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Sample records for molecule ncam-deficient mice

  1. Restoration of synaptic plasticity and learning in young and aged NCAM-deficient mice by enhancing neurotransmission mediated by GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Bukalo, Olena; Senkov, Oleg; Salmen, Benedikt; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Engel, Andreas K; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2012-02-15

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is the predominant carrier of the unusual glycan polysialic acid (PSA). Deficits in PSA and/or NCAM expression cause impairments in hippocampal long-term potentiation and depression (LTP and LTD) and are associated with schizophrenia and aging. In this study, we show that impaired LTP in adult NCAM-deficient (NCAM(-/-)) mice is restored by increasing the activity of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor (GluN) through either reducing the extracellular Mg2+ concentration or applying d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist of the GluN glycine binding site. Pharmacological inhibition of the GluN2A subtype reduced LTP to the same level in NCAM(-/-) and wild-type (NCAM(+/+)) littermate mice and abolished the rescue by DCS in NCAM(-/-) mice, suggesting that the effects of DCS are mainly mediated by GluN2A. The insufficient contribution of GluN to LTD in NCAM(-/-) mice was also compensated for by DCS. Furthermore, impaired contextual and cued fear conditioning levels were restored in NCAM(-/-) mice by administration of DCS before conditioning. In 12-month-old NCAM(-/-), but not NCAM(+/+) mice, there was a decline in LTP compared with 3-month-old mice that could be rescued by DCS. In 24-month-old mice of both genotypes, there was a reduction in LTP that could be fully restored by DCS in NCAM(+/+) mice but only partially restored in NCAM(-/-) mice. Thus, several deficiencies of NCAM(-/-) mice can be ameliorated by enhancing GluN2A-mediated neurotransmission with DCS.

  2. Role of stress system disturbance and enhanced novelty response in spatial learning of NCAM-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Brandewiede, Joerg; Jakovcevski, Mira; Stork, Oliver; Schachner, Melitta

    2013-11-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a crucial role in stress-related brain function, emotional behavior and memory formation. In this study, we investigated the functions of the glucocorticoid and serotonergic systems in mice constitutively deficient for NCAM (NCAM-/- mice). Our data provide evidence for a hyperfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with enlarged adrenal glands and increased stress-induced corticosterone release, but reduced hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression in NCAM-/- mice when compared to NCAM+/+ mice. We also obtained evidence for a hypofunction of 5-HT1A autoreceptors as indicated by increased 8-0H-DPAT-induced hypothermia. These findings suggest a disturbance of both humoral and neural stress systems in NCAM-/- mice. Accordingly, we not only confirmed previously observed hyperarousal of NCAM-/- mice in various anxiety tests, but also observed an increased response to novelty exposure in these animals. Spatial learning deficits of the NCAM-/- mice in a Morris Water maze persisted, even when mice were pretrained to prevent effects of novelty or stress. We suggest that NCAM-mediated processes are involved in both novelty/stress-related emotional behavior and in cognitive function during spatial learning.

  3. Age-related cognitive impairments in mice with a conditional ablation of the neural cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However, whether aging is associated with NCAM alterations that might contribute to age-related cognitive decline is not currently known. In this study, we determined whether conditional NCAM-deficient mice display increased vulnerability to age-related cognitive and emotional alterations. We assessed the NCAM expression levels in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and characterized the performance of adult and aged conditional NCAM-deficient mice and their age-matched wild-type littermates in a delayed matching-to-place test in the Morris water maze and a delayed reinforced alternation test in the T-maze. Although aging in wild-type mice is associated with an isoform-specific reduction of NCAM expression levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, these mice exhibited only mild impairments in working/episodic-like memory performance. However, aged conditional NCAM-deficient mice displayed pronounced impairments in both the delayed matching-to-place and the delayed reinforced alternation tests. Importantly, the deficits of aged NCAM-deficient mice in these working/episodic-like memory tasks could not be attributed to increased anxiety-like behaviors or to differences in locomotor activity. Taken together, these data indicate that reduced NCAM expression in the forebrain might be a critical factor for the occurrence of cognitive impairments during aging.

  4. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  5. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) induces neuritogenesis in the cochlear spiral ganglion via neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

    PubMed

    Euteneuer, Sara; Yang, Kuo H; Chavez, Eduardo; Leichtle, Anke; Loers, Gabriele; Olshansky, Adel; Pak, Kwang; Schachner, Melitta; Ryan, Allen F

    2013-05-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) increases survival and neurite extension of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), the primary neurons of the auditory system, via yet unknown signaling mechanisms. In other cell types, signaling is achieved by the GPI-linked GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) via recruitment of transmembrane receptors: Ret (re-arranged during transformation) and/or NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule). Here we show that GDNF enhances neuritogenesis in organotypic cultures of spiral ganglia from 5-day-old rats and mice. Addition of GFRα1-Fc increases this effect. GDNF/GFRα1-Fc stimulation activates intracellular PI3K/Akt and MEK/Erk signaling cascades as detected by Western blot analysis of cultures prepared from rats at postnatal days 5 (P5, before the onset of hearing) and 20 (P20, after the onset of hearing). Both cascades mediate GDNF stimulation of neuritogenesis, since application of the Akt inhibitor Wortmannin or the Erk inhibitor U0126 abolished GDNF/GFRα1-Fc stimulated neuritogenesis in P5 rats. Since cultures of P5 NCAM-deficient mice failed to respond by neuritogenesis to GDNF/GFRα1-Fc, we conclude that NCAM serves as a receptor for GDNF signaling responsible for neuritogenesis in early postnatal spiral ganglion.

  6. Conditional ablation of the neural cell adhesion molecule reduces precision of spatial learning, long-term potentiation, and depression in the CA1 subfield of mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bukalo, Olena; Fentrop, Nikolas; Lee, Alan Y W; Salmen, Benedikt; Law, Janice W S; Wotjak, Carsten T; Schweizer, Michaela; Dityatev, Alexander; Schachner, Melitta

    2004-02-18

    NCAM, a neural cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in neuronal migration and differentiation, axon outgrowth and fasciculation, and synaptic plasticity. To dissociate the functional roles of NCAM in the adult brain from developmental abnormalities, we generated a mutant in which the NCAM gene is inactivated by cre-recombinase under the control of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II promoter, resulting in reduction of NCAM expression predominantly in the hippocampus. This mutant (NCAMff+) did not show the overt morphological and behavioral abnormalities previously observed in constitutive NCAM-deficient (NCAM-/-) mice. However, similar to the NCAM-/- mouse, a reduction in long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was revealed. Long-term depression was also abolished in NCAMff+ mice. The deficit in LTP could be rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+ concentrations from 1.5 or 2.0 to 2.5 mm, suggesting an involvement of NCAM in regulation of Ca2+-dependent signaling during LTP. Contrary to the NCAM-/- mouse, LTP in the CA3 region was normal, consistent with normal mossy fiber lamination in NCAMff+ as opposed to abnormal lamination in NCAM-/- mice. NCAMff+ mutants did not show general deficits in short- and long-term memory in global landmark navigation in the water maze but were delayed in the acquisition of precise spatial orientation, a deficit that could be overcome by training. Thus, mice conditionally deficient in hippocampal NCAM expression in the adult share certain abnormalities characteristic of NCAM-/- mice, highlighting the role of NCAM in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region.

  7. [Allergens-induced sensitization alters airway epithelial adhesion molecules expression in mice].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Tan, Mei-Ling; Xiang, Yang; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Zhu, Li-Ming; Dai, Ai-Guo

    2015-12-25

    To explore the relationship between the epithelial adhesion molecules and immune responses of airway epithelium, we observed the expression of integrin β4 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the mice airway epithelium after sensitization with allergens. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) and then developed airway hyper-responsiveness as determined by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Both OVA and HDM sensitization led to increases of the number of peripheral leukocytes as well as inflammatory cells infiltration in lungs. OVA sensitized mice showed more severe inflammatory cells infiltration than HDM sensitized mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of mice lung tissues revealed that sensitization with both allergens also led to a decrease of integrin β4 expression and an increase of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelia. OVA sensitized mice showed a more significant increase of ICAM-1 expression compared with HDM sensitized mice. siRNA mediated silencing of integrin β4 gene in 16HBE cells resulted in an up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression. Our results indicate a possible role of airway epithelial adhesion molecules in allergen-induced airway immune responses. PMID:26701635

  8. Decreased pulmonary inflammation after ethanol exposure and burn injury in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bird, Melanie D; Morgan, Michelle O; Ramirez, Luis; Yong, Sherri; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2010-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that alcohol consumption dysregulates immune function. Burn patients who consume alcohol before their injuries demonstrate higher rates of morbidity and mortality, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, than patients without alcohol at the time of injury. Our laboratory observed higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte infiltration in the lungs of mice after ethanol exposure and burn injury than with either insult alone. To understand the mechanism of the increased pulmonary inflammatory response in mice treated with ethanol and burn injury, we investigated the role of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Wild-type and ICAM-1 knockout (KO) mice were treated with vehicle or ethanol and subsequently given a sham or burn injury. Twenty-four hours postinjury, lungs were harvested and analyzed for indices of inflammation. Higher numbers of neutrophils were observed in the lungs of wild-type mice after burn and burn with ethanol treatment. This increase in pulmonary inflammatory cell accumulation was significantly lower in the KO mice. In addition, levels of KC, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6 in the lung were decreased in the ICAM-1 KO mice after ethanol exposure and burn injury. Interestingly, no differences were observed in serum or lung tissue content of soluble ICAM-1 24 hours postinjury. These data suggest that upregulation of adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 on the vascular endothelium may play a critical role in the excessive inflammation seen after ethanol exposure and burn injury.

  9. Inflammatory and immune responses are impaired in mice deficient in intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Sligh, J E; Ballantyne, C M; Rich, S S; Hawkins, H K; Smith, C W; Bradley, A; Beaudet, A L

    1993-01-01

    Gene targeting was used to produce mice deficient in intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) or CD54, an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule that binds beta 2 integrins. Homozygous deficient animals develop normally, are fertile, and have a moderate granulocytosis. The nature of the mutation, RNA analysis, and immunostaining are consistent with complete loss of surface expression of ICAM-1. Deficient mice exhibit prominent abnormalities of inflammatory responses including impaired neutrophil emigration in response to chemical peritonitis and decreased contact hypersensitivity to 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene. Mutant cells provided negligible stimulation in the mixed lymphocyte reaction, although they proliferated normally as responder cells. These mutant animals will be extremely valuable for examining the role of ICAM-1 and its counterreceptors in inflammatory disease processes and atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8104338

  10. Species specificity and augmentation of responses to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules in human CD4 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Murine T cell responses to human class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules were shown to be a minimum of 20-70-fold lower than responses to allogeneic molecules. Transgenic mice expressing slightly below normal (75-95%) or very high (250-380%) cell surface levels of human CD4 were utilized to determine whether this was due to a species-specific interaction between murine CD4 and class II molecules. Human CD4 was shown to function in signal transduction events in murine T cells based on the ability of anti-human CD4 antibody to synergize with suboptimal doses of anti-murine CD3 antibody in stimulating T cell proliferation. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, T cell responses to human class II molecules were enhanced up to threefold, whereas allogeneic responses were unaltered. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were enhanced at least 10-fold, whereas allogeneic responses were between one and three times the level of normal responses. The relatively greater enhancement of the response to human class II molecules in both lines argues for a preferential interaction between human CD4 and human class II molecules. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were blocked by antibodies to CD4 of either species, indicating participation by both molecules. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to both human and murine class II molecules were almost completely blocked with anti-human CD4 antibody, whereas anti-murine CD4 antibody had no effect. However, anti-murine CD4 continued to synergize with anti-CD3 in stimulating T cell proliferation in these mice. Thus, overexpression of human CD4 selectively impaired the ability of murine CD4 to assist in the process of antigen recognition. The ability of human CD4 to support a strong allogeneic response under these conditions indicates that this molecule can interact with murine class II molecules to a

  11. Differential up-regulation of circulating soluble and endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, S.; Flores, S.; Gerritsen, M. E.; Anderson, D. C.; Granger, D. N.

    1997-01-01

    Although circulating levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) are frequently used as an indicator of the severity of different immune, inflammatory, or neoplastic diseases, little is known about the factors that govern plasma sICAM-1 concentration and its relationship to the membranous form of ICAM-1 (mICAM-1) expressed on vascular endothelial cells. Plasma sICAM-1 concentration (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and mICAM-1 expression (measured using the dual radiolabeled monoclonal antibody technique) in different vascular beds (eg, lung, small intestine, and spleen) were monitored in wild-type (C57BL) and ICAM-1-deficient mice, before and after administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. In wild-type mice, TNF-alpha elicited time-dependent increases in lung and intestine mICAM-1 (plateau achieved at 12 hours), with a corresponding increase in plasma sICAM-1 (peaked at 5 hours and then declined). The initial increases in mICAM-1 and pulmonary leukocyte sequestration (measured as lung myeloperoxidase activity) induced by TNF-alpha preceded any detectable elevation in sICAM-1. In ICAM-1-deficient mice, plasma sICAM-1 was reduced by approximately 70%, with > 95% reductions of mICAM-1 in lung and intestine, and > 75% reduction in splenic accumulation of anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Although TNF-alpha doubled plasma sICAM-1 in ICAM-1-deficient mice, mICAM-1 was unaffected in all tissues. Either splenectomy or pretreatment with cycloheximide resulted in an attenuated TNF-induced increase in sICAM-1, without affecting mICAM-1 expression. These findings indicate that plasma sICAM-1 concentration does not accurately reflect the level of ICAM-1 expression on endothelial cells in different vascular beds. PMID:9212746

  12. Biodistribution of 211At labeled HER-2 binding affibody molecules in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Almqvist, Ylva; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Lundqvist, Hans; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Wilbur, D Scott; Carlsson, Jörgen

    2007-05-01

    The size of affibody molecules makes them suitable as targeting agents for targeted radiotherapy with the alpha-emitter 211At, since their biokinetic properties match the short physical half-live of 211At. In this study, the potential for this approach was investigated in vivo. Two different HER-2 binding affibody molecules were radiolabeled with 211At using both the linker PAB (N-succinimidyl-para-astatobenzoate) and a decaborate-based linker, and the biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice was investigated. The influence of L-lysine and Na-thiocyanate on the 211At uptake in normal tissues was also studied. Based on the biokinetic information obtained, the absorbed dose was calculated for different organs. Compared with a previous biodistribution with 125I, the 211At biodistribution using the PAB linker showed higher uptake in lungs, stomach, thyroid and salivary glands, indicating release of free 211At. When the decaborate-based linker was used, the uptake in those organs was decreased, but instead, high uptake in kidneys and liver was found. The uptake, when using the PAB linker, could be significantly reduced in some organs by the use of L-lysine and/or Na-thiocyanate. In conclusion, affibody molecules have suitable blood-kinetics for targeted radionuclide therapy with 211At. However, the labeling chemistry affects the distribution in normal organs to a high degree and needs to be improved to allow clinical use. PMID:17390057

  13. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  14. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  15. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia.

  16. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya Nan, Fa-Jun Li, Jia

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  17. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Ertan Gökbayrak, Merve; Mutlu, Oguz; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. MATERIAL AND METHODS The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 µg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. RESULTS The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. CONCLUSIONS Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  18. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Gökbayrak, Merve Ertan; Mutlu, Oguz; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. Material/Methods The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 μg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. Results The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. Conclusions Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  19. Chronic treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule reverses dietary induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosick, Peter A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic, low level treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CO-RM), CORM-A1, has been shown to prevent the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic, low level treatment with this CO-RM can reverse established obesity via a mechanism independent of food intake. Dietary induced obese mice were treated with CORM-A1, the inactive compound iCORM-A1, or saline every 48 hours for 30 weeks while maintained on a high fat (60%) diet. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 resulted in a 33% decrease from initial body weight over the 30 week treatment period while treatment with iCORM and saline were associated with 18 and 25% gain in initial body weight over the same time frame. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 did not affect food intake or activity but resulted in a significant increase in metabolism. CORM-A1 treatment also resulted in lower fasting blood glucose, improvement in insulin sensitivity and decreased heptatic steatosis. Chronic treatment with CO releasing molecules can reverse dietary induced obesity and normalize insulin resistance independent of changes in food intake or activity. These findings are likely though a mechanism which increases metabolism. PMID:27144091

  20. Chronic treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule reverses dietary induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosick, Peter A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic, low level treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CO-RM), CORM-A1, has been shown to prevent the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic, low level treatment with this CO-RM can reverse established obesity via a mechanism independent of food intake. Dietary induced obese mice were treated with CORM-A1, the inactive compound iCORM-A1, or saline every 48 hours for 30 weeks while maintained on a high fat (60%) diet. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 resulted in a 33% decrease from initial body weight over the 30 week treatment period while treatment with iCORM and saline were associated with 18 and 25% gain in initial body weight over the same time frame. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 did not affect food intake or activity but resulted in a significant increase in metabolism. CORM-A1 treatment also resulted in lower fasting blood glucose, improvement in insulin sensitivity and decreased heptatic steatosis. Chronic treatment with CO releasing molecules can reverse dietary induced obesity and normalize insulin resistance independent of changes in food intake or activity. These findings are likely though a mechanism which increases metabolism.

  1. Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule accelerates progression of crescentic glomerulonephritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Filipe, Anne; Rahuel, Cécile; Bonnin, Philippe; Mesnard, Laurent; Guérin, Coralie; Wang, Yu; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Migration of circulating leukocytes from the vasculature into the surrounding tissue is an important component of the inflammatory response. Among the cell surface molecules identified as contributing to leukocyte extravasation is VCAM-1, expressed on activated vascular endothelium, which participates in all stages of leukocyte–endothelial interaction by binding to leukocyte surface expressed integrin VLA-4. However, not all VLA-4-mediated events can be linked to VCAM-1. A novel interaction between VLA-4 and endothelial Lutheran (Lu) blood group antigens and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) proteins has been recently shown, suggesting that Lu/BCAM may have a role in leukocyte recruitments in inflamed tissues. Here, we assessed the participation of Lu/BCAM in the immunopathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis. High expression of Lu/BCAM in glomeruli of mice with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis suggests a potential role for the local expression of Lu/BCAM in nephritogenic recruitment of leukocytes. Genetic deficiency of Lu/BCAM attenuated glomerular accumulation of T cells and macrophages, crescent formation, and proteinuria, correlating with reduced fibrin and platelet deposition in glomeruli. Furthermore, we found a pro-adhesive interaction between human monocyte α4β1 integrin and Lu/BCAM proteins. Thus, Lu/BCAM may have a critical role in facilitating the accumulation of monocytes and macrophages, thereby exacerbating renal injury. PMID:24429403

  2. Recovery of emotional behaviour in neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) null mutant mice through transgenic expression of NCAM180.

    PubMed

    Stork, O; Welzl, H; Wolfer, D; Schuster, T; Mantei, N; Stork, S; Hoyer, D; Lipp, H; Obata, K; Schachner, M

    2000-09-01

    In the present study we further investigate functions of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in the mature central nervous system and its implications for animal behaviour. To this end we generated transgenic mice expressing the major NCAM isoform with the largest cytoplasmic domain, NCAM180, under control of a promoter for the small form neurofilament gene. Transgenic mice were also bred with mice deficient in endogenous NCAM (Ncam-/- mice) so that effects of NCAM180 could be analysed in the presence and absence of endogenous NCAM. While overexpression of transgenic NCAM180 was without apparent behavioural or morphological effect, its expression in Ncam-/- mice counteracted NCAM ablation-induced aggressive, anxiety-like and antidepressant-like behaviour. It furthermore prevented a hypersensitivity of Ncam-/- mice to the anxiolytic serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone. Such recovery of emotional behaviour and behavioural 5-HT1A response occurred in spite of misdevelopment of the olfactory bulb and hippocampus that is characteristic of Ncam-/- mice, and without an apparent change in the expression of 5-HT1A binding sites in the brain. Hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent learning, though disturbed in Ncam-/- mice, remained unaffected by the transgenic NCAM180. We suggest an involvement of NCAM180-mediated cell recognition processes in the serotonergic modulation of emotional behaviour in adult mice.

  3. Mice lacking the synaptic adhesion molecule Neph2/Kirrel3 display moderate hyperactivity and defective novel object preference

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Su-Yeon; Han, Kihoon; Cutforth, Tyler; Chung, Woosuk; Park, Haram; Lee, Dongsoo; Kim, Ryunhee; Kim, Myeong-Heui; Choi, Yeeun; Shen, Kang; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate diverse aspects of neuronal synapse development, including synapse specificity, formation, and maturation. Neph2, also known as Kirrel3, is an immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule implicated in intellectual disability, neurocognitive delay associated with Jacobsen syndrome, and autism spectrum disorders. We here report mice lacking Neph2 (Neph2-/- mice) display moderate hyperactivity in a familiar, but not novel, environment and defective novel object recognition with normal performances in Morris water maze spatial learning and memory, contextual fear conditioning and extinction, and pattern separation tests. These mice also show normal levels of anxiety-like behaviors, social interaction, and repetitive behaviors. At the synapse level, Neph2-/- dentate gyrus granule cells exhibit unaltered dendritic spine density and spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission. These results suggest that Neph2 is important for normal locomotor activity and object recognition memory. PMID:26283919

  4. Annexin A2 Acts as an Adhesion Molecule on the Endometrial Epithelium during Implantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kai-Fai; Chiu, Philip C. N.; Pang, Ronald T. K.; Ng, Ernest H. Y.; Yeung, William S. B.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the function of Annexin A2 (Axna2) in mouse embryo implantation in vivo, experimental manipulation of Axna2 activities was performed in mouse endometrial tissue in vivo and in vitro. Histological examination of endometrial tissues was performed throughout the reproduction cycle and after steroid treatment. Embryo implantation was determined after blockage of the Axna2 activities by siRNA or anti-Axna2 antibody. The expression of Axna2 immunoreactivies in the endometrial luminal epithelium changed cyclically in the estrus cycle and was upregulated by estrogen. After nidatory estrogen surge, there was a concentration of Axna2 immunoreactivities at the interface between the implanting embryo and the luminal epithelium. The phenomenon was likely to be induced by the implanting embryos as no such concentration of signal was observed in the inter-implantation sites and in pseudopregnancy. Knockdown of Axna2 by siRNA reduced attachment of mouse blastocysts onto endometrial tissues in vitro. Consistently, the number of implantation sites was significantly reduced after infusion of anti-Axna2 antibody into the uterine cavity. Steroids and embryos modulate the expression of Axna2 in the endometrial epithelium. Axna2 may function as an adhesion molecule during embryo implantation in mice. PMID:26444699

  5. Annexin A2 Acts as an Adhesion Molecule on the Endometrial Epithelium during Implantation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Ye, Tian-Min; Lee, Kai-Fai; Chiu, Philip C N; Pang, Ronald T K; Ng, Ernest H Y; Yeung, William S B

    2015-01-01

    To determine the function of Annexin A2 (Axna2) in mouse embryo implantation in vivo, experimental manipulation of Axna2 activities was performed in mouse endometrial tissue in vivo and in vitro. Histological examination of endometrial tissues was performed throughout the reproduction cycle and after steroid treatment. Embryo implantation was determined after blockage of the Axna2 activities by siRNA or anti-Axna2 antibody. The expression of Axna2 immunoreactivies in the endometrial luminal epithelium changed cyclically in the estrus cycle and was upregulated by estrogen. After nidatory estrogen surge, there was a concentration of Axna2 immunoreactivities at the interface between the implanting embryo and the luminal epithelium. The phenomenon was likely to be induced by the implanting embryos as no such concentration of signal was observed in the inter-implantation sites and in pseudopregnancy. Knockdown of Axna2 by siRNA reduced attachment of mouse blastocysts onto endometrial tissues in vitro. Consistently, the number of implantation sites was significantly reduced after infusion of anti-Axna2 antibody into the uterine cavity. Steroids and embryos modulate the expression of Axna2 in the endometrial epithelium. Axna2 may function as an adhesion molecule during embryo implantation in mice.

  6. The small-molecule BGP-15 protects against heart failure and atrial fibrillation in mice.

    PubMed

    Sapra, Geeta; Tham, Yow Keat; Cemerlang, Nelly; Matsumoto, Aya; Kiriazis, Helen; Bernardo, Bianca C; Henstridge, Darren C; Ooi, Jenny Y Y; Pretorius, Lynette; Boey, Esther J H; Lim, Lydia; Sadoshima, Junichi; Meikle, Peter J; Mellet, Natalie A; Woodcock, Elizabeth A; Marasco, Silvana; Ueyama, Tomomi; Du, Xiao-Jun; Febbraio, Mark A; McMullen, Julie R

    2014-12-09

    Heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) share common risk factors, frequently coexist and are associated with high mortality. Treatment of HF with AF represents a major unmet need. Here we show that a small molecule, BGP-15, improves cardiac function and reduces arrhythmic episodes in two independent mouse models, which progressively develop HF and AF. In these models, BGP-15 treatment is associated with increased phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), which is depressed in atrial tissue samples from patients with AF. Cardiac-specific IGF1R transgenic overexpression in mice with HF and AF recapitulates the protection observed with BGP-15. We further demonstrate that BGP-15 and IGF1R can provide protection independent of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and heat-shock protein 70; signalling mediators often defective in the aged and diseased heart. As BGP-15 is safe and well tolerated in humans, this study uncovers a potential therapeutic approach for HF and AF.

  7. Epidermal Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 is Not a Primary Inducer of Cutaneous Inflammation in Transgenic Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ifor R.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    1994-10-01

    Keratinocytes at sites of cutaneous inflammation have increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), a cytokine-inducible adhesion molecule which binds the leukocyte integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. Transgenic mice were prepared in which the expression of mouse ICAM-1 was targeted to basal keratinocytes by using the human K14 keratin promoter. The level of constitutive expression attained in the transgenic mice exceeded the peak level of ICAM-1 expression induced on nontransgenic mouse keratinocytes in vitro by optimal combinations of interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α or in vivo by proinflammatory stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. In vitro adhesion assays demonstrated that cultured transgenic keratinocytes were superior to normal keratinocytes as a substrate for the LFA-1-dependent binding of mouse T cells, confirming that the transgene-encoded ICAM-1 was expressed in a functional form. However, the high level of constitutive ICAM-1 expression achieved on keratinocytes in vivo in these transgenic mice did not result in additional recruitment of CD45^+ leukocytes into transgenic epidermis, nor did it elicit dermal inflammation. Keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression also did not potentiate contact-hypersensitivity reactions to epicutaneous application of haptens. The absence of a spontaneous phenotype in these transgenic mice was not the result of increased levels of soluble ICAM-1, since serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 were equal in transgenic mice and controls. We conclude that elevated ICAM-1 expression on keratinocytes cannot act independently to influence leukocyte trafficking and elicit cutaneous inflammation.

  8. Macrophage function in alloxan diabetic mice: expression of adhesion molecules, generation of monokines and oxygen and NO radicals

    PubMed Central

    Ptak, W; Klimek, M; Bryniarski, K; Ptak, M; Majcher, P

    1998-01-01

    The increased incidence of bacterial and mycotic infections in poorly controlled diabetic patients or animals is frequently attributed to impaired activities of professional phagocytes (granulocytes, macrophages) in hypoinsulinaemic milieu. We measured production of monokines (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)), active NO and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), as well as expression of several cell surface adhesion molecules (Mac-1, -2 and -3, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and FcγRII), by thioglycollate medium-induced peritoneal macrophages of normoglycaemic and alloxan diabetic CBA/J mice (blood glucose level in the range 300 or 500 mg/dl). Macrophages of animals with moderate diabetes (300 mg/dl) produced significantly more IL-6 and TNF-α and ROIs than cells of control mice and showed an increased expression of all cell surface molecules, except Mac-3. NO/NO2 production was not affected. Administration of insulin restored enhanced values to normal levels, except for the production of ROIs which remained unusually high. We conclude that two separate mechanisms influence macrophage physiology in diabetes—lack of saturation of insulin receptors on macrophages and an indirect effect due to formation of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGE) on their surfaces. The latter is possibly responsible for increased generation of ROIs, since it cannot be down-regulated by prolonged insulin treatment. How the increased activity of macrophages of moderately diabetic mice (enhanced production of proinflammatory monokines and oxygen radicals as well as expression of molecules) is related to their ability to kill bacteria is now under investigation. PMID:9764597

  9. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors. PMID:27246030

  10. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors.

  11. Activation of CD4+ T lymphocytes form interleukin 2-deficient mice by costimulatory B7 molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Razi-Wolf, Z; Höllander, G A; Reiser, H

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2)-deficient (IL-2-/-) mice develop hemolytic anemia and chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Importantly, the induction of disease in IL-2-deficient mice is critically dependent on CD4+ T cells. We have studied the requirements of T cells from IL-2-deficient mice for costimulation with B7 antigens. Stable B7-1 or B7-2 chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell transfectants could synergize with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to induce the proliferation of CD4+ T cells from IL-2-/- mutant mice. Further mechanistic studies established that B7-induced activation resulted in surface expression of the alpha chain of the IL-2 receptor. B7-induced proliferation occurred independently of IL-4 and was largely independent of the common gamma chain of the IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15 receptors. Finally, anti-B7-2 but not anti-B7-1 mAb was able to inhibit the activation of IL-2-/- T cells induced by anti-CD3 mAb in the presence of syngeneic antigen-presenting cells. The results of our experiments indicate that IL-2-/- CD4+ T cells remain responsive to B7 stimulation and raise the possibility that B7 antagonists have a role in the prevention/treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8610140

  12. Dietary arginine enhances adhesion molecule and T helper 2 cytokine expression in mice with gut-derived sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chiu-Li; Hsu, Chun-Sen; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2006-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of arginine (Arg) on cellular adhesion molecules and intracellular Th1/Th2 cytokine expressions in mice with polymicrobial sepsis. Myeloperoxidase activity in organs was also analyzed to identify the extent of tissue injury resulting from neutrophil infiltration. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal group (NC), a control group, or an Arg group. The NC group was fed a standard chow diet. The control group was fed a common semipurified diet, and in the Arg group, part of the casein was replaced by Arg, which provided 2% of the total calories. After 3 weeks, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in the control and Arg groups. Mice in the experimental groups were sacrificed at 0, 6, 12, and 24 h after CLP, whereas mice in the NC group were sacrificed when the CLP was performed. Blood and organ samples were immediately collected for further analysis. Results showed that compared with the control group, plasma intracellular adhesion molecule-1 levels were significantly higher in the Arg group 12 and 24 h after CLP. Lymphocyte interferon-gamma expression in the Arg groups was significantly lower, whereas interleukin (IL)-4 expression was higher than the control group at various time points after CLP. The expression of lymphocyte CD11a/CD18 was significantly higher in the Arg group 6, 12, and 24 h after CLP than those of the corresponding control group and the NC group. PMN expressions of CD11b/CD18 in the Arg groups were higher than those in the control group at 12 and 24 h after CLP. The Arg group had higher IL-6 levels at 6 and 12 h in the kidney and intestine and 12 h in the lung after CLP. Higher myeloperoxidase activities were observed in the Arg groups at 24 h after CLP than those in the control group in various organs. These findings suggest that pretreatment with an Arg-supplemented diet enhances adhesion molecule and inflammatory cytokine expression during sepsis, which may aggravate the inflammatory

  13. Aromatase Deficient Female Mice Demonstrate Altered Expression of Molecules Critical for Renal Calcium Reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, Orhan K.; Hajibeigi, Asghar; Cummins, Carolyn; van Abel, Monique; Bindels, René J.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2007-04-01

    The incidence of kidney stones increases in women after the menopause, suggesting a role for estrogen deficiency. In order to determine if estrogen may be exerting an effect on renal calcium reabsorption, we measured urinary calcium excretion in the aromatase-deficient female mouse (ArKO) before and following estrogen therapy. ArKO mice had hypercalciuria that corrected during estrogen administration. To evaluate the mechanism by which estrogen deficiency leads to hypercalciuria, we examined the expression of several proteins involved in distal tubule renal calcium reabsorption, both at the message and protein levels. Messenger RNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, calbindin-D28K, the Na+/Ca++ exchanger (NCX1), and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA1b) were significantly decreased in kidneys of ArKO mice. On the other hand, klotho mRNA levels were elevated in kidneys of ArKO mice. ArKO renal protein extracts had lower levels of calbindin-D28K but higher levels of the klotho protein. Immunochemistry demonstrated increased klotho expression in ArKO kidneys. Estradiol therapy normalized the expression of TRPV5, calbindin-D28K, PMCA1b and klotho. Taken together, these results demonstrate that estrogen deficiency produced by aromatase inactivation is sufficient to produce a renal leak of calcium and consequent hypercalciuria. This may represent one mechanism leading to the increased incidence of kidney stones following the menopause in women.

  14. Small molecule LX2343 ameliorates cognitive deficits in AD model mice by targeting both amyloid β production and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-dan; Sun, Guang-long; Zhou, Ting-ting; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Streptozotocin (STZ) is widely used to induce oxidative damage and to impair glucose metabolism, apoptosis, and tau/Aβ pathology, eventually leading to cognitive deficits in both in vitro and in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we constructed a cell-based platform using STZ to induce stress conditions mimicking the complicated pathologies of AD in vitro, and evaluated the anti-amyloid effects of a small molecule, N-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-[5-chloro-2-methoxy(phenylsulfonyl)anilino]acetamide (LX2343) in the amelioration of cognitive deficits in AD model mice. Methods: Cell-based assays for screening anti-amyloid compounds were established by assessing Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and Aβ clearance in primary astrocytes and SH-SY5Y cells after the cells were treated with STZ in the presence of the test compounds. Autophagic flux was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. APP/PS1 transgenic mice were administered LX2343 (10 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 100 d. After LX2343 administration, cognitive ability of the mice was evaluated using Morris water maze test, and senile plaques in the brains were detected using Thioflavine S staining. ELISA assay was used to evaluate Aβ and sAPPβ levels, while Western blot analysis was used to measure the signaling proteins in both cell and animal brains. Results: LX2343 (5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and promoted Aβ clearance in SH-SY5Y cells and primary astrocytes. The anti-amyloid effects of LX2343 were attributed to suppressing JNK-mediated APPThr668 phosphorylation, thus inhibiting APP cleavage on one hand, and inhibiting BACE1 enzymatic activity with an IC50 value of 11.43±0.36 μmol/L, on the other hand. Furthermore, LX2343 acted as a non-ATP competitive PI3K inhibitor to negatively regulate AKT/mTOR signaling, thus promoting autophagy, and increasing Aβ clearance. Administration of LX2343 in APP

  15. An alternative approach for quantitative bioanalysis using diluted blood to profile oral exposure of small molecule anticancer drugs in mice.

    PubMed

    Liederer, Bianca M; Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M; Ubhayakar, Savita S; Deng, Yuzhong

    2013-02-01

    A quantitative bioanalytical method for pharmacokinetic studies using diluted whole blood from serially bled mice was developed. Oral exposure profiles in mice for five model anticancer compounds dacarbazine, gefitinib, gemcitabine, imatinib, and topotecan were determined following discrete and cassette (five-in-one) dosing. Six micro blood samples per animal were collected and added to a fixed amount of water. This dilution served several purposes: the red blood cells were lysed; an anticoagulant was unnecessary and the fluid volume of diluted sample was sufficient for bioanalytical assays. AUC values obtained from blood concentrations were within twofold for discrete and cassette dosing except for imatinib (2.1-fold difference) and in agreement with those obtained from plasma concentrations after discrete dosing. All compounds were stable in plasma and diluted blood samples for at least 2 weeks at approximately -80°C. Matrix and intermatrix effects were evaluated to ensure robustness and integrity of the bioanalytical assays. This method provides significant process improvement by enhancing efficiency for sample collection and processing and reducing resources (e.g., reduced compound, cost, and animal requirement) compared with conventional methods. Our study demonstrates the applicability of using diluted micro blood samples for small molecule quantitative bioanalysis to support mouse studies in drug discovery. PMID:23225118

  16. Neuregulin 1-β regulates cell adhesion molecule L1 expression in the cortex and hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Yang; Schachner, Melitta; Zhao, Weijiang

    2013-11-01

    Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) functions in neuronal migration, survival and differentiation as well as synaptogenesis during ontogenetic development and maintenance of synaptic functions in the adult mammalian brain. The neural adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) functions in similar overlapping, but also non-overlapping roles in the nervous system. In the present study, we therefore investigated some aspects of the functional relationship between Nrg1 and L1 in mammalian neural cells. Nrg1 regulates the expression of L1 in cultures of both human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and mouse cortical and hippocampal neurons. To analyze the role of Nrg1 on L1 expression in vivo, young adult male mice received intraperitoneal injections of Nrg1 or PBS (vehicle control). The correlation between Nrg1 and L1 expression was tested by qPCR, Western blot analysis, and immunocytology. Our data indicate that neuregulin 1-β (Nrg1β) increases L1 expression in neurons of the cerebral cortex, and decreases expression in neurons of the hippocampus in vitro and in vivo. In addition, Nrg1 induces phosphorylation of its receptors, ErbB2 and ErbB4, the predominant ErbB receptors in the nervous system. These results show that Nrg1β affects expression of L1 in the central nervous system and in parallel activates the ErbB receptors for Nrg1, suggesting a crosstalk between molecules that are of prime importance for nervous system functions. PMID:24140408

  17. Identification of the key molecules involved in chronic copper exposure-aggravated memory impairment in transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease using proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Luo, Xiaobin; Xu, Hua; Ma, Quan; Yuan, Jianhui; Li, Xuling; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Yang, Xifei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive impairment of cognitive functions including spatial learning and memory. Excess copper exposure accelerates the development of AD; however, the potential mechanisms by which copper exacerbates the symptoms of AD remain unknown. In this study, we explored the effects of chronic copper exposure on cognitive function by treating 6 month-old triple AD transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper sulfate in drinking water for 6 months, and identified several potential key molecules involved in the effects of chronic copper exposure on memory by proteomic analysis. The behavioral test showed that chronic copper exposure aggravated memory impairment of 3xTg-AD mice. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with mass spectrometry revealed a total of 44 differentially expressed proteins (18 upregulated and 26 down-regulated) in hippocampus between the wild-type (WT) mice and non-exposed 3xTg-AD mice. A total of 40 differentially expressed proteins were revealed (20 upregulated and 20 down-regulated) in hippocampus between copper exposed and non-exposed 3xTg-AD mice. Among these differentially expressed proteins, complexin-1 and complexin-2, two memory associated proteins, were significantly decreased in hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice compared with the WT mice. Furthermore, the expression of these two proteins was further down-regulated in 3xTg-AD mice when exposed to copper. The abnormal expression of complexin-1 and complexin-2 identified by proteomic analysis was verified by western blot analysis. Taken together, our data showed that chronic copper exposure accelerated memory impairment and altered the expression of proteins in hippocampus in 3xTg-AD mice. The functional analysis on the differentially expressed proteins suggested that complexin-1 and complexin-2 may be the key molecules involved in chronic copper exposure

  18. Identification of the key molecules involved in chronic copper exposure-aggravated memory impairment in transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease using proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Luo, Xiaobin; Xu, Hua; Ma, Quan; Yuan, Jianhui; Li, Xuling; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Yang, Xifei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive impairment of cognitive functions including spatial learning and memory. Excess copper exposure accelerates the development of AD; however, the potential mechanisms by which copper exacerbates the symptoms of AD remain unknown. In this study, we explored the effects of chronic copper exposure on cognitive function by treating 6 month-old triple AD transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper sulfate in drinking water for 6 months, and identified several potential key molecules involved in the effects of chronic copper exposure on memory by proteomic analysis. The behavioral test showed that chronic copper exposure aggravated memory impairment of 3xTg-AD mice. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with mass spectrometry revealed a total of 44 differentially expressed proteins (18 upregulated and 26 down-regulated) in hippocampus between the wild-type (WT) mice and non-exposed 3xTg-AD mice. A total of 40 differentially expressed proteins were revealed (20 upregulated and 20 down-regulated) in hippocampus between copper exposed and non-exposed 3xTg-AD mice. Among these differentially expressed proteins, complexin-1 and complexin-2, two memory associated proteins, were significantly decreased in hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice compared with the WT mice. Furthermore, the expression of these two proteins was further down-regulated in 3xTg-AD mice when exposed to copper. The abnormal expression of complexin-1 and complexin-2 identified by proteomic analysis was verified by western blot analysis. Taken together, our data showed that chronic copper exposure accelerated memory impairment and altered the expression of proteins in hippocampus in 3xTg-AD mice. The functional analysis on the differentially expressed proteins suggested that complexin-1 and complexin-2 may be the key molecules involved in chronic copper exposure

  19. Cell cycle reactivation of cochlear progenitor cells in neonatal FUCCI mice by a GSK3 small molecule inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Hahnewald, S; Perny, M; Senn, P

    2015-12-08

    Due to the lack of regenerative capacity of the mammalian auditory epithelium, sensory hair cell loss results in permanent hearing deficit. Nevertheless, a population of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells has been recently described. Identification of methods to trigger their activity could lead to exploitation of their potential therapeutically. Here we validate the use of transgenic mice reporting cell cycle progression (FUCCI), and stemness (Lgr5-GFP), as a valuable tool to identify regulators of cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells within the auditory epithelium. The small molecule compound CHIR99021 was used to inhibit GSK3 activity. This led to a significant increase in the fraction of proliferating sphere-forming cells, labeled by the FUCCI markers and in the percentage of Lgr5-GFP + cells, as well as a selective increase in the fraction of S-G2-M cells in the Lgr5 + population. Using whole mount cultures of the organ of Corti we detected a statistically significant increment in the fraction of proliferating Sox2 supporting cells after CHIR99021 treatment, but only rarely appearance of novel MyoVIIa +/Edu + hair cells. In conclusion, these tools provide a robust mean to identify novel regulators of auditory organ regeneration and to clarify the contribution of stem cell activity.

  20. The absence of the embryo in the pseudopregnant uterus alters the deposition of some ECM molecules during decidualization in mice.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Ambart E C; Barrence, Fernanda C; Zorn, Telma M T

    2015-06-01

    The embryo-implantation promotes deep changes in the uterus resulting in the formation of a new structure at the maternal-fetal interface, the decidua. Decidualization can also be induced in pseudopregnant rodents resulting in a structure called deciduoma that is morphologically and functionally similar to the decidua. Previous studies from our and other laboratories demonstrate that in rodents, decidualization of the endometrium requires remarkable remodeling of the endometrial extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mainly coordinated by estradiol and progesterone. The influence of the embryo in this process, however, has not yet been investigated. To enlarge the knowledge on this subject, the present study investigates the behavior of a set of ECM molecules, in the absence of paracrine cues originated from the embryo. For that deciduoma was induced in pseudopregnant Swiss mice, and the distribution of collagen types I, III, IV, V and the proteoglycans decorin and biglycan was investigated by immunolabeling from the fifth to the eighth day of pseudopregnancy. It was observed the deposition of collagen types III and IV as well as decorin and biglycan was similar to that previously described by our group in the decidua. However, in the absence of the embryo, some differences occur in the distribution of collagen types I and V, suggesting that beside the major role of ovarian hormones on the endometrial ECM remodeling, molecular signals originated from the conceptus may influence this process.

  1. The absence of the embryo in the pseudopregnant uterus alters the deposition of some ECM molecules during decidualization in mice.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Ambart E C; Barrence, Fernanda C; Zorn, Telma M T

    2015-06-01

    The embryo-implantation promotes deep changes in the uterus resulting in the formation of a new structure at the maternal-fetal interface, the decidua. Decidualization can also be induced in pseudopregnant rodents resulting in a structure called deciduoma that is morphologically and functionally similar to the decidua. Previous studies from our and other laboratories demonstrate that in rodents, decidualization of the endometrium requires remarkable remodeling of the endometrial extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mainly coordinated by estradiol and progesterone. The influence of the embryo in this process, however, has not yet been investigated. To enlarge the knowledge on this subject, the present study investigates the behavior of a set of ECM molecules, in the absence of paracrine cues originated from the embryo. For that deciduoma was induced in pseudopregnant Swiss mice, and the distribution of collagen types I, III, IV, V and the proteoglycans decorin and biglycan was investigated by immunolabeling from the fifth to the eighth day of pseudopregnancy. It was observed the deposition of collagen types III and IV as well as decorin and biglycan was similar to that previously described by our group in the decidua. However, in the absence of the embryo, some differences occur in the distribution of collagen types I and V, suggesting that beside the major role of ovarian hormones on the endometrial ECM remodeling, molecular signals originated from the conceptus may influence this process. PMID:25738597

  2. Cell cycle reactivation of cochlear progenitor cells in neonatal FUCCI mice by a GSK3 small molecule inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Roccio, M.; Hahnewald, S.; Perny, M.; Senn, P.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of regenerative capacity of the mammalian auditory epithelium, sensory hair cell loss results in permanent hearing deficit. Nevertheless, a population of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells has been recently described. Identification of methods to trigger their activity could lead to exploitation of their potential therapeutically. Here we validate the use of transgenic mice reporting cell cycle progression (FUCCI), and stemness (Lgr5-GFP), as a valuable tool to identify regulators of cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells within the auditory epithelium. The small molecule compound CHIR99021 was used to inhibit GSK3 activity. This led to a significant increase in the fraction of proliferating sphere-forming cells, labeled by the FUCCI markers and in the percentage of Lgr5-GFP + cells, as well as a selective increase in the fraction of S-G2-M cells in the Lgr5 + population. Using whole mount cultures of the organ of Corti we detected a statistically significant increment in the fraction of proliferating Sox2 supporting cells after CHIR99021 treatment, but only rarely appearance of novel MyoVIIa+/Edu + hair cells. In conclusion, these tools provide a robust mean to identify novel regulators of auditory organ regeneration and to clarify the contribution of stem cell activity. PMID:26643939

  3. Liver protein profiles in insulin receptor-knockout mice reveal novel molecules involved in the diabetes pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Barbara; Della-Morte, David; Donadel, Giulia; Caratelli, Sara; Bova, Luca; Pastore, Donatella; De Canio, Michele; D'Aguanno, Simona; Coppola, Andrea; Pacifici, Francesca; Arriga, Roberto; Bellia, Alfonso; Ferrelli, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Federici, Massimo; Neri, Anna; Bernardini, Sergio; Sbraccia, Paolo; Di Daniele, Nicola; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Augusto; Urbani, Andrea; Lauro, Davide

    2015-05-01

    Liver has a principal role in glucose regulation and lipids homeostasis. It is under a complex control by substrates such as hormones, nutrients, and neuronal impulses. Insulin promotes glycogen synthesis, lipogenesis, and lipoprotein synthesis and inhibits gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis, and VLDL secretion by modifying the expression and enzymatic activity of specific molecules. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to metabolic liver disease, we analyzed liver protein patterns expressed in a mouse model of diabetes by proteomic approaches. We used insulin receptor-knockout (IR(-/-)) and heterozygous (IR(+/-)) mice as a murine model of liver metabolic dysfunction associated with diabetic ketoacidosis and insulin resistance. We evaluated liver fatty acid levels by microscopic examination and protein expression profiles by orthogonal experimental strategies using protein 2-DE MALDI-TOF/TOF and peptic nLC-MS/MS shotgun profiling. Identified proteins were then loaded into Ingenuity Pathways Analysis to find possible molecular networks. Twenty-eight proteins identified by 2-DE analysis and 24 identified by nLC-MS/MS shotgun were differentially expressed among the three genotypes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a central role of high-mobility group box 1/2 and huntigtin never reported before in association with metabolic and related liver disease. A different modulation of these proteins in both blood and hepatic tissue further suggests their role in these processes. These results provide new insight into pathophysiology of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and could be useful in identifying novel biomarkers to predict risk for diabetes and its complications.

  4. Stress alleviates reduced expression of cell adhesion molecules (NCAM, L1), and deficits in learning and corticosterone regulation of apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Grootendorst, J; Oitzl, M S; Dalm, S; Enthoven, L; Schachner, M; de Kloet, E R; Sandi, C

    2001-11-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in synaptic changes underlying learning and memory processes, are implicated in the effect of stress on behavioural performance. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that (i) expression of CAMs is apolipoprotein E- (apoE) genotype dependent and (ii) repeated exposure to stress modulates the synthesis of CAMs in an apoE-genotype dependent manner. Using ELISA we tested this hypothesis and measured expression of NCAM and L1 in different brain regions of naïve and stressed apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE0/0) and C57Bl6 (wild-type) mice. Naïve apoE0/0 mice had elevated basal morning corticosterone and ACTH concentrations and decreased expression of NCAM and L1 compared to wild-type mice. Repeated exposure of mice to rats, as the common stressor, alleviated the reduction in expression of CAMs in apoE0/0 mice; seven days after the last rat exposure, expression of NCAM was increased in frontal brain and hippocampus whereas expression of L1 was increased in hippocampus and cerebellum. Rat stress attenuated the elevation of basal morning corticosterone concentration in apoE0/0 mice towards concentrations detected in wild-type mice. Moreover, rat stress improved learning and memory of apoE0/0 mice in the water maze. In conclusion, repeated exposure to stress eliminated apoE-genotype-related differences in expression of CAMs. Under these same conditions the differences in cognitive performance and corticosterone concentrations were abolished between wild type and apoE0/0 mice.

  5. Hemoglobin: a gas transport molecule that is hormonally regulated in the ovarian follicle in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Hannah M; Anastasi, Marie R; Frank, Laura A; Kind, Karen L; Richani, Dulama; Robker, Rebecca L; Russell, Darryl L; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of nonerythroid tissues are found to express hemoglobin mRNA and protein. Hemoglobin is a well-described gas transport molecule, especially for O2, but also for NO, CO2, and CO, and also acts as a reactive oxygen species scavenger. We previously found Hba-a1 and Hbb mRNA and protein at high levels within mouse periovulatory cumulus cells, but not in cumulus following in vitro maturation. This led us to investigate the temporal and spatial regulation in follicular cells during the periovulatory period. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected from equine chorionic gonadotropin/human chorionic gonadotropin-treated peripubertal SV129 female mice and collected and analyzed for gene expression and protein localization at a variety of time points over the periovulatory period. A further cohort matured in vitro with different forms of hemoglobin (ferro- and ferrihemoglobin) under different O2 atmospheric conditions (2%, 5%, and 20% O2) were subsequently fertilized in vitro and cultured to the blastocyst stage. Murine mRNA transcripts for hemoglobin were regulated by stimulation of the ovulatory cascade, in both granulosa and cumulus cells, and expression of HBA1 and HBB was highly significant in human granulosa and cumulus, but erythrocyte cell marker genes were not. Several other genes involved in hemoglobin function were similarly luteinizing hormone-regulated, including genes for heme biosynthesis. Immunohistochemistry revealed a changing localization pattern of HBA-A1 protein in murine cumulus cells and oocytes following the ovulatory signal. Significantly, no positive staining for HBA-A1 protein was observed within in vitro-matured oocytes, but, if coincubated with ferro- or ferrihemoglobin, cytoplasmic HBA-A1 was observed, similar to in vivo-derived oocytes. Addition of ferro-, but not ferrihemoglobin, had a small, positive effect on blastocyst yield, but only under either 2% or 20% O2 gas atmosphere. The identification of hemoglobin within

  6. The B Cell Adaptor Molecule Bam32 Is Critically Important for Optimal Antibody Response and Resistance to Trypanosoma congolense Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Jia, Ping; Jayachandran, Nipun; Hou, Sen; Okwor, Ifeoma; Kuriakose, Shiby; Marshall, Aaron; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bam32, a 32 kDa adaptor molecule, plays important role in B cell receptor signalling, T cell receptor signalling and antibody affinity maturation in germinal centres. Since antibodies against trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) are critically important for control of parasitemia, we hypothesized that Bam32 deficient (Bam32-/-) mice would be susceptible to T. congolense infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that T. congolense-infected Bam32-/- mice successfully control the first wave of parasitemia but then fail to control subsequent waves and ultimately succumb to their infection unlike wild type (WT) C57BL6 mice which are relatively resistant. Although infected Bam32-/- mice had significantly higher hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, their serum AST and ALT levels were not different, suggesting that increased liver pathology may not be responsible for the increased susceptibility of Bam32-/- mice to T. congolense. Using direct ex vivo flow cytometry and ELISA, we show that CD4+ T cells from infected Bam32-/- mice produced significantly increased amounts of disease-exacerbating proinflammatory cytokines (including IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6). However, the percentages of regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing CD4+ cells were similar in infected WT and Bam32-/- mice. While serum levels of parasite-specific IgM antibodies were normal, the levels of parasite-specific IgG, (particularly IgG1 and IgG2a) were significantly lower in Bam32-/- mice throughout infection. This was associated with impaired germinal centre response in Bam32-/- mice despite increased numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Adoptive transfer studies indicate that intrinsic B cell defect was responsible for the enhanced susceptibility of Bam32-/- mice to T. congolense infection. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our data show that Bam32 is important for optimal anti-trypanosome IgG antibody response and suppression of disease-promoting proinflammatory cytokines

  7. Lactones from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE-deficient mice via inhibiting over expression of NF-kB-dependent adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Wang, Ying-Chao; Li, Lai-Lai; Jin, Ye-Cheng; Sironi, Luigi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to investigate the anti-atherosclerotic effects of lactones extracted from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort (LLC) in apoE-deficient mice (ApoE(-/-) mice) and proclaim its underlying mechanisms. Expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and NF-κB around the atherosclerotic lesions was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To further validate the mechanism, effect of LLC on the secretion of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was measured by ELISA. And the activation of NF-κB was detected by western blot. Mice treated with LLC showed significant reduction in lesion sizes of thoracic segments of the aorta (p<0.01). Meanwhile, LLC treatments lead to decreases of serum TG, TC and LDL-C contents, respectively. LLC also decreased the expression of CD31, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the atherosclerotic plaque. Moreover, LLC at 3.125-25 μg/mL can dose-dependently attenuate the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in TNF-α stimulated HUVECs. Western blot result indicated LLC inhibited activation of NF-κB. These results suggested that LLC could ameliorate atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. The mechanism of action of LLC on anti-atherosclerotic effect may be attributed to the suppression of the production of NF-κB-dependent adhesion molecules. PMID:24594239

  8. Salt-inducible kinase 3 deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock accompanied by increased levels of pro-inflammatory molecules in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanosaka, Masato; Fujimoto, Minoru; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Nagatake, Takahiro; Itoh, Yumi; Kagawa, Mai; Kumagai, Ayako; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kunisawa, Jun; Naka, Tetsuji; Takemori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the innate immune system during infection and systemic inflammation. When bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binds to Toll-like receptor 4 on macrophages, several signalling cascades co-operatively up-regulate gene expression of inflammatory molecules. The present study aimed to examine whether salt-inducible kinase [SIK, a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family] could contribute to the regulation of immune signal not only in cultured macrophages, but also in vivo. LPS up-regulated SIK3 expression in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and exogenously over-expressed SIK3 negatively regulated the expression of inflammatory molecules [interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO) and IL-12p40] in RAW264.7 macrophages. Conversely, these inflammatory molecule levels were up-regulated in SIK3-deficient thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (TEPM), despite no impairment of the classical signalling cascades. Forced expression of SIK3 in SIK3-deficient TEPM suppressed the levels of the above-mentioned inflammatory molecules. LPS injection (10 mg/kg) led to the death of all SIK3-knockout (KO) mice within 48 hr after treatment, whereas only one mouse died in the SIK1-KO (n = 8), SIK2-KO (n = 9) and wild-type (n = 8 or 9) groups. In addition, SIK3-KO bone marrow transplantation increased LPS sensitivity of the recipient wild-type mice, which was accompanied by an increased level of circulating IL-6. These results suggest that SIK3 is a unique negative regulator that suppresses inflammatory molecule gene expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:25619259

  9. Coffee polyphenols suppress diet-induced body fat accumulation by downregulating SREBP-1c and related molecules in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takatoshi; Misawa, Koichi; Minegishi, Yoshihiko; Aoki, Masafumi; Ominami, Hideo; Suzuki, Yasuto; Shibuya, Yusuke; Hase, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing globally, and obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of coffee polyphenols (CPP), which are abundant in coffee and consumed worldwide, on diet-induced body fat accumulation. C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control diet, a high-fat diet, or a high-fat diet supplemented with 0.5 to 1.0% CPP for 2-15 wk. Supplementation with CPP significantly reduced body weight gain, abdominal and liver fat accumulation, and infiltration of macrophages into adipose tissues. Energy expenditure evaluated by indirect calorimetry was significantly increased in CPP-fed mice. The mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 and -2, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 in the liver were significantly lower in CPP-fed mice than in high-fat control mice. Similarly, CPP suppressed the expression of these molecules in Hepa 1-6 cells, concomitant with an increase in microRNA-122. Structure-activity relationship studies of nine quinic acid derivatives isolated from CPP in Hepa 1-6 cells suggested that mono- or di-caffeoyl quinic acids (CQA) are active substances in the beneficial effects of CPP. Furthermore, CPP and 5-CQA decreased the nuclear active form of SREBP-1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, and cellular malonyl-CoA levels. These findings indicate that CPP enhances energy metabolism and reduces lipogenesis by downregulating SREBP-1c and related molecules, which leads to the suppression of body fat accumulation.

  10. Further evidence of the in vivo role of erythropoietin or companion molecules induced by hypoxia on proliferation and continuing differentiation of BFU-e in PCDC. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Harigaya, K.; Cronkite, E.P.; Miller, M.E.; Moccia, G.

    1981-02-01

    Normal and plethoric bone marrow cells were grown in plasma clot diffusion chambers (PCDC) implanted into the peritoneum of normal mice or mice submitted to 7 h of hypoxia (23,000 ft) daily, on a single day or on 2 consecutive days at different times after implantation of the PCDC's. Daily discontinuous hypoxia (DDH) produced more 6-day bursts than other treatments. Hypoxia on days 1 and 2 after implantation was nearly as effective as DDH on day-6 bursts. Erythropoietin (Ep) levels were measured by bioassay on both diffusion chamber (DC) contents and serum. Serum Ep levels peaked after a 7-hr hypoxic exposure while the DC content Ep levels were in the nondetectable range. The data implies that either higher than normal Ep levels or a companion molecule(s) produced by hypoxia are required for 1 to 2 days early in the culture period to force an increasing number of BFU-d-e down the erythrocytic pathway and thus increase red cell production at times of need in vivo.

  11. Involvement of resistin-like molecule β in the development of methionine-choline deficient diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Hirofumi; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Iizuka, Masaki; Taki, Naoyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Kamata, Hideaki; Nagamachi, Akiko; Inaba, Toshiya; Nishimura, Fusanori; Katagiri, Hideki; Asahara, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuto; Chonan, Osamu; Encinas, Jeffery; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-28

    Resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) reportedly has multiple functions including local immune responses in the gut. In this study, we investigated the possible contribution of RELMβ to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. First, RELMβ knock-out (KO) mice were shown to be resistant to methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced NASH development. Since it was newly revealed that Kupffer cells in the liver express RELMβ and that RELMβ expression levels in the colon and the numbers of RELMβ-positive Kupffer cells were both increased in this model, we carried out further experiments using radiation chimeras between wild-type and RELMβ-KO mice to distinguish between the contributions of RELMβ in these two organs. These experiments revealed the requirement of RELMβ in both organs for full manifestation of NASH, while deletion of each one alone attenuated the development of NASH with reduced serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. The higher proportion of lactic acid bacteria in the gut microbiota of RELMβ-KO than in that of wild-type mice may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lower serum LPS level the former. These data suggest the contribution of increases in RELMβ in the gut and Kupffer cells to NASH development, raising the possibility of RELMβ being a novel therapeutic target for NASH.

  12. Involvement of resistin-like molecule β in the development of methionine-choline deficient diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Hirofumi; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Iizuka, Masaki; Taki, Naoyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Kamata, Hideaki; Nagamachi, Akiko; Inaba, Toshiya; Nishimura, Fusanori; Katagiri, Hideki; Asahara, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuto; Chonan, Osamu; Encinas, Jeffery; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) reportedly has multiple functions including local immune responses in the gut. In this study, we investigated the possible contribution of RELMβ to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. First, RELMβ knock-out (KO) mice were shown to be resistant to methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced NASH development. Since it was newly revealed that Kupffer cells in the liver express RELMβ and that RELMβ expression levels in the colon and the numbers of RELMβ-positive Kupffer cells were both increased in this model, we carried out further experiments using radiation chimeras between wild-type and RELMβ-KO mice to distinguish between the contributions of RELMβ in these two organs. These experiments revealed the requirement of RELMβ in both organs for full manifestation of NASH, while deletion of each one alone attenuated the development of NASH with reduced serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. The higher proportion of lactic acid bacteria in the gut microbiota of RELMβ-KO than in that of wild-type mice may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lower serum LPS level the former. These data suggest the contribution of increases in RELMβ in the gut and Kupffer cells to NASH development, raising the possibility of RELMβ being a novel therapeutic target for NASH. PMID:26818807

  13. Involvement of resistin-like molecule β in the development of methionine-choline deficient diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Hirofumi; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Iizuka, Masaki; Taki, Naoyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Kamata, Hideaki; Nagamachi, Akiko; Inaba, Toshiya; Nishimura, Fusanori; Katagiri, Hideki; Asahara, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuto; Chonan, Osamu; Encinas, Jeffery; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) reportedly has multiple functions including local immune responses in the gut. In this study, we investigated the possible contribution of RELMβ to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. First, RELMβ knock-out (KO) mice were shown to be resistant to methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced NASH development. Since it was newly revealed that Kupffer cells in the liver express RELMβ and that RELMβ expression levels in the colon and the numbers of RELMβ-positive Kupffer cells were both increased in this model, we carried out further experiments using radiation chimeras between wild-type and RELMβ-KO mice to distinguish between the contributions of RELMβ in these two organs. These experiments revealed the requirement of RELMβ in both organs for full manifestation of NASH, while deletion of each one alone attenuated the development of NASH with reduced serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. The higher proportion of lactic acid bacteria in the gut microbiota of RELMβ-KO than in that of wild-type mice may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lower serum LPS level the former. These data suggest the contribution of increases in RELMβ in the gut and Kupffer cells to NASH development, raising the possibility of RELMβ being a novel therapeutic target for NASH. PMID:26818807

  14. Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mice with a Conditional Ablation of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However,…

  15. 4SC-101, a novel small molecule dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor, suppresses systemic lupus erythematosus in MRL-(Fas)lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Onkar P; Sayyed, Sufyan G; Kantner, Claudia; Ryu, Mi; Schnurr, Max; Sárdy, Miklós; Leban, Johann; Jankowsky, Ruediger; Ammendola, Aldo; Doblhofer, Robert; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2010-06-01

    Immunosuppressive treatments of systemic lupus (SLE) remain associated with significant toxicities; hence, compounds with better toxicity profiles are needed. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibition with leflunomide has proven to be effective in autoimmune diseases including SLE, but leflunomide can cause a variety of side effects. We hypothesized that 4SC-101, a novel DHODH inhibitor with a more favorable toxicity profile, would be as effective as high-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) in controlling experimental SLE of female MRL(Fas)lpr mice. Daily oral gavage of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg 4SC-101 from 12 to 22 weeks of age was compared with either vehicle or CYC treatment (30 mg/kg/week, i.p.) in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Three hundred milligrams per kilogram 4SC-101 was as effective as CYC in depleting spleen autoreactive T cells, B cells, and plasma cells as well as the respective DNA and RNA serum autoantibodies. This was associated with a comparable amelioration of the renal, dermal, and pulmonary SLE manifestations of MRL(Fas)lpr mice. However, even the highest dose of 4SC-101 had no effect on bone marrow neutrophil counts, which were significantly reduced in CYC-treated mice. Together, the novel DHODH inhibitor 4SC-101 is as effective as high dose CYC in controlling SLE without causing myelosuppression. Hence, DHODH inhibition with 4SC-101 might be suitable to treat active SLE with fewer side effects than CYC.

  16. Small Molecule Kaempferol Promotes Insulin Sensitivity and Preserved Pancreatic β-Cell Mass in Middle-Aged Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalidy, Hana; Moore, William; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Aihua; Ali, Mostafa; Suh, Kyung-Shin; Zhen, Wei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Jia, Zhenquan; Hulver, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and a progressive decline in functional β-cell mass are hallmarks of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for natural, low-cost compounds to target these two defects could be a promising strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of T2D. Here, we show that dietary intake of flavonol kaempferol (0.05% in the diet) significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and circulating lipid profile, which were associated with the improved peripheral insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Kaempferol treatment reversed HF diet impaired glucose transport-4 (Glut4) and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) expression in both muscle and adipose tissues from obese mice. In vitro, kaempferol increased lipolysis and prevented high fatty acid-impaired glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, AMPK activity, and Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle cells. Using another mouse model of T2D generated by HF diet feeding and low doses of streptozotocin injection, we found that kaempferol treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in obese diabetic mice, which are associated with the improved islet β-cell mass. These results demonstrate that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic agent by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity and protecting against pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. PMID:26064984

  17. Beneficial effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) on acute doxorubicin cardiotoxicity in mice: Role of oxidative stress and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Hitesh; Pandya, Gaurav; Patel, Praful; Acharya, Aviseka; Jain, Mukul; Mehta, Anita A.

    2011-05-15

    Doxorubicin (DXR) has been used in variety of human malignancies for decades. Despite its efficacy in cancer, clinical usage is limited because of its cardiotoxicity, which has been associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs) have been shown to reduce the oxidative damage and apoptosis. The present study investigated the effects of CORM-2, a fast CO-releaser, against DXR-induced cardiotoxicity in mice using biochemical, histopathological and gene expression approaches. CORM-2 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 10 days and terminated the study on day 11. DXR (20 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected before 72 h of termination. Mice treated with DXR showed cardiotoxicity as evidenced by elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), caspase-3 and decrease the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in heart tissues. Pre- and post-treatment with CORM-2 (30 mg/kg, i.p.) elicited significant improvement in CK, LDH, MDA, caspase-3 and TAS levels. Histopathological studies showed that cardiac damage with DXR has been reversed with CORM-2 + DXR treatment. There was dramatic decrease in hematological count in DXR-treated mice, which has been improved with CORM-2. Furthermore, there was also elevation of mRNA expression of heme oxygenase-1, hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor and decrease in inducible-nitric oxide synthase expression upon treatment with CORM-2 that might be linked to cardioprotection. These data suggest that CORM-2 treatment provides cardioprotection against acute doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice and this effect may be attributed to CORM-2-mediated antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties.

  18. Small molecule TBTC as a new selective retinoid X receptor α agonist improves behavioral deficit in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanyan; Fan, Jun; Zhu, Zhiyuan; Guo, Xiaodan; Zhou, Tingting; Duan, Wenhu; Shen, Xu

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by progressive cognitive impairments. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is determined as the main pathogenesis of AD, and either decrease of Aβ production or increase of Aβ clearance is beneficial in the treatment of AD, while Aβ clearance regulation seems to be more attractive as a promising therapeutic strategy against AD based on the fact that the insufficient clearance of Aβ is tightly associated with the late onset of AD that is represented as the majority of AD cases. Here, we report that the small molecular compound, methyl 2-amino-6-(tert-butyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxylate (TBTC), as a selective agonist of retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) can effectively activate the heterodimerization of RXRα with either liver X receptor α (LXRα) or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), stimulate the expressions of the genes of apoE, ABCA1 and ABCG1, and decrease Aβ content both in cells and animal models. In addition, administration of TBTC (30mg/kg/day) in the transgenic APP-PS1 mice could also reduce the formation of senile plaques and improve the daily living activity of the mice. Therefore, our findings have suggested that TBTC might hold the potential as a drug lead compound for the treatment of AD.

  19. Novel Small Molecule Agonist of TGR5 Possesses Anti-Diabetic Effects but Causes Gallbladder Filling in Mice.

    PubMed

    Briere, Daniel A; Ruan, Xiaoping; Cheng, Christine C; Siesky, Angela M; Fitch, Thomas E; Dominguez, Carmen; Sanfeliciano, Sonia Gutierrez; Montero, Carlos; Suen, Chen S; Xu, Yanping; Coskun, Tamer; Michael, M Dodson

    2015-01-01

    Activation of TGR5 via bile acids or bile acid analogs leads to the release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from intestine, increases energy expenditure in brown adipose tissue, and increases gallbladder filling with bile. Here, we present compound 18, a non-bile acid agonist of TGR5 that demonstrates robust GLP-1 secretion in a mouse enteroendocrine cell line yet weak GLP-1 secretion in a human enteroendocrine cell line. Acute administration of compound 18 to mice increased GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY) secretion, leading to a lowering of the glucose excursion in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), while chronic administration led to weight loss. In addition, compound 18 showed a dose-dependent increase in gallbladder filling. Lastly, compound 18 failed to show similar pharmacological effects on GLP-1, PYY, and gallbladder filling in Tgr5 knockout mice. Together, these results demonstrate that compound 18 is a mouse-selective TGR5 agonist that induces GLP-1 and PYY secretion, and lowers the glucose excursion in an OGTT, but only at doses that simultaneously induce gallbladder filling. Overall, these data highlight the benefits and potential risks of using TGR5 agonists to treat diabetes and metabolic diseases.

  20. Contributions of beta2-microglobulin-dependent molecules and lymphocytes to iron regulation: insights from HfeRag1(-/-) and beta2mRag1(-/-) double knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Carlos J; Makui, Hortence; Andrews, Nancy C; Santos, Manuela M

    2004-04-01

    Genetic causes of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) include mutations in the HFE gene, coding for a beta2-microglobulin (beta2m)-associated major histocompatibility complex class I-like protein. However, iron accumulation in patients with HH can be highly variable. Previously, analysis of beta2mRag1(-/-) double-deficient mice, lacking all beta2m-dependent molecules and lymphocytes, demonstrated increased iron accumulation in the pancreas and heart compared with beta2m single knock-out mice. To evaluate whether the observed phenotype in beta2mRag1(-/-) mice was due solely to the absence of Hfe or to other beta2m-dependent molecules, we generated HfeRag1(-/-) double-deficient mice. Our studies revealed that introduction of Rag1 deficiency in Hfe knock-out mice leads to heightened iron overload, mainly in the liver, whereas the heart and pancreas are relatively spared compared with beta2mRag1(-/-) mice. These results suggest that other beta2m-interacting protein(s) may be involved in iron regulation and that in the absence of functional Hfe molecules lymphocyte numbers may influence iron overload severity.

  1. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  2. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  3. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes. PMID:26394692

  4. Deletion of Fibrinogen-like Protein 2 (FGL-2), a Novel CD4+ CD25+ Treg Effector Molecule, Leads to Improved Control of Echinococcus multilocularis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew; Spiliotis, Markus; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L.; Shalev, Itay; Levy, Gary; Lu, Xiaomei; Lin, Renyong; Wen, Hao; Gottstein, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background The growth potential of the tumor-like Echinococcus multilocularis metacestode (causing alveolar echinococcosis, AE) is directly linked to the nature/function of the periparasitic host immune-mediated processes. We previously showed that Fibrinogen-like-protein 2 (FGL2), a novel CD4+CD25+ Treg effector molecule, was over-expressed in the liver of mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis. However, little is known about its contribution to the control of this chronic helminth infection. Methods/Findings Key parameters for infection outcome in E. multilocularis-infected fgl2-/- (AE-fgl2-/-) and wild type (AE-WT) mice at 1 and 4 month(s) post-infection were (i) parasite load (i. e. wet weight of parasitic metacestode tissue), and (ii) parasite cell proliferation as assessed by determining E. multilocularis 14-3-3 gene expression levels. Serum FGL2 levels were measured by ELISA. Spleen cells cultured with ConA for 48h or with E. multilocularis Vesicle Fluid (VF) for 96h were analyzed ex-vivo and in-vitro. In addition, spleen cells from non-infected WT mice were cultured with rFGL2/anti-FGL2 or rIL-17A/anti-IL-17A for further functional studies. For Treg-immune-suppression-assays, purified CD4+CD25+ Treg suspensions were incubated with CD4+ effector T cells in the presence of ConA and irradiated spleen cells as APCs. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR were used to assess Treg, Th17-, Th1-, Th2-type immune responses and maturation of dendritic cells. We showed that AE-fgl2-/- mice exhibited (as compared to AE-WT-animals) (a) a significantly lower parasite load with reduced proliferation activity, (b) an increased T cell proliferative response to ConA, (c) reduced Treg numbers and function, and (d) a persistent capacity of Th1 polarization and DC maturation. Conclusions FGL2 appears as one of the key players in immune regulatory processes favoring metacestode survival by promoting Treg cell activity and IL-17A production that contributes to FGL2-regulation

  5. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; et al

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisinglymore » impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.« less

  6. CD80 and CD86 Costimulatory Molecules Differentially Regulate OT-II CD4+ T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Response in Cocultures with Antigen-Presenting Cells Derived from Pregnant and Pseudopregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maj, Tomasz; Slawek, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Immune phenomena during the preimplantation period of pregnancy are poorly understood. The aim of our study was to assess the capacity for antigen presentation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice in in vitro conditions. Therefore, sorted CD11c+ dendritic cells and macrophages F4/80+ and CD11b+ presenting ovalbumin (OVA) were cocultured with CD4+ T cells derived from OT-II mice's (C57BL6/J-Tg(TcraTcrb)1100Mjb/J) spleen. After 132 hours of cell culture, proliferation of lymphocytes (ELISA-BrdU), activation of these cells (flow cytometry), cytokine profile (ELISA), and influence of costimulatory molecules blocking on these parameters were measured. We did not detect any differences in regulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. CD86 seems to be the main costimulatory molecule involved in the proliferation response but CD80 is the main costimulatory molecule influencing cytokine secretion in pregnant mice. In conclusion, this study showed that CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules regulate OT-II CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine response in cocultures with antigen-presenting cells derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. The implications of these changes still remain unclear. PMID:24771983

  7. Tandem repeats of the extracellular domain of Matrix 2 influenza protein exposed in Brucella lumazine synthase decameric carrier molecule induce protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paula; Zylberman, Vanesa; Ghersi, Giselle; Boado, Lorena; Palacios, Carlos; Goldbaum, Fernando; Mattion, Nora

    2013-01-21

    The antigenic variation of influenza virus represents a major prevention problem. However, the ectodomain of the protein Matrix 2 (M2e) is nearly invariant in all human influenza A strains and has been considered as a promising candidate for a broadly protective vaccine because antibodies to M2e are protective in animal models. In this work we evaluated the possible use of Brucella abortus lumazine synthase protein (BLS), a highly immunogenic decameric protein, as a carrier of the M2e peptide. Chimeric proteins generated by the fusion of one or four in tandem copies of M2e to BLS were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and assembled in decameric subunits similarly to the wild type BLS enzyme, as demonstrated by the comparative circular dichroism spectra and size exclusion chromatography and static light scattering analysis. The M2e peptides were stably exposed at the ten N-terminal ends of each BLS molecule. Immunization of mice with purified chimeras carrying only one M2e (BLS-M2e) copy elicited a significant humoral immune response with the addition of different adjuvants. The fusion of four in tandem copies of the M2e peptide (BLS-4M2e) resulted in similar levels of humoral immune response but in the absence of adjuvant. Survival of mice challenged with live influenza virus was 100% after vaccination with BLS-4M2e adjuvanted with Iscomatrix(®) (P<0.001) and 80% when adjuvanted with alum (P<0.01), while the chimera alone protected 60% of the animals (P<0.05). The approach described in this study is intended as a contribution to the generation of universal influenza immunogens, through a simple production and purification process and using safe carriers that might eventually avoid the use of strong adjuvants. PMID:23246552

  8. Tandem repeats of the extracellular domain of Matrix 2 influenza protein exposed in Brucella lumazine synthase decameric carrier molecule induce protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paula; Zylberman, Vanesa; Ghersi, Giselle; Boado, Lorena; Palacios, Carlos; Goldbaum, Fernando; Mattion, Nora

    2013-01-21

    The antigenic variation of influenza virus represents a major prevention problem. However, the ectodomain of the protein Matrix 2 (M2e) is nearly invariant in all human influenza A strains and has been considered as a promising candidate for a broadly protective vaccine because antibodies to M2e are protective in animal models. In this work we evaluated the possible use of Brucella abortus lumazine synthase protein (BLS), a highly immunogenic decameric protein, as a carrier of the M2e peptide. Chimeric proteins generated by the fusion of one or four in tandem copies of M2e to BLS were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and assembled in decameric subunits similarly to the wild type BLS enzyme, as demonstrated by the comparative circular dichroism spectra and size exclusion chromatography and static light scattering analysis. The M2e peptides were stably exposed at the ten N-terminal ends of each BLS molecule. Immunization of mice with purified chimeras carrying only one M2e (BLS-M2e) copy elicited a significant humoral immune response with the addition of different adjuvants. The fusion of four in tandem copies of the M2e peptide (BLS-4M2e) resulted in similar levels of humoral immune response but in the absence of adjuvant. Survival of mice challenged with live influenza virus was 100% after vaccination with BLS-4M2e adjuvanted with Iscomatrix(®) (P<0.001) and 80% when adjuvanted with alum (P<0.01), while the chimera alone protected 60% of the animals (P<0.05). The approach described in this study is intended as a contribution to the generation of universal influenza immunogens, through a simple production and purification process and using safe carriers that might eventually avoid the use of strong adjuvants.

  9. Small Molecule p75NTR Ligands Reduce Pathological Phosphorylation and Misfolding of Tau, Inflammatory Changes, Cholinergic Degeneration, and Cognitive Deficits in AβPPL/S Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V.; Shen, Lin; Griend, Lilith Vander; Quach, Lisa N.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Saw, Nay; Yang, Tao; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR ) is involved in degenerative mechanisms related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, p75NTR levels are increased in AD and the receptor is expressed by neurons that are particularly vulnerable in the disease. Therefore, modulating p75NTR function may be a significant disease-modifying treatment approach. Prior studies indicated that the non-peptide, small molecule p75NTR ligands LM11A-31, and chemically unrelated LM11A-24, could block amyloid-β-induced deleterious signaling and neurodegeneration in vitro, and LM11A-31 was found to mitigate neuritic degeneration and behavioral deficits in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we determined whether these in vivo findings represent class effects of p75NTR ligands by examining LM11A-24 effects. In addition, the range of compound effects was further examined by evaluating tau pathology and neuroinflammation. Following oral administration, both ligands reached brain concentrations known to provide neuroprotection in vitro. Compound induction of p75NTR cleavage provided evidence for CNS target engagement. LM11A-31 and LM11A-24 reduced excessive phosphorylation of tau, and LM11A-31 also inhibited its aberrant folding. Both ligands decreased activation of microglia, while LM11A-31 attenuated reactive astrocytes. Along with decreased inflammatory responses, both ligands reduced cholinergic neurite degeneration. In addition to the amelioration of neuropathology in AD model mice, LM11A-31, but not LM11A-24, prevented impairments in water maze performance, while both ligands prevented deficits in fear conditioning. These findings support a role for p75NTR ligands in preventing fundamental tau-related pathologic mechanisms in AD, and further validate the development of these small molecules as a new class of therapeutic compounds. PMID:24898660

  10. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  11. A Rac1/Cdc42 GTPase-specific small molecule inhibitor suppresses growth of primary human prostate cancer xenografts and prolongs survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Zins, Karin; Lucas, Trevor; Reichl, Patrick; Abraham, Dietmar; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 have been discovered in various tumors, including prostate and Rac protein expression significantly increases in prostate cancer. The Rac and Cdc42 pathways promote the uncontrolled proliferation, invasion and metastatic properties of human cancer cells. We synthesized the novel compound AZA1 based on structural information of the known Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766. In the current study we investigated the effects of inhibition of these pathways by AZA1 on prostate tumorigenicity by performing preclinical studies using a xenograft mouse model of prostate cancer. In androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, AZA1 inhibited both Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA GTPase activity in a dose-dependent manner and blocked cellular migration and proliferation. Cyclin D1 expression significantly decreased following Rac1/Cdc42 inhibition in prostate cancer cells. AZA1 treatment also down-regulated PAK and AKT activity in prostate cancer cells, associated with induction of the pro-apoptotic function of BAD by suppression of serine-112 phosphorylation. Daily systemic administration of AZA1 for 2 weeks reduced growth of human 22Rv1 prostate tumor xenografts in mice and improved the survival of tumor-bearing animals significantly. These data suggest a role of AZA1 in blocking Rac1/Cdc42-dependent cell cycle progression, cancer cell migration and increase of cancer cell apoptosis involving down-regulation of the AKT and PAK signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells. We therefore propose that a small-molecule inhibitor therapy targeting Rac1/Cdc42 Rho GTPase signaling pathways may be used as a novel treatment for patients with advanced prostate cancer.

  12. Nervous system defects of AnkyrinB (-/-) mice suggest functional overlap between the cell adhesion molecule L1 and 440-kD AnkyrinB in premyelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Scotland, P; Zhou, D; Benveniste, H; Bennett, V

    1998-11-30

    The L1 CAM family of cell adhesion molecules and the ankyrin family of spectrin-binding proteins are candidates to collaborate in transcellular complexes used in diverse contexts in nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. This report presents evidence for functional coupling between L1 and 440-kD ankyrinB in premyelinated axons in the mouse nervous system. L1 and 440-kD ankyrinB are colocalized in premyelinated axon tracts in the developing nervous system and are both down-regulated after myelination. AnkyrinB (-/-) mice exhibit a phenotype similar to, but more severe, than L1 (-/-) mice and share features of human patients with L1 mutations. AnkyrinB (-/-) mice exhibit hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and pyramidal tracts, dilated ventricles, and extensive degeneration of the optic nerve, and they die by postnatal day 21. AnkyrinB (-/-) mice have reduced L1 in premyelinated axons of long fiber tracts, including the corpus callosum, fimbria, and internal capsule in the brain, and pyramidal tracts and lateral columns of the spinal cord. L1 was evident in the optic nerve at postnatal day 1 but disappeared by postnatal day 7 in mutant mice while NCAM was unchanged. Optic nerve axons of ankyrinB (-/-) mice become dilated with diameters up to eightfold greater than normal, and they degenerated by day 20. These findings provide the first evidence for a role of ankyrinB in the nervous system and support an interaction between 440-kD ankyrinB and L1 that is essential for maintenance of premyelinated axons in vivo.

  13. A mutational analysis of the Abetaz/Aalphad major histocompatibility complex class II molecule that restricts autoreactive T cells in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. The critical influence of alanine at position 69 in the Aalphad chain.

    PubMed

    Sai, T; Mine, M; Fukuoka, M; Koarada, S; Kimoto, M

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune symptoms of (NZBxNZW)F1 (H-2d/z) mice are reported to be critically related to the heterozygosity at the H-2 complex of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We previously showed that several Abetaz/Aalphad MHC class II molecule-restricted autoreactive T-cell clones from B/WF1 mice were pathogenic upon transfer to preautoimmune B/WF1 mice. In this study, to identify the crucial amino acid residues in Abetaz/Aalphad molecules for T-cell activation, we generated a panel of transfectant cell lines. These transfectant cell lines express the Abetaz/Aalphad MHC molecules with a mutation at each residue alpha11, alpha28, alpha57, alpha69, alpha70, alpha76 of Aalphad chain and beta86 of Abetaz chain. Replacing alpha69 alanine with threonine, valine or serine completely eliminated the ability to stimulate autoreactive T-cell clones without affecting the ability to present foreign antigen keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) or L-plastin peptide to specific T-cell clones. Replacing beta86 valine with aspartic acid resulted in a decrease in the stimulation for antigen-reactive as well as autoreactive T-cell clones. Substitutions at other residues had minimal or no effect on the stimulation of either auto- or antigen-reactive T-cell clones. These results suggest that alanine at residue 69 of the Aalphad chain is critical for the activation of autoreactive Abetaz/Aalphad-restricted T-cell clones. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:10233712

  14. Absence of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, PECAM-1/CD31, In Vivo Increases Resistance to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Michael D.; Yap, May Lin; Yip, Jana; Muller, William; Wijburg, Odilia

    2013-01-01

    PECAM-1/CD31 is known to regulate inflammatory responses and exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. This study was designed to determine the functional role of PECAM-1 in susceptibility to murine primary in vivo infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and in in vitro inflammatory responses of peritoneal macrophages. Lectin profiling showed that cellular PECAM-1 and recombinant human PECAM-1-Ig chimera contain high levels of mannose sugars and N-acetylglucosamine. Consistent with this carbohydrate pattern, both recombinant human and murine PECAM-1-Ig chimeras were shown to bind S. Typhimurium in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Using oral and fecal-oral transmission models of S. Typhimurium SL1344 infection, PECAM-1−/− mice were found to be more resistant to S. Typhimurium infection than wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. While fecal shedding of S. Typhimurium was comparable in wild-type and PECAM-1−/− mice, the PECAM-1-deficient mice had lower bacterial loads in systemic organs such as liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes than WT mice, suggesting that extraintestinal dissemination was reduced in the absence of PECAM-1. This reduced bacterial load correlated with reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) levels in sera of PECAM-1−/− mice. Following in vitro stimulation of macrophages with either whole S. Typhimurium, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (Toll-like receptor 4 [TLR4] ligand), or poly(I·C) (TLR3 ligand), production of TNF and IL-6 by PECAM-1−/− macrophages was reduced. Together, these results suggest that PECAM-1 may have multiple functions in resistance to infection with S. Typhimurium, including binding to host cells, extraintestinal spread to deeper tissues, and regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by infected macrophages. PMID:23509149

  15. The induction of experimental autoimmune myocarditis in mice lacking CD4 or CD8 molecules [corrected] [published erratum appears in J Exp Med 1994 Jan 1;179(1):371

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Experimental induction of most autoimmune diseases appears to depend on the activation of CD4+ T helper cells, while CD8+ lymphocytes may have a role in disease progression. To study the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets in T cell-dependent autoimmunity, mice lacking CD4 or CD8 molecules after gene targeting were injected with cardiac myosin to induce organ specific autoimmune myocarditis. Mice homozygous for the CD8 mutation (CD8-/-) developed significantly more severe disease as compared to CD4+/-CD8+/- controls. Surprisingly, CD4-/- mice developed autoimmune myocarditis with infiltration of TCR alpha beta +CD4-CD8- T cells in the heart tissue and appearance of autoantibodies. These data demonstrate that the lack of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells has no significant influence on the initiation of autoimmune myocarditis. CD4+ and CD8+ cells regulate disease severity and these results may explain the occurrence of autoimmunity in CD4 immunodeficiencies. PMID:8228830

  16. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  17. Leonurus sibiricus herb extract suppresses oxidative stress and ameliorates hypercholesterolemia in C57BL/6 mice and TNF-alpha induced expression of adhesion molecules and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Ja; Lee, Hye-Sook; Park, Sun-Dong; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Won-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    In Leonurus sibiricus herb extract (LHE)-supplemented animals, plasma cholesterol decreased and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol increased, resulting in a lowered atherogenic index. The plasma trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, levels of hepatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, and protein carbonyl values decreased significantly in LHE-supplemented mice (p<0.05), whereas the hepatic antioxidant indicators were all significantly elevated (p<0.05). In human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha, LHE significantly suppressed intracellular reactive oxygen species, LOX-1, and adhesion molecules. LHE supplementation may modulate the lipoprotein composition and attenuate oxidative stress by elevated antioxidant processes, thus suppressing the activation of inflammatory mediators. This is a possible mechanism of the anti-atherogenic effect.

  18. The novel chimeric anti-NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule) antibody ch.MK1 displays antitumor activity in SCID mice but does not activate complement-dependent cytolysis (CDC).

    PubMed

    Klehr, Martin; Koehl, Ulrike; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Tawadros, Samir; Fischer, Thomas; Schomäcker, Klaus; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Bochennek, Konrad; Jensen, Markus

    2009-06-01

    A monoclonal chimeric antibody ch.MK1 was generated by immunizing F004 mice expressing human instead of murine IgG1/kappa immunoglobulin constant regions. The novel antibody specifically binds cell surface-expressed human neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) as shown by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry and cytospins. Functional analysis revealed nearly complete absence of complement-dependent cytolysis in ch.MK1 and in all other anti-NCAM antibodies tested for reference (UJ13a, ERIC1, 123C3, ch.5A2, B159), indicating an unexpected and group-specific property of anti-NCAM antibodies. As a most plausible mechanism, posttranslational modification of NCAM by complement-inhibiting polysialic acid is discussed. The antibody ch.MK1 demonstrated significant in vivo activity against NCAM-positive neuroblastoma in SCID mice in presence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In absence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell no distinct antitumor activity of the antibody alone was observed. In ch.MK1 the cellular component of the immune system seems to be the dominant effector mechanism, whereas complement-dependent cytolysis seems not to be necessarily required for antitumor activity. These observations help us to understand immunotherapeutic mechanisms of native anti-NCAM antibodies and may additionally contribute to the understanding of results of currently ongoing clinical studies with conjugated anti-NCAM antibodies.

  19. Evidence that small molecule enhancement of β-hexosaminidase activity corrects the behavioral phenotype in Dutch APP(E693Q) mice through reduction of ganglioside-bound Aβ.

    PubMed

    Knight, E M; Williams, H N; Stevens, A C; Kim, S H; Kottwitz, J C; Morant, A D; Steele, J W; Klein, W L; Yanagisawa, K; Boyd, R E; Lockhart, D J; Sjoberg, E R; Ehrlich, M E; Wustman, B A; Gandy, S

    2015-02-01

    Certain mutant Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (that is, Dutch mutant APP(E693Q)) form complexes with gangliosides (GAβ). These mutant Aβ peptides may also undergo accelerated aggregation and accumulation upon exposure to GM2 and GM3. We hypothesized that increasing β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) activity would lead to a reduction in GM2 levels, which in turn, would cause a reduction in Aβ aggregation and accumulation. The small molecule OT1001 is a β-hex-targeted pharmacological chaperone with good bioavailability, blood-brain barrier penetration, high selectivity for β-hex and low cytotoxicity. Dutch APP(E693Q) transgenic mice accumulate oligomeric Aβ as they age, as well as Aβ oligomer-dose-dependent anxiety and impaired novel object recognition (NOR). Treatment of Dutch APP(E693Q) mice with OT1001 caused a dose-dependent increase in brain β-hex levels up to threefold over those observed at baseline. OT1001 treatment was associated with reduced anxiety, improved learning behavior in the NOR task and dramatically reduced GAβ accumulation in the subiculum and perirhinal cortex, both of which are brain regions required for normal NOR. Pharmacological chaperones that increase β-hex activity may be useful in reducing accumulation of certain mutant species of Aβ and in preventing the associated behavioral pathology. PMID:25349165

  20. Regulation of SIV Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cellular Immunity via Autophagosome-Mediated MHC II Molecule-Targeting Antigen Presentation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liqiang; Li, Pingchao; Xiao, Lijun; Ren, Yizhong; Wang, Dimin; Li, Chufang; Chen, Ling

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity has increasingly received attention due to its contribution in the control of HIV viral replication; therefore, it is of great significance to improve CD4+ T cell responses to enhance the efficacy of HIV vaccines. Recent studies have suggested that macroautophagy plays a crucial role in modulating adaptive immune responses toward CD4+ T cells or CD8+ T cells. In the present study, a new strategy based on a macroautophagy degradation mechanism is investigated to enhance CD4+ T cell responses against the HIV/SIV gag antigen. Our results showed that when fused to the autophagosome-associated LC3b protein, SIVgag protein can be functionally targeted to autophagosomes, processed by autophagy-mediated degradation in autolysosomes/lysosomes, presented to MHC II compartments and elicit effective potential CD4 T cell responses in vitro. Importantly, compared with the SIVgag protein alone, SIVgag-LC3b fusion antigen can induce a stronger antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response in mice, which is characterized by an enhanced magnitude and polyfunctionality. This study provides insight for the immunological modulation between viral and mammalian cells via autophagy, and it also presents an alternative strategy for the design of new antigens in the development of effective HIV vaccines. PMID:24671203

  1. Transient folate deprivation in combination with small-molecule compounds facilitates the generation of somatic cell-derived pluripotent stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-tao; Yan, Qiu-yue; Fang, Yu; Qiu, Zhan-dong; Zhang, Su-ming

    2014-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for the extra-embryonic tissues. This iPSC technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large numbers of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. However, the low efficiency of reprogramming and genomic integration of oncogenes and viral vectors limit the potential application of iPSCs. Chemical-induced reprogramming offers a novel approach to generating iPSCs. In this study, a new combination of small-molecule compounds (SMs) (sodium butyrate, A-83-01, CHIR99021, Y-27632) under conditions of transient folate deprivation was used to generate iPSC. It was found that transient folate deprivation combined with SMs was sufficient to permit reprogramming from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in the presence of transcription factors, Oct4 and Klf4, within 25 days, replacing Sox2 and c-Myc, and accelerated the generation of mouse iPSCs. The resulting cell lines resembled mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with respect to proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers and gene expressions. Deprivation of folic acid, combined with treating MEFs with SMs, can improve the inducing efficiency of iPSCs and reduce their carcinogenicity and the use of exogenous reprogramming factors.

  2. Expression profile of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD106) in inflammatory foci using rhenium-188 labelled monoclonal antibody in mice.

    PubMed

    Kairemo, K J; Strömberg, S; Nikula, T K; Karonen, S L

    1998-06-01

    Rhenium (Re)-188 is a generator (W-188/Re-188) produced high energy beta-emitter suitable for radionuclide therapy (T1/2 is 16.9 hrs and Emax 2.1 MeV (range 11 mm)). We have labelled monoclonal antibody (MAb) raised against vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) with Re-188 using glucoheptonate chelation technique and SnCl2 as reducing agent. The labelling efficiency, free perrhenate and reduced Re were controlled with thin layer chromatography and the purification of Re-188-MoAbs was performed using gel filtration. Our results indicate that Re-188-labelled antibodies remain in vitro stable and the labelling purity is > 90%. We also have applied these Re-188-MoAbs for detection of inflammatory disease in a mouse. The effective half-lives of organs of interest after an injection of Re-188-anti-VCAM1 were as follows: blood 5.2 hr, kidney 4.7 hr, and liver 9.6 hr. Re-188-anti-VCAM-1 was found to accumulate mainly in kidney and liver. One hour after the injection, the kidney contained in average as high as 12.5% and the liver 2.8 ID/g tissue. After 6 hr, the kidney contained 5.5% ID/g and the liver 2.6% ID/g. At 24 hr, the kidney uptake was 0.5% ID/g and the liver uptake 0.8% ID/g, respectively. The inflamed foci, subcutaneous lesions in the footpad skin, were visualized using gamma camera. From the distribution data the uptakes in the inflamed foci as follows: at 1 hr 2.18 (inflammation) and 1.72% ID/g (control), at 6 hr 1.42 (inflammation) and 0.85% ID/g (control), and at 24 hr 0.17 (inflammation) and 0.084% ID/g (control), respectively. Anti-VCAM-1 MAb showed better targeting as compared to control MoAbs in inflammation (caused by E.coli lipoplysaccaride). In conclusion, Re-188 is suitable for MAb labelling, and MAb against VCAM-1 may be used for detection of local inflammatory disease. PMID:9762472

  3. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  4. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  5. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  6. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  7. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  8. 'Escentric' molecules.

    PubMed

    Schön, Geza

    2008-06-01

    Can a fragrance be revolutionary? In this commentary, the creation of two unusual, extravagant fine fragrances, 'escentric01' and 'molecule01', is described. In response to the fantasy components found in release notes of many recent perfume launches, both center around a single real fragrance raw material, the transparent woody aroma chemical 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The perfume 'escentric01' contains 65% of it, accompanied by Trisamber (3), red pepper, lime oil, incense and musks, while 'molecule01' consists exclusively of 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The elegant woody note lives here its own eccentric life--the revolution starts.

  9. A novel small-molecule PPI inhibitor targeting integrin αvβ3-osteopontin interface blocks bone resorption in vitro and prevents bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Doori; Park, Chan-Won; Choi, YoungJin; Lin, Jingjing; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Lee, Soo Young; Kang, In-Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Small molecule-inhibition targeting protein-protein interaction (PPI) is now recognized as an emerging and challenging area in drug design. We developed a novel interactive drug discovery methodology known as Protein Chip technology (ProteoChip) as a cutting-edge PPI assay system applicable for unique PPI-targeting therapeutics integrated with computer-aided drug design (CADD). Here, we describe a novel small molecular PPI inhibitor, IPS-02001, which the blocks integrin αvβ3-osteopontin interface a novel PPI inhibitor identified by the interactive methodology of both ProteoChip- and CADD-based PPI assay. IPS-02001 (6,7-Dichloro-2,3,5,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) was screened from different compound libraries (InterBioScreen, Commercial libraries) using an in silico structure-based molecular docking simulation method and a protein chip-based protein-protein interaction assay system. Additionally, integrin αvβ3, an adhesion receptor expressed in osteoclasts (OCs), was implicated in the regulation of OC function via regulation of the cytoskeletal organization of OCs. IPS-02001 blocked OC maturation from murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, as well as the resorptive function of OCs. Moreover, treatment with IPS-02001 impaired downstream signaling of integrin αvβ3 linked to Pyk2, c-Src, PLCγ2, and Vav3 and disrupted the actin cytoskeleton in mature OCs. Furthermore, IPS-02001 blocked RANKL-induced bone destruction by reducing the number of OCs and protected against ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice. Thus, IPS-02001 may represent a promising new class of anti-resorptive drugs for treatment of bone diseases associated with increased OC function. PMID:27187277

  10. Walking molecules.

    PubMed

    von Delius, Max; Leigh, David A

    2011-07-01

    Movement is intrinsic to life. Biologists have established that most forms of directed nanoscopic, microscopic and, ultimately, macroscopic movements are powered by molecular motors from the dynein, myosin and kinesin superfamilies. These motor proteins literally walk, step by step, along polymeric filaments, carrying out essential tasks such as organelle transport. In the last few years biological molecular walkers have inspired the development of artificial systems that mimic aspects of their dynamics. Several DNA-based molecular walkers have been synthesised and shown to walk directionally along a track upon sequential addition of appropriate chemical fuels. In other studies, autonomous operation--i.e. DNA-walker migration that continues as long as a complex DNA fuel is present--has been demonstrated and sophisticated tasks performed, such as moving gold nanoparticles from place-to-place and assistance in sequential chemical synthesis. Small-molecule systems, an order of magnitude smaller in each dimension and 1000× smaller in molecular weight than biological motor proteins or the walker systems constructed from DNA, have also been designed and operated such that molecular fragments can be progressively transported directionally along short molecular tracks. The small-molecule systems can be powered by light or chemical fuels. In this critical review the biological motor proteins from the kinesin, myosin and dynein families are analysed as systems from which the designers of synthetic systems can learn, ratchet concepts for transporting Brownian substrates are discussed as the mechanisms by which molecular motors need to operate, and the progress made with synthetic DNA and small-molecule walker systems reviewed (142 references). PMID:21416072

  11. The expression of molecule CD28 and CD38 on CD4⁺/CD8⁺ T lymphocytes in thymus and spleen elicited by Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice model.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Ji, Peng-yu; Song, Lan-gui; Lei, Jun-xia; Lv, Zhi-yue; Wu, Zhong-dao; Shao, Xiao; Sun, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by human schistosomes such as Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is considered as an immune-related disease. It was demonstrated that specific cytokine antibodies' response elicited by S. japonicum infection was gradually downregulated with the progress of the disease, resulting in a Th1/Th2 polarization and suppression of immune response. CD28 (cluster of differentiation 28) is one of the proteins expressed on T cells that provide co-stimulatory signals required for T cell activation and survival, and CD38 is an activating marker of T lymphocyte with high expression in many acute or chronic infections. The immune signature of CD28null T cells in the peripheral circulation associates with chronic inflammation in many diseases, such as HIV and CMV infection. In the thymus, CD28 expression on developing thymocytes appears to play a role for their selection, and it synergizes with CD38 to induce apoptosis of DP (double-positive) thymocytes. Few reports about CD28 and CD38 have been published in schistosomiasis. Here, we investigated the dynamic patterns of the expression of molecules CD28 and CD38 on CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes of the thymus and spleen in mice model with S. japonicum infection. Our data indicated that at an early period of infection, the frequency of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cell in the spleen decreased significantly, but higher at chronic infection than that in control. However, it demonstrated an increasing trend in the thymus with the progression of infection. The frequency of CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells increased from acute infection in the thymus, while from chronic infection in the spleen. The expression of CD38 on CD8(+) T cells began to increase at 4 weeks post infection both in the thymus and spleen; its elevated expression on CD4(+) T cells emerged at 6 weeks post infection in the thymus and at 10 weeks post infection in the spleen. Praziquantel (PZQ) treatment could partially restore the frequency of CD28(+) T cell of CD4(+) T

  12. Stimulation of MCF-7 tumor progression in athymic nude mice by 17beta-estradiol induces WISP-2/CCN5 expression in xenografts: a novel signaling molecule in hormonal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Gibanananda; Banerjee, Snigdha; Saxena, Neela K; Campbell, Donald R; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2005-03-01

    There was 100% solid tumor formation following inoculation of MCF-7 cells. However, MCF-7 tumor progression was significantly greater in the mice exposed to 17beta-estradiol (17beta-E2) compared to unexposed mice. WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA expression was correspondingly increased in 17beta-E2 exposed MCF-7 tumors compared to unexposed xenografts. Moreover, estrogen exposure followed by anti-estrogen tamoxifen treatment drastically inhibited the tumor growth and WISP-2 expression in nude mice. Therefore, the study suggests that higher WISP-2/CCN5 expression by estrogen may be associated with the estrogen-induced growth of MCF-7 tumors in vivo. Finally, overexpression of WISP-2/CCN5 may be considered as a prognostic marker of estrogen-sensitive tumor growth.

  13. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by TAK-385 (relugolix), a novel, investigational, orally active, small molecule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist: studies in human GnRH receptor knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Masaki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Akinaga, Yumiko; Asada, Mari; Sasada, Reiko; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kusaka, Masami

    2014-01-15

    TAK-385 (relugolix) is a novel, non-peptide, orally active gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist, which builds on previous work with non-peptide GnRH antagonist TAK-013. TAK-385 possesses higher affinity and more potent antagonistic activity for human and monkey GnRH receptors compared with TAK-013. Both TAK-385 and TAK-013 have low affinity for the rat GnRH receptor, making them difficult to evaluate in rodent models. Here we report the human GnRH receptor knock-in mouse as a humanized model to investigate pharmacological properties of these compounds on gonadal function. Twice-daily oral administration of TAK-013 (10mg/kg) for 4 weeks decreased the weights of testes and ventral prostate in male knock-in mice but not in male wild-type mice, demonstrating the validity of this model to evaluate antagonists for the human GnRH receptor. The same dose of TAK-385 also reduced the prostate weight to castrate levels in male knock-in mice. In female knock-in mice, twice-daily oral administration of TAK-385 (100mg/kg) induced constant diestrous phases within the first week, decreased the uterus weight to ovariectomized levels and downregulated GnRH receptor mRNA in the pituitary after 4 weeks. Gonadal function of TAK-385-treated knock-in mice began to recover after 5 days and almost completely recovered within 14 days after drug withdrawal in both sexes. Our findings demonstrate that TAK-385 acts as an antagonist for human GnRH receptor in vivo and daily oral administration potently, continuously and reversibly suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. TAK-385 may provide useful therapeutic interventions in hormone-dependent diseases including endometriosis, uterine fibroids and prostate cancer.

  14. Post-Training Intrahippocampal Injection of Synthetic Poly-Alpha-2,8-Sialic Acid-Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Mimetic Peptide Improves Spatial Long-Term Performance in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florian, Cedrick; Foltz, Jane; Norreel, Jean-Chretien; Rougon, Genevieve; Roullet, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Several data have shown that the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is necessary for long-term memory formation and might play a role in the structural reorganization of synapses. The NCAM, encoded by a single gene, is represented by several isoforms that differ with regard to their content of alpha-2,8-linked sialic acid residues (PSA) on their…

  15. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  16. A Small Molecule Swertisin from Enicostemma littorale Differentiates NIH3T3 Cells into Islet-Like Clusters and Restores Normoglycemia upon Transplantation in Diabetic Balb/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Dadheech, Nidheesh; Soni, Sanket; Srivastava, Abhay; Dadheech, Sucheta; Gupta, Shivika; Gopurappilly, Renjitha; Bhonde, Ramesh R; Gupta, Sarita

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Stem cell therapy is one of the upcoming therapies for the treatment of diabetes. Discovery of potent differentiating agents is a prerequisite for increasing islet mass. The present study is an attempt to screen the potential of novel small biomolecules for their differentiating property into pancreatic islet cells using NIH3T3, as representative of extra pancreatic stem cells/progenitors. Methods. To identify new agents that stimulate islet differentiation, we screened various compounds isolated from Enicostemma littorale using NIH3T3 cells and morphological changes were observed. Characterization was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, Q-PCR, immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting, and insulin secretion assay for functional response in newly generated islet-like cell clusters (ILCC). Reversal of hyperglycemia was monitored after transplanting ILCC in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Results. Among various compounds tested, swertisin, an isolated flavonoid, was the most effective in differentiating NIH3T3 into endocrine cells. Swertisin efficiently changed the morphology of NIH3T3 cells from fibroblastic to round aggregate cell cluster in huge numbers. Dithizone (DTZ) stain primarily confirmed differentiation and gene expression studies signified rapid onset of differentiation signaling cascade in swertisin-induced ILCC. Molecular imaging and immunoblotting further confirmed presence of islet specific proteins. Moreover, glucose induced insulin release (in vitro) and decreased fasting blood glucose (FBG) (in vivo) in transplanted diabetic BALB/c mice depicted functional maturity of ILCC. Insulin and glucagon expression in excised islet grafts illustrated survival and functional integrity. Conclusions. Rapid induction for islet differentiation by swertisin, a novel herbal biomolecule, provides low cost and readily available differentiating agent that can be translated as a therapeutic tool for effective treatment in diabetes. PMID:23662125

  17. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  18. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  19. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  20. Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and

  1. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  2. Linking ultracold polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Avdeenkov, A V; Bohn, John L

    2003-01-31

    We predict that pairs of polar molecules can be weakly bound together in an ultracold environment, provided that a dc electric field is present. The field that links the molecules together also strongly influences the basic properties of the resulting dimer, such as its binding energy and predissociation lifetime. Because of their long-range character, these dimers will be useful in disentangling cold collision dynamics of polar molecules. As an example, we estimate the microwave photoassociation yield for OH-OH cold collisions.

  3. Interlocked molecules: Aqueous assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linyi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative self-assembly of mechanically interlocked molecules in water, instead of organic solvents, opens up the possibility of such systems being used in a biological context where their functions can be interfaced with biomolecular systems.

  4. Single-Molecule Enzymology

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang; Lu, H PETER.

    1999-06-04

    Viewing a movie of an enzyme molecule made from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we see incredible details of molecular motions, be it a change of the conformation or the action of a chemical reaction.

  5. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  6. Blood-stage malaria infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Elased, K; De Souza, J B; Playfair, J H

    1995-01-01

    Infection of mice with blood-stage Plasmodium yoelii and P. chabaudi malaria induced hypoglycaemia in normal mice and normalized the hyperglycaemia of mice made moderately diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ). Injection of parasite supernatants induced hypoglycaemia accompanied by hyperinsulinaemia in normal mice, and in STZ-diabetic mice induced a profound drop in blood glucose and restored insulin secretion; however, severely diabetic mice (two injections of STZ) remained hyperglycaemic with no change in insulin levels. We conclude that malaria infection and parasite-derived molecules lower blood glucose concentration, but only in the presence of some residual pancreatic function. Diabetic mice were less anaemic, exerted a significant control of parasitaemia, and showed enhanced phagocytic activity compared with normal mice. PMID:7882567

  7. Of Mice and Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dewald, Oliver; Ren, Guofeng; Duerr, Georg D.; Zoerlein, Martin; Klemm, Christina; Gersch, Christine; Tincey, Sophia; Michael, Lloyd H.; Entman, Mark L.; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2004-01-01

    Large animal models have provided much of the descriptive data regarding the cellular and molecular events in myocardial infarction and repair. The availability of genetically altered mice may provide a valuable tool for specific cellular and molecular dissection of these processes. In this report we compare closed chest models of canine and mouse infarction/reperfusion qualitatively and quantitatively for temporal, cellular, and spatial differences. Much like the canine model, reperfused mouse hearts are associated with marked induction of endothelial adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines. Reperfused mouse infarcts show accelerated replacement of cardiomyocytes by granulation tissue leading to a thin mature scar at 14 days, when the canine infarction is still cellular and evolving. Infarcted mouse hearts demonstrate a robust but transient postreperfusion inflammatory reaction, associated with a rapid up-regulation of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β. Unlike canine infarcts, infarcted mouse hearts show only transient macrophage infiltration and no significant mast cell accumulation. In correlation, the growth factor for macrophages, M-CSF, shows modest and transient up-regulation in the early days of reperfusion; and the obligate growth factor for mast cells, stem cell factor, SCF, is not induced. In summary, the postinfarction inflammatory response and resultant repair in the mouse heart shares many common characteristics with large mammalian species, but has distinct temporal and qualitative features. These important species-specific differences should be considered when interpreting findings derived from studies using genetically altered mice. PMID:14742270

  8. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  9. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  10. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  11. Single Molecule Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    Single-molecule manipulation studies open a door for a close-up investigation of complex biological interactions at the molecular level. In these studies, single biomolecules are pulled while their force response is being monitored. The process is often nonequilibrium, and interpretation of the results has been challenging. We used the atomic force microscope to pull proteins and DNA, and determined the equilibrium properties of the molecules using the recently derived nonequilibrium work theorem. I will present applications of the technique in areas ranging from fundamental biological problems such as DNA mechanics, to complex medical processes such as the mechanical activation of von Willebrand Factor, a key protein in blood coagulation.

  12. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  13. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  14. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  15. Halley's polymeric organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.; Korth, A.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of polymeric organic compounds in the mass spectrum of Comet Halley obtained with the Positive Ion Cluster Composition analyzer on Giotto are examined. It is found that, in addition to polyoxymethylene, other polymers and complex molecules may exist in the comet. It is suggested that polymerized hydrogen cyanide may be a source for the observed CN and NH2 jets.

  16. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  17. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  18. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  19. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  20. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the point of

  1. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 is the major adhesion molecule expressed during schistosome granuloma formation.

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, D M; McKerrow, J H

    1996-01-01

    Endothelial cell adhesion molecules play a key role in inflammation by initiating leukocyte trafficking. One of the most complex inflammatory responses is the formation of a cellular granuloma. Expression of adhesion molecules during granuloma formation was investigated by using the murine host reaction to schistosome parasite eggs deposited in the liver as a model. By both immunohistochemistry and lymphocyte adhesion assays, the predominant interaction identified was between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and its cognate integrin, leukocyte functional antigen 1 (LFA-1). ICAM-1 expression on sinusoidal endothelium was induced when eggs were first deposited in the liver, peaked in parallel with granuloma size, and was downregulated with modulation of the granuloma. Polyacrylamide beads coated with soluble parasite egg antigens could induce ICAM-1 expression on endothelial cells in vitro only in the presence of tumor necrosis factor alpha, a cytokine previously shown to be key to granuloma formation. A role for ICAM-1 in recruiting lymphocytes to the hepatic granuloma was also supported by the observation that lymphocytes preincubated with anti-LFA-1 antibody did not bind to granulomas in tissue sections. While ICAM-1 is the predominant adhesion molecule in schistosome egg granuloma formation in wild-type mice, when the ICAM-1 gene is knocked out, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 is upregulated and granuloma formation is preserved. PMID:8890229

  2. Single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1995-09-15

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required for individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed before-hand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Cometary Parent Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Paul

    1990-12-01

    We propose to use HRS observations of a suitable target-of-opportunity comet to study two outstanding problems related to the composition of the volatile component of the cometary nucleus. These problems concern two species, CO and S2, which have been observed in the cometary coma and identified as "parent" molecules sublimating directly from the nucleus. Both of these molecules have their principal fluorescent emissions in the vaccuum ultraviolet. The high spectral resolution will allow the determination of the rotational temperature of CO, which is diagnostic of the source temperature and the excitation mechanism of the observed emission. The determination of the abundance of both CO and S2 in the primarily water ice of the nucleus can serve to constrain current models of comet formation in the primordial solar nebula.

  4. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  5. Interleukin-12-induced adhesion molecule expression in murine liver.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, K. J.; Eppihimer, M. J.; Hall, L.; Wolitzky, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systemically administered interleukin (IL)-12 causes liver inflammation in mice characterized by Kupffer cell proliferation and hypertrophy, hepatocyte necrosis, and multifocal accumulations of leukocytes in the hepatic parenchyma and around portal tracts and central veins. We have used both immunohistochemical staining and radiolabeled antibody quantitation to examine adhesion molecule expression in the livers of mice dosed daily with murine IL-12. Cells infiltrating livers of IL-12-treated mice were primarily mononuclear leukocytes expressing LFA-1, VLA-4, MAC-1, and CD18 adhesion molecules but little L-selectin. Kupffer cells constitutively expressed LFA-1 and smaller amounts of MAC-1, and high levels of ICAM-1 were constitutively expressed by liver sinusoidal lining cells, portal tract, and central vein endothelia. With IL-12 treatment, existing ICAM-1 expression was up-regulated and de novo expression occurred along bile duct epithelia. VCAM-1 levels were dramatically increased, with induced expression occurring along portal tract and central vein endothelia and scattered bile duct epithelial cells and in aggregations of cells in perivascular areas and the liver parenchyma. Although constitutive expression of E- and P-selectin was negligible, Il-12 induced a moderate rise in E-selectin levels. These increases in adhesion molecule expression may have implications for the therapeutic use of IL-12, especially in patients with liver disease or autoimmune conditions where augmented adhesion molecule expression may be critical to disease pathogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9466572

  6. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  7. Molecules in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  8. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  9. Melatonin: a multitasking molecule.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun-Xian; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has revealed itself as an ubiquitously distributed and functionally diverse molecule. The mechanisms that control its synthesis within the pineal gland have been well characterized and the retinal and biological clock processes that modulate the circadian production of melatonin in the pineal gland are rapidly being unravelled. A feature that characterizes melatonin is the variety of mechanisms it employs to modulate the physiology and molecular biology of cells. While many of these actions are mediated by well-characterized, G-protein coupled melatonin receptors in cellular membranes, other actions of the indole seem to involve its interaction with orphan nuclear receptors and with molecules, for example calmodulin, in the cytosol. Additionally, by virtue of its ability to detoxify free radicals and related oxygen derivatives, melatonin influences the molecular physiology of cells via receptor-independent means. These uncommonly complex processes often make it difficult to determine specifically how melatonin functions to exert its obvious actions. What is apparent, however, is that the actions of melatonin contribute to improved cellular and organismal physiology. In view of this and its virtual absence of toxicity, melatonin may well find applications in both human and veterinary medicine.

  10. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  11. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  12. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  13. Molecules in the Spotlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  14. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  15. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  16. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  17. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  19. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1987-10-07

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photons are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions. 3 figs.

  20. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  1. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  2. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  3. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  4. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  5. The MICE luminosity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, A.; Forrest, D.; Soler, F. J. P.

    2013-02-01

    The MICE experiment will provide the first measurement of ionisation cooling, a technique suitable for reducing the transverse emittance of a tertiary muon beam in a future neutrino factory accelerator facility. MICE is presently in the final stages of commissioning its beam line. The MICE luminosity monitor has proved an invaluable tool throughout this process, providing independent measurements of particle rate from the MICE target, normalisation for beam line detectors and verification of simulation codes.

  6. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  7. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  8. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  9. Proregenerative Properties of ECM Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Plantman, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic injuries to the nervous system, regrowing axons encounter a complex microenvironment where mechanisms that promote regeneration compete with inhibitory processes. Sprouting and axonal regrowth are key components of functional recovery but are often counteracted by inhibitory molecules. This review covers extracellular matrix molecules that support neuron axonal outgrowth. PMID:24195084

  10. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  11. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  12. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-09-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens.

  13. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-09-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens. PMID:7642292

  14. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  15. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A; Branton, Daniel

    2013-07-23

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule's outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤ 0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  16. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  17. Molecules within molecules: Recognition through self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hof, Fraser; Rebek, Julius

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic molecular receptors that completely surround their target molecules can be created through the use of noncovalent interactions. These molecular capsules selectively sequester guest molecules from the influence of bulk solvent and other molecules on the basis of size, shape, and chemical complementarity. This reversible isolation spawns unique behavior within the confines of the host; the catalysis of chemical reactions and the stabilization of reactive species are possible outcomes that have been recently demonstrated. Compartmentalization of reagents can also have a dramatic effect on reactions that take place outside of the capsule, producing nonlinear kinetics in relatively simple reaction systems. PMID:11880604

  18. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26657007

  19. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  20. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT. PMID:27221947

  1. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  2. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  3. Relative Sizes of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This computer graphic depicts the relative complexity of crystallizing large proteins in order to study their structures through x-ray crystallography. Insulin is a vital protein whose structure has several subtle points that scientists are still trying to determine. Large molecules such as insuline are complex with structures that are comparatively difficult to understand. For comparison, a sugar molecule (which many people have grown as hard crystals in science glass) and a water molecule are shown. These images were produced with the Macmolecule program. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  4. Organic heterocyclic molecules become superalkalis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Naaresh; Giri, Santanab

    2016-09-21

    An organic molecule which behaves like a superalkali has been designed from an aromatic heterocyclic molecule, pyrrole. Using first-principles calculation and a systematic two-step approach, we can have superalkali molecules with a low ionization energy, even lower than that of Cs. Couple cluster (CCSD) calculation reveals that a new heterocycle, C3N2(CH3)5 derived from a well-known aromatic heterocycle, pyrrole (C4H5N) has an ionization energy close to 3.0 eV. A molecular dynamics calculation on C3N2(CH3)5 reveals that the structure is dynamically stable. PMID:27530344

  5. Persistently Active Microbial Molecules Prolong Innate Immune Tolerance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingfang; Varley, Alan W.; Munford, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Measures that bolster the resolution phase of infectious diseases may offer new opportunities for improving outcome. Here we show that inactivation of microbial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can be required for animals to recover from the innate immune tolerance that follows exposure to Gram-negative bacteria. When wildtype mice are exposed to small parenteral doses of LPS or Gram-negative bacteria, their macrophages become reprogrammed (tolerant) for a few days before they resume normal function. Mice that are unable to inactivate LPS, in contrast, remain tolerant for several months; during this time they respond sluggishly to Gram-negative bacterial challenge, with high mortality. We show here that prolonged macrophage reprogramming is maintained in vivo by the persistence of stimulatory LPS molecules within the cells' in vivo environment, where naïve cells can acquire LPS via cell-cell contact or from the extracellular fluid. The findings provide strong evidence that inactivation of a stimulatory microbial molecule can be required for animals to regain immune homeostasis following parenteral exposure to bacteria. Measures that disable microbial molecules might enhance resolution of tissue inflammation and help restore innate defenses in individuals recovering from many different infectious diseases. PMID:23675296

  6. Urea transporter proteins as targets for small-molecule diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional diuretics such as furosemide and thiazides target salt transporters in kidney tubules, but urea transporters (UTs) have emerged as alternative targets. UTs are a family of transmembrane channels expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, in particular the kidney. UT knockout mice and humans with UT mutations exhibit reduced maximal urinary osmolality, demonstrating that UTs are necessary for the concentration of urine. Small-molecule screening has identified potent and selective inhibitors of UT-A, the UT protein expressed in renal tubule epithelial cells, and UT-B, the UT protein expressed in vasa recta endothelial cells. Data from UT knockout mice and from rodents administered UT inhibitors support the diuretic action of UT inhibition. The kidney-specific expression of UT-A1, together with high selectivity of the small-molecule inhibitors, means that off-target effects of such small-molecule drugs should be minimal. This Review summarizes the structure, expression and function of UTs, and looks at the evidence supporting the validity of UTs as targets for the development of salt-sparing diuretics with a unique mechanism of action. UT-targeted inhibitors may be useful alone or in combination with conventional diuretics for therapy of various oedemas and hyponatraemias, potentially including those refractory to treatment with current diuretics. PMID:25488859

  7. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  8. Moving Molecules and Mothball Madness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, John

    1993-01-01

    Describes concrete demonstrations on the states of matter. In the first demonstration, students represent molecules; and, in the second demonstration, moth balls are heated to produce a change of state. (PR)

  9. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A.; Branton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule’s outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  10. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  11. Surface chemistry of deuterated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1983-03-01

    The chemical composition of grain mantles is calculated in order to determine the concentration of deuterated molecules relative to their hydrogenated counterparts in grain mantles. The computation takes into account reactions involving deuterium in the gas phase and on grain surfaces. The results show that the abundance of deuterium molecules in grain mantles is much higher than expected on the basis of the cosmic abundance ratio of D to H. HDCO has a relatively high abundance in grain mantles as compared to other deuterated molecules, due to the fact that H abstraction from HDCO has a lower activation barrier than D abstraction. The infrared characteristics of the calculated grain mantles are discussed and observational tests of the model calcultions are suggested. The contribution of grain surface chemistry to the concentration of molecules in the gas phase is briefly considered.

  12. Traversing the polymorphic landscape through tuning molecule-molecule, molecule-substrate and molecule-solvent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdum, Geoffrey; Gessner, Thomas; Weitz, R. Thomas; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    As subtle changes in the crystalline packing motif of molecular semiconductors can have a large impact on charge transport, a thorough understanding of the accessibility of polymorphs in thin films is needed. Using a series of core-chlorinated naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimides, we demonstrate that the choice of the alkyl substituents at the imide functionalities, as well as the choice of substrate and post-deposition processing conditions, tune the relative strengths of molecule-molecule, molecule-substrate and molecule-solvent interactions, providing a handle over polymorphic selection. We access the triclinic polymorph of NTCDI-CH2C3F7 in thermally evaporated thin films; solvent-vapor annealing induces a reversible transformation to its monoclinic polymorph. The addition of a fluoromethylene group in the alkyl substituent increases molecule-molecule interactions and, accordingly, improves the stability of its triclinic polymorph; this derivative does not undergo a polymorphic transformation with any of the post-deposition conditions we have explored.

  13. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules.

  14. Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jose, K V Jovan; Beckett, Daniel; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2015-09-01

    We present the first implementation of the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectrum of large molecules through the Molecules-in-Molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. An efficient projection of the relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments to the parent molecule enables the extension of the MIM method for the evaluation of VCD spectra (MIM-VCD). The overlapping primary subsystems in this work are constructed from interacting fragments using a number-based scheme and the dangling bonds are saturated with link hydrogen atoms. Independent fragment calculations are performed to evaluate the energies, Hessian matrix, atomic polar tensor (APT), and the atomic axial tensor (AAT). Subsequently, the link atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, as in the ONIOM approach. In the two-layer model, the long-range interactions between fragments are accounted for using a less computationally intensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM model is calibrated on the d- and l-enantiomers of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and VCD intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-VCD method is employed to predict the VCD spectra of perhydrotriphenylene and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-VCD model for exploring vibrational circular dichroism spectra of large molecules.

  15. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule.

    PubMed

    Temirov, Jamshid P; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Werner, James H

    2008-11-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots to individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  16. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  17. Anti-Ebola Activity of Diazachrysene Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Selaković, Života; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima N; Wells, Jay; Šegan, Sandra; Panchal, Rekha G; Šolaja, Bogdan A

    2015-06-12

    Herein we report on a diazachrysene class of small molecules that exhibit potent antiviral activity against the Ebola (EBOV) virus. The antiviral compounds are easily synthesized, and the most active compounds have excellent in vitro activity (0.34-0.70 μM) and are significantly less lipophilic than their predecessors. The three most potent diazachrysene antivirals do not exhibit any toxicity in vivo and protected 70-90% of the mice at 10 mg/kg following EBOV challenge. Together, these studies suggest that diazachrysenes are a promising class of compounds for hit to lead optimization and as potential Ebola therapeutics. PMID:27622742

  18. Spectroscopic modeling of water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylo, R. I.; Okhrimenko, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    This research is devoted to the vibrational spectroscopy inverse problem solution that gives a possibility to design a molecule and make conclusions about its geometry. The valence angle finding based on the usage of inverse spectral vibrational spectroscopy problem is a well-known task. 3N-matrix method was chosen to solve the proposed task. The usage of this method permits to make no assumptions about the molecule force field, besides it can be applied to molecules of matter in liquid state. Anharmonicity constants assessment is an important part of the valence angle finding. The reduction to zero vibrations is necessary because used matrix analytical expression were found in the harmonic approach. In order to find the single-valued inverse spectral problem of vibrational spectroscopy solution a shape parameter characterizing "mixing" of ω1 and ω2 vibrations forms must be found. The minimum of such a function Υ called a divergence parameter was found. This function characterizes method's accuracy. The valence angle assessment was reduced to the divergence parameter minimization. The β value concerning divergence parameter minimum was interpreted as the desired valence angle. The proposed method was applied for water molecule in liquid state: β = (88,8 ±1,7)° . The found angle fits the water molecule nearest surrounding tetrahedral model including hydrogen bond curvature in the first approximation.

  19. The entropies of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Charles T; Sellers, Jason R V

    2012-10-31

    Adsorbed molecules are involved in many reactions on solid surface that are of great technological importance. As such, there has been tremendous effort worldwide to learn how to predict reaction rates and equilibrium constants for reactions involving adsorbed molecules. Theoretical calculation of both the rate and equilibrium constants for such reactions requires knowing the entropy and enthalpy of the adsorbed molecule. While much effort has been devoted to measuring and calculating the enthalpies of well-defined adsorbates, few measurements of the entropies of adsorbates have been reported. We present here a new way to determine the standard entropies of adsorbed molecules (S(ad)(0)) on single crystal surfaces from temperature programmed desorption data, prove its accuracy by comparison to entropies measured by equilibrium methods, and apply it to published data to extract new entropies. Most importantly, when combined with reported entropies, we find that at high coverage, they linearly track the entropy of the gas-phase molecule at the same temperature (T), such that S(ad)(0)(T) = 0.70 S(gas)(0)(T) - 3.3R (R = the gas constant), with a standard deviation of only 2R over a range of 50R. These entropies, which are ~2/3 of the gas, are huge compared to most theoretical predictions. This result can be extended to reliably predict prefactors in the Arrhenius rate constant for surface reactions involving such species, as proven here for desorption. PMID:23033909

  20. Interaction of UVB-absorbing sunscreen ingredients with cutaneous molecules may alter photoimmune protection.

    PubMed

    Reeve, V E; Bosnic, M; Domanski, D

    2001-12-01

    Studies of the photoimmunoprotective properties of sunscreens have produced disparate results. In this study in hairless mice, we compared two UVB absorbers, 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate (2-EHMC) and octyl-N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (o-PABA), individually formulated in a common base lotion with a sunburn protection factor of 6. We measured their capacity to protect against suppression of the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) induced by three daily exposures of the dorsum to 6x the minimal erythemal/edematous dose (MED) of solar-simulated UV radiation (SSUV), in comparison with base lotion-treated mice exposed to 3 x 1 MED of SSUV. All treatments produced a similar minimal erythema. CHS was equally suppressed in mice irradiated through o-PABA and base lotion, but the suppression was significantly reduced in mice irradiated through 2-EHMC. Neither UVB absorber inhibited the epidermal photoisomerization to the immunosuppressive mediator, cis-urocanic acid. However, when mice were treated with exogenous cis-urocanic acid topically on the dorsum, but not when injected subcutaneously on the abdomen, suppression of CHS was observed in o-PABA- and base lotion-treated mice, but not in 2-EHMC-treated mice. Thus, the enhanced immunoprotection in mice irradiated through 2-EHMC apparently resulted from the direct inactivation of epidermal cis-urocanic acid by 2-EHMC. We conclude that comparative assessment of photoimmunoprotection by UV absorbers requires SSUV, erythemally matched exposures and consideration of potential interactions with cutaneous molecules.

  1. Electronic Transport in Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Samanta, M. P.; Henderson, J. I.; Kubiak, C. P.; Datta, S.

    1996-03-01

    A systematic theoretical study of the conductance of a class of organic molecules connected between two gold cantact pads will be presented. This class of molecules consists of oligomers of benzene rings linked at their para-positions and terminated with suitable ligand end groups designed to bond to gold substrates. Such molecules are currently being investigated experimentally for use as interconnectors in nanoscale electronic devices (J.Guay et al, J.Am.Chem.Soc., 115,1869, (1993); M.Dorogi et al, Phys. Rev. B52,9071,(1995); D.B.Janes et al, Superlatt. and Microstruc., in press). Analytical and numerical results will be presented illustrating effects of Metal Induced Gap States (MIGS), end group atoms, geometric and molecular structure on the measured conductance.

  2. Room temperature single molecule microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Enderlein, G.; Semin, D.J.; Keller, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    We have developed three capabilities to image the locations of and interrogate immobilized single fluorescent molecules: near-field scanning optical, confocal scanning optical, and wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy. Each microscopy has its own advantages. Near-field illumination can beat the diffraction limit. Confocal microscopy has high brightness and temporal resolution. Wide-field has the quickest (parallel) imaging capability. With confocal microscopy, we have verified that single fluorescent spots in our images are due to single molecules by observing photon antibunching. Using all three microscopies, we have observed that xanthene molecules dispersed on dry silica curiously exhibit intensity fluctuations on millisecond to minute time scales. We are exploring the connection between the intensity fluctuations and fluctuations in individual photophysical parameters. The fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G on silica fluctuate. The complex nature of the intensity and lifetime fluctuations is consistent with a mechanism that perturbs more than one photophysical parameter.

  3. Formation of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Juarros, E.; Côté, R.; Kirby, K.

    2002-05-01

    A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to create a number of ultracold molecules, including CaH, Na_2, K_2, Cs_2, Rb2 and CO. Novel effects are predicted to occur in samples of ultracold polar molecules.(L. Santos et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1791 (2000). We present calculations of the formation rate of ultracold hydrides (LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH), using the most accurate molecular potentials and dipole moments available. We show that these polar molecules can be produced in selected vibrational and rotational states by stimulated radiative association in a mixture of ultracold hydrogen and alkali metal atoms. We study the properties of these atomic mixtures as well as those of the hydrides, and explore the effect of shape resonances on the formation rates. [2ex] *Supported by NSF

  4. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA < 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is larger than the corresponding PA, while for an amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  5. Interstellar molecules and dense clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rank, D. M.; Townes, C. H.; Welch, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Current knowledge of the interstellar medium is discussed on the basis of recent published studies. The subjects considered include optical identification of interstellar molecules, radio molecular lines, interstellar clouds, isotopic abundances, formation and disappearance of interstellar molecules, and interstellar probing techniques. Diagrams are plotted for the distribution of galactic sources exhibiting molecular lines, for hydrogen molecule, hydrogen atom and electron abundances due to ionization, for the densities, velocities and temperature of NH3 in the direction of Sagitarius B2, for the lower rotational energy levels of H2CO, and for temporal spectral variations in masing H2O clouds of the radio source W49. Future applications of the maser and of molecular microscopy in this field are visualized.

  6. Overexpression of Thioredoxin in Transgenic Mice Attenuates Focal Ischemic Brain Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yasushi; Mitsui, Akira; Nishiyama, Akira; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Sono, Hiroshi; Gon, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Yodoi, Junji

    1999-03-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) plays important biological roles both in intra- and extracellular compartments, including in regulation of various intracellular molecules via thiol redox control. We produced TRX overexpressing mice and confirmed that there were no anatomical and physiological differences between wild-type (WT) mice and TRX transgenic (Tg) mice. In the present study we subjected mice to focal brain ischemia to shed light on the role of TRX in brain ischemic injury. At 24 hr after middle cerebral artery occlusion, infarct areas and volume were significantly smaller in Tg mice than in WT mice. Moreover neurological deficit was ameliorated in Tg mice compared with WT mice. Protein carbonyl content, a marker of cellular protein oxidation, in Tg mice showed less increase than did that of WT mice after the ischemic insult. Furthermore, c-fos expression in Tg mice was stronger than in WT mice 1 hr after ischemia. Our results suggest that transgene expression of TRX decreased ischemic neuronal injury and that TRX and the redox state modified by TRX play a crucial role in brain damage during stroke.

  7. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  8. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  9. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  10. Orbital molecules in electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, J. Paul

    2015-04-01

    Orbital molecules are made up of coupled orbital states on several metal ions within an orbitally ordered (and sometimes also charge-ordered) solid such as a transition metal oxide. Spin-singlet dimers are known in many materials, but recent discoveries of more exotic species such as 18-electron heptamers in AlV{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnetic 3-atom trimerons in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have shown that orbital molecules constitute a general new class of quantum electronic states in solids.

  11. Extracellular movement of signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Patrick; Schier, Alexander F.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular signaling molecules have crucial roles in development and homeostasis, and their incorrect deployment can lead to developmental defects and disease states. Signaling molecules are released from sending cells, travel to target cells and act over length scales of several orders of magnitude, from morphogen-mediated patterning of small developmental fields to hormonal signaling throughout the organism. We discuss how signals are modified and assembled for transport, which routes they take to reach their targets and how their range is affected by mobility and stability. PMID:21763615

  12. Extracellular movement of signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Schier, Alexander F

    2011-07-19

    Extracellular signaling molecules have crucial roles in development and homeostasis, and their incorrect deployment can lead to developmental defects and disease states. Signaling molecules are released from sending cells, travel to target cells, and act over length scales of several orders of magnitude, from morphogen-mediated patterning of small developmental fields to hormonal signaling throughout the organism. We discuss how signals are modified and assembled for transport, which routes they take to reach their targets, and how their range is affected by mobility and stability.

  13. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π–π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  14. Slow beams of massive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deachapunya, S.; Fagan, P. J.; Major, A. G.; Reiger, E.; Ritsch, H.; Stefanov, A.; Ulbricht, H.; Arndt, M.

    2008-02-01

    Slow beams of neutral molecules are of great interest for a wide range of applications, from cold chemistry through precision measurements to tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics. We report on the quantitative observation of thermal beams of perfluorinated macromolecules with masses up to 6000 amu, reaching velocities down to 11 m/s. Such slow, heavy and neutral molecular beams are of importance for a new class of experiments in matter-wave interferometry and we also discuss the requirements for further manipulation and cooling schemes with molecules in this unprecedented mass range.

  15. A new class of pluripotent stem cell cytotoxic small molecules.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark; Phoon, Chee Wee; Goh, Gwendoline Tze Wei; Seng, Eng Khuan; Guo, Xu Ming; Tan, Cherine Mei Fong; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Lee, Joel Mun Kin

    2014-01-01

    A major concern in Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC)-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of teratoma formation from contaminating undifferentiated cells. Removal of undifferentiated cells from differentiated cultures is an essential step before PSC-based cell therapies can be safely deployed in a clinical setting. We report a group of novel small molecules that are cytotoxic to PSCs. Our data indicates that these molecules are specific and potent in their activity allowing rapid eradication of undifferentiated cells. Experiments utilizing mixed PSC and primary human neuronal and cardiomyocyte cultures demonstrate that up to a 6-fold enrichment for specialized cells can be obtained without adversely affecting cell viability and function. Several structural variants were synthesized to identify key functional groups and to improve specificity and efficacy. Comparative microarray analysis and ensuing RNA knockdown studies revealed involvement of the PERK/ATF4/DDIT3 ER stress pathway. Surprisingly, cell death following ER stress induction was associated with a concomitant decrease in endogenous ROS levels in PSCs. Undifferentiated cells treated with these molecules preceding transplantation fail to form teratomas in SCID mice. Furthermore, these molecules remain non-toxic and non-teratogenic to zebrafish embryos suggesting that they may be safely used in vivo. PMID:24647085

  16. Effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on social development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Zeeba D.; Kennedy, Bruce; Katzman, Aaron; Lahvis, Garet; Kosofsky, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) in humans and animals has been shown to impair social development. Molecules that mediate synaptic plasticity and learning in the medial PFC (mPFC), specifically BDNF and its downstream signaling molecule, egr1 have been shown to affect the regulation of social interactions (SI). In this study we determined the effects of PCE on SI and the corresponding ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in developing mice. Furthermore, we studied the PCE-induced changes in constitutive expression of BDNF, egr1 and their transcriptional regulators in the mPFC as a possible molecular mechanism mediating the altered SI. In prenatal cocaine exposed (PCOC) mice we identified increased SI and USV production at P25, and increased SI but not USVs, at P35. By P45 the expression of both social behaviors normalized in PCOC mice. At the molecular level, we found increased BDNF exon IV and egr1 mRNA in the mPFC of PCOC mice at P30 that normalized by P45. This was concurrent with increased egr1 protein in the mPFC of PCOC mice at P30 suggesting a role of egr1 in the enhanced SI observed in juvenile PCOC mice. Additionally, by measuring the association of acH3K9,14, and MeCP2 at the promoters of BDNF exons I and IV, and egr1, our results provide evidence of promoter specific alterations in the mPFC of PCOC juvenile mice with increased association of acH3K9,14 only at the BDNF exon IV promoter. These results identify a potential PCE-induced molecular alteration as the underlying neurobiologic mechanism mediating the altered social development in juvenile mice. PMID:24852757

  17. Monitoring Molecules: Insights and Progress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In August, 2014, neuroscientists and physical scientists gathered together on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles to discuss how to monitor molecules in neuroscience. This field has seen significant growth since its inception in the 1970s. Here, the advances in this field are documented, including its advance into understanding the actions that specific neurotransmitters mediate during behavior. PMID:25514501

  18. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  19. Ultrafast dynamics of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Brinks, Daan; Hildner, Richard; van Dijk, Erik M H P; Stefani, Fernando D; Nieder, Jana B; Hernando, Jordi; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-04-21

    The detection of individual molecules has found widespread application in molecular biology, photochemistry, polymer chemistry, quantum optics and super-resolution microscopy. Tracking of an individual molecule in time has allowed identifying discrete molecular photodynamic steps, action of molecular motors, protein folding, diffusion, etc. down to the picosecond level. However, methods to study the ultrafast electronic and vibrational molecular dynamics at the level of individual molecules have emerged only recently. In this review we present several examples of femtosecond single molecule spectroscopy. Starting with basic pump-probe spectroscopy in a confocal detection scheme, we move towards deterministic coherent control approaches using pulse shapers and ultra-broad band laser systems. We present the detection of both electronic and vibrational femtosecond dynamics of individual fluorophores at room temperature, showing electronic (de)coherence, vibrational wavepacket interference and quantum control. Finally, two colour phase shaping applied to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is presented, which allows investigation of the persistent coherence in photosynthetic complexes under physiological conditions at the level of individual complexes. PMID:24473271

  20. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Daniel Scott

    The measurement of the hyperpolarizabilities of atoms and molecules serves as a test of molecular wave function computational techniques. In this thesis, hyperpolarizabilities for the three processes dc electric-field induced second -harmonic generation, third-harmonic generation and intensity -dependent refractive index are determined. Measurements are performed on gases so that intermolecular interactions can be neglected. We have measured the third-order polarizability of the conjugated molecules ethylene, 1,3-butadiene, 1,3,5 -hexatriene, and benzene with the technique of dc electric -field induced second-harmonic generation. These experiments were motivated by recent theoretical results which indicated that the hyperpolarizabilities of two of these molecules were negative. Had this proven to be true, it would have been the first such case for a nonresonant hyperpolarizability. Our results for benzene are in good agreement with previous measurements made on benzene in the liquid phase, lending added confidence to the use of local field factors needed for that work. We also report results for the hyperpolarizabilities of chlorodifluoromethane. The third-order polarizability is in reasonable agreement with estimates by the bond additivity approximation. An examination of the electronic dispersion of and vibrational contributions to the third-order polarizability for various processes is presented. New data for the third -harmonic polarizability for the fluorinated methanes and sulfur hexafluoride is included. Currently, ab initio calculations of molecular hyperpolarizabilities do not include any consideration of vibrational motion of the molecule. Our estimates indicate that the vibrational contributions are very important in the case of the Kerr effect. This is an important matter of principle, and should be further investigated. We have also devised an interferometric technique for the measurement of the intensity-dependent dispersion in the refractive index

  1. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  2. ISG15: leading a double life as a secreted molecule.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-04-12

    ISG15 is a well-known intracellular ubiquitin-like molecule involved in ISGylation. However, a recent study has revived the notion first put forward two decades ago that ISG15 is also a secreted molecule. Human neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes can release ISG15, even though this protein has no detectable signal peptide sequence. ISG15 has also been found in the secretory granules of granulocytes. The mechanism underlying ISG15 secretion is unknown. Secreted ISG15 acts on at least T and natural killer (NK) lymphocytes, in which it induces interferon (IFN)-γ production. However, the mechanism by which ISG15 stimulates these cells also remains unclear. ISG15 and IFN-γ seem to define an innate circuit that operates preferentially, but not exclusively, between granulocytes and NK cells. Inherited ISG15 deficiency is associated with severe mycobacterial disease in both mice and humans. This infectious phenotype probably results from the lack of secreted ISG15, because patients and mice with other inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity also display mycobacterial diseases. In addition to raising mechanistic issues, the studies described here pave the way for clinical studies of various aspects, ranging from the use of recombinant ISG15 in patients with infectious diseases to the use of ISG15-blocking agents in patients with inflammatory diseases.

  3. Localized atomic orbitals for atoms in molecules. III. Polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufderheide, Keith H.; Chung-Phillips, Alice

    1982-02-01

    Using a previously described method, localized atomic orbitals (LAOs) for atoms in molecules are constructed for the atoms C, N, O, and F in the polyatomic molecules CH4, NH3, OH2, CH3CH3, CH3NH2, CH3OH, CH3F, CH2CH2, C6H6, CO2, and CHCH. As in our prior studies, LAOs partition into sets of core, lone pair, and bonding orbitals. Ordinarily, both core and lone pair LAOs are doubly occupied and bonding is described principally as the interaction of bonding LAOs on adjacent, bonded atoms. Angles between valence LAOs on a given atom continue to vary in a manner reminiscent of trends common to simple valence shell electron pair repulsion theory. Of special interest are the systems CO2, C6H6, and CH3F: The peculiarities germane to these molecules are discussed fully in the text. Finally, certain properties (orbital populations, intra-atomic orbital angles, etc.) of groups (-CH3, -NH2, -OH, etc.) common to several systems studied show a remarkable transferability.

  4. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  5. Pivotal roles of CD8+ T cells restricted by MHC class I–like molecules in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Das, Gobardhan; Das, Jyoti; Eynott, Paul; Zhang, Yingyu; Bothwell, Alfred L.M.; Kaer, Luc Van; Shi, Yufang

    2006-01-01

    Unlike T cells restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ia or class II molecules, T cells restricted by MHC class I–like molecules demonstrate properties of both innate and adaptive immunity and are therefore considered innate-like lymphocytes (ILLs). ILLs are believed to have immunoregulatory functions, but their roles in autoimmunity and defense against infections remain elusive. To study the properties of ILLs, we generated mice expressing only MHC class I–like molecules by crossing CIITA−/− with Kb−/−Db−/− mice. Surprisingly, these mice developed a lymphoproliferative syndrome and autoimmunity, most notably inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and insulitis. The CD8+ ILLs in these mice exhibit a constitutively activated phenotype, and depletion of these cells abolished the autoimmune disorders. In addition, adoptive transfer of CD8+ ILLs from Kb−/−Db−/−CIITA−/− mice to Rag-1−/−pfn−/− mice also resulted in IBD and insulitis. These findings provide direct evidence that CD8+ ILLs are sufficient to initiate and mediate autoimmune diseases. PMID:17088432

  6. Macrophage functions in Biozzi mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dockrell, H M; Taverne, J; Lelchuk, R; Depledge, P; Brown, I N; Playfair, J H

    1985-01-01

    The faster degradation of antigen by macrophages in Biozzi low (L) responder mice, compared to Biozzi high (H) responder mice, is thought to be responsible for their lower antibody response. We have measured four functions associated with macrophages to see whether macrophages from L mice were generally more active than those from H mice. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from normal mice were compared with those from groups of mice given Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Propionibacterium acnes. Cells from normal H mice gave a stronger oxidative burst when triggered with phorbol myristate acetate, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells than cells from L mice. Cells from all mice injected with BCG or P. acnes gave a stronger oxidative burst, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells; again, both responses were higher in H mice than in L mice. By contrast, when groups of mice that had received P. acnes were given endotoxin and bled, higher titres of tumour necrosis factor were found in the sera of L mice. Spleen cells from both lines of mice released similar levels of interleukin-1, both spontaneously and in response to lipopolysaccharide. Our results suggest that these various macrophage responses are expressed independently in H and L mice. PMID:3894222

  7. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  8. Vertically coupled dipolar exciton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Kobi; Khodas, Maxim; Laikhtman, Boris; Santos, Paulo V.; Rapaport, Ronen

    2016-06-01

    While the interaction potential between two dipoles residing in a single plane is repulsive, in a system of two vertically adjacent layers of dipoles it changes from repulsive interaction in the long range to attractive interaction in the short range. Here we show that for dipolar excitons in semiconductor heterostructures, such a potential may give rise to bound states if two such excitons are excited in two separate layers, leading to the formation of vertically coupled dipolar exciton molecules. Our calculations prove the existence of such bound states and predict their binding energy as a function of the layers separation as well as their thermal distributions. We show that these molecules should be observed in realistic systems such as semiconductor coupled quantum well structures and the more recent van der Waals bound heterostructures. Formation of such molecules can lead to new effects such as a collective dipolar drag between layers and new forms of multiparticle correlations, as well as to the study of dipolar molecular dynamics in a controlled system.

  9. Simple molecules as complex systems.

    PubMed

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Arendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H2(16)O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an "ultra-small-world" property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra.

  10. Simple molecules as complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H216O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an “ultra-small-world” property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  11. Incretin-like effects of small molecule trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Susanne; Wang, Haiyan; Uhles, Sabine; Cole, Nadine; Alvarez-Sanchez, Ruben; Künnecke, Basil; Ullmer, Christoph; Matile, Hugues; Bedoucha, Marc; Norcross, Roger D.; Ottaway-Parker, Nickki; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Conde Knape, Karin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hoener, Marius C.; Sewing, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes and obesity are emerging pandemics in the 21st century creating worldwide urgency for the development of novel and safe therapies. We investigated trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) as a novel target contributing to the control of glucose homeostasis and body weight. Methods We investigated the peripheral human tissue distribution of TAAR1 by immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of a small molecule TAAR1 agonist on insulin secretion in vitro using INS1E cells and human islets and on glucose tolerance in C57Bl6, and db/db mice. Body weight effects were investigated in obese DIO mice. Results TAAR1 activation by a selective small molecule agonist increased glucose-dependent insulin secretion in INS1E cells and human islets and elevated plasma PYY and GLP-1 levels in mice. In diabetic db/db mice, the TAAR1 agonist normalized glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test. Sub-chronic treatment of diet-induced obese (DIO) mice with the TAAR1 agonist resulted in reduced food intake and body weight. Furthermore insulin sensitivity was improved and plasma triglyceride levels and liver triglyceride content were lower than in controls. Conclusions We have identified TAAR1 as a novel integrator of metabolic control, which acts on gastrointestinal and pancreatic islet hormone secretion. Thus TAAR1 qualifies as a novel and promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:26844206

  12. Class I and class II major histocompatibility molecules play a role in bone marrow-derived macrophage development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Simske, S. J.; Beharka, A. A.; Balch, S.; Luttges, M. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play significant roles in T cell development and immune function. We show that MHCI- and MHCII-deficient mice have low numbers of macrophage precursors and circulating monocytes, as well as abnormal bone marrow cell colony-stimulating factor type 1 secretion and bone composition. We suggest that MHCI and MHCII molecules play a significant role in macrophage development.

  13. Exploration of target molecules for molecular imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higashikawa, Kei; Akada, Naoki; Yagi, Katsuharu; Watanabe, Keiko; Kamino, Shinichiro; Kanayama, Yousuke; Hiromura, Makoto; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could discriminate each inflamed area of IBD model mice clearly. {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could not discriminate the difference of pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors expression was different by pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors would be new target molecules for IBD imaging. -- Abstract: Molecular imaging technology is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the efficacy evaluation of various drug therapies for it. However, it is difficult to elucidate directly the relationships between the responsible molecules and IBD using existing probes. Therefore, the development of an alternative probe that is able to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism and provide information on the appropriate guidelines for treatment is earnestly awaited. In this study, we investigated pathognomonic molecules in the intestines of model mice. The accumulation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in the inflamed area of the intestines of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)- or indomethacin (IND)-induced IBD model mice was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and autoradiography to confirm the inflamed area. The results suggested that the inflammation was selectively induced in the colons of mice by the administration of DSS, whereas it was induced mainly in the ilea and the proximal colons of mice by the administration of IND. To explore attractive target molecules for the molecular imaging of IBD, we evaluated the gene expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors in the inflamed area of the intestines of both model mice. We found that the expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly increased during the progression of IBD, whereas the expression levels were decreased as the mucosa began to heal. In particular, the expression levels of these molecules had already changed before the symptoms of IBD appeared. In

  14. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  15. Drug-induced regeneration in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Strehin, Iossif; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise; Leferovich, John; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Whereas amphibians regenerate lost appendages spontaneously, mammals generally form scars over the injury site through the process of wound repair. The MRL mouse strain is an exception among mammals because it shows a spontaneous regenerative healing trait and so can be used to investigate proregenerative interventions in mammals. We report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a central molecule in the process of regeneration in adult MRL mice. The degradation of HIF-1α protein, which occurs under normoxic conditions, is mediated by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). We used the drug 1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3-carboxylic acid (1,4-DPCA), a PHD inhibitor, to stabilize constitutive expression of HIF-1α protein. A locally injectable hydrogel containing 1,4-DPCA was designed to achieve controlled delivery of the drug over 4 to 10 days. Subcutaneous injection of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel into Swiss Webster mice that do not show a regenerative phenotype increased stable expression of HIF-1α protein over 5 days, providing a functional measure of drug release in vivo. Multiple peripheral subcutaneous injections of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel over a 10-day period led to regenerative wound healing in Swiss Webster mice after ear hole punch injury. Increased expression of the HIF-1α protein may provide a starting point for future studies on regeneration in mammals. PMID:26041709

  16. Theiler's virus infection of beta 2-microglobulin-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fiette, L; Aubert, C; Brahic, M; Rossi, C P

    1993-01-01

    Theiler's virus, a murine picornavirus, persists in the central nervous systems of susceptible mice and induces a chronic demyelinating disease. Susceptibility or resistance to this disease is controlled in part by the H2-D locus of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). For this reason, it has been proposed that CD8+ class I-restricted cytotoxic T cells play a main role in the pathogenesis of this viral infection. We recently reported the existence of anti-virus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in the course of Theiler's virus infection. In the present study, we examined the role of these effector cells in mice in which the beta 2-microglobulin gene had been disrupted. These mice fail to express class I MHC molecules and therefore lack CD8+ T cells. The mice are derived from a C57BL/6 x 129/Ola cross and are H-2b, a haplotype associated with resistance to Theiler's virus infection. beta 2-Microglobulin-deficient mice (beta 2m-/-mice) failed to clear the virus, developed demyelination, and, interestingly, did not succumb to early infection. These results demonstrate that CD8+ T cells are required to clear Theiler's virus infection. In contrast with a current hypothesis, they also demonstrate that CD8+ T cells are not major mediators of the demyelinating disease. Images PMID:8416386

  17. Host microbiota modulates development of social preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arentsen, Tim; Raith, Henrike; Qian, Yu; Forssberg, Hans; Heijtz, Rochellys Diaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence indicates that the indigenous gut microbiota exerts long-lasting programming effects on brain function and behaviour. Objective In this study, we used the germ-free (GF) mouse model, devoid of any microbiota throughout development, to assess the influence of the indigenous microbiota on social preference and repetitive behaviours (e.g. self-grooming). Methods and results Using the three-chambered social approach task, we demonstrate that when adult GF mice were given a choice to spend time with a novel mouse or object, they spent significantly more time sniffing and interacting with the stimulus mouse compared to conventionally raised mice (specific pathogen-free, SPF). Time spent in repetitive self-grooming behaviour, however, did not differ between GF and SPF mice. Real-time PCR–based gene expression analysis of the amygdala, a key region that is part of the social brain network, revealed a significant reduction in the mRNA levels of total brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), BDNF exon I-, IV-, VI-, IX-containing transcripts, and NGFI-A (a signalling molecule downstream of BDNF) in GF mice compared to SPF mice. Conclusion These results suggest that differential regulation of BDNF exon transcripts in the amygdala by the indigenous microbes may contribute to the altered social development of GF mice. PMID:26679775

  18. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin-orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin-spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born-Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  19. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Rouzée, A.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-11-01

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO2 molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  20. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  1. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  2. Nanoelectronics of a DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.; Lyra, M. L.; Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the nanoelectronic properties of a double-strand quasiperiodic DNA molecule, modeled by a tight-binding effective Hamiltonian, which includes contributions from the nucleobasis system as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our theoretical approach makes use of Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, to investigate the electronic density of states, the electronic transmissivity, and the current-voltage characteristic curves of sequences of a DNA finite segment.We compared the electronic transport found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  3. Metabolome progression during early gut microbial colonization of gnotobiotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Yusufaly, Tahir; Higginbottom, Steven; Snyder, Michael; Sonnenburg, Justin L.; Mias, George I.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome has been implicated directly in host health, especially host metabolic processes and development of immune responses. These are particularly important in infants where the gut first begins being colonized, and such processes may be modeled in mice. In this investigation we follow longitudinally the urine metabolome of ex-germ-free mice, which are colonized with two bacterial species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Bifidobacterium longum. High-throughput mass spectrometry profiling of urine samples revealed dynamic changes in the metabolome makeup, associated with the gut bacterial colonization, enabled by our adaptation of non-linear time-series analysis to urine metabolomics data. Results demonstrate both gradual and punctuated changes in metabolite production and that early colonization events profoundly impact the nature of small molecules circulating in the host. The identified small molecules are implicated in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolic processes, and offer insights into the dynamic changes occurring during the colonization process, using high-throughput longitudinal methodology. PMID:26118551

  4. Metabolome progression during early gut microbial colonization of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Marcobal, Angela; Yusufaly, Tahir; Higginbottom, Steven; Snyder, Michael; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Mias, George I

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome has been implicated directly in host health, especially host metabolic processes and development of immune responses. These are particularly important in infants where the gut first begins being colonized, and such processes may be modeled in mice. In this investigation we follow longitudinally the urine metabolome of ex-germ-free mice, which are colonized with two bacterial species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Bifidobacterium longum. High-throughput mass spectrometry profiling of urine samples revealed dynamic changes in the metabolome makeup, associated with the gut bacterial colonization, enabled by our adaptation of non-linear time-series analysis to urine metabolomics data. Results demonstrate both gradual and punctuated changes in metabolite production and that early colonization events profoundly impact the nature of small molecules circulating in the host. The identified small molecules are implicated in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolic processes, and offer insights into the dynamic changes occurring during the colonization process, using high-throughput longitudinal methodology. PMID:26118551

  5. Equine strangles modelled in mice.

    PubMed

    Chanter, N; Smith, K C; Mumford, J A

    1995-02-01

    Small animal models of Streptococcus equi infection have been confined to parenteral injection of mice which subsequently develop a septicaemia. To devise a model of infection more closely resembling strangles, 4.9 x 10(6) cfu of S. equi were placed on the nares of C3H and Balb/c mice (fifteen of each). Compared with ten uninfected controls, infected mice sneezed more often and their daily weight gain was significantly reduced. Histopathological examination seven days after infection revealed varying degrees of nasopharyngeal and regional lymphoid pathology in twenty two mice. Eleven mice had an early or mild rhinitis in which the nasal epithelium presented microabscesses containing polymorphonuclear leucocytes. Another eleven mice had a suppurative rhinitis or pharyngitis associated in most with regional lymphadenitis; in two mice, abscessated lymph nodes had erupted into perinodal connective tissues. Two mice had a vestibular abscess. The suppurative rhinitis was associated with extensive necrosis of nasal propria which occasionally extended to conchal bone, resulting in osteomyelitis. Multiple bacterial abscesses were seen in the spleen of one mouse. Histological lesions were not detected in control mice or in eight infected mice. S. equi was re-isolated from the nares of fourteen of the twenty two affected mice but not from the eight unaffected challenged mice or control mice. The close resemblance of this model to strangles in horses may justify its further use for the investigation of pathogenesis and protective immunity.

  6. Metal/molecule interfaces: Dispersion forces unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruitenbeek, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The role of dispersion forces in molecule-metal bonding has often been underestimated or ignored. Two groups now report independent single-molecule experiments that illustrate and quantify the effect of such interactions on bonding strength.

  7. Spin squeezing a cold molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we present a concrete proposal for spin squeezing the cold ground-state polar paramagnetic molecule OH, a system currently under fine control in the laboratory. In contrast to existing work, we consider a single, noninteracting molecule with angular momentum greater than 1 /2 . Starting from an experimentally relevant effective Hamiltonian, we identify an adiabatic regime where different combinations of static electric and magnetic fields can be used to realize the single-axis twisting Hamiltonian of Kitagawa and Ueda [M. Kitagawa and M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. A 47, 5138 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevA.47.5138], the uniform field Hamiltonian proposed by Law et al. [C. K. Law, H. T. Ng, and P. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 63, 055601 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.63.055601], and a model of field propagation in a Kerr medium considered by Agarwal and Puri [G. S. Agarwal and R. R. Puri, Phys. Rev. A 39, 2969 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevA.39.2969]. We then consider the situation in which nonadiabatic effects are quite large and show that the effective Hamiltonian supports spin squeezing even in this case. We provide analytical expressions as well as numerical calculations, including optimization of field strengths and accounting for the effects of field misalignment. Our results have consequences for applications such as precision spectroscopy, techniques such as magnetometry, and stereochemical effects such as the orientation-to-alignment transition.

  8. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-11-06

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  9. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  10. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  11. Visualization of large elongated DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lee, Seonghyun; Jo, Kyubong

    2015-09-01

    Long and linear DNA molecules are the mainstream single-molecule analytes for a variety of biochemical analysis within microfluidic devices, including functionalized surfaces and nanostructures. However, for biochemical analysis, large DNA molecules have to be unraveled, elongated, and visualized to obtain biochemical and genomic information. To date, elongated DNA molecules have been exploited in the development of a number of genome analysis systems as well as for the study of polymer physics due to the advantage of direct visualization of single DNA molecule. Moreover, each single DNA molecule provides individual information, which makes it useful for stochastic event analysis. Therefore, numerous studies of enzymatic random motions have been performed on a large elongated DNA molecule. In this review, we introduce mechanisms to elongate DNA molecules using microfluidics and nanostructures in the beginning. Secondly, we discuss how elongated DNA molecules have been utilized to obtain biochemical and genomic information by direct visualization of DNA molecules. Finally, we reviewed the approaches used to study the interaction of proteins and large DNA molecules. Although DNA-protein interactions have been investigated for many decades, it is noticeable that there have been significant achievements for the last five years. Therefore, we focus mainly on recent developments for monitoring enzymatic activity on large elongated DNA molecules.

  12. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  13. Analytical design of soliton molecules in fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moubissi, A.-B.; Nse Biyoghe, S.; Mback, C. B. L.; Ekogo, T. B.; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofane, T. C.; Tchofo Dinda, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical method for designing fiber systems for a highly stable propagation of soliton molecules. This analytical design uses the variational equations of the soliton molecule to determine the parameters of the most suitable fiber system for any desired soliton, thus reducing dramatically the cost of the whole procedure of design, for both the appropriate fiber system and the desired soliton molecule.

  14. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause pregnancy complications in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Mimura, Kazuya; Morishita, Yuki; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Ogura, Toshinobu; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Aoshima, Hisae; Shishido, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Yuichi; Mayumi, Tadanori; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Norio; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Yanagihara, Itaru; Saito, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials has raised concerns about their potential risks to human health. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles can cross the placenta barrier in pregnant mice and cause neurotoxicity in their offspring, but a more detailed understanding of the effects of nanoparticles on pregnant animals remains elusive. Here, we show that silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm and 35 nm, respectively, can cause pregnancy complications when injected intravenously into pregnant mice. The silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found in the placenta, fetal liver and fetal brain. Mice treated with these nanoparticles had smaller uteri and smaller fetuses than untreated controls. Fullerene molecules and larger (300 and 1,000 nm) silica particles did not induce these complications. These detrimental effects are linked to structural and functional abnormalities in the placenta on the maternal side, and are abolished when the surfaces of the silica nanoparticles are modified with carboxyl and amine groups.

  15. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  16. Colorful Kindergarten Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobick, Bryna; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Developing kindergarten lessons can be very challenging, especially at the beginning of the school year when many students are just learning to cut paper and hold crayons. The author's favorite beginning unit of the year is "mice paintings," a practical introduction to drawing, color theory, and painting. This unit also incorporates children's…

  17. Mice and Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Shively; Thompson, Charles L.

    Observations and experiments with mice, developed and tested at the Pennsylvania Advancement School with underachieving boys in grades seven and eight, are described in this teachers' guide which includes copies of student worksheets for exercises needing them. In addition to lists of materials and procedural suggestions, ideas for guiding…

  18. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1%(which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  19. Laboratory studies of astrophysical molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan

    There is growing evidence that the molecules necessary for the evolution of life on earth arrived from the interstellar medium. The study of these molecules is therefore of great current interest. Two major types of signals from interstellar space, so-called unidentified interstellar infrared emission bands and the diffuse interstellar absorption bands, have intrigued and puzzled astrochemists for decades. This work has been concentrated on how to contribute to an understanding of the origins of these perplexing signals from space and help identify other molecules that may exist in outer space. Matrix isolation spectroscopy (infrared and ultraviolet-visible) combined with theoretical calculations has been employed throughout this research. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopic measurements, aided by theoretical calculations and 13 C-isotope shifts, have led to the identification of eight heretofore unknown C n S m clusters: C 2 S, C 6 S, C 7 S, C 7 S 2 , C 9 S 2 , C 11 S 2 , C 13 S 2 , and C 15 S 2 . Infrared absorption studies of xenon polycarbon clusters aid in understanding the special electronic structure and reactivity of carbon clusters, which might be associated with the formation mechanism of Buckyball (C 60 ). Reaction of C3 with benzene and ammonia might be involved in the formation of more complex molecular structures, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and biomolecules such as the amino acids. High resolution vibrational and electronic spectra of neutral dibenzo [b,def]chrysene and its ions in 12 K argon matrices have been recorded. Spectral assignments were supported by high level theoretical calculations. A mixture of the neutral and ionic infrared spectra of dibenzo[b,def]chrysene resembles the unidentified IR bands in the reflection nebula NGC 7023. Anharmonic frequency calculations for neutral and cationic naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene using density functional theory have been carried out for the first time

  20. Immunotherapy toxic in obese mice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    New research shows immunotherapy can cause lethal inflammation in both young and aged mice that are obese. Restricting calories in aged mice protected them from toxicity, and giving young obese mice a drug for autoimmune disease prevented the fatal reactions. PMID:25583780

  1. Small-molecule trkB agonists promote axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    English, Arthur W.; Liu, Kevin; Nicolini, Jennifer M.; Mulligan, Amanda M.; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-01-01

    Treatments with two-small molecule tropomyosin receptor kinase B (trkB) ligands, 7,8 dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) and deoxygedunin, were evaluated for their ability to promote the regeneration of cut axons in injured peripheral nerves in mice in which sensory and motor axons are marked by YFP. Peripheral nerves were cut and repaired with grafts from strain-matched, nonfluorescent donors and secured in place with fibrin glue. Lengths of profiles of regenerating YFP+ axons were measured 2 wk later from confocal images. Axon regeneration was enhanced when the fibrin glue contained dilutions of 500-nM solution of either small-molecule trkB agonist. In mice in which the neurotrophin receptor trkB is knocked out selectively in neurons, axon regeneration is very weak, and topical treatment with 7,8 DHF had no effect on axon regeneration. Similar treatments with deoxygedunin had only a modest effect. In conditional BDNF knockout mice, topical treatments with either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin resulted in a reversal of the poor regeneration found in controls and produced significant enhancement of regeneration. In WT mice treated with 2 wk of daily i.p. injections of either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin (5 mg/kg), regenerating axon profiles were nearly twice as long as in controls. Restoration of direct muscle responses evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation to pretransection levels over an 8-wk survival period was found only in the treated mice. Treatments with either small-molecule trkB agonist enhanced axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation after peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:24043773

  2. Small-molecule trkB agonists promote axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    English, Arthur W; Liu, Kevin; Nicolini, Jennifer M; Mulligan, Amanda M; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-10-01

    Treatments with two-small molecule tropomyosin receptor kinase B (trkB) ligands, 7,8 dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) and deoxygedunin, were evaluated for their ability to promote the regeneration of cut axons in injured peripheral nerves in mice in which sensory and motor axons are marked by YFP. Peripheral nerves were cut and repaired with grafts from strain-matched, nonfluorescent donors and secured in place with fibrin glue. Lengths of profiles of regenerating YFP(+) axons were measured 2 wk later from confocal images. Axon regeneration was enhanced when the fibrin glue contained dilutions of 500-nM solution of either small-molecule trkB agonist. In mice in which the neurotrophin receptor trkB is knocked out selectively in neurons, axon regeneration is very weak, and topical treatment with 7,8 DHF had no effect on axon regeneration. Similar treatments with deoxygedunin had only a modest effect. In conditional BDNF knockout mice, topical treatments with either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin resulted in a reversal of the poor regeneration found in controls and produced significant enhancement of regeneration. In WT mice treated with 2 wk of daily i.p. injections of either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin (5 mg/kg), regenerating axon profiles were nearly twice as long as in controls. Restoration of direct muscle responses evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation to pretransection levels over an 8-wk survival period was found only in the treated mice. Treatments with either small-molecule trkB agonist enhanced axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation after peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:24043773

  3. Nonadiabatic calculations on hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Since its infancy quantum mechanics has treated hydrogen molecule as a test bed. Contemporary spectroscopy is able to supply the dissociation energy (D0) of H2 with the accuracy of 3 . 7 .10-4cm-1 , while current theoretical predictions are 10-3cm-1 in error. Both the uncertainties are already smaller than the quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects contributing to D0, which poses a particular challenge to theoreticians. Undoubtedly, in order to increase the predictive power of theory one has to not only account for the multitude of the tiny relativistic and QED effects but, especially, significantly increase precision of the largest component of D0--the nonrelativistic contribution. We approach the problem of solving the Schroedinger equation, equipped with new methodology, with the target precision of D0 set at the level of 10-7cm-1 .

  4. Photoluminescence of a Plasmonic Molecule.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da; Byers, Chad P; Wang, Lin-Yung; Hoggard, Anneli; Hoener, Ben; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Chang, Wei-Shun; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2015-07-28

    Photoluminescent Au nanoparticles are appealing for biosensing and bioimaging applications because of their non-photobleaching and non-photoblinking emission. The mechanism of one-photon photoluminescence from plasmonic nanostructures is still heavily debated though. Here, we report on the one-photon photoluminescence of strongly coupled 50 nm Au nanosphere dimers, the simplest plasmonic molecule. We observe emission from coupled plasmonic modes as revealed by single-particle photoluminescence spectra in comparison to correlated dark-field scattering spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the dimers is found to be surprisingly similar to the constituent monomers, suggesting that the increased local electric field of the dimer plays a minor role, in contradiction to several proposed mechanisms. Aided by electromagnetic simulations of scattering and absorption spectra, we conclude that our data are instead consistent with a multistep mechanism that involves the emission due to radiative decay of surface plasmons generated from excited electron-hole pairs following interband absorption. PMID:26165983

  5. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  6. New molecules for hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Skutella, T; Nitsch, R

    2001-02-01

    Pathfinding by developing axons towards their proper targets is an essential step in establishing appropriate neuronal connections. Recent work involving cell culture assays and molecular biology strategies, including knockout animals, strongly indicates that a complex network of guidance signals regulates the formation of hippocampal connections during development. Outgrowing axons are routed towards the hippocampal formation by specific expression of long-range cues, which include secreted class 3 semaphorins, netrin 1 and Slit proteins. Local membrane- or substrate-anchored molecules, such as ligands of the ephrin A subclass, provide layer-specific positional information. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal guidance during hippocampal development might be of importance in making therapeutic use of sprouting fibers, which are produced following the loss of afferents in CNS lesion. PMID:11164941

  7. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, George D.; Rupp, Bernhard

    1996-01-01

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an x-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the x-ray diffraction pattern.

  8. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Rupp, B.

    1996-06-11

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an X-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the X-ray diffraction pattern. 4 figs.

  9. Differential effect of HLA class-I versus class-II transgenes on human T and B cell reconstitution and function in NRG mice

    PubMed Central

    Majji, Sai; Wijayalath, Wathsala; Shashikumar, Soumya; Pow-Sang, Luis; Villasante, Eileen; Brumeanu, Teodor D.; Casares, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice expressing Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I or II transgenes have been generated, but the role of class I vs class II on human T and B cell reconstitution and function has not been investigated in detail. Herein we show that NRG (NOD.RagKO.IL2RγcKO) mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules (DRAG mice) and those co-expressing HLA-DR4 and HLA-A2 molecules (DRAGA mice) did not differ in their ability to develop human T and B cells, to reconstitute cytokine-secreting CD4 T and CD8 T cells, or to undergo immunoglobulin class switching. In contrast, NRG mice expressing only HLA-A2 molecules (A2 mice) reconstituted lower numbers of CD4 T cells but similar numbers of CD8 T cells. The T cells from A2 mice were deficient at secreting cytokines, and their B cells could not undergo immunoglobulin class switching. The inability of A2 mice to undergo immunoglobulin class switching is due to deficient CD4 helper T cell function. Upon immunization, the frequency and cytotoxicity of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in DRAGA mice was significantly higher than in A2 mice. The results indicated a multifactorial effect of the HLA-DR4 transgene on development and function of human CD4 T cells, antigen-specific human CD8 T cells, and immunoglobulin class switching. PMID:27323875

  10. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  11. Deformation of DNA molecules by hydrodynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Lee, Yi-Kuen; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2003-12-01

    The motion of a DNA molecule in a solvent flow reflects the deformation of a nano/microscale flexible mass spring structure by the forces exerted by the fluid molecules. The dynamics of individual molecules can reveal both fundamental properties of the DNA and basic understanding of the complex rheological properties of long-chain molecules. In this study, we report the dynamics of isolated DNA molecules under homogeneous extensional flow. Hydrodynamic focusing generates homogeneous extensional flow with uniform velocity in the transverse direction. The deformation of individual DNA molecules in the flow was visualized with video fluorescence microscopy. A coil stretch transition was observed when the Deborah number (De) is larger than 0.8. With a sudden stopping of the flow, the DNA molecule relaxes and recoils. The longest relaxation time of T2 DNA was determined to be 0.63 s when scaling viscosity to 0.9 cP.

  12. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-10-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron-perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance.

  13. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    PubMed Central

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron–perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance. PMID:27703143

  14. The role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in leucocyte recruitment induced by exogenous methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Lei, Xi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2012-09-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite formed during glucose, protein and fatty acid metabolism. In hyperglycaemic conditions, increased MG level has been linked to the development of diabetes and its vascular complications at the macrovascular and microvascular levels where inflammation plays a role. To study the mechanism of MG-induced inflammation in vivo, we applied MG locally to healthy mice and used intravital microscopy to investigate the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in cremasteric microvasculature. Administration of MG (25 and 50 mg/kg) to the tissue dose-dependently induced leucocyte recruitment at 4.0-5.5 hr, with 84-92% recruited cells being neutrophils. Such MG treatment up-regulated the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, but not vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway contributed to MG-induced up-regulation of these adhesion molecules and leucocyte recruitment. The role of the up-regulated endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment was determined by applying specific functional blocking antibodies to MG-treated animals and observing changes in leucocyte recruitment parameters. Our data demonstrate that the up-regulation of P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contributes to the increased leucocyte rolling flux, reduced leucocyte rolling velocity, and increased leucocyte adhesion, respectively. Our results reveal the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in microvasculature, an inflammatory condition related to diabetic vascular complications.

  15. The role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in leucocyte recruitment induced by exogenous methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yang; Lei, Xi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite formed during glucose, protein and fatty acid metabolism. In hyperglycaemic conditions, increased MG level has been linked to the development of diabetes and its vascular complications at the macrovascular and microvascular levels where inflammation plays a role. To study the mechanism of MG-induced inflammation in vivo, we applied MG locally to healthy mice and used intravital microscopy to investigate the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in cremasteric microvasculature. Administration of MG (25 and 50 mg/kg) to the tissue dose-dependently induced leucocyte recruitment at 4·0–5·5 hr, with 84–92% recruited cells being neutrophils. Such MG treatment up-regulated the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, but not vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway contributed to MG-induced up-regulation of these adhesion molecules and leucocyte recruitment. The role of the up-regulated endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment was determined by applying specific functional blocking antibodies to MG-treated animals and observing changes in leucocyte recruitment parameters. Our data demonstrate that the up-regulation of P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contributes to the increased leucocyte rolling flux, reduced leucocyte rolling velocity, and increased leucocyte adhesion, respectively. Our results reveal the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in microvasculature, an inflammatory condition related to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:22681228

  16. Loss of cell adhesion molecule CHL1 improves homeostatic adaptation and survival in hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Sun, J; Rong, W; Zhao, T; Li, D H; Ding, X; Wu, L Y; Wu, K; Schachner, M; Xiao, Z C; Zhu, L L; Fan, M

    2013-01-01

    Close homologue of L1 (CHL1) is a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule that is critical for brain development and for the maintenance of neural circuits in adults. Recent studies revealed that CHL1 has diverse roles and is involved in the regulation of recovery after spinal cord injury. CHL1 expression was downregulated in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem after the induction of acute hypoxia (AH). In the current study, we sought to address the role of CHL1 in regulating homeostasis responses to hypoxia using CHL1-knockout (CHL1(-/-)) mice. We found that, compared with wild-type littermates, CHL1(-/-) mice showed a dramatically lower mortality rate and an augmented ventilatory response after they were subjected to AH. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that CHL1 was expressed in the carotid body (CB), the key oxygen sensor in rodents, and CHL1 expression level in the CB as assayed by western blot was decreased after hypoxic exposure. The number of glomus cells and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker for glomus cells) in the CB of CHL1(-/-) mice appeared to be increased compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. In addition, in the ex vivo CB preparation, hypoxia induced a significantly greater afferent nerve discharge in CHL1(-/-) mice compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, the arterial blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels of CHL1(-/-) mice were also significantly higher than those of CHL1(+/+) mice. Our findings first demonstrate that CHL1 is a novel intrinsic factor that is involved in CB function and in the ventilatory response to AH. PMID:23949217

  17. New Breed of Mice May Improve Accuracy for Preclinical Testing of Cancer Drugs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A new breed of lab animals, dubbed “glowing head mice,” may do a better job than conventional mice in predicting the success of experimental cancer drugs—while also helping to meet an urgent need for more realistic preclinical animal models. The mice were developed to tolerate often-used light-emitting molecules, such as luciferase from fireflies and green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish. These “optical reporters” are useful for monitoring the effect of experimental therapies in live animals over time because they emit an immediate and easily detected light signal showing whether a tumor inside the animal’s body is shrinking as desired.

  18. Spatial-Temporal Expression of Non-classical MHC Class I Molecules in the C57 Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiane; Shen, Yuqing; Li, Mingli; Lv, Dan; Zhang, Aifeng; Peng, Yaqin; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies clearly demonstrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression in the brain plays an important functional role in neural development and plasticity. A previous study from our laboratory demonstrated the temporal and spatial expression patterns of classical MHC class I molecules in the brain of C57 mice. Studies regarding non-classical MHC class I molecules remain limited. Here we examine the expression of non-classical MHC class I molecules in mouse central nervous system (CNS) during embryonic and postnatal developmental stages using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. We find non-classical MHC class I molecules, M3/T22/Q1, are expressed in the cerebral cortex, neuroepithelium of the lateral ventricle, neuroepithelium of aquaeductus and developing cerebellum during embryonic developmental stages. During the postnatal period from P0 to adult, non-classical MHC class I mRNAs are detected in olfactory bulb, hippocampus, cerebellum and some nerve nuclei. Overall, the expression patterns of non-classical MHC class I molecules are similar to those of classical MHC class I molecules in the developing mouse brain. In addition, non-classical MHC class I molecules are present in the H2-K(b) and H2-D(b) double knock-out mice where their expression levels are greatly increased within the same locations as compared to wild type mice. The elucidation and discovery of the expression profile of MHC class I molecules during development is important for supporting an enhanced understanding of their physiological and potential pathological roles within the CNS.

  19. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  20. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Overexpression Ameliorates Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice by Lowering Asymmetric Dimethylarginine

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Johannes; Maas, Renke; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Arend, Michaela; Pope, Arthur J.; Cordasic, Nada; Heusinger-Ribeiro, Juliane; Atzler, Dorothee; Strobel, Joachim; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Böger, Rainer H.; Hilgers, Karl F.

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, is increasingly recognized as a novel biomarker in cardiovascular disease. To date, it remains unclear whether elevated ADMA levels are merely associated with cardiovascular risk or whether this molecule is of functional relevance in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease. To clarify this issue, we crossed dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) transgenic mice that overexpress the human isoform 1 of the ADMA degrading enzyme DDAH into ApoE-deficient mice to generate ApoE−/−/hDDAH1+/− mice. In these mice, as well as ApoE−/− wild-type littermates, atherosclerosis within the aorta as well as vascular function of aortic ring preparations was assessed. We report here that overexpression of hDDAH1 reduces plaque formation in ApoE−/− mice by lowering ADMA. The extent of atherosclerosis closely correlated with plasma ADMA levels in male but not female mice fed either a standard rodent chow or an atherogenic diet. Functional analysis of aortic ring preparations revealed improved endothelial function in mice overexpressing hDDAH1. Our findings provide proof-of-principle that ADMA plays a causal role as a culprit molecule in atherosclerosis and support recent evidence indicating a functional relevance of DDAH enzymes in genetic mouse models. Together, these results demonstrate that pharmacological interventions targeting the ADMA/DDAH pathway may represent a novel approach in the prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20348244

  1. Absence of cardiac lipid accumulation in transgenic mice with heart-specific HSL overexpression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, J; Shen, W J; Nelson, B D; Patel, S; Veerkamp, J H; Selwood, S P; Murphy, G M; Reaven, E; Kraemer, F B

    2001-10-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) hydrolyzes triglyceride (TG) in adipose tissue. HSL is also expressed in heart. To explore the actions of cardiac HSL, heart-specific, tetracycline (Tc)-controlled HSL-overexpressing mice were generated. Tc-responsive element-HSL transgenic (Tg) mice were generated and crossed with myosin heavy chain (MHC)alpha-tTA Tg mice, which express the Tc-responsive transactivator (tTA) in the heart. The double-Tg mice (MHC-HSL) were maintained with doxycycline (Dox) to suppress Tg HSL. Upon removal of Dox, cardiac HSL activity and protein increased 12- and 8-fold, respectively, and the expression was heart specific. Although cardiac TG content increased twofold in control mice after an overnight fast, it did not increase in HSL-induced mice. Electron microscopy showed numerous lipid droplets in the myocardium of fasted control mice, whereas fasted HSL-induced mice showed virtually no droplets. Microarray analysis showed altered expression of cardiac genes for fatty acid oxidation, transcription factors, signaling molecules, cytoskeletal proteins, and histocompatibility antigens in HSL-induced mice. Thus cardiac HSL plays a role in controlling accumulation of triglyceride droplets and can affect the expression of a number of cardiac genes.

  2. Antiobesity Effect of a Small Molecule Repressor of RORγ.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mi Ra; He, Yuanjun; Khan, Tanya M; Kuruvilla, Dana S; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A; Unger, Thaddeus J; White, David W; Khan, Susan; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2015-07-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor RORγ is a key regulator for T helper 17 (TH17) cell differentiation, which regulates metabolic and circadian rhythm genes in peripheral tissues. Previously, it was shown that the small molecule inverse agonist of RORγ SR1555 [1-(4-((4'-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl) ethanone] suppressed TH17 differentiation and stimulated induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells. Here, we show that treatment of cultured pre-adipocyctes with SR1555 represses the expression of RORγ while leading to increased expression of FGF21 and adipoQ. Chronic administration of SR1555 to obese diabetic mice resulted in a modest reduction in food intake accompanied with significant reduction in fat mass, resulting in reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity. Analysis ex vivo of treated mice demonstrates that SR1555 induced expression of the thermogenic gene program in fat depots. Further studies in cultured cells showed that SR1555 inhibited activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and increased fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these results suggest that pharmacological repression of RORγ may represent a strategy for treatment of obesity by increasing thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, while inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase activity results in a reduction of serum free fatty acids, leading to improved peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  3. Antiobesity Effect of a Small Molecule Repressor of RORγ

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mi Ra; He, Yuanjun; Khan, Tanya M.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A.; Unger, Thaddeus J.; White, David W.; Khan, Susan; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor RORγ is a key regulator for T helper 17 (TH17) cell differentiation, which regulates metabolic and circadian rhythm genes in peripheral tissues. Previously, it was shown that the small molecule inverse agonist of RORγ SR1555 [1-(4-((4′-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl) ethanone] suppressed TH17 differentiation and stimulated induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells. Here, we show that treatment of cultured pre-adipocyctes with SR1555 represses the expression of RORγ while leading to increased expression of FGF21 and adipoQ. Chronic administration of SR1555 to obese diabetic mice resulted in a modest reduction in food intake accompanied with significant reduction in fat mass, resulting in reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity. Analysis ex vivo of treated mice demonstrates that SR1555 induced expression of the thermogenic gene program in fat depots. Further studies in cultured cells showed that SR1555 inhibited activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and increased fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these results suggest that pharmacological repression of RORγ may represent a strategy for treatment of obesity by increasing thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, while inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase activity results in a reduction of serum free fatty acids, leading to improved peripheral insulin sensitivity. PMID:25904554

  4. Mast cell hyperplasia in the skin of Dsg4-deficient hypotrichosis mice, which are long-living mutants of lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Cai; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Tokunaka, Kazuhiro; Saiga, Kan; Date, Fumiko; Owada, Yuji; Nose, Masato; Ono, Masao

    2008-10-01

    Desmosomal cadherins are essential cell adhesion molecules expressed in the epidermis. We identified a mutation of a cadherin superfamily member, namely, desmoglein 4 (Dsg4), in early onset of death (EOD)( hage ) mice with hypotrichosis. The mutation was induced by the insertion of an early transposon II-beta into intron 8 of Dsg4. Mast cell hyperplasia was observed in the skin of EOD( hage ) mice. The abnormally expanded population of lpr T cells, i.e., CD4(-)CD8(-)B220(+)Thy1.2(+) alphabetaT cells, in the splenocytes of EOD mice was reduced in EOD( hage ) mice. Therefore, it was suspected that the long-living mutant EOD( hage ) mice were selected from lupus-prone EOD mice because of their immunological immaturity. These findings clearly indicate that Dsg4 is an important molecule for the formation of hair follicles and hypothesize that unorganized hyperplastic hair follicles in anagen due to the Dsg4 mutation provide niches for mast cell precursors in the skin.

  5. Psychopharmacological Studies in Mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Since 1998, when the laboratory of Medicinal Pharmacology was established in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, I have been interested in psychopharmacological research topics. During this period, we identified a number of novel regulatory mechanisms that control the prefrontal dopamine system through functional interaction between serotonin1A and dopamine D2 receptors or between serotonin1A and σ1 receptors. Our findings suggest that strategies that enhance the prefrontal dopamine system may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We also found that environmental factors during development strongly impact the psychological state in adulthood. Furthermore, we clarified the pharmacological profiles of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors donepezil, galantamine, and rivastigmine, providing novel insights into their mechanisms of action. Finally, we developed the female encounter test, a novel method for evaluating motivation in mice. This simple method should help advance future psychopharmacological research. In this review, we summarize the major findings obtained from our recent studies in mice.

  6. MICE Staging and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2010-03-01

    Ionization cooling will be a key technique for a high-intensity Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a high-precision, staged accelerator experiment being performed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Its goal is the first demonstration, with 0.1% resolution, of the feasibility of reducing the transverse emittance of a beam of muons by ionization cooling in low-Z absorbers. MICE is being staged in the following steps: I. Creating and characterizing a beam of muons; II. Measuring their emittance; III. Systematic comparison of successive measurements; IV. Inserting absorber; V. Reaccelerating longitudinally; and VI. Complete "10%-cooling" test. Step I is currently in progress with Step II to commence next year; completion of Step VI is anticipated in ˜2012.

  7. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  8. T cell responses in calcineurin A alpha-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have created embryonic stem (ES) cells and mice lacking the predominant isoform (alpha) of the calcineurin A subunit (CNA alpha) to study the role of this serine/threonine phosphatase in the immune system. T and B cell maturation appeared to be normal in CNA alpha -/- mice. CNA alpha -/- T cells responded normally to mitogenic stimulation (i.e., PMA plus ionomycin, concanavalin A, and anti-CD3 epsilon antibody). However, CNA alpha -/- mice generated defective antigen- specific T cell responses in vivo. Mice produced from CNA alpha -/- ES cells injected into RAG-2-deficient blastocysts had a similar defective T cell response, indicating that CNA alpha is required for T cell function per se, rather than for an activity of other cell types involved in the immune response. CNA alpha -/- T cells remained sensitive to both cyclosporin A and FK506, suggesting that CNA beta or another CNA-like molecule can mediate the action of these immunosuppressive drugs. CNA alpha -/- mice provide an animal model for dissecting the physiologic functions of calcineurin as well as the effects of FK506 and CsA. PMID:8627154

  9. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans. PMID:26079769

  10. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans.

  11. Coordination programming of photofunctional molecules.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Kusaka, Shinpei; Hayashi, Mikihiro; Nishikawa, Michihiro; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2013-04-05

    Our recent achievements relating to photofunctional molecules are addressed. Section 1 discloses a new concept of photoisomerization. Pyridylpyrimidine-copper complexes undergo a ring inversion that can be modulated by the redox state of the copper center. In combination with an intermolecular photoelectron transfer (PET) initiated by the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition of the Cu(I) state, we realize photonic regulation of the ring inversion. Section 2 reports on the first examples of heteroleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes. Conventional homoleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes suffered from low fluorescence quantum yields, whereas the heteroleptic ones feature bright fluorescence even in polar solvents. Section 3 describes our new findings on Pechmann dye, which was first synthesized in 1882. New synthetic procedures for Pechmann dye using dimethyl bis(arylethynyl)fumarate as a starting material gives rise to its new structural isomer. We also demonstrate potentiality of a donor-acceptor-donor type of Pechmann dye in organic electronics.

  12. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  13. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  14. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  15. Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Leonor I.; Friedman, Lorraine

    1972-01-01

    Virulence and infectivity of nine strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were investigated in groups of mice which were inoculated intranasally or intravenously, and some of each were treated with corticosteroids. Fatal infections were not often seen among untreated mice, but mortality usually occurred when corticosteroids were given, regardless of the route of fungus inoculation. Prior treatment did not uniformly increase the incidence of infection, however; only in the case of intranasally inoculated mice was this effect seen. Most strains appeared to be more virulent when administered intravenously, with the exception of a single strain which, under the influence of corticosteroids, repeatedly displayed greatest virulence when given intranasally. All animals that died early in the course of the disease, irrespective of route of inoculation, always had acute pulmonary lesions and usually no other organ was involved. Animals which died later or were sacrificed always had chronic lung lesions. Whether or not chronically diseased animals had additional organ involvement correlated with how the organisms were administered; intravenously inoculated animals usually had extrapulmonary as well as pulmonary lesions, but lesions of those inoculated intranasally were almost exclusively pulmonary. Corticosteroids did not alter the histologic characteristics of either the acute or the chronic type of lesion, but the lesions of treated animals were usually more extensive. Most of the survivors appeared healthy even when infection was extensive. Images PMID:4637603

  16. Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Based on Secreted, Species-Specific, Bacterial Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shih-Jung; Tapley, Asa; Adamson, John; Little, Tessa; Urbanowski, Michael; Cohen, Keira; Pym, Alexander; Almeida, Deepak; Dorasamy, Afton; Layre, Emilie; Young, David C; Singh, Ravesh; Patel, Vinod B; Wallengren, Kristina; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Moody, D Branch; Bishai, William

    2015-12-01

    Improved biomarkers are needed for tuberculosis. To develop tests based on products secreted by tubercle bacilli that are strictly associated with viability, we evaluated 3 bacterial-derived, species-specific, small molecules as biomarkers: 2 mycobactin siderophores and tuberculosinyladenosine. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrated the presence of 1 or both mycobactins and/or tuberculosinyladenosine in serum and whole lung tissues from infected mice and sputum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or lymph nodes from infected patients but not uninfected controls. Detection of the target molecules distinguished host infection status in 100% of mice with both serum and lung as the target sample. In human subjects, we evaluated detection of the bacterial small molecules (BSMs) in multiple body compartments in 3 patient cohorts corresponding to different forms of tuberculosis. We detected at least 1 of the 3 molecules in 90%, 71%, and 40% of tuberculosis patients' sputum, CSF, and lymph node samples, respectively. In paucibacillary forms of human tuberculosis, which are difficult to diagnose even with culture, detection of 1 or more BSM was rapid and compared favorably to polymerase chain reaction-based detection. Secreted BSMs, detectable in serum, warrant further investigation as a means for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with tuberculosis.

  17. Antigen Targeting to Human HLA Class II Molecules Increases Efficacy of DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Løset, Geir Åge; Vikse, Elisabeth; Fugger, Lars

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to translate promising results from DNA vaccination in mice to larger animals and humans. Previously, DNA vaccines encoding proteins that target Ag to MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on APCs have been shown to induce rapid, enhanced, and long-lasting Ag-specific Ab titers in mice. In this study, we describe two novel DNA vaccines that as proteins target HLA class II (HLA-II) molecules. These vaccine proteins cross-react with MHC-II molecules in several species of larger mammals. When tested in ferrets and pigs, a single DNA delivery with low doses of the HLA-II–targeted vaccines resulted in rapid and increased Ab responses. Importantly, painless intradermal jet delivery of DNA was as effective as delivery by needle injection followed by electroporation. As an indication that the vaccines could also be useful for human application, HLA-II–targeted vaccine proteins were found to increase human CD4+ T cell responses by a factor of ×103 in vitro. Thus, targeting of Ag to MHC-II molecules may represent an attractive strategy for increasing efficacy of DNA vaccines in larger animals and humans. PMID:27671110

  18. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  19. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  20. Rotational Cooling of Trapped Polyatomic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Rosa; Prehn, Alexander; Englert, Barbara G U; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH_{3}F) by optically pumping the population of 16 M sublevels in the rotational states J=3, 4, 5 and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J=4, K=3, M=4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby generating a translationally cold (≈30  mK) and nearly pure state ensemble of about 10^{6} molecules. Our scheme is extendable to larger sets of initial states, other final states, and a variety of molecule species, thus paving the way for internal-state control of ever-larger molecules.

  1. Single molecule nanometry for biological physics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurement is a hallmark of physics but the small length scale (~ nanometer) of elementary biological components and thermal fluctuations surrounding them challenge our ability to visualize their action. Here, we highlight the recent developments in single molecule nanometry where the position of a single fluorescent molecule can be determined with nanometer precision, reaching the limit imposed by the shot noise, and the relative motion between two molecules can be determined with ~ 0.3 nm precision at ~ 1 millisecond time resolution, and how these new tools are providing fundamental insights on how motor proteins move on cellular highways. We will also discuss how interactions between three and four fluorescent molecules can be used to measure three and six coordinates, respectively, allowing us to correlate movements of multiple components. Finally, we will discuss recent progress in combining angstrom precision optical tweezers with single molecule fluorescent detection, opening new windows for multi-dimensional single molecule nanometry for biological physics. PMID:23249673

  2. Electrophysiology and metabolism of caveolin-3-overexpressing mice.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jan M; Horikawa, Yousuke T; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E; Vincent, Kevin P; Tyan, Leonid; Yu, Judith K; McCulloch, Andrew D; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Patel, Hemal H; Roth, David M

    2016-05-01

    Caveolin-3 (Cav-3) plays a critical role in organizing signaling molecules and ion channels involved in cardiac conduction and metabolism. Mutations in Cav-3 are implicated in cardiac conduction abnormalities and myopathies. Additionally, cardiac-specific overexpression of Cav-3 (Cav-3 OE) is protective against ischemic and hypertensive injury, suggesting a potential role for Cav-3 in basal cardiac electrophysiology and metabolism involved in stress adaptation. We hypothesized that overexpression of Cav-3 may alter baseline cardiac conduction and metabolism. We examined: (1) ECG telemetry recordings at baseline and during pharmacological interventions, (2) ion channels involved in cardiac conduction with immunoblotting and computational modeling, and (3) baseline metabolism in Cav-3 OE and transgene-negative littermate control mice. Cav-3 OE mice had decreased heart rates, prolonged PR intervals, and shortened QTc intervals with no difference in activity compared to control mice. Dobutamine or propranolol did not cause significant changes between experimental groups in maximal (dobutamine) or minimal (propranolol) heart rate. Cav-3 OE mice had an overall lower chronotropic response to atropine. The expression of Kv1.4 and Kv4.3 channels, Nav1.5 channels, and connexin 43 were increased in Cav-3 OE mice. A computational model integrating the immunoblotting results indicated shortened action potential duration in Cav-3 OE mice linking the change in channel expression to the observed electrophysiology phenotype. Metabolic profiling showed no gross differences in VO2, VCO2, respiratory exchange ratio, heat generation, and feeding or drinking. In conclusion, Cav-3 OE mice have changes in ECG intervals, heart rates, and cardiac ion channel expression. These findings give novel mechanistic insights into previously reported Cav-3 dependent cardioprotection. PMID:27023865

  3. Staphylococcal enterotoxins bind H-2Db molecules on macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We screened a panel of monoclonal antibodies against selected macrophage cell surface molecules for their ability to inhibit enterotoxin binding to major histocompatibility complex class II-negative C2D (H-2b) macrophages. Two monoclonal antibodies, HB36 and TIB126, that are specific for the alpha 2 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I, blocked staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB, respectively) binding to C2D macrophages in a specific and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitory activities were haplotype-specific in that SEA and SEB binding to H-2k or H-2d macrophages was not inhibited by either monoclonal antibody. HB36, but not TIB126, inhibited enterotoxin-induced secretion of cytokines by H-2b macrophages. Lastly, passive protection of D-galactosamine-sensitized C2D mice by injection with HB36 antibody prevented SEB-induced death. Therefore, SEA and SEB binding to the alpha 2 domain of the H-2Db molecule induces biological activity and has physiological consequences.

  4. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from pomegranate.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and'no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications. PMID:24958333

  5. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  6. Structure of small clusters of parahydrogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola, Rafael; Navarro, Jesus

    2006-08-15

    The ground state energies and the one-body densities of parahydrogen clusters have been systematically calculated by the diffusion Monte Carlo technique in steps of one molecule from 3 to 50 molecules. These calculations show that parahydrogen clusters exhibit a clear geometrical order which excludes any liquidlike structure. A definite confirmation of the magic size for the cluster with 13 molecules is also obtained.

  7. A new interstellar molecule - Tricarbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, H. E.; Irvine, W. M.; Friberg, P.; Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    The C3O molecule, whose pure rotational spectrum has only recently been studied in the laboratory, has been detected in the cold, dark interstellar Taurus Molecular Cloud 1. Since C3O is the first interstelar carbon chain molecule to contain oxygen, its existence places an important new constraint on chemical schemes for cold interstellar clouds. The abundance of C3O can be understood in terms of purely gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry.

  8. Circular DNA Molecules in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    The satellite DNA's from the embryos of five species of Drosophila (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. nasuta, D. virilis and D. hydei) have been analyzed for the presence of closed circular duplex DNA molecules, as determined by CsCl-EBr gradients. Circular DNA molecules were found in every species but D. melanogaster. Analyses of cell fractions from adult Drosophila and organ fractions from Drosophila larvae show that fractions containing mitochondria are highly enriched in these molecules. PMID:4643820

  9. Microwave Stark decelerator for polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Katsunari; Momose, Takamasa

    2005-12-15

    We propose a method to decelerate polar molecules from a beam using a microwave field. A moving standing wave of a microwave electric field causes an ac Stark shift to polar molecules and decelerates them. The method is applicable to polar molecules in rotational ground states and can be used to directly load a microwave trap. Numerical simulations are presented indicating large phase-space acceptance volume.

  10. A microfluidics approach to study the accumulation of molecules at basal lamina interfaces.

    PubMed

    Arends, Fabienna; Sellner, Sabine; Seifert, Philipp; Gerland, Ulrich; Rehberg, Markus; Lieleg, Oliver

    2015-08-21

    For an efficient distribution of drugs and drug carriers through biological barriers such as the vascular system, the size and surface properties of nanoparticles and molecules play a key role. To screen for important parameters which determine the ability of drugs or drug carriers to translocate through complex biological barriers, an in vitro assay which correctly predicts the behavior of those objects in vivo would be highly desirable. Here, we present a microfluidic setup to probe the diffusive spreading of molecules with different net charges and molecular weights through a basal lamina interface - a biopolymer system which contributes to the barrier function of the vascular system and the skin. From our data, we find a charge dependent accumulation of molecules at the gel interface which is consistent with transient binding of those molecules to the gel constituents. We also observe a similar charge-dependent accumulation of molecules in living mice where the test molecules colocalize with collagen IV, a key component of the basal lamina. Our assay may serve as a platform to perform penetration experiments with even more complex interfaces combining cellular barriers with biopolymer coatings. PMID:26152353

  11. Age and isolation influence steroids release and chemical signaling in male mice.

    PubMed

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Cavaggioni, Andrea; Redaelli, Marco; Da Dalt, Laura; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2014-05-01

    Social interactions in mice involve olfactory signals, which convey information about the emitter. In turn, the mouse social and physiological status may modify the release of chemical cues. In this study, the influences of age and social isolation on the endocrine response and the release of chemical signals were investigated in male CD1 mice, allocated into four groups: Young Isolated (from weaning till 60days; N=6), Adult Isolated (till 180days; N=6), Young Grouped (6 mice/cage; till 60days; N=18), Adult Grouped (6 mice/cage; till 180days; N=18). Mice were transferred in a clean cage to observe the micturition pattern and then sacrificed. Body and organs weights, serum testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, corticosterone and the ratio Major Urinary Protein/creatinine were measured. Urinary volatile molecules potentially involved in pheromonal communication were identified. Androgen secretion was greater in isolated mice (P<0.05), suggesting a greater reactivity of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal axis. Grouped mice presented a higher degree of adrenal activity, and young mice showed a higher serum corticosterone (P<0.05) suggesting a greater stimulation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis. The micturition pattern typical of dominant male, consisting in voiding numerous droplets, was observed in Young Isolated mice only, which showed a higher protein/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Urinary 2-s-butyl-thiazoline was higher in both Young and Adult Isolated mice (P<0.005). Young Isolated mice showed the most prominent difference in both micturition pattern and potentially active substance emission, while long term isolation resulted in a less extreme phenotype; therefore social isolation had a higher impact on young mice hormone and pheromone release.

  12. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments.

  13. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J; de la Moya, Santiago

    2015-09-21

    This article aims to show the identity of "circularly polarized luminescent active simple organic molecules" as a new concept in organic chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and non-aggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented.

  14. Production and Trapping of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    David, DeMille

    2015-04-21

    We report a set of experiments aimed at the production and trapping of ultracold polar molecules. We begin with samples of laser-cooled and trapped Rb and Cs atoms, and bind them together to form polar RbCs molecules. The binding is accomplished via photoassociation, which uses a laser to catalyze the sticking process. We report results from investigation of a new pathway for photoassociation that can produce molecules in their absolute ground state of vibrational and rotational motion. We also report preliminary observations of collisions between these ground-state molecules and co-trapped atoms.

  15. Probing individual molecules with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nie, S; Chiu, D T; Zare, R N

    1994-11-11

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy coupled with a diffraction-limited laser beam and a high-efficiency detection system has been used to study the diffusive movement and emission process of individual fluorescent molecules in the liquid phase at room temperature. The high detection sensitivity achieved at fast data acquisition speeds (greater than 1 kilohertz) allows real-time observation of single-molecule fluorescence without statistical analysis. The results show fluorescence-cycle saturation at the single-molecule level and multiple recrossings of a single molecule into and out of the probe volume as well as the triplet state.

  16. Theoretical spectra of floppy molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua

    2000-09-01

    Detailed studies of the vibrational dynamics of floppy molecules are presented. Six-D bound-state calculations of the vibrations of rigid water dimer based on several anisotropic site potentials (ASP) are presented. A new sequential diagonalization truncation approach was used to diagonalize the angular part of the Hamiltonian. Symmetrized angular basis and a potential optimized discrete variable representation for intermonomer distance coordinate were used in the calculations. The converged results differ significantly from the results presented by Leforestier et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 106 , 8527 (1997)]. It was demonstrated that ASP-S potential yields more accurate tunneling splittings than other ASP potentials used. Fully coupled 4D quantum mechanical calculations were performed for carbon dioxide dimer using the potential energy surface given by Bukowski et al [J. Chem. Phys., 110, 3785 (1999)]. The intermolecular vibrational frequencies and symmetry adapted force constants were estimated and compared with experiments. The inter-conversion tunneling dynamics was studied using the calculated virtual tunneling splittings. Symmetrized Radau coordinates and the sequential diagonalization truncation approach were formulated for acetylene. A 6D calculation was performed with 5 DVR points for each stretch coordinate, and an angular basis that is capable of converging the angular part of the Hamiltonian to 30 cm-1 for internal energies up to 14000 cm-1. The probability at vinylidene configuration were evaluated. It was found that the eigenstates begin to extend to vinylidene configuration from about 10000 cm-1, and the ra, coordinate is closely related to the vibrational dynamics at high energy. Finally, a direct product DVR was defined for coupled angular momentum operators, and the SDT approach were formulated. They were applied in solving the angular part of the Hamiltonian for carbon dioxide dimer problem. The results show the method is capable of giving very accurate

  17. Role of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Radiation-Induced Brain Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.-L.; Tu Ba; Li Yuqing; Wong, C. Shun

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pathogenesis of brain injury after irradiation (IR). Methods and Materials: We assessed the expression of ICAM-1 in mouse brain after cranial IR and determined the histopathologic and behavioral changes in mice that were either wildtype (+/+) or knockout (-/-) of the ICAM-1 gene after IR. Results: There was an early dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression after IR. Increased ICAM-1 immunoreactivity was observed in endothelia and glia of ICAM-1+/+ mice up to 8 months after IR. ICAM-1-/- mice showed no expression. ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar vascular abnormalities at 2 months after 10-17 Gy, and there was evidence for demyelination and inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis at 8 months after 10 Gy. After 10 Gy, irradiated ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar behavioral changes at 2-6 months in open field, light-dark chamber, and T-maze compared with age-matched genotype controls. Conclusion: There is early and late upregulation of ICAM-1 in the vasculature and glia of mouse brain after IR. ICAM-1, however, does not have a causative role in the histopathologic injury and behavioral dysfunction after moderate single doses of cranial IR.

  18. Hybrid molecules synergistically acting against protein aggregation diseases.

    PubMed

    Korth, Carsten; Klingenstein, Ralf; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    An emerging common feature of the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the ability of many disease-associated protein aggregates to induce conversion of a normal counterpart conformer leading to an acceleration of disease progression. Curative pharmacotherapy has not been achieved so far despite successes in elucidating pathomechanisms. Here, we review the pharmaceutical strategy of generating hybrid compounds, i.e. compounds consisting of several independently acting moieties with synergistic effects, on key molecular players in AD and CJD. For prion diseases, we review hybrid compounds consisting of two different heterocyclic compounds, their synergistic effects on prion replication in a cell culture model and their ability to prolong survival of experimentally prion-infected mice in vivo. While a combination therapy of several antiprion compounds including quinacrine, clomipramine, simvastatin and tocopherol prolonged survival time to 10-25%, administration of hybrid compound quinpramine alone, a chimera of acridine and iminodibenzyl scaffolds, led to 10% survival time extension. For AD, we review a hybrid compound consisting of an Aβ recognizing D-peptide fused to a small molecule β-sheet breaker, an aminopyrazole. This molecule was able to diminish Aβ oligomers in cell culture and significantly decrease synaptotoxicity as measured by miniature excitatory postsynaptic responses in vitro. Hybrid compounds can dramatically increase potency of their single moieties and lead to novel functions when they act in a simultaneous or sequential manner thereby revealing synergistic properties. Their systematic generation combining different classes of compounds from peptides to small molecules has the potential to significantly accelerate drug discovery. PMID:24059335

  19. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  20. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  1. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  2. Bifidobacterium longum Alleviates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis by Suppressing IL-17A Response: Involvement of Intestinal Epithelial Costimulatory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Eiji; Ogita, Tasuku; Miyamoto, Junki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi

    2013-01-01

    Although some bacterial strains show potential to prevent colitis, their mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the anti-colitic mechanisms of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis JCM 1222T, focusing on the relationship between interleukin (IL)-17A secreting CD4+ T cells and intestinal epithelial costimulatory molecules in mice. Oral administration of JCM 1222T to mice alleviated dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis. The expression of type 1 helper T (Th1)- and IL-17 producing helper T (Th17)-specific cytokines and transcriptional factors was suppressed by JCM 1222T treatment. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from colitic mice induced IL-17A production from CD4+ T cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent manner, and this was suppressed by oral treatment with JCM 1222T. Using blocking antibodies for costimulatory molecules, we revealed that epithelial costimulatory molecules including CD80 and CD40, which were highly expressed in IECs from colitic mice, were involved in IEC-induced IL-17A response. Treatment of mice and intestinal epithelial cell line Colon-26 cells with JCM 1222T decreased the expression of CD80 and CD40. Collectively, these data indicate that JCM 1222T negatively regulate epithelial costimulatory molecules, and this effect might be attributed, at least in part, to suppression of IL-17A in DSS-induced colitis. PMID:24255712

  3. Sensitization to and Challenge with Gliadin Induce Pancreatitis and Extrapancreatic Inflammation in HLA-DQ8 Mice: An Animal Model of Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Mi-Young; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Kim, Sun A; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to establish a pathogenetic mechanism of pancreatitis in celiac disease and IgG4-related disease using gluten-sensitive human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ8 transgenic mice. Methods Transgenic mice expressing HLA-DQ8 genes were utilized. Control mice were not sensitized but were fed gliadin-free rice cereal. Experimental groups consisted of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice; nonsensitized mice with cerulein hyperstimulation; and gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation. Results Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation showed significant inflammatory cell infiltrates, fibrosis and acinar atrophy compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. The immunohistochemical analysis showed greater IgG1-positive plasma cells in the inflammatory infiltrates of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation or gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice showed IgG1-stained inflammatory cell infiltrates in the extrapancreatic organs, including the bile ducts, salivary glands, kidneys, and lungs. Conclusions Gliadin-sensitization and cerulein hyperstimulation of gluten-sensitive HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice resulted in pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. This animal model suggests that chronic gliadin ingestion in a susceptible individual with the HLA-DQ8 molecule may be associated with pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. PMID:27114422

  4. HLA class II (DR0401) molecules induce Foxp3+ regulatory T cell suppression of B cells in Plasmodium yoelii strain 17XNL malaria.

    PubMed

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Danner, Rebecca; Kleschenko, Yuliya; Majji, Sai; Villasante, Eileen Franke; Richie, Thomas L; Brumeanu, Teodor-Doru; David, Chella S; Casares, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Unlike human malaria parasites that induce persistent infection, some rodent malaria parasites, like Plasmodium yoelii strain 17XNL (Py17XNL), induce a transient (self-curing) malaria infection. Cooperation between CD4 T cells and B cells to produce antibodies is thought to be critical for clearance of Py17XNL parasites from the blood, with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules being required for activation of CD4 T cells. In order to better understand the correspondence between murine malaria models and human malaria, and in particular the role of MHC (HLA) class II molecules, we studied the ability of humanized mice expressing human HLA class II molecules to clear Py17XNL infection. We showed that humanized mice expressing HLA-DR4 (DR0401) molecules and lacking mouse MHC class II molecules (EA(0)) have impaired production of specific antibodies to Py17XNL and cannot cure the infection. In contrast, mice expressing HLA-DR4 (DR0402), HLA-DQ6 (DQ0601), HLA-DQ8 (DQ0302), or HLA-DR3 (DR0301) molecules in an EA(0) background were able to elicit specific antibodies and self-cure the infection. In a series of experiments, we determined that the inability of humanized DR0401.EA(0) mice to elicit specific antibodies was due to expansion and activation of regulatory CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T cells (Tregs) that suppressed B cells to secrete antibodies through cell-cell interactions. Treg depletion allowed the DR0401.EA(0) mice to elicit specific antibodies and self-cure the infection. Our results demonstrated a differential role of MHC (HLA) class II molecules in supporting antibody responses to Py17XNL malaria and revealed a new mechanism by which malaria parasites stimulate B cell-suppressogenic Tregs that prevent clearance of infection. PMID:24166949

  5. Energy Transfer Involving Diatomic Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, John Paul

    three colliding pairs, the experimental results lie between the results calculated for the same two sets of potential parameters. These parameters were those calculated to match the short range Lennard-Jones potential and a set obtained by a theoretical Thomas-Fermi treatment of the molecules.

  6. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  7. Optical interfacing single molecules with atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siyushev, Petr; Stein, Guilherme; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2013-05-01

    Organic molecules at liquid Helium temperatures can constitute high-brightness and narrow-band single photon sources. Thus, they might form an important building block for quantum information processing. A number of quantum optical experiments were conducted with single photon sources based on single molecules. It was shown that it is possible to spectrally detune the molecules, and optical interaction between several molecules could be shown. Another important ingredient for quantum information processing is the implementation of quantum memory. Atomic vapors do not only allow for slowing down light, but also for its storage and can be used as an efficient quantum memory. In the past it was impossible to utilize the high brightness of single molecules in combination with an efficient quantum memory, since the lack of spectral overlap. Here, we present spectral tuning of a single molecule to match the resonance of the sodium D-line. We reach up to 6 ×105 detected 30 MHz narrow-band single photons per second. We are able to slow down near-resonant photons from a single molecule, and simultaneous show its single photon properties. We are further able to explore the properties of atomic vapor for its use as a narrow-band filter for single molecule studies.

  8. The Distribution of Solubilized Molecules among Micelles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dennis J.

    1978-01-01

    Conflicting views have been put forward on the derivation of the distribution of solubilized molecules among micelles. This stems from failure to consider the arrangement of the solubilized molecules in the micelles. In the treatment presented enthalpy effects are ignored as they are not amenable to a simple general theory. (Author/BB)

  9. Polymer physics experiments with single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas E.

    1999-11-01

    Bacteriophage DNA molecules were taken as a model flexible polymer chain for the experimental study of polymer dynamics at the single molecule level. Video fluorescence microscopy was used to directly observe the conformational dynamics of fluorescently labeled molecules, optical tweezers were used to manipulate individual molecules, and micro-fabricated flow cells were used to apply controlled hydrodynamic strain to molecules. These techniques constitute a powerful new experimental approach in the study of basic polymer physics questions. I have used these techniques to study the diffusion and relaxation of isolated and entangled polymer molecules and the hydrodynamic deformation of polymers in elongational and shear flows. These studies revealed a rich, and previously unobserved, ``molecular individualism'' in the dynamical behavior of single molecules. Individual measurements on ensembles of identical molecules allowed the average conformation to be determined as well as the underlying probability distributions for molecular conformation. Scaling laws, that predict the dependence of properties on chain length and concentration, were also tested. The basic assumptions of the reptation model were directly confirmed by visualizing the dynamics of entangled chains.

  10. Relating single-molecule measurements to thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Keller, David; Swigon, David; Bustamante, Carlos

    2003-02-01

    Measurements made on large ensembles of molecules are routinely interpreted using thermodynamics, but the normal rules of thermodynamics may not apply to measurements made on single molecules. Using a polymer stretching experiment as an example, it is shown that in the limit of a single, short molecule the outcome of experimental measurements may depend on which variables are held fixed and which are allowed to fluctuate. Thus an experiment in which the end-to-end distance of the polymer molecule is fixed and the tension fluctuates yields a different result than an experiment where the force is fixed and the end-to-end distance fluctuates. It is further shown that this difference is due to asymmetry in the distribution of end-to-end distances for a single molecule, and that the difference vanishes in the appropriate thermodynamic limit; that is, as the polymer molecule becomes long compared to its persistence length. Despite these differences, much of the thermodynamic formalism still applies on the single-molecule level if the thermodynamic free energies are replaced with appropriate potentials of mean force. The primary remaining differences are consequences of the fact that unlike the free energies, the potentials of mean force are not in general homogeneous functions of their variables. The basic thermodynamic concepts of an intensive or extensive quantity, and the thermodynamic relationships that follow from them, are therefore less useful for interpreting single-molecule experiments.

  11. Computation of generating functions for biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Smith, T.F.; Waterman, M.S.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this paper is to give algorithms and techniques for computing generating functions of certain RNA configurations. Combinatorics and symbolic computation are utilized to calculate the generating functions for small RNA molecules. From these generating functions, it is possible to obtain information about the bonding and structure of the molecules. Specific examples of interest to biology are given and discussed.

  12. Quantum transport of the single metallocene molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Chang, Jing; Wei, Rong-Kai; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-01

    The Quantum transport of three single metallocene molecule is investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory. We find that the three metallocen molecules structure become stretched along the transport direction, the distance between two Cp rings longer than the other theory and experiment results. The lager conductance is found in nickelocene molecule, the main transmission channel is the electron coupling between molecule and the electrodes is through the Ni dxz and dyz orbitals and the s, dxz, dyz of gold. This is also confirmed by the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance at Fermi level. In addition, negative differential resistance effect is found in the ferrocene, cobaltocene molecules, this is also closely related with the evolution of the transmission spectrum under applied bias.

  13. The symmetry of single-molecule conduction.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-14

    We introduce the conductance point group which defines the symmetry of single-molecule conduction within the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown, either rigorously or to within a very good approximation, to correspond to a molecular-conductance point group defined purely in terms of the properties of the conducting molecule. This enables single-molecule conductivity to be described in terms of key qualitative chemical descriptors that are independent of the nature of the molecule-conductor interfaces. We apply this to demonstrate how symmetry controls the conduction through 1,4-benzenedithiol chemisorbed to gold electrodes as an example system, listing also the molecular-conductance point groups for a range of molecules commonly used in molecular electronics research.

  14. Single molecule sensing with carbon nanotube devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C.; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Iftikhar, Mariam; Corso, Brad L.; Gul, O. Tolga; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2013-09-01

    Nanoscale electronic devices like field-effect transistors have long promised to provide sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes have the requisite sensitivity to detect single molecule events and sufficient bandwidth to directly monitor single molecule dynamics in real time. Recent measurements have demonstrated this premise by monitoring the dynamic, single-molecule processivity of three different enzymes: lysozyme, protein Kinase A, and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. In each case, recordings resolved detailed trajectories of tens of thousands of individual chemical events and provided excellent statistics for single-molecule events. This electronic technique has a temporal resolution approaching 1 microsecond, which provides a new window for observing brief, intermediate transition states. In addition, the devices are indefinitely stable, so that the same molecule can be observed for minutes and hours. The extended recordings provide new insights into rare events like transitions to chemically-inactive conformations.

  15. Circumstellar and interstellar synthesis of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Tielens, A G; Charnley, S B

    1997-06-01

    We review the formation and evolution of complex circumstellar and interstellar molecules. A number of promising chemical routes are discussed which may lead to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules, fullerenes, and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains in the outflows from stars. Some of the problems with these chemical schemes are pointed out as well. We also review the role of grains in the formation of complex molecules in interstellar molecular clouds. This starts with the formation of simple molecules in an ice grain mantle. UV photolysis and/or thermal polymerization can convert some of these simple molecules into more complex polymeric structures. Some of these species may be released to the gas phase, particularly in the warm regions around newly formed stars. Methanol and formaldehyde seem to play an important role in this drive towards molecular complexity and their chemistry is traced in some detail.

  16. Macronuclear DNA molecules of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, R K; Brunk, C F

    1986-01-01

    The physical organization of the DNA in the macronuclei of Tetrahymena thermophila was investigated by using alternating-orthogonal-field gel electrophoresis. The genome consisted of a spectrum of molecules with lengths ranging from less than 100 to in excess of 1,500 kilobase pairs. There were about 270 different macronuclear DNA molecules, with an average size of about 800 kilobase pairs. Specific genes were mapped and were generally found on macronuclear DNA molecules of the same size in different strains of T. thermophila. This indicates that the molecular mechanisms giving rise to the macronuclear DNA molecules were precise. The fragmentation process that gave rise to macronuclear DNA molecules occurred between 11 and 19 h after the initiation of conjugation. Images PMID:3773895

  17. Chemical principles of single-molecule electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Neupane, Madhav; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-03-01

    The field of single-molecule electronics harnesses expertise from engineering, physics and chemistry to realize circuit elements at the limit of miniaturization; it is a subfield of nanoelectronics in which the electronic components are single molecules. In this Review, we survey the field from a chemical perspective and discuss the structure-property relationships of the three components that form a single-molecule junction: the anchor, the electrode and the molecular bridge. The spatial orientation and electronic coupling between each component profoundly affect the conductance properties and functions of the single-molecule device. We describe the design principles of the anchor group, the influence of the electronic configuration of the electrode and the effect of manipulating the structure of the molecular backbone and of its substituent groups. We discuss single-molecule conductance switches as well as the phenomenon of quantum interference and then trace their fundamental roots back to chemical principles.

  18. Relationships between dipole moments of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shilin; Bernath, Peter F

    2015-02-14

    The dipole moment is one of the most important physical properties of a molecule. We present a combination rule for the dipole moments of related diatomic molecules. For molecules AB, AX, BY, and XY from two different element groups in the periodic table, if their elements make a small parallelogram, reliable predictions can be obtained. Our approach is particularly useful for systems with heavy atoms. For a large set of molecules tested, the average difference of the prediction from experimental data is less than 0.2 debye (D). The dipole moments for heavy molecules such as GaCl, InBr, SrCl, and SrS, for which no experimental data are available at present, are predicted to be 3.17, 3.76, 3.85 and 11.54 D, respectively. PMID:25588998

  19. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10−7 mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells. PMID:24732879

  20. Pentamethoxyflavanone regulates macrophage polarization and ameliorates sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lili; Song, Pingping; Zhou, Hang; Li, Ang; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Hailiang; Xu, Ge; Zhou, Yang; Wu, Xuefeng; Shen, Yan; Sun, Yang; Wu, Xudong; Xu, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages, owning variable phenotypes and diverse functions, were becoming the target cells in inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of 5,7,3',4',5'-pentamethoxyflavanone (abbreviated as PMFA), a kind of flavonoid, on macrophage polarization, and investigated the underlying mechanism. We found that PMFA significantly inhibited M1 macrophage polarization and diminished the proinflammatory cytokines, meanwhile it greatly enhanced M2 macrophage related molecules. Moreover, PMFA facilitated the phenotype shift from M1 to M2. However, PMFA only slightly inhibited the activation of T and B cells. Further researches showed that the mechanisms can be attributed to PMFA's down-regulation on p-STAT1 and up-regulation on p-STAT6, the pivotal regulatory molecules for M1 and M2 polarization, respectively. In addition, PMFA ameliorated LPS- and cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice, as assessed by the raise of survival rate, descend of tissue damage and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cytokines. PMFA significantly decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and reduced the infiltration of M1 macrophages in lung. As expected, adoptive transfer of PMFA-pretreated M1 macrophages significantly increased survival rate of LPS-challenged mice compared with control mice. Taken together, the results indicate that PMFA regulates macrophage polarization via targeting the STAT1/STAT6 signals and its potential use in treatment of inflammatory disease.

  1. Obese mice are resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Ichinose, Takamichi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-06-01

    Particulate matter can exacerbate respiratory diseases such as asthma. Diesel exhaust particles are the substantial portion of ambient particulate matter with a <2.5 µm diameter in urban areas. Epidemiological data indicate increased respiratory health effects of particulate matter in obese individuals; however, the association between obesity and diesel exhaust particle-induced airway inflammation remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the differences in susceptibility to airway inflammation induced by exposure to diesel exhaust particles between obese mice (db/db) and lean mice (db/+m). Female db/db and db/+m mice were intratracheally administered diesel exhaust particles or vehicle every 2 weeks for a total of seven times. The cellular profile of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histological changes in the lungs were assessed and the lungs and serum were analyzed for the generation of cytokines, chemokines and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Diesel exhaust particle exposure-induced eosinophilic infiltration in db/+m mice accompanied by T-helper 2 cytokine, chemokine and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in the lungs. In contrast, it induced mild neutrophilic airway inflammation accompanied by elevated cytokines and chemokines in db/db mice. The lungs of db/db mice exhibited decreased expression of eosinophil activators/chemoattractants such as interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and eotaxin compared with those of db/+m mice. In addition, serum eotaxin and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels were significantly higher in db/db mice than in db/+m mice. In conclusion, obesity can affect susceptibility to diesel exhaust particle-induced airway inflammation, which is possibly due to differences in local and systemic inflammatory responses between lean and obese individuals.

  2. Defective CD8+ T cell peripheral tolerance in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kreuwel, H T; Biggs, J A; Pilip, I M; Pamer, E G; Lo, D; Sherman, L A

    2001-07-15

    Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice develop spontaneous autoimmune diabetes that involves participation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Previous studies have demonstrated spontaneous reactivity to self-Ags within the CD4+ T cell compartment in this strain. Whether CD8+ T cells in NOD mice achieve and maintain tolerance to self-Ags has not previously been evaluated. To investigate this issue, we have assessed the extent of tolerance to a model pancreatic Ag, the hemagglutinin (HA) molecule of influenza virus, that is transgenically expressed by pancreatic islet beta cells in InsHA mice. Previous studies have demonstrated that BALB/c and B10.D2 mice that express this transgene exhibit tolerance of HA and retain only low-avidity CD8+ T cells specific for the dominant peptide epitope of HA. In this study, we present data that demonstrate a deficiency in peripheral tolerance within the CD8+ T cell repertoire of NOD-InsHA mice. CD8+ T cells can be obtained from NOD-InsHA mice that exhibit high avidity for HA, as measured by tetramer (K(d)HA) binding and dose titration analysis. Significantly, these autoreactive CD8+ T cells can cause diabetes very rapidly upon adoptive transfer into NOD-InsHA recipient mice. The data presented demonstrate a retention in the repertoire of CD8+ T cells with high avidity for islet Ags that could contribute to autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

  3. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 is a modulator of inflammation and vaso-occlusion in transgenic sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, John D.; Mahaseth, Hemachandra; Welch, Thomas E.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hebbel, Robert P.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic sickle mice expressing βS hemoglobin have activated vascular endothelium that exhibits enhanced expression of NF-κB and adhesion molecules that promote vascular stasis in sickle, but not in normal, mice in response to hypoxia/reoxygenation. Sickle mice hemolyze rbcs in vivo as demonstrated by increased reticulocyte counts, plasma hemoglobin and bilirubin, and reduced plasma haptoglobin. The heme content is elevated in sickle organs, which promotes vascular inflammation and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Treatment of sickle mice with hemin further increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and inhibits hypoxia/reoxygenation–induced stasis, leukocyte-endothelium interactions, and NF-κB, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 expression. Heme oxygenase inhibition by tin protoporphyrin exacerbates stasis in sickle mice. Furthermore, treatment of sickle mice with the heme oxygenase enzymatic product carbon monoxide or biliverdin inhibits stasis and NF-κB, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 expression. Local administration of heme oxygenase-1 adenovirus to subcutaneous skin increases heme oxygenase-1 and inhibits hypoxia/reoxygenation–induced stasis in the skin of sickle mice. Heme oxygenase-1 plays a vital role in the inhibition of vaso-occlusion in transgenic sickle mice. PMID:16485041

  5. Attachment of second harmonic-active moiety to molecules for detection of molecules at interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Salafsky, Joshua S.; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2005-10-11

    This invention provides methods of detecting molecules at an interface, which comprise labeling the molecules with a second harmonic-active moiety and detecting the labeled molecules at the interface using a surface selective technique. The invention also provides methods for detecting a molecule in a medium and for determining the orientation of a molecular species within a planar surface using a second harmonic-active moiety and a surface selective technique.

  6. Molecules-in-molecules fragment-based method for the evaluation of Raman spectra of large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovan Jose, K. V.; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2015-10-01

    We present the first implementation of the evaluation Raman spectra of large molecules using the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method (MIM-Raman). Molecular fragments and associated overlapping subsystems are constructed by cutting the C-C bonds in the large molecule based on the connectivity information and a number-based fragmentation scheme. After saturating the dangling bonds with hydrogen link-atoms, independent energy and Raman frequency calculations are performed on each subsystem. Subsequently, link-atom-related forces, Hessian and polarisability derivative matrix elements are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method. In the two-layer model (MIM2), the long-range interactions, absent in the single layer model (MIM1), are taken into account through a second layer at a lower level of theory. The MIM-Raman method is benchmarked on a set of large linear and cage molecules. The MIM extrapolated energy and Raman spectra are compared with the full calculations at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) or B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) levels of theory. The benchmark analysis of 21 molecules at MIM2 show an accuracy improvement of 85% in energies, 74% in Raman frequencies and 66% in intensities over MIM1. The implementation and benchmark analysis validates the MIM-Raman model for exploring Raman spectra of large molecules in the future.

  7. Search for complex organic molecules in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    It was 1969 when the first organic molecule in space, H2CO, was discovered. Since then many organic molecules were discovered by using the NRAO 11 m (upgraded later to 12 m), Nobeyama 45 m, IRAM 30 m, and other highly sensitive radio telescopes as a result of close collaboration between radio astronomers and microwave spectroscopists. It is noteworthy that many famous organic molecules such as CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O and CH3NH2 were detected by 1975. Organic molecules were found in so-called hot cores where molecules were thought to form on cold dust surfaces and then to evaporate by the UV photons emitted from the central star. These days organic molecules are known to exist not only in hot cores but in hot corinos (a warm, compact molecular clump found in the inner envelope of a class 0 protostar) and even protoplanetary disks. As was described above, major organic molecules were known since 1970s. It was very natural that astronomers considered a relationship between organic molecules in space and the origin of life. Several astronomers challenged to detect glycine and other prebiotic molecules without success. ALMA is expected to detect such important materials to further consider the gexogenous deliveryh hypothesis. In this paper I summarize the history in searching for complex organic molecules together with difficulties in observing very weak signals from larger species. The awfully long list of references at the end of this article may be the most useful part for readers who want to feel the exciting discovery stories.

  8. Expression of the synaptic exocytosis-regulating molecule complexin 2 in taste buds and its participation in peripheral taste transduction.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yoshimoto, Joto; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi

    2015-06-01

    Taste information from type III taste cells to gustatory neurons is thought to be transmitted via synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying taste transduction through this pathway have not been fully elucidated. In this study, to identify molecules that participate in synaptic taste transduction, we investigated whether complexins (Cplxs), which play roles in regulating membrane fusion in synaptic vesicle exocytosis, were expressed in taste bud cells. Among four Cplx isoforms, strong expression of Cplx2 mRNA was detected in type III taste cells. To investigate the function of CPLX2 in taste transduction, we observed taste responses in CPLX2-knockout mice. When assessed with electrophysiological and behavioral assays, taste responses to some sour stimuli in CPLX2-knockout mice were significantly lower than those in wild-type mice. These results suggested that CPLX2 participated in synaptic taste transduction from type III taste cells to gustatory neurons. A part of taste information is thought to be transmitted via synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. To identify molecules that participate in synaptic taste transduction, we investigated complexins (Cplxs) expression in taste bud cells. Strong expression of Cplx2 mRNA was detected in taste bud cells. Furthermore, taste responses to some sour stimuli in CPLX2- knockout mice were significantly lower than those in wild-type mice. These suggested that CPLX2 participated in synaptic taste transduction.

  9. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  10. Altered Energy Homeostasis and Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity in KRAP-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Miyasaka, Kyoko; Koyanagi, Midori; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Baba, Iwai; Doi, Keiko; Ohta, Minoru; Kato, Norihiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders have become leading causes of adult morbidity and mortality. KRAP (Ki-ras-induced actin-interacting protein) is a cytoskeleton-associated protein and a ubiquitous protein among tissues, originally identified as a cancer-related molecule, however, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that KRAP-deficient (KRAP−/−) mice show enhanced metabolic rate, decreased adiposity, improved glucose tolerance, hypoinsulinemia and hypoleptinemia. KRAP−/− mice are also protected against high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance despite of hyperphagia. Notably, glucose uptake in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) in KRAP−/− mice is enhanced in an insulin-independent manner, suggesting that BAT is involved in altered energy homeostasis in KRAP−/− mice, although UCP (Uncoupling protein) expressions are not altered. Of interest is the down-regulation of fatty acid metabolism-related molecules, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)-1, ACC-2 and fatty acid synthase in the liver of KRAP−/− mice, which could in part account for the metabolic phenotype in KRAP−/− mice. Thus, KRAP is a novel regulator in whole-body energy homeostasis and may be a therapeutic target in obesity and related diseases. PMID:19156225

  11. Xpa knockout mice.

    PubMed

    de Vries, A; van Steeg, H

    1996-10-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group A correcting (XPA) gene encodes a DNA binding zinc-finger protein that recognizes DNA damage. As such the XPA protein participates in the initial step of the process of nucleotide excision repair. The multicomponent nucleotide excision repair pathway is one of the most thoroughly studied mechanisms that defends both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells against the deleterious effects of UV-B and several chemical components. In the absence of nucleotide excision repair common cellular processes like transcription and replication are disturbed by persisting (unrepaired) DNA lesions (adducts), which may lead to the accumulation of gene mutations and ultimately to cancer. Xeroderma pigmentosum patients have a > 2000 fold increased risk to develop skin cancer at sun-exposed areas. Here we describe that XPA-deficient transgenic mice show features that mimic the phenotype found in humans. Furthermore, the possible use of Xpa- and other nucleotide excision repair deficient mice in cancer research will be outlined in more detail. PMID:9110400

  12. Psychopharmacological Studies in Mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Since 1998, when the laboratory of Medicinal Pharmacology was established in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, I have been interested in psychopharmacological research topics. During this period, we identified a number of novel regulatory mechanisms that control the prefrontal dopamine system through functional interaction between serotonin1A and dopamine D2 receptors or between serotonin1A and σ1 receptors. Our findings suggest that strategies that enhance the prefrontal dopamine system may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We also found that environmental factors during development strongly impact the psychological state in adulthood. Furthermore, we clarified the pharmacological profiles of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors donepezil, galantamine, and rivastigmine, providing novel insights into their mechanisms of action. Finally, we developed the female encounter test, a novel method for evaluating motivation in mice. This simple method should help advance future psychopharmacological research. In this review, we summarize the major findings obtained from our recent studies in mice. PMID:27150930

  13. Prolactin rescues and primes autoreactive B cells directly and indirectly through dendritic cells in B6.Sle3 mice

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J; Saha, S; Peeva, E

    2013-01-01

    The lupus susceptibility interval Sle3/5 confers responsiveness to prolactin in C57BL/6 (B6) mice and hyperprolactinaemia induces a lupus-like phenotype in B6.Sel3/5 mice. In this study, the immunostimulatory effects of prolactin in B6 mice containing the Sle3 portion of the Sel3/5 interval (B6.Sle3 mice) were dissected. Because of the Sle3 interval's involvement in activation of myeloid cells, the effect of dendritic cells (DCs) from prolactin-treated B6.Sle3 mice on the phenotype of B6 mice was also evaluated. B cells from prolactin-treated B6 and B6.Sle3 mice and from B6 recipients of prolactin-modulated DCs from B6.Sle3 mice were tested for DNA-reactivity and resistance to B cell receptor (BCR)-mediated apoptosis. The expression of co-stimulatory molecules on lymphocytes and myeloid cells was also evaluated. In prolactin-treated B6.Sle3 mice, transitional type 2 B cells increased while type 1 B cells decreased as a consequence of prolactin-induced resistance to BCR-mediated apoptosis leading to the survival of DNA-reactive B cells. Follicular B cells from prolactin-treated mice expressed increased levels of CD40, B7·2 and IAb, and DCs and monocytes had higher levels of CD44 and B7·2 than placebo-treated mice. Adoptive transfer of DCs from prolactin-treated B6.Sle3 mice to B6 recipients demonstrated the intrinsic ability of prolactin-modulated DCs to induce a development of lupus-like characteristics in B6 mice. Based on these results, prolactin accelerates the breakdown of immune tolerance in B6.Sle3 mice by promoting the survival, maturation and activation of autoreactive B cells, DCs and macrophages. PMID:23574327

  14. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... to mice that had already begun to lose pigment. They found that the vitiligo-prone mice did ... disorder at all, and 76 percent of normal pigment returned among the vitiligo-affected mice, essentially reversing ...

  15. Genetic Analysis of Mice Skin Exposed by Hyper-Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Rika; Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    In the space environment, physiological alterations, such as low bone density, muscle weakness and decreased immunity, are caused by microgravity and cosmic radiation. On the other hand, it is known that the leg muscles are hypertrophy by 2G-gravity. An understanding of the effects on human body from microgravity to hyper-gravity is very important. Recently, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started a project to detect the changes on gene expression and mineral metabolism caused by microgravity by analyzing the hair of astronauts who stay in the international Space Station (ISS) for a long time. From these results of human hair’s research, the genetic effects of human hair roots by microgravity will become clear. However, it is unclear how the gene expression of hair roots was effected by hypergravity. Therefore, in this experiment, we analyzed the effect on mice skin contained hair roots by comparing microgravity or hypergravity exposed mice. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the genetic effects on mice skin by microgravity or 2G-gravity. The samples were taken from mice exposed to space flight (FL) or hypergravity environment (2G) for 3-months, respectively. The extracted and amplified RNA from these mice skin was used to DNA microarray analysis. in this experiment, we analyzed the effect of gravity by using mice skin contained hair roots, which exposed space (FL) and hyper-gravity (2G) for 3 months and each control. By DNA microarray analysis, we found the common 98 genes changed in both FL and 2G. Among these 98 genes, the functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software. Next, we focused the one of the identified pathways and compared the effects on each molecules in this pathways by the different environments, such as FL and 2G. As the results, we could detect some interesting molecules, which might be depended on the gravity levels. In addition, to investigate

  16. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  17. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications.

  18. Stretched polyethylene films probed by single molecules.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Alexander C; Hofmann, Clemens; Groenen, Edgar J J

    2011-06-01

    Stretched films of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) doped with 2.3,8.9-dibenzanthanthrene (DBATT) were studied using polarization-selective single-molecule spectroscopy at 1.8 K. By measuring the in-plane component of the electronic transition-dipole moments of individual chromophores, the alignment of dopant molecules is determined without averaging. The distributions of chromophore orientations reveal the presence of two fractions of dopant molecules: those oriented along the stretching direction and randomly oriented molecules. With increasing drawing ratio of the polyethylene films, the ratio of oriented to randomly oriented guest molecules increases, whereas the extent of chromophore orientation, that is, the width of the orientation distribution, remains the same. The results are consistent with the interpretation that oriented chromophores reside on the surfaces of polyethylene crystals, instead of in the amorphous polyethylene regions. Guest molecules in stretched polyethylene are oriented due to the alignment of the crystallites on which they are adsorbed. As such, the shape and width of the distributions of chromophore orientations are determined by the interaction of guest molecules with the crystal surfaces.

  19. Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ferez, Rosario

    2016-05-01

    Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules are formed when a ground-state atom is bound to a Rydberg atom. The binding mechanism of these Rydberg molecules is based on the low-energy collisions between a Rydberg electron and a ground-state atom and leads to the unusual oscillatory behavior of the adiabatic potential energy curves. If the ground-state atom immersed into the Rydberg wave function is replaced by a heteronuclear diatomic molecule another type of polyatomic Rydberg molecules can form. In this case, the Rydberg electron is coupled to the internal states of the polar ground-state molecule. In this talk, we will explore the electronic structure and rovibrational properties of these ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecule. For the second type of Rydberg molecules, the polar dimer is allowed to rotate in the electric fields generated by the Rydberg electron and Rydberg core as well as an additional external field. We will investigate the metamorphosis of the Born-Oppenheimer potential curves, essential for the binding mechanism, with varying electric field and analyze the resulting properties such as the vibrational structure and the alignment and orientation of the polar dimer.

  20. Symmetry calculation for molecules and transition states.

    PubMed

    Vandewiele, Nick M; Van de Vijver, Ruben; Van Geem, Kevin M; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Marin, Guy B

    2015-01-30

    The symmetry of molecules and transition states of elementary reactions is an essential property with important implications for computational chemistry. The automated identification of symmetry by computers is a very useful tool for many applications, but often relies on the availability of three-dimensional coordinates of the atoms in the molecule and hence becomes less useful when these coordinates are a priori unavailable. This article presents a new algorithm that identifies symmetry of molecules and transition states based on an augmented graph representation of the corresponding structures, in which both topology and the presence of stereocenters are accounted for. The automorphism group order of the graph associated with the molecule or transition state is used as a starting point. A novel concept of label-stereoisomers, that is, stereoisomers that arise after labeling homomorph substituents in the original molecule so that they become distinguishable, is introduced and used to obtain the symmetry number. The algorithm is characterized by its generic nature and avoids the use of heuristic rules that would limit the applicability. The calculated symmetry numbers are in agreement with expected values for a large and diverse set of structures, ranging from asymmetric, small molecules such as fluorochlorobromomethane to highly symmetric structures found in drug discovery assays. The new algorithm opens up new possibilities for the fast screening of the degree of symmetry of large sets of molecules.

  1. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  2. Study in Mice Links Key Signaling Molecule to Underlying Cause of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... by mutations in a gene that codes for collagen, an abundant structural component of bone. This type ... linked to defects in enzymes that help process collagen to its mature form. These types of OI ...

  3. Giant molecules composed of polar molecules and atoms in mixed dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ran; Tan, Shina

    2014-05-01

    Two or three polar molecules, confined to one or two dimensions, can form stable bound states with a single atom living in three dimensions, if the molecule and the atom can interact resonantly such that their mixed dimensional scattering length is large. We call these bound states ``giant molecules'' since it's a molecule composed of smaller molecules and atoms. We study their properties using techniques including exact numerical solution, exact qunatum diffusion Monte Carlo (QMC), Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), and semiclassical approximation. These bound states have a hierarchical structure reminiscent of the celestial systems.

  4. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Ogura, Masato; Homma, Miwako K; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity.

  5. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Ogura, Masato; Homma, Miwako K; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity. PMID:25668511

  6. The adaptor molecule Trif contributes to murine host defense during Leptospiral infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Priya A; Devlin, Amy A; Miller, Jennifer C; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease and is caused by pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus, including Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans). Humans, domestic and wild animals are susceptible to acute or chronic infection. The innate immune response is a critical defense mechanism against Leptospira interrogans, and has been investigated in mouse models. Murine Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to be key factors in sensing and responding to L. interrogans infection. Specifically, TLR2, TLR4 and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 are essential for host defense against L. interrogans; however, the role of the TLR adaptor molecule TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon β (TRIF) in the response to L. interrogans has not been previously determined. In the present study, TRIF was found to play an important role during leptospiral infection. Following challenge with L. interrogans, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited delayed weight gain compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in L. interrogans burden in the kidneys, lungs, and blood at early time points (less than 7days post infection). Multiple components of the innate immune responses were dampened in response to leptospiral infection including transcription and production of cytokines, and the humoral response, which suggested that TRIF contributes to expression and production of cytokines important for the host defense against L. interrogans. PMID:27259371

  7. Line broadening of confined CO gas: from molecule-wall to molecule-molecule collisions with pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, J-M; Boulet, C; Auwera, J Vander; El Hamzaoui, H; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M

    2014-02-14

    The infrared absorption in the fundamental band of CO gas confined in porous silica xerogel has been recorded at room temperature for pressures between about 5 and 920 hPa using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. The widths of individual lines are determined from fits of measured spectra and compared with ab initio predictions obtained from requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. Good agreement is obtained from the low pressure regime where the line shapes are governed by molecule-wall collisions to high pressures where the influence of molecule-molecule interactions dominates. These results, together with those obtained with a simple analytical model, indicate that both mechanisms contribute in a practically additive way to the observed linewidths. They also confirm that a single collision of a molecule with a wall changes its rotational state. These results are of interest for the determination of some characteristics of the opened porosity of porous materials through optical soundings.

  8. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives. PMID:26606461

  9. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  10. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom-molecule collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom-molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X1Σ+g ground state 85Rb2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom-molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85Rb2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 1011 cm-3.

  11. Phononic Molecules Studied by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Fainstein, A.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaitre, A.

    2010-01-04

    An acoustic nanocavity can confine phonons in such a way that they act like electrons in an atom. By combining two of these phononic-atoms, it is possible to form a phononic 'molecule', with acoustic modes that are similar to the electronic states in a hydrogen molecule. We report Raman scattering experiments performed in a monolithic structure formed by a phononic molecule embedded in an optical cavity. The acoustic mode splitting becomes evident through both the amplification and change of selection rules induced by the optical cavity confinement. The results are in perfect agreement with photoelastic model simulations.

  12. Life at the Single Molecule Level

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunny

    2011-03-04

    In a living cell, gene expression—the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA followed by translation to protein—occurs stochastically, as a consequence of the low copy number of DNA and mRNA molecules involved. Can one monitor these processes in a living cell in real time? How do cells with identical genes exhibit different phenotypes? Recent advances in single-molecule imaging in living bacterial cells allow these questions to be answered at the molecular level in a quantitative manner. It was found that rare events of single molecules can have important biological consequences.

  13. Chiral Isotropic Liquids from Achiral Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    L Hough; M Spannuth; M Nakata; D Coleman; C Jones; G Dantlgraber; C Tschierske; J Watanabe; N Clark; et al.

    2011-12-31

    A variety of simple bent-core molecules exhibit smectic liquid crystal phases of planar fluid layers that are spontaneously both polar and chiral in the absence of crystalline order. We found that because of intralayer structural mismatch, such layers are also only marginally stable against spontaneous saddle splay deformation, which is incompatible with long-range order. This results in macroscopically isotropic fluids that possess only short-range orientational and positional order, in which the only macroscopically broken symmetry is chirality - even though the phases are formed from achiral molecules. Their conglomerate domains exhibit optical rotatory powers comparable to the highest ever found for isotropic fluids of chiral molecules.

  14. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila G.; Vukstich, Vasyl S.; Papp, Alexander V.; Snegursky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by a low-energy (<70 eV) electron impact was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Stefan Matejcik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  15. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M.; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R.; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L.; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J.

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to show the identity of “CPL-active simple organic molecules” as a new concept in Organic Chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and nonaggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented. PMID:26136234

  16. Mice lacking all conventional MHC class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Lars; Labrecque, Nathalie; Engberg, Jan; Dierich, Andrée; Svejgaard, Arne; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Fugger, Lars

    1999-01-01

    MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in the selection of the T cell repertoire, in the establishment and regulation of the adaptive immune response, and in autoimmune deviation. We have generated knockout mice lacking all four of the classical murine MHC-II genes (MHCIIΔ/Δ mice), via a large (80-kilobase) deletion of the entire class II region that was engineered by homologous recombination and Cre recombinase-mediated excision. These mice feature immune system perturbations like those of Aα and Aβ knockout animals, notably a dearth of CD4+ lymphocytes in the thymus and spleen. No new anatomical or physiological abnormalities were observed in MHCIIΔ/Δ mice. Because these animals are devoid of all classical MHC-II chains, even unpaired chains, they make excellent recipients for MHC-II transgenes from other species, avoiding the problem of interspecies cross-pairing of MHC-II chains. Therefore, they should be invaluable for engineering “humanized” mouse models of human MHC-II-associated autoimmune disorders. PMID:10468609

  17. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  18. Antigen targeting to APC: from mice to veterinary species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, B; Poderoso, T; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J; Revilla, C

    2013-10-01

    Antigen delivery to receptors expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) has shown to improve immunogenicity of vaccines in mice. An enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), helper T cell or humoral responses was obtained depending on the type of APC and the surface molecule targeted. Although this strategy is being also evaluated in livestock animals with promising results, some discrepancies have been found between species and pathogens. The genetic diversity of livestock animals, the different pattern of expression of some receptors among species, the use of different markers to characterize APC in large animals and sometimes the lack of reagents make difficult to compare results obtained in different species. In this review, we summarize the data available regarding antigen targeting to APC receptors in cattle, sheep and pig and discuss the results found in these animals in the context of what has been obtained in mice. PMID:23648645

  19. Antigen targeting to APC: from mice to veterinary species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, B; Poderoso, T; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J; Revilla, C

    2013-10-01

    Antigen delivery to receptors expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) has shown to improve immunogenicity of vaccines in mice. An enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), helper T cell or humoral responses was obtained depending on the type of APC and the surface molecule targeted. Although this strategy is being also evaluated in livestock animals with promising results, some discrepancies have been found between species and pathogens. The genetic diversity of livestock animals, the different pattern of expression of some receptors among species, the use of different markers to characterize APC in large animals and sometimes the lack of reagents make difficult to compare results obtained in different species. In this review, we summarize the data available regarding antigen targeting to APC receptors in cattle, sheep and pig and discuss the results found in these animals in the context of what has been obtained in mice.

  20. Assessing Cognition in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hölter, Sabine M; Garrett, Lillian; Einicke, Jan; Sperling, Bettina; Dirscherl, Petra; Zimprich, Annemarie; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang

    2015-12-02

    Genetically modified mouse models have proven useful to study learning and memory processes and the neurocircuitry and molecular mechanisms involved, as well as to develop therapies for diseases involving cognitive impairment. A variety of tests have been developed to measure cognition in mice, and here we present those established and regularly used in the German Mouse Clinic. The test paradigms have been carefully chosen according to reliability of results and disease relevance of the cognitive functions assessed. Further criteria were time efficiency and ease of application. All tests assess slightly different but also overlapping or interacting aspects of learning and memory so that they can be used to complement each other in a comprehensive assessment of cognitive function. The five protocols described are for spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze, social discrimination, object recognition, automated assessment of learning and memory using the IntelliCage, and olfactory discrimination learning.

  1. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.; Kaplan, D.M.; / /IIT, Chicago

    2008-11-01

    Muon ionization cooling is the only practical method for preparing high-brilliance beams needed for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen with RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a particle identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. Plans for measurements of emittance and cooling are described.

  2. Small Molecules from the Human Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Mohamed S.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in the use of genomics to guide natural product discovery and a recent emphasis on understanding the molecular mechanisms of microbiota-host interactions have converged on the discovery of natural products from the human microbiome. Here, we review what is known about small molecules produced by the human microbiota. Numerous molecules representing each of the major metabolite classes have been found that have a variety of biological activities, including immune modulation and antibiosis. We discuss technologies that will affect how microbiota-derived molecules are discovered in the future, and consider the challenges inherent in finding specific molecules that are critical for driving microbe-host and microbe-microbe interactions and their biological relevance. PMID:26206939

  3. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  4. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  5. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  6. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  7. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    SciTech Connect

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-05-08

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  8. Laser Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schawlow, Arthur L.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys new laser techniques and a variety of spectroscopic experiments that can be used to detect, measure and study very small numbers of atoms on molecules. The range of applicability of these techniques is also included. (HM)

  9. Polyatomic molecules under intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Jackson, James E; Levine, Benjamin G; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-12-11

    Interaction of intense laser pulses with atoms and molecules is at the forefront of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. It is the gateway to powerful new tools that include above threshold ionization, high harmonic generation, electron diffraction, molecular tomography, and attosecond pulse generation. Intense laser pulses are ideal for probing and manipulating chemical bonding. Though the behavior of atoms in strong fields has been well studied, molecules under intense fields are not as well understood and current models have failed in certain important aspects. Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon excitation. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a "bag of atoms" during field induced ionization. In this article we present a set of experiments and theoretical calculations exploring the behavior of a large collection of aryl alkyl ketones when irradiated with intense femtosecond pulses. Specifically, we consider to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The set of molecules studied is further divided into smaller sets, sorted by type and position of functional groups. The pump-probe time-delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, which amount to only a few hundred millielectronvolts, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to predict molecular dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose the

  10. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in the heart.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Hans W M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Visser, Cees A; Meijer, Chris J L M; Hack, C Erik

    2002-11-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) belongs to the superfamily of immunoglobulin-like adhesion molecules. Up-regulation of ICAM-1 occurs in many different pathophysiological processes. Also, cardiomyocytes can express ICAM-1-for example, in acute myocardial infarction. Moreover, inhibition of ICAM-1 expression in the heart dramatically reduces infarct size. Hence, inhibitors of ICAM-1 may provide a novel therapeutic option for acute myocardial infarction.

  11. Recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules

    DOEpatents

    Swansiger, W.A.

    1984-10-17

    This invention relates to the recovery of tritium from various tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium. More particularly, the invention relates to the recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium wherein the reaction is conducted in a reactor which permits the reaction to occur as a moving front reaction from the point where the tritium enters the reactor charged with uranium down the reactor until the uranium is exhausted.

  12. Hadronic molecules in the heavy baryon spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entem, D. R.; Ortega, P. G.; Fernández, F.

    2016-01-01

    We study possible baryon molecules in the non-strange heavy baryon spectrum. We include configurations with a heavy-meson and a light baryon. We find several structures, in particular we can understand the Λc(2940) as a D*N molecule with JP = 3/2- quantum numbers. We also find D(*)Δ candidates for the recently discovered Xc(3250) resonance.

  13. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ν{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ν{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  14. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  15. Tests of Lorentz invariance using hydrogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Holger; Herrmann, Sven; Saenz, Alejandro; Peters, Achim; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the consequences of Lorentz violation (as expressed within the Lorentz-violating extension of the standard model) for the hydrogen molecule, which represents a generic model of a molecular binding. Lorentz-violating shifts of electronic, vibrational and rotational energy levels, and of the internuclear distance are calculated. This offers the possibility of obtaining improved bounds on Lorentz invariance by experiments using molecules.

  16. Auxin biology revealed by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Robert, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    The plant hormone auxin regulates virtually every aspect of plant growth and development and unraveling its molecular and cellular modes of action is fundamental for plant biology research. Chemical genomics is the use of small molecules to modify protein functions. This approach currently rises as a powerful technology for basic research. Small compounds with auxin-like activities or affecting auxin-mediated biological processes have been widely used in auxin research. They can serve as a tool complementary to genetic and genomic methods, facilitating the identification of an array of components modulating auxin metabolism, transport and signaling. The employment of high-throughput screening technologies combined with informatics-based chemical design and organic chemical synthesis has since yielded many novel small molecules with more instantaneous, precise and specific functionalities. By applying those small molecules, novel molecular targets can be isolated to further understand and dissect auxin-related pathways and networks that otherwise are too complex to be elucidated only by gene-based methods. Here, we will review examples of recently characterized molecules used in auxin research, highlight the strategies of unraveling the mechanisms of these small molecules and discuss future perspectives of small molecule applications in auxin biology. PMID:24252105

  17. A prototype storage ring for neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Crompvoets, F M; Bethlem, H L; Jongma, R T; Meijer, G

    2001-05-10

    The ability to cool and manipulate atoms with light has yielded atom interferometry, precision spectroscopy, Bose-Einstein condensates and atom lasers. The extension of controlled manipulation to molecules is expected to be similarly rewarding, but molecules are not as amenable to manipulation by light owing to a far more complex energy-level spectrum. However, time-varying electric and magnetic fields have been successfully used to control the position and velocity of ions, suggesting that these schemes can also be used to manipulate neutral particles having an electric or magnetic dipole moment. Although the forces exerted on neutral species are many orders of magnitude smaller than those exerted on ions, beams of neutral dipolar molecules have been successfully slowed down in a series of pulsed electric fields and subsequently loaded into an electrostatic trap. Here we extend the scheme to include a prototype electrostatic storage ring made of a hexapole torus with a circumference of 80 cm. After injection, decelerated bunches of deuterated ammonia molecules, each containing about 106 molecules in a single quantum state and with a translational temperature of 10 mK, travel up to six times around the ring. Stochastic cooling might provide a means to increase the phase-space density of the stored molecules in the storage ring, and we expect this to open up new opportunities for molecular spectroscopy and studies of cold molecular collisions.

  18. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  19. Self-Assemblies of novel molecules, VECAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bijay; Kim, Hye-Young; Lee, Soojin; Novak, Brian; Moldovan, Dorel

    2015-03-01

    VECAR is a newly synthesized molecule, which is an amphiphilic antioxidant molecule that consists of two molecular groups, vitamin-E and Carnosine, linked by a hydrocarbon chain. The hydrocarbon chain is hydrophobic and both vitamin-E and Carnosine ends are hydrophilic. In the synthesis process, the length of the hydrophobic chain of VECAR molecules can vary from the shortest (n =0) to the longest (n =18), where n indicates the number of carbon atoms in the chain. We conducted MD simulation studies of self-assembly of VECAR molecules in water using GROMACS on LONI HPC resources. Our study shows that there is a strong correlation between the shape and atomistic structure of the self-assembled nano-structures (SANs) and the chain-length (n) of VECAR molecules. We will report the results of data analyses including the atomistic structure of each SANs and the dynamic and energetic mechanisms of their formation as function of time. In summary, both VECAR molecules of chain-length n =18 and 9 form worm-like micelles, which may be used as a drug delivery system. This research is supported by the Louisiana Board of Regents-RCS Grant (LEQSF(2012-15)-RD-A-19).

  20. Chemical Recycling of Molecules in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Hitomi

    2015-08-01

    Modeling is essential to understand the important physical and chemical processes that occur in cometary comae, especially the relationship between native and sibling molecules, such as, HCN and CN. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms observed in comets. The effects of photoelectrons that react via impacts are important to the overall ionization in the inner coma. We have found that many molecules undergo protonation reactions with primarily water, followed by electron recombination resulting in the original molecules in a vibrationally excited state. These excited molecules spontaneously emit photons back to the ground state. We identify this series of reactions as chemical “recycling.” We discuss the importance of this mechanism for HCN, NH3, and water in comets. We also identify other relevant processes in the collision-dominated, inner coma of a comet within a global modeling framework to better understand observations and in situ measurements of cometary species, especially relationships between native and sibling molecules for the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.Acknowledgements: We appreciate support from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under Grant No. 0908529. This program is partially supported by the MEXT Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, 2014-2018.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics of Atom-Molecule Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li-Bin; Liu, Jie

    2014-03-01

    The creation of ultracold molecules has opened up new possibilities for studies on molecular matter waves, strongly interacting superfluids, high-precision molecular spectroscopy and coherent molecular optics. In an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and a degenerate Fermi-Fermi or Fermi-Bose mixture, magnetic Feshbach resonance or optical photoassociation (PA) technique has been used to create not only diatomic molecules but also more complex molecules. In this chapter, we focus on many issues of nonlinear dynamics of atom-molecule systems. In Sec. 1, on the basis of the two-channelmean-field approach, we study the manybody effects on the Landau-Zener(LZ) picture of two-body molecular production through dramatically distorting the energy levels near the Feshbach resonance. In Sec. 2, we investigate the Feshbach resonance with modulation of an oscillating magnetic field. In Sec. 3, we include the nonlinear interparticle collisions and focus on the linear instability induced by the collisions and the adiabatic fidelity of the atom-trimer dark state in a stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). In Sec. 4, we theoretically investigate conversion problem from atom to N-body polyatomic molecule in an ultracold bosonic system by implementing the generalized STIRAP. In the last section, we discuss role of two-body interactions in the Feshbach conversion of fermionic atoms to bosonic molecules.

  2. Vibrational Cooling of Photoassociated Homonuclear Cold Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passagem, Henry; Ventura, Paulo; Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we produce vibrationally cold homonuclear Rb molecules using spontaneous optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. In the first step, we use a photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the singlet ground state. Then in a second step, a 50 W broadband laser at 1071 nm, which bandwidth is about 2 nm, is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the excited state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels below ν = 35 . The molecules can be further cooled using a broadband light source near 685 nm. In order to obtain such broadband source, we have used a 5 mW superluminescent diode, which is amplified in a tapered amplifier using a double pass configuration. After the amplification, the spectrum is properly shaped and we end up with about 90 mW distributed in the 682-689 nm range. The final vibrational distribution is probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm operating at 4KHz. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  3. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  4. First wild XXY house mice.

    PubMed

    Hauffe, Heidi C; Giménez, Mabel D; Garagna, Silvia; Searle, Jeremy B

    2010-07-01

    Laboratory house mice (Mus musculus) with the XXY condition can be generated with ease and have been used as a biomedical model. However, although the XXY constitution has been described in humans and many domestic and wild mammal species, and a very large number of wild house mice have been karyotyped previously, no wild individuals of M. musculus with an XXY karyotype have ever been reported. Therefore, it is rather extraordinary that two wild XXY house mice were caught by us on two different farms in northern Italy in 2008. Except for the extra X chromosome, one male had a standard karyotype (2n = 40) and the other, the karyotype of the Cremona metacentric population (2n = 22). In this paper, the phenotype of these two individuals is described. Observations for both of these wild males agree with those of laboratory XXY mice, i.e., they had a normal body mass and appearance, but significantly smaller testes than normal, and no visible germ cells. The incidence of the XXY chromosome anomaly in wild mice (two among 5,123 wild mice surveyed by us and our colleagues, i.e., approximately 0.08% among wild-caught males) is intermediate between that found in male laboratory mice (approximately 0.04%) and that found in male humans (0.2%).

  5. What can mice tell us about Foxp2 function?

    PubMed

    French, Catherine A; Fisher, Simon E

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions of the FOXP2 gene cause a rare speech and language disorder, a discovery that has opened up novel avenues for investigating the relevant neural pathways. FOXP2 shows remarkably high conservation of sequence and neural expression in diverse vertebrates, suggesting that studies in other species are useful in elucidating its functions. Here we describe how investigations of mice that carry disruptions of Foxp2 provide insights at multiple levels: molecules, cells, circuits and behaviour. Work thus far has implicated the gene in key processes including neurite outgrowth, synaptic plasticity, sensorimotor integration and motor-skill learning.

  6. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction

  7. Local delivery of gene-modifying triplex-forming molecules to epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Faye A.; Hu, Rong-Hua; Milstone, Leonard M.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are particularly suitable candidates for in situ gene correction. Intraperitoneal administration of a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) was shown previously to introduce DNA base changes in a reporter gene in skin, without identifying which cells had been targeted. We extend those previous experiments using two triplex-forming molecules (TFMs), a peptide nucleic acid (PNA-Antp) and a TFO (AG30), and two lines of transgenic mice that have the chromosomally integrated λsupFG1 shuttle-reporter transgene. Successful in vivo genomic modification occurs in epidermis and dermis in CD1 transgenic mice following either intraperitoneal or intradermal delivery of the PNA-Antennapedia conjugate. FITC-PNA-Antp accumulates in nuclei of keratinocytes and, after intradermal delivery of the PNA-Antp, chromosomally modified, keratin 5 positive basal keratinocytes persist for at least 10 days. In hairless (SKH1) mice with the λsupFG1 transgene, intradermal delivery of the TFO, AG30, introduces gene modifications in both tail and back skin and those chromosomal modifications persist in basal keratinocytes for 10 days. Hairless mice should facilitate comparison of various targeting agents and methods of delivery. Gene targeting by repeated local administration of oligonucleotides may prove clinically useful for judiciously selected disease-causing genes in the epidermis. PMID:23014335

  8. Mechanism of cellular response to nanoscale aggregates of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yi

    This dissertation research focused on the illustration of the molecular mechanism of cellular response to nanoscale aggregates formed by small molecules. There are five chapters in this dissertation. Chapter 1 summarizes the current research on the evaluation of cell response (i.e., biocompatibility/cytotoxicity) to small molecular hydrogelators. Chapter 2 describes an interesting phenomenon that supramolecular hydrogelators consisting of N-terminated dipeptides, which exhibit selective inhibitory effects against cancer cells. This study calls for the development of a new approach for identification of protein targets of the hydrogelators. Chapter 3 describes the evaluation of interactions between cytosol proteins of a mammalian cell line and morphologically different nanoscale molecular aggregates formed by small peptidic molecules. Chapter 4 describes the research on the mechanism of a type of molecular aggregates, which cluster short microtubules to prevent the growth of microtubule. This unprecedented mechanism of "self-assembly to interfere with self-organization " contributes to inhibiting growth of cancer cells in several mammalian cell based assays and a xenograft tumor mice model. At the end, Chapter 5 reports a novel supramolecular hydrogelator, which consists of fluorene and the pentapeptide epitope (TIGYG) of potassium ion (K+) channels, to self-assemble in water to form the tunable, hierarchical nanostructures dictated by the concentration of K+. In conclusion, this dissertation research demonstrates a new approach for investigating cellular target and molecular mechanism of self-assembled aggregates formed by small peptide derivatives based hydrogelators, which will make contribution to the development of supramolecular hydrogelators as biomaterials. Moreover, the differential cytotoxicity of molecular aggregates illustrated in this research promises a new direction for developing anti-cancer drug based on interactions between molecular aggregates and

  9. Photochemical restoration of visual responses in blind mice

    PubMed Central

    Polosukhina, Aleksandra; Litt, Jeffrey; Tochitsky, Ivan; Nemargut, Joseph; Sychev, Yivgeny; De Kouchkovsky, Ivan; Huang, Tracy; Borges, Katharine; Trauner, Dirk; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Kramer, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are degenerative blinding diseases caused by the death of rods and cones, leaving the remainder of the visual system intact but largely unable to respond to light. Here we show that, AAQ, a synthetic small molecule photoswitch, can restore light sensitivity to the retina and behavioral responses in vivo in mouse models of RP without exogenous gene delivery. Brief application of AAQ bestows prolonged light sensitivity on multiple types of retinal neurons, resulting in synaptically amplified responses and center-surround antagonism in arrays of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Intraocular injection of AAQ restores the pupillary light reflex and locomotory light avoidance responses in mice lacking retinal photoreceptors, indicating reconstitution of light signaling to brain circuits. AAQ and related photoswitch molecules present a new drug strategy for restoring retinal function in degenerative blinding diseases. PMID:22841312

  10. Isomerization reactions on single adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Karina

    2009-02-17

    Molecular switches occur throughout nature. In one prominent example, light induces the isomerization of retinal from the compact 11-cis form to the elongated all-trans form, a conversion that triggers the transformation of light into a neural impulse in the eye. Applying these natural principles to synthetic systems offers a promising way to construct smaller and faster nanoelectronic devices. In such systems, electronic switches are essential components for storage and logical operations. The development of molecular switches on the single-molecule level would represent a major step toward incorporating molecules as building units into nanoelectronic circuits. Molecular switches must be both reversible and bistable. To meet these requirements, a molecule must have at least two different thermally stable forms and a way to repeatedly interconvert between those forms based on changes in light, heat, pressure, magnetic or electric fields, pH, mechanical forces, or electric currents. The conversion should be connected to a measurable change in electronic, optical, magnetic, or mechanical properties. Because isomers can differ significantly in physical and chemical properties, isomerization could serve as a molecular switching mechanism. Integration of molecular switches into larger circuits will probably require arranging them on surfaces, which will require a better understanding of isomerization reactions in these environments. In this Account, we describe our scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the isomerization of individual molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Investigating chlorobenzene and azobenzene derivatives on the fcc(111) faces of Ag, Cu, and Au, we explored the influence of substituents and the substrate on the excitation mechanism of the isomerization reaction induced by inelastically tunneling electrons. We achieved an irreversible configurational (cis-trans) isomerization of individual 4-dimethyl-amino-azobenzene-4-sulfonic acid molecules on Au

  11. Molecular characterization of novel H-2 class I molecules expressed by a C3H UV-induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, M; Lewis, K D; Rovner, D M

    1985-01-01

    Two novel class I-like molecules expressed on tumor 1591, a C3H UV-induced fibrosarcoma, are biochemically characterized using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, a cross-blocking RIA, and tryptic peptide mapping. One novel molecule that reacts with CP28, a syngeneic tumor-specific monoclonal antibody, appears mosaic because it possesses characteristics of both Kk and Dk class I molecules. The second molecule is closely related but not identical to the bona fide Ld molecule expressed on BALB/c spleen. Thus 1591 expresses at least two novel class I molecules and is vigorously rejected by normal C3H mice, while a variant tumor derived from 1591, termed AS7, does not express these two class I molecules although it still expresses Kk and Dk. The significance of these observations to the immunobiology and genetics of the UV-induced fibrosarcoma system is discussed. Speculations on the role that the major histocompatibility complex may play in the immunosurveillance of neoplasms are also presented. Images PMID:3860872

  12. Somatostatin Receptor 1 and 5 Double Knockout Mice Mimic Neurochemical Changes of Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kharmate, Geetanjali; Norman, Michael; Liu, Shi-He; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.; Brunicardi, Charles F.; Kumar, Ujendra

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD). However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST) positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5). Methods and Findings To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2). Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5−/− and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the pathophysiology of

  13. IL-1 receptor-antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout mice show anxiety-like behavior by aging.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Chisato; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kiyama, Yuji; Manabe, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-07-10

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) plays a critical role in stress responses, and its mRNA is induced in the brain by restraint stress. Previously, we reported that IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout (KO) mice, which lacked IL-1Ra molecules that antagonize the IL-1 receptor, showed anti-depression-like behavior via adrenergic modulation at the age of 8 weeks. Here, we report that IL-1Ra KO mice display an anxiety-like phenotype that is induced spontaneously by aging in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. This anxiety-like phenotype was improved by the administration of diazepam. The expression of the anxiety-related molecule glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was significantly reduced in 20-week-old but not in 11-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) was not altered between IL-1Ra KO mice and WT littermates at either 11 or 20 weeks old. Analysis of monoamine concentration in the hippocampus revealed that tryptophan, the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly increased in 20-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to littermate WT mice. These findings strongly suggest that the anxiety-like behavior observed in older mice was caused by the complicated alteration of monoamine metabolism and/or GR expression in the hippocampus.

  14. Sex-associated expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and accessory molecules, PDL-1, PDL-2 and MHC-II, in F480+ macrophages during murine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Togno-Peirce, Cristián; Nava-Castro, Karen; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are critically involved in the interaction between T. crassiceps and the murine host immune system. Also, a strong gender-associated susceptibility to murine cysticercosis has been reported. Here, we examined the sex-associated expression of molecules MHC-II, CD80, CD86, PD-L1, and PD-L2 on peritoneal F4/80(hi) macrophages of BALB/c mice infected with Taenia crassiceps. Peritoneal macrophages from both sexes of mice were exposed to T. crassiceps total extract (TcEx). BALB/c Females mice recruit higher number of macrophages to the peritoneum. Macrophages from infected animals show increased expression of PDL2 and CD80 that was dependent from the sex of the host. These findings suggest that macrophage recruitment at early time points during T. crassiceps infection is a possible mechanism that underlies the differential sex-associated susceptibility displayed by the mouse gender.

  15. Sex-Associated Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules CD80, CD86, and Accessory Molecules, PDL-1, PDL-2 and MHC-II, in F480+ Macrophages during Murine Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Togno-Peirce, Cristián; Nava-Castro, Karen; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are critically involved in the interaction between T. crassiceps and the murine host immune system. Also, a strong gender-associated susceptibility to murine cysticercosis has been reported. Here, we examined the sex-associated expression of molecules MHC-II, CD80, CD86, PD-L1, and PD-L2 on peritoneal F4/80hi macrophages of BALB/c mice infected with Taenia crassiceps. Peritoneal macrophages from both sexes of mice were exposed to T. crassiceps total extract (TcEx). BALB/c Females mice recruit higher number of macrophages to the peritoneum. Macrophages from infected animals show increased expression of PDL2 and CD80 that was dependent from the sex of the host. These findings suggest that macrophage recruitment at early time points during T. crassiceps infection is a possible mechanism that underlies the differential sex-associated susceptibility displayed by the mouse gender. PMID:23533995

  16. Mining for Molecules in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Scientists are using the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to go prospecting in a rich molecular cloud in our Milky Way Galaxy. They seek to discover new, complex molecules in interstellar space that may be precursors to life. The GBT and Molecules The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and some molecules it has discovered. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Clouds like this one are the raw material for new stars and planets. We know that complex chemistry builds prebiotic molecules in such clouds long before the stars and planets are formed. There is a good chance that some of these interstellar molecules may find their way to the surface of young planets such as the early Earth, and provide a head start for the chemistry of life. For the first time, we now have the capability to make a very thorough and methodical search to find all the chemicals in the clouds," said Anthony Remijan, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). In the past three years, Remijan and his colleagues have used the GBT to discover ten new interstellar molecules, a feat unequalled in such a short time by any other team or telescope. The scientists discovered those molecules by looking specifically for them. However, they now are changing their strategy and casting a wide net designed to find whatever molecules are present, without knowing in advance what they'll find. In addition, they are making their data available freely to other scientists, in hopes of speeding the discovery process. The research team presented its plan to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in St. Louis, MO. As molecules rotate and vibrate, they emit radio waves at specific frequencies. Each molecule has a unique pattern of such frequencies, called spectral lines, that constitutes a "fingerprint" identifying that molecule. Laboratory tests can determine the pattern of spectral lines that identifies a specific molecule. Most past discoveries came from identifying a molecule's pattern in

  17. What is the minimum number of water molecules required to dissolve a potassium chloride molecule?

    PubMed

    Sen, Anik; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2010-12-01

    This work answers an unsolved question that consists of determining the least number of water molecules necessary to separate a potassium chloride molecule. The answer based on accurate quantum chemical calculations suggests that tetramers are the smallest clusters necessary to dissociate KCl molecules. The study was made with Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory modified with the cluster theory having single, double, and perturbative triple excitations. With this extensive study, the dissociation of KCl molecule in different water clusters was evaluated. The calculated results show that four water molecules stabilize a solvent separated K(+)/Cl(-) ion-pair in prismatic structure and with six water molecules further dissociation was observed. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of KCl dissolved in water establishes that clusters are made of closely bound ions with a mean of five water molecules per ion-pair [K(+)(H(2)O)(5)Cl(-)]. (Max and Chapados, Appl Spectrosc 1999, 53, 1601; Max and Chapados, J Chem Phys 2001, 115, 2664.) The calculated results tend to support that five water molecules leads toward the formation of contact ion-pair. The structures, energies, and infrared spectra of KCl molecules in different water clusters are also discussed.

  18. Ovarian function and morphology after deletion of the DARPP-32 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, A; Fritz, S; Mani, S; Rajendra Kumar, T; Thalhammer, A; Ingrassia, P; Fienberg, A A; Greengard, P

    2004-09-01

    A plethora of systemic and local signaling molecules regulate ovarian function, but how different signaling molecules interact within an ovarian target cell is not known. Here we report that endocrine cells of the ovary express a phosphoprotein, DARPP-32 (dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32,000), which integrates signaling molecules in neurons. We thus hypothesized that DARPP-32 might act in a similar way in ovarian endocrine cells and therefore studied whether DARPP-32 gene deletion has consequences for ovarian functions in mice. Reproductive performance of adult mutants did not differ from wild-type females, as judged from numbers of litters and pups delivered. Similar steroid levels in mutant and wild-type mice ruled out gross abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. However, an analysis of ovarian morphology, using serially sectioned ovaries, revealed several differences. Ovaries of young adult mutant mice at 2 - 3 months contained luteinized follicles, but fewer corpora lutea. At 5 - 6 months, large cysts were found in mutant mice, as well as reduced numbers of preantral follicles and antral follicles. Interstitial cell hypertrophy and degeneration was marked in all mutant ovaries at this age. Thus, while the lack of DARPP-32 does not overtly alter reproductive performance in adult mice, it is associated with progressive alterations and derangements of growth and development of ovarian follicles, suggesting premature ovarian ageing. This implies that ovarian DARPP-32 is involved in follicular development, presumably by integrating effects of signaling molecules, which act together to ensure efficient follicular development.

  19. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  20. Interferon-gamma is required for lupus-like disease and lymphoaccumulation in MRL-lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Balomenos, D; Rumold, R; Theofilopoulos, A N

    1998-01-15

    Congenic MRL-lpr mice homozygous and heterozygous for the IFN-gamma gene disruption were created to assess the role of this pleotropic cytokine on the lymphoaccumulation and lupus-like disease of Fas-defective mice. Early death was prevented, and glomerulonephritis severely reduced in IFN-gamma-/- mice. Hypergammaglobulinemia was maintained with a switch from IgG2a to IgG1 predominance, but the dramatic decrease in levels of the dominant IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies was not associated with a compensatory increase in TH2-associated IgG subclasses. Remarkably, early death and glomerulonephritis were also prevented in IFN-gamma+/- mice, although autoantibody levels and glomerular immune deposits were equivalent to IFN-gamma+/+ lpr mice, indicating the importance of additional locally-exerted disease-promoting effects of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma-/- mice exhibited reduced lymphadenopathy concomitant to a decrease in DN B220(+) T cells. In vivo BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of DN B220(+) cells in IFN-gamma-/- vs. IFN-gamma+/+ lpr mice, while enhanced proliferation of all other T cell subsets was unaffected. Macrophages of IFN-gamma-/-lpr mice expressed markedly decreased levels of MHC class I and II molecules compared with controls. Moreover, the heightened expression of MHC class II molecules on proximal tubules of IFN-gamma+/+ lpr mice was significantly reduced in both IFN-gamma-/- and IFN-gamma+/- mice. The data indicate that IFN-gamma hyperproduction is required for lupus development, presumably by increasing MHC expression and autoantigen presentation to otherwise quiescent nontolerant anti-self T cells, and also by promoting local immune and inflammatory processes.

  1. Tamoxifen administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Jonathan; Littlewood, Trevor; Soucek, Laura

    2015-03-01

    The strategy of fusing a protein of interest to a hormone-binding domain (HBD) of a steroid hormone receptor allows fine control of the activity of the fused protein. Such fusion proteins are inactive in the absence of ligand, because they are complexed with a variety of intracellular polypeptides. Upon ligand binding, the receptor is released from its inhibitory complex and the fusion protein becomes functional. In the murine estrogen receptor (ER) fusion system, proteins are fused to the HBD of the ER. The system relies on the use of a mutant ER known as ER(TAM). Compared to the wild-type HBD, ER(TAM) has 1000-fold lower affinity for estrogen, yet remains responsive to activation by the synthetic steroid 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Because 4-OHT is expensive, animals can be treated with the cheaper precursor tamoxifen, which is converted into 4-OHT by a liver enzyme. Here we present an overview of the methods used to deliver tamoxifen to mice. The most used method is intraperitoneal injection, because the amount of administered compound can be better controlled, but delivery by oral gavage is also possible. For short-term and immediate-effect studies or when conversion of tamoxifen by the liver is to be avoided, 4-OHT can be used directly. PMID:25734062

  2. Assessing hoarding in mice.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J

    2006-01-01

    Hoarding is a species-typical behavior shown by rodents, as well as other animals. By hoarding, the rodent secures a food supply for times of emergency (for example, when threatened by a predator) or for times of seasonal adversity such as winter. Scatter hoarding, as seen typically in squirrels and birds, involves placing small caches of food in hidden places, generally underground. Most rodents, however, hoard a supply of food in or near the home base--for example, in 'larders' near the sleeping quarters in a burrow. In the laboratory, measurement of hoarding involves simply weighing the food transported into the home cage from an external source, but the route to that source must be secure and animal-proof; for example, there should be no holes large enough to permit escape of a mouse, and no weak points that could be enlarged by gnawing. A suitable and easily constructed apparatus is described in the protocol. Hoarding has been shown to be sensitive to brain lesions and pharmacological agents, and is a suitable test for species-typical behavior in genetically modified mice.

  3. High Pathogenicity of Wild-Type Measles Virus Infection in CD150 (SLAM) Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sellin, Caroline I.; Davoust, Nathalie; Guillaume, Vanessa; Baas, Dominique; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2006-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease, associated in certain cases with infection of the central nervous system and development of a severe neurological disease. We have generated transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the human protein SLAM (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule), or CD150, recently identified as an MV receptor. In contrast to all other MV receptor transgenic models described so far, in these mice infection with wild-type MV strains is highly pathogenic. Intranasal infection of SLAM transgenic suckling mice leads to MV spread to different organs and the development of an acute neurological syndrome, characterized by lethargy, seizures, ataxia, weight loss, and death within 3 weeks. In addition, in this model, vaccine and wild-type MV strains can be distinguished by virulence. Furthermore, intracranial MV infection of adult transgenic mice generates a subclinical infection associated with a high titer of MV-specific antibodies in the serum. Finally, to analyze new antimeasles therapeutic approaches, we created a recombinant soluble form of SLAM and demonstrated its important antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results show the high susceptibility of SLAM transgenic mice to MV-induced neurological disease and open new perspectives for the analysis of the implication of SLAM in the neuropathogenicity of other morbilliviruses, which also use this molecule as a receptor. Moreover, this transgenic model, in allowing a simple readout of the efficacy of an antiviral treatment, provides unique experimental means to test novel anti-MV preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:16775330

  4. Chronic pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR leads to cardiac dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Barrick, Cordelia J.; Yu Ming; Chao, H.-H.; Threadgill, David W.

    2008-05-01

    Molecule-targeted therapies like those against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are becoming widely used in the oncology clinic. With improvements in treatment efficacy, many cancers are being treated as chronic diseases, with patients having prolonged exposure to several therapies that were previously only given acutely. The consequence of chronic suppression of EGFR activity may lead to unexpected toxicities like altered cardiac physiology, a common organ site for adverse drug effects. To explore this possibility, we treated C57BL/6J (B6) mice with two EGFR small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), irreversible EKB-569 and reversible AG-1478, orally for 3 months. In B6 female mice, chronic exposure to both TKIs depressed body weight gain and caused significant changes in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and cardiac function. No significant differences were observed in heart weight or cardiomyocyte size but histological analysis revealed an increase in fibrosis and in the numbers of TUNEL-positive cells in the hearts from treated female mice. Consistent with histological results, LV apoptotic gene expression was altered, with significant downregulation of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2l1. Although there were no significant differences in any of these endpoints in treated male mice, suggesting sex may influence susceptibility to TKI mediated toxicity, the LVs of treated male mice had significant upregulation of Egf, Erbb2 and Nppb over controls. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic dietary exposure to TKIs may result in pathological and physiological changes in the heart.

  5. Class II haplotype differentially regulates immune response in HgCl2-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hanley, G A; Schiffenbauer, J; Sobel, E S

    1997-09-01

    One of the most striking features of exposure to low doses of mercury in mice is the high-titer haplotype-linked anti-nucleolar (ANoA) autoantibody response. Mice of H-2(s) haplotype have been high responders, while H-2(b) mice have been low. This pattern has been attributed to the class II molecule itself, but the poor response of F1 crosses between high and low responders raised the possibility that the anti-fibrillarin specificity was actually due to a closely linked dominant negative gene. To test the role of class II explicitly, F1 crosses between congenic B6.SJL (H-2(s)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice with a targeted deletion of I-AbAbeta were generated, creating mice heterozygous for all MHC loci, but expressing only I-As. In comparison with B6.SJL, no diminution of ANoA titers was found, proving that I-As itself was responsible for susceptibility and I-Ab for downregulation. Unlike I-A, expression of the I-E class II molecule could not downregulate the response in an otherwise susceptible mouse. These results suggest a complicated role for class II in the regulation of a novel, environmentally induced autoimmune response.

  6. Fluorescence Detection of Single DNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhimin

    2015-09-01

    Single-molecule detection (SMD) and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) were conducted using Cy3- and Cy5-labeled single-strand DNAs (ssDNAs) either immobilized on substrates or encapsulated in microdroplets. High-quality fluorescent images were obtained using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). In the substrate system, deposition of a low concentration of fluorescence molecules on substrates through electrostatic adsorption showed that most of the fluorescence spots were single molecules, and the mean value of signal to noise ratio (S/N) reached 6.9 ± 0.34. smFRET analysis was conducted through immobilization of donor- and acceptor-labeled oligonucleotides on substrates. In the droplet system, fluorophor-labeled oligonucleotides were injected into T-type microfluidics. Single and double fluorophor-labeled DNA molecules encapsulated in droplets were detected, the FRET efficiency and inter-dye distance of a single donor-acceptor pair were measured accurately. smFRET was conducted detailedly in the tortuous channel for the first time.

  7. Optimal Superpositioning of Flexible Molecule Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Gapsys, Vytautas; de Groot, Bert L.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the internal dynamics of a biological molecule requires the successful removal of overall translation and rotation. Particularly for flexible or intrinsically disordered peptides, this is a challenging task due to the absence of a well-defined reference structure that could be used for superpositioning. In this work, we started the analysis with a widely known formulation of an objective for the problem of superimposing a set of multiple molecules as variance minimization over an ensemble. A negative effect of this superpositioning method is the introduction of ambiguous rotations, where different rotation matrices may be applied to structurally similar molecules. We developed two algorithms to resolve the suboptimal rotations. The first approach minimizes the variance together with the distance of a structure to a preceding molecule in the ensemble. The second algorithm seeks for minimal variance together with the distance to the nearest neighbors of each structure. The newly developed methods were applied to molecular-dynamics trajectories and normal-mode ensembles of the Aβ peptide, RS peptide, and lysozyme. These new (to our knowledge) superpositioning methods combine the benefits of variance and distance between nearest-neighbor(s) minimization, providing a solution for the analysis of intrinsic motions of flexible molecules and resolving ambiguous rotations. PMID:23332072

  8. Assembling Ultracold Polar Molecules From Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lee R.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Yu, Yichao; Zhang, Jessie T.; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules are promising candidates for studying quantum many-body phenomena and building quantum information systems, due to their long-range, anisotropic, and tunable interactions. This calls for a technique to create low entropy samples of ultracold polar molecules with a large dipole moment. The lowest entropy molecular gas to date was created from atomic quantum gases in bulk or in optical lattices. The entropy is limited by that of the constituent atomic gases. We propose a method that addresses this limitation by assembling sodium cesium (NaCs) molecules from individually manipulated atoms. First, we load single Na and Cs atoms in separate optical tweezers from MOTs. We will cool them to their motional ground state using Raman sideband cooling and then merge them into a single tweezer. The tweezer confinement provides enhanced wavefunction overlap between the atom pair and molecule states. Using coherent two-photon techniques, we will then transfer the atom pair into a molecule. Our method offers reduced apparatus complexity and cycle time, single-site manipulation and imaging resolution, and should be readily extended to different species.

  9. Figuration and detection of single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevels, R.; Welch, G. R.; Cremer, P. S.; Hemmer, P.; Phillips, T.; Scully, S.; Sokolov, A. V.; Svidzinsky, A. A.; Xia, H.; Zheltikov, A.; Scully, M. O.

    2012-08-01

    Recent advances in the description of atoms and molecules based on Dimensional scaling analysis, developed by Dudley Herschbach and co-workers, provided new insights into visualization of molecular structure and chemical bonding. Prof. Herschbach is also a giant in the field of single molecule scattering. We here report on the engineering of molecular detectors. Such systems have a wide range of application from medical diagnostics to the monitoring of chemical, biological and environmental hazards. We discuss ways to identify preselected molecules, in particular, mycotoxin contaminants using coherent laser spectroscopy. Mycotoxin contaminants, e.g. aflatoxin B1 which is present in corn and peanuts, are usually analysed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. We present a new approach that derives from recent experiments in which molecules are prepared by one (or more) femtosecond laser(s) and probed by another set. We call this technique FAST CARS (femto second adaptive spectroscopic technique for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy). We propose and analyse ways in which FAST CARS can be used to identify preselected molecules, e.g. aflatoxin, rapidly and economically.

  10. Small Molecule Immunosensing Using Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors utilize refractive index changes to sensitively detect mass changes at noble metal sensor surface interfaces. As such, they have been extensively applied to immunoassays of large molecules, where their high mass and use of sandwich immunoassay formats can result in excellent sensitivity. Small molecule immunosensing using SPR is more challenging. It requires antibodies or high-mass or noble metal labels to provide the required signal for ultrasensitive assays. Also, it can suffer from steric hindrance between the small antigen and large antibodies. However, new studies are increasingly meeting these and other challenges to offer highly sensitive small molecule immunosensor technologies through careful consideration of sensor interface design and signal enhancement. This review examines the application of SPR transduction technologies to small molecule immunoassays directed to different classes of small molecule antigens, including the steroid hormones, toxins, drugs and explosives residues. Also considered are the matrix effects resulting from measurement in chemically complex samples, the construction of stable sensor surfaces and the development of multiplexed assays capable of detecting several compounds at once. Assay design approaches are discussed and related to the sensitivities obtained. PMID:22163605

  11. Modelling the spectroscopic behaviour of hot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    At elevated temperatures the molecules absorb and emit light in a very complicated fashion which is hard to characterise on the basis of laboraroty measurement. Computed line lists of molecule transitions therefore provide a vital input for models of hot atmospheres. I will describe the calculation and use of such line lists including the BT2 water line list [1], which contains some 500 million distinct rotation-vibration transitions. This linelist proved crucial in the detection of water in extrasolar planet HD189733b and has been used extensively in atmospheric modelling. Illustrations will be given at the meeting. A new linelist for the ammonia molecule has just been completed [2] which shows that standard compilations for this molecule need to be improved. Progress on a more extensive linelist for hot ammonia and linelists for other molecules will be discussed at the meeting. [1] R.J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G.J. Harris and R.N. Tolchenov, Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 368, 1087-1094 (2006) [2] S.N. Yurchenko, R.J. Barber, A. Yachmenev, W. Theil, P. Jensen and J. Tennyson, J. Phys. Chem. A, 113, 11845-11855 (2009).

  12. Feshbach molecule production in fermionic atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarie, V.

    2009-08-01

    This paper examines the problem of molecule production in an atomic fermionic gas close to an s -wave Feshbach resonance by means of a magnetic field sweep through the resonance. In the solvable case of a narrow resonance, the density of molecules at the end of the process is derived for a slow sweep. It is shown that the density of the produced molecules is lower than what an application of a naive Landau-Zener formula for level crossing would imply. However, in the limit of a very slow sweep it is still possible to achieve full conversion of fermions into the molecules. It appears that the origin of the failure of the Landau-Zener picture of the molecule production is due to the fact that the sweep goes through a quantum phase transition in the limit of an infinitely narrow resonance, in agreement with general results recently discussed in the literature. However, the precise connection of this problem to other problems with this feature is not established.

  13. Medium Effects in Single Molecule Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Simon

    2010-03-01

    We use STM-based techniques for measuring the electrical properties of metal|molecule|metal junctions. For a family of molecules HS(CH2)6-Ar-(CH2)6SH (Ar = substituted benzene), we found that the single molecule conductances varied significantly with substituent, being higher for electron-donating substituents [1]. Later, we studied the effect of increasing conjugation on this system by examining oligothiophenes HS(CH2)6-[C4H4S]x-(CH2)6SH (x = 1, 2, 3, 5). We found that the conductances of junctions involving these molecules depended upon the medium in which the measurements were made. In fact, for x = 3, the conductance was two orders of magnitude higher in the presence of water than in anhydrous conditions [2]. This presentation will outline these studies, together with the results of transport calculations that rationalise these unusual findings, and will set the results in the context of existing literature on medium effects in single molecule conductance determinations. In collaboration with Edmund Leary and Richard Nichols, University of Liverpool; Colin Lambert, Iain Grace, and Chris Finch, University of Lancaster; and Wolfgang Haiss, University of Liverpool.

  14. Mining for Molecules in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Scientists are using the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to go prospecting in a rich molecular cloud in our Milky Way Galaxy. They seek to discover new, complex molecules in interstellar space that may be precursors to life. The GBT and Molecules The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and some molecules it has discovered. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Clouds like this one are the raw material for new stars and planets. We know that complex chemistry builds prebiotic molecules in such clouds long before the stars and planets are formed. There is a good chance that some of these interstellar molecules may find their way to the surface of young planets such as the early Earth, and provide a head start for the chemistry of life. For the first time, we now have the capability to make a very thorough and methodical search to find all the chemicals in the clouds," said Anthony Remijan, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). In the past three years, Remijan and his colleagues have used the GBT to discover ten new interstellar molecules, a feat unequalled in such a short time by any other team or telescope. The scientists discovered those molecules by looking specifically for them. However, they now are changing their strategy and casting a wide net designed to find whatever molecules are present, without knowing in advance what they'll find. In addition, they are making their data available freely to other scientists, in hopes of speeding the discovery process. The research team presented its plan to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in St. Louis, MO. As molecules rotate and vibrate, they emit radio waves at specific frequencies. Each molecule has a unique pattern of such frequencies, called spectral lines, that constitutes a "fingerprint" identifying that molecule. Laboratory tests can determine the pattern of spectral lines that identifies a specific molecule. Most past discoveries came from identifying a molecule's pattern in

  15. Ultracold molecules from the bottom-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Liu, Lee R.; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules exhibit strong, long-range, and tunable dipole-dipole interactions that may be utilized for a wide range of studies in quantum simulation and quantum information processing. To realize the full potential of these studies, it is desirable to have a low entropy sample of ultracold polar molecules with full control over both internal and external states, as well as inter-particle interactions. We work toward this goal with a new, bottom-up approach using the highly polar NaCs molecule. The key steps of our scheme are trapping single Na and Cs atoms in optical dipole traps, cooling the atoms to their motional ground state using Raman sideband cooling, and finally coherently transferring them to ground state NaCs molecules via a two-photon process. This approach should enable creation of low entropy samples with full control over all degrees of freedom, as well as realizing the possibility of single-site read-out and manipulation of molecules.

  16. Metastable States of small-molecule solutions.

    PubMed

    He, Guangwen; Tan, Reginald B H; Kenis, Paul J A; Zukoski, Charles F

    2007-12-27

    Metastable states such as gels and glasses that are commonly seen in nanoparticle suspensions have found application in a wide range of products including toothpaste, hand cream, paints, and car tires. The equilibrium and metastable state behavior of nanoparticle suspensions are often described by simple fluid models where particles are treated as having hard cores and interacting with short-range attractions. Here we explore similar models to describe the presence of metastable states of small-molecule solutions. We have recently shown that the equilibrium solubilities of small hydrogen-bonding molecules and nanoparticles fall onto a corresponding-states solubility curve suggesting that with similar average strengths of attraction these molecules have similar solubilities. This observation implies that metastable states in small-molecule solutions may be found under conditions similar to those where metastable states are observed in nanoparticle and colloidal suspensions. Here we seek confirmation of this concept by exploring the existence of metastable states in solutions of small molecules.

  17. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode.

    PubMed

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Norata, Giuseppe D; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  18. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode

    PubMed Central

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S.; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L.; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  19. [Stimulating Type I interferon response with small molecules: revival of an old idea].

    PubMed

    Khiar, Samira; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferons play a central role in the establishment of an innate immune response against viral infections and tumor cells. Shortly after their discovery in 1957, several groups have looked for small molecules capable of inducing the expression of these cytokines with therapeutic applications in mind. A set of active compounds in mice were identified, but because of their relative inefficiency in humans for reasons not understood at the time, these studies fell into oblivion. In recent years, the characterization of pathogen recognition receptors and the signaling pathways they activate, together with the discovery of plasmacytoid dendritic cells, have revolutionized our understanding of innate immunity. These discoveries and the popularization of high-throughput screening technologies have renewed the interest for small molecules that can induce type I interferons. Proofs about their therapeutic potency in humans are expected very soon. PMID:26514384

  20. The MICE Run Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, or a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The new MICE Run Control has been developed to ensure proper sequencing of equipment and use of system resources to protect data quality. A description of this system, its implementation, and performance during recent muon beam data collection will be discussed.

  1. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antaris, Alexander L.; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K.; Alamparambil, Zita R.; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (~90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)--a clinically approved NIR-I dye--in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ~4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery.

  2. Small-Molecule Inhibition of BRDT for Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Matzuk, Martin M.; McKeown, Michael R.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Li, Qinglei; Ma, Lang; Agno, Julio E.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Picaud, Sarah; Yu, Richard N.; Qi, Jun; Knapp, Stefan; Bradner, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A pharmacologic approach to male contraception remains a longstanding challenge in medicine. Toward this objective, we explored the spermatogenic effects of a selective small-molecule inhibitor (JQ1) of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) subfamily of epigenetic reader proteins. Here, we report potent inhibition of the testis-specific member BRDT, which is essential for chromatin remodeling during spermatogenesis. Biochemical and crystallographic studies confirm that occupancy of the BRDT acetyl-lysine binding pocket by JQ1 prevents recognition of acetylated histone H4. Treatment of mice with JQ1 reduced seminiferous tubule area, testis size, and spermatozoa number and motility without affecting hormone levels. Although JQ1-treated males mate normally, inhibitory effects of JQ1 evident at the spermatocyte and round spermatid stages cause a complete and reversible contraceptive effect. These data establish a new contraceptive that can cross the blood:testis boundary and inhibit bromodomain activity during spermatogenesis, providing a lead compound targeting the male germ cell for contraception. PaperClip PMID:22901802

  3. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging.

    PubMed

    Antaris, Alexander L; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K; Alamparambil, Zita R; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (∼90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)-a clinically approved NIR-I dye-in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ∼4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery. PMID:26595119

  4. Role of BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma in β-cell death in Pdx1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ren, Decheng; Sun, Juan; Wang, Changzheng; Ye, Honggang; Mao, Liqun; Cheng, Emily H; Bell, Graeme I; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) are associated with diabetes in humans. Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice develop diabetes due to an increase in β-cell death leading to reduced β-cell mass. For definition of the molecular link between Pdx1 deficiency and β-cell death, Pdx1-haploinsufficient mice in which the genes for the BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma had been ablated were studied on a high-fat diet. Compared with Pdx1(+/-) mice, animals haploinsufficient for both Pdx1 and Bim or Puma genes showed improved glucose tolerance, enhanced β-cell mass, and reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells in islets. These results suggest that Bim and Puma ablation improves β-cell survival in Pdx1(+/-) mice. For exploration of the mechanisms responsible for these findings, Pdx1 gene expression was knocked down in mouse MIN6 insulinoma cells resulting in apoptotic cell death that was found to be associated with increased expression of BH3-only molecules Bim and Puma. If the upregulation of Bim and Puma that occurs during Pdx1 suppression was prevented, apoptotic β-cell death was reduced in vitro. These results suggest that Bim and Puma play an important role in β-cell apoptosis in Pdx1-deficient diabetes.

  5. Changes in cell migration-related molecules expressed by thymic microenvironment during experimental Plasmodium berghei infection: consequences on thymocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Jacy; Nagib, Patrícia R A; Andrade, Carolina F; Villa-Verde, Déa M S; Silva-Barbosa, Suse D; Savino, Wilson; Costa, Fábio T M; Verinaud, Liana

    2010-01-01

    We previously showed alterations in the thymus during experimental infection with Plasmodium berghei. Such alterations comprised histological changes, with loss of cortical–medullary limits, and the intrathymic presence of parasites. As the combination of chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical to appropriate thymocyte development, we analysed the thymic expression of ECM ligands and receptors, as well as chemokines and their respective receptors during the experimental P. berghei infection. Increased expression of ECM components was observed in thymi from infected mice. In contrast, down-regulated surface expression of fibronectin and laminin receptors was observed in thymocytes from these animals. Moreover, in thymi from infected mice there was increased CXCL12 and CXCR4, and a decreased expression of CCL25 and CCR9. An altered thymocyte migration towards ECM elements and chemokines was seen when the thymi from infected mice were analysed. Evaluation of ex vivo migration patterns of CD4/CD8-defined thymocyte subpopulations revealed that double-negative (DN), and CD4+ and CD8+ single-positive (SP) cells from P. berghei-infected mice have higher migratory responses compared with controls. Interestingly, increased numbers of DN and SP subpopulations were found in the spleens of infected mice. Overall, we show that the thymic atrophy observed in P. berghei-infected mice is accompanied by thymic microenvironmental changes that comprise altered expression of thymocyte migration-related molecules of the ECM and chemokine protein families, which in turn can alter the thymocyte migration pattern. These thymic disturbances may have consequences for the control of the immune response against this protozoan. PMID:19824923

  6. Simple treatment of ultracold polar molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, John; Quèmèner, Goulven; Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Julienne, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Collisions of polar molecules at ultracold (< μK) temperatures open the way for prospects of manipulating collision dynamics, including chemical reactions, by by varying an electric field. To understand such processes, one needs a scattering theory that accounts sufficiently accurately for the long-range van der Waals and dipolar forces acting between the molecules, but that also has a reasonable parametrization of the short-range physics when the molecules actually encounter one another. In this presentation we discuss a theory that marries a quantum-defect-theory parametrization of short-range physics, to a modified Langevin-like model that has successfully estimated the effect of electric fields. We discuss the character of the resulting scattering, including field-dependent chemical reaction rates and resonances.

  7. Electron Transport Through Single Fullerene Molecules (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stróżecka, Anna; Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Larsson, J. Andreas; Voigtländer, Bert

    2009-04-01

    Fullerenes show potential for applications in nanotechnology due to the possibility of tuning their properties by doping or functionalization. In particular, the endohedral doping of the hollow carbon cage with metal atoms allows changing the electronic and magnetic properties of the molecule without distorting the geometry of the outer shell. Here we present a low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy study of the vibrational and transport properties of Ce2atC80 metallofullerenes. We observe that electron transport through the endohedral fullerene is strongly mediated by excitation of molecular vibrations, especially the dynamics of encapsulated atoms. We measure the conductance of the single-molecule junction upon contact between the molecule and the STM tip. To determine the role of doping atoms we compare the results obtained for the endohedrally doped species with those for a hollow fullerene. Analysis shows that localization of electron density on encapsulated atoms hinders the conduction process through the fullerene.

  8. Conformational dynamics of peptide T molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2002-05-01

    Using a method of the theoretical conformational analysis, a conformational dynamics of the side chains of the amino acid residues of peptide T, a competitor of the human immuno-deficiency virus in the binding to human T cells, was investigated. For this purpose, the conformational maps of the potential surfaces were constructed over the angles of the side chains for the preferable conformations of peptide T molecule. Permissible deviations of these angles from the optimal values were determined. It has been found that the angles of the side chains of the amino acid residues involved in physiologically active fragment Thr4-Thr8 are more rigid than in the other segment of the molecule. This fact confirms the existence of such a regular structure as β-turn revealed previously in studies of the spatial structure of the peptide T molecule.

  9. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  10. Complex molecules in the galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena-Torres, Miguel Angel; Martin-Pintado, Jesus; Martin, Sergio; Amo-Baladron, Arancha

    2007-04-01

    Recently the number of complex organic molecules observed in hot cores has been increased by observing the Sgr B2N hot core, located in the GC molecular clouds. But in the inner 200pc of the center of our Galaxy complex organic molecules seems to widespread distributed along the Galactic plane. Last year large aldehydes where observed in the cm range with the Green Bank Telescope. These molecules where detected not in the hot core, but in the envelope of the SgrB2 molecular clouds and in two different positions in SgrA molecular cloud. We have not reach the maximum in the chemical complexity that these molecular clouds can show up. The next step would be to detect the more complex esters and ethers observed in hot cores and to obtain a better estimation of the physical conditions of the aldehydes observing more transitions in the mm range.

  11. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, David

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  12. Ionization of glycerin molecule by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Markush, P. P.; Kontrosh, E. E.

    2015-07-01

    The methods and results of studying the yield of positive ions produced due to direct and dissociative electron impact ionization of the glycerin molecule are described. The experiment is carried out using two independent setups, namely, a setup with a monopole mass spectrometer employing the method of crossing electron and molecular beams and a setup with a hypocycloidal electron spectrometer with the gas-filled cell. The mass spectra of the glycerin molecule are studied in the range of mass numbers of 10-95 amu at various temperatures. The energy dependences of the effective cross sections of the glycerin molecular ions produced by a monoenergetic electron beam are obtained and analyzed; using these dependences, the appearance energies of fragment ions are determined. The dynamics of the glycerin molecule fragment ions formation is investigated in the temperature range of 300-340 K.

  13. Berry connection in atom-molecule systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Fucheng; Wu Biao

    2011-08-15

    In the mean-field theory of atom-molecule systems, where bosonic atoms combine to form molecules, there is no usual U(1) symmetry, presenting an apparent hurdle for defining the Berry phase and Berry curvature for these systems. We define a Berry connection for this system, with which the Berry phase and Berry curvature can be naturally computed. We use a three-level atom-molecule system to illustrate our results. In particular, we have computed the mean-field Berry curvature of this system analytically, and compared it to the Berry curvature computed with the second-quantized model of the same system. An excellent agreement is found, indicating the validity of our definition.

  14. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Steven; Metsaelae, Markus; Zieger, Peter C.; Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Gilijamse, Joop J.; Meijer, Gerard; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de

    2007-12-15

    We report on the Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping of {sup 14}NH (a{sup 1}{delta}) radicals. In the trap, the molecules are excited on the spin-forbidden A{sup 3}{pi}<-a{sup 1}{delta} transition and detected via their subsequent fluorescence to the X{sup 3}{sigma}{sup -} ground state. The 1/e trapping time is 1.4{+-}0.1 s, from which a lower limit of 2.7 s for the radiative lifetime of the a{sup 1}{delta}, v=0, J=2 state is deduced. The spectral profile of the molecules in the trapping field is measured to probe their spatial distribution. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH followed by optical pumping of the trapped molecules to the electronic ground state is an important step toward accumulation of these radicals in a magnetic trap.

  15. Genetically engineered antibody molecules and their application.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S L; Wims, L; Wallick, S; Tan, L; Oi, V T

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes can be efficiently expressed following transfection into myeloma cells. Using protoplast fusion, transfection frequencies greater than 10(-3) can be achieved. Compatible plasmids containing two different selectible markers are used to simultaneously deliver heavy and light chain genes to the same cell. To produce molecules with differing specificities the rearranged and expressed variable regions can be cloned from the appropriate hybridoma. In some cases, variable regions from cDNAs can be inserted into the expression vectors. It is possible to manipulate the immunoglobulin genes and produce novel antibody molecules. Antibodies have been produced in which the variable regions from mouse antibodies have been joined to human constant regions. In addition, antibodies with altered constant regions have been produced. These genetically engineered antibodies provide a unique set of reagents to study structure-function relationships within the molecule. They also can potentially be used in the diagnosis and therapy of human disease.

  16. Profiling protein function with small molecule microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Winssinger, Nicolas; Ficarro, Scott; Schultz, Peter G.; Harris, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through posttranslational modification, local environment, and protein–protein interaction is critical to cellular function. The ability to analyze on a genome-wide scale protein functional activity rather than changes in protein abundance or structure would provide important new insights into complex biological processes. Herein, we report the application of a spatially addressable small molecule microarray to an activity-based profile of proteases in crude cell lysates. The potential of this small molecule-based profiling technology is demonstrated by the detection of caspase activation upon induction of apoptosis, characterization of the activated caspase, and inhibition of the caspase-executed apoptotic phenotype using the small molecule inhibitor identified in the microarray-based profile. PMID:12167675

  17. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  18. Hydrodynamic trapping of molecules in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Peter; McColl, James; Clarke, Richard W.; Ostanin, Victor P.; Jönsson, Bengt; Klenerman, David

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show how hydrodynamic forces can be used to locally trap molecules in a supported lipid bilayer (SLB). The method uses the hydrodynamic drag forces arising from a flow through a conical pipette with a tip radius of 1–1.5 μm, placed approximately 1 μm above the investigated SLB. This results in a localized forcefield that acts on molecules protruding from the SLB, yielding a hydrodynamic trap with a size approximately given by the size of the pipette tip. We demonstrate this concept by trapping the protein streptavidin, bound to biotin receptors in the SLB. It is also shown how static and kinetic information about the intermolecular interactions in the lipid bilayer can be obtained by relating how the magnitude of the hydrodynamic forces affects the accumulation of protein molecules in the trap. PMID:22699491

  19. Photostability of Organic Molecules in Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfredini, T.; Wolf, W.; Mendoza, E.; Rocco, M. L.; Lago, A.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2014-10-01

    Aromatic Infrared Bands, the footprint of molecules like neutral and ionic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), have been observed in several astrophysical environments.We present the experimental results of the photoionization and photodissociation of the methyl-benzene (or toluene) molecule, a basic unit for the methylated PAHs, using synchrotron radiation at C1s resonance, ˜ 285 eV (soft X-ray) and time-of-flight mass-spectrometry. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections have been determined. Then the ionization and destruction rates and half-life of the toluene molecule were also obtained for the X-ray photon flux of the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  1. T Cell Cosignaling Molecules in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Mandy L

    2016-05-17

    The ultimate outcome of alloreactivity versus tolerance following transplantation is potently influenced by the constellation of cosignaling molecules expressed by immune cells during priming with alloantigen, and the net sum of costimulatory and coinhibitory signals transmitted via ligation of these molecules. Intense investigation over the last two decades has yielded a detailed understanding of the kinetics, cellular distribution, and intracellular signaling networks of cosignaling molecules such as the CD28, TNF, and TIM families of receptors in alloimmunity. More recent work has better defined the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which engagement of cosignaling networks serve to either dampen or augment alloimmunity. These findings will likely aid in the rational development of novel immunomodulatory strategies to prolong graft survival and improve outcomes following transplantation.

  2. Effect of Linomide on adhesion molecules, TNF-alpha, nitrogen oxide, and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hai, A; Hershkoviz, R; Weiss, L; Lider, O; Slavin, S

    2005-02-01

    Linomide (quinoline-3-carboxamide) is an immunomodulator with anti-inflammatory effects in rodents with autoimmune diseases. Its mode of action still remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that an investigation of T cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of glycoproteins such as fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN), might provide better understanding of their in vivo mode of action in extravascular inflammatory sites. We examined the effect of Linomide on T cell adhesion to intact ECM, and separately to LN, and FN, and on the release and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha) and nitrogen oxide (NO) in relation to adhesive molecules in non-obese diabetic (NOD) female spleen cells, focusing on intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44. NOD female mice that developed spontaneous autoimmune insulitis, which destroys pancreatic islets and subsequently leads to insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus, were studied. Linomide, given in the drinking water or added to tissue cultures in vitro, inhibited the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of T cells to ECM, FN and LN, as well as the production and release of TNFalpha and NO, which play a major role in the induction and propagation of T cell-mediated insulitis. In addition, exposure of T cells to Linomide resulted in increased expression of CD44 and ICAM-1 molecules on spleen cells of Linomide-treated mice; such an increase in adhesion molecule expression may lead to more effective arrest of T cell migration in vivo. The regulation of T-cell adhesion, adhesion receptor expression, and inhibition of TNFalpha and NO secretion by Linomide may explain its beneficial role and provide a new tool for suppressing self-reactive T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases. PMID:15652754

  3. Chiral Molecules Revisited by Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    Chiral molecules have fascinated chemists for more than 150 years. While their physical properties are to a very good approximation identical, the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule can have completely different (bio)chemical activities. For example, the right-handed enantiomer of carvone smells of spearmint while the left-handed one smells of caraway. In addition, the active components of many drugs are of one specific handedness, such as in the case of ibuprofen. However, in nature as well as in pharmaceutical applications, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) remains a challenging task for analytical chemistry, despite its importance for modern drug development. We present here a new method of differentiating enantiomers of chiral molecules in the gas phase based on broadband rotational spectroscopy. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the combined quantity, μ_a μ_b μ_c, which is of opposite sign between enantiomers. It thus also provides information on the absolute configuration of the particular enantiomer. Furthermore, the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee. A significant advantage of our technique is its inherent mixture compatibility due to the fingerprint-like character of rotational spectra. In this contribution, we will introduce the technique and present our latest results on chiral molecule spectroscopy and enantiomer differentiation. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J.M. Doyle, Nature 497 (2013) 475-477 V.A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J.M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53 (2014) 1152-1155

  4. Molecule capture by olfactory antennules: mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Mark T; Mead, Kristina S; Koehl, Mimi A R

    2002-01-01

    A critical step in the process of olfaction is the movement of odorant molecules from the environment to the surface of a chemosensory structure. Many marine crustaceans capture odorant molecules with arrays of chemosensory sensilla (aesthetascs) on antennules that they flick through the water. We developed a model to calculate molecule flux to the surfaces of aesthetascs in order to study how the size, aesthetasc spacing, and flick kinematics of olfactory antennules affect their performance in capturing molecules from the surrounding water. Since the three-dimensional geometry of an aesthetasc-bearing antennule is complex, dynamically-scaled physical models can often provide an efficient method of determining the fluid velocity field through the array. Here we present a method to optimize the incorporation of such measured velocity vector fields into a numerical simulation of the advection and diffusion of odorants to aesthetasc surfaces. Furthermore, unlike earlier models of odorant interception by antennae, our model incorporates odorant concentration distributions that have been measured in turbulent ambient flows. By applying our model to the example of the olfactory antennules of mantis shrimp, we learned that flicking velocity can have profound effects on odorant flux to the aesthetascs if they operate in the speed range in which the leakiness of the gaps between the aesthetascs to fluid movement is sensitive to velocity. This sensitivity creates an asymmetry in molecule fluxes between outstroke and return stroke, which results in an antennule taking discrete samples in space and time, i.e. "sniffing". As stomatopods grow and their aesthetasc Reynolds number increases, the aesthetasc arrangement on the antennule changes in a way that maintains these asymmetries in leakiness and molecule flux between the outstroke and return stroke, allowing the individual to continue to take discrete samples as it develops. PMID:11942523

  5. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2001-06-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  6. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  7. Adsorption of polar molecules on krypton clusters.

    PubMed

    Rosso, A; Pokapanich, W; Ohrwall, G; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O; Tchaplyguine, M

    2007-08-28

    The formation process of binary clusters has been studied using synchrotron based core level photoelectron spectroscopy. Free neutral krypton clusters have been produced by adiabatic expansion and doped with chloromethane molecules using the pickup technique. The comparison between the integrated intensities, linewidths, and level shifts of the cluster features of pure krypton and of chloromethane-krypton clusters has been used to obtain information about the cluster geometry. We have shown that most of the chloromethane molecules remain on the surface of the clusters.

  8. Metastable feshbach molecules in high rotational states.

    PubMed

    Knoop, S; Mark, M; Ferlaino, F; Danzl, J G; Kraemer, T; Nägerl, H-C; Grimm, R

    2008-02-29

    We experimentally demonstrate Cs2 Feshbach molecules well above the dissociation threshold, which are stable against spontaneous decay on the time scale of 1 s. An optically trapped sample of ultracold dimers is prepared in a high rotational state and magnetically tuned into a region with a negative binding energy. The metastable character of these molecules arises from the large centrifugal barrier in combination with negligible coupling to states with low rotational angular momentum. A sharp onset of dissociation with increasing magnetic field is mediated by a crossing with a lower rotational dimer state and facilitates dissociation on demand with a well-defined energy. PMID:18352621

  9. Newly detected molecules in dense interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Avery, L W; Friberg, P; Matthews, H E; Ziurys, L M

    1988-01-01

    The last year or so has seen the identification of several new interstellar molecules, including C2S, C3S, C5H, C6H, and (probably) HC2CHO in the cold, dark cloud TMC-1; and the discovery of the first interstellar phosphorous-containing molecule, PN, in the Orion "plateau" source. Further interesting results include the observations of 13C3H2 and C3HD, and the first detection of HCOOH (formic acid) in a cold cloud.

  10. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-05-15

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  11. Electrostatic propulsion using C60 molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Stephanie D.; Rapp, Donald; Saunders, Winston A.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the potential benefits of C60 molecules as a basis for ion propulsion. Because C60 is storable, its use may result in a larger usable propellant fraction than previous methods of cluster ion propulsion. C60 may also relax such engineering constraints as grid spacing, which restrict the performance of noble gas ion propulsion. The behavior of C60 in a plasma discharge environment, as well as various electron impact cross sections of the molecule, will greatly afftect the feasibility of the concept.

  12. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  13. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, Graeme; Curry, John J.

    2011-05-11

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  14. Molecular spintronics using single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Lapo; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    A revolution in electronics is in view, with the contemporary evolution of the two novel disciplines of spintronics and molecular electronics. A fundamental link between these two fields can be established using molecular magnetic materials and, in particular, single-molecule magnets. Here, we review the first progress in the resulting field, molecular spintronics, which will enable the manipulation of spin and charges in electronic devices containing one or more molecules. We discuss the advantages over more conventional materials, and the potential applications in information storage and processing. We also outline current challenges in the field, and propose convenient schemes to overcome them.

  15. Single-molecule electrophoresis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1996-05-22

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer-simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required by individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed beforehand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method, and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented.

  16. The origin of life. [genetically important molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, N. H.; Hubbard, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Research in the areas of precambrian paleontology, chemical evolution of genetically important monomers, prebiotic dehydration-condensation reactions, organic compounds in meteorites and interstellar space, and biological exploration of the planets is summarized. Fossils in precambrian cherts and findings of eukaryotic cells are described, and recent investigations of prebiotic conditions, energy sources, and starting materials for genetic molecules are outlined. Studies of homogeneous and heterogeneous dehydrations and of nonaqueous thermal dehydrations are described. The detection of amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines in meteorites and of biologically significant molecules in interstellar clouds is discussed, as well as the possibilities of life on Jupiter, Mars, and Titan.

  17. Photoassociative production of ultracold heteronuclear ytterbium molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciurylo, Roman; Yamazaki, Rekishu; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Hara, Hideaki; Taie, Shintaro; Sugawa, Seiji; Takasu, Yosuke; Enomoto, Katsunari

    2011-09-15

    We report observations of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line in isotopic mixtures of ultracold ytterbium gases. Several heteronuclear bound states have been found for the excited {sup 170}Yb{sup 174}Yb and {sup 174}Yb{sup 176}Yb molecules. We develop a single-channel mass-scaled interaction model for the excited state molecule which well reproduces the measured bound state energies. This is an important step toward optical control of interactions in mixtures of ultracold ytterbium gases using heteronuclear optical Feshbach resonances. The model developed is applicable in collisions of other similar systems, such as cadmium and mercury.

  18. A toy model for a diatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a toy model for a diatomic molecule which is based on coupling electronic and nuclear spins to a rigid rotor. Despite its simplicity, the model can be used scientifically to analyze and understand complex molecular hyperfine spectra. In addition, the model has educational value as a number of fundamental symmetries and conservation laws of the molecule can be studied. Because of its simple structure, the model can be readily implemented as a computer program with comparatively short computing times on the order of a few seconds.

  19. Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells for Aberrant Class II Expression in Exocrine Glands from Estrogen-Deficient Mice of Healthy Background

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Rieko; Nagaoka, Ai; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Yamada, Akiko; Yoshida, Satoko; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that aberrant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders, the precise mechanisms responsible for their tissue-specific expression remain unknown. Here we show that estrogen deficiency induces aberrant class II major histocompatibility complex expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Relatively modest but functionally significant expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II and class II transactivator molecules were observed in the exocrine glands of ovariectomized (Ovx) C57BL/6 (B6) mice, but were not seen in the exocrine glands of control B6 mice. We observed that the salivary dendritic cells adjacent to the apoptotic epithelial cells positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling, were activated in Ovx mice, but were not activated in control mice. We obtained evidence that the salivary gland cells express both interferon regulatory factor-1 and class II transactivator type IV molecules in Ovx mice. Salivary gland cells from Ovx mice were also capable of inducing the activation of antigen-specific T cells from OT-II transgenic mice. These findings indicate that estrogen deficiency initiates class II transactivator type IV mRNA expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suggesting that plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a pivotal role in gender-based autoimmune disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:19359524

  20. The use of transfected fibroblasts and transgenic mice establishes that stimulation of T cells by the Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen is mediated by E alpha.

    PubMed

    Cole, B C; David, C S; Lynch, D H; Kartchner, D R

    1990-01-15

    Mycoplasma arthritidis produces a soluble protein which is active for murine and human lymphocytes when presented by Ia-bearing accessory cells. By using fibroblasts transfected in vitro with various class II Ag, we demonstrated that presentation of the M. arthritidis mitogen (MAM) to T cells was mediated by E alpha-containing molecules. We also showed that splenocytes from transgenic mice expressing E alpha heterozygously (B10.TRG E alpha+) or homozygously (B10.E alpha TG +/+) underwent a similar proliferation in response to MAM as compared with the failure of control B10.TRG E alpha- splenocytes to respond to MAM. Although splenocytes from inbred C3H and CBA mice exhibited much higher proliferative responses to MAM than did those from B10.TRG.E alpha+ or B10.E alpha TG +/+ mice, flow cytometry showed similar levels of E alpha expression. Furthermore, gamma-irradiated splenocytes from B10.TRG E alpha + mice presented MAM to T hybridoma cells with a similar efficacy as did splenocytes from C3H mice. The lesser response to MAM of lymphocytes from the E alpha transgenic mice as compared with those from C3H and B10.K mice was likewise not due to differential expression of their V beta TCR. We conclude that presentation of MAM to T cells is accomplished by E alpha-containing molecules. The studies also suggest that the conserved, nonpolymorphic regions of class II molecules may play an important role in host immune response to microbial products.

  1. Metabolism Regulates Exposure of Pancreatic Islets to Circulating Molecules In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Michau, Aurélien; Hodson, David J; Fontanaud, Pierre; Guillou, Anne; Espinosa-Carrasco, Gabriel; Molino, François; Peters, Catherine J; Robinson, Iain C; Le Tissier, Paul; Mollard, Patrice; Schaeffer, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic β-cells modulate insulin secretion through rapid sensing of blood glucose and integration of gut-derived signals. Increased insulin demand during pregnancy and obesity alters islet function and mass and leads to gestational diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes in predisposed individuals. However, it is unclear how blood-borne factors dynamically access the islets of Langerhans. Thus, understanding the changes in circulating molecule distribution that accompany compensatory β-cell expansion may be key to developing novel antidiabetic therapies. Here, using two-photon microscopy in vivo in mice, we demonstrate that islets are almost instantly exposed to peaks of circulating molecules, which rapidly pervade the tissue before clearance. In addition, both gestation and short-term high-fat-diet feeding decrease molecule extravasation and uptake rates in vivo in islets, independently of β-cell expansion or islet blood flow velocity. Together, these data support a role for islet vascular permeability in shaping β-cell adaptive responses to metabolic demand by modulating the access and sensing of circulating molecules. PMID:26581596

  2. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or co-opted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host.

  3. Evidence of water molecules--a statistical evaluation of water molecules based on electron density.

    PubMed

    Nittinger, Eva; Schneider, Nadine; Lange, Gudrun; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-04-27

    Water molecules play important roles in many biological processes, especially when mediating protein-ligand interactions. Dehydration and the hydrophobic effect are of central importance for estimating binding affinities. Due to the specific geometric characteristics of hydrogen bond functions of water molecules, meaning two acceptor and two donor functions in a tetrahedral arrangement, they have to be modeled accurately. Despite many attempts in the past years, accurate prediction of water molecules-structurally as well as energetically-remains a grand challenge. One reason is certainly the lack of experimental data, since energetic contributions of water molecules can only be measured indirectly. However, on the structural side, the electron density clearly shows the positions of stable water molecules. This information has the potential to improve models on water structure and energy in proteins and protein interfaces. On the basis of a high-resolution subset of the Protein Data Bank, we have conducted an extensive statistical analysis of 2.3 million water molecules, discriminating those water molecules that are well resolved and those without much evidence of electron density. In order to perform this classification, we introduce a new measurement of electron density around an individual atom enabling the automatic quantification of experimental support. On the basis of this measurement, we present an analysis of water molecules with a detailed profile of geometric and structural features. This data, which is freely available, can be applied to not only modeling and validation of new water models in structural biology but also in molecular design.

  4. Strategy to discover diverse optimal molecules in the small molecule universe.

    PubMed

    Rupakheti, Chetan; Virshup, Aaron; Yang, Weitao; Beratan, David N

    2015-03-23

    The small molecule universe (SMU) is defined as a set of over 10(60) synthetically feasible organic molecules with molecular weight less than ∼500 Da. Exhaustive enumerations and evaluation of all SMU molecules for the purpose of discovering favorable structures is impossible. We take a stochastic approach and extend the ACSESS framework ( Virshup et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013 , 135 , 7296 - 7303 ) to develop diversity oriented molecular libraries that can generate a set of compounds that is representative of the small molecule universe and that also biases the library toward favorable physical property values. We show that the approach is efficient compared to exhaustive enumeration and to existing evolutionary algorithms for generating such libraries by testing in the NKp fitness landscape model and in the fully enumerated GDB-9 chemical universe containing 3 × 10(5) molecules.

  5. Strategy To Discover Diverse Optimal Molecules in the Small Molecule Universe

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule universe (SMU) is defined as a set of over 1060 synthetically feasible organic molecules with molecular weight less than ∼500 Da. Exhaustive enumerations and evaluation of all SMU molecules for the purpose of discovering favorable structures is impossible. We take a stochastic approach and extend the ACSESS framework (Virshup et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2013, 135, 7296–730323548177) to develop diversity oriented molecular libraries that can generate a set of compounds that is representative of the small molecule universe and that also biases the library toward favorable physical property values. We show that the approach is efficient compared to exhaustive enumeration and to existing evolutionary algorithms for generating such libraries by testing in the NKp fitness landscape model and in the fully enumerated GDB-9 chemical universe containing 3 × 105 molecules. PMID:25594586

  6. Polarization of excitation light influences molecule counting in single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Lin, Han; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Clayton, Andrew H; Gu, Min; Russell, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy has been widely applied to count the number of biological molecules within a certain structure. The percentage of molecules that are detected significantly affects the interpretation of data. Among many factors that affect this percentage, the polarization state of the excitation light is often neglected or at least unstated in publications. We demonstrate by simulation and experiment that the number of molecules detected can be different from -40 up to 100% when using circularly or linearly polarized excitation light. This is determined mainly by the number of photons emitted by single fluorescent molecule, namely the choice of fluorescence proteins, and the background noise in the system, namely the illumination scheme. This difference can be further exaggerated or mitigated by various fixation methods, magnification, and camera settings We conclude that the final choice between circularly or linearly polarized excitation light should be made experimentally, based on the signal to noise ratio of the system.

  7. Making More-Complex Molecules Using Superthermal Atom/Molecule Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, Brian; Chutjian, Ara; Orient, Otto

    2008-01-01

    A method of making more-complex molecules from simpler ones has emerged as a by-product of an experimental study in outer-space atom/surface collision physics. The subject of the study was the formation of CO2 molecules as a result of impingement of O atoms at controlled kinetic energies upon cold surfaces onto which CO molecules had been adsorbed. In this study, the O/CO system served as a laboratory model, not only for the formation of CO2 but also for the formation of other compounds through impingement of rapidly moving atoms upon molecules adsorbed on such cold interstellar surfaces as those of dust grains or comets. By contributing to the formation of increasingly complex molecules, including organic ones, this study and related other studies may eventually contribute to understanding of the origins of life.

  8. Automated measurement of pulmonary emphysema and small airway remodeling in cigarette smoke-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Taylor, Katherine L; Mahadeva, Ravi; Boukedes, Steve S; Owen, Caroline A

    2015-01-16

    COPD is projected to be the third most common cause of mortality world-wide by 2020((1)). Animal models of COPD are used to identify molecules that contribute to the disease process and to test the efficacy of novel therapies for COPD. Researchers use a number of models of COPD employing different species including rodents, guinea-pigs, rabbits, and dogs((2)). However, the most widely-used model is that in which mice are exposed to cigarette smoke. Mice are an especially useful species in which to model COPD because their genome can readily be manipulated to generate animals that are either deficient in, or over-express individual proteins. Studies of gene-targeted mice that have been exposed to cigarette smoke have provided valuable information about the contributions of individual molecules to different lung pathologies in COPD((3-5)). Most studies have focused on pathways involved in emphysema development which contributes to the airflow obstruction that is characteristic of COPD. However, small airway fibrosis also contributes significantly to airflow obstruction in human COPD patients((6)), but much less is known about the pathogenesis of this lesion in smoke-exposed animals. To address this knowledge gap, this protocol quantifies both emphysema development and small airway fibrosis in smoke-exposed mice. This protocol exposes mice to CS using a whole-body exposure technique, then measures respiratory mechanics in the mice, inflates the lungs of mice to a standard pressure, and fixes the lungs in formalin. The researcher then stains the lung sections with either Gill's stain to measure the mean alveolar chord length (as a readout of emphysema severity) or Masson's trichrome stain to measure deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins around small airways (as a readout of small airway fibrosis). Studies of the effects of molecular pathways on both of these lung pathologies will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of COPD.

  9. Automated Measurement of Pulmonary Emphysema and Small Airway Remodeling in Cigarette Smoke-exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laucho-Contreras, Maria E.; Taylor, Katherine L.; Mahadeva, Ravi; Boukedes, Steve S.; Owen, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    COPD is projected to be the third most common cause of mortality world-wide by 2020(1). Animal models of COPD are used to identify molecules that contribute to the disease process and to test the efficacy of novel therapies for COPD. Researchers use a number of models of COPD employing different species including rodents, guinea-pigs, rabbits, and dogs(2). However, the most widely-used model is that in which mice are exposed to cigarette smoke. Mice are an especially useful species in which to model COPD because their genome can readily be manipulated to generate animals that are either deficient in, or over-express individual proteins. Studies of gene-targeted mice that have been exposed to cigarette smoke have provided valuable information about the contributions of individual molecules to different lung pathologies in COPD(3-5). Most studies have focused on pathways involved in emphysema development which contributes to the airflow obstruction that is characteristic of COPD. However, small airway fibrosis also contributes significantly to airflow obstruction in human COPD patients(6), but much less is known about the pathogenesis of this lesion in smoke-exposed animals. To address this knowledge gap, this protocol quantifies both emphysema development and small airway fibrosis in smoke-exposed mice. This protocol exposes mice to CS using a whole-body exposure technique, then measures respiratory mechanics in the mice, inflates the lungs of mice to a standard pressure, and fixes the lungs in formalin. The researcher then stains the lung sections with either Gill’s stain to measure the mean alveolar chord length (as a readout of emphysema severity) or Masson’s trichrome stain to measure deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins around small airways (as a readout of small airway fibrosis). Studies of the effects of molecular pathways on both of these lung pathologies will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25651034

  10. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in ageing aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Biljes, Daniel; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Kadow, Stephanie; Diel, Patrick; Weigt, Carmen; Burkart, Volker; Esser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed homeostasis of glucose and lipid metabolism are dominant features of the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a severe metabolic disease. T2D prevalence increases with age. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a sensor of small molecules including dietary components. AHR has been identified as potential regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Epidemiologically, exposure to xenobiotic AHR ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to T2D. We assess here the potential role of the AHR in disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in young (age 2-5 months) and old (age > 1,5 years) AHR-deficient (AHR KO) mice. Fasted young wildtype (WT) and AHR-KO mice displayed similar blood glucose kinetics after challenge with intra-peritoneal glucose injection. However, old AHR-KO mice showed lower tolerance than WT to i.p. administered glucose, i.e. glucose levels rose higher and returned more slowly to normal levels. Old mice had overall higher insulin levels than young mice, and old AHR-KO had a somewhat disturbed insulin kinetic in the serum after glucose challenge. Surprisingly, young AHR-KO mice had significantly lower triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein values than WT, i.e., a dyslipidemic profile. With ageing, AHR-KO and WT mice did not differ in these lipid levels, except for slightly reduced levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. In conclusion, our findings in AHR KO mice suggest that AHR expression is relevant for the maintenance of glucose and lipid homeostasis in old mice.

  11. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in ageing aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Biljes, Daniel; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Kadow, Stephanie; Diel, Patrick; Weigt, Carmen; Burkart, Volker; Esser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed homeostasis of glucose and lipid metabolism are dominant features of the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a severe metabolic disease. T2D prevalence increases with age. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a sensor of small molecules including dietary components. AHR has been identified as potential regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Epidemiologically, exposure to xenobiotic AHR ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to T2D. We assess here the potential role of the AHR in disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in young (age 2-5 months) and old (age > 1,5 years) AHR-deficient (AHR KO) mice. Fasted young wildtype (WT) and AHR-KO mice displayed similar blood glucose kinetics after challenge with intra-peritoneal glucose injection. However, old AHR-KO mice showed lower tolerance than WT to i.p. administered glucose, i.e. glucose levels rose higher and returned more slowly to normal levels. Old mice had overall higher insulin levels than young mice, and old AHR-KO had a somewhat disturbed insulin kinetic in the serum after glucose challenge. Surprisingly, young AHR-KO mice had significantly lower triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein values than WT, i.e., a dyslipidemic profile. With ageing, AHR-KO and WT mice did not differ in these lipid levels, except for slightly reduced levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. In conclusion, our findings in AHR KO mice suggest that AHR expression is relevant for the maintenance of glucose and lipid homeostasis in old mice. PMID:26664351

  12. Induction of cytotoxic T cells and their antitumor activity in mice transgenic for carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Mizobata, S; Tompkins, K; Simpson, J F; Shyr, Y; Primus, F J

    2000-08-01

    In order to develop immunotherapy strategies that are based on eliciting immune responsiveness to the self-antigen, human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), we examined whether cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against CEA could be elicited in CEA-transgenic and nontransgenic mice. CEA-transgenic [C57BL/ 6-TGN(CEAGe)18FJP] and nontransgenic mice were primed with CEA-transfected syngeneic fibroblasts in combination with Corynebacterium parvum. Spleen cells from immunized mice were cultured with irradiated syngeneic MC-38 colon carcinoma cells transfected with CEA (MC-38.CEA) as stimulators prior to the measurement of CTL activity. Primed nontransgenic spleen cells showed augmented CTL activity against MC-38.CEA cells as compared with control parental MC-38 cells, nontransfected or transfected with vector only. Moreover, primed CEA transgenic spleen cells showed augmented CTL activity against MC-38.CEA cells that was similar to that observed in nontransgenic mice. All CTL clones derived from either transgenic or nontransgenic mice showed cross-reactivity with MC-38 cells expressing the CEA-related antigen, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen, but not biliary glycoprotein. CEA-specific CTL clones were not identified. Adoptive transfer of cloned CTL resulted in inhibition of MC-38.CEA but not MC-38.BGP tumor growth. Tumor cures were elicited in mice treated with a combination of cloned CTL and cyclophosphamide. Histopathological examination of CEA-expressing colons from either immunized mice or recipients of cloned CTL did not reveal any autoimmune reactions. These studies demonstrate that CTL recognizing cross-reactive class I epitopes on the CEA molecule can be induced in transgenic mice. The expression of these epitopes on tumor cells creates effective targets for CTL in vivo without inducing adverse reactions in CEA-expressing normal tissues. Since anti-CEA CTL have been generated in humans, CEA-transgenic mice may be a useful model to study vaccines that are based

  13. Linkage Disequilibrium in Wild Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Cathy C; Nickerson, Deborah A; Anderson, Amy D; Weir, Bruce S; Livingston, Robert J; Dean, Matthew D; Smith, Kimberly L; Schadt, Eric E; Nachman, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    Crosses between laboratory strains of mice provide a powerful way of detecting quantitative trait loci for complex traits related to human disease. Hundreds of these loci have been detected, but only a small number of the underlying causative genes have been identified. The main difficulty is the extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) in intercross progeny and the slow process of fine-scale mapping by traditional methods. Recently, new approaches have been introduced, such as association studies with inbred lines and multigenerational crosses. These approaches are very useful for interval reduction, but generally do not provide single-gene resolution because of strong LD extending over one to several megabases. Here, we investigate the genetic structure of a natural population of mice in Arizona to determine its suitability for fine-scale LD mapping and association studies. There are three main findings: (1) Arizona mice have a high level of genetic variation, which includes a large fraction of the sequence variation present in classical strains of laboratory mice; (2) they show clear evidence of local inbreeding but appear to lack stable population structure across the study area; and (3) LD decays with distance at a rate similar to human populations, which is considerably more rapid than in laboratory populations of mice. Strong associations in Arizona mice are limited primarily to markers less than 100 kb apart, which provides the possibility of fine-scale association mapping at the level of one or a few genes. Although other considerations, such as sample size requirements and marker discovery, are serious issues in the implementation of association studies, the genetic variation and LD results indicate that wild mice could provide a useful tool for identifying genes that cause variation in complex traits. PMID:17722986

  14. Elevated plus maze for mice.

    PubMed

    Komada, Munekazu; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Although the mouse genome is now completely sequenced, the functions of most of the genes expressed in the brain are not known. The influence of a given gene on a specific behavior can be determined by behavioral analysis of mutant mice. If a target gene is expressed in the brain, behavioral phenotype of the mutant mice could elucidate the genetic mechanism of normal behaviors. The elevated plus maze test is one of the most widely used tests for measuring anxiety-like behavior. The test is based on the natural aversion of mice for open and elevated areas, as well as on their natural spontaneous exploratory behavior in novel environments. The apparatus consists of open arms and closed arms, crossed in the middle perpendicularly to each other, and a center area. Mice are given access to all of the arms and are allowed to move freely between them. The number of entries into the open arms and the time spent in the open arms are used as indices of open space-induced anxiety in mice. Unfortunately, the procedural differences that exist between laboratories make it difficult to duplicate and compare results among laboratories. Here, we present a detailed movie demonstrating our protocol for the elevated plus maze test. In our laboratory, we have assessed more than 90 strains of mutant mice using the protocol shown in the movie. These data will be disclosed as a part of a public database that we are now constructing. Visualization of the protocol will promote better understanding of the details of the entire experimental procedure, allowing for standardization of the protocols used in different laboratories and comparisons of the behavioral phenotypes of various strains of mutant mice assessed using this test.

  15. Differential effects of human interferon alpha and interferon gamma on xenografted human thyroid tissue in severe combined immunodeficient mice and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Enomoto, T; Fornasier, V; Resetkova, E; Volpé, R

    1997-03-01

    We have studied the in vivo effects of human interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) administration on human thyroid tissue xenografted into two mouse strains: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and nude mice. Human lymphocytes survive in SCID mice but are lysed in nude mice. Thyroid tissues from Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or paranodular [normal, (N)] tissue was xenografted into SCID mice (0.8 g/mouse) pretreated with anti-asialo GM-1 antiserum and radiation and also into nude mice. One week after xenografting, SCID and nude mice were divided into three groups. Group A was treated with IFN-alpha intraperitoneally (2,000 units/mouse) three times weekly; group B was treated with IFN-gamma similarly; group C was treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only (control). Autologous human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were added to mice receiving N xenografts. Blood was taken every 2 weeks for levels of IgG and thyroid antibodies (TAb). After 6 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed, and xenograft thyrocyte histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression were measured. In addition, thyrocyte cultures were stimulated in vitro with 200 units/ml of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma or PBS (control). SCID mice xenografted with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in group A showed a significantly higher TAb production than group C, whereas in group B, TAb production was not statistically increased compared to control (group C). SCID mice xenografted with N did not produce TAb in any group, nor did nude mice xenografted with AITD. Thyrocyte HLA-DR expression was markedly increased in group A and B in SCID mice xenografted with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and N tissue compared to group C. In contrast, only group B (IFN-gamma) showed an increase in thyrocyte HLA-DR in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, only IFN-gamma (not IFN-alpha) stimulated

  16. Complex organic molecules and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmann, A.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Star forming regions are characterised by the presence of a wealth of chemical species. For the past two to three decades, ever more complex organic species have been detected in the hot cores of protostars. The evolution of these molecules in the course of the star forming process is still uncertain, but it is likely that they are partially incorporated into protoplanetary disks and then into planetesimals and the small bodies of planetary systems. The complex organic molecules seen in star forming regions are particularly interesting since they probably make up building blocks for prebiotic chemistry. Recently we showed that these species were also present in the cold gas in prestellar cores, which represent the very first stages of star formation. These detections question the models which were until now accepted to account for the presence of complex organic molecules in star forming regions. In this article, we shortly review our current understanding of complex organic molecule formation in the early stages of star formation, in hot and cold cores alike and present new results on the formation of their likely precursor radicals.

  17. Molecules of significance in planetary aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, H.

    1979-01-01

    This monograph is basically devoted to spectroscopic information of the molecules of planetary interest. Only those molecules have been dealt with which have been confirmed spectroscopically to be present in the atmosphere of major planets of our solar system and play an important role in the aeronomy of the respective planets. An introduction giving the general conditions of planets and their atmospheres including the gaseous molecules is given. Some typical planetary spectra is presented and supported with a discussion on some basic concepts of optical absorption and molecular parameters that are important to the study of planetary atmospheres. Quantities like dipole moments, transition probabilities, Einstein coefficients and line strengths, radiative life times, absorption cross sections, oscillator strengths, line widths and profiles, equivalent widths, growth curves, bond strengths, electronic transition moments, Franck-Condon factors and r-centroids, etc., are discussed. Spectroscopic information and relevant data of 6 diatomic (HF, HCL, CO, H2, O2, N2) and 6 polyatomic (CO2, N2), O3, HeO, NH3, CH4) molecules are presented.

  18. Langmuir Films of Chiral Molecules on Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Tamam, L.; Menahem, T; Mastai, Y; Sloutskin, E; Yefet, S; Deustch, M

    2009-01-01

    Homo- and heterochiral Langmuir films of a chiral derivative of stearic acid are studied in situ on the surface of liquid mercury as a function of surface coverage by surface tensiometry and surface-specific synchrotron X-ray diffraction and reflectivity. A transition from a phase of surface-parallel molecules to a phase of standing-up molecules is found. The former shows no surface-parallel long-range order. The standing-up phase of both homochiral and heterochiral compositions exhibit long-range order. However, the former has an oblique unit cell with parallel molecular planes, and the later has a centered rectangular unit cell with a herringbone molecular packing. For both cases, the standing-up molecules are tilted by 44 from the surface normal and pack at a density of 19.5 Angstroms2/molecule in the plane normal to the molecular long axis. Important differences are found, and discussed, between this behavior and that of a Langmuir film of the nonchiral stearic acid on mercury.

  19. Manipulation of fullerene molecules on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Mitrofanov, V. V.; Slepchenkov, M. M.; Shunaev, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    Due to the increasing demand for functionalization of graphene and its application as a functional element of real electronic and / or mechanical devices, as well as due to its unique adhesive and sensory abilities the actual problem is the use of graphene as a substrate on which the assembly of supramolecular structures. Elements of such structures can be different molecules driven by external factors, and can be easily transported on graphene. These molecules primarily include miniature spheroidal fullerenes easy to navigate on the surface of graphene, in particular icosahedral C60. The aim of this work was to find an effective method of manipulation of fullerene C60 on graphene. As such method we proposed to introduce in graphene sheet structural defect of the atomic framework namely defect Stone-Wales (pentagon-heptagon pairs). Another structural defect studied in this paper is adsorbed on the Stone-Wales defect hydrogen atom. Molecular dynamics and tight binding method were applied to calculate the location of the molecule C60 on graphene sheet and its movement. To identify the regulatities of behavior of fullerene on graphene sheet we carried out a series of numerical experiments at different temperatures. In this paper we calculated the energy profile of interaction between fullerene and graphene sheet. Obtained results showed that forming on the surface of the graphene sheet defects in a certain way, one can control the trajectory of molecules on graphene.

  20. Proteins Are the Body's Worker Molecules

    MedlinePlus

    ... Each "bead" is a small molecule called an amino acid. There are 20 standard amino acids, each with its own shape, size, and properties. Proteins typically contain from 50 to 2,000 amino acids hooked end-to-end in many combinations. Each ...

  1. Collisions of trapped molecules with slow beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Pavlovic, Z.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Cote, R.

    2010-08-15

    We present a theoretical study of molecular-trap loss induced by collisions with slow atomic beams based on an explicit analysis of collision kinematics in the laboratory frame and a rigorous quantum description of atom-molecule scattering in external fields. The theory is applied to elucidate the effects of nonuniform magnetic and optical trapping fields on low-temperature collisions of OH (J=3/2,M{sub J}=3/2,f) molecules with {sup 4}He atoms. Our calculations quantify the extent to which both elastic and inelastic cross sections are suppressed by external trapping fields, clarify the role of small-angle scattering in trap loss, and may benefit future experiments on collisional cooling of molecules in electromagnetic traps. The calculated cross sections for trap loss in {sup 4}He + OH collisions are consistent with recent experimental observations at low beam energies [B. C. Sawyer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 203203 (2008)], demonstrating the importance of including the effects of nonuniform trapping fields in theoretical simulations of cold collision experiments with trapped molecules and slow atomic beams.

  2. Photochromism of diarylethene molecules and crystals

    PubMed Central

    IRIE, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Photochromism is defined as a reversible transformation of a chemical species between two isomers upon photoirradiation. Although vast numbers of photochromic molecules have been so far reported, photochromic molecules which exhibit thermally irreversible photochromic reactivity are limited to a few examples. The thermal irreversibility is an indispensable property for the application of photochromic molecules to optical memories and switches. We have developed a new class of photochromic molecules named “diarylethenes”, which show the thermally irreversible photochromic reactivity. The well designed diarylethene derivatives provide outstanding photochromic performance: both isomers are thermally stable for more than 470,000 years, photoinduced coloration/decoloration can be repeated more than 105 cycles, the quantum yield of cyclization reaction is close to 1 (100%), and the response times of both coloration and decoloration are less than 10 ps. This review describes theoretical background of the photochromic reactions, color changes of the derivatives in solution as well as in the single crystalline phase, and application of the crystals to light-driven actuators. PMID:20467213

  3. Polypetide signaling molecules in plant development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intercellular communication mediated by small signaling molecules is a key mechanism for coordinating plant growth and development. In the past few years, polypeptide signals have been shown to play prominent roles in processes as diverse as shoot and root meristem maintenance, vascular differentiat...

  4. A new interstellar molecule: tricarbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Matthews, H E; Irvine, W M; Friberg, P; Brown, R D; Godfrey, P D

    1984-07-12

    The cold dark interstellar Taurus Molecular Cloud One (TMC-1) is a rich source of acetylenic and polyacetylenic molecular species. As well as linear closed-shell molecules (H(C triple bond C)nCN) and symmetric rotors (CH3C triple bond CH, CH3C triple bond CCN), several radicals (C triple bond CH, C triple bond CCN, (C triple bond C2H) have also been identified, many of which had not been studied previously in the laboratory. Whether the observed abundances can be understood in terms of purely gas-phase ion-molecule chemical schemes, which produce reasonable agreement for the simplest polyatomic species, is unclear; alternative models involving the particulate interstellar grains as catalysts or sources have also been suggested. We now report the detection in TMC-1 of a new molecule, tricarbon monoxide (C3O), whose pure rotational spectrum has only very recently been studied in the laboratory. As C3O is the first known interstellar carbon chain molecule to contain oxygen, its existence places an important new constraint on chemical schemes for cold interstellar clouds. In fact, the observed abundance of tricarbon monoxide fits quite well into our model of galactochemistry.

  5. Leishmania molecules that mediate intracellular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kima, Peter E

    2014-09-01

    Parasites of the Leishmania genus are the causative agents of a complex disease called leishmaniasis. Many activities of infected cells including their responses to a range of stimuli are modulated by Leishmania parasites. This review will profile some of the parasite molecules that target host cell processes for which there has been recent progress.

  6. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction

  7. Adsorption of small organic molecules on graphene.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Petr; Karlický, František; Jurečka, Petr; Kocman, Mikuláš; Otyepková, Eva; Šafářová, Klára; Otyepka, Michal

    2013-04-24

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical quantification of the adsorption enthalpies of seven organic molecules (acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, and toluene) on graphene. Adsorption enthalpies were measured by inverse gas chromatography and ranged from -5.9 kcal/mol for dichloromethane to -13.5 kcal/mol for toluene. The strength of interaction between graphene and the organic molecules was estimated by density functional theory (PBE, B97D, M06-2X, and optB88-vdW), wave function theory (MP2, SCS(MI)-MP2, MP2.5, MP2.X, and CCSD(T)), and empirical calculations (OPLS-AA) using two graphene models: coronene and infinite graphene. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations indicated that the interactions were governed by London dispersive forces (amounting to ∼60% of attractive interactions), even for the polar molecules. The results also showed that the adsorption enthalpies were largely controlled by the interaction energy. Adsorption enthalpies obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics employing non-local optB88-vdW functional were in excellent agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the functional can cover physical phenomena behind adsorption of organic molecules on graphene sufficiently well.

  8. Molecules into Cells: Specifying Spatial Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Franklin M.

    2005-01-01

    A living cell is not an aggregate of molecules but an organized pattern, structured in space and in time. This article addresses some conceptual issues in the genesis of spatial architecture, including how molecules find their proper location in cell space, the origins of supramolecular order, the role of the genes, cell morphology, the continuity of cells, and the inheritance of order. The discussion is framed around a hierarchy of physiological processes that bridge the gap between nanometer-sized molecules and cells three to six orders of magnitude larger. Stepping stones include molecular self-organization, directional physiology, spatial markers, gradients, fields, and physical forces. The knowledge at hand leads to an unconventional interpretation of biological order. I have come to think of cells as self-organized systems composed of genetically specified elements plus heritable structures. The smallest self that can be fairly said to organize itself is the whole cell. If structure, form, and function are ever to be computed from data at a lower level, the starting point will be not the genome, but a spatially organized system of molecules. This conclusion invites us to reconsider our understanding of what genes do, what organisms are, and how living systems could have arisen on the early Earth. PMID:16339735

  9. Uranium-mediated activation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L

    2011-08-28

    Molecular complexes of uranium are capable of activating a range of industrially and economically important small molecules such as CO, CO(2), and N(2); new and often unexpected reactions provide insight into an element that needs to be well-understood if future clean-energy solutions are to involve nuclear power.

  10. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  11. SMPDB: The Small Molecule Pathway Database.

    PubMed

    Frolkis, Alex; Knox, Craig; Lim, Emilia; Jewison, Timothy; Law, Vivian; Hau, David D; Liu, Phillip; Gautam, Bijaya; Ly, Son; Guo, An Chi; Xia, Jianguo; Liang, Yongjie; Shrivastava, Savita; Wishart, David S

    2010-01-01

    The Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) is an interactive, visual database containing more than 350 small-molecule pathways found in humans. More than 2/3 of these pathways (>280) are not found in any other pathway database. SMPDB is designed specifically to support pathway elucidation and pathway discovery in clinical metabolomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and systems biology. SMPDB provides exquisitely detailed, hyperlinked diagrams of human metabolic pathways, metabolic disease pathways, metabolite signaling pathways and drug-action pathways. All SMPDB pathways include information on the relevant organs, organelles, subcellular compartments, protein cofactors, protein locations, metabolite locations, chemical structures and protein quaternary structures. Each small molecule is hyperlinked to detailed descriptions contained in the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) or DrugBank and each protein or enzyme complex is hyperlinked to UniProt. All SMPDB pathways are accompanied with detailed descriptions, providing an overview of the pathway, condition or processes depicted in each diagram. The database is easily browsed and supports full text searching. Users may query SMPDB with lists of metabolite names, drug names, genes/protein names, SwissProt IDs, GenBank IDs, Affymetrix IDs or Agilent microarray IDs. These queries will produce lists of matching pathways and highlight the matching molecules on each of the pathway diagrams. Gene, metabolite and protein concentration data can also be visualized through SMPDB's mapping interface. All of SMPDB's images, image maps, descriptions and tables are downloadable. SMPDB is available at: http://www.smpdb.ca. PMID:19948758

  12. Electrostatic Propulsion Using C60 Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Stephanie D.; Saunders, Winston A.

    1993-01-01

    Report proposes use of C60 as propellant material in electrostatic propulsion system of spacecraft. C60, C70, and similar molecules, have recently been found to have characteristics proving advantageous in electrostatic propulsion. Report discusses these characteristics and proposes experiments to determine feasibility of concept.

  13. Molecule diagram from earth-grown crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Like many chemicals in the body, the three-dimensional structure of insulin is extremely complex. When grown on the ground, insulin crystals do not grow as large or as ordered as researchers desire--obscuring the blueprint of the insulin molecules.

  14. The Molecules of the Cell Membrane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretscher, Mark S.

    1985-01-01

    Cell membrane molecules form a simple, two-dimensional liquid controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Discusses cell membrane molecular architecture, plasma membranes, epithelial cells, cycles of endocytosis and exocytosis, and other topics. Indicates that some cells internalize, then recycle, membrane area equivalent to their entire surface…

  15. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  16. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Roberta J; Richards, Justin J; Melander, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: (1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, (2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and (3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  17. Mathematics and Molecules: Exploring Connections via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploger, Don; Carlock, Margaret

    1996-01-01

    Examines the self-directed activity of two students who learned about molecular structure by writing computer programs. The programs displayed the solution of a mathematics problem, then the programs were extended to represent several classes of organic molecules. Different ways to enhance mathematical connections to chemistry education are…

  18. Progress in searches for prebiotic interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Å.; Bergman, P.; Nummelin, A.

    2001-08-01

    Recent progress in our searches for complex interstellar molecules, which may be important for the origin of life on habitable planets, is reviewed. The molecular abundance ranges and current search limits observed in a number of "hot core" sources are tabulated and discussed. The abundance limits reached in searches for most complex interstellar molecules are not much lower than the detection levels of other large molecules. While our detection of c-C2H4O (ethylene oxide, oxirane) may suggest the interstellar presence of the next larger similar ring c-C4H4O (furan - the core of the simple sugars ribose and deoxyribose, which form the backbones of RNA and DNA), our current search limits are just barely lower than the abundance level of ethylene oxide. Really deep searches for prebiotic molecules in compact cloud cores will have to await the erection of the very sensitive aperture synthesis instrument ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimetre Array, to be located in the Chilean Andes.

  19. Organic chemistry: Precision pruning of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kin S.; Engle, Keary M.

    2016-05-01

    If organic molecules were trees, then the numerous carbon-hydrogen bonds within them would be leaves. A catalyst that targets one 'leaf' out of many similar other ones looks set to be a huge leap for synthetic chemistry. See Letter p.230

  20. Organic molecules in translucent interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Krełowski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    Absorption spectra of translucent interstellar clouds contain many known molecular bands of CN, CH+, CH, OH, OH(+), NH, C2 and C3. Moreover, one can observe more than 400 unidentified absorption features, known as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), commonly believed to be carried by complex, carbon-bearing molecules. DIBs have been observed in extragalactic sources as well. High S/N spectra allow to determine precisely the corresponding column densities of the identified molecules, rotational temperatures which differ significantly from object to object in cases of centrosymmetric molecular species, and even the (12)C/(13)C abundance ratio. Despite many laboratory based studies of possible DIB carriers, it has not been possible to unambiguously link these bands to specific species. An identification of DIBs would substantially contribute to our understanding of chemical processes in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of substructures inside DIB profiles supports the idea that DIBs are very likely features of gas phase molecules. So far only three out of more than 400 DIBs have been linked to specific molecules but none of these links was confirmed beyond doubt. A DIB identification clearly requires a close cooperation between observers and experimentalists. The review presents the state-of-the-art of the investigations of the chemistry of interstellar translucent clouds i.e. how far our observations are sufficient to allow some hints concerning the chemistry of, the most common in the Galaxy, translucent interstellar clouds, likely situated quite far from the sources of radiation (stars). PMID:25467771