, more circumstantial links implicate the full-length, normal ALK receptor in the genesis of other malignancies – including glioblastoma and breast cancer – via a mechanism of receptor activation involving autocrine and/or paracrine growth loops with the reported ALK ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine. This review summarizes normal ALK biology, the confirmed and putative roles of ALK in the development of human cancers and efforts to target ALK using small-molecule kinase inhibitors. PMID:19275511

  3. Small molecule inhibitors of Late SV40 Factor (LSF) abrogate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Evaluation using an endogenous HCC model

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Devaraja; Siddiq, Ayesha; Willoughby, Jennifer L.S.; Biagi, Jessica M.; Christadore, Lisa M.; Yunes, Sarah A.; Gredler, Rachel; Jariwala, Nidhi; Robertson, Chadia L.; Akiel, Maaged A.; Shen, Xue-Ning; Subler, Mark A.; Windle, Jolene J.; Schaus, Scott E.; Fisher, Paul B.; Hansen, Ulla; Sarkar, Devanand

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal malignancy with high mortality and poor prognosis. Oncogenic transcription factor Late SV40 Factor (LSF) plays an important role in promoting HCC. A small molecule inhibitor of LSF, Factor Quinolinone Inhibitor 1 (FQI1), significantly inhibited human HCC xenografts in nude mice without harming normal cells. Here we evaluated the efficacy of FQI1 and another inhibitor, FQI2, in inhibiting endogenous hepatocarcinogenesis. HCC was induced in a transgenic mouse with hepatocyte-specific overexpression of c-myc (Alb/c-myc) by injecting N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) followed by FQI1 or FQI2 treatment after tumor development. LSF inhibitors markedly decreased tumor burden in Alb/c-myc mice with a corresponding decrease in proliferation and angiogenesis. Interestingly, in vitro treatment of human HCC cells with LSF inhibitors resulted in mitotic arrest with an accompanying increase in CyclinB1. Inhibition of CyclinB1 induction by Cycloheximide or CDK1 activity by Roscovitine significantly prevented FQI-induced mitotic arrest. A significant induction of apoptosis was also observed upon treatment with FQI. These effects of LSF inhibition, mitotic arrest and induction of apoptosis by FQI1s provide multiple avenues by which these inhibitors eliminate HCC cells. LSF inhibitors might be highly potent and effective therapeutics for HCC either alone or in combination with currently existing therapies. PMID:26313006

  4. Screening and classifying small-molecule inhibitors of amyloid formation using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Young, Lydia M; Saunders, Janet C; Mahood, Rachel A; Revill, Charlotte H; Foster, Richard J; Tu, Ling-Hsien; Raleigh, Daniel P; Radford, Sheena E; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2015-01-01

    The search for therapeutic agents that bind specifically to precursor protein conformations and inhibit amyloid assembly is an important challenge. Identifying such inhibitors is difficult because many protein precursors of aggregation are partially folded or intrinsically disordered, which rules out structure-based design. Furthermore, inhibitors can act by a variety of mechanisms, including specific or nonspecific binding, as well as colloidal inhibition. Here we report a high-throughput method based on ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) that is capable of rapidly detecting small molecules that bind to amyloid precursors, identifying the interacting protein species and defining the mode of inhibition. Using this method we have classified a variety of small molecules that are potential inhibitors of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) aggregation or amyloid-beta 1-40 aggregation as specific, nonspecific, colloidal or non-interacting. We also demonstrate the ability of IMS-MS to screen for inhibitory small molecules in a 96-well plate format and use this to discover a new inhibitor of hIAPP amyloid assembly.

  5. Multimodal effects of small molecule ROCK and LIMK inhibitors on mitosis, and their implication as anti-leukemia agents.

    PubMed

    Oku, Yusuke; Tareyanagi, Chiaki; Takaya, Shinichi; Osaka, Sayaka; Ujiie, Haruki; Yoshida, Kentaro; Nishiya, Naoyuki; Uehara, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation is vital for cell viability. Many cancer cells show chromosome instability (CIN) due to aberrant expression of the genes involved in chromosome segregation. The induction of massive chromosome segregation errors in such cancer cells by small molecule inhibitors is an emerging strategy to kill these cells selectively. Here we screened and characterized small molecule inhibitors which cause mitotic chromosome segregation errors to target cancer cell growth. We screened about 300 chemicals with known targets, and found that Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) inhibitors bypassed the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which delays anaphase onset until proper kinetochore-microtubule interactions are established. We investigated how ROCK inhibitors affect chromosome segregation, and found that they induced microtubule-dependent centrosome fragmentation. Knockdown of ROCK1 and ROCK2 revealed their additive roles in centrosome integrity. Pharmacological inhibition of LIMK also induced centrosome fragmentation similar to that by ROCK inhibitors. Inhibition of ROCK or LIMK hyper-stabilized mitotic spindles and impaired Aurora-A activation. These results suggested that ROCK and LIMK are directly or indirectly involved in microtubule dynamics and activation of Aurora-A. Furthermore, inhibition of ROCK or LIMK suppressed T cell leukemia growth in vitro, but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells. They induced centrosome fragmentation and apoptosis in T cell leukemia cells. These results suggested that ROCK and LIMK can be a potential target for anti-cancer drugs.

  6. 3-O-methylthespesilactam, a new small-molecule anticancer pan-JAK inhibitor against A2058 human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Yi; Tian, Yan; Shen, Li; Buettner, Ralf; Li, Hong-Zhi; Liu, Lucy; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Xiao, Qiang; Wu, Jun; Jove, Richard

    2013-11-15

    Natural product-inspired discovery of new drug leads plays a key role in drug development. Recently, small-molecule JAK inhibitors have been pursued for the development of anticancer therapeutics. However, most of these inhibitors reported up to now are multi-nitrogen polycyclic aromatic heterocycles. Undoubtedly, the discovery of new types of promising JAK-inhibitory leads is pivotal for JAK inhibitor-based anticancer drug development. Herein we report an unprecedented sesquiterpenoid-alkaloid named thespesilactam, containing a benzo[cd]indole scaffold, from the heartwood of the Portia tree, Thespesia populnea. Its 3-O-Me product, i.e. 8-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-3-methoxy-7-methylbenzo[cd]indol-2(1H)-one, named 3-O-methylthespesilactam, of which the structure was identified by NMR investigations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, was discovered as a new type of small-molecule anticancer pan-JAK inhibitor against A2058 human melanoma cells, and selective and potent inhibitor of JAK1 and TYK2.

  7. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  8. Diuresis and reduced urinary osmolality in rats produced by small-molecule UT-A-selective urea transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Su, Tao; Lee, Sujin; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2014-09-01

    Urea transport (UT) proteins of the UT-A class are expressed in epithelial cells in kidney tubules, where they are required for the formation of a concentrated urine by countercurrent multiplication. Here, using a recently developed high-throughput assay to identify UT-A inhibitors, a screen of 50,000 synthetic small molecules identified UT-A inhibitors of aryl-thiazole, γ-sultambenzosulfonamide, aminocarbonitrile butene, and 4-isoxazolamide chemical classes. Structure-activity analysis identified compounds that inhibited UT-A selectively by a noncompetitive mechanism with IC50 down to ∼1 μM. Molecular modeling identified putative inhibitor binding sites on rat UT-A. To test compound efficacy in rats, formulations and administration procedures were established to give therapeutic inhibitor concentrations in blood and urine. We found that intravenous administration of an indole thiazole or a γ-sultambenzosulfonamide at 20 mg/kg increased urine output by 3-5-fold and reduced urine osmolality by ∼2-fold compared to vehicle control rats, even under conditions of maximum antidiuresis produced by 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP). The diuresis was reversible and showed urea > salt excretion. The results provide proof of concept for the diuretic action of UT-A-selective inhibitors. UT-A inhibitors are first in their class salt-sparing diuretics with potential clinical indications in volume-overload edemas and high-vasopressin-associated hyponatremias.

  9. Metabolic Targeting of Malignant Tumors: Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Bioenergetic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Mathupala, Saroj P.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism in tumors deviates significantly from that of normal tissues. Increasingly, the underlying aberrant metabolic pathways are being considered as novel targets for cancer therapy. Denoted “metabolic targeting”, small molecule drugs are under investigation for focused inhibition of key metabolic steps that are utilized by tumors, since such inhibitors should harbor minimal toxicity towards surrounding normal tissues.This review will examine the primary biochemical pathways that tumors harness to enhance their bioenergetic capacity, which in turn, help their rapid proliferation and metastasis within the host. It is hoped that “metabolite-mimetic” drugs can be utilized to interfere with metabolic flux pathways active within the tumor, and across tumor-microenvironment boundary. In fact, the major pathways of mammalian metabolism, i.e., the carbohydrate, amino-acid, and fatty-acid metabolic pathways have been examined as putative targets for drug development, with some drug candidates advancing to phase II/III stages. In this regard, glucose metabolism, i.e., the glycolytic pathway - that predominates the bio-energetic flux in tumors, and the associated mitochondrial metabolism have received the most attention as suitable “druggable” targets, focused either at the pathway enzymes or at the plasma-membrane-bound metabolite transporters. Outlined in this review are pre-clinical studies that have led to the discovery of promising drug candidates to target tumor-metabolic flux, and ensuing patents, with descriptions of the biochemical rationale for the combinatorial strategy of a particular metabolic pathway-drug candidate pair. PMID:21110820

  10. New Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors Targeting Hemagglutinin-Mediated Influenza A Virus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Wang, Minxiu; Li, Bing; Mills, Debra M.; Ames, Jessica A.; Nash, Peter J.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Prichard, Mark N.; Keith, Kathy A.; Barnard, Dale L.; Caffrey, Michael; Rong, Lijun; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are a major public health threat worldwide, and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The influenza virus glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) plays critical roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, making it a potential target for the development of anti-influenza drugs. Using pseudotype virus-based high-throughput screens, we have identified several new small molecules capable of inhibiting influenza virus entry. We prioritized two novel inhibitors, MBX2329 and MBX2546, with aminoalkyl phenol ether and sulfonamide scaffolds, respectively, that specifically inhibit HA-mediated viral entry. The two compounds (i) are potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 0.3 to 5.9 μM); (ii) are selective (50% cytotoxicity concentration [CC50] of >100 μM), with selectivity index (SI) values of >20 to 200 for different influenza virus strains; (iii) inhibit a wide spectrum of influenza A viruses, which includes the 2009 pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1/2009, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/H5N1, and oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 strains; (iv) exhibit large volumes of synergy with oseltamivir (36 and 331 μM2 % at 95% confidence); and (v) have chemically tractable structures. Mechanism-of-action studies suggest that both MBX2329 and MBX2546 bind to HA in a nonoverlapping manner. Additional results from HA-mediated hemolysis of chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), competition assays with monoclonal antibody (MAb) C179, and mutational analysis suggest that the compounds bind in the stem region of the HA trimer and inhibit HA-mediated fusion. Therefore, MBX2329 and MBX2546 represent new starting points for chemical optimization and have the potential to provide valuable future therapeutic options and research tools to study the HA-mediated entry process. PMID:24198411

  11. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting the Mitotic Spindle Checkpoint Impairs the Growth of Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Weiwei; Akinfenwa, Patricia Y.; Savannah, Kari B.; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna; Laucirica, Rudolfo; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Odunsi, Kunle; Creighton, Chad J.; Lev, Dina C.; Anderson, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS) is a poorly understood cancer with few effective treatments. This study explores the molecular events involved in ULMS with the goal of developing novel therapeutic strategies. Experimental Design Genome-wide transcriptional profiling, Western blotting, and real-time PCR were used to compare specimens of myometrium, leiomyoma, and leiomyosarcoma. Aurora A kinase was targeted in cell lines derived from metastatic ULMS using siRNA or MK-5108, a highly specific small-molecule inhibitor. An orthotopic model was used to evaluate the ability of MK-5108 to inhibit ULMS growth in vivo. Results We found that 26 of 50 gene products most overexpressed in ULMS regulate mitotic centrosome and spindle functions. These include UBE2C, Aurora A and B kinase, TPX2, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1). Targeting Aurora A inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in LEIO285, LEIO505, and SK-LMS1, regardless of whether siRNA or MK-5108 was used. In vitro, MK-5108 did not consistently synergize with gemcitabine or docetaxel. Gavage of an orthotopic ULMS model with MK-5108 at 30 or 60 mg/kg decreased the number and size of tumor implants compared with sham-fed controls. Oral MK-5108 also decreased the rate of proliferation, increased intratumoral apoptosis, and increased expression of phosphohistone H3 in ULMS xenografts. Conclusions Our results show that dysregulated centrosome function and spindle assembly are a robust feature of ULMS that can be targeted to slow its growth both in vitro and in vivo. These observations identify novel directions that can be potentially used to improve clinical outcomes for this disease. PMID:22535157

  12. Discovery and Validation of a New Class of Small Molecule Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Eyer, Benjamin; Good, Misty; Guerriero, Christopher J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Afrazi, Amin; Prindle, Thomas; Ma, Congrong; Branca, Maria; Ozolek, John; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Wipf, Peter; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases may be linked to pathologically elevated signaling via the receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). There has thus been great interest in the discovery of TLR4 inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Recently, the structure of TLR4 bound to the inhibitor E5564 was solved, raising the possibility that novel TLR4 inhibitors that target the E5564-binding domain could be designed. We utilized a similarity search algorithm in conjunction with a limited screening approach of small molecule libraries to identify compounds that bind to the E5564 site and inhibit TLR4. Our lead compound, C34, is a 2-acetamidopyranoside (MW 389) with the formula C17H27NO9, which inhibited TLR4 in enterocytes and macrophages in vitro, and reduced systemic inflammation in mouse models of endotoxemia and necrotizing enterocolitis. Molecular docking of C34 to the hydrophobic internal pocket of the TLR4 co-receptor MD-2 demonstrated a tight fit, embedding the pyran ring deep inside the pocket. Strikingly, C34 inhibited LPS signaling ex-vivo in human ileum that was resected from infants with necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings identify C34 and the β-anomeric cyclohexyl analog C35 as novel leads for small molecule TLR4 inhibitors that have potential therapeutic benefit for TLR4-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23776545

  13. Small molecules as potent protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors documented in patents from 2009 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Wang, Shuai-Yu; Shi, Da-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (2-DM) are the main threats to human health in the worldwide. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a promising molecular level legitimate therapeutic target in the effective management of 2-DM. For the search of potent PTP1B inhibitors, much investigation has revealed a large number of small-molecule compounds obtained from natural sources or prepared by synthesis/semi-synthesis with various skeletons and promising anti-PTP1B activities in the treatment of 2-DM. Although some reviews on the development of PTP1B inhibitors have been published, they were mainly concentrated on the results reported in journal articles. In this review, we will provide an overview of the developments of the potent PTP1B inhibitors claimed in recent patents during the past five years (2009-2013) with their structural features and biological features, as well as the structure-activity relationships (SARs) and strategies for finding potent and specific PTP1B inhibitors. This paper will provide valuable information for understanding the current anti-PTP1B investigation and developing potent PTP1B inhibitors as treating 2-DM drugs. PMID:25643610

  14. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  15. Synthesis of a 10,000-membered library of molecules resembling carpanone and discovery of vesicular traffic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Goess, Brian C; Hannoush, Rami N; Chan, Lawrence K; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Shair, Matthew D

    2006-04-26

    Split-and-pool synthesis of a 10,000-membered library of molecules resembling the natural product carpanone has been achieved. The synthesis features development of solid-phase multicomponent reactions between nitrogen nucleophiles, enones, and hydroxylamines, and a solid-phase application of the Huisgen cycloaddition affording substituted triazoles. The synthesis was performed in high-capacity (500 microm) polystyrene beads using a one bead-one stock solution strategy that enabled phenotypic screens of the resulting library. Using whole-cell fluorescence imaging, we discovered a series of molecules from the carpanone-based library that inhibit exocytosis from the Golgi apparatus. The most potent member of this series has an IC(50) of 14 microM. We also report structure-activity relationships for the molecules exhibiting this interesting phenotype. These inhibitors of exocytosis may be useful reagents for the study of vesicular traffic. PMID:16620111

  16. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Haggie, Peter M; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    Pendrin (SLC26A4) is a Cl(-)/anion exchanger expressed in the epithelium of inflamed airways where it is thought to facilitate Cl(-) absorption and HCO3 (-) secretion. Studies using pendrin knockout mice and airway epithelial cells from hearing-impaired subjects with pendrin loss of function suggest involvement of pendrin in inflammatory lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), perhaps by regulation of airway surface liquid (ASL) volume. Here we identified small-molecule pendrin inhibitors and demonstrated their efficacy in increasing ASL volume. A cell-based, functional high-throughput screen of ∼36,000 synthetic small molecules produced 3 chemical classes of inhibitors of human pendrin. After structure-activity studies, tetrahydropyrazolopyridine and pyrazolothiophenesulfonamide compounds reversibly inhibited pendrin-facilitated Cl(-) exchange with SCN(-), I(-), NO3 (-), and HCO3 (-) with drug concentration causing 50% inhibition down to ∼2.5 μM. In well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells from non-CF and CF subjects, treatment with IL-13, which causes inflammation with strong pendrin up-regulation, strongly increased Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange and the increase was blocked by pendrin inhibition. Pendrin inhibition significantly increased ASL depth (by ∼8 μm) in IL-13-treated non-CF and CF cells but not in untreated cells. These studies implicate the involvement of pendrin-facilitated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) in the regulation of ASL volume and suggest the utility of pendrin inhibitors in inflammatory lung diseases, including CF.-Haggie, P. M., Phuan, P.-W., Tan, J.-A., Zlock, L., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26932931

  17. Small Molecule MYC Inhibitor Conjugated to Integrin-Targeted Nanoparticles Extends Survival in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Grace; Senpan, Angana; Yang, Xiaoxia; Lu, Lan; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Prochownik, Edward V.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Tomasson, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma pathogenesis is driven by the MYC oncoprotein, its dimerization with MAX, and the binding of this heterodimer to E-Boxes in the vicinity of target genes. The systemic utility of potent small molecule inhibitors of MYC-MAX dimerization was limited by poor bioavailability, rapid metabolism, and inadequate target site penetration. We hypothesized that new lipid-based MYC-MAX dimerization inhibitor prodrugs delivered via integrin-targeted nanoparticles (NP) would overcome prior shortcomings of MYC inhibitor approaches and prolong survival in a mouse model of cancer. An Sn 2 lipase-labile prodrug inhibitor of MYC-MAX dimerization (MI1-PD) was developed which decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in cultured multiple myeloma cell lines alone (P < 0.05) and when incorporated into integrin-targeted lipid-encapsulated NPs (P < 0.05). Binding and efficacy of NPs closely correlated with integrin expression of the target multiple myeloma cells. Using a KaLwRij metastatic multiple myeloma mouse model, VLA-4–targeted NPs (20 nm and 200 nm) incorporating MI1-PD (D) NPs conferred significant survival benefits compared with respective NP controls, targeted (T) no-drug (ND), and untargeted (NT) control NPs (T/D 200: 46 days vs. NT/ND: 28 days, P < 0.05 and T/D 20: 52 days vs. NT/ND: 29 days, P = 0.001). The smaller particles performed better of the two sizes. Neither MI1 nor MI1-PD provided survival benefit when administered systemically as free compounds. These results demonstrate for the first time that a small molecule inhibitor of the MYC transcription factor can be an effective anticancer agent when delivered using a targeted nanotherapy approach. PMID:25824336

  18. A hinge region mutation in C1-inhibitor (Ala436-->Thr) results in nonsubstrate-like behavior and in polymerization of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Aulak, K S; Eldering, E; Hack, C E; Lubbers, Y P; Harrison, R A; Mast, A; Cicardi, M; Davis, A E

    1993-08-25

    C1-inhibitor(Mo), a dysfunctional C1-inhibitor molecule produced in two kindred with type II hereditary angioedema, has a mutation at the P10 position (Ala436 to Thr). Like most serpins with hinge region mutations (P14, P12, P10), C1-inhibitor(Mo) loses its inhibitory activity. However, unlike the other hinge region mutations, this mutant is not converted to a substrate. As shown by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and electron microscopy, C1-inhibitor(Mo) exists in both monomeric and multimeric forms. Polymerization probably results from reactive center loop insertion into the A sheet of an adjacent molecule. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo) was shown to have a thermal stability profile intermediate to those of intact and of cleaved normal C1-inhibitor. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo) did not bind to monoclonal antibody KII, which binds only to reactive center-cleaved normal C1-inhibitor. It did, however, react with monoclonal antibody KOK12, which recognizes complexed or cleaved C1-inhibitor but not intact normal C1-inhibitor. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo), therefore, exists in a conformation similar to the complexed form of normal C1-inhibitor.

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors of the c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Miduturu, Chandra V; Kanda, Shigeru; Zhang, Jianming; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Salah, Eidarus; Deng, Xianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Knapp, Stefan; Gray, Nathanael S; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2012-04-20

    The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase modulates cellular signaling pathways governing differentiation, the innate immune response, and vasculogenesis. Here, we report the identification of types I and II kinase inhibitors with potent activity against c-Fes both in vitro and in cell-based assays. One of the most potent inhibitors is the previously described anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor TAE684. The crystal structure of TAE684 in complex with the c-Fes SH2-kinase domain showed excellent shape complementarity with the ATP-binding pocket and a key role for the gatekeeper methionine in the inhibitory mechanism. TAE684 and two pyrazolopyrimidines with nanomolar potency against c-Fes in vitro were used to establish a role for this kinase in osteoclastogenesis, illustrating the value of these inhibitors as tool compounds to probe the diverse biological functions associated with this unique kinase.

  20. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor–induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  1. A small-molecule IAP inhibitor overcomes resistance to cytotoxic therapies in malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, David S.; Keating, Joanna; Kesari, Santosh; Fast, Eva M.; Zawel, Leigh; Ramakrishna, Naren; Barnes, Jessica; Kieran, Mark W.; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Sophie E.M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the use of the small-molecule Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP) inhibitor LBW242 in combination with the standard-of-care therapies of irradiation and temozolomide for malignant gliomas. In vitro assays demonstrated that LBW242 enhanced the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy, and clonogenic assays showed that the combination therapy led to a synergistic anti-glioma effect in multiple cell lines. Neurosphere assays revealed that the combination of radiation and LBW242 led to a pro-apoptotic effect in these glioma–initiating cell-enriched assays, with a corresponding inhibition of primary tumor cell growth. Athymic mice bearing established human malignant glioma tumor xenografts treated with LBW242 plus radiation and temozolomide demonstrated a synergistic suppression of tumor growth. Taken together, these experiments show that the pro-apoptotic and anti-glioma effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy can be enhanced by the addition of a small-molecule IAP inhibitor. These results are readily translatable to clinical trial and offer the potential for improved treatment outcomes for patients with glioma. PMID:21724651

  2. Chemical methodology as a source of small-molecule checkpoint inhibitors and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) modulators

    PubMed Central

    Huryn, Donna M.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Brummond, Kay M.; Chambers, Peter G.; Eyer, Benjamin; Ireland, Alex W.; Kawasumi, Masaoki; LaPorte, Matthew G.; Lloyd, Kayla; Manteau, Baptiste; Nghiem, Paul; Quade, Bettina; Seguin, Sandlin P.; Wipf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Unique chemical methodology enables the synthesis of innovative and diverse scaffolds and chemotypes and allows access to previously unexplored “chemical space.” Compound collections based on such new synthetic methods can provide small-molecule probes of proteins and/or pathways whose functions are not fully understood. We describe the identification, characterization, and evolution of two such probes. In one example, a pathway-based screen for DNA damage checkpoint inhibitors identified a compound, MARPIN (ATM and ATR pathway inhibitor) that sensitizes p53-deficient cells to DNA-damaging agents. Modification of the small molecule and generation of an immobilized probe were used to selectively bind putative protein target(s) responsible for the observed activity. The second example describes a focused library approach that relied on tandem multicomponent reaction methodologies to afford a series of modulators of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) molecular chaperone. The synthesis of libraries based on the structure of MAL3-101 generated a collection of chemotypes, each modulating Hsp70 function, but exhibiting divergent pharmacological activities. For example, probes that compromise the replication of a disease-associated polyomavirus were identified. These projects highlight the importance of chemical methodology development as a source of small-molecule probes and as a drug discovery starting point. PMID:21502524

  3. Discovery of MK-7145, an Oral Small Molecule ROMK Inhibitor for the Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haifeng; Zhu, Yuping; Teumelsan, Nardos; Walsh, Shawn P; Shahripour, Aurash; Priest, Birgit T; Swensen, Andrew M; Felix, John P; Brochu, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Pai, Lee-Yuh; Hampton, Caryn; Corona, Aaron; Hernandez, Melba; Metzger, Joseph; Forrest, Michael; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Owens, Karen; Tong, Vincent; Parmee, Emma; Roy, Sophie; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Yang, Lihu; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Garcia, Maria L; Pasternak, Alexander

    2016-07-14

    ROMK, the renal outer medullary potassium channel, is involved in potassium recycling at the thick ascending loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct in the kidney nephron. Because of this dual site of action, selective inhibitors of ROMK are expected to represent a new class of diuretics/natriuretics with superior efficacy and reduced urinary loss of potassium compared to standard-of-care loop and thiazide diuretics. Following our earlier work, this communication will detail subsequent medicinal chemistry endeavors to further improve lead selectivity against the hERG channel and preclinical pharmacokinetic properties. Pharmacological assessment of highlighted inhibitors will be described, including pharmacodynamic studies in both an acute rat diuresis/natriuresis model and a subchronic blood pressure model in spontaneous hypertensive rats. These proof-of-biology studies established for the first time that the human and rodent genetics accurately predict the in vivo pharmacology of ROMK inhibitors and supported identification of the first small molecule ROMK inhibitor clinical candidate, MK-7145. PMID:27437080

  4. Reversible and irreversible small molecule inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) investigated by biophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rafael J; Edmondson, Dale E; Almos, Terri; Scott, Roderick; Massari, Mark E

    2015-02-15

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) plays a key role in the metabolism of dopamine, a neurotransmitter critical for the maintenance of cognitive function. Consequently, MAO-B is an important therapeutic target for disorders characterized by a decline in dopaminergic neurotransmission, including Parkinson's disease (PD). An emerging strategy in drug discovery is to utilize the biophysical approaches of thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to gain insight into binding modality and identify thermodynamically privileged chemical scaffolds. Described here is the development of such approaches for reversible and irreversible small molecule inhibitors of MAO-B. Investigation of soluble recombinant MAO-B revealed mechanism-based differences in the thermal shift and binding thermodynamic profiles of MAO-B inhibitors. Irreversible inhibitors demonstrated biphasic protein melt curves, large enthalpically favorable and entropically unfavorable binding, in contrast to reversible compounds, which were characterized by a dose-dependent increase in thermal stability and enthalpically-driven binding. The biophysical approaches described here aim to facilitate the discovery of next-generation MAO-B inhibitors.

  5. Discovery and optimization of potent and selective benzonaphthyridinone analogs as small molecule mTOR inhibitors with improved mouse microsome stability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Wang, Jinhua; Kang, Seong A.; Thoreen, Carson C.; Hur, Wooyoung; Choi, Hwan Geun; Waller, David L.; Sim, Taebo; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    Starting from small molecule mTOR inhibitor Torin1, replacement of the piperazine ring with a phenyl ring resulted in a new series of mTOR inhibitors (as exemplified by 10) that showed superior potency and selectivity for mTOR, along with significantly improved mouse liver microsome stability and a longer in vivo half-life. PMID:21621413

  6. A Novel Small-molecule Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Attenuates Inflammation in a Hepatitis Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Gong, Haiyan; Zhu, Haiyan; Ji, Qing; Su, Pei; Liu, Peng; Cao, Shannan; Yao, Jianfeng; Jiang, Linlin; Han, Mingzhe; Ma, Xiaotong; Xiong, Dongsheng; Luo, Hongbo R.; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Yuanfu

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a hallmark of many inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and septic shock and hepatitis, making it a potential therapeutic target for clinical interventions. To explore chemical inhibitors against TNFα activity, we applied computer-aided drug design combined with in vitro and cell-based assays and identified a lead chemical compound, (E)-4-(2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl) (named as C87 thereafter), which directly binds to TNFα, potently inhibits TNFα-induced cytotoxicity (IC50 = 8.73 μm) and effectively blocks TNFα-triggered signaling activities. Furthermore, by using a murine acute hepatitis model, we showed that C87 attenuates TNFα-induced inflammation, thereby markedly reducing injuries to the liver and improving animal survival. Thus, our results lead to a novel and highly specific small-molecule TNFα inhibitor, which can be potentially used to treat TNFα-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24634219

  7. Using AlphaScreen(®) to Identify Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting a Conserved Host-Pathogen Interaction.

    PubMed

    Austin, Sisley; Taouji, Saïd; Chevet, Eric; Wodrich, Harald; Rayne, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    AlphaScreen(®) is a technology particularly suitable for bi-molecular inhibitor screening assays, e.g. using protein-protein interactions with purified recombinant proteins. Each binding partner of the bi-molecular interaction is coupled either to donor or to acceptor beads. The technology is based on the quantifiable transfer of oxygen singlets from donor to acceptor microbeads brought together by a specific interaction between the partners. We identified the conserved interaction between WW domains of cellular ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family and a short peptide motif (PPxY) present in several structural and non-structural viral proteins as a potential drug target. Using an AlphaScreen assay recapitulating the interaction between Nedd4.2 and the PPxY motif of the adenoviral capsid protein VI, we screened a library of small molecules and identified specific inhibitors of this interaction. PMID:27613056

  8. A Target-Based High Throughput Screen Yields Trypanosoma brucei Hexokinase Small Molecule Inhibitors with Antiparasitic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Lyda, Todd A.; Dodson, Heidi C.; Mustata, Gabriela; Morris, Meredith T.; Leimgruber, Stephanie S.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Close, David; Lazo, John S.; Morris, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK), an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the γ-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. Methodology/Principal Findings Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were ∼20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03≤EC50<3 µM) with parasite specificity of the compounds being demonstrated using insect stage T. brucei parasites, Leishmania promastigotes, and mammalian cell lines. Analysis of two structurally related compounds, ebselen and SID 17387000, revealed that both were mixed inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics. Conclusions/Significance The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome. PMID:20405000

  9. Rational design of selective small-molecule inhibitors for β-catenin/B-cell lymphoma 9 protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, Logan R; Zhang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Min; Panic, Vanja; Wisniewski, John A; Ji, Haitao

    2015-09-30

    Selective inhibition of α-helix-mediated protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with small organic molecules provides great potential for the discovery of chemical probes and therapeutic agents. Protein Data Bank data mining using the HippDB database indicated that (1) the side chains of hydrophobic projecting hot spots at positions i, i + 3, and i + 7 of an α-helix had few orientations when interacting with the second protein and (2) the hot spot pockets of PPI complexes had different sizes, shapes, and chemical groups when interacting with the same hydrophobic projecting hot spots of α-helix. On the basis of these observations, a small organic molecule, 4'-fluoro-N-phenyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxamide, was designed as a generic scaffold that itself directly mimics the binding mode of the side chains of hydrophobic projecting hot spots at positions i, i + 3, and i + 7 of an α-helix. Convenient decoration of this generic scaffold led to the selective disruption of α-helix-mediated PPIs. A series of small-molecule inhibitors selective for β-catenin/B-cell lymphoma 9 (BCL9) over β-catenin/cadherin PPIs was designed and synthesized. The binding mode of new inhibitors was characterized by site-directed mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies. This new class of inhibitors can selectively disrupt β-catenin/BCL9 over β-catenin/cadherin PPIs, suppress the transactivation of canonical Wnt signaling, downregulate the expression of Wnt target genes, and inhibit the growth of Wnt/β-catenin-dependent cancer cells. PMID:26352795

  10. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R.; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian

    2011-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kDa and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3ζ in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer. PMID:21908710

  11. Indole molecules as inhibitors of tubulin polymerization: potential new anticancer agents, an update (2013-2015).

    PubMed

    Patil, Renukadevi; Patil, Siddappa A; Beaman, Kenneth D; Patil, Shivaputra A

    2016-07-01

    Discovery of new indole-based tubulin polymerization inhibitors will continue to dominate the synthetic efforts of many medicinal chemists working in the field. The indole ring system is an essential part of several tubulin inhibitors identified in the recent years. The present review article will update the synthesis, anticancer and tubulin inhibition activities of several important new indole classes such as 2-phenylindoles (28, 29 & 30), oxindoles (35 & 38), indole-3-acrylamides (44), indolines (46), aroylindoles (49), carbozoles (75, 76 & 82), azacarbolines (87) and annulated indoles (100-105). PMID:27476704

  12. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  13. Identification of a Pyridoxine-Derived Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting Dengue Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P.; Hassounah, Said; Quashie, Peter K.; Han, Yingshan; Oliveira, Maureen; Stranix, Brent R.

    2015-01-01

    The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity of the dengue virus (DENV) NS5 protein is an attractive target for drug design. Here, we report the identification of a novel class of inhibitor (i.e., an active-site metal ion chelator) that acts against DENV RdRp activity. DENV RdRp utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism of catalysis; therefore, we constructed a small library of compounds, through mechanism-based drug design, aimed at chelating divalent metal ions in the catalytic site of DENV RdRp. We now describe a pyridoxine-derived small-molecule inhibitor that targets DENV RdRp and show that 5-benzenesulfonylmethyl-3-hydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid hydroxyamide (termed DMB220) inhibited the RdRp activity of DENV serotypes 1 to 4 at low micromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s of 5 to 6.7 μM) in an enzymatic assay. The antiviral activity of DMB220 against DENV infection was also verified in a cell-based assay and showed a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of <3 μM. Enzyme assays proved that DMB220 was competitive with nucleotide incorporation. DMB220 did not inhibit the enzymatic activity of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and showed only weak inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity, indicating high specificity for DENV RdRp. S600T substitution in the DENV RdRp, which was previously shown to confer resistance to nucleoside analogue inhibitors (NI), conferred 3-fold hypersusceptibility to DMB220, and enzymatic analyses showed that this hypersusceptibility may arise from the decreased binding/incorporation efficiency of the natural NTP substrate without significantly impacting inhibitor binding. Thus, metal ion chelation at the active site of DENV RdRp represents a viable anti-DENV strategy, and DMB220 is the first of a new class of DENV inhibitor. PMID:26574011

  14. Novel small molecule inhibitors of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Richard I; Wu, James M; Polokoff, Mark A; Kochanny, Monica J; Dinter, Harald; Zhu, Daguang; Biroc, Sandra L; Alicke, Bruno; Bryant, Judi; Yuan, Shendong; Buckman, Brad O; Lentz, Dao; Ferrer, Mike; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Finster, Silke; Chang, Zheng; Arnaiz, Damian O

    2005-05-20

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1)/Akt signaling pathway plays a key role in cancer cell growth, survival, and tumor angiogenesis and represents a promising target for anticancer drugs. Here, we describe three potent PDK1 inhibitors, BX-795, BX-912, and BX-320 (IC(50) = 11-30 nm) and their initial biological characterization. The inhibitors blocked PDK1/Akt signaling in tumor cells and inhibited the anchorage-dependent growth of a variety of tumor cell lines in culture or induced apoptosis. A number of cancer cell lines with elevated Akt activity were >30-fold more sensitive to growth inhibition by PDK1 inhibitors in soft agar than on tissue culture plastic, consistent with the cell survival function of the PDK1/Akt signaling pathway, which is particularly important for unattached cells. BX-320 inhibited the growth of LOX melanoma tumors in the lungs of nude mice after injection of tumor cells into the tail vein. The effect of BX-320 on cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo indicates that PDK1 inhibitors may have clinical utility as anticancer agents. PMID:15772071

  15. N-Aryl-benzimidazolones as novel small molecule HSP90 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruncko, Milan; Tahir, Stephen K.; Song, Xiaohong; Chen, Jun; Ding, Hong; Huth, Jeffrey R.; Jin, Sha; Judge, Russell A.; Madar, David J.; Park, Chang H.; Park, Cheol-Min; Petros, Andrew M.; Tse, Christin; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Elmore, Steven W.

    2012-03-16

    We describe the development of a novel series of N-aryl-benzimidazolone HSP90 inhibitors (9) targeting the N-terminal ATP-ase site. SAR development was influenced by structure-based design based around X-ray structures of ligand bound HSP90 complexes. Lead compounds exhibited high binding affinities, ATP-ase inhibition and cellular client protein degradation.

  16. Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interaction with Capillary Electrophoresis Frontal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Mi; Li, Qing; Wang, Renxiao; Kang, Jingwu

    2016-08-16

    A simple and effective method for identifying inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) was developed by using capillary electrophoresis frontal analysis (CE-FA). Antiapoptotic B-cell-2 (Bcl-2) family member Bcl-XL protein, a 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled peptide truncated from the BH3 domain of Bid (F-Bid) as the ligand, and a known Bcl-XL-Bid interaction inhibitor ABT-263 were employed as an experimental model for the proof of concept. In CE-FA, the free ligand is separated from the protein and protein-ligand complex to permit the measurement of the equilibrium concentration of the ligand, hence the dissociation constant of the protein-ligand complex. In the presence of inhibitors, formation of the protein-ligand complex is hindered, thereby the inhibition can be easily identified by the raised plateau height of the ligand and the decayed plateau of the complex. Further, we proposed an equation used to convert the IC50 value into the inhibition constant Ki value, which is more useful than the former for comparison. In addition, the sample pooling strategy was employed to improve the screening throughput more than 10 times. A small chemical library composed of synthetic compounds and natural extracts were screened with the method, two natural products, namely, demethylzeylasteral and celastrol, were identified as new inhibitors to block the Bcl-XL-Bid interaction. Cell-based assay was performed to validate the activity of the identified compounds. The result demonstrated that CE-FA represents a straightforward and robust technique for screening of PPI inhibitors. PMID:27425825

  17. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  18. 5-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazoles: first small molecules as substrate competitive inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Valle; Perez, Daniel I; Perez, Concepcion; Morales-Garcia, Jose A; Soteras, Ignacio; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Encinas, Arantxa; Castro, Ana; Campillo, Nuria E; Perez-Castillo, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Martinez, Ana

    2012-02-23

    Cumulative evidence strongly supports that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a pathogenic molecule when it is up-dysregulated, emerging as an important therapeutic target in severe unmet human diseases. GSK-3 specific inhibitors might be promising effective drugs for the treatment of devastating pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and mood disorders. As GSK-3 has the ability to phosphorylate primed substrates, small molecules able to bind to this site should be perfect drug candidates, able to partially block the activity of the enzyme over some specific substrates. Here, we report substituted 5-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazoles as the first small molecules able to inhibit GSK-3 in a substrate competitive manner. These compounds are cell permeable, able to decrease inflammatory activation and to selectively differentiate neural stem cells. Overall, 5-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazoles are presented here as new molecules able to decrease neuronal cell death and to increase endogenous neurogenesis blocking the GSK-3 substrate site.

  19. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  20. Efficacy of a Mer and Flt3 tyrosine kinase small molecule inhibitor, UNC1666, in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; Zhang, Weihe; Menachof, Kelly K.; Hill, Amanda A.; Rinella, Sean; Kirkpatrick, Gregory; Page, Lauren S.; Stashko, Michael A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Wei, Qi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Dehui; DeRyckere, Deborah; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen; Earp, H. Shelton; Graham, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    Mer and Flt3 receptor tyrosine kinases have been implicated as therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this manuscript we describe UNC1666, a novel ATP-competitive small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which potently diminishes Mer and Flt3 phosphorylation in AML. Treatment with UNC1666 mediated biochemical and functional effects in AML cell lines expressing Mer or Flt3 internal tandem duplication (ITD), including decreased phosphorylation of Mer, Flt3 and downstream effectors Stat, Akt and Erk, induction of apoptosis in up to 98% of cells, and reduction of colony formation by greater than 90%, compared to treatment with vehicle. These effects were dose-dependent, with inhibition of downstream signaling and functional effects correlating with the degree of Mer or Flt3 kinase inhibition. Treatment of primary AML patient samples expressing Mer and/or Flt3-ITD with UNC1666 also inhibited Mer and Flt3 intracellular signaling, induced apoptosis, and inhibited colony formation. In summary, UNC1666 is a novel potent small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that decreases oncogenic signaling and myeloblast survival, thereby validating dual Mer/Flt3 inhibition as an attractive treatment strategy for AML. PMID:25762638

  1. Clinical development of galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate), a small molecule inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Herbertz, Stephan; Sawyer, J Scott; Stauber, Anja J; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Driscoll, Kyla E; Estrem, Shawn T; Cleverly, Ann L; Desaiah, Durisala; Guba, Susan C; Benhadji, Karim A; Slapak, Christopher A; Lahn, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling regulates a wide range of biological processes. TGF-β plays an important role in tumorigenesis and contributes to the hallmarks of cancer, including tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and escape of immune surveillance. There are several pharmacological approaches to block TGF-β signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, antisense oligonucleotides, and small molecule inhibitors. Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate) is an oral small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor I kinase that specifically downregulates the phosphorylation of SMAD2, abrogating activation of the canonical pathway. Furthermore, galunisertib has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing animal models such as breast, colon, lung cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Continuous long-term exposure to galunisertib caused cardiac toxicities in animals requiring adoption of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy to allow further development. The use of such a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model defined a therapeutic window with an appropriate safety profile that enabled the clinical investigation of galunisertib. These efforts resulted in an intermittent dosing regimen (14 days on/14 days off, on a 28-day cycle) of galunisertib for all ongoing trials. Galunisertib is being investigated either as monotherapy or in combination with standard antitumor regimens (including nivolumab) in patients with cancer with high unmet medical needs such as glioblastoma, pancreatic cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present review summarizes the past and current experiences with different pharmacological treatments that enabled galunisertib to be investigated in patients. PMID:26309397

  2. Small molecule inhibitors of the Dishevelled-CXXC5 interaction are new drug candidates for bone anabolic osteoporosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Yi; Choi, Sehee; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Lim, Hwan Jung; Lee, Hyuk; Choi, Jiwon; Ro, Eun Ji; Heo, Jung-Nyoung; Lee, Weontae; No, Kyoung Tai; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2016-01-01

    Bone anabolic agents promoting bone formation and rebuilding damaged bones would ideally overcome the limitations of anti-resorptive therapy, the current standard prescription for osteoporosis. However, the currently prescribed parathyroid hormone (PTH)-based anabolic drugs present limitations and adverse effects including osteosarcoma during long-term use. Also, the antibody-based anabolic drugs that are currently being developed present the potential limits in clinical application typical of macromolecule drugs. We previously identified that CXXC5 is a negative feedback regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway via its interaction with Dishevelled (Dvl) and suggested the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction as a potential target for anabolic therapy of osteoporosis. Here, we screened small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction via a newly established in vitro assay system. The screened compounds were found to activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and enhance osteoblast differentiation in primary osteoblasts. The bone anabolic effects of the compounds were shown using ex vivo-cultured calvaria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titration analysis confirmed interaction between Dvl PDZ domain and KY-02061, a representative of the screened compounds. Oral administration of KY-02327, one of 55 newly synthesized KY-02061 analogs, successfully rescued bone loss in the ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model. In conclusion, small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction that block negative feedback regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are potential candidates for the development of bone anabolic anti-osteoporosis drugs.

  3. The small molecule Mek1/2 inhibitor U0126 disrupts the chordamesoderm to notochord transition in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Thomas A; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Szabó, Gábor; Lele, Zsolt

    2008-01-01

    Background Key molecules involved in notochord differentiation and function have been identified through genetic analysis in zebrafish and mice, but MEK1 and 2 have so far not been implicated in this process due to early lethality (Mek1-/-) and functional redundancy (Mek2-/-) in the knockout animals. Results Here, we reveal a potential role for Mek1/2 during notochord development by using the small molecule Mek1/2 inhibitor U0126 which blocks phosphorylation of the Mek1/2 target gene Erk1/2 in vivo. Applying the inhibitor from early gastrulation until the 18-somite stage produces a specific and consistent phenotype with lack of dark pigmentation, shorter tail and an abnormal, undulated notochord. Using morphological analysis, in situ hybridization, immunhistochemistry, TUNEL staining and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that in treated embryos the chordamesoderm to notochord transition is disrupted and identify disorganization in the medial layer of the perinotochordal basement mebrane as the probable cause of the undulations and bulges in the notochord. We also examined and excluded FGF as the upstream signal during this process. Conclusion Using the small chemical U0126, we have established a novel link between MAPK-signaling and notochord differentiation. Our phenotypic analysis suggests a potential connection between the MAPK-pathway, the COPI-mediated intracellular transport and/or the copper-dependent posttranslational regulatory processes during notochord differentiation. PMID:18419805

  4. Small-Molecule Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitor of Oncogenic Rho Signaling.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Vescovo, Cosmo D; Dreyer, Elisa; Reggi, Erica; Osman, Halima; Ruggieri, Lucia; Gonano, Cynthia; Cavin, Sabrina; Box, Clare L; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Bellucci, Luca; Seeber, Michele; Fanelli, Francesca

    2016-09-22

    Uncontrolled activation of Rho signaling by RhoGEFs, in particular AKAP13 (Lbc) and its close homologs, is implicated in a number of human tumors with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. Structure predictions and alanine scanning mutagenesis of Lbc identified a circumscribed hot region for RhoA recognition and activation. Virtual screening targeting that region led to the discovery of an inhibitor of Lbc-RhoA interaction inside cells. By interacting with the DH domain, the compound inhibits the catalytic activity of Lbc, halts cellular responses to activation of oncogenic Lbc pathways, and reverses a number of prostate cancer cell phenotypes such as proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. This study provides insights into the structural determinants of Lbc-RhoA recognition. This is a successful example of structure-based discovery of a small protein-protein interaction inhibitor able to halt oncogenic Rho signaling in cancer cells with therapeutic implications.

  5. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of BRD4 Using Structure-Based Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are epigenetic readers that recognize acetylated-lysine (KAc) on proteins and are implicated in a number of diseases. We describe a virtual screening approach to identify BRD inhibitors. Key elements of this approach are the extensive design and use of substructure queries to compile a set of commercially available compounds featuring novel putative KAc mimetics and docking this set for final compound selection. We describe the validation of this approach by applying it to the first BRD of BRD4. The selection and testing of 143 compounds lead to the discovery of six novel hits, including four unprecedented KAc mimetics. We solved the crystal structure of four hits, determined their binding mode, and improved their potency through synthesis and the purchase of derivatives. This work provides a validated virtual screening approach that is applicable to other BRDs and describes novel KAc mimetics that can be further explored to design more potent inhibitors. PMID:24090311

  6. Discovery of Selective Small Molecule ROMK Inhibitors as Potential New Mechanism Diuretics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haifeng; Walsh, Shawn P; Yan, Yan; de Jesus, Reynalda K; Shahripour, Aurash; Teumelsan, Nardos; Zhu, Yuping; Ha, Sookhee; Owens, Karen A; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande S; Felix, John P; Liu, Jessica; Kohler, Martin; Priest, Birgit T; Bailey, Timothy; Brochu, Richard; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Roy, Sophie; Yang, Lihu; Mills, Sander G; Garcia, Maria L; Pasternak, Alexander

    2012-05-10

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK or Kir1.1) is a putative drug target for a novel class of diuretics that could be used for the treatment of hypertension and edematous states such as heart failure. An internal high-throughput screening campaign identified 1,4-bis(4-nitrophenethyl)piperazine (5) as a potent ROMK inhibitor. It is worth noting that this compound was identified as a minor impurity in a screening hit that was responsible for all of the initially observed ROMK activity. Structure-activity studies resulted in analogues with improved rat pharmacokinetic properties and selectivity over the hERG channel, providing tool compounds that can be used for in vivo pharmacological assessment. The featured ROMK inhibitors were also selective against other members of the inward rectifier family of potassium channels. PMID:24900480

  7. More powerful virus inhibitors from structure-based analysis of HEV71 capsid-binding molecules

    PubMed Central

    Spyrou, John A. B.; Kelly, James; Ren, Jingshan; Grimes, Jonathan; Puerstinger, Gerhard; Stonehouse, Nicola; Walter, Thomas S.; Hu, Zhongyu; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Xuemei; Peng, Wei; Rowlands, David; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (HEV71) epidemics amongst children and infants result mainly in mild symptoms, however, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, infection can be fatal. At present no therapies are available. We have used structural analysis of the complete virus to guide the design of HEV71 inhibitors. Analysis of complexes with four 3-(-4-pyridyl)-2-imidazolidinone derivatives with varying anti-HEV71 activities, pinpointed key structure-activity correlates. We then identified additional potentially beneficial substitutions, developed methods to reliably triage compounds by quantum mechanics-enhanced ligand docking, and synthesized two candidates. Structural analysis and in vitro assays confirmed the predicted binding modes and their ability to block viral infection. One ligand (IC50 = 25 pM) is an order of magnitude more potent than the best previously reported inhibitor, and is also more soluble. Our approach may be useful in the design of effective drugs for enterovirus infections. PMID:24509833

  8. Cellular Activity of New Small Molecule Protein Arginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Haya; Khan, Hasan A; Tjin, Caroline C; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational deimination of arginine side chains. Multiple PAD isozymes have been characterized, and abnormal PAD activity has been associated with several human disease states. PAD3 has been characterized as a modulator of cell growth via apoptosis inducing factor and has been implicated in the neurodegenerative response to spinal cord injury. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally constrained versions of the potent and selective PAD3 inhibitor 2. The cell activity of representative inhibitors in this series was also demonstrated for the first time by rescue of thapsigargin-induced cell death in PAD3-expressing HEK293T cells. PMID:27660689

  9. Discovery of Selective Small Molecule ROMK Inhibitors as Potential New Mechanism Diuretics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK or Kir1.1) is a putative drug target for a novel class of diuretics that could be used for the treatment of hypertension and edematous states such as heart failure. An internal high-throughput screening campaign identified 1,4-bis(4-nitrophenethyl)piperazine (5) as a potent ROMK inhibitor. It is worth noting that this compound was identified as a minor impurity in a screening hit that was responsible for all of the initially observed ROMK activity. Structure–activity studies resulted in analogues with improved rat pharmacokinetic properties and selectivity over the hERG channel, providing tool compounds that can be used for in vivo pharmacological assessment. The featured ROMK inhibitors were also selective against other members of the inward rectifier family of potassium channels. PMID:24900480

  10. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human As(III) S-Adenosylmethionine Methyltransferase (AS3MT)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most ubiquitous environmental toxin and carcinogen. Long-term exposure to arsenic is associated with human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Human As(III) S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) methyltransferases (hAS3MT) methylates As(III) to trivalent mono- and dimethyl species that are more toxic and potentially more carcinogenic than inorganic arsenic. Modulators of hAS3MT activity may be useful for the prevention or treatment of arsenic-related diseases. Using a newly developed high-throughput assay for hAS3MT activity, we identified 10 novel noncompetitive small molecule inhibitors. In silico docking analysis with the crystal structure of an AS3MT orthologue suggests that the inhibitors bind in a cleft between domains that is distant from either the As(III) or SAM binding sites. This suggests the presence of a possible allosteric and regulatory site in the enzyme. These inhibitors may be useful tools for future research in arsenic metabolism and are the starting-point for the development of drugs against hAS3MT. PMID:26577531

  11. Identification of an allosteric small-molecule inhibitor selective for the inducible form of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Howe, Matthew K; Bodoor, Khaldon; Carlson, David A; Hughes, Philip F; Alwarawrah, Yazan; Loiselle, David R; Jaeger, Alex M; Darr, David B; Jordan, Jamie L; Hunter, Lucas M; Molzberger, Eileen T; Gobillot, Theodore A; Thiele, Dennis J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Spector, Neil L; Haystead, Timothy A J

    2014-12-18

    Inducible Hsp70 (Hsp70i) is overexpressed in a wide spectrum of human tumors, and its expression correlates with metastasis, poor outcomes, and resistance to chemotherapy in patients. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors selective for Hsp70i could provide new therapeutic tools for cancer treatment. In this work, we used fluorescence-linked enzyme chemoproteomic strategy (FLECS) to identify HS-72, an allosteric inhibitor selective for Hsp70i. HS-72 displays the hallmarks of Hsp70 inhibition in cells, promoting substrate protein degradation and growth inhibition. Importantly, HS-72 is selective for Hsp70i over the closely related constitutively active Hsc70. Studies with purified protein show HS-72 acts as an allosteric inhibitor, reducing ATP affinity. In vivo HS-72 is well-tolerated, showing bioavailability and efficacy, inhibiting tumor growth and promoting survival in a HER2+ model of breast cancer. The HS-72 scaffold is amenable to resynthesis and iteration, suggesting an ideal starting point for a new generation of anticancer therapeutics targeting Hsp70i.

  12. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of non-ATP-competitive small-molecule Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-Xing; Huang, Jie; Liu, Meng; Xu, Yun-Gen; Jiang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    A series of small-molecule Plk1 inhibitors targeting the substrate-binding pocket were designed through rational drug design for the first time. The designed compounds were synthesized and their activities were evaluated in vitro. Some of the targeted compounds showed potent Plk1 inhibitory activities and anti-proliferative characters. Particularly, 5i showed Plk1 inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.68 µM. Compound 5i also showed cell growth inhibitory activity on HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 0.51 µM, which is about four times more potent compared to thymoquinone. The mechanism of action suggested that 5i was an ATP-independent and substrate-dependent Plk1 inhibitor. Compound 5i demonstrated excellent Plk1 inhibitory selectivity against Plk2, Plk3, and five serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. Our discovery and structure-activity relationship study may provide useful lead compounds for further optimization of non-ATP-competitive Plk1 inhibitors.

  13. Discovery of novel small-molecule HIV-1 replication inhibitors that stabilize capsid complexes.

    PubMed

    Lamorte, Louie; Titolo, Steve; Lemke, Christopher T; Goudreau, Nathalie; Mercier, Jean-François; Wardrop, Elizabeth; Shah, Vaibhav B; von Schwedler, Uta K; Langelier, Charles; Banik, Soma S R; Aiken, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I; Mason, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The identification of novel antiretroviral agents is required to provide alternative treatment options for HIV-1-infected patients. The screening of a phenotypic cell-based viral replication assay led to the identification of a novel class of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazol-6-one (pyrrolopyrazolone) HIV-1 inhibitors, exemplified by two compounds: BI-1 and BI-2. These compounds inhibited early postentry stages of viral replication at a step(s) following reverse transcription but prior to 2 long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circle formation, suggesting that they may block nuclear targeting of the preintegration complex. Selection of viruses resistant to BI-2 revealed that substitutions at residues A105 and T107 within the capsid (CA) amino-terminal domain (CANTD) conferred high-level resistance to both compounds, implicating CA as the antiviral target. Direct binding of BI-1 and/or BI-2 to CANTD was demonstrated using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift titration analyses. A high-resolution crystal structure of the BI-1:CANTD complex revealed that the inhibitor bound within a recently identified inhibitor binding pocket (CANTD site 2) between CA helices 4, 5, and 7, on the surface of the CANTD, that also corresponds to the binding site for the host factor CPSF-6. The functional consequences of BI-1 and BI-2 binding differ from previously characterized inhibitors that bind the same site since the BI compounds did not inhibit reverse transcription but stabilized preassembled CA complexes. Hence, this new class of antiviral compounds binds CA and may inhibit viral replication by stabilizing the viral capsid.

  14. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule HIV-1 Replication Inhibitors That Stabilize Capsid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Titolo, Steve; Lemke, Christopher T.; Goudreau, Nathalie; Mercier, Jean-François; Wardrop, Elizabeth; Shah, Vaibhav B.; von Schwedler, Uta K.; Langelier, Charles; Banik, Soma S. R.; Aiken, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of novel antiretroviral agents is required to provide alternative treatment options for HIV-1-infected patients. The screening of a phenotypic cell-based viral replication assay led to the identification of a novel class of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazol-6-one (pyrrolopyrazolone) HIV-1 inhibitors, exemplified by two compounds: BI-1 and BI-2. These compounds inhibited early postentry stages of viral replication at a step(s) following reverse transcription but prior to 2 long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circle formation, suggesting that they may block nuclear targeting of the preintegration complex. Selection of viruses resistant to BI-2 revealed that substitutions at residues A105 and T107 within the capsid (CA) amino-terminal domain (CANTD) conferred high-level resistance to both compounds, implicating CA as the antiviral target. Direct binding of BI-1 and/or BI-2 to CANTD was demonstrated using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift titration analyses. A high-resolution crystal structure of the BI-1:CANTD complex revealed that the inhibitor bound within a recently identified inhibitor binding pocket (CANTD site 2) between CA helices 4, 5, and 7, on the surface of the CANTD, that also corresponds to the binding site for the host factor CPSF-6. The functional consequences of BI-1 and BI-2 binding differ from previously characterized inhibitors that bind the same site since the BI compounds did not inhibit reverse transcription but stabilized preassembled CA complexes. Hence, this new class of antiviral compounds binds CA and may inhibit viral replication by stabilizing the viral capsid. PMID:23817385

  15. A Selective Small Molecule DNA2 Inhibitor for Sensitization of Human Cancer Cells to Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenpeng; Zhou, Mian; Li, Zhengke; Li, Hongzhi; Polaczek, Piotr; Dai, Huifang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Changwei; Karanja, Kenneth K; Popuri, Vencat; Shan, Shu-Ou; Schlacher, Katharina; Zheng, Li; Campbell, Judith L; Shen, Binghui

    2016-04-01

    Cancer cells frequently up-regulate DNA replication and repair proteins such as the multifunctional DNA2 nuclease/helicase, counteracting DNA damage due to replication stress and promoting survival. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking both DNA replication and repair by inhibiting the bifunctional DNA2 could be a potent strategy to sensitize cancer cells to stresses from radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. We show that homozygous deletion of DNA2 sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and camptothecin (CPT). Using a virtual high throughput screen, we identify 4-hydroxy-8-nitroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (C5) as an effective and selective inhibitor of DNA2. Mutagenesis and biochemical analysis define the C5 binding pocket at a DNA-binding motif that is shared by the nuclease and helicase activities, consistent with structural studies that suggest that DNA binding to the helicase domain is necessary for nuclease activity. C5 targets the known functions of DNA2 in vivo: C5 inhibits resection at stalled forks as well as reducing recombination. C5 is an even more potent inhibitor of restart of stalled DNA replication forks and over-resection of nascent DNA in cells defective in replication fork protection, including BRCA2 and BOD1L. C5 sensitizes cells to CPT and synergizes with PARP inhibitors. PMID:27211550

  16. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Hideyasu; Furuichi, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Keiji Shimbara, Naoki

    2008-04-18

    The inducible transcription factor NF-{kappa}B regulates divergent signaling pathways including inflammatory response and cancer development. Selective inhibitors for NF-{kappa}B signaling are potentially useful for treatment of inflammation and cancer. NF-{kappa}B is canonically activated by preferential disposal of its inhibitory protein; I{kappa}B, which suppresses the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. I{kappa}B{alpha} (a major member of I{kappa}B family proteins) is phosphorylated with an I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and subsequently polyubiquitylated by SCF{sup {beta}}{sup TrCP1} ubiquitin-ligase in the presence of E1 and E2 prior to proteasomal degradation. Here, we describe a novel inhibitor termed GS143, which suppressed I{kappa}B{alpha} ubiquitylation, but not I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, MDM2-directed p53 ubiquitylation, and proteasome activity in vitro. GS143 markedly suppressed the destruction of I{kappa}B{alpha} stimulated by TNF{alpha} and a set of downstream responses coupled to NF-{kappa}B signaling but not those of p53 and {beta}-catenin in vivo. Our results indicate that GS143 serves as an effective inhibitor of multiple pathways served by NF-{kappa}B signaling.

  17. High-Throughput Minigenome System for Identifying Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Ebola Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Megan R.; Pietzsch, Colette; Vausselin, Thibaut; Shaw, Megan L.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the family Filoviridae, is a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus that causes severe, often lethal, disease in humans. EBOV RNA synthesis is carried out by a complex that includes several viral proteins. The function of this machinery is essential for viral gene expression and viral replication and is therefore a potential target for antivirals. We developed and optimized a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay based on an EBOV minigenome assay, which assesses the function of the polymerase complex. The assay is robust in 384-well format and displays a large signal to background ratio and high Z-factor values. We performed a pilot screen of 2080 bioactive compounds, identifying 31 hits (1.5% of the library) with >70% inhibition of EBOV minigenome activity. We further identified eight compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations below their 50% cytotoxic concentrations, five of which had selectivity index (SI) values >10, suggesting specificity against the EBOV polymerase complex. These included an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, a target known to modulate the EBOV replication complex. They also included novel classes of inhibitors, including inhibitors of protein synthesis and hypoxia inducible factor-1. Five compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit replication of a recombinant EBOV that expresses GFP (EBOV-GFP), and four inhibited EBOV-GFP growth at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. These data demonstrate the utility of the HTS minigenome assay for drug discovery and suggest potential directions for antifiloviral drug development. PMID:26284260

  18. Structural basis for specificity of TGF[beta] family receptor small molecule inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Zeqiraj, Elton; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Sicheri, Frank; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; David, Laurent

    2012-07-24

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) receptor kinase inhibitors have a great therapeutic potential. SB431542 is one of the mainly used kinase inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway receptors, but needs improvement of its EC{sub 50} (EC{sub 50} = 1 {mu}M) to be translated to clinical use. A key feature of SB431542 is that it specifically targets receptors from the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway but not the closely related receptors from the bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) pathway. To understand the mechanisms of this selectivity, we solved the crystal structure of the TGF{beta} type I receptor (T{beta}RI) kinase domain in complex with SB431542. We mutated T{beta}RI residues coordinating SB431542 to their counterparts in activin-receptor like kinase 2 (ALK2), a BMP receptor kinase, and tested the kinase activity of mutated T{beta}RI. We discovered that a Ser280Thr mutation yielded a T{beta}RI variant that was resistant to SB431542 inhibition. Furthermore, the corresponding Thr283Ser mutation in ALK2 yielded a BMP receptor sensitive to SB431542. This demonstrated that Ser280 is the key determinant of selectivity for SB431542. This work provides a framework for optimising the SB431542 scaffold to more potent and selective inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway.

  19. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors against SecA by structure-based virtual ligand screening.

    PubMed

    De Waelheyns, Evelien; Segers, Kenneth; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Anné, Jozef; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Economou, Anastassios

    2015-11-01

    The rapid rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is one of the major concerns in modern medicine. Therefore, to treat bacterial infections, there is an urgent need for new antibacterials-preferably directed against alternative bacterial targets. One such potential target is the preprotein translocation motor SecA. SecA is a peripheral membrane ATPase and a key component of the Sec secretion pathway, the major route for bacterial protein export across or into the cytoplasmic membrane. As SecA is essential for bacterial viability, ubiquitous and highly conserved in bacteria, but not present in eukaryotic cells, it represents an attractive antibacterial target. Using an in silico approach, we have defined several potentially druggable and conserved pockets on the surface of SecA. We show that three of these potentially druggable sites are important for SecA function. A starting collection of ~500 000 commercially available small-molecules was virtually screened against a predicted druggable pocket in the preprotein-binding domain of Escherichia coli SecA using a multi-step virtual ligand screening protocol. The 1040 top-scoring molecules were tested in vitro for inhibition of the translocation ATPase activity of E. coli SecA. Five inhibitors of the translocation ATPase, and not of basal or membrane ATPase, were identified with IC50 values <65 μm. The most potent inhibitor showed an IC50 of 24 μm. The antimicrobial activity was determined for the five most potent SecA inhibitors. Two compounds were found to possess weak antibacterial activity (IC50 ~198 μm) against E. coli, whereas some compounds showed moderate antibacterial activity (IC50 ~100 μm) against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25990955

  20. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of MyD88-dependent signaling pathways using a computational screen

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Mark A.; Lee, Michael S.; Kissner, Teri L.; Alam, Shahabuddin; Waugh, David S.; Saikh, Kamal U.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used high-throughput computational screening to discover drug-like inhibitors of the host MyD88 protein-protein signaling interaction implicated in the potentially lethal immune response associated with Staphylococcal enterotoxins. We built a protein-protein dimeric docking model of the Toll-interleukin receptor (TIR)-domain of MyD88 and identified a binding site for docking small molecules. Computational screening of 5 million drug-like compounds led to testing of 30 small molecules; one of these molecules inhibits the TIR-TIR domain interaction and attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human primary cell cultures. Compounds chemically similar to this hit from the PubChem database were observed to be more potent with improved drug-like properties. Most of these 2nd generation compounds inhibit Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-1β production at 2–10 μM in human primary cells. Biochemical analysis and a cell-based reporter assay revealed that the most promising compound, T6167923, disrupts MyD88 homodimeric formation, which is critical for its signaling function. Furthermore, we observed that administration of a single dose of T6167923 completely protects mice from lethal SEB-induced toxic shock. In summary, our in silico approach has identified anti-inflammatory inhibitors against in vitro and in vivo toxin exposure with promise to treat other MyD88-related pro-inflammatory diseases. PMID:26381092

  1. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B. Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage.

  2. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hasinoff, Brian B; Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage. PMID:20832415

  3. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Pot1 Binding to Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Croy, Johnny E.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of S. pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ~20,000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with submicromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red, was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. ITC and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption. PMID:22978652

  4. A small molecule inhibitor of Pot1 binding to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Croy, Johnny E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-10-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of the regulation of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ∼20 000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with sub-micromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red (CR), was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption.

  5. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280 in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  6. The Sulfamate Small Molecule CAIX Inhibitor S4 Modulates Doxorubicin Efficacy.

    PubMed

    van Kuijk, Simon J A; Gieling, Roben G; Niemans, Raymon; Lieuwes, Natasja G; Biemans, Rianne; Telfer, Brian A; Haenen, Guido R M M; Yaromina, Ala; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig J; Williams, Kaye J

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a tumor-specific protein that is upregulated during hypoxic conditions where it is involved in maintaining the pH balance. CAIX causes extracellular acidification, thereby limiting the uptake of weak basic chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, and decreasing its efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine if doxorubicin efficacy can be increased when combined with the selective sulfamate CAIX inhibitor S4. The effect of S4 on doxorubicin efficacy was tested in vitro using cell viability assays with MDA-MB-231, FaDu, HT29 -CAIX high and HT29 -CAIX low cell lines. In addition, the efficacy of this combination therapy was investigated in tumor xenografts of the same cell lines. The addition of S4 in vitro increased the efficacy of doxorubicin in the MDA-MB-231 during hypoxic exposure (IC50 is 0.25 versus 0.14 µM, p = 0.0003). Similar results were observed for HT29-CAIX high with S4 during normoxia (IC50 is 0.20 versus 0.08 µM, p<0.0001) and in the HT29 -CAIX low cells (IC50 is 0.09 µM, p<0.0001). In vivo doxorubicin treatment was only effective in the MDA-MB-231 xenografts, but the efficacy of doxorubicin was decreased when combined with S4. In conclusion, the efficacy of doxorubicin treatment can be increased when combined with the selective sulfamate CAIX inhibitor S4 in vitro in certain cell lines. Nevertheless, in xenografts S4 did not enhance doxorubicin efficacy in the FaDu and HT29 tumor models and decreased doxorubicin efficacy in the MDA-MB-231 tumor model. These results stress the importance of better understanding the role of CAIX inhibitors in intratumoral pH regulation before combining them with standard treatment modalities, such as doxorubicin.

  7. Potent Host-Directed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Myxovirus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Stefanie A.; Ndungu, J. Maina; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Dochow, Melanie; Sun, Aiming; Natchus, Michael; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid adaptation to a pathogen

  8. Discovery of Small Molecule RIP1 Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pathologies Associated with Necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Potent inhibitors of RIP1 kinase from three distinct series, 1-aminoisoquinolines, pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines, and furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines, all of the type II class recognizing a DLG-out inactive conformation, were identified from screening of our in-house kinase focused sets. An exemplar from the furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine series showed a dose proportional response in protection from hypothermia in a mouse model of TNFα induced lethal shock. PMID:24900635

  9. Phenotypic Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors: Implications for Therapeutic Discovery and Drug Target Development in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2016-01-01

    The inability of central nervous system (CNS) neurons to regenerate damaged axons and dendrites following traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a substantial obstacle for functional recovery. Apoptotic cell death, deposition of scar tissue, and growth-repressive molecules produced by glia further complicate the problem and make it challenging for re-growing axons to extend across injury sites. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of TBI, accentuating the need for relevant leads. Cell-based and organotypic bioassays can better mimic outcomes within the native CNS microenvironment than target-based screening methods and thus should speed the discovery of therapeutic agents that induce axon or dendrite regeneration. Additionally, when used to screen focused chemical libraries such as small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors, these assays can help elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in neurite outgrowth and regeneration as well as identify novel drug targets. Here, we describe a phenotypic cellular (high content) screening assay that utilizes brain-derived primary neurons for screening small-molecule chemical libraries. PMID:27604745

  10. New Antibiotic Molecules: Bypassing the Membrane Barrier of Gram Negative Bacteria Increases the Activity of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mamelli, Laurent; Petit, Sylvain; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Giglione, Carmela; Lieutaud, Aurélie; Meinnel, Thierry; Artaud, Isabelle; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide and urgently require the development of new antibacterial molecules. Peptide deformylase is an intracellular target now well-recognized for the design of new antibiotics. The bacterial susceptibility to such a cytoplasmic target primarily depends on the capacity of the compound to reach and accumulate in the cytosol. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the respective involvement of penetration (influx) and pumping out (efflux) mechanisms to peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDF-I) activity, the potency of various series was determined using various genetic contexts (efflux overproducers or efflux-deleted strains) and membrane permeabilizers. Depending on the structure of the tested molecules, two behaviors could be observed: (i) for actinonin the first PDF-I characterized, the AcrAB efflux system was the main parameter involved in the bacterial susceptibility, and (ii), for the lastest PDF-Is such as the derivatives of 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-hydroxyacetamide, the penetration through the membrane was a important limiting step. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly show that the bacterial membrane plays a key role in modulating the antibacterial activity of PDF-Is. The bacterial susceptibility for these new antibacterial molecules can be improved by two unrelated ways in MDR strains: by collapsing the Acr efflux activity or by increasing the uptake rate through the bacterial membrane. The efficiency of the second method is associated with the nature of the compound. PMID:19649280

  11. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface.

  12. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface. PMID:27315235

  13. Functional Characterization of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of the DKK1-LRP6 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Iozzi, Sara; Remelli, Rosaria; Lelli, Barbara; Diamanti, Daniela; Pileri, Silvia; Bracci, Luisa; Roncarati, Renza; Caricasole, Andrea; Bernocco, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    Background. DKK1 antagonizes canonical Wnt signalling through high-affinity binding to LRP5/6, an essential component of the Wnt receptor complex responsible for mediating downstream canonical Wnt signalling. DKK1 overexpression is known for its pathological implications in osteoporosis, cancer, and neurodegeneration, suggesting the interaction with LRP5/6 as a potential therapeutic target. Results. We show that the small-molecule NCI8642 can efficiently displace DKK1 from LRP6 and block DKK1 inhibitory activity on canonical Wnt signalling, as shown in binding and cellular assays, respectively. We further characterize NCI8642 binding activity on LRP6 by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technology. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that the DKK1-LRP6 interaction can be the target of small molecules and unlocks the possibility of new therapeutic tools for diseases associated with DKK1 dysregulation. PMID:27398238

  14. Discovery of a small-molecule inhibitor of {beta}-1,6-glucan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Akihiro; Someya, Kazuhiko; Hata, Masato; Nakajima, Ryohei; Takemura, Makoto

    2009-02-01

    It is possible that antifungal drugs with novel modes of action will provide favorable options to treat fungal infections. In the course of our screening for antifungal compounds acting on the cell wall, a pyridobenzimidazole derivative with unique activities, named D75-4590, was discovered. During treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with D75-4590, (i) incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into the beta-1,6-glucan component was selectively reduced, (ii) proteins released from the cell had lost the beta-1,6-glucan moiety, and (iii) cells tended to clump, resulting in impaired cell growth. Genetic analysis of a D75-4590-resistant mutant of S. cerevisiae indicated that its primary target was Kre6p, which is considered to be one of the beta-1,6-glucan synthases. These results strongly suggest that D75-4590 is a specific inhibitor of beta-1,6-glucan synthesis. D75-4590 showed potent activities against various Candida species. It inhibited hyphal elongation of C. albicans as well. KRE6 is conserved in various fungi, but no homologue has been found in mammalian cells. These lines of evidence indicate that D75-4590 is a promising lead compound for novel antifungal drugs. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a beta-1,6-glucan inhibitor. PMID:19015325

  15. Snake Venom PLA2s Inhibitors Isolated from Brazilian Plants: Synthetic and Natural Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, B. M. A.; Santos, J. D. L.; Xavier, B. M.; Almeida, J. R.; Resende, L. M.; Martins, W.; Marcussi, S.; Marangoni, S.; Stábeli, R. G.; Calderon, L. A.; Soares, A. M.; Da Silva, S. L.; Marchi-Salvador, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites. PMID:24171158

  16. Snake venom PLA2s inhibitors isolated from Brazilian plants: synthetic and natural molecules.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, B M A; Santos, J D L; Xavier, B M; Almeida, J R; Resende, L M; Martins, W; Marcussi, S; Marangoni, S; Stábeli, R G; Calderon, L A; Soares, A M; Da Silva, S L; Marchi-Salvador, D P

    2013-01-01

    Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites.

  17. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Ca(2+)-S100B Reveal Two Protein Conformations.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Michael C; Ansari, Mohd Imran; Pierce, Adam D; Wilder, Paul T; McKnight, Laura E; Raman, E Prabhu; Neau, David B; Bezawada, Padmavani; Alasady, Milad J; Charpentier, Thomas H; Varney, Kristen M; Toth, Eric A; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew; Weber, David J

    2016-01-28

    The drug pentamidine inhibits calcium-dependent complex formation with p53 ((Ca)S100B·p53) in malignant melanoma (MM) and restores p53 tumor suppressor activity in vivo. However, off-target effects associated with this drug were problematic in MM patients. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were therefore completed here with 23 pentamidine analogues, and X-ray structures of (Ca)S100B·inhibitor complexes revealed that the C-terminus of S100B adopts two different conformations, with location of Phe87 and Phe88 being the distinguishing feature and termed the "FF-gate". For symmetric pentamidine analogues ((Ca)S100B·5a, (Ca)S100B·6b) a channel between sites 1 and 2 on S100B was occluded by residue Phe88, but for an asymmetric pentamidine analogue ((Ca)S100B·17), this same channel was open. The (Ca)S100B·17 structure illustrates, for the first time, a pentamidine analog capable of binding the "open" form of the "FF-gate" and provides a means to block all three "hot spots" on (Ca)S100B, which will impact next generation (Ca)S100B·p53 inhibitor design. PMID:26727270

  18. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Ca2+-S100B Reveal Two Protein Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Ansari, Mohd. Imran; Pierce, Adam D.; Wilder, Paul T.; McKnight, Laura E.; Raman, E. Prabhu; Neau, David B.; Bezawada, Padmavani; Alasady, Milad J.; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Varney, Kristen M.; Toth, Eric A.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Coop, Andrew; Weber, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The drug pentamidine inhibits calcium-dependent complex formation with p53 (CaS100B•p53) in malignant melanoma (MM), and restores p53 tumor suppressor activity in vivo. However, off-target effects associated with this drug were problematic in MM patients. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were therefore completed here with 23 pentamidine analogues, and X-ray structures of CaS100B•inhibitor complexes revealed that the C-terminus of S100B adopts two different conformations, with location of Phe-87 and Phe-88 being the distinguishing feature and termed the “FF-Gate”. For symmetric pentamidine analogues (CaS100B•5a, CaS100B•6b) a channel between Sites 1 and 2 on S100B was occluded by residue Phe-88, but for an asymmetric pentamidine analogue (CaS100B•17), this same channel was open. The CaS100B•17 structure illustrates, for the first time, a pentamidine analog capable of binding the “open” form of the “FF-gate” and provides a means to block all three “hot spots” on CaS100B, which will impact next generation CaS100B•p53 inhibitor design. PMID:26727270

  19. Pharmacokinetic drivers of toxicity for basic molecules: Strategy to lower pKa results in decreased tissue exposure and toxicity for a small molecule Met inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Dolores; Ford, Kevin A.; Hartley, Dylan P.; Harstad, Eric B.; Cain, Gary R.; Achilles-Poon, Kirsten; Nguyen, Trung; Peng, Jing; Zheng, Zhong; Merchant, Mark; Sutherlin, Daniel P.; Gaudino, John J.; Kaus, Robert; Lewin-Koh, Sock C.; Choo, Edna F.; Liederer, Bianca M.; Dambach, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Several toxicities are clearly driven by free drug concentrations in plasma, such as toxicities related to on-target exaggerated pharmacology or off-target pharmacological activity associated with receptors, enzymes or ion channels. However, there are examples in which organ toxicities appear to correlate better with total drug concentrations in the target tissues, rather than with free drug concentrations in plasma. Here we present a case study in which a small molecule Met inhibitor, GEN-203, with significant liver and bone marrow toxicity in preclinical species was modified with the intention of increasing the safety margin. GEN-203 is a lipophilic weak base as demonstrated by its physicochemical and structural properties: high LogD (distribution coefficient) (4.3) and high measured pKa (7.45) due to the basic amine (N-ethyl-3-fluoro-4-aminopiperidine). The physicochemical properties of GEN-203 were hypothesized to drive the high distribution of this compound to tissues as evidenced by a moderately-high volume of distribution (Vd > 3 l/kg) in mouse and subsequent toxicities of the compound. Specifically, the basicity of GEN-203 was decreased through addition of a second fluorine in the 3-position of the aminopiperidine to yield GEN-890 (N-ethyl-3,3-difluoro-4-aminopiperidine), which decreased the volume of distribution of the compound in mouse (Vd = 1.0 l/kg), decreased its tissue drug concentrations and led to decreased toxicity in mice. This strategy suggests that when toxicity is driven by tissue drug concentrations, optimization of the physicochemical parameters that drive tissue distribution can result in decreased drug concentrations in tissues, resulting in lower toxicity and improved safety margins. -- Highlights: ► Lower pKa for a small molecule: reduced tissue drug levels and toxicity. ► New analysis tools to assess electrostatic effects and ionization are presented. ► Chemical and PK drivers of toxicity can be leveraged to improve safety.

  20. The Sulfamate Small Molecule CAIX Inhibitor S4 Modulates Doxorubicin Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Niemans, Raymon; Lieuwes, Natasja G.; Biemans, Rianne; Telfer, Brian A.; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Yaromina, Ala; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig J.; Williams, Kaye J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a tumor-specific protein that is upregulated during hypoxic conditions where it is involved in maintaining the pH balance. CAIX causes extracellular acidification, thereby limiting the uptake of weak basic chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, and decreasing its efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine if doxorubicin efficacy can be increased when combined with the selective sulfamate CAIX inhibitor S4. The effect of S4 on doxorubicin efficacy was tested in vitro using cell viability assays with MDA-MB-231, FaDu, HT29 –CAIX high and HT29 –CAIX low cell lines. In addition, the efficacy of this combination therapy was investigated in tumor xenografts of the same cell lines. The addition of S4 in vitro increased the efficacy of doxorubicin in the MDA-MB-231 during hypoxic exposure (IC50 is 0.25 versus 0.14 µM, p = 0.0003). Similar results were observed for HT29—CAIX high with S4 during normoxia (IC50 is 0.20 versus 0.08 µM, p<0.0001) and in the HT29 –CAIX low cells (IC50 is 0.09 µM, p<0.0001). In vivo doxorubicin treatment was only effective in the MDA-MB-231 xenografts, but the efficacy of doxorubicin was decreased when combined with S4. In conclusion, the efficacy of doxorubicin treatment can be increased when combined with the selective sulfamate CAIX inhibitor S4 in vitro in certain cell lines. Nevertheless, in xenografts S4 did not enhance doxorubicin efficacy in the FaDu and HT29 tumor models and decreased doxorubicin efficacy in the MDA-MB-231 tumor model. These results stress the importance of better understanding the role of CAIX inhibitors in intratumoral pH regulation before combining them with standard treatment modalities, such as doxorubicin. PMID:27513947

  1. Therapeutic strategies for metabolic diseases: Small-molecule diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ravi; Obiang-Obounou, Brice W; Kim, Minkyoung; Choi, Yongseok; Lee, Hyun Sun; Lee, Kyeong

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic diseases such as atherogenic dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and type II diabetes are emerging as major global health problems. Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) is responsible for catalyzing the final reaction in the glycerol phosphate pathway of triglycerol synthesis. It has two isoforms, DGAT-1 and DGAT-2, which are widely expressed and present in white adipose tissue. DGAT-1 is most highly expressed in the small intestine, whereas DGAT-2 is primarily expressed in the liver. Therefore, the selective inhibition of DGAT-1 has become an attractive target with growing potential for the treatment of obesity and type II diabetes. Furthermore, DGAT-2 has been suggested as a new target for the treatment of DGAT-2-related liver diseases including hepatic steatosis, hepatic injury, and fibrosis. In view the discovery of drugs that target DGAT, herein we attempt to provide insight into the scope and further reasons for optimization of DGAT inhibitors.

  2. Characterization of EHop-016, novel small molecule inhibitor of Rac GTPase.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Ortiz, Brenda L; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Hernández, Eliud; Humphries-Bickley, Tessa; De la Mota-Peynado, Alina; Cubano, Luis A; Vlaar, Cornelis P; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2012-04-13

    The Rho GTPase Rac regulates actin cytoskeleton reorganization to form cell surface extensions (lamellipodia) required for cell migration/invasion during cancer metastasis. Rac hyperactivation and overexpression are associated with aggressive cancers; thus, interference of the interaction of Rac with its direct upstream activators, guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), is a viable strategy for inhibiting Rac activity. We synthesized EHop-016, a novel inhibitor of Rac activity, based on the structure of the established Rac/Rac GEF inhibitor NSC23766. Herein, we demonstrate that EHop-016 inhibits Rac activity in the MDA-MB-435 metastatic cancer cells that overexpress Rac and exhibits high endogenous Rac activity. The IC(50) of 1.1 μM for Rac inhibition by EHop-016 is ∼100-fold lower than for NSC23766. EHop-016 is specific for Rac1 and Rac3 at concentrations of ≤5 μM. At higher concentrations, EHop-016 inhibits the close homolog Cdc42. In MDA-MB-435 cells that demonstrate high active levels of the Rac GEF Vav2, EHop-016 inhibits the association of Vav2 with a nucleotide-free Rac1(G15A), which has a high affinity for activated GEFs. EHop-016 also inhibits the Rac activity of MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells and reduces Rac-directed lamellipodia formation in both cell lines. EHop-016 decreases Rac downstream effects of PAK1 (p21-activated kinase 1) activity and directed migration of metastatic cancer cells. Moreover, at effective concentrations (<5 μM), EHop-016 does not affect the viability of transformed mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and reduces viability of MDA-MB-435 cells by only 20%. Therefore, EHop-016 holds promise as a targeted therapeutic agent for the treatment of metastatic cancers with high Rac activity.

  3. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, P.; Hema, M.; Kaur, Gurmeet; Sridharan, V.; Prabu, P. C.; Sumana, M. N.; Princy, S. Adline

    2015-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA) is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent development, the study aims to develop a potential drug molecule targeting the SarA of S. aureus to combat biofilm associated infections in which it is involved. In our previous studies, we have reported the antibiofilm activity of SarA based biofilm inhibitor, (SarABI) with a 50% minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50) value of 200 μg/mL against S. aureus associated with vascular graft infections and also the antibiofilm activity of the root ethanolic extracts of Melia dubia against uropathogenic E. coli. In the present study, in silico design of a hybrid molecule composed of a molecule screened from M. dubia root ethanolic extracts and a modified SarA based inhibitor (SarABIM) was undertaken. SarABIM is a modified form of SarABI where the fluorine groups are absent in SarABIM. Chemical synthesis of the hybrid molecule, 4-(Benzylamino)cyclohexyl 2-hydroxycinnamate (henceforth referred to as UTI Quorum-Quencher, UTIQQ) was then performed, followed by in vitro and in vivo validation. The MBIC50 and MBIC90 of UTIQQ were found to be 15 and 65 μg/mL, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images witnessed biofilm reduction and bacterial killing in either UTIQQ or in combined use of antibiotic gentamicin and UTIQQ. Similar results were observed with in vivo studies of experimental UTI in rat model. So, we propose that the drug UTIQQ would be a promising candidate when used alone or, in combination with an antibiotic for staphylococcal associated UTI. PMID

  4. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, P; Hema, M; Kaur, Gurmeet; Sridharan, V; Prabu, P C; Sumana, M N; Princy, S Adline

    2015-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA) is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent development, the study aims to develop a potential drug molecule targeting the SarA of S. aureus to combat biofilm associated infections in which it is involved. In our previous studies, we have reported the antibiofilm activity of SarA based biofilm inhibitor, (SarABI) with a 50% minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50) value of 200 μg/mL against S. aureus associated with vascular graft infections and also the antibiofilm activity of the root ethanolic extracts of Melia dubia against uropathogenic E. coli. In the present study, in silico design of a hybrid molecule composed of a molecule screened from M. dubia root ethanolic extracts and a modified SarA based inhibitor (SarABI(M)) was undertaken. SarABI(M) is a modified form of SarABI where the fluorine groups are absent in SarABI(M). Chemical synthesis of the hybrid molecule, 4-(Benzylamino)cyclohexyl 2-hydroxycinnamate (henceforth referred to as UTI Quorum-Quencher, UTI(QQ)) was then performed, followed by in vitro and in vivo validation. The MBIC50 and MBIC90 of UTI(QQ) were found to be 15 and 65 μg/mL, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images witnessed biofilm reduction and bacterial killing in either UTI(QQ) or in combined use of antibiotic gentamicin and UTI (QQ) . Similar results were observed with in vivo studies of experimental UTI in rat model. So, we propose that the drug UTI(QQ) would be a promising candidate when used alone or, in combination with an antibiotic for staphylococcal

  5. Structure-based approach to improve a small-molecule inhibitor by the use of a competitive peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuki; Takeuchi, Koh; Ueda, Hiroshi; Morita, Yasuhiro; Tanimura, Ryuji; Shimada, Ichio; Takahashi, Hideo

    2014-03-01

    Structural information about the target-compound complex is invaluable in the early stage of drug discovery. In particular, it is important to know into which part of the initial compound additional interaction sites could be introduced to improve its affinity. Herein, we demonstrate that the affinity of a small-molecule inhibitor for its target protein could be successfully improved by the constructive introduction of the interaction mode of a competitive peptide. The strategy involved the discrimination of overlapping and non-overlapping peptide-compound pharmacophores by the use of a ligand-based NMR spectroscopic approach, INPHARMA. The obtained results enabled the design of a new compound with improved affinity for the platelet receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). The approach proposed herein efficiently combines the advantages of compounds and peptides for the development of higher-affinity druglike ligands.

  6. The pharmacology and therapeutic potential of small molecule inhibitors of acid-sensing ion channels in stroke intervention

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Tian-dong; Xiong, Zhi-gang

    2013-01-01

    In the nervous system, a decrease in extracellular pH is a common feature of various physiological and pathological processes, including synaptic transmission, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, brain trauma, and tissue inflammation. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. Following the recent identification of ASICs as critical acid-sensing extracellular proton receptors, growing evidence has suggested that the activation of ASICs plays important roles in physiological processes such as nociception, mechanosensation, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. However, the over-activation of ASICs is also linked to adverse outcomes for certain pathological processes, such as brain ischemia and multiple sclerosis. Based on the well-demonstrated role of ASIC1a activation in acidosis-mediated brain injury, small molecule inhibitors of ASIC1a may represent novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurological disorders, such as stroke. PMID:22820909

  7. Carboxylated, heteroaryl-substituted chalcones as inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression for use in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q; Ni, Liming; Worsencroft, Kimberly J; Ye, Zhihong; Weingarten, M David; Simpson, Jacob E; Skudlarek, Jason W; Marino, Elaine M; Suen, Ki-Ling; Kunsch, Charles; Souder, Amy; Howard, Randy B; Sundell, Cynthia L; Wasserman, Martin A; Sikorski, James A

    2007-03-22

    Starting from a simple chalcone template, structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to a series of carboxylated, heteroaryl-substituted chalcone derivatives as novel, potent inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression. Correlations between lipophilicity determined by calculated logP values and inhibitory efficacy were observed among structurally similar compounds of the series. Various substituents were found to be tolerated at several positions of the chalcone backbone as long as the compounds fell into the right range of lipophilicity. The chalcone alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone moiety seemed to be the pharmacophore required for inhibition of VCAM-1 expression. Compound 19 showed significant antiinflammatory effects in a mouse model of allergic inflammation, indicating that this series of compounds might have therapeutic value for human asthma and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:17323940

  8. Identification of a small molecule yeast TORC1 inhibitor with a flow cytometry-based multiplex screen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Young, Susan M.; Allen, Chris; Seeber, Andrew; Péli-Gulli, Marie-Pierre; Panchaud, Nicolas; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Yao, Tuanli; Golden, Jennifer E.; Strouse, J. Jacob; Carter, Mark B.; Kang, Huining; Bologa, Cristian G.; Foutz, Terry D.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Peterson, Blake R.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Werner-Washburne, Margaret; Loewith, Robbie J.; De Virgilio, Claudio; Sklar, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) is a serine/threonine kinase, evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human, which functions as a fundamental controller of cell growth. The moderate clinical benefit of rapamycin in mTOR-based therapy of many cancers favors the development of new TOR inhibitors. Here we report a high throughput flow cytometry multiplexed screen using five GFP-tagged yeast clones that represent the readouts of four branches of the TORC1 signaling pathway in budding yeast. Each GFP-tagged clone was differentially color-coded and the GFP signal of each clone was measured simultaneously by flow cytometry, which allows rapid prioritization of compounds that likely act through direct modulation of TORC1 or proximal signaling components. A total of 255 compounds were confirmed in dose-response analysis to alter GFP expression in one or more clones. To validate the concept of the high throughput screen, we have characterized CID 3528206, a small molecule most likely to act on TORC1 as it alters GFP expression in all five GFP clones in an analogous manner to rapamycin. We have shown that CID 3528206 inhibited yeast cell growth, and that CID 3528206 inhibited TORC1 activity both in vitro and in vivo with EC50s of 150 nM and 3.9 μM, respectively. The results of microarray analysis and yeast GFP collection screen further support the notion that CID 3528206 and rapamycin modulate similar cellular pathways. Together, these results indicate that the HTS has identified a potentially useful small molecule for further development of TOR inhibitors. PMID:22260433

  9. Metronomic Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) Is Antiangiogenic and Potentiates the Antitumor Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Benjamin D.; Spalding, Aaron C.; Campos, Marcia S.; Ashimori, Naoki; Dong Zhihong; Wang Shaomeng; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Noer, Jacques E.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of a metronomic (low-dose, high-frequency) small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) in combination with radiotherapy on microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Methods and Materials: Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to ionizing radiation and/or TW-37 and colony formation, as well as capillary sprouting in three-dimensional collagen matrices, was evaluated. Xenografts vascularized with human blood vessels were engineered by cotransplantation of human squamous cell carcinoma cells (OSCC3) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells seeded in highly porous biodegradable scaffolds into the subcutaneous space of immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with metronomic TW-37 and/or radiation, and tumor growth was evaluated. Results: Low-dose TW-37 sensitized primary endothelial cells to radiation-induced inhibition of colony formation. Low-dose TW-37 or radiation partially inhibited endothelial cell sprout formation, and in combination, these therapies abrogated new sprouting. Combination of metronomic TW-37 and low-dose radiation inhibited tumor growth and resulted in significant increase in time to failure compared with controls, whereas single agents did not. Notably, histopathologic analysis revealed that tumors treated with TW-37 (with or without radiation) are more differentiated and showed more cohesive invasive fronts, which is consistent with less aggressive phenotype. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that metronomic TW-37 potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy and suggest that patients with head and neck cancer might benefit from the combination of small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 and radiation therapy.

  10. Z3, a Novel Jak2 Tyrosine Kinase Small Molecule Inhibitor that Suppresses Jak2-mediated Pathologic Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sayyah, Jacqueline; Magis, Andrew; Ostrov, David A.; Allan, Robert W.; Braylan, Raul C.; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2008-01-01

    Jak2 tyrosine kinase is essential for animal development and hyper-kinetic Jak2 function has been linked to a host of human diseases. Control of this pathway using Jak2-specific inhibitors would therefore potentially serve as a useful research tool and/or therapeutic agent. Here, we used a high throughput program called DOCK, to predict the ability of 20,000 small molecules to interact with a structural pocket adjacent to the ATP binding site of murine Jak2. One small molecule, 2-methyl-1-phenyl-4-pyridin-2-yl-2-(2-pyridin-2-ylethyl)butan-1-one (herein designated as Z3) bound to Jak2 with a favorable energy score. Z3 inhibited Jak2-V617F and Jak2-WT autophosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, but was not cytotoxic to cells at concentrations that inhibited kinase activity. Z3 selectively inhibited Jak2 kinase function with no effect of Tyk2 or c-Src kinase function. Z3 significantly inhibited proliferation of the Jak2-V617F-expressing, human erythroleukemia cell line, HEL 92.1.7. The Z3-mediated reduction in cell proliferation correlated with reduced Jak2 and STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation levels as well as marked cell cycle arrest. Finally, Z3 inhibited the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow of an essential thrombocythemia patient harboring the Jak2-V617F mutation and a polycythemia vera patient carrying a Jak2-F537I mutation. Collectively, the data suggest that Z3 is a novel specific inhibitor of Jak2 tyrosine kinase. PMID:18723478

  11. Lifting the mask: identification of new small molecule inhibitors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli group 2 capsule biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goller, Carlos C; Arshad, Mehreen; Noah, James W; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Evans, Carrie W; Nebane, N Miranda; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sosa, Melinda; Tower, Nichole A; White, E Lucile; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Porubsky, Patrick; Maki, Brooks E; Rogers, Steven A; Schoenen, Frank; Seed, Patrick C

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs), with over 100 million UTIs occurring annually throughout the world. Increasing antimicrobial resistance among UPEC limits ambulatory care options, delays effective treatment, and may increase overall morbidity and mortality from complications such as urosepsis. The polysaccharide capsules of UPEC are an attractive target a therapeutic, based on their importance in defense against the host immune responses; however, the large number of antigenic types has limited their incorporation into vaccine development. The objective of this study was to identify small-molecule inhibitors of UPEC capsule biogenesis. A large-scale screening effort entailing 338,740 compounds was conducted in a cell-based, phenotypic screen for inhibition of capsule biogenesis in UPEC. The primary and concentration-response assays yielded 29 putative inhibitors of capsule biogenesis, of which 6 were selected for further studies. Secondary confirmatory assays identified two highly active agents, named DU003 and DU011, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 1.0 µM and 0.69 µM, respectively. Confirmatory assays for capsular antigen and biochemical measurement of capsular sugars verified the inhibitory action of both compounds and demonstrated minimal toxicity and off-target effects. Serum sensitivity assays demonstrated that both compounds produced significant bacterial death upon exposure to active human serum. DU011 administration in mice provided near complete protection against a lethal systemic infection with the prototypic UPEC K1 isolate UTI89. This work has provided a conceptually new class of molecules to combat UPEC infection, and future studies will establish the molecular basis for their action along with efficacy in UTI and other UPEC infections.

  12. A small molecule inhibitor of redox-regulated protein translocation into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Deepa V; Hasson, Samuel A; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Johnson, Meghan E; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Douglas, Colin J; Zimmerman, Johannes; Damoiseaux, Robert; Teitell, Michael A; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-04-15

    The mitochondrial disulfide relay system of Mia40 and Erv1/ALR facilitates import of the small translocase of the inner membrane (Tim) proteins and cysteine-rich proteins. A chemical screen identified small molecules that inhibit Erv1 oxidase activity, thereby facilitating dissection of the disulfide relay system in yeast and vertebrate mitochondria. One molecule, mitochondrial protein import blockers from the Carla Koehler laboratory (MitoBloCK-6), attenuated the import of Erv1 substrates into yeast mitochondria and inhibited oxidation of Tim13 and Cmc1 in in vitro reconstitution assays. In addition, MitoBloCK-6 revealed an unexpected role for Erv1 in the carrier import pathway, namely transferring substrates from the translocase of the outer membrane complex onto the small Tim complexes. Cardiac development was impaired in MitoBloCK-6-exposed zebrafish embryos. Finally, MitoBloCK-6 induced apoptosis via cytochrome c release in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) but not in differentiated cells, suggesting an important role for ALR in hESC homeostasis.

  13. A High-Throughput Small Molecule Screen for C. elegans Linker Cell Death Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schwendeman, Andrew R.; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process in metazoan development. Apoptosis, one cell death form, has been studied extensively. However, mutations inactivating key mammalian apoptosis regulators do not block most developmental cell culling, suggesting that other cell death pathways are likely important. Recent work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans identified a non-apoptotic cell death form mediating the demise of the male-specific linker cell. This cell death process (LCD, linker cell-type death) is morphologically conserved, and its molecular effectors also mediate axon degeneration in mammals and Drosophila. To develop reagents to manipulate LCD, we established a simple high-throughput screening protocol for interrogating the effects of small molecules on C. elegans linker cell death in vivo. From 23,797 compounds assayed, 11 reproducibly block linker cell death onset. Of these, five induce animal lethality, and six promote a reversible developmental delay. These results provide proof-of principle validation of our screening protocol, demonstrate that developmental progression is required for linker cell death, and suggest that larger scale screens may identify LCD-specific small-molecule regulators that target the LCD execution machinery. PMID:27716809

  14. Effect of small-molecule modification on single-cell pharmacokinetics of PARP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer H; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging, given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and intertumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small-molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small-molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model. PMID:24552776

  15. Effect of Small Molecule Modification on Single Cell Pharmacokinetics of PARP Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model. PMID:24552776

  16. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. 20/34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access substrate DNA cytosines. PMID:22181350

  17. The identification of inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni miracidial transformation by incorporating a medium-throughput small-molecule screen.

    PubMed

    Taft, Andrew S; Norante, Francesca A; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2010-06-01

    In Schistosoma mansoni, the miracidium-to-primary sporocyst transformation process is associated with many physiological, morphological, transcriptional and biochemical changes. In the present study, we use a medium-throughput small-molecule screen to identify chemical compounds inhibiting or delaying the in vitro transformation of miracidia to the sporocyst stage. The Sigma-Aldrich Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) contains 1280 well-characterized chemical compounds with various modes of action including enzyme inhibitors, antibiotics, cell-cycle regulators, apoptosis inducers and GPCR ligands. We identified 47 compounds that greatly reduce or delay this transformation process during a primary screen of live miracidia. The majority of compounds inhibiting larval transformation were from dopaminergic, serotonergic, ion channel and phosphorylation classes. Specifically, we found that dopamine D2-type antagonists, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, voltage-gated calcium channel antagonists and a PKC activator significantly reduced in vitro miracidial transformation rates. Many of the targets of these compounds regulate adenylyl cyclase activity, with the inhibition or activation of these targets resulting in increased cAMP levels in miracidia and concomitant blocking/delaying of larval transformation. PMID:20060828

  18. Modification and structure-activity relationship of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingsong; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso; Song, Haijing; Redfield, Robert; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes selected modification and structure-activity relationship of the small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, 4-benzoyl-1-[(4-methoxy-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)oxoacetyl]-2-(R)-methylpiperazine (BMS-378806). The results revealed: i) that both the presence and configuration (R vs. S) of the 3-methyl group on the piperazine moiety are important for the antiviral activity, with the 3-(R)-methyl derivatives showing the highest activity; ii) that the electronegativity of the C-4 substituent on the indole or azaindole ring seems to be important for the activity, with a small, electron-donating group such as a fluoro or a methoxy group showing enhanced activity, while a nitro group diminishes the activity; iii) that the N-1 position of the indole ring is not eligible for modification without losing activity; and iv) that bulky groups around the C-4 position of the indole or azaindole ring diminish the activity, probably due to steric hindrance in the binding. We found that a synthetic bivalent compound with two BMS-378806 moieties being tethered by a spacer demonstrated about 5-fold enhanced activity in an nM range against HIV-1 infection than the corresponding monomeric inhibitor. But the polyacrylamide-based polyvalent compounds did not show inhibitory activity at up to 200 nM.

  19. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of influenza A virus acts by suppressing PA endonuclease activity of the viral polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Singh, Kailash; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Kao, Richard Y. T.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus comprises conserved and independently-folded subdomains with defined functionalities. The N-terminal domain of the PA subunit (PAN) harbors the endonuclease function so that it can serve as a desired target for drug discovery. To identify a class of anti-influenza inhibitors that impedes PAN endonuclease activity, a screening approach that integrated the fluorescence resonance energy transfer based endonuclease inhibitory assay with the DNA gel-based endonuclease inhibitory assay was conducted, followed by the evaluation of antiviral efficacies and potential cytotoxicity of the primary hits in vitro and in vivo. A small-molecule compound ANA-0 was identified as a potent inhibitor against the replication of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2, in cell cultures. Combinational treatment of zanamivir and ANA-0 exerted synergistic anti-influenza effect in vitro. Intranasal administration of ANA-0 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. In summary, ANA-0 shows potential to be developed to novel anti-influenza agents. PMID:26956222

  20. PET imaging demonstrates histone deacetylase target engagement and clarifies brain penetrance of known and novel small molecule inhibitors in rat.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, F A; Wang, C; Van de Bittner, G C; Neelamegam, R; Takakura, W R; Karunakaran, A; Wey, H Y; Reis, S A; Gale, J; Zhang, Y L; Holson, E B; Haggarty, S J; Hooker, J M

    2014-10-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes have been demonstrated as critical components in maintaining chromatin homeostasis, CNS development, and normal brain function. Evidence in mouse models links HDAC expression to learning, memory, and mood-related behaviors; small molecule HDAC inhibitor tool compounds have been used to demonstrate the importance of specific HDAC subtypes in modulating CNS-disease-related behaviors in rodents. So far, no direct evidence exists to understand the quantitative changes in HDAC target engagement that are necessary to alter biochemistry and behavior in a living animal. Understanding the relationship between target engagement and in vivo effect is essential in refining new ways to alleviate disease. We describe here, using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of rat brain, the in vivo target engagement of a subset of class I/IIb HDAC enzymes implicated in CNS-disease (HDAC subtypes 1, 2, 3, and 6). We found marked differences in the brain penetrance of tool compounds from the hydroxamate and benzamide HDAC inhibitor classes and resolved a novel, highly brain penetrant benzamide, CN147, chronic treatment with which resulted in an antidepressant-like effect in a rat behavioral test. Our work highlights a new translational path for understanding the molecular and behavioral consequences of HDAC target engagement. PMID:25188794

  1. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  2. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of ITK and RLK Impairs Th1 Differentiation and Prevents Colitis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyoung-Soo; Shin, Hyun Mu; Haberstock-Debic, Helena; Xing, Yan; Owens, Timothy D.; Funk, Jens Oliver; Hill, Ronald J.; Bradshaw, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    In T cells, the Tec kinases IL-2–inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and resting lymphocyte kinase (RLK) are activated by TCR stimulation and are required for optimal downstream signaling. Studies of CD4+ T cells from Itk−/− and Itk−/−Rlk−/− mice have indicated differential roles of ITK and RLK in Th1, Th2, and Th17 differentiation and cytokine production. However, these findings are confounded by the complex T cell developmental defects in these mice. In this study, we examine the consequences of ITK and RLK inhibition using a highly selective and potent small molecule covalent inhibitor PRN694. In vitro Th polarization experiments indicate that PRN694 is a potent inhibitor of Th1 and Th17 differentiation and cytokine production. Using a T cell adoptive transfer model of colitis, we find that in vivo administration of PRN694 markedly reduces disease progression, T cell infiltration into the intestinal lamina propria, and IFN-γ production by colitogenic CD4+ T cells. Consistent with these findings, Th1 and Th17 cells differentiated in the presence of PRN694 show reduced P-selectin binding and impaired migration to CXCL11 and CCL20, respectively. Taken together, these data indicate that ITK plus RLK inhibition may have therapeutic potential in Th1-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26466958

  3. Modification and structure-activity relationship of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingsong; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso; Song, Haijing; Redfield, Robert; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes selected modification and structure-activity relationship of the small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, 4-benzoyl-1-[(4-methoxy-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)oxoacetyl]-2-(R)-methylpiperazine (BMS-378806). The results revealed: i) that both the presence and configuration (R vs. S) of the 3-methyl group on the piperazine moiety are important for the antiviral activity, with the 3-(R)-methyl derivatives showing the highest activity; ii) that the electronegativity of the C-4 substituent on the indole or azaindole ring seems to be important for the activity, with a small, electron-donating group such as a fluoro or a methoxy group showing enhanced activity, while a nitro group diminishes the activity; iii) that the N-1 position of the indole ring is not eligible for modification without losing activity; and iv) that bulky groups around the C-4 position of the indole or azaindole ring diminish the activity, probably due to steric hindrance in the binding. We found that a synthetic bivalent compound with two BMS-378806 moieties being tethered by a spacer demonstrated about 5-fold enhanced activity in an nM range against HIV-1 infection than the corresponding monomeric inhibitor. But the polyacrylamide-based polyvalent compounds did not show inhibitory activity at up to 200 nM. PMID:15858664

  4. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Pseudaminic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway: Targeting Motility as a Key Bacterial Virulence Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Robert; Schoenhofen, Ian C.; Tao, Limei; Aubry, Annie; Bouchard, Patrice; Reid, Christopher W.; Lachance, Paule; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Cui, Qizhi; Hogues, Hervé; Purisima, Enrico O.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is motile by means of polar flagella, and this motility has been shown to play a critical role in pathogenicity. The major structural flagellin proteins have been shown to be glycosylated with the nonulosonate sugar, pseudaminic acid (Pse). This glycan is unique to microorganisms, and the process of flagellin glycosylation is required for H. pylori flagellar assembly and consequent motility. As such, the Pse biosynthetic pathway offers considerable potential as an antivirulence drug target, especially since motility is required for H. pylori colonization and persistence in the host. This report describes screening the five Pse biosynthetic enzymes for small-molecule inhibitors using both high-throughput screening (HTS) and in silico (virtual screening [VS]) approaches. Using a 100,000-compound library, 1,773 hits that exhibited a 40% threshold inhibition at a 10 μM concentration were identified by HTS. In addition, VS efforts using a 1.6-million compound library directed at two pathway enzymes identified 80 hits, 4 of which exhibited reasonable inhibition at a 10 μM concentration in vitro. Further secondary screening which identified 320 unique molecular structures or validated hits was performed. Following kinetic studies and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of selected inhibitors from our refined list of 320 compounds, we demonstrated that three inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of approximately 14 μM, which belonged to a distinct chemical cluster, were able to penetrate the Gram-negative cell membrane and prevent formation of flagella. PMID:25267679

  5. Small molecule inhibitor of the bone morphogenetic protein pathway DMH1 reduces ovarian cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Hover, Laura D; Young, Christian D; Bhola, Neil E; Wilson, Andrew J; Khabele, Dineo; Hong, Charles C; Moses, Harold L; Owens, Philip

    2015-11-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway belonging to the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFβ) family of secreted cytokines/growth factors is an important regulator of cancer. BMP ligands have been shown to play both tumor suppressive and promoting roles in human cancers. We have found that BMP ligands are amplified in human ovarian cancers and that BMP receptor expression correlates with poor progression-free-survival (PFS). Furthermore, active BMP signaling has been observed in human ovarian cancer tissue. We also determined that ovarian cancer cell lines have active BMP signaling in a cell autonomous fashion. Inhibition of BMP signaling with a small molecule receptor kinase antagonist is effective at reducing ovarian tumor sphere growth. Furthermore, BMP inhibition can enhance sensitivity to Cisplatin treatment and regulates gene expression involved in platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Overall, these studies suggest targeting the BMP pathway as a novel source to enhance chemo-sensitivity in ovarian cancer.

  6. Small-molecule inhibitors of gram-negative lipoprotein trafficking discovered by phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Sarah M; Fleming, Paul R; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E; Whiteaker, James D; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A

    2015-03-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25583975

  7. Orally Available Small-Molecule Polymerase Inhibitor Cures a Lethal Morbillivirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Stefanie A; Yan, Dan; Hovingh, Elise S; Evers, Taylor J; Enkirch, Theresa; Reddy, G. Prabhakar; Sun, Aiming; Saindane, Manohar T; Arrendale, Richard F; Painter, George; Liotta, Dennis C; Natchus, Michael G; von Messling, Veronika; Plemper, Richard K

    2014-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly infectious morbillivirus responsible for major human morbidity and mortality in the non-vaccinated. The related, zoonotic canine distemper virus (CDV) induces morbillivirus disease in ferrets with 100% lethality. We report an orally available, shelf-stable pan-morbillivirus inhibitor that targets the viral polymerase. Prophylactic oral treatment of ferrets infected intranasally with a lethal CDV dose reduced viremia and prolonged survival. Equally infected ferrets receiving post-infection treatment at the onset of viremia showed low-grade viral loads, remained asymptomatic and recovered from infection, while control animals succumbed to the disease. Recovered animals also mounted a robust immune response and were protected against re-challenge with a lethal CDV dose. Drug-resistant viral recombinants were generated and found attenuated and transmission impaired compared to the genetic parent. These findings pioneer a path towards an effective morbillivirus therapy that aids measles eradication by synergizing vaccine and therapeutics to close herd immunity gaps due to vaccine refusal. PMID:24739760

  8. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors mitigate red blood cell lysis during freezing, transient warming and thawing.

    PubMed

    Briard, Jennie G; Poisson, Jessica S; Turner, Tracey R; Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Acker, Jason P; Ben, Robert N

    2016-03-29

    During cryopreservation, ice recrystallization is a major cause of cellular damage. Conventional cryoprotectants such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol function by a number of different mechanisms but do not mitigate or control ice recrystallization at concentrations utilized in cryopreservation procedures. In North America, cryopreservation of human red blood cells (RBCs) utilizes high concentrations of glycerol. RBC units frozen under these conditions must be subjected to a time-consuming deglycerolization process after thawing in order to remove the glycerol to <1% prior to transfusion thus limiting the use of frozen RBC units in emergency situations. We have identified several low molecular mass ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) that are effective cryoprotectants for human RBCs, resulting in 70-80% intact RBCs using only 15% glycerol and slow freezing rates. These compounds are capable of reducing the average ice crystal size of extracellular ice relative to a 15% glycerol control validating the positive correlation between a reduction in ice crystal size and increased post-thaw recovery of RBCs. The most potent IRI from this study is also capable of protecting frozen RBCs against the large temperature fluctuations associated with transient warming.

  9. The sterol biosynthesis inhibitor molecule fenhexamid impacts the vegetative compatibility of Glomus clarum.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Flores, Antonio; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie; Draye, Xavier; Guillet, Alain; Govaerts, Bernadette; Declerck, Stéphane

    2011-07-01

    The vegetative compatibility of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus clarum MUCL 46238 was evaluated after continuous exposure to fenhexamid, a sterol biosynthesis inhibitor (SBI). Three lineages of this AMF were cultured in vitro for five generations in association with Ri T-DNA transformed carrot roots in the presence of 0, 5 or 10 mg l(-1) of fenhexamid. Whatever the AMF generation, fenhexamid at 5 and 10 mg l(-1) had no significant impact on the number of spores produced. However, vegetative compatibility tests (VCT) conducted with spores from the three lineages, in the presence of 10 mg l(-1) of fenhexamid, impacted the anastomosis process. At this concentration, the morphology of the germ tubes was modified. In addition, nitrotetrazolium-trypan blue staining revealed that 10 mg l(-l) of fenhexamid significantly reduced the probability of fusion between the germ tubes regardless of the culture conditions (i.e. absence or presence of fenhexamid) preceding the VCT. Our results demonstrated that spore production was not affected by fenhexamid, while anastomosis between germ tubes was decreased. This suggested that high concentrations, accumulation or repeated application of this SBI fungicide may impact the community structure of AMF in soil.

  10. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors mitigate red blood cell lysis during freezing, transient warming and thawing

    PubMed Central

    Briard, Jennie G.; Poisson, Jessica S.; Turner, Tracey R.; Capicciotti, Chantelle J.; Acker, Jason P.; Ben, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    During cryopreservation, ice recrystallization is a major cause of cellular damage. Conventional cryoprotectants such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol function by a number of different mechanisms but do not mitigate or control ice recrystallization at concentrations utilized in cryopreservation procedures. In North America, cryopreservation of human red blood cells (RBCs) utilizes high concentrations of glycerol. RBC units frozen under these conditions must be subjected to a time-consuming deglycerolization process after thawing in order to remove the glycerol to <1% prior to transfusion thus limiting the use of frozen RBC units in emergency situations. We have identified several low molecular mass ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) that are effective cryoprotectants for human RBCs, resulting in 70–80% intact RBCs using only 15% glycerol and slow freezing rates. These compounds are capable of reducing the average ice crystal size of extracellular ice relative to a 15% glycerol control validating the positive correlation between a reduction in ice crystal size and increased post-thaw recovery of RBCs. The most potent IRI from this study is also capable of protecting frozen RBCs against the large temperature fluctuations associated with transient warming. PMID:27021850

  11. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors mitigate red blood cell lysis during freezing, transient warming and thawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Jennie G.; Poisson, Jessica S.; Turner, Tracey R.; Capicciotti, Chantelle J.; Acker, Jason P.; Ben, Robert N.

    2016-03-01

    During cryopreservation, ice recrystallization is a major cause of cellular damage. Conventional cryoprotectants such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol function by a number of different mechanisms but do not mitigate or control ice recrystallization at concentrations utilized in cryopreservation procedures. In North America, cryopreservation of human red blood cells (RBCs) utilizes high concentrations of glycerol. RBC units frozen under these conditions must be subjected to a time-consuming deglycerolization process after thawing in order to remove the glycerol to <1% prior to transfusion thus limiting the use of frozen RBC units in emergency situations. We have identified several low molecular mass ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) that are effective cryoprotectants for human RBCs, resulting in 70-80% intact RBCs using only 15% glycerol and slow freezing rates. These compounds are capable of reducing the average ice crystal size of extracellular ice relative to a 15% glycerol control validating the positive correlation between a reduction in ice crystal size and increased post-thaw recovery of RBCs. The most potent IRI from this study is also capable of protecting frozen RBCs against the large temperature fluctuations associated with transient warming.

  12. Rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors, small molecule antiviral compounds against enveloped viruses

    PubMed Central

    St.Vincent, Mireille R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Muqadas, Muhammad; Joyce, Michael A.; Barsby, Nicola L.; Epand, Raquel F.; Epand, Richard M.; Khramyshev, Stanislav A.; Valueva, Olga A.; Korshun, Vladimir A.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Schang, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral drugs targeting viral proteins often result in prompt selection for resistance. Moreover, the number of viral targets is limited. Novel antiviral targets are therefore needed. The unique characteristics of fusion between virion envelopes and cell membranes may provide such targets. Like all fusing bilayers, viral envelopes locally adopt hourglass-shaped stalks during the initial stages of fusion, a process that requires local negative membrane curvature. Unlike cellular vesicles, however, viral envelopes do not redistribute lipids between leaflets, can only use the energy released by virion proteins, and fuse to the extracellular leaflets of cell membranes. Enrichment in phospholipids with hydrophilic heads larger than their hydrophobic tails in the convex outer leaflet of vesicles favors positive curvature, therefore increasing the activation energy barrier for fusion. Such phospholipids can increase the activation barrier beyond the energy provided by virion proteins, thereby inhibiting viral fusion. However, phospholipids are not pharmacologically useful. We show here that a family of synthetic rigid amphiphiles of shape similar to such phospholipids, RAFIs (rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors), inhibit the infectivity of several otherwise unrelated enveloped viruses, including hepatitis C and HSV-1 and -2 (lowest apparent IC50 48 nM), with no cytotoxic or cytostatic effects (selectivity index > 3,000) by inhibiting the increased negative curvature required for the initial stages of fusion. PMID:20823220

  13. Proapoptotic and antiinvasive activity of Rac1 small molecule inhibitors on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Ciarlantini, Matias; Gandolfi Donadío, Lucia; Comin, María Julieta; Alonso, Daniel F; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by an intrinsic ability to invade diffusely throughout the normal brain tissue. This feature contributes mainly to the failure of existing therapies. Deregulation of small GTPases signaling, in particular Rac1 activity, plays a key role in the invasive phenotype of gliomas. Here we report the effect of ZINC69391, a specific Rac1 inhibitor developed by our group, on human glioma cell lines LN229 and U-87 MG. ZINC69391 is able to interfere with the interaction of Rac1 with Dock180, a relevant Rac1 activator in glioma invasion, and to reduce Rac1-GTP levels. The kinase Pak1, a downstream effector of Dock180–Rac1 signaling, was also downregulated upon ZINC69391 treatment. ZINC69391 reduced cell proliferation, arrested cells in G1 phase, and triggered apoptosis in glioma cells. Importantly, ZINC69391 dramatically affected cell migration and invasion in vitro, interfering with actin cytoskeleton dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of analog 1A-116, a compound derived from ZINC69391 structure. 1A-116 showed an improved antiproliferative and antiinvasive activity on glioma cells. These findings encourage further preclinical testing in clinically relevant animal models. PMID:25378937

  14. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Trafficking Discovered by Phenotypic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Paul R.; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Whiteaker, James D.; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A.

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25583975

  15. Small molecule inhibitors reveal Niemann-Pick C1 is essential for ebolavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Marceline; Misasi, John; Ren, Tao; Bruchez, Anna; Lee, Kyungae; Filone, Claire Marie; Hensley, Lisa; Li, Qi; Ory, Daniel; Chandran, Kartik; Cunningham, James

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ebolavirus (EboV) is a highly pathogenic enveloped virus that causes outbreaks of zoonotic infection in Africa. The clinical symptoms are manifestations of the massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection1 and in many outbreaks, mortality exceeds 75%. The unpredictable onset, ease of transmission, rapid progression of disease, high mortality and lack of effective vaccine or therapy have created a high level of public concern about EboV2. Here we report the identification of a novel benzylpiperazine adamantane diamide-derived compound that inhibits EboV infection. Using mutant cell lines and informative derivatives of the lead compound, we show that the target of the inhibitor is the endosomal membrane protein Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). We find that NPC1 is essential for infection, that it binds to the virus glycoprotein (GP), and that the anti-viral compounds interfere with GP binding to NPC1. Combined with the results of previous studies of GP structure and function, our findings support a model of EboV infection in which cleavage of the GP1 subunit by endosomal cathepsin proteases removes heavily glycosylated domains to expose the N-terminal domain3–7, which is a ligand for NPC1 and regulates membrane fusion by the GP2 subunit8. Thus, NPC1 is essential for EboV entry and a target for anti-viral therapy. PMID:21866101

  16. Structure of MurF from Streptococcus pneumoniae co-crystallized with a small molecule inhibitor exhibits interdomain closure

    SciTech Connect

    Longenecker, Kenton L.; Stamper, Geoffrey F.; Hajduk, Philip J.; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Jakob, Clarissa G.; Harlan, John E.; Edalji, Rohinton; Bartley, Diane M.; Walter, Karl A.; Solomon, Larry R.; Holzman, Thomas F.; Gu, Yu Gui; Lerner, Claude G.; Beutel, Bruce A.; Stoll, Vincent S.

    2010-07-19

    In a broad genomics analysis to find novel protein targets for antibiotic discovery, MurF was identified as an essential gene product for Streptococcus pneumonia that catalyzes a critical reaction in the biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan in the formation of the cell wall. Lacking close relatives in mammalian biology, MurF presents attractive characteristics as a potential drug target. Initial screening of the Abbott small-molecule compound collection identified several compounds for further validation as pharmaceutical leads. Here we report the integrated efforts of NMR and X-ray crystallography, which reveal the multidomain structure of a MurF-inhibitor complex in a compact conformation that differs dramatically from related structures. The lead molecule is bound in the substrate-binding region and induces domain closure, suggestive of the domain arrangement for the as yet unobserved transition state conformation for MurF enzymes. The results form a basis for directed optimization of the compound lead by structure-based design to explore the suitability of MurF as a pharmaceutical target.

  17. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Dual Hotspot Small-Molecule HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    LaLonde, Judith M.; Kwon, Young Do; Jones, David M.; Sun, Alexander W.; Courter, Joel R.; Soeta, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toyoharu; Princiotto, Amy M.; Wu, Xueling; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Smith, III, Amos B.

    2012-06-19

    Cellular infection by HIV-1 is initiated with a binding event between the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the cellular receptor protein CD4. The CD4-gp120 interface is dominated by two hotspots: a hydrophobic gp120 cavity capped by Phe43{sub CD4} and an electrostatic interaction between residues Arg59{sub CD4} and Asp368{sub gp120}. The CD4 mimetic small-molecule NBD-556 (1) binds within the gp120 cavity; however, 1 and related congeners demonstrate limited viral neutralization breadth. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structures of gp120 in complex with small molecules that simultaneously engage both binding hotspots. The compounds specifically inhibit viral infection of 42 tier 2 clades B and C viruses and are shown to be antagonists of entry into CD4-negative cells. Dual hotspot design thus provides both a means to enhance neutralization potency of HIV-1 entry inhibitors and a novel structural paradigm for inhibiting the CD4-gp120 protein-protein interaction.

  18. Small molecule dual-inhibitors of TRPV4 and TRPA1 for attenuation of inflammation and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kanju, Patrick; Chen, Yong; Lee, Whasil; Yeo, Michele; Lee, Suk Hee; Romac, Joelle; Shahid, Rafiq; Fan, Ping; Gooden, David M.; Simon, Sidney A.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Mook, Robert A.; Liddle, Rodger A.; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2016-01-01

    TRPV4 ion channels represent osmo-mechano-TRP channels with pleiotropic function and wide-spread expression. One of the critical functions of TRPV4 in this spectrum is its involvement in pain and inflammation. However, few small-molecule inhibitors of TRPV4 are available. Here we developed TRPV4-inhibitory molecules based on modifications of a known TRPV4-selective tool-compound, GSK205. We not only increased TRPV4-inhibitory potency, but surprisingly also generated two compounds that potently co-inhibit TRPA1, known to function as chemical sensor of noxious and irritant signaling. We demonstrate TRPV4 inhibition by these compounds in primary cells with known TRPV4 expression - articular chondrocytes and astrocytes. Importantly, our novel compounds attenuate pain behavior in a trigeminal irritant pain model that is known to rely on TRPV4 and TRPA1. Furthermore, our novel dual-channel blocker inhibited inflammation and pain-associated behavior in a model of acute pancreatitis – known to also rely on TRPV4 and TRPA1. Our results illustrate proof of a novel concept inherent in our prototype compounds of a drug that targets two functionally-related TRP channels, and thus can be used to combat isoforms of pain and inflammation in-vivo that involve more than one TRP channel. This approach could provide a novel paradigm for treating other relevant health conditions. PMID:27247148

  19. Stimulation of mammalian translation initiation factor eIF4A activity by a small molecule inhibitor of eukaryotic translation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Marie-Eve; Matthews, James; Wojnar, Joanna M.; Lindqvist, Lisa; Novac, Olivia; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Sonenberg, Nahum; Northcote, Peter; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul; Pelletier, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    RNA helicases are the largest group of enzymes in eukaryotic RNA metabolism. The DEXD/H-box putative RNA helicases form the helicase superfamily II, whose members are defined by seven highly conserved amino acid motifs, making specific targeting of selected members a challenging pharmacological problem. The translation initiation factor eIF4A is the prototypical DEAD-box RNA helicase that works in conjunction with eIF4B and eIF4H and as a subunit of eIF4F to prepare the mRNA template for ribosome binding, possibly by unwinding the secondary structure proximal to the 5′ m7GpppN cap structure. We report the identification and characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of eukaryotic translation initiation that acts in an unusual manner by stimulating eIF4A-associated activities. Our results suggest that proper control of eIF4A helicase activity is necessary for efficient ribosome binding and demonstrate the feasibility of selectively targeting DEAD-box RNA helicases with small molecules. PMID:16030146

  20. A small molecule inhibitor for ATPase activity of Hsp70 and Hsc70 enhances the immune response to protein antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Zhang, Haiying; Lee, Bo Ryeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Ha, Sang-Jun; Shin, Injae

    2015-12-01

    The ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsc70 are known to be responsible for regulation of various biological processes. However, little is known about the roles of Hsp70 and Hsc70 in modulation of immune responses to antigens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of apoptozole (Az), a small molecule inhibitor of Hsp70 and Hsc70, on immune responses to protein antigens. The results show that mice administered with both protein antigen and Az produce more antibodies than those treated with antigen alone, showing that Az enhances immune responses to administered antigens. Treatment of mice with Az elicits production of antibodies with a high IgG2c/IgG1 ratio and stimulates the release of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines, suggesting that Az activates the Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The observations made in the present study suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 and Hsc70 activities could be a novel strategy designing small molecule-based adjuvants in protein vaccines.

  1. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease.

  2. Small-Molecule Inhibitors That Target Protein–Protein Interactions in the RAD51 Family of Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Duncan E; Coyne, Anthony G; Venkitaraman, Ashok; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The development of small molecules that inhibit protein–protein interactions continues to be a challenge in chemical biology and drug discovery. Herein we report the development of indole-based fragments that bind in a shallow surface pocket of a humanised surrogate of RAD51. RAD51 is an ATP-dependent recombinase that plays a key role in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. It both self-associates, forming filament structures with DNA, and interacts with the BRCA2 protein through a common “FxxA” tetrapeptide motif. We elaborated previously identified fragment hits that target the FxxA motif site and developed small-molecule inhibitors that are approximately 500-fold more potent than the initial fragments. The lead compounds were shown to compete with the BRCA2-derived Ac-FHTA-NH2 peptide and the self-association peptide of RAD51, but they had no effect on ATP binding. This study is the first reported elaboration of small-molecular-weight fragments against this challenging target. PMID:25470112

  3. Discovery and validation of small-molecule heat-shock protein 90 inhibitors through multimodality molecular imaging in living subjects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carmel T; Reeves, Robert E; Geller, Ron; Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Hoehne, Aileen; Solow-Cordero, David E; Chiosis, Gabriela; Massoud, Tarik F; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-09-11

    Up-regulation of the folding machinery of the heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) chaperone protein is crucial for cancer progression. The two Hsp90 isoforms (α and β) play different roles in response to chemotherapy. To identify isoform-selective inhibitors of Hsp90(α/β)/cochaperone p23 interactions, we developed a dual-luciferase (Renilla and Firefly) reporter system for high-throughput screening (HTS) and monitoring the efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors in cell culture and live mice. HTS of a 30,176 small-molecule chemical library in cell culture identified a compound, N-(5-methylisoxazol-3-yl)-2-[4-(thiophen-2-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2-ylthio]acetamide (CP9), that binds to Hsp90(α/β) and displays characteristics of Hsp90 inhibitors, i.e., degradation of Hsp90 client proteins and inhibition of cell proliferation, glucose metabolism, and thymidine kinase activity, in multiple cancer cell lines. The efficacy of CP9 in disrupting Hsp90(α/β)/p23 interactions and cell proliferation in tumor xenografts was evaluated by non-invasive, repetitive Renilla luciferase and Firefly luciferase imaging, respectively. At 38 h posttreatment (80 mg/kg × 3, i.p.), CP9 led to selective disruption of Hsp90α/p23 as compared with Hsp90β/p23 interactions. Small-animal PET/CT in the same cohort of mice showed that CP9 treatment (43 h) led to a 40% decrease in (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in tumors relative to carrier control-treated mice. However, CP9 did not lead to significant degradation of Hsp90 client proteins in tumors. We performed a structural activity relationship study with 62 analogs of CP9 and identified A17 as the lead compound that outperformed CP9 in inhibiting Hsp90(α/β)/p23 interactions in cell culture. Our efforts demonstrated the power of coupling of HTS with multimodality molecular imaging and led to identification of Hsp90 inhibitors.

  4. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Zhang, Hua; Anderson, Marc O.; Saadoun, Samira; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Verkman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of spinal cord and optic nerve caused by pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) against astrocyte aquaporin-4 (AQP4). We developed a high-throughput screen to identify blockers of NMO-IgG binding to human AQP4 using a human recombinant monoclonal NMO-IgG and transfected Fisher rat thyroid cells stably expressing human M23-AQP4. Screening of ∼60,000 compounds yielded the antiviral arbidol, the flavonoid tamarixetin, and several plant-derived berbamine alkaloids, each of which blocked NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 without affecting AQP4 expression, array assembly, or water permeability. The compounds inhibited NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 in NMO patient sera and blocked NMO-IgG-dependent complement- and cell-mediated cytotoxicity with IC50 down to ∼5 μM. Docking computations identified putative sites of blocker binding at the extracellular surface of AQP4. The blockers did not affect complement-dependent cytotoxicity caused by anti-GD3 antibody binding to ganglioside GD3. The blockers reduced by >80% the severity of NMO lesions in an ex vivo spinal cord slice culture model of NMO and in mice in vivo. Our results provide proof of concept for a small-molecule blocker strategy to reduce NMO pathology. Small-molecule blockers may also be useful for other autoimmune diseases caused by binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to defined targets.—Tradtrantip, L., Zhang, H., Anderson, M. O., Saadoun, S., Phuan, P.-W., Papadopoulos, M. C., Bennett, J. L., Verkman, A. S. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica. PMID:22319008

  5. Novel small molecule 11β-HSD1 inhibitor from the endophytic fungus Penicillium commune

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Xintao; Tong, Qingyi; Zhu, Hucheng; He, Yan; Lei, Liang; Xue, Yongbo; Yao, Guangmin; Luo, Zengwei; Wang, Jianping; Li, Hua; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Two new phenone derivatives penicophenones A (1) and B (2), a new cyclic tetrapeptide penicopeptide A (3), and five known compounds were isolated from the culture broth of Penicillium commune, an endophytic fungus derived from Vitis vinifera. Compounds 1–3 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses including 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of 1 and 3 were determined by comparing its ECD with related molecules and modified Marfey’s analysis, respectively. Penicophenone A (1) possesses a rare benzannulated 6,6-spiroketal moiety, which is a new member of the unusual structural class with peniphenone A as the representative. Compound 3 exhibited significant inhibition activities against 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) in vitro and showed strong binding affinity to 11β-HSD1. Moreover, compound 3 treatments decreased the lipid droplet accumulation associate with the inhibition of 11β-HSD1 expression in differentiate-induced 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, the molecular docking demonstrated that compound 3 coordinated in the active site of 11β-HSD1 is essential for the ability of diminishing the enzyme activity. PMID:27194583

  6. Importazole, a small molecule inhibitor of the transport receptor importin-β.

    PubMed

    Soderholm, Jonathan F; Bird, Stephen L; Kalab, Petr; Sampathkumar, Yasaswini; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Uehara-Bingen, Michael; Weis, Karsten; Heald, Rebecca

    2011-07-15

    During interphase, the transport receptor importin-β carries cargoes into the nucleus, where RanGTP releases them. A similar mechanism operates in mitosis to generate a gradient of active spindle assembly factors around mitotic chromosomes. Importin-β and RanGTP have been implicated in additional cellular processes, but the precise roles of the Ran/importin-β pathway throughout the cell cycle remain poorly understood. We implemented a FRET-based, high-throughput small molecule screen for compounds that interfere with the interaction between RanGTP and importin-β and identified importazole, a 2,4-diaminoquinazoline. Importazole specifically blocks importin-β-mediated nuclear import both in Xenopus egg extracts and cultured cells, without disrupting transportin-mediated nuclear import or CRM1-mediated nuclear export. When added during mitosis, importazole impairs the release of an importin-β cargo FRET probe and causes both predicted and novel defects in spindle assembly. Together, these results indicate that importazole specifically inhibits the function of importin-β, likely by altering its interaction with RanGTP. Importazole is a valuable tool to evaluate the function of the importin-β/RanGTP pathway at specific stages during the cell cycle. PMID:21469738

  7. Discovery of Small-Molecule Nonfluorescent Inhibitors of Fluorogen-Fluorogen Activating Protein Binding Pair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Stauffer, Shaun R; Stanfield, Robyn L; Tapia, Phillip H; Ursu, Oleg; Fisher, Gregory W; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Evangelisti, Annette; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Carter, Mark B; Bologa, Cristian; Gouveia, Kristine; Poslusney, Mike; Waggoner, Alan S; Lindsley, Craig W; Jarvik, Jonathan W; Sklar, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    A new class of biosensors, fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs), has been successfully used to track receptor trafficking in live cells. Unlike the traditional fluorescent proteins (FPs), FAPs do not fluoresce unless bound to their specific small-molecule fluorogens, and thus FAP-based assays are highly sensitive. Application of the FAP-based assay for protein trafficking in high-throughput flow cytometry resulted in the discovery of a new class of compounds that interferes with the binding between fluorogens and FAP, thus blocking the fluorescence signal. These compounds are high-affinity, nonfluorescent analogs of fluorogens with little or no toxicity to the tested cells and no apparent interference with the normal function of FAP-tagged receptors. The most potent compound among these, N,4-dimethyl-N-(2-oxo-2-(4-(pyridin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)benzenesulfonamide (ML342), has been investigated in detail. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that ML342 competes with the fluorogen, sulfonated thiazole orange coupled to diethylene glycol diamine (TO1-2p), for the same binding site on a FAP, AM2.2. Kinetic analysis shows that the FAP-fluorogen interaction is more complex than a homogeneous one-site binding process, with multiple conformational states of the fluorogen and/or the FAP, and possible dimerization of the FAP moiety involved in the process.

  8. Codelivery of small molecule hedgehog inhibitor and miRNA for treating pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virender; Mondal, Goutam; Slavik, Paige; Rachagani, Satyanarayna; Batra, Surinder K; Mahato, Ram I

    2015-04-01

    Successful treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a challenge due to the desmoplastic microenvironment that promotes both tumor growth and metastasis and forms a barrier to chemotherapy. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is implicated in initiation and progression of PDAC and also contributes to desmoplasia. While Hh levels are increased in pancreatic cancer cells, levels of tumor suppressor miR-let7b, which targets several genes involved in PDAC pathogenesis, is downregulated. Therefore, our overall objective was to inhibit Hh pathway and restore miR-let7b simultaneously for synergistically treating PDAC. miR-let7b and Hh inhibitor GDC-0449 could inhibit the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II, T3M4, and MIA PaCa-2), and there was synergistic effect when miR-let7b and GDC-0449 were coformulated into micelles using methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(2-methyl- 2-carboxyl-propylenecarbonate-graft-dodecanol-graft-tetraethylene-pentamine) (mPEG-b-PCC-g-DC-g-TEPA). This copolymer self-assembled into micelles of <100 nm and encapsulated hydrophobic GDC-0449 into its core with 5% w/w drug loading and allowed complex formation between miR-let7b and its cationic pendant chains. Complete polyplex formation with miRNA was observed at the N/P ratio of 16/1. Almost 80% of GDC-0449 was released from the polyplex in a sustained manner in 2 days. miRNA in the micelle formulation was stable for up to 24 h in the presence of serum and high uptake efficiency was achieved with low cytotoxicity. This combination therapy effectively inhibited tumor growth when injected to athymic nude mice bearing ectopic tumor generated using MIA PaCa-2 cells compared to micelles carrying GDC-0449 or miR-let7b alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed decreased tumor cell proliferation with increased apoptosis in the animals treated with miR-let7b and GDC-0449 combination. PMID:25679326

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of human galactokinase and its small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, M; Wierenga, K; Elsas, L J; Lai, K

    2010-12-01

    Human galactokinase (GALK) is the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway, converting α-d-galactose into galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1-P). Recently, there is increasing interest in targeting GALK as a novel therapy to ameliorate the disease manifestations in patients with Classic Galactosemia as it would, in combination with (ga-)lactose restriction reduce accumulation of Gal-1-P, a cytotoxic agent. Previously, we identified 34 small molecule compounds that inhibited GALK in vitro using experimental high-throughput screening. In order to isolate useful lead compounds, we characterized these hits with regards to their kinase selectivity profiles, potency and capability to reduce Gal-1-P accumulation in patient cell lines, and their modes of action. We found that the majority of these compounds had IC(50)s ranging from 0.7μM to 33.3μM. When tested against other members of the GHMP kinase family, three compounds (1, 4, and 24) selectively inhibited GALK with high potency. Through alignment of GALK and mevalonate kinase (MVK) crystal structures, we identified that eight amino acid residues and an L1 loop were different within the ATP-binding pockets of these two closely related kinases. By site-directed mutagenesis experiments, we identified one amino acid residue required for the inhibitory function of two of the three selective compounds. Based on these results, we generated binding models of these two compounds using a high-precision docking program. Compounds 4 and 24 inhibited GALK in a mixed model, while compound 1 exhibited parabolic competitive inhibition. Most importantly, using cells from galactosemic patients we found that selected compounds lowered Gal-1-P concentrations.

  10. Small-molecule inhibitors of bacterial AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nuclease DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Susan K; Spicer, Timothy; Karabulut, Ahmet C; Londoño, Luz Marina; Eberhart, Christina; Fernandez Vega, Virneliz; Bannister, Thomas D; Hodder, Peter; Smith, Gerald R

    2012-05-18

    The AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nucleases are related enzymes prevalent among bacteria but not eukaryotes and are instrumental in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and in genetic recombination. Although these enzymes have been extensively studied both genetically and biochemically, inhibitors specific for this class of enzymes have not been reported. We developed a high-throughput screen based on the ability of phage T4 gene 2 mutants to grow in Escherichia coli only if the host RecBCD enzyme, or a related helicase-nuclease, is inhibited or genetically inactivated. We optimized this screen for use in 1536-well plates and screened 326,100 small molecules in the NIH molecular libraries sample collection for inhibitors of the Helicobacter pylori AddAB enzyme expressed in an E. coli recBCD deletion strain. Secondary screening used assays with cells expressing AddAB or RecBCD and a viability assay that measured the effect of compounds on cell growth without phage infection. From this screening campaign, 12 compounds exhibiting efficacy and selectivity were tested for inhibition of purified AddAB and RecBCD helicase and nuclease activities and in cell-based assays for recombination; seven were active in the 0.1-50 μM range in one or another assay. Compounds structurally related to two of these were similarly tested, and three were active in the 0.1-50 μM range. These compounds should be useful in further enzymatic, genetic, and physiological studies of these enzymes, both purified and in cells. They may also lead to useful antibacterial agents, since this class of enzymes is needed for successful bacterial infection of mammals.

  11. A small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the HIV-1 envelope and inhibits CD4 receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Fang; Blair, Wade; Wang, Tao; Spicer, Timothy; Guo, Qi; Zhou, Nannan; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, H.-G. Heidi; Rose, Ronald; Yamanaka, Gregory; Robinson, Brett; Li, Chang-Ben; Fridell, Robert; Deminie, Carol; Demers, Gwendeline; Yang, Zheng; Zadjura, Lisa; Meanwell, Nicholas; Colonno, Richard

    2003-01-01

    BMS-378806 is a recently discovered small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entrance to cells. The compound exhibits potent inhibitory activity against a panel of R5-(virus using the CCR5 coreceptor), X4-(virus using the CXCR4 coreceptor), and R5/X4 HIV-1 laboratory and clinical isolates of the B subtype (median EC50 of 0.04 μM) in culture assays. BMS-378806 is selective for HIV-1 and inactive against HIV-2, SIV and a panel of other viruses, and exhibits no significant cytotoxicity in the 14 cell types tested (concentration for 50% reduction of cell growth, >225 μM). Mechanism of action studies demonstrated that BMS-378806 binds to gp120 and inhibits the interactions of the HIV-1 envelope protein to cellular CD4 receptors. Further confirmation that BMS-378806 targets the envelope in infected cells was obtained through the isolation of resistant variants and the mapping of resistance substitutions to the HIV-1 envelope. In particular, two substitutions, M426L and M475I, are situated in the CD4 binding pocket of gp120. Recombinant HIV-1 carrying these two substitutions demonstrated significantly reduced susceptibility to compound inhibition. BMS-378806 displays many favorable pharmacological traits, such as low protein binding, minimal human serum effect on anti-HIV-1 potency, good oral bioavailability in animal species, and a clean safety profile in initial animal toxicology studies. Together, the data show that BMS-378806 is a representative of a new class of HIV inhibitors that has the potential to become a valued addition to our current armamentarium of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:12930892

  12. Traffic jam at the bacterial sec translocase: targeting the SecA nanomotor by small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Anné, Jozef

    2011-06-24

    The rapid rise of drug-resistant bacteria is one of the most serious unmet medical needs facing the world. Despite this increasing problem of antibiotic resistance, the number of different antibiotics available for the treatment of serious infections is dwindling. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial drugs, preferably with novel modes of action to potentially avoid cross-resistance with existing antibacterial agents. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to bacterial protein secretion as a potential antibacterial target. Among the different protein secretion pathways that are present in bacterial pathogens, the general protein secretory (Sec) pathway is widely considered as an attractive target for antibacterial therapy. One of the key components of the Sec pathway is the peripheral membrane ATPase SecA, which provides the energy for the translocation of preproteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. In this review, we will provide an overview of research efforts on the discovery and development of small-molecule SecA inhibitors. Furthermore, recent advances on the structure and function of SecA and their potential impact on antibacterial drug discovery will be discussed.

  13. A small-molecule inhibitor of SHIP1 reverses age- and diet-associated obesity and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Neetu; Iyer, Sonia; Sudan, Raki; Youngs, Christie; Engelman, Robert W.; Howard, Kyle T.; Russo, Christopher M.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is a key etiological phenomenon responsible for the initiation and perpetuation of obesity and diabetes. Novel therapeutic approaches that can specifically target inflammatory pathways are needed to avert this looming epidemic of metabolic disorders. Genetic and chemical inhibition of SH2-containing inositol 5′ phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) has been associated with systemic expansion of immunoregulatory cells that promote a lean-body state; however, SHIP1 function in immunometabolism has never been assessed. This led us to investigate the role of SHIP1 in metabolic disorders during excess caloric intake in mice. Using a small-molecule inhibitor of SHIP1 (SHIPi), here we show that SHIPi treatment in mice significantly reduces body weight and fat content, improves control of blood glucose and insulin sensitivity, and increases energy expenditure, despite continued consumption of a high-fat diet. Additionally, SHIPi reduces age-associated fat in mice. We found that SHIPi treatment reverses diet-associated obesity by attenuating inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT). SHIPi treatment increases IL-4–producing eosinophils in VAT and consequently increases both alternatively activated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In addition, SHIPi decreases the number of IFN-γ–producing T cells and NK cells in VAT. Thus, SHIPi represents an approach that permits control of obesity and diet-induced metabolic syndrome without apparent toxicity. PMID:27536730

  14. In vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic characterizations of AMG 900, an orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of aurora kinases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liyue; Be, Xuhai; Berry, Loren; Moore, Earl; Janosky, Brett; Wells, Mary; Pan, Wei-Jian; Zhao, Zhiyang; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine

    2011-05-01

    AMG 900 is a small molecule being developed as an orally administered, highly potent, and selective pan-aurora kinase inhibitor. The aim of the investigations was to characterize in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of AMG 900 in preclinical species. AMG 900 was rapidly metabolized in liver microsomes and highly bound to plasma proteins in the species tested. It was a weak Pgp substrate with good passive permeability. AMG 900 exhibited a low-to-moderate clearance and a small volume of distribution. Its terminal elimination half-life ranged from 0.6 to 2.4 h. AMG 900 was well-absorbed in fasted animals with an oral bioavailability of 31% to 107%. Food intake had an effect on rate (rats) or extent (dogs) of AMG 900 oral absorption. The clearance and volume of distribution at steady state in humans were predicted to be 27.3 mL/h/kg and 93.9 mL/kg, respectively. AMG 900 exhibited acceptable PK properties in preclinical species and was predicted to have low clearance in humans. AMG 900 is currently in Phase I clinical testing as a treatment for solid tumours. Preliminary human PK results appear to be consistent with the predictions.

  15. Discovery of Small Molecule Isozyme Non-specific Inhibitors of Mammalian Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Freeman-Cook, K; Elliott, R; Vajdos, F; Rajamohan, F; Kohls, D; Marr, E; Harwood Jr., H; Esler, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  16. Discovery of small molecule isozyme non-specific inhibitors of mammalian acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Jeffrey W; Freeman-Cook, Kevin D; Elliott, Richard; Vajdos, Felix; Rajamohan, Francis; Kohls, Darcy; Marr, Eric; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang; Tu, Meihua; Murdande, Sharad; Doran, Shawn D; Houser, Janet A; Song, Wei; Jones, Christopher J; Coffey, Steven B; Buzon, Leanne; Minich, Martha L; Dirico, Kenneth J; Tapley, Susan; McPherson, R Kirk; Sugarman, Eliot; Harwood, H James; Esler, William

    2010-04-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  17. Prospecting for Novel Plant-Derived Molecules of Rauvolfia serpentina as Inhibitors of Aldose Reductase, a Potent Drug Target for Diabetes and Its Complications

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shivalika; Randhawa, Vinay; Bagler, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Aldose Reductase (AR) is implicated in the development of secondary complications of diabetes, providing an interesting target for therapeutic intervention. Extracts of Rauvolfia serpentina, a medicinal plant endemic to the Himalayan mountain range, have been known to be effective in alleviating diabetes and its complications. In this study, we aim to prospect for novel plant-derived inhibitors from R. serpentina and to understand structural basis of their interactions. An extensive library of R. serpentina molecules was compiled and computationally screened for inhibitory action against AR. The stability of complexes, with docked leads, was verified using molecular dynamics simulations. Two structurally distinct plant-derived leads were identified as inhibitors: indobine and indobinine. Further, using these two leads as templates, 16 more leads were identified through ligand-based screening of their structural analogs, from a small molecules database. Thus, we obtained plant-derived indole alkaloids, and their structural analogs, as potential AR inhibitors from a manually curated dataset of R. serpentina molecules. Indole alkaloids reported herein, as a novel structural class unreported hitherto, may provide better insights for designing potential AR inhibitors with improved efficacy and fewer side effects. PMID:23613832

  18. A Specific Interaction of Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors with the Envelope Glycoprotein Complex of the Junín Hemorrhagic Fever Arenavirus*

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Celestine J.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; DeCamp, Dianne L.; Dai, Dongcheng; Petrilli, Erin B.; Boger, Dale L.; Slayden, Richard A.; Amberg, Sean M.; Sprang, Stephen R.; Nunberg, Jack H.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses are responsible for acute hemorrhagic fevers worldwide and are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Small molecule compounds have recently been discovered that inhibit arenavirus entry and protect against lethal infection in animal models. These chemically distinct inhibitors act on the tripartite envelope glycoprotein (GPC) through its unusual stable signal peptide subunit to stabilize the complex against pH-induced activation of membrane fusion in the endosome. Here, we report the production and characterization of the intact transmembrane GPC complex of Junín arenavirus and its interaction with these inhibitors. The solubilized GPC is antigenically indistinguishable from the native protein and forms a homogeneous trimer in solution. When reconstituted into a lipid bilayer, the purified complex interacts specifically with its cell-surface receptor transferrin receptor-1. We show that small molecule entry inhibitors specific to New World or Old World arenaviruses bind to the membrane-associated GPC complex in accordance with their respective species selectivities and with dissociation constants comparable with concentrations that inhibit GPC-mediated membrane fusion. Furthermore, competitive binding studies reveal that these chemically distinct inhibitors share a common binding pocket on GPC. In conjunction with previous genetic studies, these findings identify the pH-sensing interface of GPC as a highly vulnerable target for antiviral intervention. This work expands our mechanistic understanding of arenavirus entry and provides a foundation to guide the development of small molecule compounds for the treatment of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers. PMID:21159779

  19. Structure-based design, synthesis and validation of CD4-mimetic small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry: conversion of a viral entry agonist to an antagonist.

    PubMed

    Courter, Joel R; Madani, Navid; Sodroski, Joseph; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Chaiken, Irwin M; LaLonde, Judith M; Smith, Amos B

    2014-04-15

    This Account provides an overview of a multidisciplinary consortium focused on structure-based strategies to devise small molecule antagonists of HIV-1 entry into human T-cells, which if successful would hold considerable promise for the development of prophylactic modalities to prevent HIV transmission and thereby alter the course of the AIDS pandemic. Entry of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into target T-cells entails an interaction between CD4 on the host T-cell and gp120, a component of the trimeric envelope glycoprotein spike on the virion surface. The resultant interaction initiates a series of conformational changes within the envelope spike that permits binding to a chemokine receptor, formation of the gp41 fusion complex, and cell entry. A hydrophobic cavity at the CD4-gp120 interface, defined by X-ray crystallography, provided an initial site for small molecule antagonist design. This site however has evolved to facilitate viral entry. As such, the binding of prospective small molecule inhibitors within this gp120 cavity can inadvertently trigger an allosteric entry signal. Structural characterization of the CD4-gp120 interface, which provided the foundation for small molecule structure-based inhibitor design, will be presented first. An integrated approach combining biochemical, virological, structural, computational, and synthetic studies, along with a detailed analysis of ligand binding energetics, revealed that modestly active small molecule inhibitors of HIV entry can also promote viral entry into cells lacking the CD4 receptor protein; these competitive inhibitors were termed small molecule CD4 mimetics. Related congeners were subsequently identified with both improved binding affinity and more potent viral entry inhibition. Further assessment of the affinity-enhanced small molecule CD4 mimetics demonstrated that premature initiation of conformational change within the viral envelope spike, prior to cell encounter, can lead to irreversible

  20. Rational design of small-molecule inhibitors for β-catenin/T-cell factor protein-protein interactions by bioisostere replacement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binxun; Huang, Zheng; Zhang, Min; Dillard, Darren R; Ji, Haitao

    2013-03-15

    A new hot spot-based design strategy using bioisostere replacement is reported to rationally design nonpeptidic small-molecule inhibitors for protein-protein interactions. This method is applied to design new potent inhibitors for β-catenin/T-cell factor (Tcf) interactions. Three hot spot regions of Tcf for binding to β-catenin were quantitatively evaluated; the key binding elements around K435 and K508 of β-catenin were derived; a bioisostere library was used to generate new fragments that can match the proposed critical binding elements. The most potent inhibitor, with a molecular weight of 230, has a Kd of 0.531 μM for binding to β-catenin and a Ki of 3.14 μM to completely disrupt β-catenin/Tcf interactions. The binding mode of the designed inhibitors was validated by the site-directed mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. This study provides a new approach to design new small-molecule inhibitors that bind to β-catenin and effectively disrupt β-catenin/Tcf interactions specific for canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:23272635

  1. Development and implementation of a miniaturized high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S

    2007-12-01

    Polo-like kinase (Plk) 1 is a key enzyme involved in regulating the mammalian cell cycle that is also a validated anticancer drug target. Nonetheless, there are relatively few readily available potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of Plk1. To increase the availability of pharmacologically valuable Plk1 inhibitors, we describe herein the development, variability assessment, validation, and implementation of a 384-well automated, miniaturized high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer screening assay designed to identify Plk1 kinase inhibitors. Using a small molecule library of pharmaceutically active compounds to gauge high-throughput assay robustness and reproducibility, we found nine general kinase inhibitors, including H-89, which was selected as the minimum control. We then interrogated a 97,101 compound library from the National Institutes of Health repository for small molecule inhibitors of Plk1 kinase activity. The initial primary hit rate in a single 10 microM concentration format was 0.21%. Hit compounds were subjected to concentration-response confirmation and interference assays. Identified in the screen were seven compounds with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values below 1 microM, 20 compounds with IC50 values between 1 microM and 5 microM, and eight compounds with IC50 values between 5 and 10 microM, which could be assigned to seven distinct chemotype classes. Hit compounds were also examined for their ability to inhibit other kinases such as protein kinase D, focal adhesion kinase, rho-associated coiled coil protein kinase 2, c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 3, and protein kinase A via experimentation or data-mining. These compounds should be useful as probes for the biological activity of Plk1 and as leads for the development of new selective inhibitors of Plk1. PMID:18181689

  2. Accounting for target flexibility and water molecules by docking to ensembles of target structures: the HCV NS5B palm site I inhibitors case study.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Maria Letizia; Iraci, Nunzio; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Gaetani, Rosy; Guercini, Chiara; Sabatini, Stefano; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2014-02-24

    The introduction of new anti-HCV drugs in therapy is an imperative need and is necessary with a view to develop an interferon-free therapy. Thus, the discovery and development of novel small molecule inhibitors of the viral NS5B polymerase represent an exciting area of research for many pharmaceutical companies and academic groups. This study represents a contribution to this field and relies on the identification of the best NS5B model(s) to be used in structure-based computational approaches aimed at identifying novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of one of the protein allosteric sites, namely, palm site I. First, the NS5B inhibitors at palm site I were classified as water-mediated or nonwater-mediated ligands depending on their ability to interact with or displace a specific water molecule. Then, we took advantage of the available X-ray structures of the NS5B/ligand complexes to build different models of protein/water combinations, which were used to investigate the influence on docking studies of solvent sites as well as of the influence of the protein conformations. As the overall trend, we observed improved performance in the docking results of the water-mediated inhibitors by inclusion of explicit water molecules, with an opposite behavior generally happening for the nonwater-mediated inhibitors. The best performing target structures for the two ligand sets were then used for virtual screening simulations of a library containing the known NS5B inhibitors along with related decoys to assess the best performing targets ensembles on the basis of their ability to discriminate active and inactive compounds as well as to generate the correct binding modes. The parallel use of different protein structures/water sets outperformed the use of a single target structure, with the two-protein 3H98/2W-2FVC/7W and 3HKY/NoW-3SKE/NoW models resulting in the best performing ensembles for water-mediated inhibitors and nonwater-mediated inhibitors, respectively. The information

  3. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA.

  4. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA. PMID:25882520

  5. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  6. PFK15, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of PFKFB3, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Inhibits Invasion in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Ye, Liang; Zhang, Jianzhao; Yu, Pengfei; Wang, Hongbo; Ye, Zuguang; Tian, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    PFKFB3 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase) synthesizes fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6P2), which is an allosteric activator of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1), the rate-limiting enzyme of glycolysis. Overexpression of the PFKFB3 enzyme leads to high glycolytic metabolism, which is required for cancer cells to survive in the harsh tumor microenvironment. The objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor activity of PFK15 (1-(4-pyridinyl)-3-(2-quinolinyl)-2-propen-1-one), a small molecule inhibitor of PFKFB3, against gastric cancer and to explore its potential mechanisms. The effects of PFK15 on proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle progression in gastric cancer cells were evaluated by cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays, flow cytometry, and western blotting. In addition, the invasion inhibition effects of PFK15 were measured by transwell invasion assay and western blot analysis, and a xenograft tumor model was used to verify the therapeutic effect of PFK15 in vivo. Results showed that PFK15 inhibited the proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase by blocking the Cyclin-CDKs/Rb/E2F signaling pathway, and induced apoptosis through mitochondria in gastric cancer cells. Tumor volume and weight were also significantly reduced upon intraperitoneal injection with PFK15 at 25 mg/kg. In addition, PFK15 inhibited the invasion of gastric cancer cells by downregulating focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression and upregulating E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our findings indicate that PFK15 is a promising anticancer drug for treating gastric cancer. PMID:27669567

  7. Validation of a cell-based ELISA as a screening tool identifying anti-alphavirus small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spurgers, Kevin B; Hurt, Clarence R; Cohen, Jeffrey W; Eccelston, Lori T; Lind, Cathleen M; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Glass, Pamela J

    2013-10-01

    Venezuelan (VEEV), eastern, and western equine encephalitis viruses, members of the genus Alphavirus, are causative agents of debilitative and sometimes fatal encephalitis. Although human cases are rare, these viruses pose a threat to military personnel, and to public health, due to their potential use as bioweapons. Currently, there are no licensed therapeutics for treating alphavirus infections. To address this need, small-molecules with potential anti-alphavirus activity, provided by collaborators, are tested routinely in live alphavirus assays utilizing time-consuming virus yield-reduction assays. To expedite the screening/hit-confirmation process, a cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed and validated for the measurement of VEEV infection. A signal-to-background ratio of >900, and a z-factor of >0.8 indicated the robustness of this assay. For validation, the cell-based ELISA was compared directly to results from virus yield reduction assays in a single dose screen of 21 compounds. Using stringent criteria for anti-VEEV activity there was 90% agreement between the two assays (compounds displaying either antiviral activity, or no effect, in both assays). A concurrent compound-induced cell toxicity assay effectively filtered out false-positive hits. The cell-based ELISA also reproduced successfully compound dose-response virus inhibition data observed using the virus yield reduction assay. With available antibodies, this assay can be adapted readily to other viruses of interest to the biodefense community. Additionally, it is cost-effective, rapid, and amenable to automation and scale-up. Therefore, this assay could expedite greatly screening efforts and the identification of effective anti-alphavirus inhibitors.

  8. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules as surrogate markers for EGFR inhibitor sensitivity in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, M; Miki, Y; Ebina, M; Abe, K; Mori, K; Narumi, S; Suzuki, T; Sato, I; Maemondo, M; Endo, C; Inoue, A; Kumamoto, H; Kondo, T; Yamada-Okabe, H; Nukiwa, T; Sasano, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lung adenocarcinoma (LADCA) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are in general associated with relatively high clinical response rate to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) but not all responded to TKI. It has therefore become important to identify the additional surrogate markers regarding EGFR-TKI sensitivity. Methods: We first examined the effects of EGFR-TKIs, gefitinib and erlotinib, upon cell proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. We then evaluated the gene profiles related to EGFR-TKI sensitivity using a microarray analysis. Results of microarray analysis led us to focus on carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family, CEACAM 3, 5, 6, 7, and 19, as potential further surrogate markers of EGFR-TKI sensitivity. We then examined the correlation between the status of CEACAM 3, 5, 6, 7, and 19 immunoreactivity in LADCA and clinicopathological parameters of individual cases. Results: In the cases with EGFR mutations, the status of all CEACAMs examined was significantly higher than that in EGFR wild-type patients, but there were no significant differences in the status of CEACAMs between TKI responder and nonresponder among 22 patients who received gefitinib therapy. However, among 115 EGFR mutation-negative LADCA patients, both CEACAM6 and CEACAM3 were significantly associated with adverse clinical outcome (CEACAM6) and better clinical outcome (CEACAM3). Conclusion: CEACAMs examined in this study could be related to the presence of EGFR mutation in adenocarcinoma cells but not represent the effective surrogate marker of EGFR-TKI in LADCA patients. However, immunohistochemical evaluation of CEACAM3/6 in LADCA patients could provide important information on their clinical outcome. PMID:23099808

  9. Validation of PqsD as an anti-biofilm target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by development of small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Michael P; Maurer, Christine K; Zimmer, Christina; Wagner, Nathalie; Brengel, Christian; de Jong, Johannes C; Lucas, Simon; Müsken, Mathias; Häussler, Susanne; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2012-10-01

    2-Heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) are involved in the regulation of virulence factor production and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PqsD is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of these signal molecules. Using a ligand-based approach, we have identified the first class of PqsD inhibitors. Simplification and rigidization led to fragments with high ligand efficiencies. These small molecules repress HHQ and PQS production and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa. This validates PqsD as a target for the development of anti-infectives. PMID:22992202

  10. Small-molecule inhibitors targeting INK4 protein p18INK4C enhance ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yingdai; Yang, Peng; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Xianmin; Zhang, Liyan; Zhang, Peng; Cheng, Haizi; Xie, Zhaojun; Hao, Sha; Dong, Fang; Ma, Shihui; Ji, Qing; Bartlow, Patrick; Ding, Yahui; Wang, Lirong; Liu, Haibin; Li, Yanxin; Cheng, Hui; Miao, Weimin; Yuan, Weiping; Yuan, Youzhong; Cheng, Tao; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Among cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors that control the G1 phase in cell cycle, only p18 and p27 can negatively regulate haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that p18 protein is a more potent inhibitor of HSC self-renewal than p27 in mouse models and its deficiency promoted HSC expansion in long-term culture. Single-cell analysis indicated that deleting p18 gene favoured self-renewing division of HSC in vitro. Based on the structure of p18 protein and in-silico screening, we further identified novel small-molecule inhibitors that can specifically block the activity of p18 protein. Our selected lead compounds were able to expand functional HSCs in a short-term culture. Thus, these putative small-molecule inhibitors for p18 protein are valuable for further dissecting the signalling pathways of stem cell self-renewal and may help develop more effective chemical agents for therapeutic expansion of HSC. PMID:25692908

  11. Discovery of the first known small-molecule inhibitors of heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (HRI) kinase.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Mark D; Woods, Craig R; Goldberg, Steven D; Hack, Michael D; Bounds, A Dawn; Yang, Young; Wagaman, Pamela C; Phuong, Victor K; Ameriks, Angela P; Barrett, Terrance D; Kanelakis, Kimon C; Chuang, Jui Chang; Chang, Jui; Shankley, Nigel P; Rabinowitz, Michael H

    2009-12-01

    A series of indeno[1,2-c]pyrazoles were discovered to be the first known inhibitors of heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (HRI) kinase. The synthesis, structure-activity relationship profile, and in-vitro pharmacological characterization of this inaugural series of HRI kinase inhibitors are detailed.

  12. 2,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde derived Schiff bases as small molecule Hsp90 inhibitors: rational identification of a new anticancer lead.

    PubMed

    Dutta Gupta, Sayan; Revathi, B; Mazaira, Gisela I; Galigniana, Mario D; Subrahmanyam, C V S; Gowrishankar, N L; Raghavendra, N M

    2015-04-01

    Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that heals diverse array of biomolecules ranging from multiple oncogenic proteins to the ones responsible for development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Moreover they are over-expressed in cancer cells as a complex with co-chaperones and under-expressed in normal cells as a single free entity. Hence inhibitors of Hsp90 will be more effective and selective in destroying cancer cells with minimum chances of acquiring resistance to them. In continuation of our goal to rationally develop effective small molecule azomethines against Hsp90, we designed few more compounds belonging to the class of 2,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde derived imines (1-13) with our validated docking protocol. The molecules exhibiting good docking score were synthesized and their structures were confirmed by IR, (1)H NMR and mass spectral analysis. Subsequently, they were evaluated for their potential to suppress Hsp90 ATPase activity by Malachite green assay. The antiproliferative effect of the molecules were examined on PC3 prostate cancer cell lines by adopting 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay methodology. Finally, schiff base 13 emerged as the lead molecule for future design and development of Hsp90 inhibitors as anticancer agents.

  13. New Approaches of PARP-1 Inhibitors in Human Lung Cancer Cells and Cancer Stem-Like Cells by Some Selected Anthraquinone-Derived Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dah-Shyong; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chou, Shih-Jie; Chen, Tsung-Chih; Lee, Chia-Chung; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Huang, Hsu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and telomerase, as well as DNA damage response pathways are targets for anticancer drug development, and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate anticancer activities of anthraquinone-derived tricyclic and tetracyclic small molecules and their structure-activity relationships with PARP-1 inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and NSCLC-overexpressing Oct4 and Nanog clone, which show high-expression of PARP-1 and more resistance to anticancer drug. We applied our library selected compounds to NCI's 60 human cancer cell-lines (NCI-60) in order to generate systematic profiling data. Based on our analysis, it is hypothesized that these drugs might be, directly and indirectly, target components to induce mitochondrial permeability transition and the release of pro-apoptotic factors as potential anti-NSCLC or PARP inhibitor candidates. Altogether, the most active NSC747854 showed its cytotoxicity and dose-dependent PARP inhibitory manner, thus it emerges as a promising structure for anti-cancer therapy with no significant negative influence on normal cells. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics. These findings will be of great value to facilitate structure-based design of selective PARP inhibitors, in general, and telomerase inhibitors, in particular. Together, the data presented here expand our insight into the PARP inhibitors and support the resource-demanding lead optimization of structurally related small molecules for human cancer therapy. PMID:23451039

  14. Human HDAC isoform selectivity achieved via exploitation of the acetate release channel with structurally unique small molecule inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Lewis; Dobler, Markus R.; Radetich, Branko; Zhu, Yanyi; Atadja, Peter W.; Claiborne, Tavina; Grob, Jonathan E.; McRiner, Andrew; Pancost, Margaret R.; Patnaik, Anup; Shao, Wenlin; Shultz, Michael; Tichkule, Ritesh; Tommasi, Ruben A.; Vash, Brian; Wang, Ping; Stams, Travis

    2013-11-20

    Herein we report the discovery of a family of novel yet simple, amino-acid derived class I HDAC inhibitors that demonstrate isoform selectivity via access to the internal acetate release channel. Isoform selectivity criteria is discussed on the basis of X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling of these novel inhibitors bound to HDAC8, potentially revealing insights into the mechanism of enzymatic function through novel structural features revealed at the atomic level.

  15. Integrating computational and chemical biology tools in the discovery of antiangiogenic small molecule ligands of FGF2 derived from endogenous inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Foglieni, Chiara; Pagano, Katiuscia; Lessi, Marco; Bugatti, Antonella; Moroni, Elisabetta; Pinessi, Denise; Resovi, Andrea; Ribatti, Domenico; Bertini, Sabrina; Ragona, Laura; Bellina, Fabio; Rusnati, Marco; Colombo, Giorgio; Taraboletti, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The FGFs/FGFRs system is a recognized actionable target for therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting tumor growth, angiogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. We previously identified a non-peptidic compound (SM27) that retains the structural and functional properties of the FGF2-binding sequence of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a major endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. Here we identified new small molecule inhibitors of FGF2 based on the initial lead. A similarity-based screening of small molecule libraries, followed by docking calculations and experimental studies, allowed selecting 7 bi-naphthalenic compounds that bound FGF2 inhibiting its binding to both heparan sulfate proteoglycans and FGFR-1. The compounds inhibit FGF2 activity in in vitro and ex vivo models of angiogenesis, with improved potency over SM27. Comparative analysis of the selected hits, complemented by NMR and biochemical analysis of 4 newly synthesized functionalized phenylamino-substituted naphthalenes, allowed identifying the minimal stereochemical requirements to improve the design of naphthalene sulfonates as FGF2 inhibitors. PMID:27000667

  16. Inhibition of EZH2 by chemo- and radiotherapy agents and small molecule inhibitors induces cell death in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changping; Jin, Xin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Yinhui; He, Yundong; Ding, Liya; Pan, Yunqian; Chen, Shuai; Jiang, Jingting; Huang, Haojie

    2016-01-19

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the mainstay of treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, a significant portion of patients experience disease relapse and tumors ultimately evolve into castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), for which there is no cure in the clinic. The Polycomb protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is frequently overexpressed in CRPC. It is unclear whether EZH2 can be a therapeutic target in CRPC. Here, we demonstrated that chemo- and radiotherapy agents such as camptothecin (CPT) and γ irradiation decrease EZH2 expression in various PCa cell lines. We provided evidence that functional p53 and RB proteins are required for CPT- and irradiation-induced downregulation of EZH2 in CRPC cells. We demonstrated that EZH2-specific small molecule inhibitors mitigate CRPC cell growth. We further showed that the EZH2 inhibitor GSK126 inhibits both Polycomb-dependent and -independent functions of EZH2 in PCa cells. Importantly, we found that inhibition of EZH2 by genetic and pharmacological means sensitizes CRPC cells to CPT-induced apoptotic death and growth inhibition in culture and in mice. Our data suggest that concomitant administration of small molecule inhibitors of EZH2 may significantly increase the anti-tumor efficacy of conventional chemo- and radiotherapies in CRPC. PMID:26657505

  17. Discovering Bisdemethoxycurcumin from Curcuma longa rhizome as a potent small molecule inhibitor of human pancreatic α-amylase, a target for type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Rajamohanan, P R; Ravikumar, Ameeta

    2012-12-15

    Curcuma longa rhizome is used extensively in culinary preparations in Far East and South-East Asia. Health benefits of curcuminoids from C. longa as antioxidants, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory molecules have been well documented. We report here for the first time that Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) from C. longa, acts as an inhibitor to inactivate human pancreatic α-amylase, a therapeutic target for oral hypoglycemic agents in type-2 diabetes. Bioactivity guided isolation of rhizome isopropanol extract led to the identification by HPLC and NMR of BDMC as a lead small molecule inhibitor of porcine and human pancreatic α-amylase with an IC(50) value of 0.026 and 0.025 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis revealed that using starch as the substrate, HPA exhibited an uncompetitive mode of inhibition with an apparent K(i) of 3.0 μM. The study gains importance as BDMC could be a good drug candidate in development of new inhibitors of HPA and of functional foods for controlling starch digestion in order to reduce post-prandial hyperglycemia.

  18. The Effect of a Covalent and a Noncovalent Small-Molecule Inhibitor on the Structure of Abg β-Glucosidase in the Gas-Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh; Douglas, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    The effects of binding two small-molecule inhibitors to Agrobacterium sp. strain ATCC 21400 (Abg) β-glucosidase on the conformations and stability of gas-phase ions of Abg have been investigated. Biotin-iminosugar conjugate (BIC) binds noncovalently to Abg while 2,4-dinitro-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-β- d-glucopyranoside (2FG-DNP) binds covalently with loss of DNP. In solution, Abg is a dimer. Mass spectra show predominantly dimer ions, provided care is taken to avoid dissociation of dimers in solution and dimer ions in the ion sampling interface. When excess inhibitor, either covalent or noncovalent, is added to solutions of Abg, mass spectra show peaks almost entirely from 2:2 inhibitor-enzyme dimer complexes. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments show similar dissociation channels for the apo-enzyme and 2FG-enzyme dimers. The +21 dimer produces +10 and +11 monomers. The internal energy required to dissociate the +21 2FG-enzyme to its monomers (767 ± 30 eV) is about 36 eV higher than that for the apo-enzyme dimer (731 ± 6 eV), reflecting the stabilization of the free enzyme dimer by the 2FG inhibitor. The primary dissociation channels for the noncovalent BIC-enzyme dimer are loss of neutral and charged BIC. The internal energy required to induce loss of BIC is 482 ± 8 eV, considerably less than that required to dissociate the dimers. For a given charge state, ions of the covalent and noncovalent complexes have about 15 % and 25 % lower cross sections, respectively, compared with the apo-enzyme. Thus, binding the inhibitors causes the gas-phase protein to adopt more compact conformations. Noncovalent binding surprisingly produces the greatest change in protein ion conformation, despite the weaker inhibitor binding.

  19. High-Affinity Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Menin-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Interaction Closely Mimic a Natural Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shihan; Senter, Timothy J.; Pollock, Jonathan; Han, Changho; Upadhyay, Sunil Kumar; Purohit, Trupta; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2014-10-02

    The protein–protein interaction (PPI) between menin and mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) plays a critical role in acute leukemias, and inhibition of this interaction represents a new potential therapeutic strategy for MLL leukemias. We report development of a novel class of small-molecule inhibitors of the menin–MLL interaction, the hydroxy- and aminomethylpiperidine compounds, which originated from HTS of ~288000 small molecules. We determined menin–inhibitor co-crystal structures and found that these compounds closely mimic all key interactions of MLL with menin. Extensive crystallography studies combined with structure-based design were applied for optimization of these compounds, resulting in MIV-6R, which inhibits the menin–MLL interaction with IC50 = 56 nM. Treatment with MIV-6 demonstrated strong and selective effects in MLL leukemia cells, validating specific mechanism of action. Our studies provide novel and attractive scaffold as a new potential therapeutic approach for MLL leukemias and demonstrate an example of PPI amenable to inhibition by small molecules.

  20. Small-molecule ATP-competitive dual IGF-1R and insulin receptor inhibitors: structural insights, chemical diversity and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meizhong; Wang, Jing; Buck, Elizabeth; Mulvihill, Mark J

    2012-03-01

    IGF-1R has been recognized as a major target in cancer drug discovery due to its strong implications in various stages of tumorigenesis based on accumulated preclinical data. Recent research on compensatory crosstalk between IGF-1R and insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathways suggests that targeting both IGF-1R and IR should result in a more therapeutically beneficial response, than targeting IGF-1R alone (e.g., IGF-1R-specific antibodies). These findings provided biological rationale and opened the door to the discovery of a variety of small-molecule dual IGF-1R and IR inhibitors. In this review we summarize the recent developments in this field, with a focus on binding modes and binding interactions of these inhibitors with IGF-1R and/or IR. Selectivity of these inhibitors has been discussed in this context as well. This is an important area to be discussed since one of the major challenges in kinase inhibitor drug discovery is to build an optimal selectivity profile based on biological rationale.

  1. Fragment-based discovery of a new family of non-peptidic small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Colliandre, Lionel; Ahnou, Nazim; Nevers, Quentin; Gelin, Muriel; Bessin, Yannick; Brillet, Rozenn; Cala, Olivier; Douguet, Dominique; Bourguet, William; Krimm, Isabelle; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Guichou, Jean- François

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIase) that catalyse the interconversion of the peptide bond at proline residues. Several cyclophilins play a pivotal role in the life cycle of a number of viruses. The existing cyclophilin inhibitors, all derived from cyclosporine A or sanglifehrin A, have disadvantages, including their size, potential for side effects unrelated to cyclophilin inhibition and drug–drug interactions, unclear antiviral spectrum and manufacturing issues. Here we use a fragment-based drug discovery approach using nucleic magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography and structure-based compound optimization to generate a new family of non-peptidic, small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent in vitro PPIase inhibitory activity and antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus and coronaviruses. This family of compounds has the potential for broad-spectrum, high-barrier-to-resistance treatment of viral infections. PMID:27652979

  2. Discovery of novel small molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferase G9a and their mechanism in leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kondengaden, Shukkoor M; Luo, Liu-Fei; Huang, Kenneth; Zhu, Mengyuan; Zang, Lanlan; Bataba, Eudoxie; Wang, Runling; Luo, Cheng; Wang, Binghe; Li, Keqin Kathy; Wang, Peng George

    2016-10-21

    Lysine methyltransferase G9a regulates the transcription of multiple genes by primarily catalyzing mono- and di-methylation of histone H3 lysine 9, as well as several non-histone lysine sites. An attractive therapeutic target in treating leukemia, knockout studies of G9a in mice have found dramatically slowed proliferation and self-renewal of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells due to the attenuation of HoxA9-dependent transcription. In this study, a series of compounds were identified as potential inhibitors through structure-based virtual screening. Among these compounds, a new G9a inhibitor, DCG066, was confirmed by in vitro biochemical, and cell based enzyme assays. DCG066 has a novel molecular scaffold unlike other G9a inhibitors presently available. Similar to G9a's histone substrate, DCG066 can bind directly to G9a and inhibit methyltransferase activity in vitro. In addition to suppressing G9a methyltransferase activity and reducing histone H3 methylation levels, DCG066 displays low cytotoxicity in leukemia cell lines with high levels of G9a expression, including K562. This work presents DCG066 as an inhibitor of G9a with a novel structure, providing both a lead in G9a inhibitor design and a means for probing the functionality of G9a. PMID:27393948

  3. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Jumonji AT-rich Interactive Domain 1B (JARID1B) Histone Demethylase by a Sensitive High Throughput Screen*

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Joyce; Cao, Jian; Zou, Mike Ran; Morales, Alfonso; Blair, Lauren P.; Norcia, Michael; Hoyer, Denton; Tackett, Alan J.; Merkel, Jane S.; Yan, Qin

    2013-01-01

    JARID1B (also known as KDM5B or PLU1) is a member of the JARID1 family of histone lysine demethylases responsible for the demethylation of trimethylated lysine 27 in histone H3 (H3K4me3), a mark for actively transcribed genes. JARID1B is overexpressed in several cancers, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, and lung cancer. In addition, JARID1B is required for mammary tumor formation in syngeneic or xenograft mouse models. JARID1B-expressing melanoma cells are associated with increased self-renewal character. Therefore, JARID1B represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here we characterized JARID1B using a homogeneous luminescence-based demethylase assay. We then conducted a high throughput screen of over 15,000 small molecules to identify inhibitors of JARID1B. From this screen, we identified several known JmjC histone demethylase inhibitors, including 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and catechols. More importantly, we identified several novel inhibitors, including 2-4(4-methylphenyl)-1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2H)-one (PBIT), which inhibits JARID1B with an IC50 of about 3 μm in vitro. Consistent with this, PBIT treatment inhibited removal of H3K4me3 by JARID1B in cells. Furthermore, this compound inhibited proliferation of cells expressing higher levels of JARID1B. These results suggest that this novel small molecule inhibitor is a lead compound that can be further optimized for cancer therapy. PMID:23408432

  4. The cardiotoxicity and myocyte damage caused by small molecule anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors is correlated with lack of target specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B.

    2010-04-15

    The use of the new anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has revolutionized the treatment of certain cancers. However, the use of some of these results in cardiotoxicity. Large-scale profiling data recently made available for the binding of 7 of the 9 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases has allowed us to correlate kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with TKI-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The tyrosine kinase selectivity scores, but not the serine-threonine kinase scores, were highly correlated with the myocyte damaging effects of the TKIs. Additionally, we showed that damage to myocytes gave a good rank order correlation with clinical cardiotoxicity. Finally, strength of TKI binding to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) was highly correlated with myocyte damage, thus possibly implicating this kinase in contributing to TKI-induced cardiotoxicity.

  5. Adxanthromycins A and B, new inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1 mediated cell adhesion molecule from Streptomyces sp. NA-148. II. Physico-chemical properties and structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Nakano, T; Koiwa, T; Noshita, T; Funayama, S; Koshino, H; Nakagawa, A

    2000-02-01

    Adxanthromycins A and B are new inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1 mediated cell adhesion molecule isolated from the fermentation broth of Streptomyces sp. NA-148. The molecular formula of adxanthromycins A and B were determined as C42H40O17 and C48H50O22, respectively by FAB-MS and NMR spectral analyses, and the structures of both compounds were elucidated to be a dimeric anthrone peroxide skeleton containing alpha-D-galactose by various NMR spectral analyses and chemical degradation. PMID:10805577

  6. Generation of a Selective Small Molecule Inhibitor of the CBP/p300 Bromodomain for Leukemia Therapy.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Sarah; Fedorov, Oleg; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Leonards, Katharina; Jones, Katherine; Meier, Julia; Olzscha, Heidi; Monteiro, Octovia; Martin, Sarah; Philpott, Martin; Tumber, Anthony; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Yapp, Clarence; Wells, Christopher; Che, Ka Hing; Bannister, Andrew; Robson, Samuel; Kumar, Umesh; Parr, Nigel; Lee, Kevin; Lugo, Dave; Jeffrey, Philip; Taylor, Simon; Vecellio, Matteo L; Bountra, Chas; Brennan, Paul E; O'Mahony, Alison; Velichko, Sharlene; Müller, Susanne; Hay, Duncan; Daniels, Danette L; Urh, Marjeta; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Kouzarides, Tony; Prinjha, Rab; Schwaller, Jürg; Knapp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    The histone acetyltransferases CBP/p300 are involved in recurrent leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations and are key regulators of cell growth. Therefore, efforts to generate inhibitors of CBP/p300 are of clinical value. We developed a specific and potent acetyl-lysine competitive protein-protein interaction inhibitor, I-CBP112, that targets the CBP/p300 bromodomains. Exposure of human and mouse leukemic cell lines to I-CBP112 resulted in substantially impaired colony formation and induced cellular differentiation without significant cytotoxicity. I-CBP112 significantly reduced the leukemia-initiating potential of MLL-AF9(+) acute myeloid leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, I-CBP112 increased the cytotoxic activity of BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 as well as doxorubicin. Collectively, we report the development and preclinical evaluation of a novel, potent inhibitor targeting CBP/p300 bromodomains that impairs aberrant self-renewal of leukemic cells. The synergistic effects of I-CBP112 and current standard therapy (doxorubicin) as well as emerging treatment strategies (BET inhibition) provide new opportunities for combinatorial treatment of leukemia and potentially other cancers. PMID:26552700

  7. Targeting Hsp90 with small molecule inhibitors induces the over-expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule, survivin, in human A549, HONE-1 and HT-29 cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Survivin is a dual functioning protein. It inhibits the apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting caspases, and also promotes cancer cell growth by stabilizing microtubules during mitosis. Since the molecular chaperone Hsp90 binds and stabilizes survivin, it is widely believed that down-regulation of survivin is one of the important therapeutic functions of Hsp90 inhibitors such as the phase III clinically trialed compound 17-AAG. However, Hsp90 interferes with a number of molecules that up-regulate the intracellular level of survivin, raising the question that clinical use of Hsp90 inhibitors may indirectly induce survivin expression and subsequently enhance cancer anti-drug responses. The purpose of this study is to determine whether targeting Hsp90 can alter survivin expression differently in different cancer cell lines and to explore possible mechanisms that cause the alteration in survivin expression. Results Here, we demonstrated that Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, induced the over-expression of survivin in three different human cancer cell lines as shown by Western blotting. Increased survivin mRNA transcripts were observed in 17-AAG and geldanamycin-treated HT-29 and HONE-1 cancer cells. Interestingly, real-time PCR and translation inhibition studies revealed that survivin was over-expressed partially through the up-regulation of protein translation instead of gene transcription in A549 cancer cells. In addition, 17-AAG-treated A549, HONE-1 and HT-29 cells showed reduced proteasomal activity while inhibition of 26S proteasome activity further increased the amount of survivin protein in cells. At the functional level, down-regulation of survivin by siRNA further increased the drug sensitivity to 17-AAG in the tested cancer cell lines. Conclusions We showed for the first time that down-regulation of survivin is not a definite therapeutic function of Hsp90 inhibitors. Instead, targeting Hsp90 with small molecule inhibitors will induce the

  8. Small molecule kinase inhibitor LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent activity against colorectal and pancreatic cancer through inhibition of doublecortin-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is emerging as a tumor specific stem cell marker in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of inhibiting DCLK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) as well as genetically targeting the DCLK1+ cell for deletion. However, the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity have not been studied directly. Therefore, we assessed the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity using the novel small molecule kinase inhibitor, LRRK2-IN-1, which demonstrates significant affinity for DCLK1. Results Here we report that LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity including inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Additionally we found that it regulates stemness, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and oncogenic targets on the molecular level. Moreover, we show that LRRK2-IN-1 suppresses DCLK1 kinase activity and downstream DCLK1 effector c-MYC, and demonstrate that DCLK1 kinase activity is a significant factor in resistance to LRRK2-IN-1. Conclusions Given DCLK1’s tumor stem cell marker status, a strong understanding of its biological role and interactions in gastrointestinal tumors may lead to discoveries that improve patient outcomes. The results of this study suggest that small molecule inhibitors of DCLK1 kinase should be further investigated as they may hold promise as anti-tumor stem cell drugs. PMID:24885928

  9. Discovery of highly potent and selective small molecule ADAMTS-5 inhibitors that inhibit human cartilage degradation via encoded library technology (ELT).

    PubMed

    Deng, Hongfeng; O'Keefe, Heather; Davie, Christopher P; Lind, Kenneth E; Acharya, Raksha A; Franklin, G Joseph; Larkin, Jonathan; Matico, Rosalie; Neeb, Michael; Thompson, Monique M; Lohr, Thomas; Gross, Jeffrey W; Centrella, Paolo A; O'Donovan, Gary K; Bedard, Katie L Sargent; van Vloten, Kurt; Mataruse, Sibongile; Skinner, Steven R; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Carpenter, Tiffany Y; Shearer, Todd W; Clark, Matthew A; Cuozzo, John W; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Morgan, Barry A

    2012-08-23

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS-5 is considered a potential target for the treatment of osteoarthritis. To identify selective inhibitors of ADAMTS-5, we employed encoded library technology (ELT), which enables affinity selection of small molecule binders from complex mixtures by DNA tagging. Selection of ADAMTS-5 against a four-billion member ELT library led to a novel inhibitor scaffold not containing a classical zinc-binding functionality. One exemplar, (R)-N-((1-(4-(but-3-en-1-ylamino)-6-(((2-(thiophen-2-yl)thiazol-4-yl)methyl)amino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)pyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-4-propylbenzenesulfonamide (8), inhibited ADAMTS-5 with IC(50) = 30 nM, showing >50-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-4 and >1000-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-1, ADAMTS-13, MMP-13, and TACE. Extensive SAR studies showed that potency and physicochemical properties of the scaffold could be further improved. Furthermore, in a human osteoarthritis cartilage explant study, compounds 8 and 15f inhibited aggrecanase-mediated (374)ARGS neoepitope release from aggrecan and glycosaminoglycan in response to IL-1β/OSM stimulation. This study provides the first small molecule evidence for the critical role of ADAMTS-5 in human cartilage degradation. PMID:22891645

  10. Diverse Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease APE1 Identified from a Screen of a Large Public Collection

    PubMed Central

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N.; Maloney, David J.; Jadhav, Ajit; Wilson, David M.; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS) of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment. PMID:23110144

  11. Forces and Dynamics of Glucose and Inhibitor Binding to Sodium Glucose Co-transporter SGLT1 Studied by Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Neundlinger, Isabel; Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Wildling, Linda; Rankl, Christian; Wang, Lai-Xi; Gruber, Hermann J.; Kinne, Rolf K. H.; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy was employed to investigate the dynamics of the sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT1) upon substrate and inhibitor binding on the single molecule level. CHO cells stably expressing rbSGLT1 were probed by using atomic force microscopy tips carrying either thioglucose, 2′-aminoethyl β-d-glucopyranoside, or aminophlorizin. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains of different length and varying end groups were used as tether. Experiments were performed at 10, 25 and 37 °C to address different conformational states of SGLT1. Unbinding forces between ligands and SGLT1 were recorded at different loading rates by changing the retraction velocity, yielding binding probability, width of energy barrier of the binding pocket, and the kinetic off rate constant of the binding reaction. With increasing temperature, width of energy barrier and average life time increased for the interaction of SGLT1 with thioglucose (coupled via acrylamide to a long PEG) but decreased for aminophlorizin binding. The former indicates that in the membrane-bound SGLT1 the pathway to sugar translocation involves several steps with different temperature sensitivity. The latter suggests that also the aglucon binding sites for transport inhibitors have specific, temperature-sensitive conformations. PMID:24962566

  12. Discovery of Potent Anticancer Agent HJC0416, an Orally Bioavailable Small Molecule Inhibitor of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Ding, Chunyong; Xiong, Ailian; Wild, Christopher; Wang, Lili; Ye, Na; Cai, Guoshuai; Flores, Rudolfo M.; Ding, Ye; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop orally bioavailable small-molecule STAT3 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for human cancer, a series of novel diversified analogues based on our identified lead compound HJC0149 (1) (5-chloro-N-(1,1-dioxo-1H-1λ6-benzo[b]thiophen-6-yl)-2-hydroxybenzamide, Eur. J. Med. Chem. 2013, 62, 498–507) have been rationally designed, synthesized, and pharmacologically evaluated. Molecular docking studies and biological characterization supported our earlier findings that the O-alkylamino-tethered side chain on the hydroxyl group is an effective and essential structural determinant for improving biological activities and druglike properties of these molecules. Compounds with such modifications exhibited potent antiproliferative effects against breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines with IC50 values from low micromolar to nanomolar range. Among them, the newly discovered STAT3 inhibitor 12 (HJC0416) displayed an intriguing anticancer profile both in vitro and in vivo (i.p. & p.o.). More importantly, HJC0416 is an orally bioavailable anticancer agent as a promising candidate for further development. PMID:24904966

  13. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of CD4-gp120 binding based on virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Elban, Mark A.; Courter, Joel R.; Sugawara, Akihiro; Soeta, Takahiro; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D.; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Smith, Amos B.

    2011-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight compound JRC-II-191 inhibits infection of HIV-1 by blocking the binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CD4 receptor and is therefore an important lead in the development of a potent viral entry inhibitor. Reported here is the use of two orthogonal screening methods, GOLD docking and ROCS shape-based similarity searching, to identify amine-building blocks that, when conjugated to the core scaffold, yield novel analogues that maintain similar affinity for gp120. Use of this computational approach to expand SAR produced analogues of equal inhibitory activity but with diverse capacity to enhance viral infection. The novel analogues provide additional lead scaffolds for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that employ protein-ligand interactions in the vestibule of gp120 Phe 43 cavity. PMID:21169023

  14. Structure Guided Chemical Modifications of Propylthiouracil Reveal Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cytochrome b5 Reductase 3 That Increase Nitric Oxide Bioavailability*

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Md. Mizanur; Reinders, Fabio G.; Koes, David; Nguyen, Anh T.; Mutchler, Stephanie M.; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Alvarez, Roger A.; Miller, Megan P.; Cheng, Dongmei; Chen, Bill B.; Jackson, Edwin K.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Straub, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    NADH cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3) is critical for reductive reactions such as fatty acid elongation, cholesterol biosynthesis, drug metabolism, and methemoglobin reduction. Although the physiological and metabolic importance of CYB5R3 has been established in hepatocytes and erythrocytes, emerging investigations suggest that CYB5R3 is critical for nitric oxide signaling and vascular function. However, advancement toward fully understanding CYB5R3 function has been limited due to a lack of potent small molecule inhibitors. Because of this restriction, we modeled the binding mode of propylthiouracil, a weak inhibitor of CYB5R3 (IC50 = ∼275 μm), and used it as a guide to predict thiouracil-biased inhibitors from the set of commercially available compounds in the ZINC database. Using this approach, we validated two new potent derivatives of propylthiouracil, ZINC05626394 (IC50 = 10.81 μm) and ZINC39395747 (IC50 = 9.14 μm), both of which inhibit CYB5R3 activity in cultured cells. Moreover, we found that ZINC39395747 significantly increased NO bioavailability in renal vascular cells, augmented renal blood flow, and decreased systemic blood pressure in response to vasoconstrictors in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These compounds will serve as a new tool to examine the biological functions of CYB5R3 in physiology and disease and also as a platform for new drug development. PMID:26001785

  15. Structure Guided Chemical Modifications of Propylthiouracil Reveal Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cytochrome b5 Reductase 3 That Increase Nitric Oxide Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Md Mizanur; Reinders, Fabio G; Koes, David; Nguyen, Anh T; Mutchler, Stephanie M; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Alvarez, Roger A; Miller, Megan P; Cheng, Dongmei; Chen, Bill B; Jackson, Edwin K; Camacho, Carlos J; Straub, Adam C

    2015-07-01

    NADH cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3) is critical for reductive reactions such as fatty acid elongation, cholesterol biosynthesis, drug metabolism, and methemoglobin reduction. Although the physiological and metabolic importance of CYB5R3 has been established in hepatocytes and erythrocytes, emerging investigations suggest that CYB5R3 is critical for nitric oxide signaling and vascular function. However, advancement toward fully understanding CYB5R3 function has been limited due to a lack of potent small molecule inhibitors. Because of this restriction, we modeled the binding mode of propylthiouracil, a weak inhibitor of CYB5R3 (IC50 = ∼275 μM), and used it as a guide to predict thiouracil-biased inhibitors from the set of commercially available compounds in the ZINC database. Using this approach, we validated two new potent derivatives of propylthiouracil, ZINC05626394 (IC50 = 10.81 μM) and ZINC39395747 (IC50 = 9.14 μM), both of which inhibit CYB5R3 activity in cultured cells. Moreover, we found that ZINC39395747 significantly increased NO bioavailability in renal vascular cells, augmented renal blood flow, and decreased systemic blood pressure in response to vasoconstrictors in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These compounds will serve as a new tool to examine the biological functions of CYB5R3 in physiology and disease and also as a platform for new drug development. PMID:26001785

  16. Design and synthesis of small molecule RhoA inhibitors: a new promising therapy for cardiovascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing; Feng, Enguang; Ma, Sheng; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Xiaofeng; Li, Honglin; Huang, Huang; Zhu, Jin; Zhu, Weiliang; Shen, Xu; Miao, Liyan; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jian

    2011-07-14

    RhoA is a member of Rho GTPases, a subgroup of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins. RhoA, as an important regulator of diverse cellular signaling pathways, plays significant roles in cytoskeletal organization, transcription, and cell-cycle progression. The RhoA/ROCK inhibitors have emerged as a new promising treatment for cardiovascular diseases. However, to date, RhoA inhibitors are macromolecules, and to our knowledge, small molecular-based inhibitors have not been reported. In this study, a series of first-in-class small molecular RhoA inhibitors have been discovered by using structure-based virtual screening in conjunction with chemical synthesis and bioassay. Virtual screening of ∼200,000 compounds, followed by SPR-based binding affinity assays resulted in three compounds with binding affinities to RhoA at the micromolar level (compounds 1-3). Compound 1 was selected for further structure modifications in considering binding activity and synthesis ease. Fourty-one new compounds (1, 12a-v, 13a-h, and 14a-j) were designed and synthesized accordingly. It was found that eight (12a, 12j, 14a, 14b, 14d, 14e, 14 g, and 14h) showed high RhoA inhibition activities with IC(50) values of 1.24 to 3.00 μM. A pharmacological assay indicated that two compounds (14g and 14 h) demonstrated noticeable vasorelaxation effects against PE-induced contraction in thoracic aorta artery rings and served as good leads for developing more potent cardiovascular agents.

  17. Designing Second Generation Anti-Alzheimer Compounds as Inhibitors of Human Acetylcholinesterase: Computational Screening of Synthetic Molecules and Dietary Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Amat-ur-Rasool, Hafsa; Ahmed, Mehboob

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a big cause of memory loss, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The disease leads to irreversible loss of neurons that result in reduced level of acetylcholine neurotransmitter (ACh). The reduction of ACh level impairs brain functioning. One aspect of AD therapy is to maintain ACh level up to a safe limit, by blocking acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme that is naturally responsible for its degradation. This research presents an in-silico screening and designing of hAChE inhibitors as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs. Molecular docking results of the database retrieved (synthetic chemicals and dietary phytochemicals) and self-drawn ligands were compared with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs against AD as controls. Furthermore, computational ADME studies were performed on the hits to assess their safety. Human AChE was found to be most approptiate target site as compared to commonly used Torpedo AChE. Among the tested dietry phytochemicals, berberastine, berberine, yohimbine, sanguinarine, elemol and naringenin are the worth mentioning phytochemicals as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs The synthetic leads were mostly dual binding site inhibitors with two binding subunits linked by a carbon chain i.e. second generation AD drugs. Fifteen new heterodimers were designed that were computationally more efficient inhibitors than previously reported compounds. Using computational methods, compounds present in online chemical databases can be screened to design more efficient and safer drugs against cognitive symptoms of AD. PMID:26325402

  18. Designing Second Generation Anti-Alzheimer Compounds as Inhibitors of Human Acetylcholinesterase: Computational Screening of Synthetic Molecules and Dietary Phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Amat-Ur-Rasool, Hafsa; Ahmed, Mehboob

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a big cause of memory loss, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The disease leads to irreversible loss of neurons that result in reduced level of acetylcholine neurotransmitter (ACh). The reduction of ACh level impairs brain functioning. One aspect of AD therapy is to maintain ACh level up to a safe limit, by blocking acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme that is naturally responsible for its degradation. This research presents an in-silico screening and designing of hAChE inhibitors as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs. Molecular docking results of the database retrieved (synthetic chemicals and dietary phytochemicals) and self-drawn ligands were compared with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs against AD as controls. Furthermore, computational ADME studies were performed on the hits to assess their safety. Human AChE was found to be most approptiate target site as compared to commonly used Torpedo AChE. Among the tested dietry phytochemicals, berberastine, berberine, yohimbine, sanguinarine, elemol and naringenin are the worth mentioning phytochemicals as potential anti-Alzheimer drugs The synthetic leads were mostly dual binding site inhibitors with two binding subunits linked by a carbon chain i.e. second generation AD drugs. Fifteen new heterodimers were designed that were computationally more efficient inhibitors than previously reported compounds. Using computational methods, compounds present in online chemical databases can be screened to design more efficient and safer drugs against cognitive symptoms of AD. PMID:26325402

  19. Structure-based screen identifies a potent small-molecule inhibitor of Stat5a/b with therapeutic potential for prostate cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhiyong; Gu, Lei; Vergalli, Jenny; Mariani, Samanta A.; De Dominici, Marco; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Purushottamachar, Puranik; McCue, Peter A.; Trabulsi, Edouard; Lallas, Costas D.; Gupta, Shilpa; Ellsworth, Elyse; Blackmon, Shauna; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Leiby, Benjamin; Xia, Guanjun; Rui, Hallgeir; Hoang, David T.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Cingolani, Gino; Njar, Vincent; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Calabretta, Bruno; Nevalainen, Marja T.

    2015-01-01

    Bypassing tyrosine kinases responsible for Stat5a/b phosphorylation would be advantageous for therapy development for Stat5a/b-regulated cancers. Here, we sought to identify small-molecule inhibitors of Stat5a/b for lead optimization and therapy development for prostate cancer (PC) and Bcr-Abl-driven leukemias. In silico screening of chemical structure databases combined with medicinal chemistry was used for identification of a panel of small-molecule inhibitors to block SH2-domain-mediated docking of Stat5a/b to the receptor-kinase complex and subsequent phosphorylation and dimerization. We tested the efficacy of the lead-compound, IST5-002, in experimental models and patient samples of two known Stat5a/b-driven cancers, prostate cancer (PC) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The lead compound Inhibitor of Stat5-002 (IST5-002) prevented both Jak2 and Bcr-Abl-mediated phosphorylation and dimerization of Stat5a/b, and selectively inhibited transcriptional activity of Stat5a (IC50 1.5 μM) and Stat5b (IC50 3.5 μM). IST5-002 suppressed nuclear translocation of Stat5a/b, binding to DNA and Stat5a/b target gene expression. IST5-002 induced extensive apoptosis of PC cells, impaired growth of PC xenograft tumors and induced cell death in patient-derived PCs when tested ex vivo in explant organ cultures. Importantly, IST5-002 induced robust apoptotic death not only of imatinib-sensitive but also imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines and primary CML cells from patients. IST5-002 provides a lead structure for further chemical modifications for clinical development for Stat5a/b-driven solid tumors and hematological malignancies. PMID:26026053

  20. The use of ion mobility mass spectrometry to probe modulation of the structure of p53 and of MDM2 by small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Eleanor R.; Jurneczko, Ewa; Nicholson, Judith; Hupp, Ted R.; Zawacka-Pankau, Joanna; Selivanova, Galina; Barran, Perdita E.

    2015-01-01

    Developing drug-like molecules to inhibit the interactions formed by disordered proteins is desirable due to the high correlation of disorder with protein implicated in disease, but is challenging due in part to the lack of atomistically resolved and resolvable structures from conformationally dynamic systems. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is well-positioned to assess protein ligand interactions along with the effect of a given inhibitor on conformation. Here we demonstrate the use of IM-MS to characterize the effect of two inhibitors RITA and Nutlin-3 on their respective binding partners: p53 and MDM2. RITA binds N-terminal transactivation domain of p53 (Np53) weakly, preventing direct observation of the complex in the gas phase. Nonetheless, upon incubation with RITA, we observe an alteration in the charge state distribution and in the conformational distributions adopted by Np53 in the gas phase. This finding supports the hypothesis that RITAs mode of action proceeds via a conformational change in p53. Circular dichroism corroborates our gas phase findings, showing a slight increase in secondary structure content on ligand incubation, and HDX-MS experiments also highlight the dynamic properties of this protein. Using the same approach we present data to show the effect of Nutlin-3 binding to the N-terminal domain of MDM2 (N-MDM2), N-MDM2 presents as at least two conformational families in the absence of Nutlin-3. Upon Nutlin-3 binding, the protein undergoes a compaction event similar to that exhibited by RITA on Np53. This multi-technique approach highlights the inherent disorder in these systems; and in particular exemplifies the power of IM-MS as a technique to study transient interactions between small molecule inhibitors and intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:26217671

  1. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Tau aggregation by targeting monomeric Tau as a potential therapeutic approach for Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Marcus; Neumann, Thomas; Schwizer, Daniel; Callaway, Kari; Vendruscolo, Michele; Schenk, Dale; George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eva M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; McConlogue, Lisa; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Tóth, Gergely

    2016-01-01

    A potential strategy to alleviate the aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is to maintain the native functional state of the protein by small molecule binding. However, the targeting of the native state of IDPs by small molecules has been challenging due to their heterogeneous conformational ensembles. To tackle this challenge, we applied a high-throughput chemical microarray surface plasmon resonance imaging screen to detect the binding between small molecules and monomeric full-length Tau, a protein linked with the onset of a range of Tauopathies. The screen identified a novel set of drug-like fragment and lead-like compounds that bound to Tau. We verified that the majority of these hit compounds reduced the aggregation of different Tau constructs in vitro and in N2a cells. These results demonstrate that Tau is a viable receptor of drug-like small molecules. The drug discovery approach that we present can be applied to other IDPs linked to other misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. PMID:26510979

  2. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Tau Aggregation by Targeting Monomeric Tau As a Potential Therapeutic Approach for Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Marcus; Neumann, Thomas; Schwizer, Daniel; Callaway, Kari; Vendruscolo, Michele; Schenk, Dale; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eva M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; McConlogue, Lisa; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Tóth, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    A potential strategy to alleviate the aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is to maintain the native functional state of the protein by small molecule binding. However, the targeting of the native state of IDPs by small molecules has been challenging due to their heterogeneous conformational ensembles. To tackle this challenge, we applied a high-throughput chemical microarray surface plasmon resonance imaging screen to detect the binding between small molecules and monomeric full-length Tau, a protein linked with the onset of a range of Tauopathies. The screen identified a novel set of drug-like fragment and lead-like compounds that bound to Tau. We verified that the majority of these hit compounds reduced the aggregation of different Tau constructs in vitro and in N2a cells. These results demonstrate that Tau is a viable receptor of drug-like small molecules. The drug discovery approach that we present can be applied to other IDPs linked to other misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

  3. Small molecule inhibitors of IkappaB kinase are selectively toxic for subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma defined by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lloyd T; Davis, R Eric; Pierce, Jackie; Hepperle, Michael; Xu, Yajun; Hottelet, Maria; Nong, Yuhua; Wen, Danyi; Adams, Julian; Dang, Lenny; Staudt, Louis M

    2005-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the NF-kappaB pathway is required for survival of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here we show that a small molecule IkappaB kinase (IKK) inhibitor, PS-1145, and related compounds are toxic for ABC DLBCL cell lines but not for cell lines derived from the other prevalent form of DLBCL, germinal center B cell-like DLBCL. Treatment of ABC lines with these inhibitors rapidly induced a series of gene expression changes that were attributable to cessation of constitutive IKK activity, similar to changes induced by acute expression of genetic inhibitors of NF-kappaB, confirming the effectiveness and specificity of this compound. Before cell death, inhibition of IKK also induced features of apoptosis and an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. To test further the specificity of this toxicity, an inducible form of NF-kappaB was created by fusing the p65 NF-kappaB subunit with the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (p65-ERD). In the presence of tamoxifen, p65-ERD reversed the toxicity of IKK inhibition and restored expression of many NF-kappaB target genes. Another subgroup of DLBCL, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), also expresses NF-kappaB target genes, and treatment of a PMBL cell line with an IKK inhibitor was toxic and induced gene expression changes of a distinct group of NF-kappaB target genes. These studies validate the NF-kappaB pathway as a promising therapeutic target in ABC DLBCL, PMBL, and other lymphomas that depend on the activity of NF-kappaB for survival and proliferation. PMID:15671525

  4. 4SC-101, a novel small molecule dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor, suppresses systemic lupus erythematosus in MRL-(Fas)lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Onkar P; Sayyed, Sufyan G; Kantner, Claudia; Ryu, Mi; Schnurr, Max; Sárdy, Miklós; Leban, Johann; Jankowsky, Ruediger; Ammendola, Aldo; Doblhofer, Robert; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2010-06-01

    Immunosuppressive treatments of systemic lupus (SLE) remain associated with significant toxicities; hence, compounds with better toxicity profiles are needed. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibition with leflunomide has proven to be effective in autoimmune diseases including SLE, but leflunomide can cause a variety of side effects. We hypothesized that 4SC-101, a novel DHODH inhibitor with a more favorable toxicity profile, would be as effective as high-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) in controlling experimental SLE of female MRL(Fas)lpr mice. Daily oral gavage of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg 4SC-101 from 12 to 22 weeks of age was compared with either vehicle or CYC treatment (30 mg/kg/week, i.p.) in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Three hundred milligrams per kilogram 4SC-101 was as effective as CYC in depleting spleen autoreactive T cells, B cells, and plasma cells as well as the respective DNA and RNA serum autoantibodies. This was associated with a comparable amelioration of the renal, dermal, and pulmonary SLE manifestations of MRL(Fas)lpr mice. However, even the highest dose of 4SC-101 had no effect on bone marrow neutrophil counts, which were significantly reduced in CYC-treated mice. Together, the novel DHODH inhibitor 4SC-101 is as effective as high dose CYC in controlling SLE without causing myelosuppression. Hence, DHODH inhibition with 4SC-101 might be suitable to treat active SLE with fewer side effects than CYC.

  5. Oridonin: a small molecule inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) isolated from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Luan, Jian; Zhang, Yaofang; Yang, Shuang; Wang, Xue; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an epithelial chloride channel regulating the transepithelial transport of electrolyte and water. In the recent years, CFTR chloride channel becomes the new molecular target of treating secretory diarrhea. The objective of this study is to find out a novel CFTR inhibitor from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and study on its pharmacological activity. About 34,000 factions of TCM extracts were screened by high throughput screening (HTS) in this research. We found that Rabdosia rubescens show a potent inhibition on CFTR. Under the bio-active analysis guidance, an ent-kaurane diterpenoid - oridonin (PubChem CID: 34378) was isolated from R. rubescens. A series of intensive studies showed that oridonin remarkably reduced iodide influx in wt-CFTR and ΔF508-CFTR FRT epithelial cells in a dose-dependent and irreversible way. Oridonin sharply blocked FSK-stimulated short-circuit current in both rats and mice intestine in vitro. In mouse closed-loop model, oridonin reduced cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion significantly over 6hours in vivo. Thus we concluded that oridonin is a new inhibitor of CFTR Cl(-) channel. It will be a good leading compound for developing the new drug of cholera toxin-induced secretory diarrhea. PMID:25447156

  6. Salicylic Acid Based Small Molecule Inhibitor for the Oncogenic Src Homology-2 Domain Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 (SHP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xian; He, Yantao; Liu, Sijiu; Yu, Zhihong; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yang, Zhenyun; Dong, Yuanshu; Nabinger, Sarah C.; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Wang, Lina; Chan, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2010-08-13

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) plays a pivotal role in growth factor and cytokine signaling. Gain-of-function SHP2 mutations are associated with Noonan syndrome, various kinds of leukemias, and solid tumors. Thus, there is considerable interest in SHP2 as a potential target for anticancer and antileukemia therapy. We report a salicylic acid based combinatorial library approach aimed at binding both active site and unique nearby subpockets for enhanced affinity and selectivity. Screening of the library led to the identification of a SHP2 inhibitor II-B08 (compound 9) with highly efficacious cellular activity. Compound 9 blocks growth factor stimulated ERK1/2 activation and hematopoietic progenitor proliferation, providing supporting evidence that chemical inhibition of SHP2 may be therapeutically useful for anticancer and antileukemia treatment. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the structure of SHP2 in complex with 9 reveals molecular determinants that can be exploited for the acquisition of more potent and selective SHP2 inhibitors.

  7. A potent and selective small molecule inhibitor of sirtuin 1 promotes differentiation of pluripotent P19 cells into functional neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Seok; Lee, Chang-Hee; Chang, Gyeong-Eon; Cheong, Eunji; Shin, Injae

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is known to suppress differentiation of pluripotent/multipotent cells and neural progenitor cells into neurons by blocking activation of transcription factors critical for neurogenesis. EX-527 is a highly selective and potent inhibitor against SIRT1 and has been used as a chemical probe that modulates SIRT1-associated biological processes. However, the effect of EX-527 on neuronal differentiation in pluripotent cells has not been well elucidated. Here, we report an examination of EX-527 effects on neurogenesis of pluripotent P19 cells. The results showed that EX-527 greatly accelerated differentiation of P19 cells into neurons without generation of cardiac cells and astrocytes. Importantly, neurons derived from P19 cells treated with EX-527 generated voltage-dependent sodium currents and depolarization-induced action potentials. The findings indicate that the differentiated cells have electrophysiological properties. The present study suggests that the selective SIRT1 inhibitor could have the potential of being employed as a chemical inducer to generate functionally active neurons. PMID:27680533

  8. Biologic activity of the novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor LLL12 against canine osteosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background STAT3 [1] has been shown to be dysregulated in nearly every major cancer, including osteosarcoma (OS). Constitutive activation of STAT3, via aberrant phosphorylation, leads to proliferation, cell survival and resistance to apoptosis. The present study sought to characterize the biologic activity of a novel allosteric STAT3 inhibitor, LLL12, in canine OS cell lines. Results We evaluated the effects of LLL12 treatment on 4 canine OS cell lines and found that LLL12 inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreased the expression of several transcriptional targets of STAT3 in these cells. Lastly, LLL12 exhibited synergistic anti-proliferative activity with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin in the OS lines. Conclusion LLL12 exhibits biologic activity against canine OS cell lines through inhibition of STAT3 related cellular functions supporting its potential use as a novel therapy for OS. PMID:23244668

  9. Small Molecule Inhibitors of the LEDGF Site of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase Identified by Fragment Screening and Structure Based Design

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S.; Rhodes, David I.; Vandegraaff, Nick; Le, Giang; Smith, Jessica A.; Clark, Lisa J.; Jones, Eric D.; Coates, Jonathan A. V.; Thienthong, Neeranat; Newman, Janet; Dolezal, Olan; Mulder, Roger; Ryan, John H.; Savage, G. Paul; Francis, Craig L.; Deadman, John J.

    2012-01-01

    A fragment-based screen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) integrase led to a number of compounds that bound to the lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding site of the integrase catalytic core domain. We determined the crystallographic structures of complexes of the HIV integrase catalytic core domain for 10 of these compounds and quantitated the binding by surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that the compounds inhibit the interaction of LEDGF with HIV integrase in a proximity AlphaScreen assay, an assay for the LEDGF enhancement of HIV integrase strand transfer and in a cell based assay. The compounds identified represent a potential framework for the development of a new series of HIV integrase inhibitors that do not bind to the catalytic site of the enzyme. PMID:22808106

  10. I. Development of Metal-Mediated SPOT-Synthesis Methods for the Efficient Construction of Small-Molecule Macroarrays. II. Design and Synthesis of Novel Bacterial Biofilm Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Reto

    I. The use of small molecule probes to explore biological phenomena has become a valuable tool in chemical biology. As a result, methods that permit the rapid synthesis and biological evaluation of such compounds are highly sought-after. The small molecule macroarray represents one such approach for the synthesis and identification of novel bioactive agents. Macroarrays are readily constructed via the SPOT-synthesis technique on planar cellulose membranes, yielding spatially addressed libraries of ˜10-1000 unique compounds. We sought to expand the arsenal of chemical reactions compatible with this solid-phase platform, and developed highly efficient SPOT-synthesis protocols for the Mizoroki-Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. We demonstrated that these metal-mediated reactions can be implemented, either individually or sequentially, for the efficient construction of small molecules in high purity on rapid time scales. Utilizing these powerful C-C and C-N bond forming coupling reactions, we constructed a series of macroarrays based on novel stilbene, phenyl-naphthalene, and triazole scaliblds. Subsequent biological testing of the stilbene and phenyl-naphthalene libraries revealed several potent antagonists and agonists, respectively, of the quorum sensing (QS) receptor LuxR in Vibrio fischeri. II. Bacteria living within biofilms are notorious for their resistance to known antibiotic agents, and constitute a major human health threat. Methods to attenuate biofilm growth would have a significant impact on the management of bacterial infections. Despite intense research efforts, small molecules capable of either inhibiting or dispersing biolilms remain scarce. We utilized natural products with purported anti-biofilm or QS inhibitory activity as sources of structural insight to guide the synthesis of novel biofilm modulators with improved activities. These studies revealed 2-aminobenzimidazole derivatives as highly potent

  11. Molecular Probing of the HPV-16 E6 Protein Alpha Helix Binding Groove with Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rietz, Anne; Petrov, Dino P.; Bartolowits, Matthew; DeSmet, Marsha; Davisson, V. Jo; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2016-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) HPV E6 protein has emerged as a central oncoprotein in HPV-associated cancers in which sustained expression is required for tumor progression. A majority of the E6 protein interactions within the human proteome use an alpha-helix groove interface for binding. The UBE3A/E6AP HECT domain ubiquitin ligase binds E6 at this helix-groove interface. This enables formation of a trimeric complex with p53, resulting in destruction of this tumor suppressor. While recent x-ray crystal structures are useful, examples of small molecule probes that can modulate protein interactions at this interface are limited. To develop insights useful for potential structure-based design of ligands for HPV E6, a series of 2,6-disubstituted benzopyranones were prepared and tested as competitive antagonists of E6-E6AP helix-groove interactions. These small molecule probes were used in both binding and functional assays to evaluate recognition features of the E6 protein. Evidence for an ionic functional group interaction within the helix groove was implicated by the structure-activity among the highest affinity ligands. The molecular topographies of these protein-ligand interactions were evaluated by comparing the binding and activities of single amino acid E6 mutants with the results of molecular dynamic simulations. A group of arginine residues that form a rim-cap over the E6 helix groove offer compensatory roles in binding and recognition of the small molecule probes. The flexibility and impact on the overall helix-groove shape dictated by these residues offer new insights for structure-based targeting of HPV E6. PMID:26915086

  12. The Role of Histone Deacetylases in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Small-Molecule Inhibitors as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürli, Roland W.; Thomas, Elizabeth; Beaumont, Vahri

    Neurodegenerative disorders are devastating for patients and their social environment. Their etiology is poorly understood and complex. As a result, there is clearly an urgent need for therapeutic agents that slow down disease progress and alleviate symptoms. In this respect, interference with expression and function of multiple gene products at the epigenetic level has offered much promise, and histone deacetylases play a crucial role in these processes. This review presents an overview of the biological pathways in which these enzymes are involved and illustrates the complex network of proteins that governs their activity. An overview of small molecules that interfere with histone deacetylase function is provided.

  13. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Cytokine-Mediated STAT1 Signal Transduction In β-Cells With Improved Aqueous Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Stephen S.; Tang, Alicia J.; Lundh, Morten; Mosher, Carrie M.; Perkins, Kedar M.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of BRD0476 (1), a small molecule generated by diversity-oriented synthesis that suppresses cytokine-induced β-cell apoptosis. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 1 and analogs with improved aqueous solubility. By replacing naphthyl with quinoline moieties, we prepared active analogs with up to a 1400-fold increase in solubility from 1. In addition, we demonstrated that compound 1 and analogs inhibit STAT1 signal transduction induced by IFN-γ. PMID:23617753

  14. Novel biologic agents for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-part 2: adoptive cellular immunotherapy, small-molecule inhibitors, and immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Tanya; Rosen, Steven T

    2015-04-01

    Globally, the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma is increasing. Aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are treated with curative intent in the frontline setting, but indolent diseases like chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma are not considered to be curable in general. Additionally, relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphomas have a poor overall outcome, with treatment response durations often decreasing with each relapse. Novel therapies are sought to improve outcomes in this patient population. In a two-part review, we describe the promising new biologic therapies that have emerged over the last 5 years, some approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and others undergoing active investigation. In Part 1, we discussed monoclonal antibodies. Here, in Part 2, we discuss adoptive cellular immunotherapies, small-molecule inhibitors, and immunomodulatory agents. We also mention other novel therapies on the horizon.

  15. Selective small molecule Stat3 inhibitor reduces breast cancer tumor-initiating cells and improves recurrence free survival in a human-xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Dave, Bhuvanesh; Landis, Melissa D; Tweardy, David J; Chang, Jenny C; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Wu, Meng-Fen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Westbrook, Thomas F; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Liu, Dan; Lewis, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis and disease relapse are hypothesized to result from tumor initiating cells (TICs). Previously, we have defined a CD44+/CD24-/low mammosphere-forming tumorigenic 493-gene signature in breast cancer. Stat3 was identified as a critical node in self-renewal based on an ongoing lentiviral shRNA screen being conducted in two breast cancer cell lines SUM159 and BT549. In corroborating work, targeting the SH2 domain of Stat3 with a novel small molecule decreased the percentage of cells expressing TIC markers (CD44+/CD24-/low and ALDH+) and mammosphere formation in p-Stat3 overexpressing human breast cancer xenografts in SCID-beige mice. Importantly, we observed a four-fold improvement in the 30-day recurrence-free survival relative to docetaxel alone with the addition of the Stat3 inhibitor in the chemoresistant tumor model. Thus, these findings provide a strong impetus for the development of selective Stat3 inhibitors in order to improve survival in patients with p-Stat3 overexpressing tumors. PMID:22879872

  16. Development of a Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Kir1.1, the Renal Outer Medullary Potassium ChannelS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Gautam; Chauder, Brian A.; Liu, Wen; Dawson, Eric S.; Kadakia, Rishin; Nguyen, Thuy T.; Lewis, L. Michelle; Meiler, Jens; Weaver, C. David; Satlin, Lisa M.; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium (K+) channel, ROMK (Kir1.1), is a putative drug target for a novel class of loop diuretic that would lower blood volume and pressure without causing hypokalemia. However, the lack of selective ROMK inhibitors has hindered efforts to assess its therapeutic potential. In a high-throughput screen for small-molecule modulators of ROMK, we previously identified a potent and moderately selective ROMK antagonist, 7,13-bis(4-nitrobenzyl)-1,4,10-trioxa-7,13-diazacyclopentadecane (VU590), that also inhibits Kir7.1. Because ROMK and Kir7.1 are coexpressed in the nephron, VU590 is not a good probe of ROMK function in the kidney. Here we describe the development of the structurally related inhibitor 2,2′-oxybis(methylene)bis(5-nitro-1H-benzo[d]imidazole) (VU591), which is as potent as VU590 but is selective for ROMK over Kir7.1 and more than 65 other potential off-targets. VU591 seems to block the intracellular pore of the channel. The development of VU591 may enable studies to explore the viability of ROMK as a diuretic target. PMID:20926757

  17. Discovery of novel INK4C small-molecule inhibitors to promote human and murine hematopoietic stem cell ex vivo expansion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiang-Qun; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Liping; Ding, Yahui; Yang, Ming; Tong, Qin; Cheng, Haizi; Ji, Qing; McGuire, Terence; Yuan, Weiping; Cheng, Tao; Gao, Yingdai

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have emerged as promising therapeutic cell sources for high-risk hematological malignancies and immune disorders. However, their clinical use is limited by the inability to expand these cells ex vivo. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify specific targets and effective probes that can expand HSCs. Here we report a novel class of INK4C (p18INK4C or p18) small molecule inhibitors (p18SMIs), which were initially found by in silico 3D screening. We identified a lead p18 inhibitor, XIE18-6, confirmed its p18-targeting specificity and bioactivity of promoting HSCs expansion, and then performed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies by synthesizing a series of analogs of XIE18–6. Among these, compound 40 showed the most potent bioactivity in HSCs expansion (ED50 = 5.21 nM). We confirmed that compound 40 promoted expansion of both murine and human HSCs, and also confirmed its p18-targeting specificity. Notably, compound 40 did not show significant cytotoxicity toward 32D cells or HSCs, nor did it augment leukemia cell proliferation. Taken together, our newly discovered p18SMIs represent novel chemical agents for murine and human HSCs ex vivo expansion and also can be used as valuable chemical probes for further HSC biology research towards promising utility for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26681454

  18. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  19. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chongqiang; Wang, Wenlong; Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-03-15

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  20. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  1. A small molecule PAI-1 functional inhibitor attenuates neointimal hyperplasia and vascular smooth muscle cell survival by promoting PAI-1 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Simone, Tessa M; Higgins, Stephen P; Archambeault, Jaclyn; Higgins, Craig E; Ginnan, Roman G; Singer, Harold; Higgins, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the primary inhibitor of urokinase-and tissue-type plasminogen activators (uPA and tPA), is an injury-response gene implicated in the development of tissue fibrosis and cardiovascular disease. PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in the balloon catheter-injured carotid and in the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-enriched neointima of ligated arteries. PAI-1/uPA complex formation and PAI-1 antiproteolytic activity can be inhibited, via proteolytic cleavage, by the small molecule antagonist tiplaxtinin which effectively increased the VSMC apoptotic index in vitro and attenuated carotid artery neointimal formation in vivo. In contrast to the active full-length serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN), elastase-cleaved PAI-1 (similar to tiplaxtinin) also promoted VSMC apoptosis in vitro and similarly reduced neointimal formation in vivo. The mechanism through which cleaved PAI-1 (CL-PAI-1) stimulates apoptosis appears to involve the TNF-α family member TWEAK (TNF-α weak inducer of apoptosis) and it's cognate receptor, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-inducible 14 (FN14). CL-PAI-1 sensitizes cells to TWEAK-stimulated apoptosis while full-length PAI-1 did not, presumably due to its ability to down-regulate FN14 in a low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent mechanism. It appears that prolonged exposure of VSMCs to CL-PAI-1 induces apoptosis by augmenting TWEAK/FN14 pro-apoptotic signaling. This work identifies a critical, anti-stenotic, role for a functionally-inactive (at least with regard to its protease inhibitory function) cleaved SERPIN. Therapies that promote the conversion of full-length to cleaved PAI-1 may have translational implications.

  2. A Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor of Influenza A Viruses that Targets Polymerase Function and Indirectly Induces Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Ortigoza, Mila Brum; Dibben, Oliver; Maamary, Jad; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Leyva-Grado, Victor H.; Abreu, Pablo; Ayllon, Juan; Palese, Peter; Shaw, Megan L.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN) is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule. PMID:22577360

  3. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part I. Integrase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia . E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee

    2007-03-23

    We have identified oleuropein (Ole) and hydroxytyrosol (HT) as a unique class of HIV-1 inhibitors from olive leaf extracts effective against viral fusion and integration. We used molecular docking simulation to study the interactions of Ole and HT with viral targets. We find that Ole and HT bind to the conserved hydrophobic pocket on the surface of the HIV-gp41 fusion domain by hydrogen bonds with Q577 and hydrophobic interactions with I573, G572, and L568 on the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat peptide N36, interfering with formation of the gp41 fusion-active core. To test and confirm modeling predications, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 fusion complex formation using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on HIV-1 fusion core formation with EC{sub 50}s of 66-58 nM, with no detectable toxicity. Our findings on effects of HIV-1 integrase are reported in the subsequent article.

  4. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part II. Integrase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee . E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-23

    We report molecular modeling and functional confirmation of Ole and HT binding to HIV-1 integrase. Docking simulations identified two binding regions for Ole within the integrase active site. Region I encompasses the conserved D64-D116-E152 motif, while region II involves the flexible loop region formed by amino acid residues 140-149. HT, on the other hand, binds to region II. Both Ole and HT exhibit favorable interactions with important amino acid residues through strong H-bonding and van der Waals contacts, predicting integrase inhibition. To test and confirm modeling predictions, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 integrase activities including 3'-processing, strand transfer, and disintegration. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on all three activities, with EC{sub 50}s in the nanomolar range. These studies demonstrate that molecular modeling of target-ligand interaction coupled with structural-activity analysis should facilitate the design and identification of innovative integrase inhibitors and other therapeutics.

  5. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of PDK1/PLCγ1 Interaction Blocks Breast and Melanoma Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Claudio; Calleja, Veronique; Ferro, Riccardo; Fantin, Alessandro; Riley, Andrew M.; Potter, Barry V. L.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Maffucci, Tania; Larijani, Banafshé; Falasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence suggests that phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1) is a suitable target to counteract tumourigenesis and metastasis dissemination. We recently identified a novel signalling pathway required for PLCγ1 activation which involves formation of a protein complex with 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1). In an effort to define novel strategies to inhibit PLCγ1-dependent signals we tested here whether a newly identified and highly specific PDK1 inhibitor, 2-O-benzyl-myo-inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate (2-O-Bn-InsP5), could affect PDK1/PLCγ1 interaction and impair PLCγ1-dependent cellular functions in cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that 2-O-Bn-InsP5 interacts specifically with the pleckstrin homology domain of PDK1 and impairs formation of a PDK1/PLCγ1 complex. 2-O-Bn-InsP5 is able to inhibit the epidermal growth factor-induced PLCγ1 phosphorylation and activity, ultimately resulting in impaired cancer cell migration and invasion. Importantly, we report that 2-O-Bn-InsP5 inhibits cancer cell dissemination in zebrafish xenotransplants. This work demonstrates that the PDK1/PLCγ1 complex is a potential therapeutic target to prevent metastasis and it identifies 2-O-Bn-InsP5 as a leading compound for development of anti-metastatic drugs. PMID:27199173

  6. Optimizing small molecule inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 to prevent infection by Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Lourido, Sebastian; Zhang, Chao; Lopez, Michael; Tang, Keliang; Barks, Jennifer; Wang, Qiuling; Wildman, Scott A.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Sibley, L. David

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is sensitive to bulky pyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidine (PP) inhibitors due to the presence of a Gly gatekeeper in the essential calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1). Here we synthesized a number of new derivatives of 3-methyl-benzyl-PP (3-MB-PP, or 1). The potency of PP analogs in inhibiting CDPK1 enzyme activity in vitro (low nM IC50 values) and blocking parasite growth in host cell monolayers in vitro (low μM EC50 values) were highly correlated and occurred in a CDPK1-specific manner. Chemical modification of the PP scaffold to increase half-life in the presence of microsomes in vitro led to identification of compounds with enhanced stability while retaining activity. Several of these more potent compounds were able to prevent lethal infection with T. gondii in the mouse model. Collectively the strategies outlined here provide a route for development of more effective compounds for treatment of toxoplasmosis, and perhaps related parasitic diseases. PMID:23470217

  7. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 Inhibits Ubiquitin Signaling at DNA Double-strand Breaks*

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ismail Hassan; McDonald, Darin; Strickfaden, Hilmar; Xu, Zhizhong; Hendzel, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1)-mediated histone ubiquitylation plays an important role in aberrant gene silencing in human cancers and is a potential target for cancer therapy. Here we show that 2-pyridine-3-yl-methylene-indan-1,3-dione (PRT4165) is a potent inhibitor of PRC1-mediated H2A ubiquitylation in vivo and in vitro. The drug also inhibits the accumulation of all detectable ubiquitin at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the retention of several DNA damage response proteins in foci that form around DSBs, and the repair of the DSBs. In vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity assays revealed that PRT4165 inhibits both RNF2 and RING 1A, which are partially redundant paralogues that together account for the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity found in PRC1 complexes, but not RNF8 nor RNF168. Because ubiquitylation is completely inhibited despite the efficient recruitment of RNF8 to DSBs, our results suggest that PRC1-mediated monoubiquitylation is required for subsequent RNF8- and/or RNF168-mediated polyubiquitylation. Our results demonstrate the unique feature of PRT4165 as a novel chromatin-remodeling compound and provide a new tool for the inhibition of ubiquitylation signaling at DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:23902761

  8. Probing the catalytic functions of Bub1 kinase using the small molecule inhibitors BAY-320 and BAY-524

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Anna P; von Schubert, Conrad; Cubizolles, Fabien; Siemeister, Gerhard; Hitchcock, Marion; Mengel, Anne; Schröder, Jens; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury; von Nussbaum, Franz; Mumberg, Dominik; Nigg, Erich A

    2016-01-01

    The kinase Bub1 functions in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and in chromosome congression, but the role of its catalytic activity remains controversial. Here, we use two novel Bub1 inhibitors, BAY-320 and BAY-524, to demonstrate potent Bub1 kinase inhibition both in vitro and in intact cells. Then, we compared the cellular phenotypes of Bub1 kinase inhibition in HeLa and RPE1 cells with those of protein depletion, indicative of catalytic or scaffolding functions, respectively. Bub1 inhibition affected chromosome association of Shugoshin and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), without abolishing global Aurora B function. Consequently, inhibition of Bub1 kinase impaired chromosome arm resolution but exerted only minor effects on mitotic progression or SAC function. Importantly, BAY-320 and BAY-524 treatment sensitized cells to low doses of Paclitaxel, impairing both chromosome segregation and cell proliferation. These findings are relevant to our understanding of Bub1 kinase function and the prospects of targeting Bub1 for therapeutic applications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12187.001 PMID:26885717

  9. Common Pharmacophore of Structurally Distinct Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Intracellular Retrograde Trafficking of Ribosome Inactivating Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shichao; Park, Jewn Giew; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Tumer, Nilgun E.; Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2013-12-01

    We reported previously (+/-)-2-(5-methylthiophen-2-yl)-3-phenyl-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H)-one [(+/-)-Retro-2cycl] as the chemical structure of Retro-2 that showed mouse protection against ricin, a notorious ribosome inactivating protein (RIP). Herein we report our chemical resolution of (+/-)-Retro-2cycl, analog synthesis, and cell-based evaluation showing that the two optically pure enantiomers and their achiral analog have nearly the same degree of cell protection against ricin as (+/-)-Retro-2cycl. We also report our computational studies explaining the lack of stereo preference and revealing a common pharmacophore of structurally distinct inhibitors of intracellular retrograde trafficking of RIPs. This pharmacophore comprises a central aromatic ring o-substituted by an aromatic ring and a moiety bearing an O or S atom attached to sp2 C atom(s). These results offer new insights into lead identification and optimization for RIP antidote development to minimize the global health threat caused by ribosome-inactivating proteins.

  10. Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitors Are Orally Bioavailable, Fast-Acting Molecules with Activity against Different Species Causing Malaria in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Caron, Joachim; Chen, Patty; Witkowski, Benoit; Menard, Didier; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Renia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Martínez, María Santos; Ferrer, Santiago; Sanz, Laura M.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Wittlin, Sergio; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael J.; Sinden, Robert E.; Fuchter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Current antimalarials are under continuous threat due to the relentless development of drug resistance by malaria parasites. We previously reported promising in vitro parasite-killing activity with the histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294 and its analogue TM2-115. Here, we further characterize these diaminoquinazolines for in vitro and in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties to prioritize and direct compound development. BIX-01294 and TM2-115 displayed potent in vitro activity, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of <50 nM against drug-sensitive laboratory strains and multidrug-resistant field isolates, including artemisinin-refractory Plasmodium falciparum isolates. Activities against ex vivo clinical isolates of both P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax were similar, with potencies of 300 to 400 nM. Sexual-stage gametocyte inhibition occurs at micromolar levels; however, mature gametocyte progression to gamete formation is inhibited at submicromolar concentrations. Parasite reduction ratio analysis confirms a high asexual-stage rate of killing. Both compounds examined displayed oral efficacy in in vivo mouse models of Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum infection. The discovery of a rapid and broadly acting antimalarial compound class targeting blood stage infection, including transmission stage parasites, and effective against multiple malaria-causing species reveals the diaminoquinazoline scaffold to be a very promising lead for development into greatly needed novel therapies to control malaria. PMID:25421480

  11. Histone methyltransferase inhibitors are orally bioavailable, fast-acting molecules with activity against different species causing malaria in humans.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Nicholas A; Sundriyal, Sandeep; Caron, Joachim; Chen, Patty; Witkowski, Benoit; Menard, Didier; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Renia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Santos Martínez, María; Ferrer, Santiago; Sanz, Laura M; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Wittlin, Sergio; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael J; Sinden, Robert E; Fuchter, Matthew J; Scherf, Artur

    2015-02-01

    Current antimalarials are under continuous threat due to the relentless development of drug resistance by malaria parasites. We previously reported promising in vitro parasite-killing activity with the histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294 and its analogue TM2-115. Here, we further characterize these diaminoquinazolines for in vitro and in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties to prioritize and direct compound development. BIX-01294 and TM2-115 displayed potent in vitro activity, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of <50 nM against drug-sensitive laboratory strains and multidrug-resistant field isolates, including artemisinin-refractory Plasmodium falciparum isolates. Activities against ex vivo clinical isolates of both P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax were similar, with potencies of 300 to 400 nM. Sexual-stage gametocyte inhibition occurs at micromolar levels; however, mature gametocyte progression to gamete formation is inhibited at submicromolar concentrations. Parasite reduction ratio analysis confirms a high asexual-stage rate of killing. Both compounds examined displayed oral efficacy in in vivo mouse models of Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum infection. The discovery of a rapid and broadly acting antimalarial compound class targeting blood stage infection, including transmission stage parasites, and effective against multiple malaria-causing species reveals the diaminoquinazoline scaffold to be a very promising lead for development into greatly needed novel therapies to control malaria. PMID:25421480

  12. Discovery of novel STAT3 small molecule inhibitors via in silico site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenying; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Li, Chenglong

    2013-06-13

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been validated as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. To stop both STAT3 activation and dimerization, a viable strategy is to design inhibitors blocking its SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site that is responsible for both actions. A new fragment-based drug design (FBDD) strategy, in silico site-directed FBDD, was applied in this study. A designed novel compound, 5,8-dioxo-6-(pyridin-3-ylamino)-5,8-dihydronaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (LY5), was confirmed to bind to STAT3 SH2 by fluorescence polarization assay. In addition, four out of the five chosen compounds have IC50 values lower than 5 μM for the U2OS cancer cells. 8 (LY5) has an IC50 range in 0.5-1.4 μM in various cancer cell lines. 8 also suppresses tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. This study has demonstrated the utility of this approach and could be used to other drug targets in general. PMID:23651330

  13. Histone methyltransferase inhibitors are orally bioavailable, fast-acting molecules with activity against different species causing malaria in humans.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Nicholas A; Sundriyal, Sandeep; Caron, Joachim; Chen, Patty; Witkowski, Benoit; Menard, Didier; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Renia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Santos Martínez, María; Ferrer, Santiago; Sanz, Laura M; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Wittlin, Sergio; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael J; Sinden, Robert E; Fuchter, Matthew J; Scherf, Artur

    2015-02-01

    Current antimalarials are under continuous threat due to the relentless development of drug resistance by malaria parasites. We previously reported promising in vitro parasite-killing activity with the histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294 and its analogue TM2-115. Here, we further characterize these diaminoquinazolines for in vitro and in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties to prioritize and direct compound development. BIX-01294 and TM2-115 displayed potent in vitro activity, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of <50 nM against drug-sensitive laboratory strains and multidrug-resistant field isolates, including artemisinin-refractory Plasmodium falciparum isolates. Activities against ex vivo clinical isolates of both P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax were similar, with potencies of 300 to 400 nM. Sexual-stage gametocyte inhibition occurs at micromolar levels; however, mature gametocyte progression to gamete formation is inhibited at submicromolar concentrations. Parasite reduction ratio analysis confirms a high asexual-stage rate of killing. Both compounds examined displayed oral efficacy in in vivo mouse models of Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum infection. The discovery of a rapid and broadly acting antimalarial compound class targeting blood stage infection, including transmission stage parasites, and effective against multiple malaria-causing species reveals the diaminoquinazoline scaffold to be a very promising lead for development into greatly needed novel therapies to control malaria.

  14. Light-responsive nanoparticle depot to control release of a small molecule angiogenesis inhibitor in the posterior segment of the eye

    PubMed Central

    Anh Nguyen Huu, Viet; Luo, Jing; Zhu, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Patel, Sherrina; Boone, Alexander; Mahmoud, Enas; McFearin, Cathryn; Olejniczak, Jason; de Gracia Lux, Caroline; Lux, Jacques; Fomina, Nadezda; Huynh, Michelle; Zhang, Kang; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-01-01

    Therapies for macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy require intravitreal injections every 4-8 weeks. Injections are uncomfortable, time-consuming, and carry risks of infection and retinal damage. However, drug delivery via noninvasive methods to the posterior segment of the eye has been a major challenge due to the eye's unique anatomy and physiology. Here we present a novel nanoparticle depot platform for on-demand drug delivery using a far ultraviolet (UV) light-degradable polymer, which allows noninvasively triggered drug release using brief, low-power light exposure. Nanoparticles stably retain encapsulated molecules in the vitreous, and can release cargo in response to UV exposure up to 30 weeks post-injection. Light-triggered release of nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a small molecule angiogenesis inhibitor, 10 weeks post-injection suppresses choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in rats. Light-sensitive nanoparticles are biocompatible and cause no adverse effects on the eye as assessed by electroretinograms (ERG), corneal and retinal tomography, and histology. PMID:25571784

  15. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of ETV1, YK-4-279, Prevents Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Said; Minas, Tsion; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Justvig, Sarah; Çelik, Haydar; Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Han, Jenny; Kallarakal, Abraham T.; Kong, Yali; Rudek, Michelle A.; Brown, Milton L.; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Üren, Aykut

    2014-01-01

    Background The erythroblastosis virus E26 transforming sequences (ETS) family of transcription factors consists of a highly conserved group of genes that play important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Chromosomal translocations fusing ETS factors to promoters of androgen responsive genes have been found in prostate cancers, including the most clinically aggressive forms. ERG and ETV1 are the most commonly translocated ETS proteins. Over-expression of these proteins in prostate cancer cells results in a more invasive phenotype. Inhibition of ETS activity by small molecule inhibitors may provide a novel method for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Findings We recently demonstrated that the small molecule YK-4-279 inhibits biological activity of ETV1 in fusion-positive prostate cancer cells leading to decreased motility and invasion in-vitro. Here, we present data from an in-vivo mouse xenograft model. SCID-beige mice were subcutaneously implanted with fusion-positive LNCaP-luc-M6 and fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 tumors. Animals were treated with YK-4-279, and its effects on primary tumor growth and lung metastasis were evaluated. YK-4-279 treatment resulted in decreased growth of the primary tumor only in LNCaP-luc-M6 cohort. When primary tumors were grown to comparable sizes, YK-4-279 inhibited tumor metastasis to the lungs. Expression of ETV1 target genes MMP7, FKBP10 and GLYATL2 were reduced in YK-4-279 treated animals. ETS fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 xenografts were unresponsive to the compound. Furthermore, YK-4-279 is a chiral molecule that exists as a racemic mixture of R and S enantiomers. We established that (S)-YK-4-279 is the active enantiomer in prostate cancer cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that YK-4-279 is a potent inhibitor of ETV1 and inhibits both the primary tumor growth and metastasis of fusion positive prostate cancer xenografts. Therefore, YK-4-279 or similar compounds may be

  16. Design, synthesis, and analysis of a polyethelene glycol-modified (PEGylated) small molecule inhibitor of integrin {alpha}4{beta}1 with improved pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Pepinsky, R B; Lee, W-C; Cornebise, M; Gill, A; Wortham, K; Chen, L L; Leone, D R; Giza, K; Dolinski, B M; Perper, S; Nickerson-Nutter, C; Lepage, D; Chakraborty, A; Whalley, E T; Petter, R C; Adams, S P; Lobb, R R; Scott, D M

    2005-02-01

    Integrin alpha4beta1 plays an important role in inflammatory processes by regulating the migration of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. Previously, we identified BIO5192 [2(S)-{[1-(3,5-dichloro-benzenesulfonyl)-pyrrolidine-2(S)-carbonyl]-amino}-4-[4-methyl-2(S)-(methyl-{2-[4-(3-o-tolyl-ureido)-phenyl]-acetyl}-amino)-pentanoylamino]-butyric acid], a highly selective and potent (K(D) of 9 pM) small molecule inhibitor of alpha4beta1. Although BIO5192 is efficacious in various animal models of inflammatory disease, high doses and daily treatment of the compound are needed to achieve a therapeutic effect because of its relatively short serum half-life. To address this issue, polyethylene glycol modification (PEGylation) was used as an approach to improve systemic exposure. BIO5192 was PEGylated by a targeted approach in which derivatizable amino groups were incorporated into the molecule. Two sites were identified that could be modified, and from these, five PEGylated compounds were synthesized and characterized. One compound, 2a-PEG (K(D) of 19 pM), was selected for in vivo studies. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 2a-PEG were dramatically improved relative to the unmodified compound. The PEGylated compound was efficacious in a rat model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis at a 30-fold lower molar dose than the parent compound and required only a once-a-week dosing regimen compared with a daily treatment for BIO5192. Compound 2a-PEG was highly selective for alpha4beta1. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of PEGylation of alpha4beta1-targeted small molecules with retention of activity in vitro and in vivo. 2a-PEG, and related compounds, will be valuable reagents for assessing alpha4beta1 biology and may provide a new therapeutic approach to treatment of human inflammatory diseases.

  17. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  18. Preclinical Characterization of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Small Molecule Inhibitors for Primary and Metastatic Brain Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hikmat H.; Paran, Chris; VanderVeen, Nathan; Savakus, Jonathan; Doherty, Robert; Petruzzella, Emanuele; Hoeschele, James D.; Appelman, Henry; Raptis, Leda; Mikkelsen, Tom; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been implicated as a hub for multiple oncogenic pathways. The constitutive activation of STAT3 is present in several cancers, including gliomas (GBMs), and is associated with poor therapeutic responses. Phosphorylation of STAT3 triggers its dimerization and nuclear transport, where it promotes the transcription of genes that stimulate tumor growth. In light of this role, inhibitors of the STAT3 pathway are attractive therapeutic targets for cancer. To this end, we evaluated the STAT3-inhibitory activities of three compounds (CPA-7 [trichloronitritodiammineplatinum(IV)], WP1066 [(S,E)-3-(6-bromopyridin-2-yl)-2-cyano-N-(1-phenylethyl)acrylamide, C17H14BrN3O], and ML116 [4-benzyl-1-{thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl}piperidine, C18H19N3S]) in cultured rodent and human glioma cells, including GBM cancer stem cells. Our results demonstrate a potent induction of growth arrest in GBM cells after drug treatment with a concomitant induction of cell death. Although these compounds were effective at inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation, they also displayed variable dose-dependent inhibition of STAT1, STAT5, and nuclear factor κ light-chain enhancer of activated B cells. The therapeutic efficacy of these compounds was further evaluated in peripheral and intracranial mouse tumor models. Whereas CPA-7 elicited regression of peripheral tumors, both melanoma and GBM, its efficacy was not evident when the tumors were implanted within the brain. Our data suggest poor permeability of this compound to tumors located within the central nervous system. WP1066 and ML116 exhibited poor in vivo efficacy. In summary, CPA-7 constitutes a powerful anticancer agent in models of peripheral solid cancers. Our data strongly support further development of CPA-7–derived compounds with increased permeability to enhance their efficacy in primary and metastatic brain tumors. PMID:24696041

  19. Cell cycle reactivation of cochlear progenitor cells in neonatal FUCCI mice by a GSK3 small molecule inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Hahnewald, S; Perny, M; Senn, P

    2015-12-08

    Due to the lack of regenerative capacity of the mammalian auditory epithelium, sensory hair cell loss results in permanent hearing deficit. Nevertheless, a population of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells has been recently described. Identification of methods to trigger their activity could lead to exploitation of their potential therapeutically. Here we validate the use of transgenic mice reporting cell cycle progression (FUCCI), and stemness (Lgr5-GFP), as a valuable tool to identify regulators of cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells within the auditory epithelium. The small molecule compound CHIR99021 was used to inhibit GSK3 activity. This led to a significant increase in the fraction of proliferating sphere-forming cells, labeled by the FUCCI markers and in the percentage of Lgr5-GFP + cells, as well as a selective increase in the fraction of S-G2-M cells in the Lgr5 + population. Using whole mount cultures of the organ of Corti we detected a statistically significant increment in the fraction of proliferating Sox2 supporting cells after CHIR99021 treatment, but only rarely appearance of novel MyoVIIa +/Edu + hair cells. In conclusion, these tools provide a robust mean to identify novel regulators of auditory organ regeneration and to clarify the contribution of stem cell activity.

  20. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  1. Cell cycle reactivation of cochlear progenitor cells in neonatal FUCCI mice by a GSK3 small molecule inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Roccio, M.; Hahnewald, S.; Perny, M.; Senn, P.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of regenerative capacity of the mammalian auditory epithelium, sensory hair cell loss results in permanent hearing deficit. Nevertheless, a population of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells has been recently described. Identification of methods to trigger their activity could lead to exploitation of their potential therapeutically. Here we validate the use of transgenic mice reporting cell cycle progression (FUCCI), and stemness (Lgr5-GFP), as a valuable tool to identify regulators of cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells within the auditory epithelium. The small molecule compound CHIR99021 was used to inhibit GSK3 activity. This led to a significant increase in the fraction of proliferating sphere-forming cells, labeled by the FUCCI markers and in the percentage of Lgr5-GFP + cells, as well as a selective increase in the fraction of S-G2-M cells in the Lgr5 + population. Using whole mount cultures of the organ of Corti we detected a statistically significant increment in the fraction of proliferating Sox2 supporting cells after CHIR99021 treatment, but only rarely appearance of novel MyoVIIa+/Edu + hair cells. In conclusion, these tools provide a robust mean to identify novel regulators of auditory organ regeneration and to clarify the contribution of stem cell activity. PMID:26643939

  2. Discovery of novel phenolic antioxidants as inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression for use in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q; Somers, Patricia K; Hoong, Lee K; Zheng, X Sharon; Ye, Zhihong; Worsencroft, Kimberly J; Simpson, Jacob E; Hotema, Martha R; Weingarten, M David; MacDOnald, Mathew L; Hill, Russell R; Marino, Elaine M; Suen, Ki-Ling; Luchoomun, Jayraz; Kunsch, Charles; Landers, Laura K; Stefanopoulos, Dimitria; Howard, Randy B; Sundell, Cynthia L; Saxena, Uday; Wasserman, Martin A; Sikorski, James A

    2004-12-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mediates recruitment of leukocytes to endothelial cells and is implicated in many inflammatory conditions. Since part of the signal transduction pathway that regulates the activation of VCAM-1 expression is redox-sensitive, compounds with antioxidant properties may have inhibitory effects on VCAM-1 expression. Novel phenolic compounds have been designed and synthesized starting from probucol (1). Many of these compounds demonstrated potent inhibitory effects on cytokine-induced VCAM-1 expression and displayed potent antioxidant effects in vitro. Some of these derivatives (4o, 4p, 4w, and 4x) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and IL-6 from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro and showed antiinflammatory effects in an animal model. Compounds 4ad and 4ae are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and prevention of chronic organ transplant rejection, respectively. PMID:15566311

  3. Enhanced Neurite Outgrowth of Human Model (NT2) Neurons by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Rho/ROCK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roloff, Frank; Scheiblich, Hannah; Dewitz, Carola; Dempewolf, Silke; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Axonal injury in the adult human central nervous system often results in loss of sensation and motor functions. Promoting regeneration of severed axons requires the inactivation of growth inhibitory influences from the tissue environment and stimulation of the neuron intrinsic growth potential. Especially glial cell derived factors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, Nogo-A, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin in general, prevent axon regeneration. Most of the glial growth inhibiting factors converge onto the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in neurons. Although conditions in the injured nervous system are clearly different from those during neurite outgrowth in vitro, here we use a chemical approach to manipulate Rho/ROCK signalling with small-molecule agents to encourage neurite outgrowth in cell culture. The development of therapeutic treatments requires drug testing not only on neurons of experimental animals, but also on human neurons. Using human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A GTPase) activation and promotes neurite growth. Inhibition of the downstream effector Rho kinase by the drug Y-27632 results in a strong increase in neurite outgrowth. Conversely, activation of the Rho pathway by lysophosphatidic acid results in growth cone collapse and eventually to neurite retraction. Finally, we show that blocking of Rho kinase, but not RhoA results in an increase in neurons bearing neurites. Due to its anti-inflammatory and neurite growth promoting action, the use of a pharmacological treatment of damaged neural tissue with Ibuprofen should be explored. PMID:25714396

  4. MELK-T1, a small-molecule inhibitor of protein kinase MELK, decreases DNA-damage tolerance in proliferating cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beke, Lijs; Kig, Cenk; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Boens, Shannah; Boeckx, An; van Heerde, Erika; Parade, Marc; De Bondt, An; Van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Bashir, Tarig; Ogata, Souichi; Meerpoel, Lieven; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beullens, Monique; Brehmer, Dirk; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK), a serine/threonine protein kinase, has oncogenic properties and is overexpressed in many cancer cells. The oncogenic function of MELK is attributed to its capacity to disable critical cell-cycle checkpoints and reduce replication stress. Most functional studies have relied on the use of siRNA/shRNA-mediated gene silencing. In the present study, we have explored the biological function of MELK using MELK-T1, a novel and selective small-molecule inhibitor. Strikingly, MELK-T1 triggered a rapid and proteasome-dependent degradation of the MELK protein. Treatment of MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast adenocarcinoma cells with MELK-T1 induced the accumulation of stalled replication forks and double-strand breaks that culminated in a replicative senescence phenotype. This phenotype correlated with a rapid and long-lasting ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) activation and phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2). Furthermore, MELK-T1 induced a strong phosphorylation of p53 (cellular tumour antigen p53), a prolonged up-regulation of p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1) and a down-regulation of FOXM1 (Forkhead Box M1) target genes. Our data indicate that MELK is a key stimulator of proliferation by its ability to increase the threshold for DNA-damage tolerance (DDT). Thus, targeting MELK by the inhibition of both its catalytic activity and its protein stability might sensitize tumours to DNA-damaging agents or radiation therapy by lowering the DNA-damage threshold. PMID:26431963

  5. MELK-T1, a small-molecule inhibitor of protein kinase MELK, decreases DNA-damage tolerance in proliferating cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Beke, Lijs; Kig, Cenk; Linders, Joannes T M; Boens, Shannah; Boeckx, An; van Heerde, Erika; Parade, Marc; De Bondt, An; Van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Bashir, Tarig; Ogata, Souichi; Meerpoel, Lieven; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Johnson, Christopher N; Beullens, Monique; Brehmer, Dirk; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK), a serine/threonine protein kinase, has oncogenic properties and is overexpressed in many cancer cells. The oncogenic function of MELK is attributed to its capacity to disable critical cell-cycle checkpoints and reduce replication stress. Most functional studies have relied on the use of siRNA/shRNA-mediated gene silencing. In the present study, we have explored the biological function of MELK using MELK-T1, a novel and selective small-molecule inhibitor. Strikingly, MELK-T1 triggered a rapid and proteasome-dependent degradation of the MELK protein. Treatment of MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast adenocarcinoma cells with MELK-T1 induced the accumulation of stalled replication forks and double-strand breaks that culminated in a replicative senescence phenotype. This phenotype correlated with a rapid and long-lasting ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) activation and phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2). Furthermore, MELK-T1 induced a strong phosphorylation of p53 (cellular tumour antigen p53), a prolonged up-regulation of p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1) and a down-regulation of FOXM1 (Forkhead Box M1) target genes. Our data indicate that MELK is a key stimulator of proliferation by its ability to increase the threshold for DNA-damage tolerance (DDT). Thus, targeting MELK by the inhibition of both its catalytic activity and its protein stability might sensitize tumours to DNA-damaging agents or radiation therapy by lowering the DNA-damage threshold. PMID:26431963

  6. In vivo analysis of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor humanized monoclonal antibody MK-0646 and small molecule kinase inhibitor OSI-906 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leiphrakpam, Premila D; Agarwal, Ekta; Mathiesen, Michelle; Haferbier, Katie L; Brattain, Michael G; Chowdhury, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    The development and characterization of effective anticancer drugs against colorectal cancer (CRC) is of urgent need since it is the second most common cause of cancer death. The study was designed to evaluate the effects of two IGF-1R antagonists, MK-0646, a recombinant fully humanized monoclonal antibody and OSI-906, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor on CRC cells. Xenograft study was performed on IGF-1R-dependent CRC cell lines for analyzing the antitumor activity of MK-0646 and OSI-906. Tumor proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using Ki67 and TUNEL assays, respectively. We also performed in vitro characterization of MK-0646 and OSI-906 treatment on CRC cells to identify mechanisms associated with drug-induced cell death. Exposure of the GEO and CBS tumor xenografts to MK-0646 or OSI-906 led to a decrease in tumor growth. TUNEL analysis showed an increase of approximately 45-55% in apoptotic cells in both MK-0646 and OSI-906 treated tumor samples. We report the novel finding that treatment with IGF-1R antagonists led to downregulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) protein involved in cell survival and inhibition of cell death. In conclusion, IGF-1R antagonists (MK-0646 and OSI-906) demonstrated single agent inhibition of subcutaneous CRC xenograft growth. This was coupled to pro-apoptotic effects resulting in downregulation of XIAP and inhibition of cell survival. We report a novel mechanism by which MK-0646 and OSI-906 elicits cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, these results indicate that MK-0646 and OSI-906 may be potential anticancer candidates for the treatment of patients with IGF-1R-dependent CRC. PMID:24173770

  7. MLN8054, A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Aurora Kinase A, Sensitizes Androgen-Resistant Prostate Cancer to Radiation;Aurora kinase A; MLN8054; Prostate cancer; Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, Luigi; Niermann, Kenneth; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Varki, Vinod; Kim, Kwang Woon; Kopsombut, Prapaporn; Jung, Dae Kwang; Bo Lu

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether MLN8054, an Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A) inhibitor causes radiosensitization in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: In vitro studies consisted of culturing PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells and then immunoblotting Aurora A and phospho-Aurora A after radiation and/or nocodazole with MLN8054. Phases of the cell cycle were measured with flow cytometry. PC3 and DU145 cell lines were measured for survival after treatment with MLN8054 and radiation. Immunofluorescence measured {gamma}-H2AX in the PC3 and DU145 cells after treatment. In vivo studies looked at growth delay of PC3 tumor cells in athymic nude mice. PC3 cells grew for 6 to 8 days in mice treated with radiation, MLN8054, or combined for 7 more days. Tumors were resected and fixed on paraffin and stained for von Willebrand factor, Ki67, and caspase-3. Results: In vitro inhibition of Aurora-A by MLN8054 sensitized prostate cancer cells, as determined by dose enhancement ratios in clonogenic assays. These effects were associated with sustained DNA double-strand breaks, as evidenced by increased immunofluorescence for {gamma}-H2AX and significant G2/M accumulation and polyploidy. In vivo, the addition of MLN8054 (30 mg/kg/day) to radiation in mouse prostate cancer xenografts (PC3 cells) significantly increased tumor growth delay and apoptosis (caspase-3 staining), with reduction in cell proliferation (Ki67 staining) and vascular density (von Willebrand factor staining). Conclusion: MLN8054, a novel small molecule Aurora-A inhibitor showed radiation sensitization in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. This warrants the clinical development of MLN8054 with radiation for prostate cancer patients.

  8. Discovery of ML358, a Selective Small Molecule Inhibitor of the SKN-1 Pathway Involved in Drug Detoxification and Resistance in Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Fontaine, Pauline; Leung, Chi K; Maloney, Patrick; Hershberger, Paul M; Wang, Ying; Bousquet, Michelle S; Luesch, Hendrik; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Pinkerton, Anthony B; Smith, Layton H; Malany, Siobhan; Choe, Keith

    2015-08-21

    Nematodes parasitize ∼1/3 of humans worldwide, and effective treatment via administration of anthelmintics is threatened by growing resistance to current therapies. The nematode transcription factor SKN-1 is essential for development of embryos and upregulates the expression of genes that result in modification, conjugation, and export of xenobiotics, which can promote resistance. Distinct differences in regulation and DNA binding relative to mammalian Nrf2 make SKN-1 a promising and selective target for the development of anthelmintics with a novel mode of action that targets stress resistance and drug detoxification. We report 17 (ML358), a first in class small molecule inhibitor of the SKN-1 pathway. Compound 17 resulted from a vanillamine-derived hit identified by high throughput screening that was advanced through analog synthesis and structure-activity studies. Compound 17 is a potent (IC50 = 0.24 μM, Emax = 100%) and selective inhibitor of the SKN-1 pathway and sensitizes the model nematode C. elegans to oxidants and anthelmintics. Compound 17 is inactive against Nrf2, the homologous mammalian detoxification pathway, and is not toxic to C. elegans (LC50 > 64 μM) and Fa2N-4 immortalized human hepatocytes (LC50 > 5.0 μM). In addition, 17 exhibits good solubility, permeability, and chemical and metabolic stability in human and mouse liver microsomes. Therefore, 17 is a valuable probe to study regulation and function of SKN-1 in vivo. By selective targeting of the SKN-1 pathway, 17 could potentially lead to drug candidates that may be used as adjuvants to increase the efficacy and useful life of current anthelmintics.

  9. A Rac1/Cdc42 GTPase-specific small molecule inhibitor suppresses growth of primary human prostate cancer xenografts and prolongs survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Zins, Karin; Lucas, Trevor; Reichl, Patrick; Abraham, Dietmar; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 have been discovered in various tumors, including prostate and Rac protein expression significantly increases in prostate cancer. The Rac and Cdc42 pathways promote the uncontrolled proliferation, invasion and metastatic properties of human cancer cells. We synthesized the novel compound AZA1 based on structural information of the known Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766. In the current study we investigated the effects of inhibition of these pathways by AZA1 on prostate tumorigenicity by performing preclinical studies using a xenograft mouse model of prostate cancer. In androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, AZA1 inhibited both Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA GTPase activity in a dose-dependent manner and blocked cellular migration and proliferation. Cyclin D1 expression significantly decreased following Rac1/Cdc42 inhibition in prostate cancer cells. AZA1 treatment also down-regulated PAK and AKT activity in prostate cancer cells, associated with induction of the pro-apoptotic function of BAD by suppression of serine-112 phosphorylation. Daily systemic administration of AZA1 for 2 weeks reduced growth of human 22Rv1 prostate tumor xenografts in mice and improved the survival of tumor-bearing animals significantly. These data suggest a role of AZA1 in blocking Rac1/Cdc42-dependent cell cycle progression, cancer cell migration and increase of cancer cell apoptosis involving down-regulation of the AKT and PAK signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells. We therefore propose that a small-molecule inhibitor therapy targeting Rac1/Cdc42 Rho GTPase signaling pathways may be used as a novel treatment for patients with advanced prostate cancer.

  10. The inhibition of tyrosine kinase receptor signalling in leiomyosarcoma cells using the small molecule kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (Vatalanib®).

    PubMed

    Gaumann, Andreas K A; Drexler, Hannes C A; Lang, Sven A; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Buchdunger, Elisabeth; Wood, Jeanette; Bold, Guido; Breier, Georg

    2014-12-01

    Leiomyosarcomas remain challenging tumors to manage and novel therapy strategies besides radiation and conventional chemotherapy are needed. Targeting angiogenesis by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) of the tumor vasculature with small molecules is a promising new therapy. It has been shown recently that these receptors are not only expressed on tumor endothelium but also on tumor cells themselves. Thus, we investigated the expression of members of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) family and corresponding growth factors in leiomyosarcoma tissue specimens and in the leiomyosarcoma cell lines SK-LMS-1 and SK-UT-1. We evaluated the influence of the VEGFR inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (PTK787) on cell growth, migration, apoptosis and phosphorylation of intracellular signalling molecules. In human leiomyosarcoma tissue specimens VEGFR‑1/-2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR-β) were strongly expressed. Both leiomyosarcoma cell lines expressed VEGFR‑1/-3 and PDGFR-β but VEGFR-2 protein expression was positive only in SK-UT-1. SK-LMS-1 and SK-UT-1 cells secreted high and low amounts of VEGF-A, respectively, whereas PDGF-BB secretion was similar in both cell lines. Application of PTK787 led to partial inhibition of PDGF-BB-activated AKT/p90RSK and ERK1/2 signalling pathways. In contrast, protein phosphorylation was not affected by PTK787 in VEGF-A-treated cells. PTK787 turned out to inhibit cell migration even though no effects were observed upon stimulation with VEGF-A or PDGF-BB. In line, cell growth in leiomyosarcoma cell lines remained unchanged upon PTK787 treatment alone and with subsequent VEGF-A- or PDGF-BB-stimulation. However, VEGF-A, but not PDGF-BB-treated cells showed increased cell death upon PTK787 treatment. VEGFR family members are expressed in leiomyosarcomas in vivo and in vitro. Upon receptor stimulation, PTK787 is able to inhibit subsequent phosphorylation events and influences cell

  11. FAK inhibition with small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases viability, clonogenicity, and cell attachment in thyroid cancer cell lines and synergizes with targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Shalana; Golubovskaya, Vita M.; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Liu, Biao; Cance, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is up-regulated in thyroid cancer and small molecule FAK scaffolding inhibitor, Y15, was shown to decrease cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. We sought to test the effectiveness of Y15 in thyroid cancer cell lines, profile gene expression with Y15 compared with clinical trial FAK inhibitor PF-04554878, and use Y15 in novel drug combinations. Cell viability was decreased in a dose dependent manner in four thyroid cancer cell lines with Y15 and with higher doses in PF-04554878. Y397 FAK and total FAK were decreased with Y15 and decreased less with PF-04554878. Detachment and necrosis were increased in a dose-dependent manner in all cell lines with Y15. Clonogenicity was decreased in a dose-dependent manner for both Y15 and PF-04554878. We compared gene profiles between papillary thyroid cell lines, TPC1, BCPAP and K1, and 380, 109, and 74 genes were significantly >2-fold changed with Y15 treatment, respectively. Common up-regulated genes were involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, transcription and heat shock; down-regulated genes were involved in cell cycle, cell-to-cell interactions, and cancer stem cell markers. We also compared gene profiles of TT cells treated with Y15 versus PF-04554878. Y15 caused 144 genes to change over 4 fold and PF-04554878 caused 208 gene changes >4-fold (p<0.05). Among genes changed 4 fold, 11 were shared between the treatments, including those involved in metabolism, cell cycle, migration and transcription. Y15 demonstrated synergy with PF-04554878 in TT cells and also synergy with Cabozantinib, Sorafenib, Pazopanib, and strong synergy with Sunitinib in resistant K1 cells. This report revealed the biological effect of Y15 inhibitor, detected the unique and common gene signature profiles in response to Y15 in 4 different thyroid cancer cell lines, demonstrated differential response changes with Y15 and PF-04554878 treatment, and showed the synergy of Y15 with PF-04554878, Cabozantinib, Sorafenib, Pazopanib, and

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism of 10074-G5, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of c-Myc/Max dimerization.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Dana M; Guo, Jianxia; Parise, Robert A; Beumer, Jan H; Egorin, Merrill J; Lazo, John S; Prochownik, Edward V; Eiseman, Julie L

    2010-12-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein is overexpressed in many tumors and is essential for maintaining the proliferation of transformed cells. To function as a transcription factor, c-Myc must dimerize with Max via the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper protein (bHLH-ZIP) domains in each protein. The small molecule 7-nitro-N-(2-phenylphenyl)-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-amine (10074-G5) binds to and distorts the bHLH-ZIP domain of c-Myc, thereby inhibiting c-Myc/Max heterodimer formation and inhibiting its transcriptional activity. We report in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism of 10074-G5 in human xenograft-bearing mice. In vitro, 10074-G5 inhibited the growth of Daudi Burkitt's lymphoma cells and disrupted c-Myc/Max dimerization. 10074-G5 had no effect on the growth of Daudi xenografts in C.B-17 SCID mice that were treated with 20 mg/kg 10074-G5 intravenously for 5 consecutive days. Inhibition of c-Myc/Max dimerization in Daudi xenografts was not seen 2 or 24 h after treatment. Concentrations of 10074-G5 in various matrices were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV, and metabolites of 10074-G5 were identified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The plasma half-life of 10074-G5 in mice treated with 20 mg/kg i.v. was 37 min, and peak plasma concentration was 58 μM, which was 10-fold higher than peak tumor concentration. The lack of antitumor activity probably was caused by the rapid metabolism of 10074-G5 to inactive metabolites, resulting in tumor concentrations of 10074-G5 insufficient to inhibit c-Myc/Max dimerization. Our identification of 10074-G5 metabolites in mice will help design new, more metabolically stable small-molecule inhibitors of c-Myc.

  13. The Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor, OSU-T315, Suppresses Vestibular Schwannoma and Meningioma Growth by Inhibiting PDK2 Function in the AKT Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Pimentel, ME; Igarashi, S; Dunn, AM; Behbahani, M; Miller, C; Read, CM; Jacob, A

    2016-01-01

    Activation of PKB/AKT signaling, which requires PDK1 and PDK2 function, drives Vestibular Schwannoma (VS) and meningioma growth. PDK2 function is defined as a molecule that phosphorylates AKT-Ser473. Integrin-Linked Kinase (ILK) functions as PDK2 in PKB/AKT activation in many cancers; therefore, we hypothesized that OSU-T315, a small molecule ILK inhibitor, will inhibit the ILK-PDK2 function in PKB/AKT signaling activation in VS and meningioma cell growth. OSU-T315 decreased cell viability at IC50 < 2μM in VS (HEI193) and meningioma (Ben-Men-1) cell lines, in primary cells at < 3.5μM, while in normal primary Schwann cells at 7.1μM. OSU-T315 inhibits AKT signaling by decreasing phosphorylation at AKT-Ser473, AKT-Thr308, ILK-Ser246 and ILK-Thr173. In addition, OSU-T315 affected the phosphorylation or expression levels of AKT downstream proliferation effectors as well as autophagy markers. Flow cytometry shows that OSU-T315 increased the percentage of cells arrested at G2/M for both, HEI193 (39.99%) and Ben-Men-1 (26.96%) cells, compared to controls (21.54%, 8.47%). Two hours of OSU-T315 treatment increased cell death in both cell lines (34.3%, 9.1%) versus untreated (12.1%, 8.1%). Though longer exposure increased cell death in Ben-Men-1, TUNEL assays showed that OSU-T315 does not induce apoptosis. OSU-T315 was primarily cytotoxic for HEI193 and Ben-Men-1 inducing a dysregulated autophagy. Our studies suggest that OSU-T315 has translational potential as a chemotherapeutic agent against VS and meningioma.

  14. Novel cell-based in vitro screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors against intracellular replication of Cryptococcus neoformans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Sweta; Correia, Joao N; Garelnabi, Mariam; Voelz, Kerstin; May, Robin C; Hall, Rebecca A

    2016-07-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans poses a major threat to immunocompromised patients and is a leading killer of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients worldwide. Cryptococci are known to manipulate host macrophages and can either remain latent or proliferate intracellularly within the host phagocyte, a favourable niche that also renders them relatively insensitive to antifungal agents. Here we report an attempt to address this limitation by using a fluorescence-based drug screening method to identify potential inhibitors of intracellular proliferation of C. neoformans. The Prestwick Chemical Library(®) of FDA-approved small molecules was screened for compounds that limit the intracellular replication of a fluorescently-tagged C. neoformans reference strain (H99-GFP) in macrophages. Preliminary screening revealed 19 of 1200 compounds that could significantly reduce intracellular growth of the pathogen. Secondary screening and host cell cytotoxicity assays highlighted fendiline hydrochloride as a potential drug candidate for the development of future anticryptococcal therapies. Live cell imaging demonstrated that this Ca(2+) channel blocker strongly enhanced phagosome maturation in macrophages leading to improved fungal killing and reduced intracellular replication. Whilst the relatively high dose of fendiline hydrochloride required renders it unfit for clinical deployment against cryptococcosis, this study highlights a novel approach for identifying new lead compounds and unravels a pharmacologically promising scaffold towards the development of novel antifungal therapies for this neglected disease. PMID:27289450

  15. Structural Characterization and Computer-aided Optimization of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Arp2/3 Complex, a Key Regulator of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Baggett, Andrew W.; Cournia, Zoe; Han, Min Suk; Patargias, George; Glass, Adam C.; Liu, Shih-Yuan; Nolen, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    CK-666 (1) is a recently discovered small molecule inhibitor of the Arp2/3 complex, a key actin cytoskeleton regulator with roles in bacterial pathogenesis and motility of cancer cells. While 1 is commercially available, the crystal structure of Arp2/3 (Actin-related protein 2/3) complex with 1 bound has not been reported, making its mechanism of action uncertain. Furthermore, its relatively low potency increases its potential for off target effects in vivo, complicating interpretation of its influence in cell biological studies and precluding its use in clinical applications. Here we report the crystal structure of 1 bound to Arp2/3 complex, which reveals that 1 binds between the Arp2 and Arp3 subunits to stabilize the inactive conformation of the complex. Based on the crystal structure, we used computational docking and free energy perturbation calculations of monosubstituted derivatives of 1 to guide optimization efforts. Biochemical assays of ten newly synthesized compounds led to the identification of compound 2, which exhibits a 3 fold increase in inhibitory activity in vitro. In addition, our computational analyses unveiled a surface groove at the interface of the Arp2 and Arp3 subunits that can be exploited for additional structure-based optimization. PMID:22623398

  16. An inducible heat shock protein 70 small molecule inhibitor demonstrates anti-dengue virus activity, validating Hsp70 as a host antiviral target.

    PubMed

    Howe, Matthew K; Speer, Brittany L; Hughes, Philip F; Loiselle, David R; Vasudevan, Subhash; Haystead, Timothy A J

    2016-06-01

    An estimated three billion people are at risk of Dengue virus (DENV) infection worldwide and there are currently no approved therapeutic interventions for DENV infection. Due to the relatively small size of the DENV genome, DENV is reliant on host factors throughout the viral life cycle. The inducible form of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70i) has been implicated as a host factor in DENV pathogenesis, however the complete role remains to be elucidated. Here we further illustrate the importance of Hsp70i in dengue virus pathogenesis and describe the antiviral activity of the allosteric small molecule inhibitor that is selective for Hsp70i, called HS-72. In monocytes, Hsp70i is expressed at low levels preceding DENV infection, but Hsp70i expression is induced upon DENV infection. Targeting Hsp70i with HS-72, results in a dose dependent reduction in DENV infected monocytes, while cell viability was maintained. HS-72 works to reduce DENV infection by inhibiting the entry stage of the viral life cycle, through disrupting the association of Hsp70i with the DENV receptor complex. This work highlights Hsp70i as an antiviral target and HS-72 as a potential anti-DENV therapeutic agent.

  17. TGF-β Small Molecule Inhibitor SB431542 Reduces Rotator Cuff Muscle Fibrosis and Fatty Infiltration By Promoting Fibro/Adipogenic Progenitor Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lawrence; Laron, Dominique; Ning, Anne Y.; Kim, Hubert T.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent a large burden of muscle-tendon injuries in our aging population. While small tears can be repaired surgically with good outcomes, critical size tears are marked by muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty infiltration, which can lead to failed repair, frequent re-injury, and chronic disability. Previous animal studies have indicated that Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) signaling may play an important role in the development of these muscle pathologies after injury. Here, we demonstrated that inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling with the small molecule inhibitor SB431542 in a mouse model of massive rotator cuff tear results in decreased fibrosis, fatty infiltration, and muscle weight loss. These observed phenotypic changes were accompanied by decreased fibrotic, adipogenic, and atrophy-related gene expression in the injured muscle of mice treated with SB431542. We further demonstrated that treatment with SB431542 reduces the number of fibro/adipogenic progenitor (FAP) cells—an important cellular origin of rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration, in injured muscle by promoting apoptosis of FAPs. Together, these data indicate that the TGF-β pathway is a critical regulator of the degenerative muscle changes seen after massive rotator cuff tears. TGF-β promotes rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration by preventing FAP apoptosis. TGF-β regulated FAP apoptosis may serve as an important target pathway in the future development of novel therapeutics to improve muscle outcomes following rotator cuff tear. PMID:27186977

  18. Structure-activity relationship study of 4EGI-1, small molecule eIF4E/eIF4G protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Takrouri, Khuloud; Chen, Ting; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Sahoo, Rupam; Kabha, Eihab; Chen, Han; Cantel, Sonia; Wagner, Gerhard; Halperin, Jose A; Aktas, Bertal H; Chorev, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for regulating the activity of translation initiation factors and multitude of other cellular process, and form the largest block of untapped albeit most challenging targets for drug development. 4EGI-1, (E/Z)-2-(2-(4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)hydrazono)-3-(2-nitrophenyl)propanoic acid, is a hit compound discovered in a screening campaign of small molecule libraries as an inhibitor of translation initiation factors eIF4E and eIF4G protein-protein interaction; it inhibits translation initiation in vitro and in vivo. A series of 4EGI-1-derived thiazol-2-yl hydrazones have been designed and synthesized in order to delineate the structural latitude and improve its binding affinity to eIF4E, and increase its potency in inhibiting the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction. Probing a wide range of substituents on both phenyl rings comprising the 3-phenylpropionic acid and 4-phenylthiazolidine moieties in the context of both E- and Z-isomers of 4EGI-1 led to analogs with enhanced binding affinity and translation initiation inhibitory activities. PMID:24675136

  19. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G. Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-04-25

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  20. A small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii motility induces the posttranslational modification of myosin light chain-1 and inhibits myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Heaslip, Aoife T; Leung, Jacqueline M; Carey, Kimberly L; Catti, Federica; Warshaw, David M; Westwood, Nicholas J; Ballif, Bryan A; Ward, Gary E

    2010-01-15

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that enters cells by a process of active penetration. Host cell penetration and parasite motility are driven by a myosin motor complex consisting of four known proteins: TgMyoA, an unconventional Class XIV myosin; TgMLC1, a myosin light chain; and two membrane-associated proteins, TgGAP45 and TgGAP50. Little is known about how the activity of the myosin motor complex is regulated. Here, we show that treatment of parasites with a recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of invasion and motility results in a rapid and irreversible change in the electrophoretic mobility of TgMLC1. While the precise nature of the TgMLC1 modification has not yet been established, it was mapped to the peptide Val46-Arg59. To determine if the TgMLC1 modification is responsible for the motility defect observed in parasites after compound treatment, the activity of myosin motor complexes from control and compound-treated parasites was compared in an in vitro motility assay. TgMyoA motor complexes containing the modified TgMLC1 showed significantly decreased motor activity compared to control complexes. This change in motor activity likely accounts for the motility defects seen in the parasites after compound treatment and provides the first evidence, in any species, that the mechanical activity of Class XIV myosins can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to their associated light chains.

  1. Identification of Small Molecule Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) Inhibitor That Disrupts Interactions with PIP-box Proteins and Inhibits DNA Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Inoue, Akira; Hishiki, Asami; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Connelly, Michele; Evison, Benjamin; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Kuraoka, Isao; Rodrigues, Patrick; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Sato, Mamoru; Yagi, Takashi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered that 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) inhibits binding of a PIP-box sequence peptide to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein by competing for the same binding site, as evidenced by the co-crystal structure of the PCNA-T3 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Based on this observation, we have designed a novel, non-peptide small molecule PCNA inhibitor, T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), a T3 derivative that lacks thyroid hormone activity. T2AA inhibited interaction of PCNA/PIP-box peptide with an IC50 of ∼1 μm and also PCNA and full-length p21 protein, the tightest PCNA ligand protein known to date. T2AA abolished interaction of PCNA and DNA polymerase δ in cellular chromatin. De novo DNA synthesis was inhibited by T2AA, and the cells were arrested in S-phase. T2AA inhibited growth of cancer cells with induction of early apoptosis. Concurrently, Chk1 and RPA32 in the chromatin are phosphorylated, suggesting that T2AA causes DNA replication stress by stalling DNA replication forks. T2AA significantly inhibited translesion DNA synthesis on a cisplatin-cross-linked template in cells. When cells were treated with a combination of cisplatin and T2AA, a significant increase in phospho(Ser139)histone H2AX induction and cell growth inhibition was observed. PMID:22383522

  2. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of pyrazole-based small-molecule inhibitors of Mdm2/4-p53 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Christner, Susan M.; Clausen, Dana M.; Beumer, Jan H.; Parise, Robert A.; Guo, Jianxia; Huang, Yijun; Dömling, Alexander S; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The interaction of p53, with its negative regulators Mdm2/4 has been widely studied [1]. In p53+/+ cells, expression of Mdm2/4 leads to p53 turnover, inhibition of downstream transcription, decreasing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. We report in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism of YH264, YH263 and WW751, three proposed small molecule inhibitors of the Mdm2/4-p53 interaction. Methods MTT cytotoxicity assays were performed and alterations in proteins were examined using Western blots. Mice were dosed 150 mg/kg YH264 or YH263 iv or po QDx5. Mice were iv dosed 88 mg/kg, 57 mg/kg, or 39 mg/kg WW751 for three, five, or five days. YH264, YH263 and WW751 and metabolites were quantitated by LC-MS/MS. Results IC50 values for YH264, YH263 and WW751 against p53 wild type HCT 116 cells after 72 h of incubation were 18.3 ± 2.3 μM, 8.9 ± 0.6 μM, and 3.1 ± 0.2 μM respectively. Only YH264 appeared to affect p53 expression in vitro. None of the compounds affected the growth of HCT 116 xenografts in C.B-17 SCID mice. YH264 plasma half-life was 147 min; YH263 plasma half-life was 263 min; and WW751 plasma half-life was less than 120 min. Conclusions Despite dosing the mice at the maximum soluble doses, we could not achieve tumor concentrations equivalent to the intracellular concentrations required to inhibit cell growth in vitro. YH263 and WW751 do not appear to affect p53/Mdm2 and none of the three were active in a subcutaneous HCT116 p53+/+ xenograft model. PMID:26050209

  3. Inhibiting receptor tyrosine kinase AXL with small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 reduces glioblastoma growth, migration, and invasion in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Julia; Torka, Robert; Korsing, Sören; Radke, Josefine; Krementeskaia, Irina; Nieminen, Melina; Bai, Xi; Ullrich, Axel; Heppner, Frank; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Receptor tyrosine kinase AXL (RTK-AXL) is regarded as suitable target in glioma therapy. Here we evaluate the anti-tumoral effect of small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 targeting RTK-AXL in a preclinical glioma model and provide evidence that RTK-AXL is expressed and phosphorylated in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Experimental design We studied the impact of BMS-777607 targeting RTK-AXL in GBM models in vitro and in vivo utilizing glioma cells SF126 and U118MG. Impact on proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis was investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and functional assays in vitro and in vivo. Tumor growth was assessed with MRI. Human GBM tissue was analyzed in terms of RTK-AXL phosphorylation by immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results BMS-777607 displayed various anti-cancer effects dependent on increased apoptosis, decreased proliferation and migration in vitro and ex vivo in SF126 and U118 GBM cells. In vivo we observed a 56% tumor volume reduction in SF126 xenografts and remission in U118MG xenografts of more than 91%. The tube formation assay confirmed the anti-angiogenic effect of BMS-777607, which became also apparent in tumor xenografts. IHC of human GBM tissue localized phosphorylated RTK-AXL in hypercellular tumor regions, the migratory front of tumor cells in pseudo-palisades, and in vascular proliferates within the tumor. We further proved RTK-AXL phosphorylation in primary and recurrent disease state. Conclusion Collectively, these data strongly suggest that targeting RTK-AXL with BMS-777607 could represent a novel and potent regimen for the treatment of primary and recurrent GBM. PMID:26848524

  4. Phase I assessment of new mechanism-based pharmacodynamic biomarkers for MLN8054, a small-molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Arijit; Shinde, Vaishali; Tabernero, Josep; Cervantes, Andres; Cohen, Roger B; Dees, E Claire; Burris, Howard; Infante, Jeffrey R; Macarulla, Teresa; Elez, Elena; Andreu, Jordi; Rodriguez-Braun, Edith; Rosello, Susana; von Mehren, Margaret; Meropol, Neal J; Langer, Corey J; ONeil, Bert; Bowman, Douglas; Zhang, Mengkun; Danaee, Hadi; Faron-Yowe, Laura; Gray, Gary; Liu, Hua; Pappas, Jodi; Silverman, Lee; Simpson, Chris; Stringer, Bradley; Tirrell, Stephen; Veiby, Ole Petter; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A

    2011-02-01

    The mitotic kinase Aurora A is an important therapeutic target for cancer therapy. This study evaluated new mechanism-based pharmacodynamic biomarkers in cancer patients in two phase I studies of MLN8054, a small-molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase. Patients with advanced solid tumors received MLN8054 orally for 7 consecutive days in escalating dose cohorts, with skin and tumor biopsies obtained before and after dosing. Skin biopsies were evaluated for increased mitotic cells within the basal epithelium. Tumor biopsies were assessed for accumulation of mitotic cells within proliferative tumor regions. Several patients in the highest dose cohorts showed marked increases in the skin mitotic index after dosing. Although some tumors exhibited increases in mitotic cells after dosing, others displayed decreases, a variable outcome consistent with dual mechanisms of mitotic arrest and mitotic slippage induced by antimitotics in tumors. To provide a clearer picture, mitotic cell chromosome alignment and spindle bipolarity, new biomarkers of Aurora A inhibition that act independently of mitotic arrest or slippage, were assessed in the tumor biopsies. Several patients, primarily in the highest dose cohorts, had marked decreases in the percentage of mitotic cells with aligned chromosomes and bipolar spindles after dosing. Evidence existed for an exposure-effect relationship for mitotic cells with defects in chromosome alignment and spindle bipolarity that indicated a biologically active dose range. Outcomes of pharmacodynamic assays from skin and tumor biopsies were concordant in several patients. Together, these new pharmacodynamic assays provide evidence for Aurora A inhibition by MLN8054 in patient skin and tumor tissues. PMID:21148750

  5. The Small Molecule Inhibitor G6 Significantly Reduces Bone Marrow Fibrosis and the Mutant Burden in a Mouse Model of Jak2-Mediated Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kirabo, Annet; Park, Sung O.; Wamsley, Heather L.; Gali, Meghanath; Baskin, Rebekah; Reinhard, Mary K.; Zhao, Zhizhuang J.; Bisht, Kirpal S.; Keserű, György M.; Cogle, Christopher R.; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2013-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome–negative myeloproliferative neoplasms, including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, and myelofibrosis, are disorders characterized by abnormal hematopoiesis. Among these myeloproliferative neoplasms, myelofibrosis has the most unfavorable prognosis. Furthermore, currently available therapies for myelofibrosis have little to no efficacy in the bone marrow and hence, are palliative. We recently developed a Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) small molecule inhibitor called G6 and found that it exhibits marked efficacy in a xenograft model of Jak2-V617F–mediated hyperplasia and a transgenic mouse model of Jak2-V617F–mediated polycythemia vera/essential thrombocytosis. However, its efficacy in Jak2-mediated myelofibrosis has not previously been examined. Here, we hypothesized that G6 would be efficacious in Jak2-V617F–mediated myelofibrosis. To test this, mice expressing the human Jak2-V617F cDNA under the control of the vav promoter were administered G6 or vehicle control solution, and efficacy was determined by measuring parameters within the peripheral blood, liver, spleen, and bone marrow. We found that G6 significantly reduced extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver and splenomegaly. In the bone marrow, G6 significantly reduced pathogenic Jak/STAT signaling by 53%, megakaryocytic hyperplasia by 70%, and the Jak2 mutant burden by 68%. Furthermore, G6 significantly improved the myeloid to erythroid ratio and significantly reversed the myelofibrosis. Collectively, these results indicate that G6 is efficacious in Jak2-V617F–mediated myelofibrosis, and given its bone marrow efficacy, it may alter the natural history of this disease. PMID:22796437

  6. Role of an indole-thiazolidine molecule PPAR pan-agonist and COX inhibitor on inflammation and microcirculatory damage in acute gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Santin, José Roberto; Daufenback Machado, Isabel; Rodrigues, Stephen F P; Teixeira, Simone; Muscará, Marcelo N; Lins Galdino, Suely; da Rocha Pitta, Ivan; Farsky, Sandra H P

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to show the in vivo mechanisms of action of an indole-thiazolidine molecule peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor pan-agonist (PPAR pan) and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, LYSO-7, in an ethanol/HCl-induced (Et/HCl) gastric lesion model. Swiss male mice were treated with vehicle, LYSO-7 or Bezafibrate (p.o.) 1 hour before oral administration of Et/HCl (60%/0.03M). In another set of assays, animals were injected i.p. with an anti-granulocyte antibody, GW9962 or L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) before treatment. One hour after Et/HCl administration, neutrophils were quantified in the blood and bone marrow and the gastric microcirculatory network was studied in situ. The gastric tissue was used to quantify the percentage of damaged area, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein and PPARγ protein and gene expression. Acid secretion was evaluated by the pylorus ligation model. LYSO-7 or Bezafibrate treatment reduced the necrotic area. LYSO-7 treatment enhanced PPARγ gene and protein expression in the stomach, and impaired local neutrophil influx and stasis of the microcirculatory network caused by Et/HCl administration. The effect seemed to be due to PPARγ agonist activity, as the LYSO-7 effect was abolished in GW9962 pre-treated mice. The reversal of microcirculatory stasis, but not neutrophil influx, was mediated by nitric oxide (NO), as L-NAME pre-treatment abolished the LYSO-7-mediated reestablishment of microcirculatory blood flow. This effect may depend on enhanced eNOS protein expression in injured gastric tissue. The pH and concentration of H(+) in the stomach were not modified by LYSO-7 treatment. In addition, LYSO-7 may induce less toxicity, as 28 days of oral treatment did not induce weight loss, as detected in pioglitazone treated mice. Thus, we show that LYSO-7 may be an effective treatment for gastric lesions by controlling neutrophil

  7. Role of an Indole-Thiazolidine Molecule PPAR Pan-Agonist and COX Inhibitor on Inflammation and Microcirculatory Damage in Acute Gastric Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Santin, José Roberto; Daufenback Machado, Isabel; Rodrigues, Stephen F. P.; Teixeira, Simone; Muscará, Marcelo N.; Lins Galdino, Suely; da Rocha Pitta, Ivan; Farsky, Sandra H. P.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to show the in vivo mechanisms of action of an indole-thiazolidine molecule peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor pan-agonist (PPAR pan) and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, LYSO-7, in an ethanol/HCl-induced (Et/HCl) gastric lesion model. Swiss male mice were treated with vehicle, LYSO-7 or Bezafibrate (p.o.) 1 hour before oral administration of Et/HCl (60%/0.03M). In another set of assays, animals were injected i.p. with an anti-granulocyte antibody, GW9962 or L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) before treatment. One hour after Et/HCl administration, neutrophils were quantified in the blood and bone marrow and the gastric microcirculatory network was studied in situ. The gastric tissue was used to quantify the percentage of damaged area, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein and PPARγ protein and gene expression. Acid secretion was evaluated by the pylorus ligation model. LYSO-7 or Bezafibrate treatment reduced the necrotic area. LYSO-7 treatment enhanced PPARγ gene and protein expression in the stomach, and impaired local neutrophil influx and stasis of the microcirculatory network caused by Et/HCl administration. The effect seemed to be due to PPARγ agonist activity, as the LYSO-7 effect was abolished in GW9962 pre-treated mice. The reversal of microcirculatory stasis, but not neutrophil influx, was mediated by nitric oxide (NO), as L-NAME pre-treatment abolished the LYSO-7-mediated reestablishment of microcirculatory blood flow. This effect may depend on enhanced eNOS protein expression in injured gastric tissue. The pH and concentration of H+ in the stomach were not modified by LYSO-7 treatment. In addition, LYSO-7 may induce less toxicity, as 28 days of oral treatment did not induce weight loss, as detected in pioglitazone treated mice. Thus, we show that LYSO-7 may be an effective treatment for gastric lesions by controlling neutrophil

  8. Crystal structure and bonding analysis of the first dinuclear calcium(II)-proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) `butterfly molecule': a combined microcrystal synchrotron and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hengjiang

    2016-04-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) are prodrugs used widely to treat acid-related diseases since the late 1980s. After an extensive research effort it has become clear that the fundamental interactions between metal atoms and PPIs are of paramount importance for both drug release and long-term therapeutic safety. Unfortunately, until now, very little information has been available on this topic. In this paper, we report the crystal structure analysis of a novel calcium-PPI compound incorporating bridging and terminal deprotonated (R)-rabeprazole tricyclic ligands (L), namely bis[μ-(R)-2-({[4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridin-2-yl]methyl}sulfinyl)-6,7-dihydro-3H-benzofuro[5,6-d]imidazol-1-ido]bis{dimethanol[(R)-2-({[4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridin-2-yl]methyl}sulfinyl)-6,7-dihydro-3H-benzofuro[5,6-d]imidazol-1-ido]calcium(II)} methanol hexasolvate, [Ca2(C20H22N3O4S)4(CH3OH)4]·6CH3OH or [Ca2(L)4(CH3OH)4]·6CH3OH, which crystallizes from methanol in the polar C2 space group. Using low-temperature microcrystal synchrotron radiation, we demonstrate that this compound is in the form of a beautiful `butterfly molecule', consisting of a C2-symmetric dinuclear (CH3OH)2LCa(II)(μ2-L)2Ca(II)L(HOCH3)2 framework. A large amount of disorder is found within the bridging L ligand and the conformation of the fused tetrahydrofuran ring exhibits great variety. All the sulfinyl groups remain intact and the nonbonded Ca...Ca distance is significantly longer than in other calcium dimers, indicating steric hindrance in the bridging ligands. Considerable hydrogen bonding and aromatic C-H...π interactions co-operate to stabilize the whole complex, as well as to facilitate supramolecular assembly. Additional investigations into the bond nature were made using density functional theory (DFT) methods at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level; geometry optimization, Mulliken atomic charges, MEP (molecular electrostatic potential), HOMO-LUMO (highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular

  9. A New Class of Orthosteric uPAR•uPA Small-Molecule Antagonists Are Allosteric Inhibitors of the uPAR•Vitronectin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2015-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR•uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently-labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 µM and inhibited the tight uPAR•uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 µM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR•uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN•uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR•uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells, and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTN•uPARSMB interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR•VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  10. A new class of orthosteric uPAR·uPA small-molecule antagonists are allosteric inhibitors of the uPAR·vitronectin interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O

    2015-06-19

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 μM and inhibited the tight uPAR·uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 μM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR·uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN·uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR·uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTNSMB·uPAR interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR·VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  11. Identification of T. gondii Myosin Light Chain-1 as a Direct Target of TachypleginA-2, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Parasite Motility and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Tran, Fanny; Pathak, Ravindra B.; Poupart, Séverine; Heaslip, Aoife T.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Ward, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Motility of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii plays an important role in the parasite’s life cycle and virulence within animal and human hosts. Motility is driven by a myosin motor complex that is highly conserved across the Phylum Apicomplexa. Two key components of this complex are the class XIV unconventional myosin, TgMyoA, and its associated light chain, TgMLC1. We previously showed that treatment of parasites with a small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii invasion and motility, tachypleginA, induces an electrophoretic mobility shift of TgMLC1 that is associated with decreased myosin motor activity. However, the direct target(s) of tachypleginA and the molecular basis of the compound-induced TgMLC1 modification were unknown. We show here by “click” chemistry labelling that TgMLC1 is a direct and covalent target of an alkyne-derivatized analogue of tachypleginA. We also show that this analogue can covalently bind to model thiol substrates. The electrophoretic mobility shift induced by another structural analogue, tachypleginA-2, was associated with the formation of a 225.118 Da adduct on S57 and/or C58, and treatment with deuterated tachypleginA-2 confirmed that the adduct was derived from the compound itself. Recombinant TgMLC1 containing a C58S mutation (but not S57A) was refractory to click labelling and no longer exhibited a mobility shift in response to compound treatment, identifying C58 as the site of compound binding on TgMLC1. Finally, a knock-in parasite line expressing the C58S mutation showed decreased sensitivity to compound treatment in a quantitative 3D motility assay. These data strongly support a model in which tachypleginA and its analogues inhibit the motility of T. gondii by binding directly and covalently to C58 of TgMLC1, thereby causing a decrease in the activity of the parasite’s myosin motor. PMID:24892871

  12. Targeting the apoptotic machinery in pancreatic cancers using small-molecule antagonists of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Collins A.; Roy, Indrajit; Tryggestad, Eric; Feldmann, Georg; Pinilla, Clemencia; Welsh, Kate; Reed, John C.; Armour, Elwood P.; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph; Rakheja, Dinesh; Maitra, Anirban

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of many solid tumors, including pancreatic cancers, and may be the underlying basis for the suboptimal response to chemo-radiation therapies. Overexpression of a family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) is commonly observed in pancreatic malignancies. We determined the therapeutic efficacy of recently described small-molecule antagonists of the X-linked IAP (XIAP) in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Primary pancreatic cancers were assessed for XIAP expression by immunohistochemistry, using a pancreatic cancer tissue microarray. XIAP small-molecule antagonists (“XAntag”; compounds 1396-11 and 1396-12) and the related compound 1396-28 were tested in vitro in a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc1, Capan1, and BxPC3) and in vivo in s.c. xenograft models for their ability to induce apoptosis and impede neoplastic growth. In addition, pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with XAntags in conjunction with either tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or with radiation to determine potential synergy for such dual targeting of the apoptotic machinery. XIAP was overexpressed in 14 of 18 (77%) of primary pancreatic cancers. The XAntags 1396-11 and 1396-12, but not the inactive isomer 1396-28, induced profound apoptosis in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines tested in vitro, with a IC50 in the range of 2 to 5 μmol/L. Mechanistic specificity of the XAntags for the baculoviral IAP repeat-2 domain of XIAP was shown by preferential activation of downstream “effector” caspases (caspase-3 and caspase-7) versus the upstream “initiator” caspase-9. S.c. BxPC3 xenograft growth in athymic mice was significantly inhibited by monotherapy with XAntags; treated xenografts showed marked apoptosis and increased cleavage of caspase-3. Notably, striking synergy was demonstrable when XAntags were combined with either TRAIL or radiation therapy, as measured by growth inhibition in

  13. Up-regulation of IGF-1R by mutant RAS in leukemia and potentiation of RAS signaling inhibitors by small molecule inhibition of IGF-1R

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Nonami, Atsushi; Chen, Zhao; Nelson, Erik; Chen, Yongfei; Liu, Feiyang; Cho, Haeyeon; Zhang, Jianming; Sattler, Martin; Mitsiades, Constantine; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael; Griffin, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Activating mutations in the RAS oncogene occur frequently in human leukemias. Direct targeting of RAS has proven to be challenging, although targeting of downstream RAS mediators, such as MEK, is currently being tested clinically. Given the complexity of RAS signaling, it is likely that combinations of targeted agents will be more effective than single agents. Experimental Design A chemical screen using RAS-dependent leukemia cells was developed to identify compounds with unanticipated activity in the presence of a MEK inhibitor, and led to identification of inhibitors of IGF-1R. Results were validated using cell-based proliferation assays and apoptosis, cell cycle, and gene knockdown assays, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and a non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Results Mechanistically, IGF-1R protein expression/activity was substantially increased in mutant RAS-expressing cells, and suppression of RAS led to decreases in IGF-1R. Synergy between MEK and IGF-1R inhibitors correlated with induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell cycle progression, and decreased phospho-S6 and phospho-4E-BP1. In vivo, NSG mice tail vein-injected with OCI-AML3-luc+ cells showed significantly lower tumor burden following one week of daily oral administration of 50 mg/kg NVP-AEW541 (IGF-1R inhibitor) combined with 25 mg/kg AZD6244 (MEK inhibitor), as compared to mice treated with either agent alone. Drug combination effects observed in cell-based assays were generalized to additional mutant RAS-positive neoplasms. Conclusions The finding that downstream inhibitors of RAS signaling and IGF-1R inhibitors have synergistic activity warrants further clinical investigation of IGF-1R and RAS signaling inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for RAS-driven malignancies. PMID:25186968

  14. Quantification of histone H3 Lys27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) by high-throughput microscopy enables cellular large-scale screening for small-molecule EZH2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luense, Svenja; Denner, Philip; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury; Hartung, Ingo; Husemann, Manfred; Stresemann, Carlo; Prechtl, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    EZH2 inhibition can decrease global histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and thereby reactivates silenced tumor suppressor genes. Inhibition of EZH2 is regarded as an option for therapeutic cancer intervention. To identify novel small-molecule (SMOL) inhibitors of EZH2 in drug discovery, trustworthy cellular assays amenable for phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) are crucial. We describe a reliable approach that quantifies changes in global levels of histone modification marks using high-content analysis (HCA). The approach was validated in different cell lines by using small interfering RNA and SMOL inhibitors. By automation and miniaturization from a 384-well to 1536-well plate, we demonstrated its utility in conducting phenotypic HTS campaigns and assessing structure-activity relationships (SAR). This assay enables screening of SMOL EZH2 inhibitors and can advance the mechanistic understanding of H3K27me3 suppression, which is crucial with regard to epigenetic therapy. We observed that a decrease in global H3K27me3, induced by EZH2 inhibition, comprises two distinct mechanisms: (1) inhibition of de novo DNA methylation and (II) inhibition of dynamic, replication-independent H3K27me3 turnover. This report describes an HCA assay for primary HTS to identify, profile, and optimize cellular active SMOL inhibitors targeting histone methyltransferases, which could benefit epigenetic drug discovery.

  15. Quantification of Histone H3 Lys27 Trimethylation (H3K27me3) by High-Throughput Microscopy Enables Cellular Large-Scale Screening for Small-Molecule EZH2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Luense, Svenja; Denner, Philip; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury; Hartung, Ingo; Husemann, Manfred; Stresemann, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    EZH2 inhibition can decrease global histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and thereby reactivates silenced tumor suppressor genes. Inhibition of EZH2 is regarded as an option for therapeutic cancer intervention. To identify novel small-molecule (SMOL) inhibitors of EZH2 in drug discovery, trustworthy cellular assays amenable for phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) are crucial. We describe a reliable approach that quantifies changes in global levels of histone modification marks using high-content analysis (HCA). The approach was validated in different cell lines by using small interfering RNA and SMOL inhibitors. By automation and miniaturization from a 384-well to 1536-well plate, we demonstrated its utility in conducting phenotypic HTS campaigns and assessing structure-activity relationships (SAR). This assay enables screening of SMOL EZH2 inhibitors and can advance the mechanistic understanding of H3K27me3 suppression, which is crucial with regard to epigenetic therapy. We observed that a decrease in global H3K27me3, induced by EZH2 inhibition, comprises two distinct mechanisms: (1) inhibition of de novo DNA methylation and (II) inhibition of dynamic, replication-independent H3K27me3 turnover. This report describes an HCA assay for primary HTS to identify, profile, and optimize cellular active SMOL inhibitors targeting histone methyltransferases, which could benefit epigenetic drug discovery. PMID:25409661

  16. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2, MK2): Medicinal Chemistry Efforts To Lead Small Molecule Inhibitors to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Mario; Forli, Stefano; Manetti, Fabrizio

    2016-04-28

    The p38/MAPK-activated kinase 2 (MK2) pathway is involved in a series of pathological conditions (inflammation diseases and metastasis) and in the resistance mechanism to antitumor agents. None of the p38 inhibitors entered advanced clinical trials because of their unwanted systemic side effects. For this reason, MK2 was identified as an alternative target to block the pathway but avoiding the side effects of p38 inhibition. However, ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors suffered from low solubility, poor cell permeability, and scarce kinase selectivity. Fortunately, non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of MK2 have been already discovered that allowed circumventing the selectivity issue. These compounds showed the additional advantage to be effective at lower concentrations in comparison to the ATP-competitive inhibitors. Therefore, although the significant difficulties encountered during the development of these inhibitors, MK2 is still considered as an attractive target to treat inflammation and related diseases to prevent tumor metastasis and to increase tumor sensitivity to chemotherapeutics.

  17. Identification and Pharmacological Analysis of High Efficacy Small Molecule Inhibitors of EGF-EGFR Interactions in Clinical Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: a Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Gudala, Suresh; Khan, Uzma; Kanungo, Niteesh; Bandaru, Srinivas; Hussain, Tajamul; Parihar, Ms; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Mundluru, Hema Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of EGFR-EGF interactions forms an important therapeutic rationale in treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma. Established inhibitors have been successful in reducing proliferative processes observed in NSCLC, however patients suffer serious side effects. Considering the narrow therapeutic window of present EGFR inhibitors, the present study centred on identifying high efficacy EGFR inhibitors through structure based virtual screening strategies. Established inhibitors - Afatinib, Dacomitinib, Erlotinib, Lapatinib, Rociletinib formed parent compounds to retrieve similar compounds by linear fingerprint based tanimoto search with a threshold of 90%. The compounds (parents and respective similars) were docked at the EGF binding cleft of EGFR. Patch dock supervised protein-protein interactions were established between EGF and ligand (query and similar) bound and free states of EGFR. Compounds ADS103317, AKOS024836912, AGN-PC-0MXVWT, GNF-Pf-3539, SCHEMBL15205939 were retrieved respectively similar to Afatinib, Dacomitinib, Erlotinib, Lapatinib, Rociletinib. Compound- AGN-PC-0MXVWT akin to Erlotinib showed highest affinity against EGFR amongst all the compounds (parent and similar) assessed in the study. Further, AGN-PC-0MXVWT brought about significant blocking of EGFR-EGF interactions in addition showed appreciable ADMET properties and pharmacophoric features. In the study, we report AGN-PC-0MXVWT to be an efficient and high efficacy inhibitor of EGFR-EGF interactions identified through computational approaches.

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14740.001 PMID:27434671

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. PMID:27434671

  20. Small-molecule pyrimidine inhibitors of the cdc2-like (Clk) and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated (Dyrk) kinases: development of chemical probe ML315.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Thomas C; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Wang, Jenna L; Auld, Douglas S; Gerritz, Samuel W; Schoenen, Frank J; Thomas, Craig J; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2013-06-15

    Substituted pyrimidine inhibitors of the Clk and Dyrk kinases have been developed, exploring structure-activity relationships around four different chemotypes. The most potent compounds have low-nanomolar inhibitory activity against Clk1, Clk2, Clk4, Dyrk1A and Dyrk1B. Kinome scans with 442 kinases using agents representing three of the chemotypes show these inhibitors to be highly selective for the Clk and Dyrk families. Further off-target pharmacological evaluation with ML315, the most selective agent, supports this conclusion. PMID:23642479

  1. Hydrogen-Bonded Water Molecules in the M2 Channel of the Influenza A Virus Guide the Binding Preferences of Ammonium-Based Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gianti, Eleonora; Carnevale, Vincenzo; DeGrado, William F.; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The tetrameric M2 proton channel of influenza A virus is an integral membrane protein responsible for the acidification of the viral interior. Drugs such as amantadine target the transmembrane region of wild type M2 by acting as pore blockers. However, a number of mutations affecting this domain confer drug resistance, prompting the need for alternative inhibitors. The availability of high-resolution structures of drug-bound M2, paired with computational investigations, revealed that inhibitors can bind at different sites, and provided useful insights in understanding the principles governing proton conduction. Here, we investigated by computation the energetic and geometric factors determining the relative stability of pore blockers at individual sites of different M2 strains. We found that local free energy minima along the translocation pathway of positively charged chemical species correspond to experimentally determined binding sites of inhibitors. Then, by examining the structure of water clusters hydrating each site, as well as of those displaced by binding of hydrophobic scaffolds, we predicted the binding preferences of M2 ligands. This information can be used to guide the identification of novel classes of inhibitors. PMID:25353315

  2. Client Proteins and Small Molecule Inhibitors Display Distinct Binding Preferences for Constitutive and Stress-Induced HSP90 Isoforms and Their Conformationally Restricted Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunmin; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Yim, Kendrick; Rivas, Candy; Alarcon, Sylvia; Schwartz, Harvey; Khamit-Kush, Kofi; Scroggins, Bradley T.; Beebe, Kristin; Trepel, Jane B.; Neckers, Len

    2015-01-01

    The two cytosolic/nuclear isoforms of the molecular chaperone HSP90, stress-inducible HSP90α and constitutively expressed HSP90β, fold, assemble and maintain the three-dimensional structure of numerous client proteins. Because many HSP90 clients are important in cancer, several HSP90 inhibitors have been evaluated in the clinic. However, little is known concerning possible unique isoform or conformational preferences of either individual HSP90 clients or inhibitors. In this report, we compare the relative interaction strength of both HSP90α and HSP90β with the transcription factors HSF1 and HIF1α, the kinases ERBB2 and MET, the E3-ubiquitin ligases KEAP1 and RHOBTB2, and the HSP90 inhibitors geldanamycin and ganetespib. We observed unexpected differences in relative client and drug preferences for the two HSP90 isoforms, with HSP90α binding each client protein with greater apparent affinity compared to HSP90β, while HSP90β bound each inhibitor with greater relative interaction strength compared to HSP90α. Stable HSP90 interaction was associated with reduced client activity. Using a defined set of HSP90 conformational mutants, we found that some clients interact strongly with a single, ATP-stabilized HSP90 conformation, only transiently populated during the dynamic HSP90 chaperone cycle, while other clients interact equally with multiple HSP90 conformations. These data suggest different functional requirements among HSP90 clientele that, for some clients, are likely to be ATP-independent. Lastly, the two inhibitors examined, although sharing the same binding site, were differentially able to access distinct HSP90 conformational states. PMID:26517842

  3. New small molecule inhibitors of histone methyl transferase DOT1L with a nitrile as a non-traditional replacement for heavy halogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Spurr, Sophie S; Bayle, Elliott D; Yu, Wenyu; Li, Fengling; Tempel, Wolfram; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu; Fish, Paul V

    2016-09-15

    A number of new nucleoside derivatives are disclosed as inhibitors of DOT1L activity. SARs established that DOT1L inhibition could be achieved through incorporation of polar groups and small heterocycles at the 5-position (5, 6, 12) or by the application of alternative nitrogenous bases (18). Based on these results, CN-SAH (19) was identified as a potent and selective inhibitor of DOT1L activity where the polar 5-nitrile group was shown by crystallography to bind in the hydrophobic pocket of DOT1L. In addition, we show that a polar nitrile group can be used as a non-traditional replacement for heavy halogen atoms. PMID:27485386

  4. In vitro and In vivo Activity of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting the Pleckstrin Homology Domain of Protein Kinase B/AKT

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Sylvestor A.; Ali, M. Ahad; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhou, Li Li; Lemos, Robert; Ihle, Nathan; Skillman, A. Geoffrey; Zhang, Shuxing; Mash, Eugene A.; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in activating survival and antiapoptotic pathways within cancer cells. Several studies have shown that this pathway is constitutively activated in many different cancer types. The goal of this study was to discover novel compounds that bind to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT, thereby inhibiting AKT activation. Using proprietary docking software, 22 potential PH domain inhibitors were identified. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the binding of the compounds to the expressed PH domain of AKT followed by an in vitro activity screen in Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We identified a novel chemical scaffold in several of the compounds that binds selectively to the PH domain of AKT, inducing a decrease in AKT activation and causing apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. Structural modifications of the scaffold led to compounds with enhanced inhibitory activity in cells. One compound, 4-dodecyl-N-(1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl) benzenesulfonamide, inhibited AKT and its downstream targets in cells as well as in pancreatic cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice; it also exhibited good antitumor activity. In summary, a pharmacophore for PH domain inhibitors targeting AKT function was developed. Computer-aided modeling, synthesis, and testing produced novel AKT PH domain inhibitors that exhibit promising preclinical properties. PMID:19491272

  5. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  6. Suppression of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in human fibroblasts using small molecule inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase and MK2.

    PubMed

    Alimbetov, Dauren; Davis, Terence; Brook, Amy J C; Cox, Lynne S; Faragher, Richard G A; Nurgozhin, Talgat; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Kipling, David

    2016-04-01

    Senescent cells show an altered secretome profile termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). There is an increasing body of evidence that suggests that the accumulation of SASP-positive senescent cells in humans is partially causal in the observed shift to a low-level pro-inflammatory state in aged individuals. This in turn suggests the SASP as a possible therapeutic target to ameliorate inflammatory conditions in the elderly, and thus a better understanding of the signalling pathways underlying the SASP are required. Prior studies using the early generation p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 indicated that p38 signalling was required for the SASP. In this study, we extend these observations using two next-generation p38 inhibitors (UR-13756 and BIRB 796) that have markedly improved selectivity and specificity compared to SB203580, to strengthen the evidence that the SASP is p38-dependent in human fibroblasts. BIRB 796 has an efficacy and toxicity profile that has allowed it to reach Phase III clinical trials, suggesting its possible use to suppress the SASP in vivo. We also demonstrate for the first time a requirement for signalling through the p38 downstream MK2 kinase in the regulation of the SASP using two MK2 inhibitors. Finally, we demonstrate that a commercially-available multiplex cytokine assay technology can be used to detect SASP components in the conditioned medium of cultured fibroblasts from both young and elderly donors. This assay is a high-throughput, multiplex microtitre-based assay system that is highly sensitive, with very low sample requirements, allowing it to be used for low-volume human biological fluids. Our initial studies using existing multiplex plates form the basis for a "SASP signature" assay that could be used as a high-throughput system in a clinical study setting. Our findings therefore provide important steps towards the study of, and intervention in, the SASP in human ageing and age-related disease.

  7. Compound library screening identified Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors as potential key molecules for the development of new chemotherapeutics against schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Lancelot, Julien; Dissous, Colette

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases (PKs) are one of the largest protein families in most eukaryotic organisms. These enzymes are involved in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism and a large number of the anticancer drugs currently used are directed against PKs. The structure and function of PKs are well conserved throughout evolution. In schistosome parasites, PKs were shown to be involved in essential functions at every stage of the parasite life cycle, making these enzymes promising anti-parasite drug targets. In this study, we tested a panel of commercial inhibitors for various PKs and analyzed their effects on pairing and egg production by schistosomes as well as their toxicity towards schistosomula larvae. Results obtained confirmed the deleterious effect of PK targeting on Schistosoma mansoni physiology and the important function of different tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases in the biology and reproduction of this parasite. They also indicated for the first time that the Protein kinase B (also called Akt) which is a major downstream target of many receptor tyrosine kinases and a central player at the crossroads of signal transduction pathways activated in response to growth factors and insulin, can constitute a novel target for anti-schistosome chemotherapy. Structural and functional studies have shown that SmAkt is a conserved kinase and that its activity can be inhibited by commercially available Akt inhibitors. In treated adult worms, Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors induced profound alterations in pairing and egg laying and they also greatly affected the viability of schistosomula larvae. PMID:25516836

  8. Structural Basis for Rational Design of Inhibitors Targeting Trypanosoma cruzi Sterol 14α-Demethylase: Two Regions of the Enzyme Molecule Potentiate Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which was once thought to be confined to endemic regions of Latin America, has now gone global, becoming a new worldwide challenge with no cure available. The disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which depends on the production of endogenous sterols, and therefore can be blocked by sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) inhibitors. Here we explore the spectral binding parameters, inhibitory effects on T. cruzi CYP51 activity, and antiparasitic potencies of a new set of β-phenyl imidazoles. Comparative structural characterization of the T. cruzi CYP51 complexes with the three most potent inhibitors reveals two opposite binding modes of the compounds ((R)-6, EC50 = 1.2 nM, vs (S)-2/(S)-3, EC50 = 1.0/5.5 nM) and suggests the entrance into the CYP51 substrate access channel and the heme propionate-supporting ceiling of the binding cavity as two distinct areas of the protein that enhance molecular recognition and therefore could be used for the development of more effective antiparasitic drugs. PMID:25033013

  9. Allosteric modulation of AURKA kinase activity by a small-molecule inhibitor of its protein-protein interaction with TPX2

    PubMed Central

    Janeček, Matej; Rossmann, Maxim; Sharma, Pooja; Emery, Amy; Huggins, David J.; Stockwell, Simon R.; Stokes, Jamie E.; Tan, Yaw S.; Almeida, Estrella Guarino; Hardwick, Bryn; Narvaez, Ana J.; Hyvönen, Marko; Spring, David R.; McKenzie, Grahame J.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    The essential mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA) is controlled during cell cycle progression via two distinct mechanisms. Following activation loop autophosphorylation early in mitosis when it localizes to centrosomes, AURKA is allosterically activated on the mitotic spindle via binding to the microtubule-associated protein, TPX2. Here, we report the discovery of AurkinA, a novel chemical inhibitor of the AURKA-TPX2 interaction, which acts via an unexpected structural mechanism to inhibit AURKA activity and mitotic localization. In crystal structures, AurkinA binds to a hydrophobic pocket (the ‘Y pocket’) that normally accommodates a conserved Tyr-Ser-Tyr motif from TPX2, blocking the AURKA-TPX2 interaction. AurkinA binding to the Y- pocket induces structural changes in AURKA that inhibit catalytic activity in vitro and in cells, without affecting ATP binding to the active site, defining a novel mechanism of allosteric inhibition. Consistent with this mechanism, cells exposed to AurkinA mislocalise AURKA from mitotic spindle microtubules. Thus, our findings provide fresh insight into the catalytic mechanism of AURKA, and identify a key structural feature as the target for a new class of dual-mode AURKA inhibitors, with implications for the chemical biology and selective therapeutic targeting of structurally related kinases. PMID:27339427

  10. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Aristos J; Brown, Adam R; Chapman, Mark L; Estacion, Mark; Turner, Jamie; Mis, Malgorzata A; Wilbrey, Anna; Payne, Elizabeth C; Gutteridge, Alex; Cox, Peter J; Doyle, Rachel; Printzenhoff, David; Lin, Zhixin; Marron, Brian E; West, Christopher; Swain, Nigel A; Storer, R Ian; Stupple, Paul A; Castle, Neil A; Hounshell, James A; Rivara, Mirko; Randall, Andrew; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Krafte, Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G; Patel, Manoj K; Butt, Richard P; Stevens, Edward B

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7's role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission.

  11. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release

    PubMed Central

    Estacion, Mark; Turner, Jamie; Mis, Malgorzata A.; Wilbrey, Anna; Payne, Elizabeth C.; Gutteridge, Alex; Cox, Peter J.; Doyle, Rachel; Printzenhoff, David; Lin, Zhixin; Marron, Brian E.; West, Christopher; Swain, Nigel A.; Storer, R. Ian; Stupple, Paul A.; Castle, Neil A.; Hounshell, James A.; Rivara, Mirko; Randall, Andrew; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Krafte, Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G.; Patel, Manoj K.; Butt, Richard P.; Stevens, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7’s role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission. PMID:27050761

  12. Rationally designed anti-HIV peptides containing multifunctional domains as molecule probes for studying the mechanisms of action of the first and second generation HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Shi, Weiguo; Xue, Na; Pan, Chungen; Jing, Weiguo; Liu, Keliang; Jiang, Shibo

    2008-10-31

    We have previously shown that the first generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) fusion inhibitor T20 (Fuzeon) contains a critical lipid-binding domain (LBD), whereas C34, another anti-HIV peptide derived from the gp41 C-terminal heptad repeat, consists of an important pocket-binding domain (PBD), and both share a common 4-3 heptad repeat (HR) sequence (Liu, S., Jing, W., Cheung, B., Lu, H., Sun, J., Yan, X., Niu, J., Farmar, J., Wu, S., and Jiang, S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9612-9620). T1249, the second generation HIV fusion inhibitor, has both LBD and PBD but a different HR sequence, suggesting that these three anti-HIV peptides may have distinct mechanisms of action. Here we rationally designed a set of peptides that contain multiple copies of a predicted HR sequence (5HR) or the HR sequence plus either LBD (4HR-LBD) or PBD (PBD-4HR) or both (PBD-3HR-LBD), and we compared their anti-HIV-1 activity and biophysical properties. We found that the peptide 5HR exhibited low-to-moderate inhibitory activity on HIV-1-mediated cell-cell fusion, whereas addition of LBD and/or PBD to the HR sequence resulted in a significant increase of the anti-HIV-1 activity. The peptides containing PBD, including PBD-4HR and PBD-3HR-LBD, could form a stable six-helix bundle with the N-peptide N46 and effectively blocked the gp41 core formation, whereas the peptides containing LBD, e.g. 4HR-LBD and PBD-3HR-LBD, could interact with the lipid vehicles. These results suggest that the HR sequence in these anti-HIV peptides acts as a structure domain and is responsible for its interaction with the HR sequence in N-terminal heptad repeat, whereas PBD and LBD are critical for interactions with their corresponding targets. T20, C34, and T1249 may function like 4HR-LBD, PBD-4HR, and PBD-3HR-LBD, respectively, to interact with different target sites for inhibiting HIV fusion and entry. Therefore, this study provides important information for understanding the mechanisms of action of the

  13. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anders; Pedersen, Søren W.; Dorr, Liam A.; Vallon, Gary; Ripoche, Isabelle; Ducki, Sylvie; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical and biophysical methods, such as fluorescence polarization (FP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and 1H-15N HSQC NMR. Our data show that under the applied in vitro conditions, ZL006 and IC87201 do not interact with the PDZ domains of nNOS or PSD-95, nor inhibit the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interface by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action. PMID:26177569

  14. Lessons learnt from gefitinib and erlotinib: Key insights into small-molecule EGFR-targeted kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Laack, Eckart; Sauter, Guido; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    Improving treatment options and patient outcomes for those with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents a significant worldwide challenge. Although traditional treatment strategies are widely accepted and initially successful, many tumors still fail to respond to available drugs. Therapeutic options for patients with NSCLC are therefore moving towards more individual and personalized treatment strategies. The first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), designed to target specific molecular pathways within the tumor, have paved the way towards tailored therapy. Promising experience with these agents has opened the door to a sudden surge of new drug advances. The development of these second-generation treatments offer the potential to further maximize patient benefit and provide greater therapeutic options for patients with advanced NSCLC. As the number of second-generation TKIs continues to grow, the efficacy and safety of new members of this class continue to be established in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:20646778

  15. Synthesis and SAR of ⁹⁹mTc/Re-labeled small molecule prostate specific membrane antigen inhibitors with novel polar chelates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Genliang; Maresca, Kevin P; Hillier, Shawn M; Zimmerman, Craig N; Eckelman, William C; Joyal, John L; Babich, John W

    2013-03-01

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is recognized as an attractive molecular target for the development of radiopharmaceuticals to image and potentially treat metastatic prostate cancer. A series of novel (99m)Tc/Re-tricarbonyl radiolabeled PSMA inhibitors were therefore synthesized by the attachment of glutamate-urea-lysine (Glu-urea-Lys) and glutamate-urea-glutamate (Glu-urea-Glu) pharmacophore to single amino acid chelate (SAAC) where the SAAC ligand was either bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino (DPA), bis((1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl)amino (NMI), bis((1-(carboxymethyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl)amino (CIM) or bis((1-(2-(bis(carboxymethyl)amino)-2-oxoethyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl)amino (TIM). The in vitro binding affinity of the rhenium complexes was evaluated using PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. IC(50) values ranged from 3.8 ± 2 to >2000 nM. A linker between the SAAC chelate and pharmacophore was required for high affinity binding. However, extending the length of the linker did not substantially improve binding. PSMA binding was also influenced by the nature of the SAAC chelate. One of the most potent compounds, 23b (IC(50)=4.8 ± 2.7 nM), was radiolabeled with technetium tricarbonyl ({(99m)Tc(CO)(3)}(+)) to afford the {(99m)Tc(CO)(3)}(+) complex in excellent yield and high purity. This effort has led to the identification of a diverse series of promising high affinity {(99m)Tc(CO)(3)}(+) radiolabeled PSMA inhibitors. PMID:23333070

  16. Design, synthesis and in vitro and in vivo antitumour activity of 3-benzylideneindolin-2-one derivatives, a novel class of small-molecule inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 interaction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guang-hui; Shen, Jia-jia; Zhan, Yue-chen; Yi, Hong; Xue, Si-tu; Wang, Zhen; Ji, Xing-yue; Li, Zhuo-rong

    2014-06-23

    A novel class of small-molecule inhibitors of MDM2-p53 interaction with a (E)-3-benzylideneindolin-2-one scaffold was identified using an integrated virtual screening strategy that combined both pharmacophore- and structure-based approaches. The hit optimisation identified several compounds with more potent activity than the hit compound and the positive drug nutlin-3a, especially compound 1b, which exhibited both the highest binding affinity to MDM2 (Ki = 0.093 μM) and the most potent antiproliferative activity against HCT116 (wild type p53) cells (GI50 = 13.42 μM). Additionally, 1b dose-dependently inhibited tumour growth in BALB/c mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma, with no visible sign of toxicity. In summary, compound 1b represents a novel and promising lead structure for the development of anticancer drugs as MDM2-p53 interaction disruptors.

  17. Small molecule enoxacin is a cancer-specific growth inhibitor that acts by enhancing TAR RNA-binding protein 2-mediated microRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Melo, Sonia; Villanueva, Alberto; Moutinho, Catia; Davalos, Veronica; Spizzo, Riccardo; Ivan, Cristina; Rossi, Simona; Setien, Fernando; Casanovas, Oriol; Simo-Riudalbas, Laia; Carmona, Javier; Carrere, Jordi; Vidal, August; Aytes, Alvaro; Puertas, Sara; Ropero, Santiago; Kalluri, Raghu; Croce, Carlo M; Calin, George A; Esteller, Manel

    2011-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are critical for many cellular pathways. The disruption of miRNAs and their processing machineries also contributes to the development of human tumors. A common scenario for miRNA expression in carcinogenesis is emerging that shows that impaired miRNA production and/or down-regulation of these transcripts occurs in many neoplasms. Several of these lost miRNAs have tumor-suppressor features, so strategies to restore their expression globally in malignancies would be a welcome addition to the current therapeutic arsenal against cancer. Herein, we show that the small molecule enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone used as an antibacterial compound, enhances the production of miRNAs with tumor suppressor functions by binding to the miRNA biosynthesis protein TAR RNA-binding protein 2 (TRBP). The use of enoxacin in human cell cultures and xenografted, orthotopic, and metastatic mouse models reveals a TRBP-dependent and cancer-specific growth-inhibitory effect of the drug. These results highlight the key role of disrupted miRNA expression patterns in tumorigenesis, and suggest a unique strategy for restoring the distorted microRNAome of cancer cells to a more physiological setting.

  18. A High-Throughput, Cell-Based Screening Method for siRNA and Small Molecule Inhibitors of mTORC1 Signaling Using the In Cell Western Technique

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The mTORC1 pathway is a central regulator of cell growth, and defective mTORC1 regulation plays a causative role in a variety of human diseases, including cancer, tumor syndromes such as the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), and metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Given the importance of mTORC1 signaling in these diseases, there has been significant interest in developing screening methods suitable for identifying inhibitors of mTORC1 activation. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput, cell-based assay for the detection of rpS6-phosphorylation as a measure of mTORC1 signaling. This assay takes advantage of the “In Cell Western” (ICW) technique using the Aerius infrared imaging system (LI-COR® Biosciences). The ICW procedure involves fixation and immunostaining of cells in a manner similar to standard immunofluorescence methods but takes advantage of secondary antibodies conjugated to infrared-excitable fluorophores for quantitative detection by the Aerius® scanner. In addition, the cells are stained with an infrared-excitable succinimidyl ester dye, which covalently modifies free amine groups in fixed cells and provides a quantitative measure of cell number. We present validation data and pilot screens in a 384-well format demonstrating that this assay provides a statistically robust method for both small molecule and siRNA screening approaches designed to identify inhibitors of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:20085456

  19. DW10075, a novel selective and small-molecule inhibitor of VEGFR, exhibits antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-yuan; Lv, Yong-cong; Tong, Lin-jiang; Peng, Ting; Qu, Rong; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Yi-ming; Chen, Yi; Wei, Li-xin; Geng, Mei-yu; Duan, Wen-hu; Xie, Hua; Ding, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Targeting the VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) pathway has proved to be an effective antiangiogenic approach for cancer treatment. Here, we identified 6-((2-((3-acetamidophenyl)amino)pyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-N-phenyl-1-naphthamide (designated herein as DW10075) as a novel and highly selective inhibitor of VEGFRs. Methods: In vitro tyrosine kinase activity was measured using ELISA, and intracellular signaling pathway proteins were detected by Western blot analysis. Endothelial cell proliferation was examined with CCK-8 assays, and tumor cell proliferation was determined with SRB assays. Cell migration, tube formation and rat aortic ring assays were used to detect antiangiogenic activity. Antitumor efficacy was further evaluated in U87-MG human glioblastoma xenograft tumors in nude mice receiving DW10075 (500 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for two weeks. Results: Among a panel of 21 kinases tested, DW10075 selectively inhibited VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 (the IC50 values were 6.4, 0.69 and 5.5 nmol/L, respectively), but did not affect 18 other kinases including FGFR and PDGFR at 10 μmol/L. DW10075 significantly blocked VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR and its downstream signaling transduction in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), thus inhibited VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation. DW10075 (1–100 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited VEGF-induced HUVEC migration and tube formation and suppressed angiogenesis in both the rat aortic ring model and the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model. Furthermore, DW10075 exhibited anti-proliferative activity against 22 different human cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 2.2 μmol/L (for U87-MG human glioblastoma cells) to 22.2 μmol/L (for A375 melanoma cells). In U87-MG xenograft tumors in nude mice, oral administration of DW10075 significantly suppressed tumor growth, and reduced the expression of CD31 and Ki67 in the tumor tissues. Conclusion: DW10075 is a potent and highly selective inhibitor of VEGFR that

  20. Virtual screening of natural inhibitors to the predicted HBx protein structure of Hepatitis B Virus using molecular docking for identification of potential lead molecules for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rajesh Kumar; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Taj, Gohar; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The HBx protein in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a potential target for anti-liver cancer molecules. Therefore, it is of interest to screen known natural compounds against the HBx protein using molecular docking. However, the structure of HBx is not yet known. Therefore, the predicted structure of HBx using threading in LOMET was used for docking against plant derived natural compounds (curcumin, oleanolic acid, resveratrol, bilobetin, luteoline, ellagic acid, betulinic acid and rutin) by Molegro Virtual Docker. The screening identified rutin with binding energy of -161.65 Kcal/mol. Thus, twenty derivatives of rutin were further designed and screened against HBx. These in silico experiments identified compounds rutin01 (-163.16 Kcal/mol) and rutin08 (- 165.76 Kcal/mol) for further consideration and downstream validation. PMID:25187683

  1. A Small Molecule Screen in Stem Cell-derived Motor Neurons Identifies a Kinase Inhibitor as a Candidate Therapeutic for ALS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin M.; Gupta, Shailesh K.; Kim, Kevin J.; Powers, Berit E.; Cerqueira, Antonio; Wainger, Brian J.; Ngo, Hien D.; Rosowski, Kathryn A.; Schein, Pamela A.; Ackeifi, Courtney A.; Arvanites, Anthony C.; Davidow, Lance S.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Rubin, Lee L.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease, characterized by motor neuron (MN) death, for which there are no truly effective treatments. Here, we describe a new small molecule survival screen carried out using MNs from both wildtype and mutant SOD1 mouse embryonic stem cells. Among the hits we found, kenpaullone had a particularly impressive ability to prolong the healthy survival of both types of MNs that can be attributed to its dual inhibition of GSK3 and HGK kinases. Furthermore, kenpaullone also strongly improved the survival of human MNs derived from ALS patient induced pluripotent stem cells and was more active than either of two compounds, olesoxime and dexpramipexole, that recently failed in ALS clinical trials. Our studies demonstrate the value of a stem cell approach to drug discovery and point to a new paradigm for identification and preclinical testing of future ALS therapeutics. PMID:23602540

  2. Circular trimers of gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 constitute a distinct population of functional enzyme molecules differentially regulated by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1

    PubMed Central

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Born, Benjamin; Solomonov, Inna; Zajac, Ewa; Saldova, Radka; Senske, Michael; Ugarte-Berzal, Estefanía; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Van Damme, Jo; Garcia-Pardo, Angeles; Froeyen, Matheus; Deryugina, Elena I.; Quigley, James P.; Moestrup, Søren K.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Sagi, Irit; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) (EC 3.4.24.35) cleaves many substrates and is produced by most cell types as a zymogen, proMMP-9, in complex with the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Natural proMMP-9 occurs as monomers, homomultimers, and heterocomplexes, but our knowledge about the overall structure of proMMP-9 monomers and multimers is limited. We investigated biochemical, biophysical, and functional characteristics of zymogen and activated forms of MMP-9 monomers and multimers. In contrast to a conventional notion of a dimeric nature of MMP-9 homomultimers, we demonstrate that these are reduction-sensitive trimers. Based on the information from electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we generated a 3Dstructure model of the proMMP-9 trimer. Remarkably, the proMMP-9 trimers possessed a 50-fold higher affinity for TIMP-1 than the monomers. In vivo, this finding was reflected in a higher extent of TIMP-1 inhibition of angiogenesis induced by trimers versus monomers. Our results show that proMMP-9 trimers constitute a novel structural and functional entity that is differentially regulated by TIMP-1. PMID:25360794

  3. A Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting CREB-CBP Complex Possesses Anti-Cancer Effects along with Cell Cycle Regulation, Autophagy Suppression and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Woo; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Sin-Aye; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Meng, Wuyi; Jürgensmeier, Juliane M.; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Hong, Waun Ki; Boyer, Julie L.; Herbst, Roy S.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer, is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Despite attempts for the treatment of lung cancer which have been accumulating, promising new therapies are still needed. Here, we found that cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-CREB binding protein (CBP) transcription factors complex inhibitor, Naphthol AS-TR phosphate (NASTRp), is a potential therapeutic agent for lung cancer. We show that NASTRp inhibited oncogenic cell properties through cell cycle arrest with concomitant suppression of tumor-promoting autophagy with down-regulations of Atg5-12 and Atg7, and accumulation of p62 in human lung cancer cell lines. In addition, NASTRp induced expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers such as DDIT3/CHOP, and led to apoptosis along with Bim induction. These findings suggest that transcription factor/co-activator complex, CREB-CBP, can be a potential therapeutic target and its inhibition could be a novel therapeutic strategy for lung cancer. PMID:25897662

  4. Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationships of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Oncoprotein, an Anti-Polyomaviral Target

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tushar; Seguin, Sandlin P.; Liang, Mary; Resnick, Lynn; Goldberg, Margot T.; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Pipas, James M.; Wipf, Peter; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyomavirus infections are common and relatively benign in the general human population but can become pathogenic in immunosuppressed patients. Because most treatments for polyomavirus-associated diseases nonspecifically target DNA replication, existing treatments for polyomavirus infection possess undesirable side effects. However, all polyomaviruses express Large Tumor Antigen (T Ag), which is unique to this virus family and may serve as a therapeutic target. Previous screening of pyrimidinone-peptoid hybrid compounds identified MAL2-11B and a MAL2-11B tetrazole derivative as inhibitors of viral replication and T Ag ATPase activity (IC50 of ~20-50μM). To improve upon this scaffold and to develop a structure-activity relationship for this new class of antiviral agents, several iterative series of MAL2-11B derivatives were synthesized. The replacement of a flexible methylene chain linker with a benzyl group or, alternatively, the addition of an ortho-methyl substituent on the biphenyl side chain in MAL2-11B yielded analogs with modestly improved IC50s (~15 μM), which retained antiviral activity. After combining both structural motifs, a new lead compound was identified that inhibited T Ag ATPase activity with an IC50 of ~5 μM. We suggest that the knowledge gained from the structure-activity relationship and a further refinement cycle of the MAL2-11B scaffold will provide a specific, novel therapeutic treatment option for polyomavirus infections and their associated diseases. PMID:25440730

  5. Enhancement of Radiation Sensitivity in Lung Cancer Cells by a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor That Targets the β-Catenin/Tcf4 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guifen; Han, Xiaofeng; Bao, Wenjing; Cheng, Yanyan; Tian, Wang; Yan, Maocai; Yang, Guanlin; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment choice for unresectable advanced human lung cancers, and a critical adjuvant treatment for surgery. However, radiation as a lung cancer treatment remains far from satisfactory due to problems associated with radiation resistance in cancer cells and severe cytotoxicity to non-cancer cells, which arise at doses typically administered to patients. We have recently identified a promising novel inhibitor of β-catenin/Tcf4 interaction, named BC-23 (C21H14ClN3O4S), which acts as a potent cell death enhancer when used in combination with radiation. Sequential exposure of human p53-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1299 cells to low doses of x-ray radiation, followed 1 hour later by administration of minimally cytotoxic concentrations of BC-23, resulted in a highly synergistic induction of clonogenic cell death (combination index <1.0). Co-treatment with BC-23 at low concentrations effectively inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and down-regulates c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression. S phase arrest and ROS generation are also involved in the enhancement of radiation effectiveness mediated by BC-23. BC-23 therefore represents a promising new class of radiation enhancer. PMID:27014877

  6. Significant partial response of metastatic intra-abdominal and pelvic round cell liposarcoma to a small-molecule VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor apatinib

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Min; Bi, Jingwang; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Baocheng; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is the second most common subtype of liposarcoma. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy have a limited efficacy for treating advanced myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, with relatively serious side effects. Case presentation: We herein present a 68-year-old Chinese woman initially diagnosed with advanced multiple intra-abdominal and pelvic round cell liposarcoma. She refused to receive cytotoxic chemotherapy and received apatinib as the first-line therapy, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 that has been used in the treatment of patients with metastatic gastric cancer who progressed with 2 or more chemotherapy regimens. This patient was partially responsive to apatinib with a dose of 500 mg daily. No serious drug-related side effects were observed. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that some cases of liposarcoma may be responsive to antiangiogenic agent apatinib. Randomized clinical studies are needed to further confirm the efficacy and safety of apatinib in the clinical treatment of liposarcoma. PMID:27495042

  7. Enhancement of Radiation Sensitivity in Lung Cancer Cells by a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor That Targets the β-Catenin/Tcf4 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghao; Gao, Mei; Luo, Guifen; Han, Xiaofeng; Bao, Wenjing; Cheng, Yanyan; Tian, Wang; Yan, Maocai; Yang, Guanlin; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment choice for unresectable advanced human lung cancers, and a critical adjuvant treatment for surgery. However, radiation as a lung cancer treatment remains far from satisfactory due to problems associated with radiation resistance in cancer cells and severe cytotoxicity to non-cancer cells, which arise at doses typically administered to patients. We have recently identified a promising novel inhibitor of β-catenin/Tcf4 interaction, named BC-23 (C21H14ClN3O4S), which acts as a potent cell death enhancer when used in combination with radiation. Sequential exposure of human p53-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1299 cells to low doses of x-ray radiation, followed 1 hour later by administration of minimally cytotoxic concentrations of BC-23, resulted in a highly synergistic induction of clonogenic cell death (combination index <1.0). Co-treatment with BC-23 at low concentrations effectively inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and down-regulates c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression. S phase arrest and ROS generation are also involved in the enhancement of radiation effectiveness mediated by BC-23. BC-23 therefore represents a promising new class of radiation enhancer.

  8. Enhancement of Radiation Sensitivity in Lung Cancer Cells by a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor That Targets the β-Catenin/Tcf4 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghao; Gao, Mei; Luo, Guifen; Han, Xiaofeng; Bao, Wenjing; Cheng, Yanyan; Tian, Wang; Yan, Maocai; Yang, Guanlin; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment choice for unresectable advanced human lung cancers, and a critical adjuvant treatment for surgery. However, radiation as a lung cancer treatment remains far from satisfactory due to problems associated with radiation resistance in cancer cells and severe cytotoxicity to non-cancer cells, which arise at doses typically administered to patients. We have recently identified a promising novel inhibitor of β-catenin/Tcf4 interaction, named BC-23 (C21H14ClN3O4S), which acts as a potent cell death enhancer when used in combination with radiation. Sequential exposure of human p53-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1299 cells to low doses of x-ray radiation, followed 1 hour later by administration of minimally cytotoxic concentrations of BC-23, resulted in a highly synergistic induction of clonogenic cell death (combination index <1.0). Co-treatment with BC-23 at low concentrations effectively inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and down-regulates c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression. S phase arrest and ROS generation are also involved in the enhancement of radiation effectiveness mediated by BC-23. BC-23 therefore represents a promising new class of radiation enhancer. PMID:27014877

  9. Impact of the putative cancer stem cell markers and growth factor receptor expression on the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and cytotoxic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Puvanenthiran, Soozana; Essapen, Sharadah; Seddon, Alan M.; Modjtahedi, Helmout

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression and activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2 have been reported in numerous cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of a large panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines (OCCLs) to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs. The aim was to see if there was any association between the protein expression of various biomarkers including three putative ovarian cancer stem cell (CSC) markers (CD24, CD44, CD117/c-Kit), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and HER family members and response to treatment with these agents. The sensitivity of 10 ovarian tumour cell lines to the treatment with various forms of HER TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sapitinib, afatinib, canertinib, neratinib), as well as other TKIs (dasatinib, imatinib, NVP-AEW541, crizotinib) and cytotoxic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin), as single agents or in combination, was determined by SRB assay. The effect on these agents on the cell cycle distribution, and downstream signaling molecules and tumour migration were determined using flow cytometry, western blotting, and the IncuCyte Clear View cell migration assay respectively. Of the HER inhibitors, the irreversible pan-TKIs (canertinib, neratinib and afatinib) were the most effective TKIs for inhibiting the growth of all ovarian cancer cells, and for blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR, HER-2, AKT and MAPK in SKOV3 cells. Interestingly, while the majority of cancer cells were highly sensitive to treatment with dasatinib, they were relatively resistant to treatment with imatinib (i.e., IC50 >10 μM). Of the cytotoxic agents, paclitaxel was the most effective for inhibiting the growth of OCCLs, and of various combinations of these drugs, only treatment with a combination of NVP-AEW541 and paclitaxel produced a synergistic or additive anti-proliferative effect in all three cell lines examined (i.e., SKOV3, Caov3, ES2

  10. Taselisib (GDC-0032), a Potent β-Sparing Small Molecule Inhibitor of PI3K, Radiosensitizes Head and Neck Squamous Carcinomas Containing Activating PIK3CA Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Zumsteg, Zachary S.; Morse, Natasha; Krigsfeld, Gabriel; Gupta, Gaorav; Higginson, Daniel S.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Morris, Luc; Ganly, Ian; Shiao, Stephan L.; Powell, Simon N.; Chung, Christine H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Baselga, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Activating PIK3CA genomic alterations are frequent in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and there is an association between phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling and radioresistance. Hence, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of inhibiting PI3K with GDC-0032, a PI3K inhibitor with potent activity against p110α, in combination with radiation in HNSCC. Experimental Design The efficacy of GDC-0032 was assessed in vitro in 26 HNSCC cell lines with crystal violet proliferation assays, and changes in PI3K signaling were measured by Western blot analysis. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were assessed with Annexin V staining via flow cytometry and clonogenic survival assays, respectively. DNA damage repair was assessed with immunofluorescence for γH2AX foci, and cell cycle analysis was performed with flow cytometry. In vivo efficacy of GDC-0032 and radiation was assessed in xenografts implanted into nude mice. Results GDC-0032 inhibited potently PI3K signaling and displayed greater antiproliferative activity in HNSCC cell lines with PIK3CA mutations or amplification, whereas cell lines with PTEN alterations were relatively resistant to its effects. Pretreatment with GDC-0032 radiosensitized PIK3CA-mutant HNSCC cells, enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis, impaired DNA damage repair, and prolonged G2–M arrest following irradiation. Furthermore, combined GDC-0032 and radiation was more effective than either treatment alone in vivo in subcutaneous xenograft models. Conclusions GDC-0032 has increased potency in HNSCC cell lines harboring PIK3CA-activating aberrations. Further, combined GDC-0032 and radiotherapy was more efficacious than either treatment alone in PIK3CA-altered HNSCC in vitro and in vivo. This strategy warrants further clinical investigation PMID:26589432

  11. NMS-P937, an orally available, specific small-molecule polo-like kinase 1 inhibitor with antitumor activity in solid and hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Valsasina, Barbara; Beria, Italo; Alli, Cristina; Alzani, Rachele; Avanzi, Nilla; Ballinari, Dario; Cappella, Paolo; Caruso, Michele; Casolaro, Alessia; Ciavolella, Antonella; Cucchi, Ulisse; De Ponti, Anna; Felder, Eduard; Fiorentini, Francesco; Galvani, Arturo; Gianellini, Laura M; Giorgini, Maria L; Isacchi, Antonella; Lansen, Jaqueline; Pesenti, Enrico; Rizzi, Simona; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Sola, Francesco; Moll, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase considered to be the master player of cell-cycle regulation during mitosis. It is indeed involved in centrosome maturation, bipolar spindle formation, chromosome separation, and cytokinesis. PLK1 is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and its overexpression often correlates with poor prognosis. Although five different PLKs are described in humans, depletion or inhibition of kinase activity of PLK1 is sufficient to induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cell lines and in xenograft tumor models. NMS-P937 is a novel, orally available PLK1-specific inhibitor. The compound shows high potency in proliferation assays having low nanomolar activity on a large number of cell lines, both from solid and hematologic tumors. NMS-P937 potently causes a mitotic cell-cycle arrest followed by apoptosis in cancer cell lines and inhibits xenograft tumor growth with clear PLK1-related mechanism of action at well-tolerated doses in mice after oral administration. In addition, NMS-P937 shows potential for combination in clinical settings with approved cytotoxic drugs, causing tumor regression in HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts upon combination with irinotecan and prolonged survival of animals in a disseminated model of acute myelogenous leukemia in combination with cytarabine. NMS-P937, with its favorable pharmacologic parameters, good oral bioavailability in rodent and nonrodent species, and proven antitumor activity in different preclinical models using a variety of dosing regimens, potentially provides a high degree of flexibility in dosing schedules and warrants investigation in clinical settings.

  12. Targeting Multiple Conformations Leads to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the uPAR·uPA Protein-Protein Interaction that Block Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, May; Wang, Fang; Jo, Inha; Knabe, W. Eric; Wilson, Sarah M.; Li, Liwei; Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Li, Jing; Sledge, George; Khanna, Rajesh; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of the urokinase receptor (uPAR) with its binding partners including the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) at the cell surface triggers a series of proteolytic and signaling events that promote invasion and metastasis. Here, we report the discovery of a small molecule (IPR-456) and its derivatives that inhibit the tight uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. IPR-456 was discovered by virtual screening against multiple conformations of uPAR sampled from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Biochemical characterization reveal that the compound binds to uPAR with sub-micromolar affinity (Kd = 310 nM) and inhibits the tight protein-protein interaction with an IC50 of 10 μM. Free energy calculations based on explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations suggested the importance of a carboxylate moiety on IPR-456, which was confirmed by the activity of several derivatives including IPR-803. Immunofluorescence imaging showed that IPR-456 inhibited uPA binding to uPAR of breast MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with an IC50 of 8 μM. The compounds blocked MDA-MB-231 cell invasion, but IPR-456 showed little effect on MDA-MB-231 migration, and no effect on adhesion, suggesting that uPAR mediates these processes through its other binding partners. PMID:21875078

  13. Combined therapeutic use of AdGFPFasL and small molecule inhibitors of ceramide metabolism in prostate and head and neck cancers: a status report.

    PubMed

    Norris, J S; Bielawska, A; Day, T; El-Zawahri, A; ElOjeimy, S; Hannun, Y; Holman, D; Hyer, M; Landon, C; Lowe, S; Dong, J Y; McKillop, J; Norris, K; Obeid, L; Rubinchik, S; Tavassoli, M; Tomlinson, S; Voelkel-Johnson, C; Liu, X

    2006-12-01

    As of January 2005, there were 1020 gene therapy clinical trials ongoing worldwide with 675 or 66.2% devoted to cancer gene therapy. The majority are occurring in the US and Europe (http://www.wiley.co.uk/genetherapy/clinical/). At the present time, to our knowledge there are no trials that employ gene delivery of Fas Ligand (FasL). As an important note, and in contrast to somatic cell therapy trials, there are no reported deaths due to therapeutic vector administration in any cancer gene therapy trial. That said, from our studies and from the published literature, the issue of gene delivery remains the major obstacle to successfully employing gene therapy for cancer treatment. Numerous laboratories are studying this with many different approaches. My co-workers and I have focused on the delivery issue by using various approaches that address tumor targeting and transgene expression. In addition, we are focusing on enhancing tumor cell killing via the bystander effect and through use of small molecules to enhance bystander activity. PMID:16763610

  14. High-content image-based screening of a signal transduction pathway inhibitor small-molecule library against highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P; Tritsch, Sarah R; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Whitehouse, Chris A; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    High-content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a small-molecule library of compounds targeting signal transduction pathways for antiviral activity against multiple highly pathogenic RNA viruses. Of the 2843 compounds screened, 120 compounds exhibited ≥60% antiviral activity. Four compounds (E225-0969, E528-0039, G118-0778, and G544-0735), which were most active against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their concentration-response profile and cytotoxicity. These compounds did not show any visible cytotoxicity at the highest concentration of compound tested (200 µM). All four of these compounds were more active than ribavirin against several viruses. One compound, E225-0969, had the lowest effective concentration (EC50 = 1.9-8.92 µM) for all the viruses tested. This compound was 13- and 43-fold more inhibitory against RVFV and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), respectively, than ribavirin. The highest selectivity index (>106.2) was for E225-0969 against CHIKV. Time-of-addition assays suggested that all four lead compounds targeted early steps in the viral life cycle (entry and/or replication) but not virus egress. Overall, this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals against highly pathogenic viruses.

  15. A novel small-molecule PPI inhibitor targeting integrin αvβ3-osteopontin interface blocks bone resorption in vitro and prevents bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Doori; Park, Chan-Won; Choi, YoungJin; Lin, Jingjing; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Lee, Soo Young; Kang, In-Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Small molecule-inhibition targeting protein-protein interaction (PPI) is now recognized as an emerging and challenging area in drug design. We developed a novel interactive drug discovery methodology known as Protein Chip technology (ProteoChip) as a cutting-edge PPI assay system applicable for unique PPI-targeting therapeutics integrated with computer-aided drug design (CADD). Here, we describe a novel small molecular PPI inhibitor, IPS-02001, which the blocks integrin αvβ3-osteopontin interface a novel PPI inhibitor identified by the interactive methodology of both ProteoChip- and CADD-based PPI assay. IPS-02001 (6,7-Dichloro-2,3,5,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) was screened from different compound libraries (InterBioScreen, Commercial libraries) using an in silico structure-based molecular docking simulation method and a protein chip-based protein-protein interaction assay system. Additionally, integrin αvβ3, an adhesion receptor expressed in osteoclasts (OCs), was implicated in the regulation of OC function via regulation of the cytoskeletal organization of OCs. IPS-02001 blocked OC maturation from murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, as well as the resorptive function of OCs. Moreover, treatment with IPS-02001 impaired downstream signaling of integrin αvβ3 linked to Pyk2, c-Src, PLCγ2, and Vav3 and disrupted the actin cytoskeleton in mature OCs. Furthermore, IPS-02001 blocked RANKL-induced bone destruction by reducing the number of OCs and protected against ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice. Thus, IPS-02001 may represent a promising new class of anti-resorptive drugs for treatment of bone diseases associated with increased OC function. PMID:27187277

  16. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) Inhibits Repair of Interstrand DNA Cross-link, Enhances DNA Double Strand Break, and Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Cisplatin*

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Akira; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Hishiki, Asami; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Evison, Benjamin J.; Actis, Marcelo; Canman, Christine E.; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2014-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/PCNA interacting protein box (PIP-Box) interactions, including T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), inhibit translesion DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of PCNA in complex with T2AA revealed that T2AA bound to the surface adjacent to the subunit interface of the homotrimer of PCNA in addition to the PIP-box binding cavity. Because this site is close to Lys-164, which is monoubiquitinated by RAD18, we postulated that T2AA would affect monoubiquitinated PCNA interactions. Binding of monoubiquitinated PCNA and a purified pol η fragment containing the UBZ and PIP-box was inhibited by T2AA in vitro. T2AA decreased PCNA/pol η and PCNA/REV1 chromatin colocalization but did not inhibit PCNA monoubiquitination, suggesting that T2AA hinders interactions of pol η and REV1 with monoubiquitinated PCNA. Interstrand DNA cross-links (ICLs) are repaired by mechanisms using translesion DNA synthesis that is regulated by monoubiquitinated PCNA. T2AA significantly delayed reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL. Neutral comet analysis of cells receiving T2AA in addition to cisplatin revealed that T2AA significantly enhanced formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by cisplatin. T2AA promoted colocalized foci formation of phospho-ATM and 53BP1 and up-regulated phospho-BRCA1 in cisplatin-treated cells, suggesting that T2AA increases DSBs. When cells were treated by cisplatin and T2AA, their clonogenic survival was significantly less than that of those treated by cisplatin only. These findings show that the inhibitors of monoubiquitinated PCNA chemosensitize cells by inhibiting repair of ICLs and DSBs. PMID:24474685

  17. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a beta blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by approximately 80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain metabolites: gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1), prostacyclin (PGI2), PGI3, lipoxins (LXs), resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-gamma ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the

  18. Design and in vitro activities of N-alkyl-N-[(8-R-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]heteroarylsulfonamides, novel, small-molecule hypoxia inducible factor-1 pathway inhibitors and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jiyoung; Jabbar, Adnan Abdul; Devi, Narra Sarojini; Yin, Shaoman; Wang, Yingzhe; Tan, Chalet; Culver, Deborah; Snyder, James P; Van Meir, Erwin G; Goodman, Mark M

    2012-08-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is an attractive target for cancer, as it controls tumor adaptation to growth under hypoxia and mediates chemotherapy and radiation resistance. We previously discovered 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide as a novel, small-molecule HIF-1 pathway inhibitor in a high-throughput cell-based assay, but its in vivo delivery is hampered by poor aqueous solubility (0.009 μM in water; log P(7.4) = 3.7). Here we describe the synthesis of 12 N-alkyl-N-[(8-R-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]heteroarylsulfonamides, which were designed to possess optimal lipophilicities and aqueous solubilities by in silico calculations. Experimental log P(7.4) values of 8 of the 12 new analogs ranged from 1.2-3.1. Aqueous solubilities of three analogs were measured, among which the most soluble N-[(8-methoxy-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-(propan-2-yl)pyridine-2-sulfonamide had an aqueous solubility of 80 μM, e.g., a solubility improvement of ∼9000-fold. The pharmacological optimization had limited impact on drug efficacy as the compounds retained IC(50) values at or below 5 μM in our HIF-dependent reporter assay.

  19. Discovery of methyl 4'-methyl-5-(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxylate, an improved small-molecule inhibitor of c-Myc-max dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Jay; Wang, Huabo; Yap, Jeremy L; Sabato, Philip E; Hu, Angela; Prochownik, Edward V; Fletcher, Steven

    2014-10-01

    c-Myc is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) transcription factor that is responsible for the transcription of a wide range of target genes involved in many cancer-related cellular processes. Over-expression of c-Myc has been observed in, and directly contributes to, a variety of human cancers including those of the hematopoietic system, lung, prostate and colon. To become transcriptionally active, c-Myc must first dimerize with Myc-associated factor X (Max) via its own bHLH-ZIP domain. A proven strategy towards the inhibition of c-Myc oncogenic activity is to interfere with the structural integrity of the c-Myc-Max heterodimer. The small molecule 10074-G5 is an inhibitor of c-Myc-Max dimerization (IC50 =146 μM) that operates by binding and stabilizing c-Myc in its monomeric form. We have identified a congener of 10074-G5, termed 3jc48-3 (methyl 4'-methyl-5-(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxylate), that is about five times as potent (IC50 =34 μM) at inhibiting c-Myc-Max dimerization as the parent compound. 3jc48-3 exhibited an approximate twofold selectivity for c-Myc-Max heterodimers over Max-Max homodimers, suggesting that its mode of action is through binding c-Myc. 3jc48-3 inhibited the proliferation of c-Myc-over-expressing HL60 and Daudi cells with single-digit micromolar IC50 values by causing growth arrest at the G0 /G1 phase. Co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that 3jc48-3 inhibits c-Myc-Max dimerization in cells, which was further substantiated by the specific silencing of a c-Myc-driven luciferase reporter gene. Finally, 3jc48-3's intracellular half-life was >17 h. Collectively, these data demonstrate 3jc48-3 to be one of the most potent, cellularly active and stable c-Myc inhibitors reported to date.

  20. Small molecule inhibitors of CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Bikash; Xu, Shili; Grande, Fedora; Garofalo, Antonio; Neamati, Nouri

    2013-01-01

    CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor involved in a number of physiological processes in the hematopoietic and immune systems. The SDF-1/CXCR4 axis is significantly associated with several diseases, such as HIV, cancer, WHIM syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, pulmonary fibrosis and lupus. For example, CXCR4 is one of the major co-receptors for HIV entry into target cells, while in cancer it plays an important role in tumor cell metastasis. Several promising CXCR4 antagonists have been developed to block SDF-1/CXCR4 interactions that are currently under different stages of development. The first in class CXCR4 antagonist, plerixafor, was approved by the FDA in 2008 for the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells and several other drugs are currently in clinical trials for cancer, HIV, and WHIM syndrome. While the long-term safety data for the first generation CXCR4 antagonists are not yet available, several new compounds are under preclinical development in an attempt to provide safer and more efficient treatment options for HIV and cancer patients. PMID:23382786

  1. Small Molecule Inhibitors of CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Bikash; Xu, Shili; Grande, Fedora; Garofalo, Antonio; Neamati, Nouri

    2013-01-01

    CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor involved in a number of physiological processes in the hematopoietic and immune systems. The SDF-1/CXCR4 axis is significantly associated with several diseases, such as HIV, cancer, WHIM syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, pulmonary fibrosis and lupus. For example, CXCR4 is one of the major co-receptors for HIV entry into target cells, while in cancer it plays an important role in tumor cell metastasis. Several promising CXCR4 antagonists have been developed to block SDF-1/CXCR4 interactions that are currently under different stages of development. The first in class CXCR4 antagonist, plerixafor, was approved by the FDA in 2008 for the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells and several other drugs are currently in clinical trials for cancer, HIV, and WHIM syndrome. While the long-term safety data for the first generation CXCR4 antagonists are not yet available, several new compounds are under preclinical development in an attempt to provide safer and more efficient treatment options for HIV and cancer patients. PMID:23382786

  2. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  3. SKLB70326, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cell-cycle progression, induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and apoptosis in human hepatic carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yuanyuan; He, Haiyun; Peng, Feng; Liu, Jiyan; Dai, Xiaoyun; Lin, Hongjun; Xu, Youzhi; Zhou, Tian; Mao, Yongqiu; Xie, Gang; Yang, Shengyong; Yu, Luoting; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yinglan

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 is a novel compound and has activity of anti-HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest via inhibiting the activity of CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. -- Abstract: We previously reported the potential of a novel small molecule 3-amino-6-(3-methoxyphenyl)thieno[2.3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (SKLB70326) as an anticancer agent. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effects and possible mechanisms of SKLB70326 in vitro. We found that SKLB70326 treatment significantly inhibited human hepatic carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro, and the HepG2 cell line was the most sensitive to its treatment. The inhibition of cell proliferation correlated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest, which was followed by apoptotic cell death. The SKLB70326-mediated cell-cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4 and CDK6 but not cyclin D1 or cyclin E. The phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was also observed. SKLB70326 treatment induced apoptotic cell death via the activation of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2. The expression levels of p53 and p21 were also induced by SKLB70326 treatment. Moreover, SKLB70326 treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, SKLB70326, a novel cell-cycle inhibitor, notably inhibits HepG2 cell proliferation through the induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Its potential as a candidate anticancer agent warrants further investigation.

  4. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  5. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  6. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations and modelling of the residue interaction networks in the BRAF kinase complexes with small molecule inhibitors: probing the allosteric effects of ligand-induced kinase dimerization and paradoxical activation.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, G M

    2016-10-20

    Protein kinases are central to proper functioning of cellular networks and are an integral part of many signal transduction pathways. The family of protein kinases represents by far the largest and most important class of therapeutic targets in oncology. Dimerization-induced activation has emerged as a common mechanism of allosteric regulation in BRAF kinases, which play an important role in growth factor signalling and human diseases. Recent studies have revealed that most of the BRAF inhibitors can induce dimerization and paradoxically stimulate enzyme transactivation by conferring an active conformation in the second monomer of the kinase dimer. The emerging connections between inhibitor binding and BRAF kinase domain dimerization have suggested a molecular basis of the activation mechanism in which BRAF inhibitors may allosterically modulate the stability of the dimerization interface and affect the organization of residue interaction networks in BRAF kinase dimers. In this work, we integrated structural bioinformatics analysis, molecular dynamics and binding free energy simulations with the protein structure network analysis of the BRAF crystal structures to determine dynamic signatures of BRAF conformations in complexes with different types of inhibitors and probe the mechanisms of the inhibitor-induced dimerization and paradoxical activation. The results of this study highlight previously unexplored relationships between types of BRAF inhibitors, inhibitor-induced changes in the residue interaction networks and allosteric modulation of the kinase activity. This study suggests a mechanism by which BRAF inhibitors could promote or interfere with the paradoxical activation of BRAF kinases, which may be useful in informing discovery efforts to minimize the unanticipated adverse biological consequences of these therapeutic agents.

  8. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  9. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  10. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  11. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  12. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  13. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  14. Conformation-specific inhibitors of Raf kinases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolun; Schleicher, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery linking B-Raf mutations to human tumors in 2002, significant advances in the development of Raf inhibitors have been made, leading to the recent approval of two Raf inhibitor drugs. This chapter includes a brief introduction to B-Raf as a validated target and focuses on the three different binding modes observed with Raf small-molecule inhibitors. These various binding modes lock the Raf kinase in different conformations that impact the toxicity profiles of the inhibitors. Possible solutions to mitigate the side effects caused by inhibitor-induced dimerization are also discussed.

  15. 'Escentric' molecules.

    PubMed

    Schön, Geza

    2008-06-01

    Can a fragrance be revolutionary? In this commentary, the creation of two unusual, extravagant fine fragrances, 'escentric01' and 'molecule01', is described. In response to the fantasy components found in release notes of many recent perfume launches, both center around a single real fragrance raw material, the transparent woody aroma chemical 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The perfume 'escentric01' contains 65% of it, accompanied by Trisamber (3), red pepper, lime oil, incense and musks, while 'molecule01' consists exclusively of 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The elegant woody note lives here its own eccentric life--the revolution starts.

  16. Energy-Based Pharmacophore and Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship (3D-QSAR) Modeling Combined with Virtual Screening To Identify Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Silent Mating-Type Information Regulation 2 Homologue 1 (SIRT1).

    PubMed

    Pulla, Venkat Koushik; Sriram, Dinavahi Saketh; Viswanadha, Srikant; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2016-01-25

    Silent mating-type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1), being the homologous enzyme of silent information regulator-2 gene in yeast, has multifaceted functions. It deacetylates a wide range of histone and nonhistone proteins; hence, it has good therapeutic importance. SIRT1 was believed to be overexpressed in many cancers (prostate, colon) and inflammatory disorders (rheumatoid arthritis). Hence, designing inhibitors against SIRT1 could be considered valuable. Both structure-based and ligand-based drug design strategies were employed to design novel inhibitors utilizing high-throughput virtual screening of chemical databases. An energy-based pharmacophore was generated using the crystal structure of SIRT1 bound with a small molecule inhibitor and compared with a ligand-based pharmacophore model that showed four similar features. A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model was developed and validated to be employed in the virtual screening protocol. Among the designed compounds, Lead 17 emerged as a promising SIRT1 inhibitor with IC50 of 4.34 μM and, at nanomolar concentration (360 nM), attenuated the proliferation of prostate cancer cells (LnCAP). In addition, Lead 17 significantly reduced production of reactive oxygen species, thereby reducing pro inflammatory cytokines such as IL6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory potential of the compound was ascertained using an animal paw inflammation model induced by carrageenan. Thus, the identified SIRT1 inhibitors could be considered as potent leads to treat both cancer and inflammation.

  17. Energy-Based Pharmacophore and Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship (3D-QSAR) Modeling Combined with Virtual Screening To Identify Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Silent Mating-Type Information Regulation 2 Homologue 1 (SIRT1).

    PubMed

    Pulla, Venkat Koushik; Sriram, Dinavahi Saketh; Viswanadha, Srikant; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2016-01-25

    Silent mating-type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1), being the homologous enzyme of silent information regulator-2 gene in yeast, has multifaceted functions. It deacetylates a wide range of histone and nonhistone proteins; hence, it has good therapeutic importance. SIRT1 was believed to be overexpressed in many cancers (prostate, colon) and inflammatory disorders (rheumatoid arthritis). Hence, designing inhibitors against SIRT1 could be considered valuable. Both structure-based and ligand-based drug design strategies were employed to design novel inhibitors utilizing high-throughput virtual screening of chemical databases. An energy-based pharmacophore was generated using the crystal structure of SIRT1 bound with a small molecule inhibitor and compared with a ligand-based pharmacophore model that showed four similar features. A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model was developed and validated to be employed in the virtual screening protocol. Among the designed compounds, Lead 17 emerged as a promising SIRT1 inhibitor with IC50 of 4.34 μM and, at nanomolar concentration (360 nM), attenuated the proliferation of prostate cancer cells (LnCAP). In addition, Lead 17 significantly reduced production of reactive oxygen species, thereby reducing pro inflammatory cytokines such as IL6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory potential of the compound was ascertained using an animal paw inflammation model induced by carrageenan. Thus, the identified SIRT1 inhibitors could be considered as potent leads to treat both cancer and inflammation. PMID:26636371

  18. Dis-organizing centrosomal clusters: specific cancer therapy for a generic spread?

    PubMed

    Bhakta-Guha, D; Saeed, M E M; Greten, H J; Efferth, T

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and the annual incidence of new cancer cases is rising worldwide. Due to the frequent development of resistance and the side effects of established anti-cancer drugs, the quest for new drugs with improved therapeutic features goes on. In contrast to cytotoxic chemotherapy of the past, the concept of targeted chemotherapy attempts to increase specificity of therapy by attacking tumor-related mechanisms. A novel emerging treatment concept represents the inhibition of centrosomal clustering. The centrosome regulates mitotic spindle formation assuring uniform separation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Many tumors contain supernumerary centrosomes, which contribute to aneuploidy induction via multipolar mitotic spindle formation. As spindle multipolarity leads to cell death, tumor cells developed centrosomal clustering mechanism to prevent multipolar spindle formation by coalescence of multiple centrosomes into two functional spindle poles. Inhibition of centrosome clustering represents a novel strategy for drug development and leads to the formation of multipolar spindles and subsequent cell death. In the present review, we report advances in understanding the biology of centrosomal clustering as well as enlist compounds capable of inducing the formation of multipolar spindles such as indolquinolizines, integrin-linked kinase inhibitors (QLT-0267), noscapinoids (EM011), phthalamide derivatives (TC11), griseofulvin, phenanthridines (PJ-34), CCC1-01, CW069 GF-15, colcemid, nocodazole, paclitaxel, and vinblastine. We also present in silico result of compounds that bind to γ-tubulin under the ambit of centrosomal clustering inhibition. We observed maximum binding efficacy in GF-15, CW069, paclitaxel and larotaxel with GF-15 exhibiting least energy of -8.4 Kcal/mol and 0.7 μM Pki value.

  19. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  20. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  1. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  2. Walking molecules.

    PubMed

    von Delius, Max; Leigh, David A

    2011-07-01

    Movement is intrinsic to life. Biologists have established that most forms of directed nanoscopic, microscopic and, ultimately, macroscopic movements are powered by molecular motors from the dynein, myosin and kinesin superfamilies. These motor proteins literally walk, step by step, along polymeric filaments, carrying out essential tasks such as organelle transport. In the last few years biological molecular walkers have inspired the development of artificial systems that mimic aspects of their dynamics. Several DNA-based molecular walkers have been synthesised and shown to walk directionally along a track upon sequential addition of appropriate chemical fuels. In other studies, autonomous operation--i.e. DNA-walker migration that continues as long as a complex DNA fuel is present--has been demonstrated and sophisticated tasks performed, such as moving gold nanoparticles from place-to-place and assistance in sequential chemical synthesis. Small-molecule systems, an order of magnitude smaller in each dimension and 1000× smaller in molecular weight than biological motor proteins or the walker systems constructed from DNA, have also been designed and operated such that molecular fragments can be progressively transported directionally along short molecular tracks. The small-molecule systems can be powered by light or chemical fuels. In this critical review the biological motor proteins from the kinesin, myosin and dynein families are analysed as systems from which the designers of synthetic systems can learn, ratchet concepts for transporting Brownian substrates are discussed as the mechanisms by which molecular motors need to operate, and the progress made with synthetic DNA and small-molecule walker systems reviewed (142 references). PMID:21416072

  3. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  4. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) using NVP-AEW541, a small molecule kinase inhibitor, reduces orthotopic pancreatic cancer growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christian; Schachtschneider, Philipp; Lang, Sven A; Gaumann, Andreas; Mori, Akira; Zimmermann, Johann; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K; Stoeltzing, Oliver

    2008-07-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is frequently overexpressed and constitutively activated in pancreatic cancer, thus representing a promising target for therapy. We investigated the impact of a novel inhibitor of IGF-IR (NVP-AEW541) on signalling and growth of pancreatic cancer. Human pancreatic cancer cells and endothelial cells were employed, and effects of NVP-AEW541 on signalling pathways investigated by Western blotting. NVP-AEW541 diminished the activation of IGF-IR, IRS-1, Erk, Akt and STAT3. Furthermore, NVP-AEW541 reduced cancer cell proliferation and abrogated migratory effects of IGF-I. NVP-AEW541 elicited a direct effect on endothelial cells in terms of reducing endothelial cell migration. In vivo, treatment of mice with NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced orthotopic pancreatic tumour growth, vascularisation, and VEGF expression. Interestingly, NVP-AEW541 lowered serum levels of IGF-binding-protein-3 (IGFBP-3). In conclusion, the IGF-IR inhibitor NVP-AEW541 effectively disrupts IGF-I signalling and reduces pancreatic tumour growth. Hence, blocking IGF-IR could prove valuable for targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer.

  5. A novel AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, inhibits phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activates phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1 dependent on the liver cancer cell type

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUNCHENG; ZHENG, YUANWEN; FAHEEM, ALI; SUN, TIANTONG; LI, CHUNYOU; LI, ZHE; ZHAO, DIANTANG; WU, CHAO; LIU, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway dysregulation, AKT is typically accepted as a promising anticancer therapeutic target. mTOR, in particular, represents a suitable therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma, whilst suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia family member-1 (SMG-1) is believed to serve a potential tumor suppressor role in human cancer. Despite SMG-1 and mTOR belonging to the same PI3K-related kinase family, the interactions between them are not yet fully understood. In the present study, a novel pyrrolopyrimidine-derived compound, AZD5363, was observed to suppress proliferation in liver cancer Hep-G2 and Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of downstream molecules in the AKT signal pathway, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. AZD5363 activated the phosphorylation of mTOR, dependent on the liver cancer cell type, as it may have differing effects in various liver cancer cell lines. Additionally, AZD5363 also activated SMG-1 within the same liver cancer cells types, which subsequently activated the phosphorylation of mTOR. In conclusion, the present study indicates that AZD5363 inhibited phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activated phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1, dependent on the liver cancer type. PMID:26998062

  6. Optimization of a series of potent and selective ketone histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pescatore, Giovanna; Kinzel, Olaf; Attenni, Barbara; Cecchetti, Ottavia; Fiore, Fabrizio; Fonsi, Mas