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Sample records for molten-salt nuclear energy

  1. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed.

  2. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Molten Salt Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sabharwall; M. Green; S.J. Yoon; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing concerns in the production of reliable energy sources, the next generation in reliable power generation, hybrid energy systems, are being developed to stabilize these growing energy needs. The hybrid energy system incorporates multiple inputs and multiple outputs. The vitality and efficiency of these systems resides in the energy storage application. Energy storage is necessary for grid stabilizing and storing the overproduction of energy to meet peak demands of energy at the time of need. With high thermal energy production of the primary nuclear heat generation source, molten salt energy storage is an intriguing option because of its distinct properties. This paper will discuss the different energy storage options with the criteria for efficient energy storage set forth, and will primarily focus on different molten salt energy storage system options through a thermodynamic analysis

  3. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System: Molten Salt Energy Storage (Summer Report 2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Michael George mckellar; Su-Jong Yoon

    2013-11-01

    Effective energy use is a main focus and concern in the world today because of the growing demand for energy. The nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) is a valuable technical concept that can potentially diversify and leverage existing energy technologies. This report considers a particular NHES design that combines multiple energy systems including a nuclear reactor, energy storage system (ESS), variable renewable generator (VRG), and additional process heat applications. Energy storage is an essential component of this particular NHES because its design allows the system to produce peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant power output. Many energy storage options are available, but this study mainly focuses on a molten salt ESS. The primary purpose of the molten salt ESS is to enable the nuclear reactor to be a purely constant heat source by acting as a heat storage component for the reactor during times of low demand, and providing additional capacity for thermo-electric power generation during times of peak electricity demand. This report will describe the rationale behind using a molten salt ESS and identify an efficient molten salt ESS configuration that may be used in load following power applications. Several criteria are considered for effective energy storage and are used to identify the most effective ESS within the NHES. Different types of energy storage are briefly described with their advantages and disadvantages. The general analysis to determine the most efficient molten salt ESS involves two parts: thermodynamic, in which energetic and exergetic efficiencies are considered; and economic. Within the molten salt ESS, the two-part analysis covers three major system elements: molten salt ESS designs (two tank direct and thermocline), the molten salt choice, and the different power cycles coupled with the molten salt ESS. Analysis models are formulated and analyzed to determine the most effective ESS. The results show that the most

  4. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  5. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  6. The results of the investigations of Russian Research Center—``Kurchatov Institute'' on molten salt applications to problems of nuclear energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Vladimir M.

    1995-09-01

    The results of investigations on molten salt (MS) applications to problems of nuclear energy systems that have been conducted in Russian Research ``Kurchatov Institute'' are presented and discussed. The spectrum of these investigations is rather broad and covers the following items: physical characteristics of molten salt nuclear energy systems (MSNES); nuclear and radiation safety of MSNES; construction materials compatible with MS of different compositions; technological aspects of MS loops; in-reactor loop testing. It is shown that main findings of completed program support the conclusion that there are no physical nor technological obstacles on a way of MS application to different nuclear energy systems.

  7. Molten salts and energy related materials.

    PubMed

    Fray, Derek

    2016-08-15

    Molten salts have been known for centuries and have been used for the extraction of aluminium for over one hundred years and as high temperature fluxes in metal processing. This and other molten salt routes have gradually become more energy efficient and less polluting, but there have been few major breakthroughs. This paper will explore some recent innovations that could lead to substantial reductions in the energy consumed in metal production and in carbon dioxide production. Another way that molten salts can contribute to an energy efficient world is by creating better high temperature fuel cells and novel high temperature batteries, or by acting as the medium that can create novel materials that can find applications in high energy batteries and other energy saving devices, such as capacitors. Carbonate melts can be used to absorb carbon dioxide, which can be converted into C, CO and carbon nanoparticles. Molten salts can also be used to create black silicon that can absorb more sunlight over a wider range of wavelengths. Overall, there are many opportunities to explore for molten salts to play in an efficient, low carbon world. PMID:27276650

  8. Molten salts and energy related materials.

    PubMed

    Fray, Derek

    2016-08-15

    Molten salts have been known for centuries and have been used for the extraction of aluminium for over one hundred years and as high temperature fluxes in metal processing. This and other molten salt routes have gradually become more energy efficient and less polluting, but there have been few major breakthroughs. This paper will explore some recent innovations that could lead to substantial reductions in the energy consumed in metal production and in carbon dioxide production. Another way that molten salts can contribute to an energy efficient world is by creating better high temperature fuel cells and novel high temperature batteries, or by acting as the medium that can create novel materials that can find applications in high energy batteries and other energy saving devices, such as capacitors. Carbonate melts can be used to absorb carbon dioxide, which can be converted into C, CO and carbon nanoparticles. Molten salts can also be used to create black silicon that can absorb more sunlight over a wider range of wavelengths. Overall, there are many opportunities to explore for molten salts to play in an efficient, low carbon world.

  9. Nuclear performance optimization of the molten-salt fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.; Bandini, B.R.

    1986-06-05

    Improved nuclear analysis, including the treatment of resonance and spatial self-shielding, coupled with an optimization procedure, has resulted in an improved performance estimate for the molten salt blanket. Net U-233 breeding ratio ranges between 0.58 and 0.63, and blanket energy multiplication ranges between 1.8 and 1.9.

  10. New safe nuclear energy for the next century thorium molten-salt nuclear energy synergetics

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, K. ); Lecocq, A. ); Mitachi, K. ); Kato, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    In the next century, the fission breeder concept will not be practical from the several reasons to solve the global energy problems, including environmental and North-South problems. In this paper as a new measure, a simple rational Th breeding fuel cycle system, composed of simple power stations and fissile producers, is proposed to establish the essential improvement in issues of safety, powersize flexibility, nuclear-proliferation and terrorism, radio-waste, economy, etc. securing the simple operation, maintenance and chemical processing.

  11. Molten salt thermal energy storage for utility peaking loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, A.; Haslett, R.; Joyce, J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the use of thermal energy storage (TES) in molten salts to increase the capacity of power plants. Five existing fossil and nuclear electric utility plants were selected as representative of current technology. A review of system load diagrams indicated that TES to meet loads over 95% of peak was a reasonable goal. Alternate TES heat exchanger locations were evaluated, showing that the stored energy should be used either for feedwater heating or to generate steam for an auxiliary power cycle. Specific salts for each concept are recommended. Design layouts were prepared for one plant, and it was shown that a TES tube/shell heat exchanger system could provide about 7% peaking capability at lower cost than adding steam generation capacity. Promising alternate heat exchanger concepts were also identified.

  12. Molten Salt Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maru, H. C.; Dullea, J. F.; Kardas, A.; Paul, L.; Marianowski, L. G.; Ong, E.; Sampath, V.; Huang, V. M.; Wolak, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of storing thermal energy at temperatures of 450 C to 535 C in the form of latent heat of fusion was examined for over 30 inorganic salts and salt mixtures. Alkali carbonate mixtures were chosen as phase-change storage materials in this temperature range because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, moderate cost, low volumetric expansion upon melting, low corrosivity, and good chemical stability. Means of improving heat conduction through the solid salt were explored.

  13. Molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    In this volume, the historical background, scope, problems, economics, and future applications of molten salt technologies are discussed. Topics presented include molten salts in primary production of aluminum, general principles and handling and safety of the alkali metals, first-row transition metals, group VIII metals and B-group elements, solution electrochemistry, transport phenomena, corrosion in different molten salts, cells with molten salt electrolytes and reactants, fuel cell design, hydrocracking and liquefaction, heat storage in phase change materials, and nuclear technologies.

  14. Molten Salt Fuel Version of Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W; Shaw, H F; Caro, A; Kaufman, L; Latkowski, J F; Powers, J; Turchi, P A

    2008-10-24

    Molten salt with dissolved uranium is being considered for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) fission blanket as a backup in case a solid-fuel version cannot meet the performance objectives, for example because of radiation damage of the solid materials. Molten salt is not damaged by radiation and therefore could likely achieve the desired high burnup (>99%) of heavy atoms of {sup 238}U. A perceived disadvantage is the possibility that the circulating molten salt could lend itself to misuse (proliferation) by making separation of fissile material easier than for the solid-fuel case. The molten salt composition being considered is the eutectic mixture of 73 mol% LiF and 27 mol% UF{sub 4}, whose melting point is 490 C. The use of {sup 232}Th as a fuel is also being studied. ({sup 232}Th does not produce Pu under neutron irradiation.) The temperature of the molten salt would be {approx}550 C at the inlet (60 C above the solidus temperature) and {approx}650 C at the outlet. Mixtures of U and Th are being considered. To minimize corrosion of structural materials, the molten salt would also contain a small amount ({approx}1 mol%) of UF{sub 3}. The same beryllium neutron multiplier could be used as in the solid fuel case; alternatively, a liquid lithium or liquid lead multiplier could be used. Insuring that the solubility of Pu{sup 3+} in the melt is not exceeded is a design criterion. To mitigate corrosion of the steel, a refractory coating such as tungsten similar to the first wall facing the fusion source is suggested in the high-neutron-flux regions; and in low-neutron-flux regions, including the piping and heat exchangers, a nickel alloy, Hastelloy, would be used. These material choices parallel those made for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL. The nuclear performance is better than the solid fuel case. At the beginning of life, the tritium breeding ratio is unity and the plutonium plus {sup 233}U production rate is {approx}0

  15. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  16. Protection of nuclear graphite toward fluoride molten salt by glassy carbon deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardet, V.; Gomes, S.; Delpeux, S.; Dubois, M.; Guérin, K.; Avignant, D.; Renaudin, G.; Duclaux, L.

    2009-02-01

    Molten salt reactor represents one of the promising future Generation IV nuclear reactors families where the fuel, a liquid molten fluoride salt, is circulating through the graphite reactor core. The interactions between nuclear graphite and fluoride molten salt and also the graphite surface protection were investigated in this paper by powder X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray microanalysis. Nuclear graphite discs were covered by two kinds of protection deposit: a glassy carbon coating and a double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon. Different behaviours have been highlighted according to the presence and the nature of the coated protection film. Intercalation of molten salt between the graphite layers did not occur. Nevertheless the molten salt adhered more or less to the surface of the graphite disc, filled more or less the graphite surface porosity and perturbed more or less the graphite stacking order at the disc surface. The behaviour of unprotected graphite was far to be satisfactory after two days of immersion of graphite in molten salt at 500 °C. The best protection of the graphite disc surface, with the maximum of inertness towards molten salt, has been obtained with the double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon.

  17. Molten salt considerations for accelerator-driven subcritical fission to close the nuclear fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Adams, Marvin; Baty, Austin; Gerity, James; McIntyre, Peter; Melconian, Karie; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat; Tsevkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    The host salt selection, molecular modeling, physical chemistry, and processing chemistry are presented here for an accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). The core is fueled solely with the transuranics (TRU) and long-lived fission products (LFP) from used nuclear fuel. The neutronics and salt composition are optimized to destroy the transuranics by fission and the long-lived fission products by transmutation. The cores are driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. One such ADSMS system can destroy the transuranics in the used nuclear fuel produced by a 1GWe conventional reactor. It uniquely provides a method to close the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy.

  18. Molten salt considerations for accelerator-driven subcritical fission to close the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Baty, Austin; Gerity, James; McIntyre, Peter; Melconian, Karie; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Adams, Marvin; Tsevkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2013-04-19

    The host salt selection, molecular modeling, physical chemistry, and processing chemistry are presented here for an accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). The core is fueled solely with the transuranics (TRU) and long-lived fission products (LFP) from used nuclear fuel. The neutronics and salt composition are optimized to destroy the transuranics by fission and the long-lived fission products by transmutation. The cores are driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. One such ADSMS system can destroy the transuranics in the used nuclear fuel produced by a 1GWe conventional reactor. It uniquely provides a method to close the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy.

  19. Space Molten Salt Reactor Concept for Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Surface Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eades, M.; Flanders, J.; McMurray, N.; Denning, R.; Sun, X.; Windl, W.; Blue, T.

    Students at The Ohio State University working under the NASA Steckler Grant sought to investigate how molten salt reactors with fissile material dissolved in a liquid fuel medium can be applied to space applications. Molten salt reactors of this kind, built for non-space applications, have demonstrated high power densities, high temperature operation without pressurization, high fuel burn up and other characteristics that are ideal for space fission systems. However, little research has been published on the application of molten salt reactor technology to space fission systems. This paper presents a conceptual design of the Space Molten Salt Reactor (SMSR), which utilizes molten salt reactor technology for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power at the 100 kWe to 15 MWe level. Central to the SMSR design is a liquid mixture of LiF, BeF2 and highly enriched U235F4 that acts as both fuel and core coolant. In brief, some of the positive characteristics of the SMSR are compact size, simplified core design, high fuel burn up percentages, proliferation resistant features, passive safety mechanisms, a considerable body of previous research, and the possibility for flexible mission architecture.

  20. Application of Molten Salt Reactor Technology to Nuclear Electric Propulsion Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, Bruce; Sorensen, Kirk; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and planetary surface power missions require reactors that are lightweight, operationally robust, and scalable in power for widely varying scientific mission objectives. Molten salt reactor technology meets all of these requirements and offers an interesting alternative to traditional gas cooled, liquid metal, and heat pipe space reactors.

  1. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of thermal energy storage (TES) in the latent heat of molten salts as a means of conserving fossil fuels and lowering the cost of electric power was evaluated. Public utility systems provided electric power on demand. This demand is generally maximum during late weekday afternoons, with considerably lower overnight and weekend loads. Typically, the average demand is only 60% to 80% of peak load. As peak load increases, the present practice is to purchase power from other grid facilities or to bring older less efficient fossil-fuel plants on line which increase the cost of electric power. The widespread use of oil-fired boilers, gas turbine and diesel equipment to meet peaking loads depletes our oil-based energy resources. Heat exchangers utilizing molten salts can be used to level the energy consumption curve. The study begins with a demand analysis and the consideration of several existing modern fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants for use as models. Salts are evaluated for thermodynamic, economic, corrosive, and safety characteristics. Heat exchanger concepts are explored and heat exchanger designs are conceived. Finally, the economics of TES conversions in existing plants and new construction is analyzed. The study concluded that TES is feasible in electric power generation. Substantial data are presented for TES design, and reference material for further investigation of techniques is included.

  2. The molten salt reactor adventure

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1985-08-01

    A personal history of the development of molten salt reactors in the United States is presented. The initial goal was an aircraft propulsion reactor, and a molten fluoride-fueled Aircraft Reactor Experiment was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1954. In 1956, the objective shifted to civilian nuclear power, and reactor concepts were developed using a circulating UF4-ThF4 fuel, graphite moderator, and Hastelloy N pressure boundary. The program culminated in the successful operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment in 1965 to 1969. By then the Atomic Energy Commission's goals had shifted to breeder development; the molten salt program supported on-site reprocessing development and study of various reactor arrangements that had potential to breed. Some commercial and foreign interest contributed to the program which, however, was terminated by the government in 1976. The current status of the technology and prospects for revived interest are summarized.

  3. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Ramana G.

    2013-10-23

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222ºC) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 °C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the go

  4. Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission in a Molten Salt Core: Green Nuclear Power for the New Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Scientists at Texas A&M University, Brookhaven National Lab, and Idaho National Lab are developing a design for accelerator-drive subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). Three high-power proton beams are delivered to spallation targets in a molten salt core, where they provide ˜3% of the fast neutrons required to sustain 600 MW of fission. The proton beams are produced by a flux-coupled stack of superconducting strong-focusing cyclotrons. The fuel consists of a eutectic of sodium chloride with either spent nuclear fuel from a conventional U power reactor (ADSMS-U) or thorium (ADSMS-Th). The subcritical core cannot go critical under any failure mode. The core cannot melt down even if all power is suddenly lost to the facility for a prolonged period. The ultra-fast neutronics of the core makes it possible to operate in an isobreeding mode, in which neutron capture breeds the fertile nuclide into a fissile nuclide at the same rate that fission burns the fissile nuclide, and consumes 90% of the fertile inventory instead of the 5% consumed in the original use in a conventional power plant. The ultra-fast neutronics produces a very low equilibrium inventory of the long-lived minor actinides, ˜10^4 less than what is produced in conventional power plants. ADSMS offers a method to safely produce the energy needs for all mankind for the next 3000 years.

  5. Nuclear-grade zirconium prepared by combining combustion synthesis with molten-salt electrorefining technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Nersisyan, Hayk H.; Park, Kyung-Tae; Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Jeong-Guk; Lee, Jeong-Min; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2011-06-01

    Zirconium has a low absorption cross-section for neutrons, which makes it an ideal material for use in nuclear reactor applications. However, hafnium typically contained in zirconium causes it to be far less useful for nuclear reactor materials because of its high neutron-absorbing properties. In the present study, a novel effective method has been developed for the production of hafnium-free zirconium. The process includes two main stages: magnesio-thermic reduction of ZrSiO 4 under a combustion mode, to produce zirconium silicide (ZrSi), and recovery of hafnium-free zirconium by molten-salt electrorefining. It was found that, depending on the electrorefining procedure, it is possible to produce zirconium powder with a low hafnium content: 70 ppm, determined by ICP-AES analysis.

  6. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Tison, R. R.; Marianowski, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The results of comparative screening studies of candidate molten carbonate salts as phase change materials (PCM) for advanced solar thermal energy storage applications at 540 to 870 C (1004 to 1600 F) and steam Rankine electric generation at 400 to 540 C (752 to 1004 F) are presented. Alkali carbonates are attractive as latent heat storage materials because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, low corrosivity, moderate cost, and safe and simple handling requirements. Salts were tested in 0.1 kWhr lab scale modules and evaluated on the basis of discharge heat flux, solidification temperature range, thermal cycling stability, and compatibility with containment materials. The feasibility of using a distributed network of high conductivity material to increase the heat flux through the layer of solidified salt was evaluated. The thermal performance of an 8 kWhr thermal energy storage (TES) module containing LiKCO3 remained very stable throughout 5650 hours and 130 charge/discharge cycles at 480 to 535 C (896 to 995 F). A TES utilization concept of an electrical generation peaking subsystem composed of a multistage condensing steam turbine and a TES subsystem with a separate power conversion loop was defined. Conceptual designs for a 100 MW sub e TES peaking system providing steam at 316 C, 427 C, and 454 C (600 F, 800 F, and 850 F) at 3.79 million Pa (550 psia) were developed and evaluated. Areas requiring further investigation have also been identified.

  7. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, R.J.; Claar, T.D.; Tison, R.R.

    1980-02-01

    Experimental results of comparative screening studies of candidate molten carbonate salts as phase-change materials (PCM) for advanced solar-thermal energy storage applications at 540/sup 0/ to 870/sup 0/C and steam-Rankine electric generation at 400/sup 0/ to 540/sup 0/C are presented. Alkali carbonates are attractive as latent-heat storage materials because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, low corrosivity, moderate cost, and safe and simple handling requirements. Salts were tested in 0.1 kWhr lab-scale modules and evaluated on the basis of discharge heat flux, solidification temperature range, thermal cycling stability, and compatibility with containment materials. The feasibility of using a distributed network of high-conductivity material to increase the heat flux through the layer of solidified salt was experimentally evaluated. The thermal performance of an 8 kWhr thermal energy storage (TES) module containing LiKCO/sub 3/ remained very stable throughout 5650 h and 130 charge/discharge cycles at 480/sup 0/ to 535/sup 0/C. A TES utilization concept of an electrical generation peaking subsytem composed of a multistage condensing steam turbine and a TES subsystem with a separate power conversion loop was defined. Conceptual designs for a 100 MW/sub e/ TES peaking system providing steam at 316/sup 0/, 427/sup 0/, and 454/sup 0/ at 3.79 x 10/sup 6/ Pa were developed and evaluated. Areas requiring further investigation have also been identiied.

  8. Archimede solar energy molten salt parabolic trough demo plant: Improvements and second year of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccari, Augusto; Donnola, Sandro; Matino, Francesca; Tamano, Shiro

    2016-05-01

    Since July 2013, the first stand-alone Molten Salt Parabolic Trough (MSPT) demo plant, which was built in collaboration with Archimede Solar Energy and Chiyoda Corporation, is in operation, located adjacent to the Archimede Solar Energy (ASE) manufacturing plant in Massa Martana (Italy). During the two year's operating time frame, the management of the demo plant has shown that MSPT technology is a suitable and reliable option. Several O&M procedures and tests have been performed, as Heat Loss and Minimum Flow Test, with remarkable results confirming that this technology is ready to be extended to standard size CSP plant, if the plant design takes into account molten salt peculiarities. Additionally, the plant has been equipped on fall 2014 with a Steam Generator system by Chiyoda Corporation, in order to test even this important MSPT plant subsystem and to extend the solar field active time, overcoming the previous lack of an adequate thermal load. Here, a description of the plant improvements and the overall plant operation figures will be presented.

  9. Molten salt electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, U.F.; Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this work is to develop preparation and clean-up processes for the fuel and carrier salt used in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology molten salt nuclear system. The front-end or fuel preparation process focuses on the removal of fission products, uranium, and zirconium from spent nuclear fuel by utilizing electrochemical methods. The same method provide the separation of the transition metal fission products at the back end of the fuel cycle. Molten salts provide a natural medium for the separation of actinides and fission products from one another because they are robust, radiation resistant solvents that can be recycled. The presentation will describe the design of the electrochemistry system, the method used for salt purification, and results of preliminary experiments.

  10. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt

  11. Neutronic Analysis of the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine Using Various Thorium Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acır, Adem

    2013-08-01

    In this study, a neutronic performance of the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) molten salt blanket is investigated. Neutronic calculations are performed by using XSDRNPM/SCALE5 codes in S8-P3 approximation. The thorium molten salt composition considered in this calculation is 75 % LiF—25 % ThF4, 75 % LiF—24 % ThF4—1 % 233UF4, 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4. Also, effects of the 6Li enrichment in molten salt are performed for all heavy metal salt. The radiation damage behaviors of SS-304 structural material with respect to higher fissionable fuel content and 6Li enrichment are computed. By higher fissionable fuel content in molten salt and with 6Li enrichment (20 and 50 %) in the coolant in form of 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4, an initial TBR >1.05 can be realized. On the other hand, the 75 % LiF—25 % ThF4 or 75 % LiF—24 % ThF4—1 % 233UF4 molten salt fuel as regards maintained tritium self-sufficiency is not suitable as regards improving neutronic performance of LIFE engine. A high quality fissile fuel with a rate of ~2,850 kg/year of 233U can be produced with 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4. The energy multiplication factor is increased with high rate fission reactions of 233U occurring in the molten salt zone. Major damage mechanisms in SS-304 first wall stell have been computed as DPA = 48 and He = 132 appm per year with 75 % LiF—23 % ThF4—2 % 233UF4. This implies a replacement of the SS-304 first wall stell of every between 3 and 4 years.

  12. Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roland

    2011-08-03

    Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

  13. Molten salt chemistry: An introduction and selected applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Marassi, R.

    1987-01-01

    The major fundamental topics covered are the structure of melts, thermodynamics of molten salt mixtures, theoretical and experimental studies of transport processes, metal-metal salt solutions, solvent properties of melt systems, acid-base effects in molten salt chemistry, electronic absorption, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt systems, electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry in molten salts, and organic chemistry in molten salts. The applied aspects include the chemistry of aluminium production, electrodeposition using molten salts, and molten salt batteries and fuel cells.

  14. Impact of thorium based molten salt reactor on the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaradat, Safwan Qasim Mohammad

    Molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of six reactors selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The liquid fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR) is a MSR concept based on thorium fuel cycle. LFTR uses liquid fluoride salts as a nuclear fuel. It uses 232Th and 233U as the fertile and fissile materials, respectively. Fluoride salt of these nuclides is dissolved in a mixed carrier salt of lithium and beryllium (FLiBe). The objective of this research was to complete feasibility studies of a small commercial thermal LFTR. The focus was on neutronic calculations in order to prescribe core design parameter such as core size, fuel block pitch (p), fuel channel radius, fuel path, reflector thickness, fuel salt composition, and power. In order to achieve this objective, the applicability of Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to MSR modeling was verified. Then, a prescription for conceptual small thermal reactor LFTR and relevant calculations were performed using MCNP to determine the main neutronic parameters of the core reactor. The MCNP code was used to study the reactor physics characteristics for the FUJI-U3 reactor. The results were then compared with the results obtained from the original FUJI-U3 using the reactor physics code SRAC95 and the burnup analysis code ORIPHY2. The results were comparable with each other. Based on the results, MCNP was found to be a reliable code to model a small thermal LFTR and study all the related reactor physics characteristics. The results of this study were promising and successful in demonstrating a prefatory small commercial LFTR design. The outcome of using a small core reactor with a diameter/height of 280/260 cm that would operate for more than five years at a power level of 150 MWth was studied. The fuel system 7LiF - BeF2 - ThF4 - UF4 with a (233U/ 232Th) = 2.01 % was the candidate fuel for this reactor core.

  15. Simplified Reference Electrode for Electrorefining of Spent Nuclear Fuel in High Temperature Molten Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Kim Davies; Shelly X Li

    2007-09-01

    Pyrochemical processing plays an important role in development of proliferation- resistant nuclear fuel cycles. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a pyrochemical process has been implemented for the treatment of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) in the last decade. Electrorefining in a high temperature molten salt is considered a signature or central technology in pyroprocessing fuel cycles. Separation of actinides from fission products is being demonstrated by electrorefining the spent fuel in a molten UCl3-LiCl-KCl electrolyte in two engineering scale electrorefiners (ERs). The electrorefining process is current controlled. The reference electrode provides process information through monitoring of the voltage difference between the reference and the anode and cathode electrodes. This information is essential for monitoring the reactions occurring at the electrodes, investigating separation efficiency, controlling the process rate, and determining the process end-point. The original reference electrode has provided good life expectancy and signal stability, but is not easily replaceable. The reference electrode used a vycor-glass ion-permeable membrane containing a high purity silver wire with one end positioned in ~2 grams of LiCl/KCl salt electrolyte with a low concentration (~1%) AgCl. It was, however, a complex assembly requiring specialized skill and talent to fabricate. The construction involved multiple small pieces, glass joints, ceramic to glass joints, and ceramic to metal joints all assembled in a high purity inert gas environment. As original electrodes reached end-of-life it was uncertain if the skills and knowledge were readily available to successfully fabricate replacements. Experimental work has been conducted to identify a simpler electrode design while retaining the needed long life and signal stability. This improved design, based on an ion-permeable membrane of mullite has been completed. Use of the silver wire

  16. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  17. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  18. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  19. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  20. A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K.; Oomori, T.

    2013-07-01

    At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

  1. Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Simpson, Mike

    2012-11-30

    This project addresses both practical and fundamental scientific issues of direct relevance to operational challenges of the molten LiCl-KCl salt pyrochemical process, while providing avenues for improvements in the process. In order to understand the effects of the continually changing composition of the molten salt bath during the process, the project team will systematically vary the concentrations of rare earth surrogate elements, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium, which will be added to the molten LiCl-KCl salt. They will also perform a limited number of focused experiments by the dissolution of depleted uranium. All experiments will be performed at 500 deg C. The project consists of the following tasks. Researchers will measure density of the molten salts using an instrument specifically designed for this purpose, and will determine the melting points with a differential scanning calorimeter. Knowledge of these properties is essential for salt mass accounting and taking the necessary steps to prevent melt freezing. The team will use cyclic voltammetry studies to determine redox potentials of the rare earth cations, as well as their diffusion coefficients and activities in the molten LiCl-KCl salt. In addition, the team will perform anodic stripping voltammetry to determine the concentration of the rare earth elements and their solubilities, and to develop the scientific basis for an on-line diagnostic system for in situ monitoring of the cation species concentration (rare earths in this case). Solubility and activity of the cation species are critically important for the prediction of the salt's useful lifetime and disposal.

  2. Molten-Salt Batteries for Medium and Large-Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Yang, Zhenguo

    2014-12-01

    This chapter discusses two types of molten salt batteries. Both of them are based on a beta-alumina solid electrolyte and molten sodium anode, i.e., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. The chapter first reviews the basic electrochemistries and materials for various battery components. It then describes the performance of state-of-the-art batteries and future direction in material development for these batteries.

  3. Corrosion of Ferritic Steels in High Temperature Molten Salt Coolants for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; El-Dasher, B; de Caro, M S; Ferreira, J

    2008-11-25

    Corrosion of ferritic steels in high temperature molten fluoride salts may limit the life of advanced reactors, including some hybrid systems that are now under consideration. In some cases, the steel may be protected through galvanic coupling with other less noble materials with special neutronic properties such a beryllium. This paper reports the development of a model for predicting corrosion rates for various ferritic steels, with and without oxide dispersion strengthening, in FLiBe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) and FLiNaK (Li-Na-K-F) coolants at temperatures up to 800 C. Mixed potential theory is used to account for the protection of steel by beryllium, Tafel kinetics are used to predict rates of dissolution as a function of temperature and potential, and the thinning of the mass-transfer boundary layer with increasing Reynolds number is accounted for with dimensionless correlations. The model also accounts for the deceleration of corrosion as the coolants become saturated with dissolved chromium and iron. This paper also reports electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of steels at their corrosion potentials in high-temperature molten salt environments, with the complex impedance spectra interpreted in terms of the interfacial charge transfer resistance and capacitance, as well as the electrolyte conductivity. Such in situ measurement techniques provide valuable insight into the degradation of materials under realistic conditions.

  4. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  5. Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors - history and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlíř, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core and also by the requirements of continuous 'on-line' reprocessing of the spent fuel. The history of Molten Salt Reactors reaches the period of fifties and sixties, when the first experimental Molten Salt Reactors were constructed and tested in ORNL (US). Several molten salt techniques dedicated to fresh molten salt fuel processing and spent fuel reprocessing were studied and developed in those days. Today, after nearly thirty years of discontinuance, a renewed interest in the Molten Salt Reactor technology is observed. Current experimental R&D activities in the area of Molten Salt Reactor technology are realized by a relatively small number of research institutions mainly in the EU, Russia and USA. The main effort is directed primarily to the development of separation processes suitable for the molten salt fuel processing and reprocessing technology. The techniques under development are molten salt/liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media, fused salt volatilization techniques and gas extraction from the molten salt medium.

  6. Chloroaluminate molten salt electrolytes and vanadium pentoxide xerogel cathodes for high energy density batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian

    The work presented here is part of an effort to develop a new type of battery which uses an alkali metal such as lithium or sodium or the alkaline earth magnesium, as the anode, a V2O5 xerogel as cathode, and a 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride/aluminum chloride room temperature molten salt as electrolyte. First, the stability of the electrolyte was studied. The electrochemistry of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIC), the organic component of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride/aluminum chloride molten salt, was examined in acetonitrile. Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to study the reduction of EMI+, the cation of EMIC. Controlled potential coulometry was used to determine the number of electrons involved in the EMI+ reduction process. EMI+ reduction was found to be a one-electron, diffusion controlled process occurring at -2.35V (vs. a reference electrode consisting of a Ag wire in 0.1 M tetra-n-butylammonium perchlorate (TBAP)/acetonitrile solution) in 0.1M TBAP/acetonitrile solution. Two products were generated from the reduction, which are oxidized at about -0.45 and -0.65V. Mass spectroscopy data for these two products suggest that they are degradation products of EMI+. The major products of EMI+ reduction are not electrochemically active within the available potential window. Thus, small amounts of these species should not have a serious effect on the operation of a cell using an EMIC/AlCl3 electrolyte. The second project was to develop a method for buffering a melt which contains free Mg2+ ion for insertion into a V2O 5 xerogel cathode. The buffering of melts with MgCl2 and Mg metal was investigated starting with both acidic and basic melts. The following reaction is proposed for the Mg ribbon in acidic melt: 8Al2Cl - 7+3Mg→2Al+3Mg2++14AlCl -4 This was verified by electrochemical and atomic emission spectroscopy inductively coupled plasma (AES/ICP) data. Finally, the intercalation of Li+, Na+, and Mg2+ ions

  7. Extracting information from the molten salt database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzuric, Slobodan; Suh, Changwon; Gaune-Escard, Marcelle; Rajan, Krishna

    2006-12-01

    Molten salt technology is a catchall phrase that includes some very diverse technologies; electrochemistry, heat transfer, chemical oxidation/reduction baths, and nuclear reactors. All of these technologies are linked by the general characteristics of molten salts that can function as solvents, have good heat-transfer characteristics, function like a fluid, can attain very high temperatures, can conduct electricity, and also may have chemical catalytic properties. The Janz molten salt database is the most comprehensive compilation of property data about molten salts available today and is widely used for both fundamental and applied purposes. Databases are traditionally viewed as “static” documents that are used in a “search and retrieval” mode. These static data can be transformed by informatics and data mining tools into a dynamic dataset for analysis of the properties of the, materials and for making predictions. While this approch has been successful in the chemical and biochemical sciences in searching for and establishing structure-property relationships, it is not widely used in the materials science community. Because the design of the original molten salt database was not oriented toward this informatics goal, it was essential to evaluate this dataset in terms of data mining standards. Two techniques were used—a projection (principal components analysis (PCA)) and a predictive method (partial least squares (PLS))—in conjunction with fundamental knowledge acquired from the long-term practice of molten salt chemistry.

  8. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing condition by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Kato, T.; Hanada, K.; Koizumi, T.; Aose, S.

    2005-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas. In addition, the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides on ceramics corrosion were evaluated in that condition. Most of ceramic oxides showed good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride from thermodynamic calculation results. On the other hand, from corrosion test result, silicon nitride, mullite (Al6Si2O13) and cordierite (Mg2Al3(AlSi5O18)) have a good corrosion resistance which is corresponding to 0.1 mm/y or less. No cracks on the materials were observed and flexural strength did not drop remarkably after 480 h corrosion testing in molten salt under Cl2 O2 atmosphere.

  9. Calculation of activities of ions in molten salts with potential application to the pyroprocessing of nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Salanne, Mathieu; Simon, Christian; Turq, Pierre; Madden, Paul A

    2008-01-31

    The ability to separate fission products by electrodeposition from molten salts depends, in part, on differences between the interactions of the different fission product cations with the ions present in the molten salt "solvent". These differences may be expressed as ratios of activity coefficients, which depend on the identity of the solvent and other factors. Here, we demonstrate the ability to calculate these activity coefficient ratios using molecular dynamics simulations with sufficient precision to guide the choice of suitable solvent systems in practical applications. We use polarizable ion interaction potentials which have previously been shown to give excellent agreement with structural, transport, and spectroscopic information of the molten salts, and the activity coefficients calculated in this work agree well with experimental data. The activity coefficients are shown to vary systematically with cation size for a set of trivalent cations.

  10. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-09

    The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

  11. Molten salt techniques. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.; Gale, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This collection of five papers on molten salts deals with the following specific topics: the actinides and their salts, including their availability along with techniques and equipment for their handling, preparation, purification, and physical property measurement; cryolite systems and methods for their handling, preparation, and thermodynamic and physicochemical property assessment, as well as the use of electrodes in molten cryolite; the theory, construction, and application of reference electrodes for molten salt electrolytes; neutron diffraction in molten salt systems including isotope exchange methods for sample preparation; and dry boxes and inert atmosphere techniques for molten salt handling and analysis.

  12. Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR) System Study

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D; Miller, Laurence F

    2014-04-01

    Can the hybrid system combination of (1) a critical fission Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) having a thermal spectrum and a high Conversion Ratio (CR) with (2) an external source of high energy neutrons provide an attractive solution to the world's expanding demand for energy? The present study indicates the answer is an emphatic yes.

  13. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Holcomb, David Eugene; Flanagan, George F; Patton, Bruce W; Howard, Rob L; Harrison, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  14. Al/Cl2 molten salt battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J.

    1972-01-01

    Molten salt battery has been developed with theoretical energy density of 5.2 j/kg (650 W-h/lb). Battery, which operates at 150 C, can be used in primary mode or as rechargeable battery. Battery has aluminum anode and chlorine cathode. Electrolyte is mixture of AlCl3, NaCl, and some alkali metal halide such as KCl.

  15. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    Sizing procedures are presented for latent heat thermal energy storage systems that can be used for electric utility off-peak energy storage, solar power plants and other preliminary design applications.

  16. Molten salt techniques. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R.J.; Lovering, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This is the second volume in a series addressing the practical aspects of molten salt research. The book covers experiments with alkali metal carbonates, oxides, silicates, phosphates and borates. Additional sections cover molten salt spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and automated admittance spectroscopy of the semiconductor/molten salt electrolyte interface. Particular emphasis is given to safety considerations for working with these high temperature, often corrosive materials. Planning of experiments is of interest, and several experiments are described. Attention is given to the selection of materials to be used in this research, including the purification of the salts themselves, and the requirements for laboratory apparatus.

  17. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth carbonate latent-heat storage salts, metallic containment materials, and thermal conductivity enhancement materials were investigated to satisfy the high temperature (704 to 871 C) thermal energy storage requirements of advanced solar-thermal power generation concepts are described. Properties of the following six salts selected for compatibility studies are given: three pure carbonates, K2CO3, Li2CO3 and Na2CO3; two eutectic mixtures, BaCO3/Na2CO3 and K2CO3/NaCO3, and one off-eutectic mixture of Na2CO3/K2CO3.

  18. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  19. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Ong, E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results of compatibility screening studies of 100 salt/containment/thermal conductivity enhancement (TCE) combinations for the high temperature solar thermal application range of 704 deg to 871 C (1300 to 1600 F) are presented. Nine candidate containment/HX alloy materials and two TCE materials were tested with six candidate solar thermal alkali and alkaline earth carbonate storage salts (both reagent and technical grade of each). Compatibility tests were conducted with salt encapsulated in approx. 6.0 inch x 1 inch welded containers of test material from 300 to 3000 hours. Compatibility evaluations were end application oriented, considering the potential 30 year lifetime requirement of solar thermal power plant components. Analyses were based on depth and nature of salt side corrosion of materials, containment alloy thermal aging effects, weld integrity in salt environment, air side containment oxidation, and chemical and physical analyses of the salt. A need for more reliable, and in some cases first time determined thermophysical and transport property data was also identified for molten carbonates in the 704 to 871 C temperature range. In particular, accurate melting point (mp) measurements were performed for Li2CO3 and Na2CO3 while melting point, heat of fusion, and specific heat determinations were conducted on 81.3 weight percent Na2CO3-18.7 weight percent K2CO3 and 52.2 weight percent BaCO3-47.8 weight percent Na2CO3 to support future TES system design and ultimate scale up of solar thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems.

  20. Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry: recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Chapman, D.M.; Harward, B.L.; Klatt, L.N.; Smith, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry will be reviewed in this paper. UV-visible transmission, infrared reflectance, resonance and normal Raman, and electron spin resonance spectroelectrochemistry have been used for molten salt studies. Two recent applications of uv-visible transmission spectroelectrochemistry to studies of organic and inorganic solutes in molten SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride and AlCl/sub 3/-NaCl will be described.

  1. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet materialmore » in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.« less

  2. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

  3. Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2004-07-01

    Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

  4. Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia; Piyush Sabharwall

    2012-09-01

    The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 °C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700

  5. Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia

    2012-05-01

    The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 C

  6. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  7. On the use of a molten salt fast reactor to apply an idealized transmutation scenario for the nuclear phase out.

    PubMed

    Merk, Bruno; Rohde, Ulrich; Glivici-Cotruţă, Varvara; Litskevich, Dzianis; Scholl, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In the view of transmutation of transuranium (TRU) elements, molten salt fast reactors (MSFRs) offer certain advantages compared to solid fuelled reactor types like sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). In the first part these advantages are discussed in comparison with the SFR technology, and the research challenges are analyzed. In the second part cycle studies for the MSFR are given for different configurations--a core with U-238 fertile, a fertile free core, and a core with Th-232 as fertile material. For all cases, the transmutation potential is determined and efficient transmutation performance for the case with thorium as a fertile material as well as for the fertile free case is demonstrated and the individual advantages are discussed. The time evolution of different important isotopes is analyzed. In the third part a strategy for the optimization of the transmutation efficiency is developed. The final aim is dictated by the phase out decision of the German government, which requests to put the focus on the determination of the maximal transmutation efficiency and on an as much as possible reduced leftover of transuranium elements at the end of the reactor life. This minimal leftover is achieved by a two step procedure of a first transmuter operation phase followed by a second deep burning phase. There the U-233, which is bred in the blanket of the core consisting of thorium containing salt, is used as feed. It is demonstrated, that transmutation rates up to more than 90% can be achieved for all transuranium isotopes, while the production of undesired high elements like californium is very limited. Additionally, the adaptations needed for the simulation of a MSFR, and the used tool HELIOS 1.10 is described. PMID:24690768

  8. On the use of a molten salt fast reactor to apply an idealized transmutation scenario for the nuclear phase out.

    PubMed

    Merk, Bruno; Rohde, Ulrich; Glivici-Cotruţă, Varvara; Litskevich, Dzianis; Scholl, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In the view of transmutation of transuranium (TRU) elements, molten salt fast reactors (MSFRs) offer certain advantages compared to solid fuelled reactor types like sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). In the first part these advantages are discussed in comparison with the SFR technology, and the research challenges are analyzed. In the second part cycle studies for the MSFR are given for different configurations--a core with U-238 fertile, a fertile free core, and a core with Th-232 as fertile material. For all cases, the transmutation potential is determined and efficient transmutation performance for the case with thorium as a fertile material as well as for the fertile free case is demonstrated and the individual advantages are discussed. The time evolution of different important isotopes is analyzed. In the third part a strategy for the optimization of the transmutation efficiency is developed. The final aim is dictated by the phase out decision of the German government, which requests to put the focus on the determination of the maximal transmutation efficiency and on an as much as possible reduced leftover of transuranium elements at the end of the reactor life. This minimal leftover is achieved by a two step procedure of a first transmuter operation phase followed by a second deep burning phase. There the U-233, which is bred in the blanket of the core consisting of thorium containing salt, is used as feed. It is demonstrated, that transmutation rates up to more than 90% can be achieved for all transuranium isotopes, while the production of undesired high elements like californium is very limited. Additionally, the adaptations needed for the simulation of a MSFR, and the used tool HELIOS 1.10 is described.

  9. On the Use of a Molten Salt Fast Reactor to Apply an Idealized Transmutation Scenario for the Nuclear Phase Out

    PubMed Central

    Merk, Bruno; Rohde, Ulrich; Glivici-Cotruţă, Varvara; Litskevich, Dzianis; Scholl, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In the view of transmutation of transuranium (TRU) elements, molten salt fast reactors (MSFRs) offer certain advantages compared to solid fuelled reactor types like sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). In the first part these advantages are discussed in comparison with the SFR technology, and the research challenges are analyzed. In the second part cycle studies for the MSFR are given for different configurations – a core with U-238 fertile, a fertile free core, and a core with Th-232 as fertile material. For all cases, the transmutation potential is determined and efficient transmutation performance for the case with thorium as a fertile material as well as for the fertile free case is demonstrated and the individual advantages are discussed. The time evolution of different important isotopes is analyzed. In the third part a strategy for the optimization of the transmutation efficiency is developed. The final aim is dictated by the phase out decision of the German government, which requests to put the focus on the determination of the maximal transmutation efficiency and on an as much as possible reduced leftover of transuranium elements at the end of the reactor life. This minimal leftover is achieved by a two step procedure of a first transmuter operation phase followed by a second deep burning phase. There the U-233, which is bred in the blanket of the core consisting of thorium containing salt, is used as feed. It is demonstrated, that transmutation rates up to more than 90% can be achieved for all transuranium isotopes, while the production of undesired high elements like californium is very limited. Additionally, the adaptations needed for the simulation of a MSFR, and the used tool HELIOS 1.10 is described. PMID:24690768

  10. Molten Salts for High Temperature Reactors: University of Wisconsin Molten Salt Corrosion and Flow Loop Experiments -- Issues Identified and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Matt Ebner; Manohar Sohal; Phil Sharpe; Thermal Hydraulics Group

    2010-03-01

    Considerable amount of work is going on regarding the development of high temperature liquid salts technology to meet future process needs of Next Generation Nuclear Plant. This report identifies the important characteristics and concerns of high temperature molten salts (with lesson learned at University of Wisconsin-Madison, Molten Salt Program) and provides some possible recommendation for future work

  11. A furnace and environmental cell for the in situ investigation of molten salt electrolysis using high-energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Styles, Mark J; Rowles, Matthew R; Madsen, Ian C; McGregor, Katherine; Urban, Andrew J; Snook, Graeme A; Scarlett, Nicola V Y; Riley, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and implementation of a relatively large controlled-atmosphere cell and furnace arrangement. The purpose of this equipment is to facilitate the in situ characterization of materials used in molten salt electrowinning cells, using high-energy X-ray scattering techniques such as synchrotron-based energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. The applicability of this equipment is demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the phase composition of a model inert anode material, which were taken during an in situ study of an operational Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge electrowinning cell, featuring molten CaCl(2) as the electrolyte. The feasibility of adapting the cell design to investigate materials in other high-temperature environments is also discussed. PMID:22186642

  12. A furnace and environmental cell for the in situ investigation of molten salt electrolysis using high-energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Styles, Mark J; Rowles, Matthew R; Madsen, Ian C; McGregor, Katherine; Urban, Andrew J; Snook, Graeme A; Scarlett, Nicola V Y; Riley, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and implementation of a relatively large controlled-atmosphere cell and furnace arrangement. The purpose of this equipment is to facilitate the in situ characterization of materials used in molten salt electrowinning cells, using high-energy X-ray scattering techniques such as synchrotron-based energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. The applicability of this equipment is demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the phase composition of a model inert anode material, which were taken during an in situ study of an operational Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge electrowinning cell, featuring molten CaCl(2) as the electrolyte. The feasibility of adapting the cell design to investigate materials in other high-temperature environments is also discussed.

  13. Cathode for molten salt batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mamantov, Gleb; Marassi, Roberto

    1977-01-01

    A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

  14. Liquid fuel molten salt reactors for thorium utilization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gehin, Jess C.; Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2016-04-08

    Molten salt reactors (MSRs) represent a class of reactors that use liquid salt, usually fluoride- or chloride-based, as either a coolant with a solid fuel (such as fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors) or as a combined coolant and fuel with fuel dissolved in a carrier salt. For liquid-fuelled MSRs, the salt can be processed online or in a batch mode to allow for removal of fission products as well as introduction of fissile fuel and fertile materials during reactor operation. The MSR is most commonly associated with the 233U/thorium fuel cycle, as the nuclear properties of 233U combined with themore » online removal of parasitic absorbers allow for the ability to design a thermal-spectrum breeder reactor; however, MSR concepts have been developed using all neutron energy spectra (thermal, intermediate, fast, and mixed-spectrum zoned concepts) and with a variety of fuels including uranium, thorium, plutonium, and minor actinides. Early MSR work was supported by a significant research and development (R&D) program that resulted in two experimental systems operating at ORNL in the 1960s, the Aircraft Reactor Experiment and the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment. Subsequent design studies in the 1970s focusing on thermal-spectrum thorium-fueled systems established reference concepts for two major design variants: (1) a molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR), with multiple configurations that could breed additional fissile material or maintain self-sustaining operation; and (2) a denatured molten salt reactor (DMSR) with enhanced proliferation-resistance. T MSRs has been selected as one of six most promising Generation IV systems and development activities have been seen in fast-spectrum MSRs, waste-burning MSRs, MSRs fueled with low-enriched uranium (LEU), as well as more traditional thorium fuel cycle-based MSRs. This study provides an historical background of MSR R&D efforts, surveys and summarizes many of the recent development, and provides analysis comparing

  15. Extended utility of molten-salt chemistry: unprecedented synthesis of a water-soluble salt-inclusion solid comprised of high-nuclearity vanadium oxide clusters.

    PubMed

    Queen, Wendy L; West, J Palmer; Hudson, Joan; Hwu, Shiou-Jyh

    2011-11-01

    Polyoxometallates (POMs) are desirable in materials applications ranging from uses as catalysts in selective oxidation reactions to molecular-like building blocks for the preparation of new extended solids. With the use of an unprecedented approach involving high temperature, molten salt methods, a fascinating series of salt-inclusion solids (SISs) that contain high nuclearity POMs has been isolated for the first time. Cs(11)Na(3)(V(15)O(36))Cl(6) (1) was synthesized using the eutectic NaCl/CsCl flux (mp 493 °C) which serves as a reactive solvent in crystal growth and allows for the SIS formation. Its framework can be viewed as an "ionic" lattice composed of alternately packed counterions of Cl-centered [V(15)O(36)Cl](9-) clusters (V15; S = 11/2) and multinuclear [Cs(9)Na(3)Cl(5)](7+) cations. In light of the structural analysis, 1 was proven to be soluble in water giving rise to a dark green solution that is similar in color to single crystals of the title compound. Infrared spectroscopy of the solid formed from fast evaporation of the solution supports the presence of dissolved V15 clusters. Also noteworthy is the magnetization of 1 at 2 K, which reveals an s-shaped plot resembling that of superparamagnetic materials.

  16. Effect of Using Thorium Molten Salts on the Neutronic Performance of PACER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acır, Adem; Übeyli, Mustafa

    2010-04-01

    Utilization of nuclear explosives can produce a significant amount of energy which can be converted into electricity via a nuclear fusion power plant. An important fusion reactor concept using peaceful nuclear explosives is called as PACER which has an underground containment vessel to handle the nuclear explosives safely. In this reactor, Flibe has been considered as a working coolant for both tritium breeding and heat transferring. However, the rich neutron source supplied from the peaceful nuclear explosives can be used also for fissile fuel production. In this study, the effect of using thorium molten salts on the neutronic performance of the PACER was investigated. The computations were performed for various coolants bearing thorium and/or uranium-233 with respect to the molten salt zone thickness in the blanket. Results pointed out that an increase in the fissile content of the salt increased the neutronic performance of the reactor remarkably. In addition, higher energy production was obtained with thorium molten salts compared to the pure mode of the reactor. Moreover, a large quantity of 233U was produced in the blanket in all cases.

  17. Preliminary Neutronics Design Studies for a Molten Salt Blanket LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J

    2008-10-23

    The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Program being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aims to design a hybrid fission-fusion subcritical nuclear engine that uses a laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) system to drive a subcritical fission blanket. This combined fusion-fission hybrid system could be used for generating electricity, material transmutation or incineration, or other applications. LIFE does not require enriched fuel since it is a sub-critical system and LIFE can sustain power operation beyond the burnup levels at which typical fission reactors need to be refueled. In light of these factors, numerous options have been suggested and are being investigated. Options being investigated include fueling LIFE engines with spent nuclear fuel to aid in disposal/incineration of commercial spent nuclear fuel or using depleted uranium or thorium fueled options to enhance proliferation resistance and utilize non-fissile materials [1]. LIFE engine blanket designs using a molten salt fuel system represent one area of investigation. Possible applications of a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket include uses as a spent nuclear fuel burner, fissile fuel breeding platform, and providing a backup alternative to other LIFE engine blanket designs using TRISO fuel particles in case the TRISO particles are found to be unable to withstand the irradiation they will be subjected to. These molten salts consist of a mixture of LiF with UF{sub 4} or ThF{sub 4} or some combination thereof. Future systems could look at using PuF{sub 3} or PuF{sub 4} as well, though no work on such system with initial plutonium loadings has been performed for studies documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document preliminary neutronics design studies performed to support the development of a molten salt blanket LIFE engine option, as part of the LIFE Program being performed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory

  18. Application of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gourishankar, K. V.

    1998-11-11

    Metallothermic reductions have been extensively studied in the field of extractive metallurgy. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we have developed a molten-salt based reduction process using lithium. This process was originally developed to reduce actinide oxides present in spent nuclear fuel. Preliminary thermodynamic considerations indicate that this process has the potential to be adapted for the extraction of other metals. The reduction is carried out at 650 C in a molten-salt (LiCl) medium. Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), produced during the reduction of the actinide oxides, dissolves in the molten salt. At the end of the reduction step, the lithium is regenerated from the salt by an electrowinning process. The lithium and the salt from the electrowinning are then reused for reduction of the next batch of oxide fuel. The process cycle has been successfully demonstrated on an engineering scale in a specially designed pyroprocessing facility. This paper discusses the applicability of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes with specific reference to our process. Results are presented from our work on actinide oxides to highlight the role of lithium and its effect on process variables in these molten-salt based reduction processes.

  19. Effect of nanoparticles on heat capacity of nanofluids based on molten salts as PCM for thermal energy storage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different nanofluids with phase change behavior were developed by mixing a molten salt base fluid (selected as phase change material) with nanoparticles using the direct-synthesis method. The thermal properties of the nanofluids obtained were investigated. These nanofluids can be used in concentrating solar plants with a reduction of storage material if an improvement in the specific heat is achieved. The base salt mixture was a NaNO3-KNO3 (60:40 ratio) binary salt. The nanoparticles used were silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), and a mix of silica-alumina (SiO2-Al2O3). Three weight fractions were evaluated: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%. Each nanofluid was prepared in water solution, sonicated, and evaporated. Measurements on thermophysical properties were performed by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the dispersion of the nanoparticles was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained show that the addition of 1.0 wt.% of nanoparticles to the base salt increases the specific heat of 15% to 57% in the solid phase and of 1% to 22% in the liquid phase. In particular, this research shows that the addition of silica-alumina nanoparticles has a significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of the NaNO3-KNO3 binary salt. These results deviated from the predictions of the theoretical model used. SEM suggests a greater interaction between these nanoparticles and the salt. PMID:24168168

  20. Effect of nanoparticles on heat capacity of nanofluids based on molten salts as PCM for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Cerritelli, Gian F.; Miliozzi, Adio; Kenny, José M.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, different nanofluids with phase change behavior were developed by mixing a molten salt base fluid (selected as phase change material) with nanoparticles using the direct-synthesis method. The thermal properties of the nanofluids obtained were investigated. These nanofluids can be used in concentrating solar plants with a reduction of storage material if an improvement in the specific heat is achieved. The base salt mixture was a NaNO3-KNO3 (60:40 ratio) binary salt. The nanoparticles used were silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), and a mix of silica-alumina (SiO2-Al2O3). Three weight fractions were evaluated: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%. Each nanofluid was prepared in water solution, sonicated, and evaporated. Measurements on thermophysical properties were performed by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the dispersion of the nanoparticles was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained show that the addition of 1.0 wt.% of nanoparticles to the base salt increases the specific heat of 15% to 57% in the solid phase and of 1% to 22% in the liquid phase. In particular, this research shows that the addition of silica-alumina nanoparticles has a significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of the NaNO3-KNO3 binary salt. These results deviated from the predictions of the theoretical model used. SEM suggests a greater interaction between these nanoparticles and the salt.

  1. Effect of nanoparticles on heat capacity of nanofluids based on molten salts as PCM for thermal energy storage.

    PubMed

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Cerritelli, Gian F; Miliozzi, Adio; Kenny, José M

    2013-10-29

    In this study, different nanofluids with phase change behavior were developed by mixing a molten salt base fluid (selected as phase change material) with nanoparticles using the direct-synthesis method. The thermal properties of the nanofluids obtained were investigated. These nanofluids can be used in concentrating solar plants with a reduction of storage material if an improvement in the specific heat is achieved. The base salt mixture was a NaNO3-KNO3 (60:40 ratio) binary salt. The nanoparticles used were silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), and a mix of silica-alumina (SiO2-Al2O3). Three weight fractions were evaluated: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%. Each nanofluid was prepared in water solution, sonicated, and evaporated. Measurements on thermophysical properties were performed by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the dispersion of the nanoparticles was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained show that the addition of 1.0 wt.% of nanoparticles to the base salt increases the specific heat of 15% to 57% in the solid phase and of 1% to 22% in the liquid phase. In particular, this research shows that the addition of silica-alumina nanoparticles has a significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of the NaNO3-KNO3 binary salt. These results deviated from the predictions of the theoretical model used. SEM suggests a greater interaction between these nanoparticles and the salt.

  2. Batteries using molten salt electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A.

    2003-04-08

    An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

  3. Metals Electroprocessing in Molten Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study seeks to explain the poor quality of solid electrodeposits in molten salts through a consideration of the effects of fluid flow of the electrolyte. Transparent cells allow observation of electrolyte circulation by a laser schlieren optical technique during the electrodeposition of solid zinc from the molten salt electrolyte, ZnCl2 - LiCl-KCl. Experimental variables are current, density, electrolyte composition, and cell geometry. Based on the results of earlier electrodeposition studies as well as reports in the literature, these parameters are identified as having the primary influence on cell performance and deposit quality. Experiments are conducted to measure the fluid flow patterns and the electrochemical cell characteristics, and to correlate this information with the morphology of the solid electrodeposit produced. Specifically, cell voltage, cell current, characteristic time for dendrite evolution, and dendrite growth directions are noted. Their relationship to electrolyte flow patterns and the morphology of the resulting electrodeposit are derived. Results to date indicate that laser schlieren imaging is capable of revealing fluid flow patterns in a molten salt electrolyte.

  4. A Possible Regenerative, Molten-Salt, Thermoelectric Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Jacob; Thaller, Lawrence H.; Weber, Donald E.

    1964-01-01

    Molten or fused salts have been evaluated as possible thermoelectric materials because of the relatively good values of their figures of merit, their chemical stability, their long liquid range, and their ability to operate in conjunction with a nuclear reactor to produce heat. In general, molten salts are electrolytic conductors; therefore, there will be a transport of materials and subsequent decomposition with the passage of an electric current. It is possible nonetheless to overcome this disadvantage by using the decomposition products of the molten-salt electrolyte in a fuel cell. The combination of a thermoelectric converter and a fuel cell would lead to a regenerative system that may be useful.

  5. Effects of Stress on Corrosion in a Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdzis, Samuel; Manos, Dennis; Cooke, William

    Molten salt is often used as a heat transfer and energy storage fluid in concentrating solar power plants. Despite its suitable thermal properties, molten salt can present challenges in terms of corrosion. Previous studies have focused extensively on mass loss due to molten salt-induced corrosion. In contrast, we have investigated how corrosion begins and how it changes the surface of stainless steel. Samples of alloys including 304 and 316 stainless steel were exposed to the industry-standard NaNO3-KNO3 (60%-40% by weight) mixture at temperatures over 500°C and then analyzed using Hirox, SEM, and TOF-SIMS. We compare the corrosion at grain boundaries to that within single grain surfaces, showing the effect of the increased internal stresses and the weakened passivation layer. Also, we have examined the enhanced corrosion of samples under mechanical stress, simulating the effects of thermal stresses in a power plant.

  6. Transient simulation of molten salt central receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doupis, Dimitri; Wang, Chuan; Carcorze-Soto, Jorge; Chen, Yen-Ming; Maggi, Andrea; Losito, Matteo; Clark, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Alstom is developing concentrated solar power (CSP) utilizing 60/40wt% NaNO3-KNO3 molten salt as the working fluid in a tower receiver for the global renewable energy market. In the CSP power generation cycle, receivers undergo a daily cyclic operation due to the transient nature of solar energy. Development of robust and efficient start-up and shut-down procedures is critical to avoiding component failures due to mechanical fatigue resulting from thermal transients, thus maintaining the performance and availability of the CSP plant. The Molten Salt Central Receiver (MSCR) is subject to thermal transients during normal daily operation, a cycle that includes warmup, filling, operation, draining, and shutdown. This paper describes a study to leverage dynamic simulation and finite element analysis (FEA) in development of start-up, shutdown, and transient operation concepts for the MSCR. The results of the FEA also verify the robustness of the MSCR design to the thermal transients anticipated during the operation of the plant.

  7. Organic waste processing using molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M. G., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal means of oxidizing (destroying) the organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. The U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is currently funding research that will identify alternatives to incineration for the treatment of organic-based mixed wastes. (Mixed wastes are defined as waste streams which have both hazardous and radioactive properties.) One such project is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Expedited Technology Demonstration of Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). The goal of this project is to conduct an integrated demonstration of MSO, including off-gas and spent salt treatment, and the preparation of robust solid final forms. Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are presently being performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO process vessel with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. In this paper we describe the integrated system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is to identify the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  8. The case for the thorium molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, E. D.; Furukawa, K.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Barros, H.

    2012-02-01

    Shortcomings of current PWR and BWR, solid uranium-fuel, nuclear power reactors are summarized. It is shown how the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) created and operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA (1960s-1970s) and developed as FUJI reactor by Furukawa and collaborators (1980s-1990s), addresses all of these shortcomings. Relevant properties of the MSR regarding to simplicity, its impact on capital and operating costs, safety, waste product production, waste reprocessing, power efficiency and non proliferation properties are reviewed. The Thorium MSR within the THORIMS-NES fuel cycle system is described concluding that the superior properties of the MSR make this the technology of choice to provide the required future energy in the South American region.

  9. Compatibility of molten salts with advanced solar dynamic receiver materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal-coated graphite fibers are being considered as a thermal conductivity enhancement filler material for molten salts in solar dynamic thermal energy storage systems. The successful metal coating chosen for this application must exhibit acceptable wettability and must be compatible with the molten salt environment. Contact angle values between molten lithium fluoride and several metal, metal fluoride, and metal oxide substrates have been determined at 892 C using a modification of the Wilhelmy plate technique. Reproducible contact angles with repeated exposure to the molten LiF indicated compatibility.

  10. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode. PMID:26871485

  11. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode.

  12. The chemistry and status of rechargeable molten-salt batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.; Mamantov, G.; Tischer, R.P.; Vissers, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The chemistry and the state of development of rechargeable molten salt cells and batteries of current interest are reviewed in this work. Molten-salt cells offer the most attractive combination of high specific energy (100-200 Wh/kg), high specific power (50-200 W/kg), and long cycle life (300-1500 cycles) of any rechargeable cells under investigation at this time. It is these important features that justify the development and application of cells that have the disadvantages of operation at elevated temperatures, and difficult materials problems. There are two major categories of molten-salt cells: those in which the molten salt is the sole electrolyte, and those in which the molten salt serves as a reactant and as an auxiliary electrolyte (the main electrolyte is a solid). In the first category are such cells as LiAl/LiCl-KCl/FeS, LiAl/LiCl-KCl/FeS/sub 2/, and Li/sub 4/Si/LiCl-KCl/FeS/sub 2/; in the second category are Na/Na/sub 2/O . xAl/sub 2/O/sub 3//Na/sub 2/S /SUB n/ -S, Na/Na/sup +/ glass/Na/sub 2/S /SUB n/ -S, Na/Na/sub 2/O . xAl/sub 2/O/sub 3//SCl/sub 3/AlCl/sub 4/ in NaCl-AlCl/sub 3/, and Li/Li/sub 2/O/LiNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. These cells have operating temperatures ranging from 150 to 475/sup 0/C, and all must be sealed from the atmosphere because of the alkali metal reactants and hydrolytic degradation of molten salt electrolytes.

  13. Gasification characteristics of organic waste by molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Minami, Keishi; Yamauchi, Makoto; Morimitsu, Shinsuke; Tanimoto, Kazumi

    Recently, along with the growth in economic development, there has been a dramatic accompanying increase in the amount of sludge and organic waste. The disposal of such is a significant problem. Moreover, there is also an increased in the consumption of electricity along with economic growth. Although new energy development, such as fuel cells, has been promoted to solve the problem of power consumption, there has been little corresponding promotion relating to the disposal of sludge and organic waste. Generally, methane fermentation comprises the primary organic waste fuel used in gasification systems. However, the methane fermentation method takes a long time to obtain the fuel gas, and the quality of the obtained gas is unstable. On the other hand, gasification by molten salt is undesirable because the molten salt in the gasification gas corrodes the piping and turbine blades. Therefore, a gasification system is proposed by which the sludge and organic waste are gasified by molten salt. Moreover, molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are needed to refill the MCFC electrolyte volatilized in the operation. Since the gasification gas is used as an MCFC fuel, MCFC electrolyte can be provided with the fuel gas. This paper elucidates the fundamental characteristics of sludge and organic waste gasification. A crucible filled with the molten salt comprising 62 Li 2CO 3/38 K 2CO 3, is installed in the reaction vessel, and can be set to an arbitrary temperature in a gas atmosphere. In this instance, the gasifying agent gas is CO 2. Sludge or the rice is supplied as organic waste into the molten salt, and is gasified. The chemical composition of the gasification gas is analyzed by a CO/CO 2 meter, a HC meter, and a SO x meter gas chromatography. As a result, although sludge can generate CO and H 2 near the chemical equilibrium value, all of the sulfur in the sludge is not fixed in the molten salt, because the sludge floats on the surface of the carbonate by the specific

  14. LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R; Brown, N; Caro, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Kaufman, L; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Powers, J; Shaw, H; Turchi, P

    2008-12-11

    The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

  15. Molten salt eutectics from atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Thompson, Aidan P; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2011-09-01

    Despite their importance for solar thermal power applications, phase-diagrams of molten salt mixture heat transfer fluids (HTFs) are not readily accessible from first principles. We present a molecular dynamics scheme general enough to identify eutectics of any HTF candidate mixture. The eutectic mixture and temperature are located using the liquid mixture free energy and the pure component solid-liquid free energy differences. The liquid mixture free energy is obtained using thermodynamic integration over particle identity transmutations sampled with molecular dynamics at a single temperature. Drawbacks of conventional phase diagram mapping methodologies are avoided by not considering solid mixtures, thereby evading expensive computations of solid phase free energies. Numerical results for binary and ternary mixtures of alkali nitrates agree well with experimental measurements.

  16. Hydrated multivalent cations are new class of molten salt mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Electrical conductance and activation energy measurements on mixtures of calcium and potassium nitrate show the hydrated form to be a new class of molten salt. The theoretical glass transition temperature of the hydrate varied in a manner opposite to that of the anhydrous system.

  17. Modelisation of the SECMin molten salts environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, M.; Slim, C.; Delpech, S.; di Caprio, D.; Stafiej, J.

    2014-06-01

    We develop a cellular automata modelisation of SECM experiments to study corrosion in molten salt media for generation IV nuclear reactors. The electrodes used in these experiments are cylindrical glass tips with a coaxial metal wire inside. As the result of simulations we obtain the current approach curves of the electrodes with geometries characterized by several values of the ratios of glass to metal area at the tip. We compare these results with predictions of the known analytic expressions, solutions of partial differential equations for flat uniform geometry of the substrate. We present the results for other, more complicated substrate surface geometries e. g. regular saw modulated surface, surface obtained by Eden model process, ...

  18. Alloys compatibility in molten salt fluorides: Kurchatov Institute related experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexandr

    2013-10-01

    In the last several years, there has been an increased interest in the use of high-temperature molten salt fluorides in nuclear power systems. For all molten salt reactor designs, materials selection is a very important issue. This paper summarizes results, which led to selection of materials for molten salt reactors in Russia. Operating experience with corrosion thermal convection loops has demonstrated good capability of the “nickel-molybdenum alloys + fluoride salt fueled by UF4 and PuF3 + cover gas” system up to 750 °C. A brief description is given of the container material work in progress. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys in stressed and unloaded conditions studies was also tested in different molten salt mixtures at temperatures up to 700-750 °C, also with measurement of the redox potential. HN80MTY alloy with 1% added Al is the most resistant to tellurium intergranular cracking of Ni-base alloys under study.

  19. Thermal-hydraulics of internally heated molten salts and application to the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorina, Carlo; Cammi, Antonio; Luzzi, Lelio; Mikityuk, Konstantin; Ninokata, Hisashi; Ricotti, Marco E.

    2014-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactors (MSR) are an innovative kind of nuclear reactors and are presently considered in the framework of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF-IV) for their promising performances in terms of low resource utilization, waste minimization and enhanced safety. A unique feature of MSRs is that molten fluoride salts play the distinctive role of both fuel (heat source) and coolant. The presence of an internal heat generation perturbs the temperature field and consequences are to be expected on the heat transfer characteristics of the molten salts. In this paper, the problem of heat transfer for internally heated fluids in a straight circular channel is first faced on a theoretical ground. The effect of internal heat generation is demonstrated to be described by a corrective factor applied to traditional correlations for the Nusselt number. It is shown that the corrective factor can be fully characterized by making explicit the dependency on Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. On this basis, a preliminary correlation is proposed for the case of molten fluoride salts by interpolating the results provided by an analytic approach previously developed at the Politecnico di Milano. The experimental facility and the related measuring procedure for testing the proposed correlation are then presented. Finally, the developed correlation is used to carry out a parametric investigation on the effect of internal heat generation on the main out-of-core components of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR), the reference circulating-fuel MSR design in the GIF-IV. The volumetric power determines higher temperatures at the channel wall, but the effect is significant only in case of large diameters and/or low velocities.

  20. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-07-18

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor. 4 figs.

  1. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1995-01-01

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor.

  2. The behavior of water in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

    1983-05-01

    The differing behavior of water equilibrated with three separate molten salt solvents is discussed with respect to the chemistry of the solutions and the electroreductive mechanisms at gold electrodes.

  3. Corrosion of Mullite by Molten Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lee, Kang N.; Yoshio, Tetsuo

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of molten salts of different Na2O activities and mullite is examined with furnace and burner tests. The more-acidic molten salts form small amounts of Al2O3; the more-basic molten salts form various Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 compounds. The results are interpreted using the Na2O-Al203-SiO2 ternary phase diagram, and some possible diffusion paths are discussed. The generally higher melting points of Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 compounds lead to better behavior of mullite in molten salts, as compared to SiO2-protected ceramics such as SiC. Mullite-coated SiC is discussed, and the corrosion behavior is evaluated.

  4. Production of lead metal by molten-salt electrolysis with energy-efficient electrodes. Rept. of investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.E.; Chambers, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines investigated electrode designs for electrowinning lead metal from a LiCl-KCl-PbCl2 electrolyte at 450 C. The major objective of the investigation was to decrease the energy requirement for lead electrowinning. Electrolysis was performed in a bench-scale cell using several graphite electrode assemblies. Parameters, such as electrode spacing, current density, and chlorine gas removal from the anode, were investigated in the bench-scale tests. An optimum electrode assembly, termed the sawtooth design, was scaled up and operated at 3,000 and 4,000 A. The sawtooth electrodes operating at 3,000 A produced lead for 0.66 kW times h/kg. The electrodes were constructed by cutting large triangular grooves in the electrode surfaces. The electrodes were placed together such that the triangular peaks of one electrode projected into the triangular valleys of the other electrode. Chlorine did not build up on the anode with the sawtooth electrodes.

  5. Molten salt reactors for burning dismantled weapons fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Engel, J.R. ); Dodds, H.L. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-12-01

    In this paper, the molten salt reactor (MSR) option for burning fissile fuel form dismantled weapons is examined. It is concluded that MSRs are potentially suitable for beneficial utilization of the dismantled fuel. the MSRs have the flexibility to utilize any fissile fuel in continuous operation with no special modifications, as demonstrated in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, while maintaining their economy. The MSRs further require a minimum of special fuel preparation and can tolerate denaturing and dilution of the fuel. Fuel shipments can be arbitrarily small, which may reduce the risk of diversion. The MSRs have inherent safety features that make them acceptable and attractive. They can burn a fuel type completely and convert it to other fuels. The MSRs also have the potential for burning the actinides and delivering the waste in an optimal form, thus contributing to the solution of one of the major remaining problems for deployment o nuclear power.

  6. Fission product ion exchange between zeolite and a molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougar, Mary Lou D.

    The electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and has been demonstrated through processing the sodium-bonded SNF from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho. In this process, components of the SNF, including U and species more chemically active than U, are oxidized into a bath of lithium-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt. Uranium is removed from the salt solution by electrochemical reduction. The noble metals and inactive fission products from the SNF remain as solids and are melted into a metal waste form after removal from the molten salt bath. The remaining salt solution contains most of the fission products and transuranic elements from the SNF. One technique that has been identified for removing these fission products and extending the usable life of the molten salt is ion exchange with zeolite A. A model has been developed and tested for its ability to describe the ion exchange of fission product species between zeolite A and a molten salt bath used for pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The model assumes (1) a system at equilibrium, (2) immobilization of species from the process salt solution via both ion exchange and occlusion in the zeolite cage structure, and (3) chemical independence of the process salt species. The first assumption simplifies the description of this physical system by eliminating the complications of including time-dependent variables. An equilibrium state between species concentrations in the two exchange phases is a common basis for ion exchange models found in the literature. Assumption two is non-simplifying with respect to the mathematical expression of the model. Two Langmuir-like fractional terms (one for each mode of immobilization) compose each equation describing each salt species. The third assumption offers great simplification over more traditional ion exchange modeling, in which interaction of solvent species with each other

  7. The viscosity and electrical conductivity of single molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-established Arrhenius-type temperature-dependence of the specific and molar conductivities of molten salts, it turns out that they also depend linearly on the molar volumes, in analogy with the behavior of their fluidities. Similar values of the molar volumes representing the immobilization of the ions result from both kinds of flow phenomena. However, the activation energy for the fluidity is some five times larger than for the conductivity.

  8. Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Jonemann, M.

    2013-05-01

    Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

  9. Advances in electroanalysis, sensing and monitoring in molten salts.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Damion K; Elliott, Justin P; Blair, Ewen O; Reeves, Simon J; Schmüser, Ilka; Walton, Anthony J; Mount, Andrew R

    2016-08-15

    Microelectrodes have a number of advantages over macroelectrodes for quantitative electroanalysis and monitoring, including reduced iR drop, a high signal-to-noise ratio and reduced sensitivity to convection. Their use in molten salts has been generally precluded by the combined materials challenges of stresses associated with thermal cycling and physical and corrosive chemical degradation at the relatively high temperatures involved. We have shown that microfabrication, employing high precision photolithographic patterning in combination with the controlled deposition of materials, can be used to successfully address these challenges. The resulting molten salt compatible microelectrodes (MSMs) enable prolonged quantitative microelectrode measurements in molten salts (MSs). This paper reports the fabrication of novel MSM disc electrodes, chosen because they have an established ambient analytical response. It includes a detailed set of electrochemical characterisation studies which demonstrate both their enhanced capability over macroelectrodes and over commercial glass pulled microelectrodes, and their ability to extract quantitative electroanalytical information from MS systems. MSM measurements are then used to demonstrate their potential for shedding new light on the fundamental properties of, and processes in, MSs, such as mass transport, charge transfer reaction rates and the selective plating/stripping and alloying reactions of liquid Bi and other metals; this will underpin the development of enhanced MS industrial processes, including pyrochemical spent nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  10. Advances in electroanalysis, sensing and monitoring in molten salts.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Damion K; Elliott, Justin P; Blair, Ewen O; Reeves, Simon J; Schmüser, Ilka; Walton, Anthony J; Mount, Andrew R

    2016-08-15

    Microelectrodes have a number of advantages over macroelectrodes for quantitative electroanalysis and monitoring, including reduced iR drop, a high signal-to-noise ratio and reduced sensitivity to convection. Their use in molten salts has been generally precluded by the combined materials challenges of stresses associated with thermal cycling and physical and corrosive chemical degradation at the relatively high temperatures involved. We have shown that microfabrication, employing high precision photolithographic patterning in combination with the controlled deposition of materials, can be used to successfully address these challenges. The resulting molten salt compatible microelectrodes (MSMs) enable prolonged quantitative microelectrode measurements in molten salts (MSs). This paper reports the fabrication of novel MSM disc electrodes, chosen because they have an established ambient analytical response. It includes a detailed set of electrochemical characterisation studies which demonstrate both their enhanced capability over macroelectrodes and over commercial glass pulled microelectrodes, and their ability to extract quantitative electroanalytical information from MS systems. MSM measurements are then used to demonstrate their potential for shedding new light on the fundamental properties of, and processes in, MSs, such as mass transport, charge transfer reaction rates and the selective plating/stripping and alloying reactions of liquid Bi and other metals; this will underpin the development of enhanced MS industrial processes, including pyrochemical spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. PMID:27252128

  11. Corresponding-states data correlations and molten salts viscosities

    SciTech Connect

    Janz, G.J.; Yamamura, T.; Hansen, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    Transport properties of molten salts are encountered in a broad range of R D tasks, particularly in areas of high-temperature thermal energy storage and in advanced battery concepts. This communication examines a semiempirical corresponding-states correlation as a predictive method using molten salts viscosities. Predictive calculations with molten NaCl and KNO/sub 3/ as model systems, and with calibration quality data sets as the reference base, are used to evaluate this method. While the proper slope for the temperature dependence is forecast, the quality of the predicted data depend directly on the accuracy level of the one experimental value that is the seed for the calculations. Some results are described to show how such calculations have proved useful in guiding value judgments in studies of the viscosity data in the open scientific literature.

  12. Cathodic polarization of sulfur in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, A.I.; Dukhanin, G.P.; Morachevskii, A.G.; Simikov, I.A.

    1985-12-01

    As a continuation of studies on the electrochemical behavior of sulfur in molten salts, this paper reports work on the determination of lithium and potassium ion discharge potentials at a sulfur electrode during cathodic polarization in molten LiNO/sub 3/-LiNO/sub 2/-LiOH and LiNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ at 423/sup 0/K as well as in molten LiF-LiCl-LiI and LiC1-KC1 ay 650/sup 0/K. The studies were carried out by taking polarization curves in a pulsed galvanostatic mode using a three-electrode electrochemical cell. The sulfur electrode floating on the molten salt electrolyte contacted a 5-mm-diameter graphite rod that also touched the molten salt. The same patterns were observed for the cathodic polarization of sulfur in both halide and nitrate melts.

  13. Multipass apparatus for molten salt spectroelectrochemical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harward, B.L.; Klatt, L.N.; Mamantov, G.

    1985-07-01

    Although various spectroelectrochemical methods have been applied to studies in molten salt media, the development of techniques and apparatus to improve the optical sensitivity of such measurements is nonexistent. The corrosive nature, moisture sensitivity, and elevated temperatures associated with molten salts often preclude the use of sophisticated optical systems and fragile cell components. A simple apparatus is described for enhancement of the optical signal in molten salt spectroelectrochemical experiments. In this method, the optical beam is redirected through an OTE (optically transparent electrode) several times by a mirror assembly positioned outside the thin-layer cell. The gain in optical sensitivity is defined as the ratio of the response for n passes to that for a single pass. 29 references, 4 figures.

  14. Studies of metals electroprocessing in molten salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Fluid flow patterns in molten salt electrolytes were observed in order to determine how mass transport affects the morphology of the metal deposit. Studies conducted on the same metal, both in aqueous electrolytes in which coherent solid electrodeposits are produced, as well as in transparent molten salt electrolytes are described. Process variables such as current density and composition of the electrolyte are adjusted to change the morphology of the electrodeposit and, thus, to permit the study of the nature of electrolyte flow in relation to the quality of the electrodeposit.

  15. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  16. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-02-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  17. Steady State Analysis of Small Molten Salt Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahisa; Mitachi, Koshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a thermal neutron reactor with graphite moderation and operates on the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The feature of the MSR is that fuel salt flows inside the reactor during the nuclear fission reaction. In the previous study, the authors developed numerical model with which to simulate the effects of fuel salt flow on the reactor characteristics. In this study, we apply the model to the steady-state analysis of a small MSR system and estimate the effects of fuel flow. The model consists of two-group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes, transport equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors and energy conservation equations for fuel salt and the graphite moderator. The following results are obtained: (1) in the rated operation condition, the peaks of the neutron fluxes slightly move toward the bottom from the center of the reactor and the delayed neutron precursors are significantly carried by the fuel salt flow, and (2) the extension of residence time in the external-loop system and the rise of the fuel inflow temperature show weak negative reactivity effects, which decrease the neutron multiplication factor of the small MSR system.

  18. Accelerator-driven molten-salt blankets: Physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Durkee, J.W.; Perry, R.T.; Poston, D.I.

    1994-10-01

    A number of nuclear physics issues concerning the Los Alamos molten-salt accelerator-driven plutonium converter are discussed. General descriptions of several concepts using internal and external moderation are presented. Burnup and salt processing requirement calculations are presented for four concepts, indicating that both the high power density externally moderated concept and an internally moderated concept achieve total plutonium burnups approaching 90% at salt processing rates of less than 2 m{sup 3} per year. Beginning-of-life reactivity temperature coefficients and system kinetic response are also discussed. Future research should investigate the effect of changing blanket composition on operational and safety characteristics.

  19. Parametric analyses of single-zone thorium-fueled molten salt reactor fuel cycle options

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.J.; Worrall, A.; Gehin, J.C.; Harrison, T.J.; Sunny, E.E.

    2013-07-01

    Analyses of fuel cycle options based on thorium-fueled Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) have been performed in support of fuel cycle screening and evaluation activities for the United States Department of Energy. The MSR options considered are based on thermal spectrum MSRs with 3 different separations levels: full recycling, limited recycling, and 'once-through' operation without active separations. A single-fluid, single-zone 2250 MWth (1000 MWe) MSR concept consisting of a fuel-bearing molten salt with graphite moderator and reflectors was used as the basis for this study. Radiation transport and isotopic depletion calculations were performed using SCALE 6.1 with ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. New methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) enables MSR analysis using SCALE, modeling material feed and removal by taking user-specified parameters and performing multiple SCALE/TRITON simulations to determine the resulting equilibrium operating conditions. Parametric analyses examined the sensitivity of the performance of a thorium MSR to variations in the separations efficiency for protactinium and fission products. Results indicate that self-sustained operation is possible with full or limited recycling but once-through operation would require an external neutron source. (authors)

  20. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Study for Thermal Molten Salt Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidaud, Adrien; Ivanona, Tatiana; Mastrangelo, Victor; Kodeli, Ivo

    2006-04-01

    The Thermal Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) using the thorium cycle can achieve the GEN IV objectives of economy, safety, non-proliferation and durability. Its low production of higher actinides, coupled with its breeding capabilities - even with a thermal spectrum - are very valuable characteristics for an innovative reactor. Furthermore, the thorium cycle is more flexible than the uranium cycle since only a small fissile inventory (<2 tons by GWe) is required to start one reactor. The potential of these reactors is currently being extensively studied at the CNRS and EdF /1,2/. A simplified chemical reprocessing is envisaged compared to that used for the former Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR). The MSBR concept was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970's based on the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE). The main goals of our current studies are to achieve a reactor concept that enables breeding, improved safety and having chemical reprocessing needs reduced and simplified as much as reasonably possible. The neutronic properties of the new TMSR concept are presented in this paper. As the temperature coefficient is close to zero, we will see that the moderation ratio cannot be chosen to simultaneously achieve a high breeding ratio, long graphite lifetime and low uranium inventory. It is clear that any safety margin taken due to uncertainty in the nuclear data will significantly reduce the capability of this concept, thus a sensitivity analysis is vital to propose measurements which would allow to reduce at present high uncertainties in the design parameters of this reactor. Two methodologies, one based on OECD/NEA deterministic codes and one on IPPE (Obninsk) stochastic code, are compared for keff sensitivity analysis. The uncertainty analysis of keff using covariance matrices available in evaluated files has been performed. Furthermore, a comparison of temperature coefficient sensitivity profiles is presented for the most important reactions

  1. Molten salt reactors - safety options galore

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Dodds, H.L.

    1997-03-01

    Safety features and attributes of molten salt reactors (MSR) are described. The unique features of fluid fuel reactors of on-line continuous processing and the ability for so-called external cooling result in simple and safe designs with low excess reactivity, low fission product inventory, and small source term. These, in turn, make a criticality accident unlikely and reduce the severity of a loss of coolant to where they are no longer severe accidents. A melt down is not an accident for a reactor that uses molten fuel. The molten salts are stable, non-reactive and efficient heat transfer media that operate at high temperatures at low pressures and are highly compatible with selected structural materials. All these features reduce the accident plethora. Freeze valves can be used for added safety. An ultimate safe reactor (U.S.R) is described with safety features that are passive, inherent and non-tamperable (PINT).

  2. Advances in molten salt chemistry: Vol. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mamautov, G.; Braunstein, J.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: electronic properties of solutions of liquid metals and ionic melts; metal-metal halide, metal-chalcogen, and metal-metal solutions; metallic models; the use of high pressure in the study of molten salts; the purpose of high pressure experimentation; melting point curves and phase diagrams; compressibilities and equations of state; electrical conductivity measurements; physical chemistry and electrochemistry of alkali carbonate melts; equilibrium properties of molten carbonates; electrochemical characteristics and corrosion; stability of ceramics; some new molten salt electrolytic processes; sodium metal production by the use of a beta-alumina diaphragm; recovery of metallic sodium or caustic soda and sulfur from flue gas; high temperature electrolysis of water; and LiCl electrolysis by the use of a bipolar liquid metal electrode.

  3. Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Jr., Robert D.

    1977-01-01

    A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

  4. Molten salt destruction of base hydrolysate

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B.E.; Kanna, R.L.; Chambers, R.D.; Upadhye, R.S.; Promeda, C.O.

    1996-10-01

    There is a great need for alternatives to open burn/open detonation of explosives and propellants from dismantled munitions. LANL has investigated the use of base hydrolysis for the demilitarization of explosives. Hydrolysates of Comp B, Octol, Tritonal, and PBXN-109 were processed in the pilot molten salt unit (in building 191). NOx and CO emissions were found to be low, except for CO from PBXN-109 processing. This report describes experimental results of the destruction of the base hydrolysates.

  5. Application of Molten Salt Reactor Technology to MMW In-Space NEP and Surface Power Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, Bruce; Sorensen, Kirk; Rodgers, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Anticipated manned nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and planetary surface power missions will require multimegawatt nuclear reactors that are lightweight, operationally robust, and scalable in power for widely varying scientific mission objectives. Molten salt reactor technology meets all of these requirements and offers an interesting alternative to traditional multimegawatt gas-cooled and liquid metal concepts.

  6. Advances toward industrialization of novel molten salt electrochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Tsujimura, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-15

    We have invented various novel molten salt electrochemical processes, that can be put to practical use in the fields of energy and materials. These processes are promising from both technological and commercial viewpoints, and they are currently under development for industrial application. To showcase current developments in work toward industrialization, we focus here on three of these processes: (1) electrolytic synthesis of ammonia from water and nitrogen under atmospheric pressure, (2) electrochemical formation of carbon film, and (3) plasma-induced discharge electrolysis to produce nanoparticles.

  7. Advances toward industrialization of novel molten salt electrochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Tsujimura, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-15

    We have invented various novel molten salt electrochemical processes, that can be put to practical use in the fields of energy and materials. These processes are promising from both technological and commercial viewpoints, and they are currently under development for industrial application. To showcase current developments in work toward industrialization, we focus here on three of these processes: (1) electrolytic synthesis of ammonia from water and nitrogen under atmospheric pressure, (2) electrochemical formation of carbon film, and (3) plasma-induced discharge electrolysis to produce nanoparticles. PMID:27265244

  8. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Multivalent Ion Concentrations in Molten Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Zink; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson; Ben F. Cowan; Steven D. Herrmann; Shelly X. Li

    2010-07-01

    Electrorefining of spent metallic nuclear fuel in high temperature molten salt systems is a core technology in pyroprocessing, which in turn plays a critical role in the development of advanced fuel cycle technologies. In electrorefining, spent nuclear fuel is treated electrochemically in order to effect separations between uranium, noble metals, and active metals, which include the transuranics. The accumulation of active metals in a lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt electrolyte occurs at the expense of the UCl3-oxidant concentration in the electrolyte, which must be periodically replenished. Our interests lie with the accumulation of active metals in the molten salt electrolyte. The real-time monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte is highly desirable for controlling electrochemical operations and assuring materials control and accountancy. However, real-time monitoring is not possible with current methods for sampling and chemical analysis. A new solid-state electrochemical sensor is being developed for real-time monitoring of actinide ion concentrations in a molten salt electrorefiner. The ultimate function of the sensor is to monitor plutonium concentrations during electrorefining operations, but in this work gadolinium was employed as a surrogate material for plutonium. In a parametric study, polycrystalline sodium beta double-prime alumina (Na-ß?-alumina) discs and tubes were subject to vapor-phase exchange with gadolinium ions (Gd3+) using a gadolinium chloride salt (GdCl3) as a precursor to produce gadolinium beta double-prime alumina (Gd-ß?-alumina) samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructural analysis were performed on the ion-exchanged discs to determine the relationship between ion exchange and Gd3+ ion conductivity. The ion-exchanged tubes were configured as potentiometric sensors in order to monitor real-time Gd3+ ion concentrations in mixtures of gadolinium

  9. Pulsed power molten salt battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that carbon cathodes with chlorine work well. Lithium alloy chlorine at 450 C, 1 atm given high power capability, high energy density, DC + pulsing yields 600 pulses, no initial peak, and can go to red heat without burn-up. Electrochemical performance at the cell and cell stack level out under demanding test regime. Engineering and full prototype development for advancing this technology is warranted.

  10. Pulsed power molten salt battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1992-02-01

    It was concluded that carbon cathodes with chlorine work well. Lithium alloy chlorine at 450 C, 1 atm given high power capability, high energy density, DC + pulsing yields 600 pulses, no initial peak, and can go to red heat without burn-up. Electrochemical performance at the cell and cell stack level out under demanding test regime. Engineering and full prototype development for advancing this technology is warranted.

  11. Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Squire, Dwight V.; Robinson, Jeffrey A.; House, Palmer A.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

  12. Low temperature oxidation using support molten salt catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Alan W.; Czerpak, Peter J.; Hilbert, Patrick M.

    2003-05-20

    Molten salt reactions are performed by supporting the molten salt on a particulate support and forming a fluidized bed of the supported salt particles. The method is particularly suitable for combusting hydrocarbon fuels at reduced temperatures, so that the formation NO.sub.x species is reduced. When certain preferred salts are used, such as alkali metal carbonates, sulfur and halide species can be captured by the molten salt, thereby reducing SO.sub.x and HCl emissions.

  13. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

    1999-08-17

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

  14. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; LaCamera, Alfred F.; Troup, R. Lee; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

  15. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Craig; Kurup, Parthiv; Akar, Sertac; Flores, Francisco

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  16. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.

    1997-03-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs.

  18. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector

    2015-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  19. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector

    2015-04-29

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  20. Solar gasification of biomass: design and characterization of a molten salt gasification reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Brandon Jay

    The design and implementation of a prototype molten salt solar reactor for gasification of biomass is a significant milestone in the development of a solar gasification process. The reactor developed in this work allows for 3 kWth operation with an average aperture flux of 1530 suns at salt temperatures of 1200 K with pneumatic injection of ground or powdered dry biomass feedstocks directly into the salt melt. Laboratory scale experiments in an electrically heated reactor demonstrate the benefits of molten salt and the data was evaluated to determine the kinetics of pyrolysis and gasification of biomass or carbon in molten salt. In the presence of molten salt overall gas yields are increased by up to 22%; pyrolysis rates double due to improved heat transfer, while carbon gasification rates increase by an order of magnitude. Existing kinetic models for cellulose pyrolysis fit the data well, while carbon gasification in molten salt follows kinetics modeled with a 2/3 order shrinking-grain model with a pre-exponential factor of 1.5*106 min-1 and activation energy of 158 kJ/mol. A reactor concept is developed based around a concentric cylinder geometry with a cavity-style solar receiver immersed within a volume of molten carbonate salt. Concentrated radiation delivered to the cavity is absorbed in the cavity walls and transferred via convection to the salt volume. Feedstock is delivered into the molten salt volume where biomass gasification reactions will be carried out producing the desired product gas. The features of the cavity receiver/reactor concept are optimized based on modeling of the key physical processes. The cavity absorber geometry is optimized according to a parametric survey of radiative exchange using a Monte Carlo ray tracing model, resulting in a cavity design that achieves absorption efficiencies of 80%-90%. A parametric survey coupling the radiative exchange simulations to a CFD model of molten salt natural convection is used to size the annulus

  1. Molten salt applications in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.

    2005-02-01

    The science of molten salt electrochemistry for electrowinning of reactive metals, such as calcium, and its in situ application in pyro-reduction has been described. Calcium electrowinning has been performed in a 5 10 wt% calcium oxide calcium chloride molten salt by the electrolytic dissociation of calcium oxide. This electrolysis requires the use of a porous ceramic sheath around the anode to keep the cathodically deposited calcium and the anodic gases separate. Stainless steel cathode and graphite anode have been used in the temperature range of 850 950 °C. This salt mixture is produced as a result of the direct oxide reduction (DOR) of reactive metal oxides by calcium in a calcium chloride bath. The primary purpose of this process is to recover the expensive calcium reductant and to recycle calcium chloride. Experimental data have been included to justify the suitability as well as limitations of the electrowinning process. Transport of oxygen ions through the sheath is found to be the rate controlling step. Under the constraints of the reactor design, a calcium recovery rate of approx. 150 g/h was achieved. Feasibility of a process to produce metals by pyrometallurgical reduction, using the calcium reductant produced electrolytically within the same reactor, has been shown in a hybrid process. Several processes are currently under investigation to use this electrowon calcium for in situ reduction of metal oxides.

  2. Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

    1999-08-02

    Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

  3. 13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT EXTRACTION LINE. THE MOLTEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT EXTRACTION LINE. THE MOLTEN SALT EXTRACTION PROCESS WAS USED TO PURIFY PLUTONIUM BY REMOVING AMERICIUM, A DECAY BY-PRODUCT OF PLUTONIUM. (1/98) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Cooling molten salt reactors using "gas-lift"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Valenta, Vaclav; Klimko, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This study briefly describes the selection of a type of two-phase flow, suitable for intensifying the natural flow of nuclear reactors with liquid fuel - cooling mixture molten salts and the description of a "Two-phase flow demonstrator" (TFD) used for experimental study of the "gas-lift" system and its influence on the support of natural convection. The measuring device and the application of the TDF device is described. The work serves as a model system for "gas-lift" (replacing the classic pump in the primary circuit) for high temperature MSR planned for hydrogen production. An experimental facility was proposed on the basis of which is currently being built an experimental loop containing the generator, separator bubbles and necessary accessories. This loop will model the removal of gaseous fission products and tritium. The cleaning of the fuel mixture of fluoride salts eliminates problems from Xenon poisoning in classical reactors.

  5. Cooling molten salt reactors using “gas-lift”

    SciTech Connect

    Zitek, Pavel E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz; Valenta, Vaclav E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz; Klimko, Marek E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz

    2014-08-06

    This study briefly describes the selection of a type of two-phase flow, suitable for intensifying the natural flow of nuclear reactors with liquid fuel - cooling mixture molten salts and the description of a “Two-phase flow demonstrator” (TFD) used for experimental study of the “gas-lift” system and its influence on the support of natural convection. The measuring device and the application of the TDF device is described. The work serves as a model system for “gas-lift” (replacing the classic pump in the primary circuit) for high temperature MSR planned for hydrogen production. An experimental facility was proposed on the basis of which is currently being built an experimental loop containing the generator, separator bubbles and necessary accessories. This loop will model the removal of gaseous fission products and tritium. The cleaning of the fuel mixture of fluoride salts eliminates problems from Xenon poisoning in classical reactors.

  6. Molten Salt Fuel Cycle Requirements for ADTT Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. F.; Del Cul, G. D.; Toth, L. M.

    1999-06-07

    The operation of an ADT system with the associated nuclear reactions has a profound effect upon the chemistry of the fuel - especially with regards to container compatibility and the chemical separations that may be required. The container can be protected by maintaining the redox chemistry within a relatively narrow, non-corrosive window. Neutron economy as well as other factors require a sophisticated regime of fission product separations. Neither of these control requirements has been demonstrated on the scale or degree of sophistication necessary to support an ADT device. We review the present situation with respect to fluoride salts, and focus on the critical issues in these areas which must be addressed. One requirement for advancement in this area - a supply of suitable materials - will soon be fulfilled by the remediation of ORNL's Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, and the removal of a total of 11,000 kg of enriched (Li-7 > 99.9%) coolant, flush, and fuel salts.

  7. Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmett, D.L.; Fusselman, S.P.; Roy, J.J.; Gay, R.L.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Takahashi, N.

    1996-10-01

    TRUMP-S (TRansUranic Management through Pyropartitioning Separation) is a pyrochemical process being developed to separate actinides form fission products in nuclear waste. A key process step involving molten salt electrorefining to separate actinides from lanthanides has been studied on a laboratory scale. Electrorefining of U, Np, Pu, Am, and lanthanide mixtures from molten cadmium at 450 C to a solid cathode utilizing a molten chloride electrolyte resulted in > 99% removal of actinides from the molten cadmium and salt phases. Removal of the last few percent of actinides is accompanied by lowered cathodic current efficiency and some lanthanide codeposition. Actinide/lanthanide separation ratios on the cathode are ordered U > Np > Pu > Am and are consistent with predictions based on equilibrium potentials.

  8. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Dylan C. P.

    2013-08-15

    Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50

  9. Energetic materials destruction using molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

    1994-04-29

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. LLNL has built a small-scale unit to test the destruction of HE using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process. In addition to the high explosive HMX, destruction has been carried out on RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. Also destroyed was a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, destruction has been carried out on a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, and PBX-9404.

  10. [Fission Working Group -- Molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Engel, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of molten salt reactors (MSRs) which are fluid fuel reactors and, as such, have several unique features, some which are important to the burning of fissile material from dismantled weapons. This material can be added on-line during operation in either continuous or batch form. The added fuel need only be in an acceptable chemical form, but no fuel manufacturing or minimum discrete amounts for a fuel element are required. Fluid fuel reactors can have partial or full on-line fuel processing. When online fuel processing is utilized, a particular fuel component, for example the plutonium, can be burned completely, or in some sense can be converted to other kinds of fuel, for example into [sup 233]U. There is no equivalent of fuel burnup in continuous processing reactors, and no need for reprocessing in external plants and manufacturing of fuel elements, transportation, and reinsertion in the reactor.

  11. [Fission Working Group -- Molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Engel, J.R.

    1992-12-31

    This report provides an assessment of molten salt reactors (MSRs) which are fluid fuel reactors and, as such, have several unique features, some which are important to the burning of fissile material from dismantled weapons. This material can be added on-line during operation in either continuous or batch form. The added fuel need only be in an acceptable chemical form, but no fuel manufacturing or minimum discrete amounts for a fuel element are required. Fluid fuel reactors can have partial or full on-line fuel processing. When online fuel processing is utilized, a particular fuel component, for example the plutonium, can be burned completely, or in some sense can be converted to other kinds of fuel, for example into {sup 233}U. There is no equivalent of fuel burnup in continuous processing reactors, and no need for reprocessing in external plants and manufacturing of fuel elements, transportation, and reinsertion in the reactor.

  12. Dismantled weapons fuel burning in molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Engel, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    The advantages of burning fissile material from dismantled weapons in molten salt reactors (MSRs) are described. The fluid fuel MSRs with some, or full, processing are nondedicated reactors that generate energy and completely burn the fissile material on a continuous basis. No fuel fabrication is needed, and the entire dismantling can be done in a secure facility. Shipments are made in small, safe, and secure quantities. Denaturing, spiking, or mixing can be done at the source for added safety. MSRs are very safe reactors that help close the fuel cycle and simplify waste treatment, thereby contributing to acceptability. Additionally, MSRs are expected to be economically competitive as electric power stations. The safety, security, simplicity, economy, and proliferation resistant properties support the deployment in countries that have the need.

  13. Fast Thorium Molten Salt Reactors Started with Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Le Brun, C.; Brissot, R.; Liatard, E.; Meplan, O.; Nuttin, A.

    2006-07-01

    One of the pending questions concerning Molten Salt Reactors based on the {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycle is the supply of the fissile matter, and as a consequence the deployment possibilities of a fleet of Molten Salt Reactors, since {sup 233}U does not exist on earth and is not yet produced in the current operating reactors. A solution may consist in producing {sup 233}U in special devices containing Thorium, in Pressurized Water or Fast Neutrons Reactors. Two alternatives to produce {sup 233}U are examined here: directly in standard Molten Salt Reactors started with Plutonium as fissile matter and then operated in the Th/{sup 233}U cycle; or in dedicated Molten Salt Reactors started and fed with Plutonium as fissile matter and Thorium as fertile matter. The idea is to design a critical reactor able to burn the Plutonium and the minor actinides presently produced in PWRs, and consequently to convert this Plutonium into {sup 233}U. A particular reactor configuration is used, called 'unique channel' configuration in which there is no moderator in the core, leading to a quasi fast neutron spectrum, allowing Plutonium to be used as fissile matter. The conversion capacities of such Molten Salt Reactors are excellent. For Molten Salt Reactors only started with Plutonium, the assets of the Thorium fuel cycle turn out to be quickly recovered and the reactor's characteristics turn out to be equivalent to Molten Salt Reactors operated with {sup 233}U only. Using a combination of Molten Salt Reactors started or operated with Plutonium and of Molten Salt Reactors started with {sup 233}U, the deployment capabilities of these reactors fully satisfy the condition of sustainability. (authors)

  14. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  15. Control strategies in a thermal oil - Molten salt heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, Lidia; Bonilla, Javier; Rodríguez-García, Margarita M.; Palenzuela, Patricia; de la Calle, Alberto; Valenzuela, Loreto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a preliminary control scheme for a molten salt - thermal oil heat exchanger. This controller regulates the molten salt mass flow rate to reach and maintain the desired thermal oil temperature at the outlet of the heat exchanger. The controller architecture has been tested using an object-oriented heat exchanger model that has been validated with data from a molten salt testing facility located at CIEMAT-PSA. Different simulations are presented with three different goals: i) to analyze the controller response in the presence of disturbances, ii) to demonstrate the benefits of designing a setpoint generator and iii) to show the controller potential against electricity price variations.

  16. Transient analysis of a molten salt central receiver (MSCR) in a solar power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A.; Wang, C.; Akinjiola, O.; Lou, X.; Neuschaefer, C.; Quinn, J.

    2016-05-01

    Alstom is developing solar power tower plants utilizing molten salt as the working fluid. In solar power tower, the molten salt central receiver (MSCR) atop of the tower is constructed of banks of tubes arranged in panels creating a heat transfer surface exposed to the solar irradiation from the heliostat field. The molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF), in this case 60/40%wt NaNO3-KNO3, flows in serpentine flow through the surface collecting sensible heat thus raising the HTF temperature from 290°C to 565°C. The hot molten salt is stored and dispatched to produce superheated steam in a steam generator, which in turn produces electricity in the steam turbine generator. The MSCR based power plant with a thermal energy storage system (TESS) is a fully dispatchable renewable power plant with a number of opportunities for operational and economic optimization. This paper presents operation and controls challenges to the MSCR and the overall power plant, and the use of dynamic model computer simulation based transient analyses applied to molten salt based solar thermal power plant. This study presents the evaluation of the current MSCR design, using a dynamic model, with emphasis on severe events affecting critical process response, such as MS temperature deviations, and recommend MSCR control design improvements based on the results. Cloud events are the scope of the transient analysis presented in this paper. The paper presents results from a comparative study to examine impacts or effects on key process variables related to controls and operation of the MSCR plant.

  17. Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility (Building 7503) standards/requirements identification document adherence assessment plan at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This is the Phase 2 (adherence) assessment plan for the Building 7503 Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Facility standards/requirements identification document (S/RID). This document outlines the activities to be conducted from FY 1996 through FY 1998 to ensure that the standards and requirements identified in the MSRE S/RID are being implemented properly. This plan is required in accordance with the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-2, November 9, 1994, Attachment 1A. This plan addresses the major aspects of the adherence assessment and will be consistent with Energy Systems procedure QA-2. 7 ``Surveillances.``

  18. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  19. Boric ester-type molten salt via dehydrocoupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumi, Noriyoshi; Toyota, Yoshiyuki; Joshi, Prerna; Puneet, Puhup; Vedarajan, Raman; Takekawa, Toshihiro

    2014-11-14

    Novel boric ester-type molten salt was prepared using 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride as a key starting material. After an ion exchange reaction of 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride with lithium (bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide) (LiNTf2), the resulting 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium NTf2 was reacted with 9-borabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (9-BBN) to give the desired boric ester-type molten salt in a moderate yield. The structure of the boric ester-type molten salt was supported by 1H-, 13C-, 11B- and 19F-NMR spectra. In the presence of two different kinds of lithium salts, the matrices showed an ionic conductivity in the range of 1.1 × 10⁻⁴-1.6 × 10⁻⁵ S cm⁻¹ at 51 °C. This was higher than other organoboron molten salts ever reported.

  20. Molten salt electrolyte battery cell with overcharge tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Nelson, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte battery having an increased overcharge tolerance employs a negative electrode with two lithium alloy phases of different electrochemical potential, one of which allows self-discharge rates which permits battery cell equalization.

  1. On-line Monitoring of Actinide Concentrations in Molten Salt Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis W. Johnson; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar; Shelly X. Li

    2006-11-01

    Pyroprocessing, a treatment method for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), is currently being studied at the Idaho National Laboratory. The key operation of pyroprocessing which takes place in an electrorefiner is the electrochemical separation of actinides from other constituents in spent fuel. Efficient operation of the electrorefiner requires online monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte. Square-wave voltammetry (SWV) and normal pulse voltammetry (NPV) are being investigated to assess their applicability to the measurement of actinide concentrations in the electrorefiner.

  2. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt.

    PubMed

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450-470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl-KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. •The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.•This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.•The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going.

  3. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt

    PubMed Central

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450–470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl–KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. • The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept. • This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L. • The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going. PMID:26150977

  4. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt.

    PubMed

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450-470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl-KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. •The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.•This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.•The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going. PMID:26150977

  5. Prediction of the thermophysical properties of molten salt fast reactor fuel from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, A. E.; Corradini, D.; Dewan, L.; Chartrand, P.; Simon, C.; Madden, P. A.; Salanne, M.

    2014-05-01

    Molten fluorides are known to show favourable thermophysical properties which make them good candidate coolants for nuclear fission reactors. Here we investigate the special case of mixtures of lithium fluoride and thorium fluoride, which act both as coolant and as fuel in the molten salt fast reactor concept. By using ab initio parameterised polarisable force fields, we show that it is possible to calculate the whole set of properties (density, thermal expansion, heat capacity, viscosity and thermal conductivity) which are necessary for assessing the heat transfer performance of the melt over the whole range of compositions and temperatures. We then deduce from our calculations several figures of merit which are important in helping the optimisation of the design of molten salt fast reactors.

  6. Enhanced molten salt purification by electrochemical methods: feasibility experiments with flibe

    SciTech Connect

    Alan K Wertsching; Brandon S Grover; Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project (INL/EXT-10-18297) highlighted how thermo-physical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the of composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report titled ‘An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermo

  7. Evaluation of room-temperature chloroaluminate molten salts as electrolytes for high energy density batteries. Final report, June 1988-April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, R.L.

    1990-04-01

    This report reviews past battery studies using room-temperature chloroaluminate electrolytes, pointing out problems experienced. The report then summarizes attempts to circumvent these problems. A cell is described that uses a sodium anode, a copper (II) chloride cathode, and room-temperature chloroaluminate electrolyte buffered to the neutral composition. Cells give an open circuit voltage greater than 2.75 volts and discharge near 1 milliAmperes per centimeters squared at voltages greater than 2 volts for more than 20 hours. Cell failure is attributed to the formation of a nonconductive coating on the sodium electrode. Suggestions for future studies are presented. While the room-temperature chloroaluminates appear suitable for high-voltage, low-current batteries, their physical properties may limit their potential for high energy density batteries.

  8. Increased Lifetime for Biomass and Waste to Energy Power Plant Boilers with HVOF Coatings: High Temperature Corrosion Testing Under Chlorine-Containing Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, Maria; Tuurna, Satu; Varis, Tommi

    2013-06-01

    Heat exchanger surfaces of waste to energy and biomass power plant boilers experience often severe corrosion due to very aggressive components in the used fuels. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coatings offer excellent protection for boiler tubes against high temperature corrosion due to their high density and good adherence to the substrate material. Several thermal spray coatings with high chromium content were sprayed with HVOF technique. Their mechanical properties and high temperature corrosion resistance were tested and analyzed. The coating materials included NiCr, IN625, Ni-21Cr-10W-9Mo-4Cu, and iron-based partly amorphous alloy SHS9172 (Fe-25Cr-15W-12Nb-6Mo). High temperature corrosion testing was performed in NaCl-KCl-Na2SO4 salt with controlled H2O atmosphere at 575 and 625 °C. The corrosion test results of the coatings were compared to corrosion resistance of tube materials (X20, Alloy 263 and Sanicro 25).

  9. R and D of On-line Reprocessing Technology for Molten-Salt Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, Jan; Tulackova, Radka; Chuchvalcova Bimova, Karolina

    2006-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) represents one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included in the Generation IV reactors family. The reactor can be operated as the thorium breeder or as the actinide transmuter. However, the future deployment of Molten-Salt Reactors will be significantly dependent on the successful mastering of advanced reprocessing technologies dedicated to their fuel cycle. Here the on-line reprocessing technology connected with the fuel circuit of MSR is of special importance because the reactor cannot be operated for a long run without the fuel salt clean-up. Generally, main MSR reprocessing technologies are pyrochemical, majority of them are fluoride technologies. The proposed flow-sheets of MSR on-line reprocessing are based on a combination of molten-salt / liquid metal extraction and electro-separation processes, which can be added to the gas extraction process already verified during the MSRE project in ORNL. The crucial separation method proposed for partitioning of actinides from fission products is based on successive Anodic dissolution and Cathodic deposition processes in molten fluoride media. (authors)

  10. Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Brummond, W.A.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-11-02

    As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. Major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process has been demonstrated for the destruction of HE and HE-containing wastes. MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as binders and metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. LLNL has built a small-scale (about 1 kg/hr throughput) unit to test the destruction of HE using the MSD process. The authors have demonstrated that HE`s and liquid propellants can be safely and fully destroyed using the molten salt destruction process. The authors are currently working on a number of improvements to the process. They are modifying the design of unit to obtain more throughput without any increase in salt entrainment. They are implementing an advanced nozzle design for injection of larger particles. They are defining operating envelopes for a number of high explosives and formulations. They are developing models to study the temperature profile of a top-feed nozzle for feeding larger particles into the unit.

  11. Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

    2010-03-31

    The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary goal is to

  12. Molten Salt Mixture Properties (KF-ZrF4 and KCl-MgCl2) for Use in RELAP5-3D for High Temperature Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2012-06-01

    Molten salt coolants are being investigated as primary coolants for a fluoride high-temperature reactor and as secondary coolants for high temperature reactors such as the next generation nuclear plant. This work provides a review of the thermophysical properties of candidate molten salt coolants for use as a secondary heat transfer medium from a high temperature reactor to a processing plant. The molten salts LiF-NaF-KF, KF-ZrF4 and KCl-MgCl2 were considered for use in the secondary coolant loop. The thermophysical properties necessary to add the molten salts KF-ZrF4 and KCl-MgCl2 to RELAP5-3D were gathered for potential modeling purposes. The properties of the molten salt LiF-NaF-KF were already available in RELAP5-3D. The effect that the uncertainty in individual properties had on the Nusselt number was evaluated. This uncertainty in the Nusselt number was shown to be nearly independent of the molten salt temperature.

  13. Diagnosis of sources of current inefficiency in industrial molten salt electrolysis cells by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-07-29

    The purpose of this project was to employ Raman spectroscopy in the study of industrial molten salt electrolysis cells. The objective was to improve the understanding of the chemistry and electrochemistry of the relevant melt systems and, in turn, of energy loss mechanisms in the industrial processes. On this basis new ways to improve the energy efficiency of these industrial reactors might be identified. The research plan has several principal elements. First, there was the design and construction of laboratory scale representations of industrial molten salt electrolysis cells that would at the same time serve a spectrocells. Secondly, there was the mastery of the preparation of the molten salt electrolytes, what in industry is called the ''front end.'' Thirdly, there was the adaptation of commercially available Raman instrumentation in order to facilitate the proposed studies. It is the nature of the specimens that so dramatically distinguished this work from conventional Raman studies for which commercial instrumentation is designed: first, the laboratory scale electrolysis cells are large compared to typical spectrocells; and secondly, the cells operate at, what for Raman studies are, extremely high temperatures. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Utilization of Heavy Metal Molten Salts in the ARIES-RS Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa; Yapıcı, Hüseyin

    2008-09-01

    ARIES-RS is one of the major magnetic fusion energy reactor designs that uses a blanket having vanadium alloy structure cooled by lithium [1, 2]. It is a deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion driven reactor, having a fusion power of 2170 MW [1, 2]. This study presents the neutronic analysis of the ARIES-RS fusion reactor using heavy metal molten salts in which Li2BeF4 as the main constituent was mixed with increased mole fractions of heavy metal salt (ThF4 or UF4) starting by 2 mol.% up to 12 mol.%. Neutron transport calculations were carried out with the help of the SCALE 4.3 system by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and a S 8- P 3 approximation. According to the numerical results, tritium self-sufficiency was attained for the coolants, Flibe with 2% UF4 or ThF4 and 4% UF4. In addition, higher energy multiplication values were found for the salt with UF4 compared to that with ThF4. Furthermore, significant amount of high quality nuclear fuel was produced to be used in external reactors.

  15. Injector nozzle for molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.

    1996-01-01

    An injector nozzle has been designed for safely injecting energetic waste materials, such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels, into a molten salt reactor in a molten salt destruction process without premature detonation or back burn in the injection system. The energetic waste material is typically diluted to form a fluid fuel mixture that is injected rapidly into the reactor. A carrier gas used in the nozzle serves as a carrier for the fuel mixture, and further dilutes the energetic material and increases its injection velocity into the reactor. The injector nozzle is cooled to keep the fuel mixture below the decomposition temperature to prevent spontaneous detonation of the explosive materials before contact with the high-temperature molten salt bath.

  16. Injector nozzle for molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.

    1996-02-13

    An injector nozzle has been designed for safely injecting energetic waste materials, such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels, into a molten salt reactor in a molten salt destruction process without premature detonation or back burn in the injection system. The energetic waste material is typically diluted to form a fluid fuel mixture that is injected rapidly into the reactor. A carrier gas used in the nozzle serves as a carrier for the fuel mixture, and further dilutes the energetic material and increases its injection velocity into the reactor. The injector nozzle is cooled to keep the fuel mixture below the decomposition temperature to prevent spontaneous detonation of the explosive materials before contact with the high-temperature molten salt bath. 2 figs.

  17. Electrochemical-metallothermic reduction of zirconium in molten salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Talko, F.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method for separating hafnium from zirconium of the type wherein a feed containing zirconium and hafnium chlorides is prepared from zirconium-hafnium chloride and the feed is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a hafnium chloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. It comprises: reducing the zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the distillation column to metal by electrochemically reducing an alkaline earth metal in a molten salt bath with the molten salt in the molten salt bath consisting essentially of a mixture of at least one alkali metal chloride and at least one alkaline earth metal chloride and zirconium chloride, with the reduced alkaline earth metal reacting with the zirconium chloride to produce zirconium metal and alkaline earth metal chloride.

  18. RETRACTED ARTICLE: The Evaluation of Reactor Performance by using Flibe and Flinabe Molten Salts in the APEX Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Turgay; Hançerlioğulları, Aybaba

    2012-04-01

    The modeling of APEX hybrid reactor, produced by using ARIES-RS hybrid reactor technology, has been performed by using the MCNP-4B computer code and ENDF/B-V-VI nuclear data. Around the fusion chamber, molten salts Flibe (Li2BeF4) and Flinabe (LiNaBeF4) were used as cooling materials. APEX reactor was modeled in the torus form by adding nuclear materials of low significance in the specified percentages between percent 0-12 to the molten salts. The result of the study indicated that fissile material production, UF4 and ThF4 heavy metal salt increased nearly at the same percentage and it was observed that the percentage of it was practically the same in both materials. In order for the hybrid reactor to work itself in terms of tritium, TBR (tritium breeding ratio) should be lower than 1.05. When flibe molten salt was utilized in the APEX hybrid reactor, TBR was calculated as >1, 22 and when flinabe molten salt was used, TBR was calculated as >1.06.

  19. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2012-07-01

    A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

  20. Optimized molten salt receivers for ultimate trough solar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffelmann, Klaus-J.; Richert, Timo; Kuckelkorn, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Today parabolic trough collectors are the most successful concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. For the next development step new systems with increased operation temperature and new heat transfer fluids (HTF) are currently developed. Although the first power tower projects have successfully been realized, up to now there is no evidence of an all-dominant economic or technical advantage of power tower or parabolic trough. The development of parabolic trough technology towards higher performance and significant cost reduction have led to significant improvements in competitiveness. The use of molten salt instead of synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid will bring down the levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) even further while providing dispatchable energy with high capacity factors. FLABEG has developed the Ultimate TroughTM (UT) collector, jointly with sbp Sonne GmbH and supported by public funds. Due to its validated high optical accuracy, the collector is very suitable to operate efficiently at elevated temperatures up to 550 °C. SCHOTT will drive the key-innovations by introducing the 4th generation solar receiver that addresses the most significant performance and cost improvement measures. The new receivers have been completely redesigned to provide a product platform that is ready for high temperature operation up to 550 °C. Moreover distinct product features have been introduced to reduce costs and risks in solar field assembly and installation. The increased material and design challenges incurred with the high temperature operation have been reflected in sophisticated qualification and validation procedures.

  1. Treatment of Difficult Wastes with Molten Salt Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Kwak, S

    2003-02-21

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is a good alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes such as explosives, low-level mixed waste streams, PCB contaminated oils, spent resins and carbon. Since mid-1990s, the U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) have jointly invested in MSO development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL first demonstrated the MSO process for the effective destruction of explosives, explosives-contaminated materials, and other wastes on a 1.5-kg/hr bench-scale unit, and then in an integrated MSO facility capable of treating 8 kg/hr of low-level radioactive mixed wastes. Several MSO systems have been built with sizes up to 10 ft in height and 16 inches in diameter. LLNL in 2001 completed a MSO plant for DAC for the destruction of explosives-contaminated sludge and explosives-contaminated carbon. We will present in this paper our latest demonstration data and our operational experience with MSO.

  2. Corrosion of SiC by Molten Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Smialek, James L.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced ceramic materials considered for wide range of applications as in gas turbine engines and heat exchangers. In such applications, materials may be in corrosive environments that include molten salts. Very corrosive to alloys. In order to determine extent of problem for ceramic materials, corrosion of SiC by molten salts studied in both jet fuel burners and laboratory furnaces. Surface of silicon carbide corroded by exposure to flame seeded with 4 parts per million of sodium. Strength of silicon carbide decreased by corrosion in flame and tube-furnace tests.

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of nanohydroxyapatite synthesized by molten salt method.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Indira, J; Kavitha, L; Kannan, S; Ferreira, J M F

    2010-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanopowders were synthesized by molten salt method at 260 degrees C. The as-prepared powders were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). With the aid of the obtained results the effect of calcining time on the crystallinity, size and morphology of HAP nanopowders is presented. The HAP nanopowders synthesized by molten salt method consist of pure phase of HAP without any impurities and showed the rod-like morphology without detectable decomposition up to 1100 degrees C.

  4. High-temperature molten-salt thermal electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Plichta, E.J.; Behl, W.K.

    1990-02-12

    This invention relates in general to a high temperature molten salt thermal electrochemical cell and in particular to such a cell including cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) as the cathode material. High temperature molten salt thermal electrochemical cells are widely used as power sources for projectiles, rockets, bombs, mines, missiles, decoys, jammers and torpedoes. These are also used as fuses. Thermal electrochemical cells are reserve-type cells that can be activated by heating with a pyrotechnic heat source such as zirconium and barium chromate powders or mixtures of iron powder and potassium perchlorate.

  5. Thorium-Fueled Underground Power Plant Based on Molten Salt Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, Ralph W.; Teller, Edward

    2005-09-15

    This paper addresses the problems posed by running out of oil and gas supplies and the environmental problems that are due to greenhouse gases by suggesting the use of the energy available in the resource thorium, which is much more plentiful than the conventional nuclear fuel uranium. We propose the burning of this thorium dissolved as a fluoride in molten salt in the minimum viscosity mixture of LiF and BeF{sub 2} together with a small amount of {sup 235}U or plutonium fluoride to initiate the process to be located at least 10 m underground. The fission products could be stored at the same underground location. With graphite replacement or new cores and with the liquid fuel transferred to the new cores periodically, the power plant could operate for up to 200 yr with no transport of fissile material to the reactor or of wastes from the reactor during this period. Advantages that include utilization of an abundant fuel, inaccessibility of that fuel to terrorists or for diversion to weapons use, together with good economics and safety features such as an underground location will diminish public concerns. We call for the construction of a small prototype thorium-burning reactor.

  6. A new approach for modeling and analysis of molten salt reactors using SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J. J.; Harrison, T. J.; Gehin, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    The Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy is performing an evaluation and screening of potential fuel cycle options to provide information that can support future research and development decisions based on the more promising fuel cycle options. [1] A comprehensive set of fuel cycle options are put into evaluation groups based on physics and fuel cycle characteristics. Representative options for each group are then evaluated to provide the quantitative information needed to support the valuation of criteria and metrics used for the study. Included in this set of representative options are Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs), the analysis of which requires several capabilities that are not adequately supported by the current version of SCALE or other neutronics depletion software packages (e.g., continuous online feed and removal of materials). A new analysis approach was developed for MSR analysis using SCALE by taking user-specified MSR parameters and performing a series of SCALE/TRITON calculations to determine the resulting equilibrium operating conditions. This paper provides a detailed description of the new analysis approach, including the modeling equations and radiation transport models used. Results for an MSR fuel cycle option of interest are also provided to demonstrate the application to a relevant problem. The current implementation is through a utility code that uses the two-dimensional (2D) TRITON depletion sequence in SCALE 6.1 but could be readily adapted to three-dimensional (3D) TRITON depletion sequences or other versions of SCALE. (authors)

  7. [Bio-oil production from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt].

    PubMed

    Ji, Dengxiang; Cai, Tengyue; Ai, Ning; Yu, Fengwen; Jiang, Hongtao; Ji, Jianbing

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of pyrolysis conditions on bio-oil production from biomass in molten salt, experiments of biomass pyrolysis were carried out in a self-designed reactor in which the molten salt ZnCl2-KCl (with mole ratio 7/6) was selected as heat carrier, catalyst and dispersion agent. The effects of metal salt added into ZnCl2-KCl and biomass material on biomass pyrolysis were discussed, and the main compositions of bio-oil were determined by GC-MS. Metal salt added into molten salt could affect pyrolysis production yields remarkably. Lanthanon salt could enhance bio-oil yield and decrease water content in bio-oil, when mole fraction of 5.0% LaCl3 was added, bio-oil yield could reach up to 32.0%, and water content of bio-oil could reduce to 61.5%. The bio-oil and char yields were higher when rice straw was pyrolysed, while gas yield was higher when rice husk was used. Metal salts showed great selectivity on compositions of bio-oil. LiCl and FeCl2 promoted biomass to pyrolyse into smaller molecular weight compounds. CrCl3, CaCl2 and LaCl3 could restrain second pyrolysis of bio-oil. The research provided a scientific reference for production of bio-oil from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt.

  8. Production of oxygen from lunar soil by molten salt electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Rudolf

    1989-01-01

    A simple approach to utilizing lunar resources proposes to dissolve lunar soil, without or with little beneficiation, in a suitable molten salt and to electrolyze the oxides to oxygen and a metal byproduct. The envisioned process and the required technological advances are discussed. Promising electrolysis conditions have been identified in a recent experimental program to manufacture silicon and aluminum from anorthite.

  9. Chemical Safety: Molten Salt Baths Cited as Lab Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Rudy

    1982-01-01

    Discusses danger of explosions with molten salts baths, commonly used as heat-transfer media. One such explosion involved use of a bath containing 3-lb sodium nitrite and 1-lb potassium thiocyanate. Although most commercially available mixtures for heat transfer contain oxidizers, a reducer (thiocyanate) was included which possibly triggered the…

  10. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.; Wernly, K.

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  11. 9. VIEW OF MOLTEN SALT BATH EQUIPMENT AND ROLLER PRESSES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF MOLTEN SALT BATH EQUIPMENT AND ROLLER PRESSES BEING INSTALLED ON THE WEST SIDE (SIDE B) OF BUILDING 883. SIDE B OF BUILDING 883 WAS USED TO PROCESS ENRICHED URANIUM FROM 1957-66. (1/23/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT BATHS USED TO UNIFORMLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT BATHS USED TO UNIFORMLY AND QUICKLY HEAT METALS PRIOR TO WORKING (ROLLING). (9/16/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Electrochemical studies of kinetic properties of titanium- and vanadium-hydrogen systems at intermediate temperatures using molten salt techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, B.Y.; Deublein, G.; Huggins, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    A novel molten salt technique for studying hydrogen transport in Ti an V metals is described. The molten-salt electrolytes were eutectic mixtures of alkali halides dissolved with excess LiH, operating in temperature ranges typically above 300 C, to which electrochemical techniques were difficult to apply conventionally. The authors used the molten salt technique to investigate the thermodynamic properties of the Ti-H system previously. In this work, they determined composition-dependent diffusion and permeation data of hydrogen in Ti and in binary hydride phases using a galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT). The results are in accordance with the best values reported by others using different techniques. They also reported some preliminary results regarding the kinetic properties of hydrogen in V and its hydride measured by more conventional time-lag and steady-state permeation techniques. The successful application of this molten salt technique in the metal hydrogen systems opened a new arena for potential application in energy conversion and storage.

  14. Materials Testing for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Molten Salt Fission System: A look at the Materials Science of Molten Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Balachandran, Shreyas; Foley, David; Hartwig, Karl; McIntyre, Peter; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    For an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt fission core to survive its 50+ year fuel life, the primary vessel, heat exchanger, and various internal components must be made of materials that resist corrosion and radiation damage in a high-temperature environment, (500-800 C). An experimental study of the corrosion behavior of candidate metals in contact with molten salt is being conducted at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Initial experiments have been run on Nb, Ta, Ni, two zirconium alloys, Hastelloy-N, and a series of steel alloys to form a base line for corrosion in both chloride and bromide salt. Metal coupons were immersed in LiCl-KCl or LiBr-KBr at 700 C in an inert-atmosphere. Salt samples were extracted on a time schedule over a 24-hr period. The samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of metals from corrosion. Preliminary results will be presented.

  15. Nuclear energy and waste management pyroprocess for system symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishihara, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    The actinide management has become a key issue in nuclear energy. Recovering and fissioning transuranium elements reduce the long-term proliferation risks and the environmental burden. The better way of waste management will be made by system symbiosis: a combination of light-water reactor and fast reactor and/or accelerator-driven transmutation system should be sought. The new recycling technology should be able to achieve good economy with smaller plants, which can process fuels from different types of reactors on a common technical basis. Ease in handling the higher heat load of transuranium nuclides is also important. Pyroprocesses with the use of molten salts are regarded as the strong candidate for such recycling technology. In JAEA, the first laboratory for the high-temperature chemistry of Am and Cm has been established. The fundamental data will be combined with the computer code for predicting the molten-salts electrolytic processes.

  16. Electrochemical Synthesis of Magnesium Hexaboride by Molten Salt Technique.

    PubMed

    Angappan, S; Kalaiselvi, N; Sudha, R; Visuvasam, A

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports electrochemical synthesis of MgB6 from molten salts using the precursor consists of LiF-B2O3-MgCl2. An attempt has been made to synthesize metastable phase MgB6 crystal by electrolysis method. DTA/TGA studies were made to determine the eutectic point of the melt and it was found to be around 900°C. The electrolysis was performed at 900°C under argon atmosphere, at current density of 1.5 A/cm(2). The electrodeposited crystals were examined using XRD, SEM, and XPS. From the above studies, the electrochemical synthesis method for hypothetical MgB6 from chloro-oxy-fluoride molten salt system is provided. Mechanism for the formation of magnesium hexaboride is discussed.

  17. Electrochemical Synthesis of Magnesium Hexaboride by Molten Salt Technique

    PubMed Central

    Angappan, S.; Kalaiselvi, N.; Sudha, R.; Visuvasam, A.

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports electrochemical synthesis of MgB6 from molten salts using the precursor consists of LiF–B2O3–MgCl2. An attempt has been made to synthesize metastable phase MgB6 crystal by electrolysis method. DTA/TGA studies were made to determine the eutectic point of the melt and it was found to be around 900°C. The electrolysis was performed at 900°C under argon atmosphere, at current density of 1.5 A/cm2. The electrodeposited crystals were examined using XRD, SEM, and XPS. From the above studies, the electrochemical synthesis method for hypothetical MgB6 from chloro-oxy-fluoride molten salt system is provided. Mechanism for the formation of magnesium hexaboride is discussed. PMID:27350961

  18. Molten salt treatment to minimize and optimize waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Crosley, S.M.; Gay, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    A combination molten salt oxidizer (MSO) and molten salt reactor (MSR) is described for treatment of waste. The MSO is proposed for contained oxidization of organic hazardous waste, for reduction of mass and volume of dilute waste by evaporation of the water. The NTSO residue is to be treated to optimize the waste in terms of its composition, chemical form, mixture, concentration, encapsulation, shape, size, and configuration. Accumulations and storage are minimized, shipments are sized for low risk. Actinides, fissile material, and long-lived isotopes are separated and completely burned or transmuted in an MSR. The MSR requires no fuel element fabrication, accepts the materials as salts in arbitrarily small quantities enhancing safety, security, and overall acceptability.

  19. Hydrocracking of coal using molten salts as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, S.; Nomura, M.; Sakashita, H.; Nishimura, M.; Miyake, M.

    1981-10-01

    Characteristics of the reactions during coal liquefaction and the hydrocracking of coal and coal-related materials using ZnCl2-transition metal chloride or ZnCl2-alkaline metal chloride are discussed. The studies involve development of a molten salt catalyst for hydrocracking heavy residual oils or coals, including hydrocarbons containing many heteroatoms. It was found that ZnCl2 shows higher activity for hydrocracking of anthracene and phenanthrene, and experiments with Yubari coal using the binary metal catalysts ZnCl2-MoCl5 and ZnCl2-CrCl3 are described. The use of molten salts in the desulphurization of heavy residual oils is also explored, specifically for the hydrocracking of benziophene, and the possibility that a coal-like polymer structure containing an oxygen surplus might depolymerize above ternary melts is suggested.

  20. Conception of electron beam-driven subcritical molten salt ultimate safety reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalin, S. S.; Alekseev, P. N.; Ignat'ev, V. V.; Kolyaskin, O. E.; Men'shikov, L. I.; Mostovoi, V. I.; Prusakov, V. N.; Subbotin, S. A.; Krasnykh, A. K.; Popov, Yu. P.; Rudenko, V. T.; Somov, L. N.; Dikansky, N. S.; Novokhatsky, A. V.; Dovbnia, A. N.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is a preliminary sketch of a conception to develop the ``ultimate safety reactor'' using modern reactor and accelerator technologies. This approach would not require a long-range R&D program. The ultimate safety reactor could produce heat and electric energy, expand the production of fuel, or be used for the transmutation of long-lived wastes. The use of the combined double molten salt reactor system allows adequate neutron multiplication to permit using an electron accelerator for the initial neutron flux. The general parameters of such a system are discussed in this paper.

  1. Design of a helium-cooled molten salt fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Fulton, F.J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Sherwood, A.E.; Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Wong, C.P.C.; DeVan, J.H.

    1985-02-01

    A new conceptual blanket design for a fusion reactor produces fissile material for fission power plants. Fission is suppressed by using beryllium, rather than uranium, to multiply neutrons and also by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding media (LiF + BeF/sub 2/ + TghF/sub 4/) is circulated through the blanket and on to the online processing system where /sup 233/U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket including the steel pipes containing the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion rate by molten salt. We estimate the breeder, having 3000 MW of fusion power, produces 6400 kg of /sup 233/U per year, which is enough to provide make up for 20 GWe of LWR per year (or 14 LWR plants of 4440 MWt) or twice that many HTGRs or CANDUs. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and the blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS tandem mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 times an LWR of the same power. The estimated present value cost of the /sup 2/anumber/sup 3/U produced is $40/g if utility financed or $16/g if government financed.

  2. Design of a helium-cooled molten salt fusion breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, R. W.; Lee, J. D.; Fulton, F. J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W. S., Jr.; Sherwood, A. E.; Berwald, D. H.; Whitley, R. H.; Wong, C. P. C.; Devan, J. H.

    1985-02-01

    A new conceptual blanket design for a fusion reactor is discussed which produces fissile material for fission power plants. Fission is suppressed by using beryllium, rather than uranium, to multiply neutrons and also by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding media (LiF + BeF2 + TghF4) is circulated through the blanket and on to the online processing system where (233)U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket including the steel pipes containing the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion rate by molten salt. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and the blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 time an LWR of the same power. The estimated present value cost of the (233)U produced is $40/g if utility financed or $16/g if government financed.

  3. Molten salt processing of mixed wastes with offgas condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Brummond, W.; Celeste, J.; Farmer, J.; Hoenig, C.; Krikorian, O.H.; Upadhye, R. ); Gay, R.L.; Stewart, A.; Yosim, S. . Energy Systems Group)

    1991-05-13

    We are developing an advanced process for treatment of mixed wastes in molten salt media at temperatures of 700--1000{degrees}C. Waste destruction has been demonstrated in a single stage oxidation process, with destruction efficiencies above 99.9999% for many waste categories. The molten salt provides a heat transfer medium, prevents thermal surges, and functions as an in situ scrubber to transform the acid-gas forming components of the waste into neutral salts and immobilizes potentially fugitive materials by a combination of particle wetting, encapsulation and chemical dissolution and solvation. Because the offgas is collected and assayed before release, and wastes containing toxic and radioactive materials are treated while immobilized in a condensed phase, the process avoids the problems sometimes associated with incineration processes. We are studying a potentially improved modification of this process, which treats oxidizable wastes in two stages: pyrolysis followed by catalyzed molten salt oxidation of the pyrolysis gases at ca. 700{degrees}C. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. ac impedance measurements of molten salt thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pritpal; Guidotti, Ronald A.; Reisner c, David

    Non-destructive testing of thermal batteries without activating them is a challenging proposition. Molten salt thermal batteries are activated by raising their temperature to above the melting point of the salt constituting the electrolyte. One approach that we have considered is to raise the temperature of the molten salt electrolyte to a temperature below the melting point so that the battery does not get activated yet may provide sufficient mobility of the ionic species to be able to obtain some useful ac impedance measurements. This hypothesis was put to the test for two Li(Si)/FeS 2 molten salt batteries with two electrolytes of different melting points—a standard LiCl-KCl eutectic that melts at 352 °C and a LiBr-KBr-LiCl eutectic with a melting point of 319 °C. ac impedance measurements as a function of frequency and temperature below the melting point are presented for single cells and batteries.

  5. Characteristics of solidified products containing radioactive molten salt waste.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, In-Tae; Cho, Yong-Zun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Kim, Joon-Hyung

    2007-11-01

    The molten salt waste from a pyroprocess to recover uranium and transuranic elements is one of the problematic radioactive wastes to be solidified into a durable wasteform for its final disposal. By using a novel method, named as the GRSS (gel-route stabilization/solidification) method, a molten salt waste was treated to produce a unique wasteform. A borosilicate glass as a chemical binder dissolves the silicate compounds in the gel products to produce one amorphous phase while most of the phosphates are encapsulated by the vitrified phase. Also, Cs in the gel product is preferentially situated in the silicate phase, and it is vitrified into a glassy phase after a heat treatment. The Sr-containing phase is mainly phosphate compounds and encapsulated by the glassy phase. These phenomena could be identified by the static and dynamic leaching test that revealed a high leach resistance of radionuclides. The leach rates were about 10(-3) - 10(-2) g/m2 x day for Cs and 10(-4) - 10(-3) g/m2 x day for Sr, and the leached fractions of them were predicted to be 0.89% and 0.39% at 900 days, respectively. This paper describes the characteristics of a unique wasteform containing a molten salt waste and provides important information on a newly developed immobilization technology for salt wastes, the GRSS method.

  6. CO2 decomposition using electrochemical process in molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Koya; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2012-08-01

    The electrochemical decomposition of CO2 gas to carbon and oxygen gas in LiCl-Li2O and CaCl2-CaO molten salts was studied. This process consists of electrochemical reduction of Li2O and CaO, as well as the thermal reduction of CO2 gas by the respective metallic Li and Ca. Two kinds of ZrO2 solid electrolytes were tested as an oxygen ion conductor, and the electrolytes removed oxygen ions from the molten salts to the outside of the reactor. After electrolysis in both salts, the aggregations of nanometer-scale amorphous carbon and rod-like graphite crystals were observed by transmission electron microscopy. When 9.7 %CO2-Ar mixed gas was blown into LiCl-Li2O and CaCl2-CaO molten salts, the current efficiency was evaluated to be 89.7 % and 78.5 %, respectively, by the exhaust gas analysis and the supplied charge. When a solid electrolyte with higher ionic conductivity was used, the current and carbon production became larger. It was found that the rate determining step is the diffusion of oxygen ions into the ZrO2 solid electrolyte.

  7. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevinitsa, V. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing 233U from 232Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  8. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nevinitsa, V. A. Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing {sup 233}U from {sup 232}Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  9. Implementation of Molten Salt Properties into RELAP5-3D/ATHENA

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff Davis

    2005-01-01

    Molten salts are being considered as coolants for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) in both the reactor and the heat transport loop between the reactor and the hydrogen production plant because of their superior thermophysical properties compared to helium. Because specific molten salts have not been selected for either application, four separate molten salts were implemented into the RELAP5-3D/ATHENA computer program as working fluids. The implemented salts were LiF-BeF2 in a molar mixture that is 66% LiF and 34% BeF2, respectively, NaBF4-NaF (92% and 8%), LiF-NaF-KF (11.5%, 46.5%, and 42%), and NaF-ZrF4 (50% and 50%). LiF-BeF2 is currently the first choice for the primary coolant for the Advanced High- Temperature Reactor, while NaF-ZrF4 is being considered as an alternate. NaBF4-NaF and LiFNaF- KF are being considered as possible coolants for the heat transport loop. The molten salts were implemented into ATHENA using a simplified equation of state based on data and correlations obtained from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The simplified equation of state assumes that the liquid density is a function of temperature and pressure and that the liquid heat capacity is constant. The vapor is assumed to have the same composition as the liquid and is assumed to be a perfect gas. The implementation of the thermodynamic properties into ATHENA for LiF-BeF2 was verified by comparisons with results from a detailed equation of state that utilized a soft-sphere model. The comparisons between the simplified and soft-sphere models were in reasonable agreement for liquid. The agreement for vapor properties was not nearly as good as that obtained for liquid. Large uncertainties are possible in the vapor properties because of a lack of experimental data. The simplified model used here is not expected to be accurate for boiling or single-phase vapor conditions. Because neither condition is expected during NGNP applications, the simplified equation of state is considered

  10. Thermo-mechanical and optical optimization of the molten salt receiver for a given heliostat field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augsburger, Germain; Das, Apurba K.; Boschek, Erik; Clark, Michael M.

    2016-05-01

    The tower type molten salt solar thermal power plant has proven to be advantageous over other utility scale solar power plant configurations due to its scalability and provision of storage, thereby improving the dispatchability. The configuration consists of a molten salt central receiver (MSCR) located atop an optimally located tower within a heliostat field with thousands of mirrors. The MSCR receives the concentrated energy from the heliostat field which heats a molten salt heat transfer fluid for thermal storage and utilization in producing steam as and when required for power generation. The MSCR heat transfer surface consists of banks of tangent tubes arranged in panels. The combined cost of the heliostat field and the receiver is 40%-50% of the total plant cost, which calls for optimization to maximize their utilization. Several previous studies have looked into the optimum solar power plant size based on various site conditions. However, the combined optimization of the receiver and the heliostat field has not been reported before. This study looks into the optimum configuration of the receiver for a given heliostat field. An in-house tool has been developed to select and rank a few receiver surface configurations (typically <50) from a list of hundreds of thousands of possible options. The operating limits which the heliostat field needs to obey are defined for the ranked surface configurations based on several different design considerations (e.g. mechanical integrity, corrosion limits). The thermal output of the receiver configurations for a given heliostat field is maximized. A combined rank indicating the optimum configurations in descending order of preference is presented based on the performance and various other practical considerations (e.g. total surface area, cost of material, ability of aiming strategies to distribute the flux). The methodology thus provided can be used as a guideline to arrive at an optimum receiver configuration for a given

  11. Technical review of Molten Salt Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The process was reviewed for destruction of mixed low-level radioactive waste. Results: extensive development work and scaleup has been documented on coal gasification and hazardous waste which forms a strong experience base for this MSO process; it is clearly applicable to DOE wastes such as organic liquids and low-ash wastes. It also has potential for processing difficult-to-treat wastes such as nuclear grade graphite and TBP, and it may be suitable for other problem waste streams such as sodium metal. MSO operating systems may be constructed in relatively small units for small quantity generators. Public perceptions could be favorable if acceptable performance data are presented fairly; MSO will likely require compliance with regulations for incineration. Use of MSO for offgas treatment may be complicated by salt carryover. Figs, tabs, refs.

  12. Preliminary safety calculations to improve the design of Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brovchenko, M.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Allibert, M.; Capellan, N.; Ghetta, V.; Laureau, A.

    2012-07-01

    Molten salt reactors are liquid fuel reactors so that they are flexible in operation but very different in the safety approach from solid fuel reactors. This study bears on the specific concept named Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). Since this new nuclear technology is in development, safety is an essential point to be considered all along the R and D studies. This paper presents the first step of the safety approach: the systematic description of the MSFR, limited here to the main systems surrounding the core. This systematic description is the basis on which we will be able to devise accidental scenarios. Thanks to the negative reactivity feedback coefficient, most accidental scenarios lead to reactor shut down. Because of the decay heat generated in the fuel salt, it must be cooled. After the description of the tools developed to calculate the residual heat, the different contributions are discussed in this study. The decay heat of fission products in the MSFR is evaluated to be low (3% of nominal power), mainly due to the reprocessing that transfers the fission products to the gas reprocessing unit. As a result, the contribution of the actinides is significant (0.5% of nominal power). The unprotected loss of heat sink transients are studied in this paper. It appears that slow transients are favorable (> 1 min) to minimize the temperature increase of the fuel salt. This work will be the basis of further safety studies as well as an essential parameter for the design of the draining system. (authors)

  13. Chronopotentiometry of refractory metals, actinides and oxyanions in molten salts: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The applications of chronopotentiometry to the study of electrochemical behavior of three technologically important areas of refractory metals, actinides, and oxyanions in molten salts are critically reviewed. Chronopotentiometry is a very versatile diagnostic tool to understand the reaction mechanism of the electrode processes for the electrochemical reduction/oxidation of these electroactive species in molten salt solutions. Well adherent, compact, and uniformly thick coatings of refractory metals may be electrodeposited from their solutions in molten salts.

  14. Chronopotentiometry of refractory metals, actinides and oxyanions in molten salts: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, N.P.

    1992-09-01

    The applications of chronopotentiometry to the study of electrochemical behavior of three technologically important areas of refractory metals, actinides, and oxyanions in molten salts are critically reviewed. Chronopotentiometry is a very versatile diagnostic tool to understand the reaction mechanism of the electrode processes for the electrochemical reduction/oxidation of these electroactive species in molten salt solutions. Well adherent, compact, and uniformly thick coatings of refractory metals may be electrodeposited from their solutions in molten salts.

  15. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens with catalytic molten salt mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1978-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. The subject hydrogen halide is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxygen compound of vanadium and alkali metal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen. The reduced vanadium which remains after this contacting is regenerated to the active higher valence state by contacting the spent molten salt with a stream of oxygen-bearing gas.

  16. Maintaining molten salt electrolyte concentration in aluminum-producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Robert J.; Mezner, Michael B.; Bradford, Donald R

    2005-01-04

    A method of maintaining molten salt concentration in a low temperature electrolytic cell used for production of aluminum from alumina dissolved in a molten salt electrolyte contained in a cell free of frozen crust wherein volatile material is vented from the cell and contacted and captured on alumina being added to the cell. The captured volatile material is returned with alumina to cell to maintain the concentration of the molten salt.

  17. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  18. Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

    2011-09-20

    A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

  19. Role of molten salt flux in melting of used beverage container (UBC) scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, J.; Sahai, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Recycling of aluminum scrap, such as Used Beverage Container (UBC) scrap is steadily increasing. In secondary remelting of such scrap, it is a common practice to use protective molten salt cover. An appropriate salt protects metal from oxidation, promotes coalescence of the suspended metal droplets, and separates clean metal from the oxide contamination. The molten salt also reacts with metal. This causes metal loss and change of resulting metal composition. In this paper, role of molten salt fluxes in melting of UBC scrap is discussed, and selection criteria for molten salt are provided.

  20. Helium-cooled molten-salt fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Fulton, F.J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Sherwood, A.E.; Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Wong, C.P.C.; Devan, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    We present a new conceptual design for a fusion reactor blanket that is intended to produce fissile material for fission power plants. Fast fission is suppressed by using beryllium instead of uranium to multiply neutrons. Thermal fission is suppressed by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding medium (LiF + BeF/sub 2/ + ThF/sub 4/) is circulated through the blanket and to the on-line processing system where /sup 233/U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket and the austenitic steel tubes that contain the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion by molten salt. We estimate that a breeder having 3000 MW of fusion power will produce 6500 kg of /sup 233/U per year. This amount is enough to provide makeup for 20 GWe of light-water reactors per year or twice that many high-temperature gas-cooled reactors or Canadian heavy-water reactors. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS tandem mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 times a light-water reactor of the same power. The estimated cost of the /sup 233/U produced is $40/g for fusion plants costing 2.35 times that of a light-water reactor if utility owned or $16/g if government owned.

  1. Technical developments in molten salt solar central receiver systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, G.; Johnson, S.D.; Smith, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Solar system components have undergone considerable analysis and evaluation through various efforts such as the Saguaro and Solar 100 design programs and the experimental work conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. While the foregoing work has established the feasibility of molten salt solar plant design, further prototypical testing is necessary prior to the construction of large scale plants. Work is underway on a program to demonstrate the viability of the receiver design, the operation of full size hot and cold salt pumps, and the operability of major salt valves for a commercial solar plant. This work will be undertaken at the Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) in Albuquerque.

  2. From molten salts to ionic liquids: a "nano" journey.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Jairton

    2011-11-15

    Ionic liquids (ILs), a special group of classical molten salts, are widely used in various fields of science. Historically, researchers have tested ILs out of curiosity or to improve a specific property in a particular system in many areas of chemistry or materials science. However, today, ILs are far from being simple chemical curiosities and sit at the center of various green industrial innovation processes, where they play important roles in materials extraction, reactive catalytic supports, spatial devices, and biotransformations. In this Account, we describe a journey into a nanostructured universe to better understand the unique properties of ionic liquids and their modern applications. Because molten salts have been known for centuries and have found limited uses, we try to explain why modern nonaqueous ILs deserve increased interest and curiosity. We discuss the characteristics that distinguish modern nonaqueous ILs and compare them with classical molten salts. One of the main differences between room temperature ILs, especially those based on imidazolium cations, and simple molten salts, is the molecular asymmetry built into at least one of the ions. This asymmetry in modern, nonaqueous ILs opposes the strong charge ordering due to ionic interactions that normally would cause the system to crystallize. In addition, the presence of a cooperative network of hydrogen bonds between the cations and anions induces structural directionality (the entropic effect). Therefore, modern ILs form preorganized structures, mainly through hydrogen bonding, that induce structural directionality. In contrast, classical salts form aggregates only through ionic bonds. In other words, weak interactions order the structures in modern ILs while charges order the structure within classical salts. ILs cannot be regarded as merely homogeneous solvents. In fact, ILs form extended hydrogen-bond networks with polar and nonpolar nano domains and therefore are by definition

  3. Specific heat capacity of molten salt-based alumina nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Chang; Huang, Chien-Hsun

    2013-06-21

    There is no consensus on the effect of nanoparticle (NP) addition on the specific heat capacity (SHC) of fluids. In addition, the predictions from the existing model have a large discrepancy from the measured SHCs in nanofluids. We show that the SHC of the molten salt-based alumina nanofluid decreases with reducing particle size and increasing particle concentration. The NP size-dependent SHC is resulted from an augmentation of the nanolayer effect as particle size reduces. A model considering the nanolayer effect which supports the experimental results was proposed.

  4. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-01

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF2-ThF4-233UF4 respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155.

  5. Metals recovering from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) using molten salts.

    PubMed

    Flandinet, L; Tedjar, F; Ghetta, V; Fouletier, J

    2012-04-30

    Recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEE) has been taken into consideration in the literature due to the large quantity of concerned wastes and their hazardous contents. The situation is so critical that EU published European Directives imposing collection and recycling with a minimum of material recovery [1]. Moreover, WEEEs contain precious metals, making the recycling of these wastes economically interesting, but also some critical metals and their recycling leads to resource conservation. This paper reports on a new approach for recycling waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). Molten salts and specifically molten KOH-NaOH eutectic is used to dissolve glasses, oxides and to destruct plastics present in wastes without oxidizing the most valuable metals. This method is efficient for recovering a copper-rich metallic fraction, which is, moreover, cleared of plastics and glasses. In addition, analyses of gaseous emission show that this method is environmentally friendly since most of the process gases, such as carbon monoxide and dioxide and halogens, are trapped in the highly basic molten salt. In other respects, under operation without oxygen, a large quantity of hydrogen is produced and might be used as fuel gas or as synthesis gas, leading to a favourable energy balance for this new process.

  6. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  7. Sintering and Microstructure of BaTiO3 Nano Particles Synthesized by Molten Salt Method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Shin, Hyo-Soon; Yeo, Dong-Hun; Ha, Gook-Hyun; Nahm, Sahn

    2016-05-01

    In order to establish thinner dielectric layers in thick film electronic components such as MLCC (Multilayer ceramic capacitor), BaTiO3 nanoparticles have been utilized. However, studies on the synthesis of nanoparticles smaller than 20 nm, the characteristics of the BaTiO3 powder, and the powder's sintering are lacking. Therefore, this paper aims to synthesize BaTiO3 particles smaller than 20 nm by using the molten salt method and evaluate the microstructure and dielectric properties by varying the sintering temperature from 750 degrees C to 1200 degrees C. Through the molten salt method and by using KOH-KCl mixed salt, 20 nm BaTiO3 powder was synthesized at a low temperature of 150 degrees C. Sintering the pellets formed from the synthesized 20 nm BaTiO3 nano powder led to the observation of an unusual phenomenon where the particles grew to approximate sizes below 850 degrees C where densification progressed. At sintering temperatures above 950 degrees C, particles that expanded into rod shapes were observed and these particles were identified to be unreacted TiO2 based on the results of the EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) analysis and phase analysis results.

  8. Determination and evaluation of the thermophysical properties of an alkali carbonate eutectic molten salt.

    PubMed

    An, Xuehui; Cheng, Jinhui; Zhang, Peng; Tang, Zhongfeng; Wang, Jianqiang

    2016-08-15

    The thermal physical properties of Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 eutectic molten salt were comprehensively investigated. It was found that the liquid salt can remain stable up to 658 °C (the onset temperature of decomposition) by thermal analysis, and so the investigations on its thermal physical parameters were undertaken from room temperature to 658 °C. The density was determined using a self-developed device, with an uncertainty of ±0.00712 g cm(-3). A cooling curve was obtained from the instrument, giving the liquidus temperature. For the first time, we report the obtainment of the thermal diffusivity using a laser flash method based on a special crucible design and establishment of a specific sample preparation method. Furthermore, the specific heat capacity was also obtained by use of DSC, and combined with thermal diffusivity and density, was used to calculate the thermal conductivity. We additionally built a rotating viscometer with high precision in order to determine the molten salt viscosity. All of these parameters play an important part in the energy storage and transfer calculation and safety evaluation for a system.

  9. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  10. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors. PMID:26931711

  11. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    SciTech Connect

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, Abdul Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-30

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155.

  12. Summary of the Workshop on Molten Salt Reactor Technologies Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Startup of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Betzler, Benjamin R; Mays, Gary T

    2016-01-01

    A workshop on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) technologies commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on October 15 16, 2015. The MSRE represented a pioneering experiment that demonstrated an advanced reactor technology: the molten salt eutectic-fueled reactor. A multinational group of more than 130 individuals representing a diverse set of stakeholders gathered to discuss the historical, current, and future technical challenges and paths to deployment of MSR technology. This paper provides a summary of the key messages from this workshop.

  13. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Willit, James L.

    2010-09-21

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  14. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Willit, James L.

    2007-09-11

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  15. Applications of molten salts in reactive metals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    Pyrochemical processes using molten salts provide a unique opportunity for the extraction and refining of many reactive and valuable metals either directly from the beneficiated ore or from other process effluent that contain reactive metal compounds. This research program is aimed at developing a process for the production and recovery of reactive and valuable metals, such as zinc, tin, lead, bismuth and silver, in a hybrid reactor combining electrolytic production of the calcium reductant and in-situ utilization of this reductant for pyrochemical reduction of the metal compounds, such as halide or oxides. The process is equally suitable for producing other low melting metals, such as cadmium and antimony. The cell is typically operated below 1000C temperature. Attempts have been made to produce silver, lead, bismuth, tin and cerium by calciothermic reduction in a molten salt media. In a separate effort, calcium has been produced by an electrolytic dissociation of lime in a calcium chloride medium. The most important characteristic of the hybrid technology is its ability to produce metals under ``zero-waste`` conditions.

  16. Wetting behavior of dialkylimidazolium chloroaluminate, a room temperature molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, J.

    1985-08-01

    Eberhart (1979) has found that the wetting behavior of a battery electrolyte can have a dramatic effect on the internal resistance of the battery as well as its cycle life. Good wetting of battery separators by electrolyte is essential for the easy passage of ions through the separator pores, while porous, gas diffusion electrodes require a lesser degree of wetting. For several years, a room temperature molten salt system has been under study. This system is composed of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (C6N2H11Cl or MeEtImCl) plus aluminum chloride. The application of this novel liquid solution as a battery electrolyte appears to be promising. Available data suggest that likely candidates include cells with a chlorine positive electrode reactant and a magnesium, aluminum, or zinc negative electrode material. The present investigation is concerned with an assessment of the wetting behavior in the considered system, taking into account a study of the contact angles of various room temperature molten salts on candidate battery separator and porous electrode materials. 10 references.

  17. A theoretical investigation of gadolinium (III) solvation in molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazebroucq, Sandrine; Picard, Gérard S.; Adamo, Carlo

    2005-06-01

    The solvation of lanthanides [here Gd(III)] in molten LiCl and KCl has been studied using a classical solvation approach, based on clusters of increasing size. In particular, density-functional calculations have been carried out on charged and neutral clusters, containing up to 35 chlorine halide molecules. A number of properties have been then evaluated and analyzed, including structural, vibrational, and thermochemical data. Special attention has also been devoted to the analysis of the local structure of the solvent surrounding the Gd3+ cation, a problem deeply investigated by experimentalists. Our results show that the charged clusters are not suitable to model the first solvation shell in such species, since their structures are strongly affected by the large electrostatic contribution. In contrast, more reliable simulations are obtained using the neutral clusters. In the latter, the coordination of Gd(III) in molten salts is computed to be 8 or 6, according to the salt LiCl or KCl. Furthermore, a good agreement is found with the experimental structural data and Raman spectra. Finally, preliminary results of potential interest for the estimation of solvation thermodynamics, a key parameter for exploiting molten salt chemistry, are reported for neutral clusters.

  18. The influence of the anionic species of a molten salt on lipid organization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Room-temperature molten salts have become the solvent of choice to replace organic solvents in processing commodity plant lipids. Replacing the typical organic solvent with molten salts reduces common hazards, such as volatility and flammability, associated with organic solvent use. In addition, m...

  19. Molecular modelling: An analytical tool with a predictive character for investigating reactivity in molten salt media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Gérard S.; Bouyer, Frédéric C.

    1995-04-01

    Possibilities offered by Molecular Modelling for studying homogeneous and interfacial processes and reactions in melts are discussed. A few typical illustrative examples covering some of the main research fields of molten salt chemistry and electrochemistry are given. Quantum chemistry calculations, Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo methods appear to be fantastic tools for analyzing and predicting reactivity in molten salts.

  20. Electrochemical behavior of simulated debris from a severe accident using a molten salt system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yuya; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yamada, Akira; Mizuguchi, Koji; Fujita, Reiko

    2013-07-01

    In a severe nuclear accident, the fuel in the reactor may melt, forming debris, which contains a UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} stable oxide mixture and parts of the reactor, such as Zircaloy and iron components. Proper handling of the debris is a critically important issue. The debris does not have the same composition as spent fuel, and so it is impossible to apply conventional reprocessing technology directly. In this study, we successfully separated Zr and Fe from simulated debris using NaCl-KCl molten salt electrolysis, and we selectively recovered the Zr and Fe. The simulated debris was made from Zr, Fe, and CeO{sub 2}. The CeO{sub 2} was used for simulating stable UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}. With this approach, it should be possible to reduce the volume of the debris by recovering metals, which can then be treated as low level radioactive wastes.

  1. First-principles calculations of the thermodynamic properties of transuranium elements in a molten salt medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Seunghyo; Kwak, Dohyun; Lee, Juseung; Kang, Joonhee; Han, Byungchan

    2014-03-01

    We utilized first-principles density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations to evaluate the thermodynamic feasibility of a pyroprocessing methodology for reducing the volume of high-level radioactive materials and recycling spent nuclear fuels. The thermodynamic properties of transuranium elements (Pu, Np and Cm) were obtained in electrochemical equilibrium with a LiCl-KCl molten salt as ionic phases and as adsorbates on a W(110) surface. To accomplish the goal, we rigorously calculated the double layer interface structures on an atomic resolution, on the thermodynamically most stable configurations on W(110) surfaces and the chemical activities of the transuranium elements for various coverages of those elements. Our results indicated that the electrodeposition process was very sensitive to the atomic level structures of Cl ions at the double-layer interface. Our studies are easily expandable to general electrochemical applications involving strong redox reactions of transition metals in non-aqueous solutions.

  2. Development of pyro-processing technology for thorium-fuelled molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Straka, M.; Szatmary, L.

    2012-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is classified as the non-classical nuclear reactor type based on the specific features coming out from the use of liquid fuel circulating in the MSR primary circuit. Other uniqueness of the reactor type is based on the fact that the primary circuit of the reactor is directly connected with the on-line reprocessing technology, necessary for keeping the reactor in operation for a long run. MSR is the only reactor system, which can be effectively operated within the {sup 232}Th- {sup 233}U fuel cycle as thorium breeder with the breeding factor significantly higher than one. The fuel cycle technologies proposed as ford the fresh thorium fuel processing as for the primary circuit fuel reprocessing are pyrochemical and mainly fluoride. Although these pyrochemical processes were never previously fully verified, the present-day development anticipates an assumption for the successful future deployment of the thorium-fuelled MSR technology. (authors)

  3. On the exploration of molten salt (FLiNaK) interaction with plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Sup; Park, Hyonjae; Lho, Taihyeop

    2011-10-01

    We investigated possibility of application of molten salt as a liquid wall in plasma confinement device. Plasma interactions of molten salt - FLiNaK (LiF 46.5 mol% + NaF 11.5% + KF 42 mol%) were investigated by OES(Optical Emission Spectroscopy) and RGA(Residual Gas Analyzer). The plasma was generated with ECR source and the molten salt was maintained as liquid with SUS 316 mold-heater. Optical and mass spectrums were measured during hydrogen plasma interaction with the molten salt and qualitative analysis of resultant species was done. Chemical/physical erosion of FLiNaK after interaction of hydrogen plasma was studied with ICP-MS and IC (Ion Chromatography). Viscosity change of FLiNaK after plasma interaction was measured. Based on the preliminary measurement result, a plasma interaction system with flowing molten salt was designed.

  4. Front-end and back-end electrochemistry of molten salt in accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.; Venneri, F.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop preparation and clean-up processes for the fuel and carrier salt in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology molten salt nuclear system. The front-end or fuel preparation process focuses on the removal of fission products, uranium, and zirconium from spent nuclear fuel by utilizing electrochemical methods (i.e., electrowinning). The same method provides the separation of the so-called noble metal fission products at the back-end of the fuel cycle. Both implementations would have important diversion safeguards. The proposed separation processes and a thermodynamic analysis of the electrochemical separation method are presented.

  5. Experience with Alloys Compatibility with Fuel and Coolant Salts and their Application to Molten Salt Actinide Recycler and Transmuter

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Aleksandr; Gnidoi, Ivan; Fedulov, Vladimir; Afonichkin, Valery; Bovet, Andrei; Subbotin, Vladimir; Panov, Aleksandr; Toropov, Andrei

    2006-07-01

    This paper summarizes results of recent work and the present state of knowledge about materials for molten salt reactors. The central focus is placed on the compatibility of container alloys with molten salt for Molten Salt Actinide Recycler and Transmuter. Preliminary results from recent thermal convection loop studies are presented. Methods for purification of molten salt composition and improvement of Ni- base container alloys compatibility by maintaining the salt at low redox potential are discussed. (authors)

  6. Recent advances in the molten salt destruction of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, C. O., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for destroying explosives, liquid gun propellant, and explosives-contaminated materials on a 1.5 kg of explosive/hr bench- scale unit (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). In our recently constructed 5 kg/hr pilot- scale unit we have also demonstrated the destruction of a liquid gun propellant and simulated wastes containing HMX (octogen). MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic materials waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a vessel containing molten salt (a eutectic mixture of sodium, potassium, and lithium carbonates). The following pure explosives have been destroyed in our bench-scale experimental unit located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K- 6 (keto-RDX), NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following compositions were also destroyed: Comp B, LX- IO, LX- 1 6, LX- 17, PBX-9404, and XM46 (liquid gun propellant). In this 1.5 kg/hr bench-scale unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NO{sub x} were found to be well below 1%. In addition to destroying explosive powders and compositions we have also destroyed materials that are typical of residues which result from explosives operations. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic-bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the process data obtained on the bench-scale unit we designed and constructed a next-generation 5 kg/hr pilot-scale unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. The pilot unit has completed process implementation operations and explosives safety reviews. To date, in this

  7. Unsteady Characteristics of Three-Core Molten Salt Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahisa; Mitachi, Koshi; Nishio, Masatoshi

    Numerical analysis has been performed for load-following capability of a 465 MWth Three-Core Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). “Reactor-slaved-to-turbine control technique” is adopted for reactor control. As for this control technique, a turbine is controlled by a speed regulator of a generator, and subsequently the reactor is controlled so as to follow the turbine output. In this study, the turbine power is rapidly changed in a range of 50-150% of the rated power. Then transient characteristics of fuel salt and graphite temperatures, neutron fluxes, delayed neutron precursors, and reactor output are calculated. The analysis result shows that the reactor output is capable of following the turbine power in the range of the turbine output of 50-150%.

  8. Conceptual design of a thorium for molten salt transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Buksa, J.J.; Beard, C.A.; Veneri, F.; Elson, J.S.; Park, J.J.; Prael, R.E.; Waters, L.S.; Davidson, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    A spallation target constructed of thorium metal has been designed for applications using molten-salt as the target coolant. The design consists of an array of wire-wrapped, hastelloy-clad, thorium rods in which a parabolic void region is introduced in the upper regions. Each target rod is approximately 1 m in length, 3.1 an in diameter, and has a clad thickness of 0.05 cm; 140 rods are arranged in a triangular lattice with a pitch of 3.2 cm, which results in a cylindrical target configuration with a radius of 20 cm and an estimated yield of 17 neutrons/proton 800 MeV protons.

  9. A facile molten-salt route to graphene synthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Giordano, Cristina; Antonietti, Markus

    2014-01-15

    Efficient synthetic routes are continuously pursued for graphene in order to implement its applications in different areas. However, direct conversion of simple monomers to graphene through polymerization in a scalable manner remains a major challenge for chemists. Herein, a molten-salt (MS) route for the synthesis of carbon nanostructures and graphene by controlled carbonization of glucose in molten metal chloride is reported. In this process, carbohydrate undergoes polymerization in the presence of strongly interacting ionic species, which leads to nanoporous carbon with amorphous nature and adjustable pore size. At a low precursor concentration, the process converts the sugar molecules (glucose) to rather pure few-layer graphenes. The MS-derived graphenes are strongly hydrophobic and exhibit remarkable selectivity and capacity for absorption of organics. The methodology described may open up a new avenue towards the synthesis and manipulation of carbon materials in liquid media.

  10. Aluminum anodization in a basic ambient temperature molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, R.T.; Osteryoung, R.A. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-05-01

    The authors describe aluminum anodization studied in the basic AlCl/sub 3/:1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (ImCl) ambient temperature molten salt (AlCl/sub 3/:ImCl molar ratio ..e..1.0). The anodization process was studied as a function of chloride anion concentration. Two different anodization processes are observed with onset potentials of approximately -1.1 and 0V. The more cathodic anodization involves formation of the tetrachloroaluminate anion and exhibits a limiting current controlled by diffusion of chloride to the electrode surface. The number of chlorides required for each Al anodized was determined to be 4.6 +- 0.4. The more anodic anodization shows no diffusion control. A value for the diffusion coefficient of chloride was obtained which is lower than previously reported; the difference involves using an n value of 1, rather than 2/3. No reduction of the tetrachloroaluminate anion was observed even at elevated temperatures.

  11. Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants :

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten; Muley, Nishant

    2013-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600ÀC were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580ÀC, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320ÀC) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600ÀC and the other 565ÀC. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565ÀC. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

  12. -Coated Superni 600 Under Molten Salt at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgal, Deepa; Kumar, Sanjeet; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya

    2014-11-01

    Cr3C2-25(NiCr) and Cr3C2-25(NiCr)+0.4%CeO2 coatings were deposited on nickel-based superalloy Superni 600 by Detonation-gun technique. Studies were conducted on bare and coated alloys in molten salt environment (Na2SO4-25%NaCl) at 900 °C under cyclic condition. Characterization of the corrosion product was done using field emission scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques. The bare Superni 600 shows penetration of corrosion beneath the metal layer thereby indicating internal oxidation. The coating of Cr3C2-25(NiCr) with 0.4%CeO2 leads to the formation of adherent scale.

  13. A rechargeable cadmium-bromine battery using room temperature chloroaluminate molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Dymek, C.J. Jr.; Reynolds, G.F.; Wilkes, J.S.

    1987-07-01

    Galvanic cells were tested using as electrolytes room temperature molten salts formed by mixing AlCl/sub 3/ with 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MEICl). Zn and Cd, each with basic melt (containing Cl/sup -/ and AlCl/sub 4//sup -/) were the anodes. Br/sub 2/ dissolved in basic melt with a reticulated vitreous carbon current collector was the cathode in each case. MEI/sup +/-selective Nafion was used as a separator. The Zn electrode was found to be irreversible, while the Cd/Br/sub 2/ cell is rechargeable with an open-circuit voltage of 2.0V, an extended temperature range of operation, and potential for high specific energy.

  14. Treatment of waste by the Molten Salt Oxidation process at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Crosley, S.M.; Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E.; Gay, R.L.; Barclay, K.M.; Newcomb, J.C.; Yosim, S.J.

    1993-03-01

    The Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) process has been under development by the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) to treat hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste. Testing of the system was done on a number of wastes to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the process. This testing included simulated intermediate level waste (ILW) from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The intermediate level waste stream consisted of a slurry of concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate, with a small amount of miscellaneous combustible components (PVC, TBP, kerosene, and ion exchange resins). The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the destruction of the organics, evaporation of the water, and conversion of the hazardous salts (hydroxide and nitrate) to non-hazardous sodium carbonate. Results of the tests are discussed and analyzed, and the possibilities of applying the MSO process to different waste streams at ORNL in the future are explored.

  15. Molten salt synthesis of single-crystalline K2Ti6O13 annular nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianke; Tang, Shaolong; Yu, Jiangying; Zhai, Lin; Shi, Yangguang; Deng, Yu; Du, Youwei

    2010-08-01

    Single-crystalline K2Ti6O13 ring-like structures have been synthesized via a simple molten salt method without any templates and surfactants. The annular structures have several different types, such as nanoring, wheel-like and diskette-like ring. Each type of rings was characterized individually by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These annular structures are formed by the loop-by-loop self-coiling of K2Ti6O13 nanobelts in the ring plane. The driving force of self-coiling is suggested to minimize the local electrostatic energy introduced by spontaneous polarization.

  16. An aluminum/chlorine rechargeable cell employing a room temperature molten salt electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, P. R.; Palmisano, J. B.

    1988-03-01

    A novel Al/Cl2 rechargeable electrochemical cell is decribed which employs an Al negative and graphtie positive electrode in a room temperature molten salt electrolyte of 1.5:1 AlCl3:1,2-dimethyl-3-propylimidazolium chloride. The graphite positive electrode functions as a reversible intercalation electrode for chlorine, eliminating the need for separate anolyte and catholyte compartments. The cell possesses an average discharge voltage of 1.7V for currents of 1-10 mA/g graphite, and over 150 cycles at 100 percent depth-of-discharge for positive electrode limited cells have been demonstrated. Improvements in the chlorine storage capacity of the positive electrode are needed to obtain satisfactory energy densities.

  17. High-value use of weapons-plutonium by burning in molten salt accelerator-driven subcritical systems or reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.; Venneri, F.

    1993-11-01

    The application of thermal-spectrum molten-salt reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems to the destruction of weapons-return plutonium is considered from the perspective of deriving the maximum societal benefit. The enhancement of electric power production from burning the fertile fuel {sup 232}Th with the plutonium is evaluated. Also the enhancement of destruction of the accumulated waste from commercial nuclear reactors is considered using the neutron-rich weapons plutonium. Most cases examined include the concurrent transmutation of the long-lived actinide and fission product waste ({sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se).

  18. Thermodynamic Assessment of Hot Corrosion Mechanisms of Superalloys Hastelloy N and Haynes 242 in Eutectic Mixture of Molten Salts KF and ZrF4

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff

    2012-02-01

    The KF - ZrF4 system was considered for the application as a heat exchange agent in molten salt nuclear reactors (MSRs) beginning with the work carried out at ORNL in early fifties. Based on a combination of excellent properties such as thermal conductivity, viscosity in the molten state, and other thermo-physical and rheological properties, it was selected as one of possible candidates for the nuclear reactor secondary heat exchanger loop.

  19. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, E.C.

    1993-12-23

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500{degree}C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li-Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  20. Magneto-hydrodynamic detection of vortex shedding for molten salt flow sensing.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Crocker, Robert W.

    2012-09-01

    High temperature flow sensors must be developed for use with molten salts systems at temperatures in excess of 600ÀC. A novel magneto-hydrodynamic sensing approach was investigated. A prototype sensor was developed and tested in an aqueous sodium chloride solution as a surrogate for molten salt. Despite that the electrical conductivity was a factor of three less than molten salts, it was found that the electrical conductivity of an electrolyte was too low to adequately resolve the signal amidst surrounding noise. This sensor concept is expected to work well with any liquid metal application, as the generated magnetic field scales proportionately with electrical conductivity.

  1. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Eddie C.

    1995-01-01

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500.degree. C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  2. Preparation of Al-Si Master Alloy by Electrochemical Reduction of Fly Ash in Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aimin; Li, Liangxing; Xu, Junli; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen; Yu, Jiangyu; Chen, Gong

    2014-05-01

    An electrochemical method on preparation of Al-Si master alloy was investigated in fluoride-based molten salts of 47.7wt.%NaF-43.3wt.%AlF3-4wt.%CaF2 containing 5 wt.% fly ash at 1233 K. The cathodic products obtained by galvanostatic electrolysis were analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectrometry. The result showed that the compositions of the products are Al, Si, and Al3.21Si0.47. Meanwhile, the cathodic electrochemical process was studied by cyclic voltammetry, and the results showed the reduction peak of aluminum deposition is at -1.3 V versus the platinum quasi-reference electrode in 50.3wt.%NaF-45.7wt.%AlF3-4wt.%CaF2 molten salts, while the reduction peak at -1.3 V was the co-deposition of aluminum and silicon when the fly ash was added. The silicon and iron were formed via both co-deposition and aluminothermic reduction. In the electrolysis experiments, current efficiency first increased to a maximum value of 40.7% at a current density of 0.29 A/cm2, and then it decreased with the increase of current density. With the electrolysis time lasting, the content of aluminum in the alloys decreased from 76.05 wt.% to 48.29 wt.% during 5 h, while the content of silicon increased from 15.94 wt.% to 37.89 wt.%.

  3. The preliminary analysis on the steady-state and kinetic features of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, B.; Lu, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A novel design concept of molten salt pebble-bed reactor with an ultra-simplified integral primary circuit called 'Nuclear Hot Spring' has been proposed, featured by horizontal coolant flow in a deep pool pebble-bed reactor, providing 'natural safety' features with natural circulation under full power operation and less expensive primary circuit arrangement. In this work, the steady-state physical properties of the equilibrium state of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor are calculated by using the VSOP code, and the steady-state thermo-hydraulic analysis is carried out based on the approximation of absolutely horizontal flow of the coolant through the core. A new concept of 2-dimensional, both axial and radial, multi-pass on-line fuelling scheme is presented. The result reveals that the radial multi-pass scheme provides more flattened power distribution and safer temperature distribution than the one-pass scheme. A parametric analysis is made corresponding to different pebble diameters, the key parameter of the core resistance and the temperature at the pebble center. It is verified that within a wide range of pebble diameters, the maximum pebble center temperatures are far below the safety limit of the fuel, and the core resistance is considerably less than the buoyant force, indicating that the natural circulation under full power operation is achievable and the ultra-simplified integral primary circuit without any pump is possible. For the kinetic properties, it is verified that the negative temperature coefficient is achieved in sufficient under-moderated condition through the preliminary analysis on the temperature coefficients of fuel, coolant and moderator. The requirement of reactivity compensation at the shutdown stages of the operation period is calculated for the further studies on the reactivity control. The molten salt pebble-bed reactor with horizontal coolant flow can provide enhanced safety and economical features. (authors)

  4. Molten salt synthesis and localized surface plasmon resonance study of vanadium dioxide nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fu; Liu Yun; Liu Chunyan

    2009-12-15

    Rutile-type vanadium dioxide nanopowders with four different sizes were successfully synthesized by carbothermal reducing V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in KCl-LiCl molten salt. XRD and TEM characterizations suggested that vanadium dioxide particles formed by a broken and reunited process of vanadium oxide. Molten salt and organic carbon sources are crucial to the size of final particles. In the presence of the molten salt, the organic carbon with a shorter chain length would induce smaller particles. The UV-VIS-IR spectral measurements for as-prepared vanadium dioxide announced an obvious localized surface plasmon resonance band in the near infrared region at 90 deg. C. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the formation mechanism of VO{sub 2}(M) nanoparticles in molten salt, particles size can be controlled by choosing organic carbon sources with different chain length.

  5. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. Inmore » conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.« less

  6. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. In conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.

  7. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, Amalie L; Halligan, Deaglan O; Parks, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. Overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.

  8. Development of High-Temperature Transport Technologies of Molten Salt Slurry in Pyrometallurgical Reprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijikata, Takatoshi; Koyama, Tadafumi

    Pyrometallurgical-reprocessing is one of the most promising technologies for advanced fuel cycle with favorable economic potential and intrinsic proliferation resistance. The development of transport technology for molten salt is a key issue in the industrialization of pyro-reprocessing. As for pure molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt at approximately 773 K, we have already reported the successful results of transport using gravity and a centrifugal pump. However, molten salt in an electrorefiner mixes with insoluble fines when spent fuel is dissolved in porous anode basket. The insoluble consists of noble metal fission products, such as Pd, Ru, Mo, and Zr. There have been very few transport studies of a molten salt slurry (metal fines-molten salt mixture). Hence, transport experiments on a molten salt slurry were carried out to investigate the behavior of the slurry in a tube. The apparatus used in the transport experiments on the molten salt slurry consisted of a supply tank, a 10° inclined transport tube (10 mm inner diameter), a valve, a filter, and a recovery tank. Stainless steel (SS) fines with diameters from 53 to 415 μm were used. To disperse these fines homogenously, the molten salt and fines were stirred in the supply tank by an impeller at speeds from 1200 to 2100 rpm. The molten salt slurry containing 0.04 to 0.4 vol.% SS fines was transported from the supply tank to the recovery tank through the transportation tube. In the recovery tank, the fines were separated from the molten salt by the filter to measure the transport behavior of molten salt and SS fines. When the velocity of the slurry was 0.02 m/s, only 1% of the fines were transported to the recovery tank. On the other hand, most of the fines were transported when the velocity of the slurry was more than 0.8 m/s. Consequently, the molten salt slurry can be transported when the velocity is more than 0.8 m/s.

  9. Preliminary decommissioning study reports. Volume 5, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.

    1984-09-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) is one of approximately 76 facilities currently managed by the ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). This program, as part of the DOE national SFMP, is responsible for the maintenance and surveillance and the final decommissioning of radioactively-contaminated surplus ORNL facilities. A long range planning effort is being conducted that will outline the scope and objectives of the ORNL program and establish decommissioning priorities based on health and safety concerns, budget constraints, and other programmatic constraints. In support of this SFMP planning activity, preliminary engineering assessments are being conducted for each of the ORNL surplus facilities currently managed under the program. These efforts, in general, are designed to: (1) provide an initial assessment of the potential decommissioning alternatives; (2) choose a preferred alternative and provide a justification for that choice, and (3) provide a preliminary description of the decommissioning plan, including cost and schedule estimates. Because of several issues which cannot be evaluated quantitatively at this time, this report on the MSRE does not select a ``most probable decommissioning mode`` but rather discusses the issues and representative alternatives for disposal of the MSRE fuel salts and decommissioning of the facility. A budget and schedule representative of the types of activities likely to be required is also suggested for preliminary use in the SFMP Long Range Plan.

  10. Molten Salt Promoting Effect in Double Salt CO2 Absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Chen, Haobo; Singh, Prabhakar; King, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of molten salts as catalysts for CO2 absorption by MgO, and extend these observations to the MgO-containing double salt oxides. We will show that the phenomena involved with CO2 absorption by MgO and MgO-based double salts are similar and general, but with some important differences. This paper focuses on the following key concepts: i) identification of conditions that favor or disfavor participation of isolated MgO during double salt absorption, and investigation of methods to increase the absorption capacity of double salt systems by including MgO participation; ii) examination of the relationship between CO2 uptake and melting point of the promoter salt, leading to the recognition of the role of pre-melting (surface melting) in these systems; and iii) extension of the reaction pathway model developed for the MgO-NaNO3 system to the double salt systems. This information advances our understanding of MgO-based CO2 absorption systems for application with pre-combustion gas streams.

  11. Room temperature molten salt as medium for lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. S.; Zhou, R. Q.

    Due to the wide electrochemical window and high ionic conductivity, the 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MeEtImCl) room temperature molten salt (RTMS) was investigated as the medium for lithium battery in the present work. The addition of C 6H 5SO 2Cl to the RTMS was shown to improve its chemical stability and the reversibility of the lithium electrode because of the removal of Al 2Cl 7- from the melt. Electrochemical reaction which occurred at the LiCoO 2 was studied and the carbon current collector was found to interact with the melt. Out of the various carbon materials studied, graphite was found to be the best material. A LiAl/LiCoO 2 battery using RTMS as the electrolyte was assembled for battery test. Satisfactory results were obtained in preliminary cycling, showing a cell voltage of 3.45 V with better than 90% coulombic efficiency and a discharging capacity of 112 mA h/g LiCoO 2 at current density of 1 mA/cm 2.

  12. Development of fluoride reprocessing technologies devoted to molten-salt reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, Jan; Marecek, Martin; Tulackova, Radka; Chuchvalcova Bimova, Karolina

    2007-07-01

    Main fuel processing and reprocessing technologies proposed for Molten Salt Reactor fuel cycle are pyrochemical or pyrometallurgical, majority of them are fluoride technologies. It is based on the fact that Molten Salt Reactor fuel is in the chemical form of molten fluorides and the reprocessing technology is needed to be an 'on-line' process. The corresponding pyrochemical separation processes proposed for MSR fuel processing and reprocessing are mainly fluoride volatilization processes, molten salt / liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media and gas extraction from the molten salt medium. Techniques based on fluoride volatilization and on electrochemical separation from fluoride molten salt media are under development in the Czech Republic. Whereas the Fluoride Volatility Method is proposed to be the main 'Front-end' technology of the MSR used as the actinide burner (transmuter), the electro-separation methods should be dedicated to the 'on-line' reprocessing of the circulating MSR fuel and should be used as for MSR incinerating transuranium fuel as for MSR working within the {sup 232}Th - {sup 233}U fuel cycle. (authors)

  13. Investigation of concentration-dependence of thermodynamic properties of lanthanum, yttrium, scandium and terbium in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yafei; Zhou, Wentao; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of rare earth metals in LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte are crucial to the development of electrochemical separation for the treatment of used nuclear fuels. In the present study, activity coefficient, apparent potential, and diffusion coefficient of lanthanum, yttrium, scandium, and terbium in the molten salt (58 at% LiCl and 42 at% KCl) were calculated by the method of molecular dynamics simulation up to a concentration around 3 at% at temperatures of 723 K and 773 K. It was found that the activity coefficient and the apparent potential increase with the species concentration while diffusion coefficient shows a trend of increase followed by decrease. The calculated results were validated by available measurement data of dilution cases. This research extends the range of data to a wide component and would provide further insight to the pyroprocessing design and safeguards.

  14. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  15. Convective heat transfer in the laminar-turbulent transition region with molten salt in a circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-ting, Wu; Bin, Liu; Chong-fang, Ma; Hang, Guo

    2009-10-15

    In order to understand the heat transfer characteristics of molten salt and testify the validity of the well-known empirical convective heat transfer correlations, experimental study on transition convective heat transfer with molten salt in a circular tube was conducted. Molten salt circulations were realized and operated in a specially designed system over 1000 h. The average forced convective heat transfer coefficients of molten salt were determined by least-squares method based on the measured data of flow rates and temperatures. Finally, a heat transfer correlation of transition flow with molten salt in a circular tube was obtained and good agreement was observed between the experimental data of molten salt and the well-known correlations presented by Hausen and Gnielinski, respectively. (author)

  16. Preparation and luminescence characteristics of monazite Eu3+:LaPO4 nanocrystals in NH4NO3 molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinyang

    2015-12-01

    Molten-salt method and NH4NO3 flux were developed to fabricate monoclinic monazite Eu3+:LaPO4 nanocrystals for the first time. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, excitation spectra, emission spectra and luminescence decay curves. The as-obtained products were quasihexagonal Eu3+:LaPO4 nanocrystals with the mean size of 30 nm. The room temperature charge transfer bands (CTB) exhibited red-shift and spectral broadening in comparison with 10 K CTB. The optimal Eu3+ concentration was determined to be 8 mol% by a comparative study of the relative emission intensities for different Eu3+ doping concentrations. The higher concentration quenching could be caused by the possible nonradiative energy transfer (electric multipole-multipole interaction). The relationship between the FL lifetime of 5D0 energy level and Eu3+ concentration was investigated based on Auzel's model. This work is important not only to understand the unique physical properties of Eu3+:LaPO4 nanocrystals but also to bring an opportunity for the development of the other nanocrystals via the molten salt synthesis in NH4NO3 flux.

  17. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  18. Preliminary Study on LiF4-ThF4-PuF4 Utilization as Fuel Salt of miniFUJI Molten Salt Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Widayani; Irwanto, Dwi

    2016-08-01

    miniFUJI reactor is molten salt reactor (MSR) which is one type of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The original miniFUJI reactor design uses LiF-BeF2-ThF4-233UF4 as a fuel salt. In the present study, the use of LiF4-ThF4-PuF4 as fuel salt instead of LiF-BeF2-ThF4-UF4 will be discussed. The neutronics cell calculation has been performed by using PIJ (collision probability method code) routine of SRAC 2006 code, with the nuclear data library is JENDL-4.0. The results reveal that the reactor can attain the criticality condition with the plutonium concentration in the fuel salt is equal to 9.16% or more. The conversion ratio diminishes with the enlarging of plutonium concentration in the fuel. The neutron spectrum of miniFUJI MSR with plutonium fuel becomes harder compared to that of the 233U fuel.

  19. A molten Salt Am242M Production Reactor for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2005-01-01

    The use of Am242m holds great promise for increasing the efficiency nuclear thermal rocket engines. Because Am242m has the highest fission cross section of any known isotope (1000's of barns), its extremely high reactivity may be used to directly heat a propellant gas with fission fragments. Since this isotope does not occur naturally, it must be bred in special production reactors designed for that purpose. The primary advantage to using molten salt reactors for breeding Am242m is that the reactors can be reprocessed continually yielding a constant rate of production of the isotope. Once built and initially fueled, the reactor will continually breed the additional fuel it needs to remain critical. The only feedstock required is a salt of U238. No enriched fuel is required during normal operation and all fissile material, except the Am242m, is maintained in a closed loop. For a reactor operating at 200 MW several kilograms of Am242m may be bred each year.

  20. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVan, J. H.; DiStefano, J. R.; Eatherly, W. P.; Keiser, J. R.; Klueh, R. L.

    1995-09-01

    A Molten-Salt Reactor Program for civilian power applications was initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1956. In 1965 the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) went critical and was successfully operated for several years. Operation of the MSRE revealed two deficiencies in the Hastelloy N alloy that had been developed specifically for molten-salt systems. The alloy embrittled at elevated temperatures as a result of exposure to thermal neutrons (radiation damage) and grain boundary embrittlement occurred in materials exposed to fuel salt. Intergranular cracking was found to be associated with fission products, viz. tellurium. An improved Hastelloy N composition was subsequently developed that had better resistance to both of these problems. However, the discovery that fission product cracking could be significantly decreased by making the salt sufficiently reducing offers the prospect of improved compatibility with molten salts containing fission products and resistance to radiation damage in ABC applications. Recommendations are made regarding the types of corrosion tests and mechanistic studies needed to qualify materials for operation with PuF3-containing molten salts.

  1. Resistance of Nanostructured Environmental Barrier Coatings to the Movement of Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S.; Frederick, L.; McDonald, A.

    2012-09-01

    Corrosion of components in a recovery boiler is a major problem faced by the pulp and paper industry. The superheater tubes become severely corroded due to the presence of sulfidic gases in the boiler and molten salts which are deposited on the surface of the tubes. As a result, the boiler must be decommissioned for expensive maintenance and repairs. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings have been shown to provide corrosion resistance when applied on gas turbines operating at high temperatures. Air plasma-sprayed YSZ environmental barrier coatings on Type 309 stainless steel were exposed to three different corrosive environments: Test A—600 °C, salt vapors, flue gases, 168 h; Test B—600 °C, molten salt, air, 168 h; and Test C—600 °C, molten salt, flue gases, 168 h. Two different types of YSZ coatings—conventional YSZ and nanostructured YSZ—were tested to study their resistance to corrosion and molten salt penetration. The performances of both types of coatings were evaluated, and a comparative study was conducted. It was found that the nanostructured YSZ samples protected the stainless steel substrate better than their conventional counterparts. This superior performance was attributed to the presence of semi-molten nano-agglomerates present in the coating microstructure, which acted as collection points for the penetrating molten salts.

  2. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Eatherly, W.P.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    A Molten-Salt Reactor Program for power applications was initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1956. In 1965 the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) went critical and was successfully operated for several years. Operation of the MSRE revealed two deficiencies in the Hastelloy N alloy that had been developed specifically for molten-salt systems. The alloy embrittled at elevated temperatures as a result of exposure to thermal neutrons (radiation damage) and grain boundary embrittlement occurred in materials to fuel salt. Intergranular cracking was found to be associated with fission products, viz. tellurium. An improved Hastelloy N composition was subsequently developed that had better resistance to both of these problems. However, the discovery that fission product cracking could be significantly decreased by making the salt sufficiently reducing offers the prospect of improved compatibility with molten salts containing fission products and resistance to radiation damage in ABC applications. Recommendations are made regarding the types of corrosion tests and mechanistic studies needed to qualify materials for operation with PuF{sub 3}-containing molten salts.

  3. Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the technical and economic feasibility of molten salt oxidation technology as a volume reduction and recovery process for {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste. Combustible low-level waste material contaminated with {sup 238}Pu residue is destroyed by oxidation in a 900 C molten salt reaction vessel. The combustible waste is destroyed creating carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash and insoluble {sup 2328}Pu in the spent salt. The valuable {sup 238}Pu is recycled using aqueous recovery techniques. Experimental test results for this technology indicate a plutonium recovery efficiency of 99%. Molten salt oxidation stabilizes the waste converting it to a non-combustible waste. Thus installation and use of molten salt oxidation technology will substantially reduce the volume of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of molten salt oxidation indicate a significant cost savings when compared to the present plans to package, or re-package, certify and transport these wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for permanent disposal. Clear and distinct cost advantages exist for MSO when the monetary value of the recovered {sup 238}Pu is considered.

  4. Dynamic modelling and simulation of linear Fresnel solar field model based on molten salt heat transfer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkarainen, Elina; Tähtinen, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Demonstrations of direct steam generation (DSG) in linear Fresnel collectors (LFC) have given promising results related to higher steam parameters compared to the current state-of-the-art parabolic trough collector (PTC) technology using oil as heat transfer fluid (HTF). However, DSG technology lacks feasible solution for long-term thermal energy storage (TES) system. This option is important for CSP technology in order to offer dispatchable power. Recently, molten salts have been proposed to be used as HTF and directly as storage medium in both line-focusing solar fields, offering storage capacity of several hours. This direct molten salt (DMS) storage concept has already gained operational experience in solar tower power plant, and it is under demonstration phase both in the case of LFC and PTC systems. Dynamic simulation programs offer a valuable effort for design and optimization of solar power plants. In this work, APROS dynamic simulation program is used to model a DMS linear Fresnel solar field with two-tank TES system, and example simulation results are presented in order to verify the functionality of the model and capability of APROS for CSP modelling and simulation.

  5. A nightly conditioning method to reduce parasitic power consumption in molten-salt central-receiver solar-power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    A method to reduce nightly parasitic power consumption in a molten salt central receiver is discussed where salt is drained from the piping and heat tracing is turned off to allow the piping to cool to ambient overnight, then in the morning the pipes are filled while they are cold. Since the piping and areas of the receiver in a molten-nitrate salt central-receiver solar power plant must be electrically heated to maintain their temperatures above the nitrate salt freezing point (430{degrees}F, 221{degrees}C), considerable energy could be used to maintain such temperatures during nightly shut down and bad weather. Experiments and analyses have been conducted to investigate cold filling receiver panels and piping as a way of reducing parasitic electrical power consumption and increasing the availability of the plant. The two major concerns with cold filling are: (1) how far can the molten salt penetrate cold piping before freezing closed and (2) what thermal stresses develop during the associated thermal shock. Experiments and analysis are discussed.

  6. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, J. R.; Devan, J. H.; Keiser, J. R.; Klueh, R. L.; Eatherly, W. P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF2 molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  7. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  8. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  9. Transient Analyses for a Molten Salt Transmutation Reactor Using the Extended SIMMER-III Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shisheng; Rineiski, Andrei; Maschek, Werner; Ignatiev, Victor

    2006-07-01

    Recent developments extending the capabilities of the SIMMER-III code for the dealing with transient and accidents in Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) are presented. These extensions refer to the movable precursor modeling within the space-time dependent neutronics framework of SIMMER-III, to the molten salt flow modeling, and to new equations of state for various salts. An important new SIMMER-III feature is that the space-time distribution of the various precursor families with different decay constants can be computed and took into account in neutron/reactivity balance calculations and, if necessary, visualized. The system is coded and tested for a molten salt transmuter. This new feature is also of interest in core disruptive accidents of fast reactors when the core melts and the molten fuel is redistributed. (authors)

  10. Review of the Molten Salt Electric Experiment: A solar central receiver project

    SciTech Connect

    Delameter, W.R.; Bergan, N.E.

    1986-12-01

    The Molten Salt Electric Experiment was the first full solar-to-electric central receiver system to use molten nitrate salt as a primary working fluid. The experiment was built and tested at the Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between 1982 and 1985. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a molten salt central receiver system. The Molten Salt Electric Experiment was operated through a year of successful testing; system performance was measured, operating procedures and an effective receiver control algorithm were developed, and personnel from participating electrical utilities and solar industries were trained to operate the system. The testing culminated in a one-month power production campaign to measure daily performance, component reliability, and system availability. This paper discusses the major accomplishments and some of the more significant problems of the project.

  11. Preparation of Ferrotitanium Alloy from Ilmenite by Electrochemical Reduction in Chloride Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Can-can; Hua, Yi-xin; Chen, Kong-hao; Jie, Ya-fei; Zhou, Zhong-ren; Ru, Juan-jian; Xiong, Li; Gong, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Ferrotitanium alloy is prepared by electrochemical reduction from ilmenite in LiCl-KCl and LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 molten salts, respectively. The products prepared are observed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). It is shown that Fe2Ti can be prepared from ilmenite in LiCl-KCl molten salt at 1073 K with a cell voltage of 3.2 V. Ilmenite can be electrochemically reduced to FeTi in LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 molten salt under the same condition. It is indicated that CaCl2 can promote the reaction and is favors the deoxidization of the FeTiO3.

  12. A silane-based electroactive film prepared in an imidazolium chloroaluminate molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, R.T. . Frank J. Seiler Research Lab.); Osteryoung, R.A. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-07-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of Ph[sub 3]SiCl (Ph = phenyl) in the room-temperature molten salt AlCl[sub 3]:EMICl (EMICl = 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) results in the formation of an adherent electroactive film on the surface of solid electrodes. The film is reversibly oxidized and reduced in the molten salt and is conducting when in the oxidized state. Based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the film consists of both a silane and an imidazole component, and the charge storage properties of the film are localized on the heterocyclic rings. This electroactive film compares favorably to other conducting polymers currently being investigated as positive electrodes in room-temperature molten salt batteries.

  13. Measurements of the partial electronic conductivity in lithium chloride - potassium chloride molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, G.J.; Huggins, R.A.; Lee, M.C.Y.

    1983-05-01

    The partial electronic conductivity of the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic molten salt electrolyte has been studied as a function of lithium activity, temperature and melt composition using the Wagner asymmetric d-c polarization technique. Measurements were made over the temperature range 383-465/sup 0/C and at lithium activities extending from 1.95 X 10/sup -7/ to unity. The results confirmed the applicability of this technique to molten salt systems. The partial electronic conductivity was shown to be much greater than the partial hole conductivity over the range of lithium activities investigated, and was found to increase monotonically with temperature and lithium activity, but decreased on addition of excess LiCl to the eutectic composition. Approximate values of self-discharge currents for cells utilizing an ''Al/LiAl'' negative electrode and a LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte have been calculated.

  14. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, E.C.

    1995-10-03

    An electrochemical method is described for separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500 C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode. 3 figs.

  15. Molten salt CO2 capture and electro-transformation (MSCC-ET) into capacitive carbon at medium temperature: effect of the electrolyte composition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bowen; Chen, Zhigang; Gao, Muxing; Song, Yuqiao; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Tang, Juanjuan; Xiao, Wei; Mao, Xuhui; Wang, Dihua

    2016-08-15

    Electrochemical transformation of CO2 into functional materials or fuels (i.e., carbon, CO) in high temperature molten salts has been demonstrated as a promising way of carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) in recent years. In a view of continuous operation, the electrolysis process should match very well with the CO2 absorption kinetics. At the same time, in consideration of the energy efficiency, a molten salt electrochemical cell running at lower temperature is more beneficial to a process powered by the fluctuating renewable electricity from solar/wind farms. Ternary carbonates (Li : Na : K = 43.5 : 31.5 : 25.0) and binary chlorides (Li : K = 58.5 : 41.5), two typical kinds of eutectic melt with low melting points and a wide electrochemical potential window, could be the ideal supporting electrolyte for the molten salt CO2 capture and electro-transformation (MSCC-ET) process. In this work, the CO2 absorption behaviour in Li2O/CaO containing carbonates and chlorides were investigated on a home-made gas absorption testing system. The electrode processes as well as the morphology and properties of carbon obtained in different salts are compared to each other. It was found that the composition of molten salts significantly affects the absorption of CO2, electrode processes and performance of the product. Furthermore, the relationship between the absorption and electro-transformation kinetics are discussed based on the findings. PMID:27193751

  16. Molten salt CO2 capture and electro-transformation (MSCC-ET) into capacitive carbon at medium temperature: effect of the electrolyte composition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bowen; Chen, Zhigang; Gao, Muxing; Song, Yuqiao; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Tang, Juanjuan; Xiao, Wei; Mao, Xuhui; Wang, Dihua

    2016-08-15

    Electrochemical transformation of CO2 into functional materials or fuels (i.e., carbon, CO) in high temperature molten salts has been demonstrated as a promising way of carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) in recent years. In a view of continuous operation, the electrolysis process should match very well with the CO2 absorption kinetics. At the same time, in consideration of the energy efficiency, a molten salt electrochemical cell running at lower temperature is more beneficial to a process powered by the fluctuating renewable electricity from solar/wind farms. Ternary carbonates (Li : Na : K = 43.5 : 31.5 : 25.0) and binary chlorides (Li : K = 58.5 : 41.5), two typical kinds of eutectic melt with low melting points and a wide electrochemical potential window, could be the ideal supporting electrolyte for the molten salt CO2 capture and electro-transformation (MSCC-ET) process. In this work, the CO2 absorption behaviour in Li2O/CaO containing carbonates and chlorides were investigated on a home-made gas absorption testing system. The electrode processes as well as the morphology and properties of carbon obtained in different salts are compared to each other. It was found that the composition of molten salts significantly affects the absorption of CO2, electrode processes and performance of the product. Furthermore, the relationship between the absorption and electro-transformation kinetics are discussed based on the findings.

  17. Optimal spacing within a tubed, volumetric, cavity receiver suitable for modular molten salt solar towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A 2-dimensional radiation analysis has been developed to analyse the radiative efficiency of an arrangement of heat transfer tubes distributed in layers but spaced apart to form a tubed, volumetric receiver. Such an arrangement could be suitable for incorporation into a cavity receiver. Much of the benefit of this volumetric approach is gained after using 5 layers although improvements do continue with further layers. The radiation analysis splits each tube into multiple segments in which each segment surface can absorb, reflect and radiate rays depending on its surface temperature. An iterative technique is used to calculate appropriate temperatures depending on the distribution of the net energy absorbed and assuming that the cool heat transfer fluid (molten salt) starts at the front layer and flows back through successive layers to the rear of the cavity. Modelling the finite diameter of each layer of tubes increases the ability of a layer to block radiation scattered at acute angles and this effect is shown to reduce radiation losses by nearly 25% compared to the earlier 1-d analysis. Optimum efficient designs tend to occur when the blockage factor is 0.2 plus the inverse of the number of tube layers. It is beneficial if the distance between successive layers is ≥ 2 times the diameter of individual tubes and in this situation, if the incoming radiation is spread over a range of angles, the performance is insensitive to the degree of any tube positional offset or stagger between layers.

  18. A final report on the Phase 1 testing of a molten-salt cavity receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, J M; Smith, D C

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and testing of a solar central receiver using molten nitrate salt as a heat exchange fluid. Design studies for large commercial plants (30--100 MWe) have shown molten salt to be an excellent fluid for solar thermal plants as it allows for efficient thermal storage. Plant design studies concluded that an advanced receiver test was required to address uncertainties not covered in prior receiver tests. This recommendation led to the current test program managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The 4.5 MWt receiver is installed at Sandia National Laboratories' Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The receiver incorporates features of large commercial receiver designs. This report describes the receiver's configuration, heat absorption surface (design and sizing), the structure and supporting systems, and the methods for control. The receiver was solar tested during a six-month period at the Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of the testing was to characterize the operational capabilities of the receiver under a number of solar operating and stand-by conditions. This testing consisted of initial check-out of the systems, followed by steady-state performance, transient receiver operation, receiver operation in clouds, receiver thermal loss testing, receiver start-up operation, and overnight thermal conditioning tests. This report describes the design, fabrication, and results of testing of the receiver.

  19. Measurement of thermophysical properties of molten salts: Mixtures of alkaline carbonate salts

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, N.; Matsuura, M.; Makino, A.; Hirata, T.; Kato, Y.

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop measuring methods for the thermal diffusivity, the specific heat capacity, and the density of molten salts, as well as to measure these properties of mixtures of alkaline carbonate salts. The thermal diffusivity is measured by the stepwise heating method. The sample salt is poured into a thin container, and as a result, a three-layered cell is formed. The thermal diffusivity is obtained from the ratio of temperature rises at different times measured at the rear surface of the cell when the front surface is heated by the stepwise energy from an iodine lamp. The specific heat capacity is measured using an adiabatic scanning calorimeter. The density is measured by Archimedes' principle. Thermal conductivity is determined from the above properties. Measured samples are Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (42.7-57.3, 50.0-50.0, and 62.0-38.0 mol%).

  20. Large-scale synthesis of mullite nanowires by molten salt method.

    PubMed

    Huo, Kaifu; Zhu, Boquan; Fu, Jijiang; Li, Xuedong; Chu, Paul K

    2010-07-01

    Single-crystalline mullite (3Al2O3 2SiO2) nanowires have been produced in large quantities by a low cost and environmentally benign molten salt synthesis (MSS) method. The raw materials, Al2(SO4)3 and SiO2 powders, react in molten Na2SO4 at 1000 degrees C to produce mullite nanowires without the use of surfactants or templates. After the synthesis, the remaining salts can be easily separated from the products by washing with water. The final products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The thermal and chemical behavior of the raw materials is investigated by heating at a rate of 10 degrees C/min up to 1200 degrees C in air followed by thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analyses. The single-crystalline mullite nanowires have diameters of 30-80 nm and lengths from several hundreds of nanometers to micrometers and the growth mechanism is discussed.

  1. Molten salt synthesis and luminescent properties of YVO4:Ln (Ln = Eu3+, Dy3+) nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenglu; Wang, Fang; Jia, Peiyun; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Eu3+ and Dy(3+)-doped YVO4 nanocrystallites were successfully prepared at 400 degrees C in equal moles of NaNO3 and KNO3 molten salts. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectrum and lifetime were used to characterize the nanocrystallites. XRD results demonstrate that NaOH concentration and annealing temperature play important roles in phase purity and crystallinity of the nanocrystallites, the optimum NaOH concentration and annealing temperature being 6:40 and 400 degrees C respectively. TEM micrographs show the nanocrystallites are well crystallized with a cubic morphology in an average grain size of about 18 nm. Upon excitation of the vanadate group at 314 nm, YVO4:Eu3+ and YVO4:Dy3+ nanocrystallites exhibit the characteristic emission of Eu3+ and Dy3+, which indicates that there is an energy transfer from the vanadate group to the rare earth ions. Moreover, the structure and luminescent properties of the nanocrystallites were compared with their bulk counterparts with same composition in detail.

  2. Molten salt synthesis and luminescent properties of YVO4:Ln (Ln = Eu3+, Dy3+) nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenglu; Wang, Fang; Jia, Peiyun; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-03-01

    Eu3+ and Dy(3+)-doped YVO4 nanocrystallites were successfully prepared at 400 degrees C in equal moles of NaNO3 and KNO3 molten salts. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectrum and lifetime were used to characterize the nanocrystallites. XRD results demonstrate that NaOH concentration and annealing temperature play important roles in phase purity and crystallinity of the nanocrystallites, the optimum NaOH concentration and annealing temperature being 6:40 and 400 degrees C respectively. TEM micrographs show the nanocrystallites are well crystallized with a cubic morphology in an average grain size of about 18 nm. Upon excitation of the vanadate group at 314 nm, YVO4:Eu3+ and YVO4:Dy3+ nanocrystallites exhibit the characteristic emission of Eu3+ and Dy3+, which indicates that there is an energy transfer from the vanadate group to the rare earth ions. Moreover, the structure and luminescent properties of the nanocrystallites were compared with their bulk counterparts with same composition in detail.

  3. Electrochemical separation of actinides and fission products in molten salt electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R. L.; Grantham, L. F.; Fusselman, S. P.; Grimmett, D. L.; Roy, J. J.

    1995-09-15

    Molten salt electrochemical separation may be applied to accelerator-based conversion (ABC) and transmutation systems by dissolving the fluoride transport salt in LiCl-KCl eutectic solvent. The resulting fluoride-chloride mixture will contain small concentrations of fission product rare earths (La, Nd, Gd, Pr, Ce, Eu, Sm, and Y) and actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm). The Gibbs free energies of formation of the metal chlorides are grouped advantageously such that the actinides can be deposited on a solid cathode with the majority of the rare earths remaining in the electrolyte. Thus, the actinides are recycled for further transmutation. Rockwell and its partners have measured the thermodynamic properties of the metal chlorides of interest (rare earths and actinides) and demonstrated separation of actinides from rare earths in laboratory studies. A model is being developed to predict the performance of a commercial electrochemical cell for separations starting with PUREX compositions. This model predicts excellent separation of plutonium and other actinides from the rare earths in metal-salt systems.

  4. Molten salt synthesis and luminescent properties of YVO4:Ln (Ln = Eu3+, Dy3+) nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenglu; Wang, Fang; Jia, Peiyun; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Eu3+ and Dy(3+)-doped YVO4 nanocrystallites were successfully prepared at 400 degrees C in equal moles of NaNO3 and KNO3 molten salts. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectrum and lifetime were used to characterize the nanocrystallites. XRD results demonstrate that NaOH concentration and annealing temperature play important roles in phase purity and crystallinity of the nanocrystallites, the optimum NaOH concentration and annealing temperature being 6:40 and 400 degrees C respectively. TEM micrographs show the nanocrystallites are well crystallized with a cubic morphology in an average grain size of about 18 nm. Upon excitation of the vanadate group at 314 nm, YVO4:Eu3+ and YVO4:Dy3+ nanocrystallites exhibit the characteristic emission of Eu3+ and Dy3+, which indicates that there is an energy transfer from the vanadate group to the rare earth ions. Moreover, the structure and luminescent properties of the nanocrystallites were compared with their bulk counterparts with same composition in detail. PMID:22523959

  5. Validation of electro-thermal simulation with experimental data to prepare online operation of a molten salt target at ISOLDE for the Beta Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimmino, S.; Mendonca, T. M.; Marzari, S.; Stora, T.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the Beta Beams is to study oscillation property of pure electrons neutrinos. It produces high energy beams of pure electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos for oscillation experiments by beta decay of 6He and 18Ne radioactive ion beams, stored in a decay ring at γ = 100. The production of 6He beam has already been accomplished using a thick beryllium oxide target. However, the production of the needed rate of 18Ne has proven to be more challenging. In order to achieve the requested yield for 18Ne a new high power target design based on a circulating molten salt loop has been proposed. To verify some elements of the design, a static molten salt target prototype has been developed at ISOLDE and operated successfully. This paper describes the electro-thermal study of the molten salt target taking into account the heat produced by Joule effect, radiative heat exchange, active water cooling due to forced convection and air passive cooling due to natural convection. The numerical results were compared with the available experimental data in order to validate the model. This approach allows one to improve the reliability of the model, which will help to predict the thermo-mechanical impact of the required targets for future facilities such as HIE-ISOLDE and the Beta-Beams.

  6. Substituent effects on ferrocenes in aluminum chloride-butylpyridinium chloride molten-salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Edgecombe, A.L.; Fowler, J.S.; Gibbard, H.F. ); Slocum, D.W. ); Phillips, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The visible absorption spectra and reduction potentials of 11 ferrocenes containing electron-withdrawing substituents were determined in an N-n-butylpyridinium chloride-aluminum chloride molten salt. When the substituent(s) on the cyclopentadienyl ring(s) of ferrocene were varied, the reduction potential was caused to range over 1.25 V, and the wavelength for maximum absorption of visible light was varied by nearly 200 nm. These changes are greater than have been observed for similar ferrocenes in other nonaqueous solvents. Evidence is presented for specific interactions of particular ferrocenes with the molten salt.

  7. Establishment of a room temperature molten salt capability to measure fundamental thermodynamic properties of actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Costa, D.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this work was to establish a capability for the measurement of fundamental thermodynamic properties of actinide elements in room temperature molten salts. This capability will be used to study in detail the actinide chloro- and oxo-coordination chemistries that dominate in the chloride-based molten salt media. Uranium will be the first actinide element under investigation.

  8. Nuclear Energy Technologies for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Yildiz, Bilge; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear energy can be used as the primary thermal energy source in centralized hydrogen production through several methods to address the expected demand for hydrogen. The hydrogen production technologies that the nuclear reactors can be coupled to are such as high temperature thermochemical and hybrid processes, water electrolysis, and high-temperature steam electrolysis. Energy efficiency and use of clean technologies is important to meet the increasing energy demand in a climate friendly manner. High operating temperatures are needed for more efficient thermochemical and electrochemical hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Therefore, high temperature reactors, such as the gas cooled, molten salt cooled and liquid metal cooled reactor technologies, are the candidates for use in hydrogen production. Among these alternatives, high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) coupled to an advanced gas reactor cooled by supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) and a direct S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle has the potential to provide higher energy efficiency at lower temperature range than the other alternatives. (authors)

  9. Absorption and desorption of SO2 in aqueous solutions of diamine-based molten salts.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung Rok; Hwang, Junhyeok; Kim, Chang Soo; Park, Ho Seok; Cheong, Minserk; Kim, Hoon Sik; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2015-05-30

    SO2 absorption and desorption behaviors were investigated in aqueous solutions of diamine-derived molten salts with a tertiary amine group on the cation and a chloride anion, including butyl-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)-dimethylammonium chloride ([BTMEDA]Cl, pKb=8.2), 1-butyl-1,4-dimethylpiperazinium chloride ([BDMP]Cl, pKb=9.8), and 1-butyl-4-aza-1-azoniabicyclo[2,2,2]octane chloride ([BDABCO]Cl, pKb=11.1). The SO2 absorption and desorption performance of the molten salt were greatly affected by the basicity of the molten salt. Spectroscopic, X-ray crystallographic, and computational results for the interactions of SO2 with molten salts suggest that two types of SO2-containg species could be generated depending on the basicity of the unquaternized amino group: a dicationic species comprising two different anions, HSO3(-) and Cl(-), and a monocationic species bearing Cl(-) interacting with neutral H2SO3.

  10. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations of molten salt vapor complexes using Gaussian-2 theory: LiAlF{sub 4} and NaAlF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Curtiss, L.A.

    1993-04-01

    The structures and energies of the molten salt vapor complexes LiAlF{sub 4} and NaAlF{sub 4} are studied using new high level ab initio molecular orbital methods. The structures are determined using Moller-Plesset perturbation theory to second-order and the total energies are determined using a recently introduced modification of Gaussian-2 (G2) theory. The total energies are used to determine relative energies of the corner-, edge-, and face-bridged structures and accurate reaction energies. The results are compared to previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  11. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations of molten salt vapor complexes using Gaussian-2 theory: LiAlF[sub 4] and NaAlF[sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Curtiss, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The structures and energies of the molten salt vapor complexes LiAlF[sub 4] and NaAlF[sub 4] are studied using new high level ab initio molecular orbital methods. The structures are determined using Moller-Plesset perturbation theory to second-order and the total energies are determined using a recently introduced modification of Gaussian-2 (G2) theory. The total energies are used to determine relative energies of the corner-, edge-, and face-bridged structures and accurate reaction energies. The results are compared to previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  12. Molten salt oxidation of chloro-organic compounds: Experimental results for product gas compositions and final forms studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, J.C.; Haas, P.A.; Bell, J.T.; Crosley, S.M.; Calhoun, C.L. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Nulf, L.E.

    1995-04-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) has been selected as a promising technology for treatment of some US Department of Energy (DOE) mixed wastes. Mixed wastes are defined as those wastes that contain both radioactive components, which are regulated by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and hazardous waste components, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has installed and operated a bench-scale MSO apparatus to obtain experimental information needed before the design and construction of an MSO pilot plant. The primary objective of the experiments performed was to show that dioxin and furan emissions from a molten salt oxidation (MSO) unit were below the proposed regulatory limit of 0.1 ng/m{sup 3} as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin equivalents or toxic equivalence quotient. The feed stream was to contain 2,4-dichlorophenol, a suspected precursor to the formation of dioxin and furans. The tests were to be done over a range of salt compositions and flow rates expected in a pilot- or full-scale MSO unit. Two other objectives were to demonstrate destruction and removal efficiencies (DREs) greater than US Environmental Protection Agency requirements and to show that levels of products of incomplete combustion (PICs) are the same as, or lower than, those observed in incinerators for two common waste constituents [carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) and CH{sub 3}CCl{sub 3}]. A final objective was to perform some initial studies of final waste forms using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). This report presents the results from the operation of the bench-scale MSO system.

  13. An extended version of the SERPENT-2 code to investigate fuel burn-up and core material evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufiero, M.; Cammi, A.; Fiorina, C.; Leppänen, J.; Luzzi, L.; Ricotti, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the Monte Carlo burn-up code SERPENT-2 has been extended and employed to study the material isotopic evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This promising GEN-IV nuclear reactor concept features peculiar characteristics such as the on-line fuel reprocessing, which prevents the use of commonly available burn-up codes. Besides, the presence of circulating nuclear fuel and radioactive streams from the core to the reprocessing plant requires a precise knowledge of the fuel isotopic composition during the plant operation. The developed extension of SERPENT-2 directly takes into account the effects of on-line fuel reprocessing on burn-up calculations and features a reactivity control algorithm. It is here assessed against a dedicated version of the deterministic ERANOS-based EQL3D procedure (PSI-Switzerland) and adopted to analyze the MSFR fuel salt isotopic evolution. Particular attention is devoted to study the effects of reprocessing time constants and efficiencies on the conversion ratio and the molar concentration of elements relevant for solubility issues (e.g., trivalent actinides and lanthanides). Quantities of interest for fuel handling and safety issues are investigated, including decay heat and activities of hazardous isotopes (neutron and high energy gamma emitters) in the core and in the reprocessing stream. The radiotoxicity generation is also analyzed for the MSFR nominal conditions. The production of helium and the depletion in tungsten content due to nuclear reactions are calculated for the nickel-based alloy selected as reactor structural material of the MSFR. These preliminary evaluations can be helpful in studying the radiation damage of both the primary salt container and the axial reflectors.

  14. Waste Stream Generated and Waste Disposal Plans for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighi, M. H.; Szozda, R. M.; Jugan, M. R.

    2002-02-26

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site is located in Tennessee, on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), south of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant across Haw Ridge in Melton Valley. The MSRE was run by ORNL to demonstrate the desirable features of the molten-salt concept in a practical reactor that could be operated safely and reliably. It introduced the idea of a homogeneous reactor using fuel salt media and graphite moderation for power and breeder reactors. The MSRE reactor and associated components are located in cells beneath the floor in the high-bay area of Building 7503 (Figure 1). The reactor was operated from June 1965 to December 1969. When the reactor was shut down, fuel salt was drained from the reactor circuit to two drain tanks. A ''clean'' salt was then circulated through the reactor as a decontamination measure and drained to a third drain tank. When operations ceased, the fuel and flush salts were allowed t o cool and solidify in the drain tanks. At shutdown, the MSRE facility complex was placed in a surveillance and maintenance program. As a result of the S&M program, it was discovered in 1994 that gaseous uranium (233U/232U) hexafluoride (UF6) had moved throughout the MSRE process systems. The UF6 was generated when radiolysis of the fluorine salts caused the individual constituents to dissociate to their component atoms, including free fluorine.Some of the free fluorine combined with uranium fluorides (UF4) in the salt to form UF6. UF6 is gaseous at slightly above ambient temperatures; thus, periodic heating of the fuel salts (which was intended to remedy the radiolysis problems) and simple diffusion had allowed the UF6 to move out of the salt and into the process systems of MSRE.

  15. Concept evaluation of nuclear fusion driven symbiotic energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renier, J. P.; Hoffman, T. J.

    An analysis of systems based on D-T and semi-catalyzed D-D fusion-powered U233 breeders is presented. Metallic thorium pebble-bed blankets with a batch reprocessing mode and a molten salt blanket with on-line continuous or batch reprocessing were used. Neutronics depletion calculations are coupled with a scenario optimization and a cost analysis code. The fusion-driven symbiotes are compared with LMFBR-driven energy systems. The analyses of the symbiotic energy systems were performed at equilibrium, at the maximum rate of grid expansion and for a given nuclear power demand. Attractive schemes are identified based on D-T driven fusion-drivers operated with low plasma performance parameters.

  16. Diagnosis of sources of current inefficiency in industrial molten salt electrolysis cells by Raman spectroscopy: A topical report on chlorides: Topical report, June 1982-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-06-01

    Molten salt electrolysis, a very energy-intensive process, is used in the extraction of light metals. Aluminum production by the Hall process and magnesium production in the Dow and I.G. Farbenindustrie cells constitute the major commercial applications of metal electrowinning from molten-salt media at present. The energy input into the electrolysis cell is in the form of direct current, and the energy efficiencies in the magnesium or aluminum processes are only in the 30 to 40% range. Major energy reductions are achieved by reducing the cell voltage or by increasing the current efficiency. Goal of the research is to identify the sources of the current losses occurring in molten salt electrolysis. This research worked on the systems of I.G. Farben magnesium chloride and Alcoa smelting aluminum chloride processes. Raman spectra were measured and analyzed for each component or their mixtures of the electrolyte for magnesium and aluminum reduction in chloride melts. Raman measurements were also conducted on the melts of industrial composition for aluminum and magnesium electrolysis. In laboratory-scale cells which imitated industrial practice, Raman spectra were measured in situ during electrolysis in attempts to identify the streamers, coloration of electrolyte, and any subvalent species. They were known to occur only during electrolysis, and they have been reported to be possible current losses. Cyclic voltammetry was conducted to obtain information about the generation of subvalent species which were not detected by Raman measurement. These were thought to be kinetic entities present only during electrolysis. Results of Raman spectroscopy and electrochemistry of magnesium and aluminum reduction from molten chloride bath are presented. The results would be useful to establish the basis for the study of electrolysis of aluminum from molten fluoride media. 119 refs., 66 figs.

  17. Molten salt extraction of transuranic and reactive fission products from used uranium oxide fuel

    DOEpatents

    Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2014-05-27

    Used uranium oxide fuel is detoxified by extracting transuranic and reactive fission products into molten salt. By contacting declad and crushed used uranium oxide fuel with a molten halide salt containing a minor fraction of the respective uranium trihalide, transuranic and reactive fission products partition from the fuel to the molten salt phase, while uranium oxide and non-reactive, or noble metal, fission products remain in an insoluble solid phase. The salt is then separated from the fuel via draining and distillation. By this method, the bulk of the decay heat, fission poisoning capacity, and radiotoxicity are removed from the used fuel. The remaining radioactivity from the noble metal fission products in the detoxified fuel is primarily limited to soft beta emitters. The extracted transuranic and reactive fission products are amenable to existing technologies for group uranium/transuranic product recovery and fission product immobilization in engineered waste forms.

  18. Monte Carlo study of molten salt with charge asymmetry near the electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, Jacek; Lamperski, Stanisław

    2014-02-01

    Results of the Monte Carlo simulation of the electrode | molten salt or ionic liquid interface are reported. The system investigated is approximated by the primitive model of electrolyte being in contact with a charged hard wall. Ions differ in charges, namely anions are divalent and cations are monovalent but they are of the same diameter d = 400 pm. The temperature analysis of heat capacity at a constant volume Cv and the anion radial distribution function, g2-/2-, allowed the choice of temperature of the study, which is T = 2800 K and corresponds to T* = 0.34 (definition of reduced temperature T* in text). The differential capacitance curve of the interface with the molten salt or ionic liquid at c = 5.79 M has a distorted bell shape. It is shown that with increasing electrolyte concentration from c = 0.4 to 5 M the differential capacitance curves undergo transition from U shape to bell shape.

  19. Monte Carlo study of molten salt with charge asymmetry near the electrode surface.

    PubMed

    Kłos, Jacek; Lamperski, Stanisław

    2014-02-01

    Results of the Monte Carlo simulation of the electrode | molten salt or ionic liquid interface are reported. The system investigated is approximated by the primitive model of electrolyte being in contact with a charged hard wall. Ions differ in charges, namely anions are divalent and cations are monovalent but they are of the same diameter d = 400 pm. The temperature analysis of heat capacity at a constant volume Cv and the anion radial distribution function, g2-/2-, allowed the choice of temperature of the study, which is T = 2800 K and corresponds to T(*) = 0.34 (definition of reduced temperature T(*) in text). The differential capacitance curve of the interface with the molten salt or ionic liquid at c = 5.79 M has a distorted bell shape. It is shown that with increasing electrolyte concentration from c = 0.4 to 5 M the differential capacitance curves undergo transition from U shape to bell shape.

  20. Modeling and analysis of a molten salt electrowinning system with liquid cadmium cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.R.; Ahn, D.H.; Paek, S.; Kwon, S.W.; Kim, S.H.; Shim, J.B.; Chung, H.; Kim, E.H.

    2007-07-01

    In the present work, an electrowinning process in the LiCl-KCl/Cd system is considered to model and analyze the equilibrium behavior and electro-transport of the actinide and rare-earth elements. Equilibrium distributions of the actinide and rare-earth elements in a molten salt and liquid cadmium system have been estimated for an infinite potentiostatic electrolysis from the thermodynamic data and material balance. A simple dynamic modeling of this process was performed by taking into account the material balances and diffusion-controlled electrochemical reactions in a diffusion layer at an electrode interface between the molten salt and liquid cadmium cathode. This model demonstrated a prediction of the concentration behaviors, a faradic current of each element and an electrochemical potential as function of the time up to the corresponding electro-transport satisfying a given applied current based on a galvano-static electrolysis. (authors)

  1. Assessment of molten-salt solar central-receiver freeze-up and recovery events

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.; Dunkin, S.R.

    1996-02-01

    Molten salt used as a heat transfer fluid in central-receiver so ar power plants has a high freezing point (430{degrees}F (221{degrees}C)). It is very likely during the life of the plant that the receiver will accidentally freeze up due to equipment malfunction or operator error. Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of a molten salt receiver freeze-up and recovery event and methods to thaw the receiver. In addition, simulated freeze/thaw experiments were conducted to determine what happens when salt freezes and is thawed in receiver tubes and to quantify the damage caused to candidate receiver tube materials. Fourteen tube samples of various materials, diameters and wall thicknesses were tested to destruction. Results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  2. Grain orientation in high Tc superconductors by molten salt powder synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Sudhakar; Schulze, Walter A.

    1991-01-01

    The molten salt or the flux method is used to fabricate a grain oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (123) superconductor. Here we suggest a two-stage approach in using the 'green phase', Y2BaCuO5 (211), as seed crystals in the formation of YBa2Cu3O(7-x). The process uses Y2BaCuO5 formed by molten salt synthesis. The Y2BaCuO5 phase was observed to be stable in water and in most of the salt systems. Salt processing can form a small quantity of anisotropic particles of Y2BaCuO5. This material can form the 123 phase when tape cast and sintered in the presence of the required levels of Ba and Cu.

  3. Exploratory corrosion tests on alloys in molten salts at 900/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, R.T.; Thomas, T.M.; Lai, G.Y.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory corrosion tests were conducted on 16 commercial alloys in carbonate, chloride, and hydroxide molten salts at 900/sup 0/C for up to three weeks. Corrosion information, including weight change, observations of the coupons, metallographic examination, and evaluation of the corrosion product by SEM, was obtained on the coupons exposed to these salts. These tests indicated that a number of the alloys showed significant resistance to metal loss in the carbonate molten salt with corrosion rates on the order of several millimeters per year. The corrosion product is an interpenetrating structure of metal from the more noble alloy ingredients and of an oxide made up of the reaction between melt components and oxidizable metals from the alloy.

  4. Neutronics Study on Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems with Thorium-Based Fuel for Comparison Between Solid and Molten-Salt Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Kenji; Tenzou, Hideki; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2002-06-15

    Since thorium is an abundant fertile material, there is hope for the thorium-cycle fuels for an accelerator driven subcritical system (ADS). The ADS utilizes neutrons, which are generated by high-energy protons of giga-electron-volt-grade, but cross sections for the interaction of high-energy particles are not available for use in current ADS engineering design. In this paper the neutron behavior in the ADS target based on the related experimental data is clarified, and the feasibility of the ADS regarding both the molten salts (Flibe: {sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4}, chloride: NaCl-ThCl{sub 4}-{sup 233}UCl{sub 4}) and oxide ([Th, {sup 233}U]O{sub 2}) fuels is examined. The difference between the experiment and the calculated result at the ADS high-energy region is discussed. In a comparison of the fuels, the time evolution of k{sub eff} and the beam current in the burning period are calculated. The calculated results suggest that the ADS with solid fuel has better future prospects than that with molten-salt fuels. The ADS with Flibe molten-salt fuel tends to require a high beam current and consequently needs the installation of a metallic spallation target and the continuous removal for fission products and protactinium. In comparison with the Flibe fuel, the ADS with chloride fuel has a flux distribution that is similar to a solid fuel reactor.

  5. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  6. Ceramic waste form for residues from molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Hopper, R.W.; Rard, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    A ceramic waste form based on Synroc-D is under development for the incorporation of the mineral residues from molten salt oxidation treatment of mixed low-level wastes. Samples containing as many as 32 chemical elements have been fabricated, characterized, and leach-tested. Universal Treatment Standards have been satisfied for all regulated elements except and two (lead and vanadium). Efforts are underway to further improve chemical durability.

  7. Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-15

    This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

  8. JUPITER-II Molten Salt Flibe Research: An Update On Tritium, Mobilization and Redox Chemistry Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Petti; D. A. Petti; G. R. Smolik; Michael F. Simpson; John P. Sharpe; R. A. Anderl; S. Fukada; Y. Hatano; Masanori Hara; Y. Oya; T. Terai; D.-K. Sze; S. Tanaka

    2005-05-01

    The second Japan/US Program on Irradiation Tests for Fusion Research (JUPITER-II) began on April 1, 2001. Part of the collaborative research centers on studies of the molten salt 2LiF2–BeF2 (also known as Flibe) for fusion applications. Flibe has been proposed as a self-cooled breeder in both magnetic and inertial fusion power plant designs over the last 25 years. The key feasibility issues associated with the use of Flibe are the corrosion of structural material by the molten salt, tritium behavior and control in the molten salt blanket system, and safe handling practices and releases from Flibe during an accidental spill. These issues are all being addressed under the JUPITER-II program at the Idaho National Laboratory in the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility. In this paper, we review the program to date in the area of tritium/deuterium behavior, Flibe mobilization under accident conditions and testing of Be as a redox agent to control corrosion. Future activities planned through the end of the collaboration are also presented.

  9. Behavior of toxic metals and radionuclides during molten salt oxidation of chlorinated plastics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Chul; Cho, Yong-Jun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Yoo, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Joon-Hyung

    2004-01-01

    Molten salt oxidation is one of the promising alternatives to incineration for chlorinated organics without the emission of chlorinated organic pollutants. This study investigated the behavior of three hazardous metals (Cd, Pb, and Cr) and four radioactive metal surrogates (Cs, Ce, Gd, and Sm) in the molten Na2CO3 oxidation reactor during the destruction of PVC plastics. In the tested temperature ranges (1143 1223K) and NaCl content (0-10%), the impact of temperature on the retention of cadmium and lead in the molten salt reactor was very small, but that of the NaCl content for their retention was relatively higher. The influence of NaCl accumulation was, however, proven to be practically negligible due to the low-temperature operating characteristics of the molten salt oxidation system. Neither temperature increase nor chlorine accumulation in the MSO reactor reduced the retention of Cr, Ce, Gd, and Sm. Over 99.98% of these metals remained in the reactor. The influence of the temperature on the cesium behavior is relatively large for a chlorine addition, however, over 99.7% of cesium remained in the reactor throughout the entire test. The experimental metal entrainment rate and the entrained metal particle size distribution agree well with the theoretical equilibrium metal distributions.

  10. An evaluation of possible next-generation high temperature molten-salt power towers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Gregory J.

    2011-12-01

    Since completion of the Solar Two molten-salt power tower demonstration in 1999, the solar industry has been developing initial commercial-scale projects that are 3 to 14 times larger. Like Solar Two, these initial plants will power subcritical steam-Rankine cycles using molten salt with a temperature of 565 C. The main question explored in this study is whether there is significant economic benefit to develop future molten-salt plants that operate at a higher receiver outlet temperature. Higher temperatures would allow the use of supercritical steam cycles that achieve an improved efficiency relative to today's subcritical cycle ({approx}50% versus {approx}42%). The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of a 565 C subcritical baseline plant was compared with possible future-generation plants that operate at 600 or 650 C. The analysis suggests that {approx}8% reduction in LCOE can be expected by raising salt temperature to 650 C. However, most of that benefit can be achieved by raising the temperature to only 600 C. Several other important insights regarding possible next-generation power towers were also drawn: (1) the evaluation of receiver-tube materials that are capable of higher fluxes and temperatures, (2) suggested plant reliability improvements based on a detailed evaluation of the Solar Two experience, and (3) a thorough evaluation of analysis uncertainties.

  11. Molten Salt Electrodeposition of Silicon in Cu-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhanvaran, Samira

    Widespread use of solar energy has not been realized to date because its cost is not competitive with conventional energy sources. The high price of solar grade silicon has been one of the barriers against photovoltaic industry achieving its much anticipated growth. Therefore, developing a method, which is energy efficient and will deliver inexpensive silicon feedstock material is essential. The electrodeposition of Si from a cryolite-based melt was investigated in the present work as a possible solution. This study proposed electrowinning of Si in molten Cu-Si alloy, to decrease the working temperature and increase the efficiency. Solvent refining can be used to recover Si from Cu-Si and also as a second purification method. The physicochemical properties of the potential electrolyte, cryolite-SiO 2 melts, were studied in the first step of this work. The deposition potential of Si on a graphite cathode was measured to determine the working potential and the effect of SiO2 concentration on it. In the next step, the deposition potential of Si from cryolite--SiO2 melt on Cu and Cu-Si cathodes was determined using cyclic voltammetry. Next, the cathodic and the anodic current inefficiencies of the process were measured. Continuous analysis of the evolved gas enabled the instantaneous measurement of the current efficiency and the kinetics of the deposition. Finally, the effectiveness of the process in delivering high purity Si was investigated. Si dendrites were precipitated out of the Cu-Si cathode and recovered to determine the purity of the final product as the final step of this study. The produced Si was separated from the alloy matrix by crushing and acid leaching and the purity was reported. The findings of this research show that the proposed method has the potential to produce high purity silicon with low B content. Further development is required to remove some metallic impurities that are remained in Si.

  12. Molten salt steam generator subsystem research experiment. Volume I. Phase 1 - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    A study was conducted for Phase 1 of a two-phase project whose objectives were to develop a reliable, cost-effective molten salt steam generating subsystem for solar thermal plants, minimize uncertainty in capital, operating, and maintenance costs, and demonstrate the ability of molten salt to generate high-pressure, high-temperature steam. The Phase 1 study involved the conceptual design of molten salt steam generating subsystems for a nominal 100-MWe net stand-alone solar central receiver electric generating plant, and a nominal 100-MWe net hybrid fossil-fueled electric power generating plant that is 50% repowered by a solar central receiver system. As part of Phase 1, a proposal was prepared for Phase 2, which involves the design, construction, testing and evaluation of a Subsystem Research Experiment of sufficient size to ensure successful operation of the full-size subsystem designed in Phase 1. Evaluation of several concepts resulted in the selection of a four-component (preheater, evaporator, superheater, reheater), natural circulation, vertically oriented, shell and tube (straight) heat exchanger arrangement. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the system included full and part load performance, circulation requirements, stability, and critical heat flux analysis. Flow-induced tube vibration, tube buckling, fatigue evaluation of tubesheet junctions, steady-state tubesheet analysis, and a simplified transient analysis were included in the structural analysis of the system. Operating modes and system dynamic response to load changes were identified. Auxiliary equipment, fabrication, erection, and maintenance requirements were also defined. Installed capital costs and a project schedule were prepared for each design.

  13. Destruction of XM-46 (aka LGP-1846) using the Molten Salt Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-03-01

    The experimental work done on the destruction of the liquid gun propellant XM-46 (or LGP-1846) using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the US Army is described in this report. The current methods of disposal of large quantities of high explosives (HE), propellants and wastes containing energetic materials by open burning or open detonation (OB/OD), or by incineration, are becoming undesirable. LLNL is developing MSD as an alternative to OB/OD and incineration of energetic materials. A series of 18 continuous experimental runs were made wherein a solution of XM-46 and water was injected into a bed of molten salt comprising the carbonates of sodium, potassium and lithium, along with air. The results from these experiments, described in detail in the main body of this report, show that: XM-46 can be safely and completely destroyed in a bed of molten salt at temperatures well below those needed for incineration. Under optimum operating conditions, less than 1% of the chemically bound nitrogen in the XM-46 is converted to NO{sub x}, and less than 1% carbon is converted to CO. There exist, however, a number of technical uncertainties: We need to understand better why nitrates build up in the salt bath, and what we can do to reduce this amount. We need to understand the mechanism of XM-46 oxidation and ways to minimize the formation of CO and NO{sub x}. In addition, we would like to find out ways by which a more concentrated solution of XM-46 can be introduced into the reactor, so as to increase the throughputs.

  14. Studies on Hot Corrosion of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo Boiler Tube Steel and Its Weldments in the Molten Salt Na2SO4-60 pct V2O5 Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravindra; Tewari, V. K.; Prakash, S.

    2007-01-01

    Hot corrosion is mainly due to the dissolution of protective oxides in the molten salt at the metal surface and their reprecipitation at some other sites as nonprotective porous mass. The hot corrosion attack along the grain boundaries leading to subsurface precipitation of oxides and sulfides also contributes to weakening of material. Ferritic steel with 2.25Cr 1Mo is used widely as a candidate material in the steam generating system of power plants. Hot corrosion studies were conducted on 2.25Cr-1Mo unwelded as well as welded steel specimens with molten salt coated after exposure at 900 °C under cyclic conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX) was used to analyze the corrosion products.

  15. Glovebox design requirements for molten salt oxidation processing of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.B.; Acosta, S.V.; Wernly, K.D.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated combustible waste. Molten salt oxidation (MSO) provides a method for removing greater than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible waste. Implementation of MSO processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and consequently reduce the cost of TRU waste disposal operations at LANL. The glovebox design requirements for unit operations including size reduction and MSO processing will be presented.

  16. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  17. Molten salt oxidation: a versatile and promising technology for the destruction of organic-containing wastes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhitong; Li, Jinhui; Zhao, Xiangyang

    2011-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO), a robust thermal but non-flame process, has the inherent capability of destroying organic constituents in wastes, while retaining inorganic and radioactive materials in situ. It has been considered as an alternative to incineration and may be a solution to many waste disposal problems. The present review first describes the history and development of MSO, as well as design and engineering details, and then focuses on reaction mechanisms and its potential applications in various wastes, including hazardous wastes, medical wastes, mixed wastes, and energetic materials. Finally, the current status of and prospects for the MSO process and directions for future research are considered.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V in molten salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyrl, W. H.; Blackburn, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V has been studied in several molten salt environments. Extensive data are reported for the alloy in highly pure LiCl-KCl. The influence of the metallurgical heat treatment and texture, and the mechanical microstructure show similarities with aqueous solutions at lower temperature. The fracture path and cracking modes are also similar to that found in other environments. The influence of H2O and H(-) in molten LiCl-KCl lead to the conclusion that hydrogen does not play a major role in crack extension in this environment.

  19. Electrochemical synthesis of superconductive MgB 2 from molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Kenji; Abe, Hideki

    2003-05-01

    We have found that superconductive MgB2 can be electrochemically synthesized from molten salts. The electrolysis was performed in an Ar flow at 600 °C on fused mixtures composed of MgCl2, MgB2O4, Na2B2O4 and alkali halides such as KCl, NaCl, and LiCl. Superconductivity was observed for a wide variety of electrolytes. It was also found that the magnetic and electrical transport properties are the most improved for samples prepared from MgCl2-NaCl-KCl-MgB2O4 electrolytes.

  20. The source term and waste optimization of molten salt reactors with processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Dodds, H.L.

    1993-07-01

    The source term of a molten salt reactor (MSR) with fuel processing is reduced by the ratio of processing time to refueling time as compared to solid fuel reactors. The reduction, which can be one to two orders of magnitude, is due to removal of the long-lived fission products. The waste from MSRs can be optimized with respect to its chemical composition, concentration, mixture, shape, and size. The actinides and long-lived isotopes can be separated out and returned to the reactor for transmutation. These features make MSRs more acceptable and simpler in operation and handling.

  1. Reactions of coal and model coal compounds in room temperature molten salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.S.; Winans, R.E.; McBeth, R.L.

    1984-05-01

    A 2:1 AlCl/sub 3/-pyridinium chloride molten salt solution was used as the reaction medium for the alkylation of diphenylethane and a bituminous coal by 2-propanol. Probably accompanying the room temperature Friedel-Crafts alkylation is a reduction of C=O to -C-OH. Completely deuterated 2-propanol did not react at all with the pyridinium ring. The pyridinium chloride serves to lower the temperature at which the AlCl/sub 3/ is able to catalyze the reactions. The pyridinium chloride also catalyzes the Friedel-Crafts alkylation.

  2. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  3. Investigation on the Oxidation and Reduction of Titanium in Molten Salt with the Soluble TiC Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulan; Wan, Chaopin; Liu, Xuan; Li, Li

    2015-12-01

    To reveal the oxidation process of titanium from TiC anode and the reduction mechanism of titanium ions in molten NaCl-KCl, the polarization curve of TiC anode in molten NaCl-KCl and cyclic voltammograms of the molten salt after polarization were studied. Investigation on the polarization curve shows that titanium can be oxidized and dissociated from the TiC anode at very low potential. The cyclic voltammograms demonstrated that the reduction reaction of titanium ions in the molten salt is a one-step process. By potentiostatic electrolysis, dendritic titanium is obtained on the steel plate. The work promotes the understanding on the process of electrochemical oxidization/dissociation of titanium from TiC anode and the reduction mechanism of titanium ions in molten salt.

  4. Destruction of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in a ternary carbonate molten salt reactor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-tong; Li, Jin-hui; Zhao, Xiang-yang

    2013-09-30

    Soil contamination by PBDEs has become a significant environmental concern and requires appropriate remediation technologies. In this study, the destruction of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in a ternary molten salt (Li, Na, K)2 CO3 reactor was evaluated. The effects of reaction temperature, additive amount of BDE-209 and salt mixture, on off-gas species, were investigated. The salt mixture after reaction was characterized by XRD analysis and a reaction pathway proposed. The results showed that the amounts of C2H6, C2H4, C4H8 and CH4 in the off-gas decreased with increases in temperature, while the CO2 level increased. When the reaction temperature reached 750 °C, incomplete combustion products (PICs) were no longer detected. Increasing BDE-209 loading was not helpful for the reaction, as more PICs were produced. Larger amounts of salt mixture were helpful for the reaction and PICs were not observed with the mole ratio 1: 2000 of BDE-209 to carbonate melt. XRD analysis confirmed the capture of bromine in BDE-209 by the molten salt.

  5. Destruction of chlorobenzene and carbon tetrachloride in a two-stage molten salt oxidation reactor system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Chul; Cho, Yong-Jun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Kim, Eung-Ho

    2008-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is one of the promising alternative destruction technologies for chlorinated organics, because it is capable of trapping chlorine during organic destruction. This study investigated the characteristics of a two-stage MSO reactor system for the destruction of CCl(4) and C(6)H(5)Cl. Investigated parameters were the MSO reactor temperature (from 1023 K to 1223 K) and the excess oxidizing air feed rate (50% and 100%). The destruction of chlorinated solvents is substantial in the Li(2)CO(3)-Na(2)CO(3) eutectic molten salt, irrespective of the tested condition. However, further oxidation of CO, which is found to be the major destruction product, is not substantial due to the limited temperature and gas residence time in the MSO reactor. Increases in the reactor temperature as well as those in the oxidizing air feed rate consistently lead to decreased emissions of carbon monoxide. No significant influence of the MSO reactor operating condition on the chlorine capturing efficiency was found. Over 99.95% and 99.997% of the chlorine was captured in the hot MSO reactors during the C(6)H(5)Cl and CCl(4) destructions, respectively. This result suggests a relatively low potential of the MSO system in the recombination of chlorinated organics, when compared to a conventional incineration system. PMID:18501405

  6. Tritium permeation and recovery for the helium-cooled molten salt fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, A.E.

    1984-09-01

    Design concepts are presented to control tritium permeation from a molten salt/helium fusion breeder reactor. This study assumes tritium to be a gas dissolved in molten salt, with TF formation suppressed. Tritium permeates readily through the hot steel tubes of the reactor and steam generator and will leak into the steam system at the rate of about one gram per day in the absence of special permeation barriers, assuming that 1% of the helium coolant flow rate is processed for tritium recovery at 90% efficiency per pass. The proposed permeation barrier for the reactor tubes is a 10 ..mu..m layer of tungsten which, in principle, will reduce tritium blanket permeation by a factor of about 300 below the bare-steel rate. A research and development effort is needed to prove feasibility or to develop alternative barriers. A 1 mm aluminum sleeve is proposed to suppress permeation through the steam generator tubes. This gives a calculated reduction factor of more than 500 relative to bare steel, including a factor of 30 due to an assumed oxide layer. The permeation equations are developed in detail for a multi-layer tube wall including a frozen salt layer and with two fluid boundary-layer resistances. Conditions are discussed for which Sievert's or Henry's Law materials become flux limiters. An analytical model is developed to establish the tritium split between wall permeation and reactor-tube flow.

  7. Destruction of chlorobenzene and carbon tetrachloride in a two-stage molten salt oxidation reactor system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Chul; Cho, Yong-Jun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Kim, Eung-Ho

    2008-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is one of the promising alternative destruction technologies for chlorinated organics, because it is capable of trapping chlorine during organic destruction. This study investigated the characteristics of a two-stage MSO reactor system for the destruction of CCl(4) and C(6)H(5)Cl. Investigated parameters were the MSO reactor temperature (from 1023 K to 1223 K) and the excess oxidizing air feed rate (50% and 100%). The destruction of chlorinated solvents is substantial in the Li(2)CO(3)-Na(2)CO(3) eutectic molten salt, irrespective of the tested condition. However, further oxidation of CO, which is found to be the major destruction product, is not substantial due to the limited temperature and gas residence time in the MSO reactor. Increases in the reactor temperature as well as those in the oxidizing air feed rate consistently lead to decreased emissions of carbon monoxide. No significant influence of the MSO reactor operating condition on the chlorine capturing efficiency was found. Over 99.95% and 99.997% of the chlorine was captured in the hot MSO reactors during the C(6)H(5)Cl and CCl(4) destructions, respectively. This result suggests a relatively low potential of the MSO system in the recombination of chlorinated organics, when compared to a conventional incineration system.

  8. Influence of volatile chlorides on the molten salt synthesis of ternary oxide nanorods and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rørvik, Per Martin; Lyngdal, Tone; Saeterli, Ragnhild; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Holmestad, Randi; Grande, Tor; Einarsrud, Mari-Ann

    2008-04-21

    A molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, has been re-examined to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 or 820 degrees C. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was respectively BaTi2O5/BaTi5O11 and Na2Ti6O13 for the two different systems, in contradiction to the previous studies. It was shown that NaCl reacted with BaO (PbO) resulting in loss of volatile BaCl2 (PbCl2) and formation and preferential growth of titanium oxide-rich nanorods instead of the target phase BaTiO3 (or PbTiO3). The molten salt synthesis route may therefore not necessarily yield nanorods of the target ternary oxide as reported previously. In addition, the importance of NaCl(g) for the growth of nanorods below the melting point of NaCl was demonstrated in a special experimental setup, where NaCl and the precursors were physically separated.

  9. Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-12-01

    The sodium-nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is operated at relatively high temperature (250-350 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150200 °C can not only lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature-related degradations, but also allow the use of lower cost materials for construction. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures, reduction in ohmic losses is required, including the reduced ohmic resistance of β″-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point secondary electrolytes. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin BASE (600 μm) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salts used as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replacement of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of these ternary molten salts demonstrated improved ionic conductivity and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175 °C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. The cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150 °C.

  10. Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-12-15

    The sodium–nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is operated at relatively high temperature (250–350 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150200 °C can not only lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature-related degradations, but also allow the use of lower cost materials for construction. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures, reduction in ohmic losses is required, including the reduced ohmic resistance of β"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point secondary electrolytes. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin BASE (600 μm) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salts used as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replacement of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of these ternary molten salts demonstrated improved ionic conductivity and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175 °C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. Finally, the cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150 °C.

  11. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  12. Improvement of the Neutronic Performance of the PACER Fusion Concept Using Thorium Molten Salt with Reactor Grade Plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acır, Adem

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the improvement of neutronic performance of a dual purpose modified PACER concept has been investigated. Flibe as the main constituent are fixed as 92% coolant. ThF4 is mixed with increased mole-fractions of RG-PuF4 starting by 0 mol % up to 1 mol %. TBR variations for all the investigated salts with respect to the RG-PuF4 contents are computed. Tritium self-sufficiency is provided with the ThF4 when the adding RG-PuF4 content is higher than 0.75%. The energy multiplication of the blanket is increased as 70% with adding RG-PuF4 contents to ThF4. High quality fissile isotope 233U are produced with increasing RG-PuF4. DPA and helium production increases with increased RG-PuF4 content in molten salt. Radiation damage with dpa <1.7 and He <3.3 ppm after a plant operation period of 30 years will be well below the damage limit values.

  13. Transport Properties of LiTFSI-Acetamide Room Temperature Molten Salt Electrolytes Applied in an Li-Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao-Chen; Hsu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Chen-Ruei

    2007-11-01

    In the present work some transport properties of the binary room temperature molten salt (RTMS) lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfone)imide (LiTFSI)-acetamide [LiN(SO2CF3)2-CH3CONH2], applied in an Li-ion battery, have been investigated. The phase diagram was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The result reveals that the binary RTMS has an eutectic point at 201 K and the 30 mol% LiTFSI composition. The electric conductivity was measured using a direct current computerized method. The result shows that the conductivities of the melts increase with increasing temperature and acetamide content. The densities of all melts decrease with increasing temperature and acetamide content. The equivalent conductivities were fitted by the Arrhenius equation, where the activation energies were 18.15, 18.52, 20.35, 25.08 kJ/mol for 10, 20, 30, 40 mol% LiTFSI, respectively. Besides the relationships between conductivity, density composition and temperature, of the ion interaction is discussed.

  14. Multi-Physics Modeling of Molten Salt Transport in Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis and Recycling of Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Adam; Pati, Soobhankar

    2012-03-11

    Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis is a new energy-efficient zero-emissions process for producing high-purity magnesium and high-purity oxygen directly from industrial-grade MgO. SOM Recycling combines SOM electrolysis with electrorefining, continuously and efficiently producing high-purity magnesium from low-purity partially oxidized scrap. In both processes, electrolysis and/or electrorefining take place in the crucible, where raw material is continuously fed into the molten salt electrolyte, producing magnesium vapor at the cathode and oxygen at the inert anode inside the SOM. This paper describes a three-dimensional multi-physics finite-element model of ionic current, fluid flow driven by argon bubbling and thermal buoyancy, and heat and mass transport in the crucible. The model predicts the effects of stirring on the anode boundary layer and its time scale of formation, and the effect of natural convection at the outer wall. MOxST has developed this model as a tool for scale-up design of these closely-related processes.

  15. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of Sr-ferrite powder prepared by the molten-salt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuemin; Zhong, Wei; Yan, Shiming; Au, Chak-Tong; Lü, Liya; Du, Youwei

    2014-06-01

    Sub-micrometre high-performance Sr-ferrite powder was prepared by a molten-salt method using Na2SO4 as the fluxing agent. In the reaction process, a mixture of superfine powder was pre-sintered at 1150 °C for 3 h and then annealed at 850 °C for 2 h. The as-obtained Sr-ferrite powder is SrFe12O19 with a hexagonal magnetoplumbite structure. We observe that with raising the pre-sintering temperature as well as increasing the annealing temperature and time, there is an enlargement of particle size. We regulated the reaction parameters to optimize the magnetic properties of the Sr-ferrite powder. The structure with the best magnetic properties is quasi-cubic in shape and relatively uniform in size, showing a coercivity of 471.89 kA m-1, a saturation magnetization of 91.51 µWb m kg-1, a remanence ratio of 0.50 and a maximum magnetic energy product of 7.89 kJ m-3. We then studied the effects of particle size, demagnetization factor and magnetocrystalline anisotropy on coercivity. Compared with the conventional ceramic process, the one presented here is more convenient and economical for the production of homogeneous hexagonal ferrite powders of high magnetic performance.

  16. Reactor Controllability of 3-Region-Core Molten Salt Reactor System - A Study on Load Following Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Takahisa Yamamoto; Koshi Mitachi; Masatoshi Nishio

    2006-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) systems are liquid-fueled reactors that can be used for actinide burning, production of electricity, production of hydrogen, and production of fissile fuels (breeding). Thorium (Th) and uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) are fertile and fissile of the MSR systems, and dissolved in a high-temperature molten fluoride salt (fuel salt) with a very high boiling temperature (up to 1650 K), that is both the reactor nuclear fuel and the coolant. The MSR system is one of the six advanced reactor concepts identified by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) as a candidate for cooperative development. In the MSR system, fuel salt flows through a fuel duct constructed around a reactor core and fuel channel of a graphite moderator accompanied by fission reaction and heat generation, and flows out to an external-loop system consisted of a heat exchanger and a circulation pump. Due to the motion of fuel salt, delayed neutron precursors that are one of the source of neutron production make to change their position between the fission reaction and neutron emission events and decay even occur in the external loop system. Hence the reactivity and effective delayed neutron precursor fraction of the MSR system are lower than those of solid fuel reactor systems such as Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWRs). Since all of the presently operating nuclear power reactors utilize solid fuel, little attention had been paid to the MSR analysis of the reactivity loss and reactor characteristics change caused by the fuel salt circulation. Sides et al. and Shimazu et al. developed MSR analytical models based on the point reactor kinetics model to consider the effect of fuel salt flow. Their models represented a reactor as having six zones for fuel salt and three zones for the graphite moderator. Since their models employed the point reactor kinetics model and the rough temperature approximation, their results were not sufficiently accurate to

  17. Design of a californium source-driven measurement system for accountability of material recovered from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment charcoal bed

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzinger, D.L.; Perez, R.B.; Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1998-05-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility (MSRE) operated from 1965 to 1969. The fuel was a molten salt that flowed through the reactor core which consisted of uranium tetrafluoride with molten lithium and beryllium salt used as the coolant. In 1968 the fuel was switched from {sup 235}U to {sup 233}U. The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment was canceled in 1969 at which time approximately 4800 kg of salt was transferred to the fuel drain tanks. There was about 36.3 kg of uranium, 675 grams of plutonium and various fission products present in the fuel salt. The salt was allowed to solidify in the fuel drain tanks. The salt was heated on a yearly basis to recombine the fluorine gas with the uranium salt mixture. In March 1994, a gas sample was taken from the off gas system that indicated {sup 233}U had migrated from the fuel drain tank system to the off gas system. It was found that approximately 2.6 kg of uranium had migrated to the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed (ACB). The ACB is located in the concrete-lined charcoal bed cell which is below ground level located outside the MSRE building. Therefore, there was a concern for the potential of a nuclear criticality accident, although water would have to leak into the chamber for a criticality accident to occur. Unstable carbon/fluorine compounds were also formed when the fluorine reacted with the charcoal in the charcoal bed. The purpose of the proposed measurement system was to perform an accountability measurement to determine the fissile mass of {sup 233}U in the primary vessel. The contents of the primary containment assembly will then be transferred to three smaller containers for long term storage. Calculations were performed using MCNP-DSP to determine the configuration of the measurement system. The information obtained from the time signatures can then be compared to the measurement data to determine the amount of {sup 233}U present in the primary containment assembly.

  18. The mechanics of pressed-pellet separators in molten salt batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Kevin Nicholas; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Roberts, Scott Alan; Grillet, Anne

    2014-06-01

    We present a phenomenological constitutive model that describes the macroscopic behavior of pressed-pellet materials used in molten salt batteries. Such materials include separators, cathodes, and anodes. The purpose of this model is to describe the inelastic deformation associated with the melting of a key constituent, the electrolyte. At room temperature, all constituents of these materials are solid and do not transport cations so that the battery is inert. As the battery is heated, the electrolyte, a constituent typically present in the separator and cathode, melts and conducts charge by flowing through the solid skeletons of the anode, cathode, and separator. The electrochemical circuit is closed in this hot state of the battery. The focus of this report is on the thermal-mechanical behavior of the separator, which typically exhibits the most deformation of the three pellets during the process of activating a molten salt battery. Separator materials are composed of a compressed mixture of a powdered electrolyte, an inert binder phase, and void space. When the electrolyte melts, macroscopically one observes both a change in volume and shape of the separator that depends on the applied boundary conditions during the melt transition. Although porous flow plays a critical role in the battery mechanics and electrochemistry, the focus of this report is on separator behavior under flow-free conditions in which the total mass of electrolyte is static within the pellet. Specific poromechanics effects such as capillary pressure, pressure-saturation, and electrolyte transport between layers are not considered. Instead, a phenomenological model is presented to describe all such behaviors including the melting transition of the electrolyte, loss of void space, and isochoric plasticity associated with the binder phase rearrangement. The model is appropriate for use finite element analysis under finite deformation and finite temperature change conditions. The model

  19. Preliminary molten salt extraction experiments with dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.L.; Long, J.L.; Humiston, T.J.; Murray, A.M.

    1989-01-30

    Dicesium hexachloroplutonate was prepared on a 200-gram scale and used as an oxidant in the molten salt extraction process to remove americium from plutonium metal. Single-pass extraction efficiencies exceeding 90% were achieved in molten calcium chloride. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Molten salt rolling bubble column, reactors utilizing same and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Klinger, Kerry M.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2015-11-17

    Reactors for carrying out a chemical reaction, as well as related components, systems and methods are provided. In accordance with one embodiment, a reactor is provided that includes a furnace and a crucible positioned for heating by the furnace. The crucible may contain a molten salt bath. A downtube is disposed at least partially within the interior crucible along an axis. The downtube includes a conduit having a first end in communication with a carbon source and an outlet at a second end of the conduit for introducing the carbon material into the crucible. At least one opening is formed in the conduit between the first end and the second end to enable circulation of reaction components contained within the crucible through the conduit. An oxidizing material may be introduced through a bottom portion of the crucible in the form of gas bubbles to react with the other materials.

  1. Fabrication of aluminum nitride crucibles for molten salt and plutonium compatibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A.

    1991-07-24

    The overall objective of this research was to fabricate a calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride crucible and determine the compatibility of this crucible with molten chloride salts and plutonium metal in the DOR process. Calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride was preferred over yttrium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride because of (1) the presence of calcium chloride, calcium oxide, and calcium metal in the molten salts utilized in the DOR process, and (2) the higher volatility of the secondary phases formed compared with phases resulting from the addition of yttrium oxide during the aluminum nitride sintering process. The calcium oxide system may yield a higher purity crystal structure with fewer secondary phases present than in the yttrium oxide system. The secondary phases that are present in the grain boundaries may be unreactive with the calcium chloride salt due to the presence of calcium in the secondary phases.

  2. Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in molten salt reactor miniFUJI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, A.

    2014-09-01

    Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in 25MWth and 50MWth of miniFUJI MSR (molten salt reactor) has been carried out. In this study, a very high enriched uranium that we called weapon grade uranium has been employed in UF4 composition. The 235U enrichment is 90 - 95 %. The results show that the 25MWth miniFUJI MSR can get its criticality condition for 1.56 %, 1.76%, and 1.96% of UF4 with 235U enrichment of at least 93%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the 50 MWth miniFUJI reactor can be critical for 1.96% of UF4 with 235U enrichment of at smallest amount 95%. The neutron spectra are almost similar for each power output.

  3. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  4. Electrochemical preparation of single-crystalline Cr 2O 3 from molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hideki; Nishida, Kenji; Imai, Motoharu; Kitazawa, Hideaki

    2004-06-01

    Single crystals of Cr 2O 3 have been grown by means of electrolysis on a 1:100 stoichiometric mixture of CrO 3 and cesium molybdate, Cs 2MoO 4, fused at 1000°C in an ambient atmosphere. Potentiometric measurements on the molten salts have shown the existence of a critical voltage of -320 mV below which hexagonal platelets-shaped single-crystalline Cr 2O 3 is grown on the surface of the working electrode. Coulometry measurements have revealed that the Cr ions are at their highest oxidation state of Cr +6 in the molten electrolyte, which suggests that the electric reduction of Cr +6 to Cr +3 drives the single-crystal growth of Cr 2O 3.

  5. Expedited demonstration of molten salt mixed waste treatment technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-02

    This final report discusses the molten salt mixed waste project in terms of the various subtasks established. Subtask 1: Carbon monoxide emissions; Establish a salt recycle schedule and/or a strategy for off-gas control for MWMF that keeps carbon monoxide emission below 100 ppm on an hourly averaged basis. Subtask 2: Salt melt viscosity; Experiments are conducted to determine salt viscosity as a function of ash composition, ash concentration, temperature, and time. Subtask 3: Determine that the amount of sodium carbonate entrained in the off-gas is minimal, and that any deposited salt can easily be removed form the piping using a soot blower or other means. Subtask 4: The provision of at least one final waste form that meets the waste acceptance criteria of a landfill that will take the waste. This report discusses the progress made in each of these areas.

  6. Air/molten salt direct-contact heat-transfer experiment and economic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, M. S.

    1983-11-01

    Direct-contact heat-transfer coefficients have been measured in a pilot-scale packed column heat exchanger for molten salt/air duty. Two types of commercial tower packings were tested: metal Raschig rings and initial Pall rings. Volumetric heat-transfer coefficients were measured and appeared to depend upon air flow but not on salt flow rate. An economic analysis was used to compare the cost-effectiveness of direct-contact heat exchange with finned-tube heat exchanger in this application. Incorporating the measured volumetric heat-transfer coefficients, a direct-contact system appeared to be from two to five times as cost-effective as a finned-tube heat exchanger, depending upon operating temperature. The large cost advantage occurs for higher operating temperatures (2700(0)C), where high rates of heat transfer and flexibility in materials choice give the cost advantage to the direct-contact heat exchanger.

  7. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-06

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  8. Low-temperature nitridation of manganese and iron oxides using NaNH2 molten salt.

    PubMed

    Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro

    2013-10-21

    Manganese and iron nitrides are important functional materials, but their synthesis processes from oxides often require high temperatures. Herein, we show a novel meta-synthesis method for manganese and iron nitrides by low-temperature nitridation of their oxides using NaNH2 molten salt as the nitrogen source in an autoclave at 240 °C. With this method, nitridation of micrometer-sized oxide particles kept their initial morphologies, but the size of the primary particles decreased. The thermodynamic driving force is considered to be the conversion of oxides to sodium hydroxide, and the kinetic of nitridation is improved by the decrease of particle size and the low melting point of NaNH2. This technique as developed here has the advantages of low reaction temperature, reduced consumption of ammonia, employing nonspecialized equipment, and providing facile control of the reactions for producing nitrides from oxides.

  9. Large-scale synthesis of monodisperse magnesium ferrite via an environmentally friendly molten salt route.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhengsong; He, Minglong; Wang, Ruikun; Qin, Weiwei; Zhao, Dejian; Chen, Changle

    2014-02-17

    Sub-micrometer-sized magnesium ferrite spheres consisting of uniform small particles have been prepared using a facile, large-scale solid-state reaction employing a molten salt technique. Extensive structural characterization of the as-prepared samples has been performed using scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The yield of the magnesium ferrite sub-micrometer spheres is up to 90%, and these sub-micrometer spheres are made up of square and rectangular nanosheets. The magnetic properties of magnesium ferrite sub-micrometer spheres are investigated, and the magnetization saturation value is about 24.96 emu/g. Moreover, the possible growth mechanism is proposed based on the experimental results.

  10. Electrochemistry of actinides and fission products in molten salts-Data review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinsuo

    2014-04-01

    The thermodynamic and electrochemical properties of actinides and fission products in the molten salt determine the pyroprocessing separation performance. Extensive measurements have been carried out to provide fundamental data for evaluating the separation efficiency and technology feasibility of pyroprocessing although the technology has been very well developed in laboratory. The state of the art of fundamental data for substance or materials involved in pyropocessing will be reviewed in the present article. The available data will be summarized and reanalyzed. New correlations, which extend the available data to a broad range of applications, will be developed based on available data from different measurements. Further research topics on providing fundamental data that is needed for scaling the current laboratory technology to industrial applications are identified.

  11. Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

    2008-07-09

    An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

  12. Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in molten salt reactor miniFUJI

    SciTech Connect

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, A.

    2014-09-30

    Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in 25MWth and 50MWth of miniFUJI MSR (molten salt reactor) has been carried out. In this study, a very high enriched uranium that we called weapon grade uranium has been employed in UF{sub 4} composition. The {sup 235}U enrichment is 90 - 95 %. The results show that the 25MWth miniFUJI MSR can get its criticality condition for 1.56 %, 1.76%, and 1.96% of UF{sub 4} with {sup 235}U enrichment of at least 93%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the 50 MWth miniFUJI reactor can be critical for 1.96% of UF{sub 4} with {sup 235}U enrichment of at smallest amount 95%. The neutron spectra are almost similar for each power output.

  13. Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wishau, R.

    1998-05-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is proposed as a {sup 238}Pu waste treatment technology that should be developed for volume reduction and recovery of {sup 238}Pu and as an alternative to the transport and permanent disposal of {sup 238}Pu waste to the WIPP repository. In MSO technology, molten sodium carbonate salt at 800--900 C in a reaction vessel acts as a reaction media for wastes. The waste material is destroyed when injected into the molten salt, creating harmless carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash in the spent salt. The spent salt can be treated using aqueous separation methods to reuse the salt and to recover 99.9% of the precious {sup 238}Pu that was in the waste. Tests of MSO technology have shown that the volume of combustible TRU waste can be reduced by a factor of at least twenty. Using this factor the present inventory of 574 TRU drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated wastes is reduced to 30 drums. Further {sup 238}Pu waste costs of $22 million are avoided from not having to repackage 312 of the 574 drums to a drum total of more than 4,600 drums. MSO combined with aqueous processing of salts will recover approximately 1.7 kilograms of precious {sup 238}Pu valued at 4 million dollars (at $2,500/gram). Thus, installation and use of MSO technology at LANL will result in significant cost savings compared to present plans to transport and dispose {sup 238}Pu TRU waste to the WIPP site. Using a total net present value cost for the MSO project as $4.09 million over a five-year lifetime, the project can pay for itself after either recovery of 1.6 kg of Pu or through volume reduction of 818 drums or a combination of the two. These savings show a positive return on investment.

  14. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  15. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened. PMID:20873683

  16. Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullhusen, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear data needs for generation IV systems. Future of nuclear energy and the role of nuclear data / P. Finck. Nuclear data needs for generation IV nuclear energy systems-summary of U.S. workshop / T. A. Taiwo, H. S. Khalil. Nuclear data needs for the assessment of gen. IV systems / G. Rimpault. Nuclear data needs for generation IV-lessons from benchmarks / S. C. van der Marck, A. Hogenbirk, M. C. Duijvestijn. Core design issues of the supercritical water fast reactor / M. Mori ... [et al.]. GFR core neutronics studies at CEA / J. C. Bosq ... [et al]. Comparative study on different phonon frequency spectra of graphite in GCR / Young-Sik Cho ... [et al.]. Innovative fuel types for minor actinides transmutation / D. Haas, A. Fernandez, J. Somers. The importance of nuclear data in modeling and designing generation IV fast reactors / K. D. Weaver. The GIF and Mexico-"everything is possible" / C. Arrenondo Sánchez -- Benmarks, sensitivity calculations, uncertainties. Sensitivity of advanced reactor and fuel cycle performance parameters to nuclear data uncertainties / G. Aliberti ... [et al.]. Sensitivity and uncertainty study for thermal molten salt reactors / A. Biduad ... [et al.]. Integral reactor physics benchmarks- The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP) / J. B. Briggs, D. W. Nigg, E. Sartori. Computer model of an error propagation through micro-campaign of fast neutron gas cooled nuclear reactor / E. Ivanov. Combining differential and integral experiments on [symbol] for reducing uncertainties in nuclear data applications / T. Kawano ... [et al.]. Sensitivity of activation cross sections of the Hafnium, Tanatalum and Tungsten stable isotopes to nuclear reaction mechanisms / V. Avrigeanu ... [et al.]. Generating covariance data with nuclear models / A. J. Koning. Sensitivity of Candu-SCWR reactors physics calculations to nuclear data files / K. S

  17. Molten salt synthesis, visible and near-IR region spectral properties of europium or neodymium doped CoNb2O6 columbite niobate.

    PubMed

    Ekmekçi, Mete Kaan; Erdem, Murat; Başak, Ali Sadi

    2015-03-28

    Pure Nd(3+)- or Eu(3+)-doped CoNb2O6 powders have been prepared by a molten salt synthesis method using a Li2SO4-Na2SO4 or NaCl-KCl salt mixture as a flux at relatively low temperatures as compared to the solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction patterns of pure CoNb2O6 samples indicated an orthorhombic single phase. For Eu(3+)-doped CoNb2O6 samples, the luminescence of Eu(3+) was observed at 615 nm as red emission while the Nd(3+) doped sample showed a typical emission at 1064 nm varying with the Eu(3+) or Nd(3+) doping concentrations. These luminescence characteristics of the doped samples may be attributed to the energy transfer between rare earth ions and CoO6 octahedral groups in the columbite structure.

  18. The origin of the conductivity maximum in molten salts. II. SnCl2 and HgBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravindakshan, Nikhil P.; Kuntz, Colin M.; Gemmell, Kyle E.; Johnson, Keith E.; East, Allan L. L.

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of electrical conductivity maxima of molten salts versus temperature during orthobaric (closed-vessel) conditions is further examined via ab initio simulations. Previously, in a study of molten BiCl3, a new theory was offered in which the conductivity falloff at high temperatures is due not to traditional ion association, but to a rise in the activation energy for atomic ions hopping from counterion to counterion. Here this theory is further tested on two more inorganic melts which exhibit conductivity maxima: another high-conducting melt (SnCl2, σmax = 2.81 Ω-1 cm-1) and a low-conducting one (HgBr2, σmax = 4.06 × 10-4 Ω-1 cm-1). First, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were performed and again appear successful in reproducing the maxima for both these liquids. Second, analysis of the simulated liquid structure (radial distributions, species concentrations) was performed. In the HgBr2 case, a very molecular liquid like water, a clear Grotthuss chain of bromide transfers was observed in simulation when seeding the system with a HgBr+ cation and HgBr3- anion. The first conclusion is that the hopping mechanism offered for molten BiCl3 is simply the Grotthuss mechanism for conduction, applicable not just to H+ ions, but also to halide ions in post-transition-metal halide melts. Second, it is conjectured that the conductivity maximum is due to rising activation energy in network-covalent (halide-bridging) melts (BiCl3, SnCl2, PbCl2), but possibly a falling Arrhenius prefactor (collision frequency) for molecular melts (HgBr2).

  19. The origin of the conductivity maximum in molten salts. II. SnCl2 and HgBr2.

    PubMed

    Aravindakshan, Nikhil P; Kuntz, Colin M; Gemmell, Kyle E; Johnson, Keith E; East, Allan L L

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of electrical conductivity maxima of molten salts versus temperature during orthobaric (closed-vessel) conditions is further examined via ab initio simulations. Previously, in a study of molten BiCl3, a new theory was offered in which the conductivity falloff at high temperatures is due not to traditional ion association, but to a rise in the activation energy for atomic ions hopping from counterion to counterion. Here this theory is further tested on two more inorganic melts which exhibit conductivity maxima: another high-conducting melt (SnCl2, σmax = 2.81 Ω(-1) cm(-1)) and a low-conducting one (HgBr2, σmax = 4.06 × 10(-4) Ω(-1) cm(-1)). First, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were performed and again appear successful in reproducing the maxima for both these liquids. Second, analysis of the simulated liquid structure (radial distributions, species concentrations) was performed. In the HgBr2 case, a very molecular liquid like water, a clear Grotthuss chain of bromide transfers was observed in simulation when seeding the system with a HgBr(+) cation and HgBr3 (-) anion. The first conclusion is that the hopping mechanism offered for molten BiCl3 is simply the Grotthuss mechanism for conduction, applicable not just to H(+) ions, but also to halide ions in post-transition-metal halide melts. Second, it is conjectured that the conductivity maximum is due to rising activation energy in network-covalent (halide-bridging) melts (BiCl3, SnCl2, PbCl2), but possibly a falling Arrhenius prefactor (collision frequency) for molecular melts (HgBr2). PMID:27609001

  20. Preparation of Al-Si Master Alloy by Electrochemical Reduction of Volcanic Rock in Cryolite Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aimin; Shi, Zhongning; Xu, Junli; Hu, Xianwei; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic rock found in the Longgang Volcano Group in Jilin Province of China has properties essentially similar to Apollo lunar soils and previously prepared lunar soil simulants, such as Johnson Space Center Lunar simulant and Minnesota Lunar simulant. In this study, an electrochemical method of preparation of Al-Si master alloy was investigated in 52.7 wt.%NaF-47.3 wt.%AlF3 melt adding 5 wt.% volcanic rock at 1233 K. The cathodic electrochemical process was studied by cyclic voltammetry, and the results showed that the cathodic reduction of Si(IV) is a two-step reversible diffusion-controlled reaction. Si(IV) is reduced to Si(II) by two electron transfers at -1.05 V versus platinum quasi-reference electrode in 52.7 wt.%NaF-47.3 wt.%AlF3 molten salt adding 5 wt.% volcanic rock, while the reduction peak at -1.18 V was the co-deposition of aluminum and silicon. In addition, the cathodic product obtained by galvanostatic electrolysis for 4 h was analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The results showed that the phase compositions of the products are Al, Si, Al5FeSi, and Al3.21Si0.47, while the components are 90.5 wt.% aluminum, 4.4 wt.% silicon, 1.9 wt.% iron, and 0.2 wt.% titanium.

  1. Gaseous fission product management for molten salt reactors and vented fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, S. J.; Forsberg, C.; Massie, M.

    2012-07-01

    Fission gas disposal is one of the unresolved difficulties for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) and advanced reactors with vented fuel systems. As these systems operate, they produce many radioactive isotopes of xenon and krypton (e.g. {sup 135}Xe t{sub 1/2} = 9.14 hours and {sup 85}Kr t{sub 1/2}= 10.73 years). Removing these gases proves vital to the success of such reactor designs for two reasons. First, the gases act as large neutron sinks which decrease reactivity and must be counterbalanced by increasing fuel loading. Second, for MSRs, inert fission product gases naturally separate quickly from high temperature salts, thus creating high vapor pressure which poses safety concerns. For advanced reactors with solid vented fuel, the gases are allowed to escape into an off-gas system and thus must be managed. Because of time delays in transport of fission product gases in vented fuel systems, some of the shorter-lived radionuclides will decay away thereby reducing the fission gas source term relative to an MSR. To calculate the fission gas source term of a typical molten salt reactor, we modeled a 1000 MWe graphite moderated thorium MSR similar to that detailed in Mathieu et al. [1]. The fuel salt used in these calculations was LiF (78 mole percent) - (HN)F 4 (22 mole percent) with a heavy nuclide composition of 3.86% {sup 233}U and 96.14% {sup 232}Th by mass. Before we can remove the fission product gases produced by this reactor configuration, we must first develop an appropriate storage mechanism. The gases could be stored in pressurized containers but then one must be concerned about bottle failure. Methods to trap noble gases in matrices are expensive and complex. Alternatively, there are direct storage/disposal options: direct injection into the Earth or injecting a grout-based product into the Earth. Advances in drilling technologies, hydro fracture technologies, and methods for the sequestration of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel plants are creating new options

  2. Preparation of Binary and Ternary Oxides by Molten Salt Method and its Electrochemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. V.; Theng, L. Pei; Soh, Hulbert; Beichen, Z.; Jiahuan, F.; Yu, C.; Ling, A. Yen; Andreea, L. Y.; Ng, C. H. Justin; Liang, T. J. L. Galen; Ian, M. F.; An, H. V. T.; Ramanathan, K.; Kevin, C. W. J.; Daryl, T. Y. W.; Hao, T. Yi; Loh, K. P.; Chowdari, B. V. R.

    2013-07-01

    We report simple binary oxides namely SnO2, TiO2, CuO, MnO2, Fe2O3, Co3O4 and ternary oxides like MnCo2O4 by molten salt method at a temperature range of 280°C to 950°C in air and discuss the effect of morphology, crystal structure and electrochemical properties of binary and ternary oxides. Materials were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area methods. XRD patterns showed all MSM prepared materials exhibited characteristic lattice parameter values. BET surface area varies depending on the nature of the material, molten salt and preparation temperature and the obtained values are in the range, 1 to 160 m2/g. Electrochemical properties were studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical performance studies were carried in the voltage range, 0.005-1.0V for SnO2, 1.0-2.8V for TiO2 and Fe2O3, MCo2O4 (M = Co, Mn), MnO2 and CuO were cycled in the range, 0.005-3.0V. At a current rates of 30-100 mA/g and a scan rate of 0.058 mV/sec was used for galvanostatic cycling and cyclic voltammetry. SnO2 showed that an alloying-de-alloying reaction occurs at ˜0.2 and ˜0.5 V vs. Li. TiO2 main intercalation and de-interaction reactions at ˜1.7 and ˜1.8 V vs. Li. Co3O4, MnCo2O4, and MnO2 main discharge potentials at ˜1.2, 0.9V and 0.4V, resp. and charge potentials peak ˜2.0V and 1.5V vs. Li. CuO prepared at 750°C exhibited main anodic peak at ˜2.45V and cathodic peaks at ˜0.85V and ˜1.25V. We discussed the possible reaction mechanisms and Li-storage performance values in detail.

  3. Room temperature inorganic ``quasi-molten salts`` as alkali-metal electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, K.; Zhang, S.; Angell, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Room temperature inorganic liquids of high ionic conductivity have been prepared by reacting Lewis acid AlCl with sulfonyl chlorides. The mechanism is not clear at this time since a crystal structure study of the 1:1 complex with CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}Cl (T{sub m} = 30 C) is not consistent with a simple chloride transfer to create AlClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} anions. The liquid is in a state somewhere between ionic and molecular. A new term quasi-molten salt is adopted to describe this state. A comparably conducting liquid can be made using BCL{sub 3} in place of AlCl{sub 3}. Unlike their organic counterparts based on ammonium cations (e.g., pyridinium or imidazolium) which reduce in the presence of alkali metals, this inorganic class of cation shows great stability against electrochemical reduction (ca. {minus}1.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li), with the useful consequence that reversible lithium and sodium metal deposition/stripping can be supported. The electrochemical window for these quasi-salts with AlCl{sub 3} ranges up to 5.0 V, and their room temperature conductivities exceed 10{sup {minus}4} S/cm. They dissolve lithium and sodium tetrachloroaluminates up to mole fraction {approximately} 0.6 at 100 C and intermediate compositions are permanently stable at ambient. The resultant lithium or sodium salt solutions exhibit electrochemical windows of 4.5--5.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li or Na{sup +}/Na and show room temperature conductivities of 10{sup {minus}3.0}--10{sup {minus}2.5} S/cm. In preliminary charge/discharge tests, the cell Li/``quasi-ionic liquid electrolyte``/Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} showed a discharge capacity of ca. 110 mAh/(g of cathode) and sustained 80% of the initial capacity after 60 cycles, indicating that these quasi-molten salt-based electrolytes are promising candidates for alkali-metal batteries.

  4. Preliminary study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1983-02-01

    A preliminary laboratory-scale study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts investigated the (1) solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ in molten salts, (2) electrochemical behavior of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/, and (3) electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ with the determination of current efficiency as a function of current density. The solubility measurements show that MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte at 1023 K can dissolve up to 3.3 mol % sulfide. The molar ratio of sulfur to aluminum in the eutectic is about one, which suggests that some sulfur remains undissolved, probably in the form of MgS. The experimental data and thermodynamic calculations suggest that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolves in the eutectic to form AlS/sup +/ species in solution. Addition of AlCl/sub 3/ to the eutectic enhances the solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/; the solubility increases with increasing AlCl/sub 3/ concentration. The electrode reaction mechanism for the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ was elucidated by using linear sweep voltammetry. The cathodic reduction of aluminum-ion-containing species to aluminum proceeds by a reversible, diffusion-controlled, three-electron reaction. The anodic reaction involves the two-electron discharge of sulfide-ion-containing species, followed by the fast dimerization of sulfur atoms to S/sub 2/. Electrolysis experiments show that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolved in molten MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic or in eutectic containing AlCl/sub 3/ can be electrolyzed to produce aluminum and sulfur. In the eutectic at 1023 K, the electrolysis can be conducted up to about 300 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the saturation solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/. Although these preliminary results are promising, additional studies are needed to elucidate many critical operating parameters before the technical potential of the electrolysis can be accurately assessed. 20 figures, 18 tables.

  5. New operating strategies for molten salt in line focusing solar fields - Daily drainage and solar receiver preheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickhoff, Martin; Meyer-Grünefeldt, Mirko; Keller, Lothar

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays molten salt is efficiently used in point concentrating solar thermal power plants. Line focusing systems still have the disadvantage of elevated heat losses at night because of active freeze protection of the solar field piping system. In order to achieve an efficient operation of line focusing solar power plants using molten salt, a new plant design and a novel operating strategy is developed for Linear Fresnel- and Parabolic Trough power plants. Daily vespertine drainage of the solar field piping and daily matutinal refilling of the solar preheated absorber tubes eliminate the need of nocturnal heating of the solar field and reduce nocturnal heat losses to a minimum. The feasibility of this new operating strategy with all its sub-steps has been demonstrated experimentally.

  6. Wetting behavior of imidazolium-containing, room-temperature molten salt. Technical report, 11 June 28-August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, J.G.

    1984-08-28

    A room-temperature, molten-salt system composed of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride plus aluminum chloride has been developed and extensively studied over the last few years. The most promising application of this liquid mixture is as a battery electrolyte, and for this reason a study was undertaken of the wettability of various candidate battery component materials by the molten salt. Advancing and receding contact angles were determined for the binary melt as a function of such variables as mixture composition, chlorination of the imidazolium ion, replacement of AlCl3 by LiCl, solid porosity, and solid surface cleaning procedure. Measurements were also made of the surface tension of the melt at one basic composition. Surface tension data was helpful in understanding the composition dependence of melt wetting behavior.

  7. Preparation of SiC/SiO2 core-shell nanowires via molten salt mediated carbothermal reduction route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ju; Yan, Shuai; Jia, Quanli; Huang, Juntong; Lin, Liangxu; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-06-01

    The growth of silicon carbide (SiC) crystal generally requires a high temperature, especially when low quality industrial wastes are used as the starting raw materials. In this work, SiC/SiO2 core-shell nanowires (NWs) were synthesized from low cost silica fume and sucrose via a molten salt mediated carbothermal reduction (CR) route. The molten salt was found to be effective in promoting the SiC growth and lowering the synthesis temperature. The resultant NWs exhibited a heterostructure composed of a 3C-SiC core of 100 nm in diameter and a 5-10 nm thick amorphous SiO2 shell layer. The photoluminescence spectrum of the achieved SiC NWs displayed a significant blue shift (a dominant luminescence at round 422 nm), which suggested that they were high quality and could be a promising candidate material for future optoelectronic applications.

  8. The use of molten salts as physical models for the study of solidification in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Jurek K.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that molten salts possess attributes rendering them attractive as physical models of cast metals in solidification studies. Molten alkali halides have an approximately correct Prandtl number for this modeling of metallic melts, and are transparent to visible light. Attention is given to solidification in the LiCl-KCl system, in order to determine whether such phenomena as solute rejection can be observed and characterized through the application of laser schlieren imaging.

  9. Aerosol-assisted molten salt synthesis of NaInS(2) nanoplates for use as a new photoanode material.

    PubMed

    Mann, Amanda K P; Wicker, Susanne; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2012-12-01

    NaInS(2) , a H(2) -evolving photocatalyst, is synthesized as single-crystalline hexagonal plates by coupling a molten salt synthesis with ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) for the first time. USP NaInS(2) films are used as a new photoanode material and have an initial photocurrent of ≈37 μA/cm(2) upon illumination and activities 25 times greater than films made from a standard non-aerosol NaInS(2) sample.

  10. Effects assessment of 10 functioning years on the main components of the molten salt PCS experimental facility of ENEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggioli, Walter; Di Ascenzi, Primo; Rinaldi, Luca; Tarquini, Pietro; Fabrizi, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    In the frame of the Solar Thermodynamic Laboratory, ENEA has improved CSP Parabolic Trough technologies by adopting new advanced solutions for linear tube receivers and by implementing a binary mixture of molten salt (60% NaNO3 and 40% KNO3) [1] as both heat transfer fluid and heat storage medium in solar field and in storage tanks, thus allowing the solar plants to operate at high temperatures up to 550°C. Further improvements have regarded parabolic mirror collectors, piping and process instrumentation. All the innovative components developed by ENEA, together with other standard parts of the plant, have been tested and qualified under actual solar operating conditions on the PCS experimental facility at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center in Rome (Italy). The PCS (Prova Collettori Solari, i.e. Test of Solar Collectors) facility is the main testing loop built by ENEA and it is unique in the world for what concerns the high operating temperature and the fluid used (mixture of molten salt). It consists in one line of parabolic trough collectors (test section of 100 m long life-size solar collectors) using, as heat transfer fluid, the aforesaid binary mixture of molten salt up to 10 bar, at high temperature in the range 270° and 550°C and a flow rate up to 6.5 kg/s. It has been working since early 2004 [2] till now; it consists in a unique closed loop, and it is totally instrumented. In this paper the effects of over ten years qualification tests on the pressurized tank will be presented, together with the characterization of the thermal losses of the piping of the molten salt circuit, and some observations performed on the PCS facility during its first ten years of operation.

  11. Application of ceramic membrane in molten salt electrolysis of CaO-CaCl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, P.D.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1998-09-01

    Calciothermic reduction of radioactive metal oxides and halides produces calcium compounds as the by-product which require subsequent processing to mitigate and control a potential source of waste generation. Attempts to recover elemental calcium by direct molten salt electrolysis of calcium compounds using carbon anodes have met with very limited success due to severe process limitations and stringent cell design requirements. A feasible process to win calcium in a modified cell is discussed where a porous anodic diaphragm has been used around the carbon anode. The effective diffusion coefficient for steady state cell operation has been estimated and is found to depend on the porosity and morphology of the anode sheath. An expression for the maximum electrowinning rate, incorporating an effective diffusion coefficient, has been developed and can be used to determine the limiting current density under steady-state conditions. The possibility of enhancing the current efficiency to an acceptable level by in situ application of calcium as a reductant is suggested.

  12. Corrosion Resistance of Sintered and Pyrolytic Boron Nitride in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznestsov, S.A.; Polyakov, E.G.; Stangrit, P.T.

    1986-02-01

    This paper compares the behavior of sintered and pyrolytic boron nitride in the following molten salts: KC1-NaC1-K/sub 3/A1F/sub 6/ (15 wt. %), LiF-BaF/sub 2/-LaF/sub 3/ (40 wt. %)-La/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (2 wt. %), KC1-NaC1-K/sub 2/HFF/sub 6/ (15 wt. %), KC1-NaC1-K/sub 2/ZrF/sub 6/ (15 wt. %), KC1-NaC1-K/sub 2/NbF/sub 7/ (10 wt. %), and KC1-NaC1-K/sub 2/TaF/sub 7/ (10 wt. %). The gas phase composition was determined on a Perkin-Elmer F-30 chromatograph and the boron in the electrolyte by reaction with carminic acid. The lack of adhesion of pyrolytic boron nitride to glassy carbon and pyrographite makes it possible to use it for producing various articles, particularly capillaries, and to fabricate highly stable cells for measuring the electrical conductivity of extremely aggressive melts. Pyrolytic boron nitride is inapplicable as an electrical insulator in melts contining K/sub 2/NbF/sub 7/ and K/sub 2/TaF/sub 7/ due to surface formation of conductive metal nitrides.

  13. Control of molten salt corrosion of fusion structural materials by metallic beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; H. Nishimura; T. Terai

    2009-04-01

    A series of tests have been performed between 2001 and 2006 at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research facility of the Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate chemical compatibility between the molten salt flibe (2LiF+BeF2 in moles) and fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. The tests adopted metallic beryllium contact as main fluoride potential control, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) in controlled conditions at 530 C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic impurities dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration dropped to level close to the detectable limit when the beryllium rod was inserted and increased once the content of excess beryllium in the system had been consumed by HF reduction and specimens corrosion progressed. Metallographic analysis of the samples after 500 hours exposure in reactive conditions showed evidence of the formation of unstable chromium oxide layers on the specimens surface.

  14. Direct Conversion of Greenhouse Gas CO2 into Graphene via Molten Salts Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liwen; Song, Yang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Liu, Yingjun; Ge, Jianbang; Jiao, Handong; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Junxiang; Zhu, Hongmin; Fray, Derek J

    2016-03-21

    Producing graphene through the electrochemical reduction of CO2 remains a great challenge, which requires precise control of the reaction kinetics, such as diffusivities of multiple ions, solubility of various gases, and the nucleation/growth of carbon on a surface. Here, graphene was successfully created from the greenhouse gas CO2 using molten salts. The results showed that CO2 could be effectively fixed by oxygen ions in CaCl2-NaCl-CaO melts to form carbonate ions, and subsequently electrochemically split into graphene on a stainless steel cathode; O2 gas was produced at the RuO2-TiO2 inert anode. The formation of graphene in this manner can be ascribed to the catalysis of active Fe, Ni, and Cu atoms at the surface of the cathode and the microexplosion effect through evolution of CO in between graphite layers. This finding may lead to a new generation of proceedures for the synthesis of high value-added products from CO2, which may also contribute to the establishment of a low-carbon and sustainable world.

  15. Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.C.

    1997-11-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  16. Thermal analysis to support decommissioning of the molten salt reactor experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, C.D.; Morris, D.G.; Park, J.E.; Williams, P.T.

    1996-06-01

    As part of the decommissioning process for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, several thermal-sciences issues were addressed. Apparently a mixture of UF{sub 6} and F{sub 2} had diffused into the upper portion of one charcoal column in the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB), leading to radiative decay heating and possible chemical reaction sources. A proposed interim corrective action was planned to remove the water from the ACB cell to reduce criticality and reactivity concerns and then fill the ACB cell with an inert material. This report describes design of a thermocouple probe to obtain temperature measurements for mapping the uranium deposit, as well as development of steady-state and transient numerical models for the heat transfer inside the charcoal column. Additional numerical modeling was done to support filling of the ACB cell. Results from this work were used to develop procedures for meeting the goals of the MSRE Remediation Project without exceeding appropriate thermal limits.

  17. Direct Conversion of Greenhouse Gas CO2 into Graphene via Molten Salts Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liwen; Song, Yang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Liu, Yingjun; Ge, Jianbang; Jiao, Handong; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Junxiang; Zhu, Hongmin; Fray, Derek J

    2016-03-21

    Producing graphene through the electrochemical reduction of CO2 remains a great challenge, which requires precise control of the reaction kinetics, such as diffusivities of multiple ions, solubility of various gases, and the nucleation/growth of carbon on a surface. Here, graphene was successfully created from the greenhouse gas CO2 using molten salts. The results showed that CO2 could be effectively fixed by oxygen ions in CaCl2-NaCl-CaO melts to form carbonate ions, and subsequently electrochemically split into graphene on a stainless steel cathode; O2 gas was produced at the RuO2-TiO2 inert anode. The formation of graphene in this manner can be ascribed to the catalysis of active Fe, Ni, and Cu atoms at the surface of the cathode and the microexplosion effect through evolution of CO in between graphite layers. This finding may lead to a new generation of proceedures for the synthesis of high value-added products from CO2, which may also contribute to the establishment of a low-carbon and sustainable world. PMID:26871684

  18. Uncertainty studies of real anode surface area in computational analysis for molten salt electrorefining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungyeol; Park, Jaeyeong; Hoover, Robert O.; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael F.; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Hwang, Il Soon

    2011-09-01

    This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 h of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

  19. Convective heat transfer from molten salt droplets in a direct contact heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, O.; Naterer, G. F.; Dincer, I.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new predictive model of droplet flow and heat transfer from molten salt droplets in a direct contact heat exchanger. The process is designed to recover heat from molten CuCl in a thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle of hydrogen production. This heat recovery occurs through the physical interaction between high temperature CuCl droplets and air. Convective heat transfer between droplets and air is analyzed in a counter-current spray flow heat exchanger. Numerical results for the variations of temperature, velocity and heat transfer rate are presented for two cases of CuCl flow. The optimal dimensions of the heat exchanger are found to be a diameter of 0.13 m, with a height of 0.6 and 0.8 m, for 1 and 0.5 mm droplet diameters, respectively. Additional results are presented and discussed for the heat transfer effectiveness and droplet solidification during heat recovery from the molten CuCl droplets.

  20. Electrochemistry of LiCl-Li2O-H2O Molten Salt Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Natalie J. Gese; Batric Pesic

    2013-03-01

    Uranium can be recovered from uranium oxide (UO2) spent fuel through the combination of the oxide reduction and electrorefining processes. During oxide reduction, the spent fuel is introduced to molten LiCl-Li2O salt at 650 degrees C and the UO2 is reduced to uranium metal via two routes: (1) electrochemically, and (2) chemically by lithium metal (Li0) that is produced electrochemically. However, the hygroscopic nature of both LiCl and Li2O leads to the formation of LiOH, contributing hydroxyl anions (OH-), the reduction of which interferes with the Li0 generation required for the chemical reduction of UO2. In order for the oxide reduction process to be an effective method for the treatment of uranium oxide fuel, the role of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O system must be understood. The behavior of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O molten salt system was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamperometry, while reduction to hydrogen was confirmed with gas chromatography.

  1. Synthesis of Nano Sized Cr2AlC Powders by Molten Salt Method.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Zhu, Jianfeng; Wang, Fen; Tang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Cr2AlC powders were successfully synthesized by molten salt method using Cr, Al and C as starting materials. The effects of the process parameters and amount of Al addition on the purity of the Cr2AlC powders were also investigated in details. The formation mechanism of Cr2AlC powders was investigated by XRD and DSC. The results indicated that intermediates of Cr7C3 and Cr- Al intermetallics, such as CrAl17, Cr2Al, Cr2Al8, were formed by the reactions among the initial elements, then the intermediates gradually transformed to Cr2AlC. From the fixed composition of Cr:Al:C = 2:1.2:1, high purity Cr2AlC powders could be obtained with an inorganic salt KCl as a solvent at 1250 degrees C for 60 min under argon atmosphere which was lower than that (generally 1450 degrees C) of conventional solid state reaction.

  2. Measuring lanthanide concentrations in molten salt using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Arel; Lakis, Rollin E; Simpson, Michael F; Horowitz, Leo; Craparo, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The versatility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as an analytical method for high-temperature applications was demonstrated through measurement of the concentrations of the lanthanide elements europium (Eu) and praseodymium (Pr) in molten eutectic lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) salts at a temperature of 500 °C. Laser pulses (1064 nm, 7 ns, 120 mJ/pulse) were focused on the top surface of the molten salt samples in a laboratory furnace under an argon atmosphere, and the resulting LIBS signals were collected using a broadband Echelle-type spectrometer. Partial least squares (PLS) regression using leave-one-sample-out cross-validation was used to quantify the concentrations of Eu and Pr in the samples. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for Eu was 0.13% (absolute) over a concentration range of 0-3.01%, and for Pr was 0.13% (absolute) over a concentration range of 0-1.04%.

  3. Electrochemical study of the properties of indium in room temperature chloroaluminate molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.S.Y.; Sun, I.W.

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of indium was studied with voltammetry and chronoamperometry at glassy carbon, tungsten, and nickel electrodes in the basic and acidic aluminum chloride-1,2-dimethyl-3-propylimidazolium chloride molten salt at 27 C. In the basic melt, In(III) is complexed as [InCl{sub 5}]{sup 2{minus}}, which could be reduced to indium metal through a three-electron reduction process. The electrodeposition of indium on glassy carbon and tungsten electrodes involves progressive three-dimensional nucleation on a finite number of active sites with diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei. The electrodeposition of indium metal on a nickel electrode entails progressive three-dimensional nucleation on a large number of active sites. The formal potentials of the In(III)/In couple in the 44.4 to 55.6 and 49.0 to 51.0 mole percent (m/o) melts are {minus}1.096 and {minus}1.009 V, respectively, vs. Al(III)Al in the 66.7 to 33.3 m/o.

  4. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The novel techniques described herein rely on the production of the nitride precursor (N{sup 3-}) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (February 2006-September 2006) focused on establishing that mass transport of GaN occurs in molten LiCl, the construction of a larger diameter electrochemical cell, the design, modification, and installation of a made-to-order glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and the feasibility of using room temperature molten salts to perform nitride chemistry experiments.

  5. Microstructure and kinetics of hot corrosion for a nickel alloy in molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.W.; Brummond, W.A.; Grimmett, D.L.; Newcomb, J.C.; Chiang, K.T.; Gay, R.L.

    1996-12-01

    Metallography, analytical SEM, and XRD were used to measure kinetics and characterize the microstructure of hot corrosion of the Ni-Cr-Fe alloy INCONEL 600 after 500 h immersion in molten Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}- NaCl salt at 900-950 C in an oxidizing atmosphere. This was done to assess the alloy as a reaction vessel material for a waste treatment process known as Molten Salt Oxidation. The alloy was found to hot corrode by surface oxidation and intergranular attack. Combined rate for loss of load-bearing cross-section metal was comparable to corrosion rates for analogous salts. About 5% of the oxide scale was a continuous, dense, protective layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the metal/oxide interface. A middle portion comprised about 55% of the scale and was a porous, mixed oxide of NiO>Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}>Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The outer 40% was nearly all NiO with dense grains and cavitated grain boundaries. Overall, the NiO was dominant and the lesser amounts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were roughly equivalent. No direct invasion of salt through the oxide to the metal was observed.

  6. Uncertainty Studies of Real Anode Surface Area in Computational Analysis for Molten Salt Electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Sungyeol Choi; Jaeyeong Park; Robert O. Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson; Kwang-Rag Kim; Il Soon Hwang

    2011-09-01

    This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 hours of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

  7. Separation of Actinides from LWR Spent Fuel Using Molten-Salt-Based Electrochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, Eric J.; Gourishankar, Karthick V.; Smith, James L.; Chow, Lorac S.; Redey, Laszlo

    2001-12-15

    Results are presented of work done at Argonne National Laboratory to develop a molten-salt-based electrochemical technology for extracting uranium and transuranic elements from spent light water reactor fuel. In this process, the actinide oxides in the spent fuel are reduced using lithium at 650 deg. C in the presence of molten LiCl, yielding the corresponding actinides and Li{sub 2}O. The actinides are then extracted from the reduction product by means of electrorefining. Associated with the reduction step is an ancillary salt-recovery step designed to electrochemically reduce the Li{sub 2}O concentration of the salt and recover the lithium metal.Experiments were performed at the laboratory scale (50 to 150 g of fuel and 0.5 to 3.5 l of salt) and engineering scale (3.7 to 5.2 kg of fuel and 50 l of salt). Laboratory-scale experiments were designed to obtain information on the fundamental factors affecting process rates. Engineering-scale experiments were conducted to verify that the parameters controlling process scaleup are sufficiently understood, and to test equipment and operating concepts at or near full scale. All indications are that the electrochemical-based process should be workable at practical plant sizes.

  8. Primary and secondary room temperature molten salt electrochemical cells. Rept. for Jun 84-Mar 85

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, G.F.; Dymek, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Three primary cells (a, b, and c) and two secondary cell candidates (d and e) were examined using room-temperature molten salts as electrolytes in each case: (a) A1 anode / A1Cl3-MEIC1 (N=0.37) // FeCl3-MEIC1 (N=0.33) / W cathode (b) A1 anode / A1Cl3-MEIC1 (N=0.37) // WCL6-MEIC1 (N=0.33) / W cathode (c) A1 anode / A1Br3-MEIBr (N=0.33) / BR2 / RVC, Pt cathode (d) Zn anode / A1Cl3-MEIC1 (N=0.33) // A1Cl3-MEIC1 (N=0.60) / A1 cathode (e) Cd anode / A1Cl3-MEIC1 (N=0.33) // A1Cl3-MEIC1 (N=0.60) / A1 cathode. All cells except (c) used electrolytes containing 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MEIC1), where N is the mole fraction of aluminum halide in the melt. Cell (c) used electrolytes containing 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium bromide (MEIBr). An IONAC anion exchange membrane separated the anolyte and catholyte solutions in cells (a) and (b), while in cells (d) and (e) a NAFION cation exchange membrane separated the anolyte and catholyte solutions. In cell (c) a phase boundary separated the anolyte and catholyte solutions, with reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) acting as the anode current carrier.

  9. Stabilization/Solidification of radioactive molten salt waste via gel-route pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, In-Tae; Kim, Hwan-Young; Ryu, Seung-Kon; Kim, Joon-Hyung

    2007-02-15

    The volatilization of radionuclides during the stabilization/solidification of radioactive wastes at high temperatures is one of the major problems to be considered in choosing suitable wasteforms, process, material systems, etc. This paper reports a novel method to convert volatile wastes into nonvolatile compounds via a sol-gel process, which is different from the conventional method using metal-alkoxides and organic solvents. The material system was designed with sodium silicate (Si) as a gelling agent, phosphoric acid (P) as a catalyst/stabilizer, aluminum nitrate (Al) as a property promoter, and H20 as a solvent. A novel structural model for the chemical conversion of molten salt waste, named RPRM (Reaction Product in Reaction Module), was established, and the waste could be solidified with glass matrix via a simple procedure. The leached fraction of Cs and Sr by a PCT leaching method was 0.72% and 0.014%, respectively. In conclusion, the RPRM model isto converttargetwastes into stable and manageable products, not to obtain a specific crystalline product for each radionuclide. This paper suggested a new stabilization/solidification method for salt wastes by establishing the gel-forming material system and showing a practical example, not a new synthesis method of stable crystalline phase. This process, named "gel-route stabilization/solidification (GRSS)", will be a prospective alternative with stable chemical process on the immobilization of salt wastes and various mixed radioactive waste for final disposal.

  10. Economic evaluation of solar-only and hybrid power towers using molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Several hybrid and solar-only configurations for molten-salt power towers were evaluated with a simple economic model, appropriate for screening analysis. The solar specific aspects of these plants were highlighted. In general, hybrid power towers were shown to be economically superior to solar-only plants with the same field size. Furthermore, the power-booster hybrid approach was generally preferred over the fuel-saver hybrid approach. Using today`s power tower technology, economic viability for the solar power-boost occurs at fuel costs in the neighborhood of $2.60/MBtu to $4.40/ MBtu (low heating value) depending on whether coal-based or gas-turbine-based technology is being offset. The cost Of CO[sub 2] avoidance was also calculated for solar cases in which the fossil fuel cost was too low for solar to be economically viable. The avoidance costs are competitive with other proposed methods of removing CO[sub 2] from fossil-fired power plants.

  11. Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2012-03-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  12. Radon Measurements at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Facility from August 1997 through April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.L.

    1999-04-01

    From August 1997 through April 1998, radon and radon progeny measurements were collected at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the baseline concentrations of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and their progeny in the air at selected points with emphasis on the characterization of 220Rn and its daughter products in the high bay area. The daughter product concentrations ranged from the equivalent of approximately 0.001 times the derived air concentration (DAC) of the isotope mixture up to 0.09 DAC, with the highest measurements occurring inside the pit above the equipment drain tank cell. Direct radon measurements in this area indicated a relatively constant 222Rn concentration with an average value of 1.4 pCi/L and a 220Rn concentration that fluctuated from <1 pCi/L up to about 30 pCi/L. Measurements were also collected inside the vent house adjacent to building 7503. The progeny concentrations inside the room ranged from an equivalent of about 0.002 DAC up to 0.01 DAC. The direct radon measurements in the vent house indicated a relatively constant 222Rn concentration with an average value of 0.7 pCi/L while the 220Rn concentration varied appreciably and ranged from <0.5 pCi/L up to almost 200 pCi/L with an average concentration of 18 pCi/L.

  13. Mixed-convective, conjugate heat transfer during molten salt quenching of small parts

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    It is common in free quenching immersion heat treatment calculations to locally apply constant or surface-averaged heat-transfer coefficients obtained from either free or forced steady convection over simple shapes with small temperature differences from the ambient fluid. This procedure avoids the solution of highly transient, non-Boussinesq conjugate heat transfer problems which often involve mixed convection, but it leaves great uncertainty about the general adequacy of the results. In this paper we demonstrate for small parts (dimensions of the order of inches rather than feet) quenched in molten salt, that it is feasible to calculate such nonuniform surface heat transfer from first principles without adjustable empirical parameters. We use literature physical property salt data from the separate publications of Kirst et al., Nissen, Carling, and Teja, et al. for T<1000 F, and then extrapolate it to the initial part temperature. The reported thermal/chemical breakdown of NaNO{sub 2} for T>800 F is not considered to be important due to the short time the surface temperature exceeds that value for small parts. Similarly, for small parts, the local Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers are below the corresponding critical values for most if not all of the quench, so that we see no evidence of the existence of significant turbulence effects, only some large scale unsteadiness for brief periods. The experimental data comparisons from the open literature include some probe cooling-rate results of Foreman, as well as some cylinder thermal histories of Howes.

  14. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Kamali, Ali Reza Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-10-15

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: {yields} Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. {yields} The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. {yields} A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. {yields} The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  15. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 2. Commercial plant study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, Arthur L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit (PDU). This process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of the salt. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  16. Measuring lanthanide concentrations in molten salt using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Arel; Lakis, Rollin E; Simpson, Michael F; Horowitz, Leo; Craparo, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The versatility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as an analytical method for high-temperature applications was demonstrated through measurement of the concentrations of the lanthanide elements europium (Eu) and praseodymium (Pr) in molten eutectic lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) salts at a temperature of 500 °C. Laser pulses (1064 nm, 7 ns, 120 mJ/pulse) were focused on the top surface of the molten salt samples in a laboratory furnace under an argon atmosphere, and the resulting LIBS signals were collected using a broadband Echelle-type spectrometer. Partial least squares (PLS) regression using leave-one-sample-out cross-validation was used to quantify the concentrations of Eu and Pr in the samples. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for Eu was 0.13% (absolute) over a concentration range of 0-3.01%, and for Pr was 0.13% (absolute) over a concentration range of 0-1.04%. PMID:25226247

  17. Ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy for effluent analysis in a molten salt electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Calaway, W. F.; Hryn, J. N.

    2003-08-01

    An apparatus that combines gas phase spectroscopy over two wavelength ranges for analysis of effluent from a molten salt electrochemical cell is described. The cell is placed in a quartz tube that is sealed at the top with a cap containing feedthrus for power, thermometry, and gas flow. A resistance furnace brings the cell assembly to the desired temperature while the cap remains cooled by water. Inert gas continually purges the cell headspace carrying effluent from the electrolysis sequentially through two gas cells, one in a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and one in a fiber-optic coupled ultraviolet visible spectrometer. Strong vibrational absorptions in the IR can easily identify common effluent components such as HCl, CO, CO2, and H2O. Electronic bands can identify IR-inactive molecules of importance including Cl2 and O2. Since the absorptivity of all of these species is known, determinations of the gas concentration can be made without using standards. Spectra from the electrolysis of molten MgCl2 are shown and discussed, as well as the limit of detection and inherent time resolution of the apparatus as implemented.

  18. A perspective on liquid salts for energy and materials.

    PubMed

    Irvine, J T S

    2016-08-15

    Liquid salts comprising molten salts and ionic liquids offer important media to address both energy and materials challenges. Here we review topics presented in this Faraday Discussion volume related to improved electrowinning of metals, optimisation of processes, new electrochemical device concepts, chemistry in ionic liquids, conversion of biomass, carbon chemistry and nuclear applications. The underlying phenomenology is then reviewed and commentary given. Some future applications are then discussed, further exemplifying the high potential rewards achievable from these chemistries.

  19. A perspective on liquid salts for energy and materials.

    PubMed

    Irvine, J T S

    2016-08-15

    Liquid salts comprising molten salts and ionic liquids offer important media to address both energy and materials challenges. Here we review topics presented in this Faraday Discussion volume related to improved electrowinning of metals, optimisation of processes, new electrochemical device concepts, chemistry in ionic liquids, conversion of biomass, carbon chemistry and nuclear applications. The underlying phenomenology is then reviewed and commentary given. Some future applications are then discussed, further exemplifying the high potential rewards achievable from these chemistries. PMID:27483385

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 625 in PbSO4-Pb3O4-PbCl2-ZnO-10 Wt Pct CdO Molten Salt Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi Zahrani, E.; Alfantazi, A. M.

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion behavior and degradation mechanisms of alloy 625 under a 47.288 PbSO4-12.776 Pb3O4-6.844PbCl2-23.108ZnO-10CdO (wt pct) molten salt mixture under air atmosphere were studied at 873 K, 973 K, and 1073 K (600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to evaluate the degradation mechanisms and characterize the corrosion behavior of the alloy. Morphology, chemical composition, and phase structure of the corrosion products and surface layers of the corroded specimens were studied by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) and X-ray map analyses. Results confirmed that during the exposure of alloy 625 to the molten salt, chromium was mainly dissolved through an active oxidation process as CrO3, Cr2O3, and CrNbO4, while nickel dissolved only as NiO in the system. Formation of a porous and nonprotective oxide layer with low resistance is responsible for the weak protective properties of the barrier layer at high temperatures of 973 K and 1073 K (700 °C and 800 °C). There were two kinds of attack for INCONEL 625, including general surface corrosion and pitting. Pitting corrosion occurred due to the breakdown of the initial oxide layer by molten salt dissolution of the oxide or oxide cracking.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  2. Method for removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report details the pyrometallurgical process for recycling spent metal fuels from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which involves electrorefining spent fuel in a molten salt electrolyte (LiCl-KCI-U/PuCl{sub 3}) at 500{degree}C. The total heavy metal chloride concentration in the salt will be about 2 mol %. At some point, the concentrations of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products in the salt must be reduced to lower the amount of heat generated in the electrorefiner. The heavy metal concentration in the salt must be reduced before removing the fission products from the salt. The operation uses a lithium-cadmium alloy anode that is solid at 500{degree}C, a solid mandrel cathode with a ceramic catch crucible below to collect heavy metal that falls off it, and a liquid cadmium cathode. The design criteria that had to be met by this equipment included the following: (1) control of the reduction rate by lithium, (2) good separation between heavy metal and rare earths, and (3) the capability to collect heavy metal and rare earths over a wide range of salt compositions. In tests conducted in an engineering-scale electrorefiner (10 kg uranium per cathode), good separation was achieved while removing uranium and rare earths from the salt. Only 13% of the rare earths was removed, while 99.9% of the uranium in the salt was removed; subsequently, the rare earths were also reduced to low concentrations. The uranium concentration in the salt was reduced to 0.05 ppm after uranium and rare earths were transferred from the salt to a solid mandrel cathode with a catch crucible. Rare earth concentrations in the salt were reduced to less than 0.01 wt % in these operations. Similar tests are planned to remove plutonium from the salt in a laboratory-scale (100--300 g heavy metal) electrorefiner.

  3. Solid oxide membrane-assisted controllable electrolytic fabrication of metal carbides in molten salt.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xingli; Zheng, Kai; Lu, Xionggang; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2016-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC), titanium carbide (TiC), zirconium carbide (ZrC), and tantalum carbide (TaC) have been electrochemically produced directly from their corresponding stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOx/C) precursors by electrodeoxidation in molten calcium chloride (CaCl2). An assembled yttria stabilized zirconia solid oxide membrane (SOM)-based anode was employed to control the electrodeoxidation process. The SOM-assisted controllable electrochemical process was carried out in molten CaCl2 at 1000 °C with a potential of 3.5 to 4.0 V. The reaction mechanism of the electrochemical production process and the characteristics of these produced metal carbides (MCs) were systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses clearly identify that SiC, TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides can be facilely fabricated. SiC carbide can be controlled to form a homogeneous nanowire structure, while the morphologies of TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides exhibit porous nodular structures with micro/nanoscale particles. The complex chemical/electrochemical reaction processes including the compounding, electrodeoxidation, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes in molten CaCl2 are also discussed. The present results preliminarily demonstrate that the molten salt-based SOM-assisted electrodeoxidation process has the potential to be used for the facile and controllable electrodeoxidation of MOx/C precursors to micro/nanostructured MCs, which can potentially be used for various applications. PMID:27195950

  4. Laminar iridium coating produced by pulse current electrodeposition from chloride molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li'an; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2013-10-01

    Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, Iridium (Ir) is one of the most promising oxidation-resistant coatings for refractory materials above 1800 °C in aerospace field. However, the Ir coatings prepared by traditional methods are composed of columnar grains throughout the coating thickness. The columnar structure of the coating is considered to do harm to its oxidation resistance. The laminar Ir coating is expected to have a better high-temperature oxidation resistance than the columnar Ir coating does. The pulse current electrodeposition, with three independent parameters: average current density (Jm), duty cycle (R) and pulse frequency (f), is considered to be a promising method to fabricate layered Ir coating. In this study, laminar Ir coatings were prepared by pulse current electrodeposition in chloride molten salt. The morphology, roughness and texture of the coatings were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), profilometer and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results showed that the laminar Ir coatings were composed of a nucleation layer with columnar structure and a growth layer with laminar structure. The top surfaces of the laminar Ir coatings consisted of cauliflower-like aggregates containing many fine grains, which were separated by deep grooves. The laminar Ir coating produced at the deposition condition of 20 mA/cm2 (Jm), 10% (R) and 6 Hz (f) was quite smooth (Ra 1.01 ± 0.09 μm) with extremely high degree of preferred orientation of <1 1 1>, and its laminar structure was well developed with clear boundaries and uniform thickness of sub-layers.

  5. Solid oxide membrane-assisted controllable electrolytic fabrication of metal carbides in molten salt.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xingli; Zheng, Kai; Lu, Xionggang; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2016-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC), titanium carbide (TiC), zirconium carbide (ZrC), and tantalum carbide (TaC) have been electrochemically produced directly from their corresponding stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOx/C) precursors by electrodeoxidation in molten calcium chloride (CaCl2). An assembled yttria stabilized zirconia solid oxide membrane (SOM)-based anode was employed to control the electrodeoxidation process. The SOM-assisted controllable electrochemical process was carried out in molten CaCl2 at 1000 °C with a potential of 3.5 to 4.0 V. The reaction mechanism of the electrochemical production process and the characteristics of these produced metal carbides (MCs) were systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses clearly identify that SiC, TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides can be facilely fabricated. SiC carbide can be controlled to form a homogeneous nanowire structure, while the morphologies of TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides exhibit porous nodular structures with micro/nanoscale particles. The complex chemical/electrochemical reaction processes including the compounding, electrodeoxidation, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes in molten CaCl2 are also discussed. The present results preliminarily demonstrate that the molten salt-based SOM-assisted electrodeoxidation process has the potential to be used for the facile and controllable electrodeoxidation of MOx/C precursors to micro/nanostructured MCs, which can potentially be used for various applications.

  6. Measurements and Analysis of Oxygen Bubble Distributions in LiCl-KCl Molten Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan W. Bezzant; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson

    2013-03-01

    Transparent system experimental studies have been performed to provide measurement and analysis of oxygen bubble distributions and mass transfer coefficients at different sparging rates ranging from 0.05 to 0.20 L/min in LiCl-KCl molten salt at 500 degrees C using a high-speed digital camera and an oxygen sensor. The results reveal that bubble sizes and rise velocities increased with an increase in oxygen sparging rate. The bubbles observed were ellipsoidal in shape, and an equivalent diameter based on the ellipsoid volume was calculated. The average equivalent bubble diameters at 500 degrees C and these oxygen sparging rates range from 2.63 to 4.07 mm. Results show that the bubble equivalent diameters at each respective sparging rate are normally distributed. A Fanning friction factor correlation was produced to predict a bubble’s rise velocity based on its equivalent diameter. The oxygen mass transfer coefficients for four sparging rates were calculated using the oxygenation model. These calculated values were within the order of magnitude of 10-2 cm/sec and followed a decreasing trend corresponding to an increasing bubble size and sparging rate. The diffusivities were calculated based on two different types of mechanisms, one based on physics of the bubbles and the other on systematic properties. The results reveal that diffusivity values calculated from bubble physics are 1.65 to 8.40 x 10-5 cm2/sec, which are within the range suggested by literature for gases in liquids of a similar viscosity.

  7. Tungsten coatings electro-deposited on CFC substrates from oxide molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ningbo; Zhang, Yingchun; Lang, Shaoting; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Lili

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten is considered as plasma facing material in fusion devices because of its high melting point, its good thermal conductivity, its low erosion rate and its benign neutron activation properties. On the other hand, carbon based materials like C/C fiber composites (CFC) have been used for plasma facing materials (PFMs) due to their high thermal shock resistance, light weight and high strength. Tungsten coatings on CFC substrates are used in the JET divertor in the frame of the JET ITER-like wall project, and have been prepared by plasma spray (PS) and other techniques. In this study, tungsten coatings were electro-deposited on CFC from Na2WO4-WO3 molten salt under various deposition parameters at 900 °C in air. In order to obtain tungsten coatings with excellent performance, the effects of pulse duration ratio and pulse current density on microstructures and crystal structures of tungsten coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Rigaku Industrial Co., Ltd., D/MAX-RB) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM, JSM 6480LV). It is found that the pulsed duration ratio and pulse current density had a significant influence on tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. SEM observation revealed that intact, uniform and dense tungsten coatings formed on the CFC substrates. Both the average grain size and thickness of the coating increased with the pulsed current density. The XRD results showed that the coatings consisted of a single phase of tungsten with the body centered cubic (BCC) structure. The oxygen content of electro-deposited tungsten coatings was lower than 0.05%, and the micro-hardness was about 400 HV.

  8. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 1. PDU operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit. In this process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of sodium carbonate, removal of sulfur, and disposal of the ash. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner during one of the runs. The principal problem encountered during the five test runs was maintaining a continuous flow of melt from the gasifier to the quench tank. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined-cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  9. The electrochemistry of metals in room-temperature chloroaluminate molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiao-Hong.

    1992-01-01

    The room-temperature chloroaluminate molten salt, aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride has proven to be useful electrolyte for the electrodeposition and electrodissolution of metals. The electrodeposition of lead, tin, silver, gold, and mercury was studied in this melt. Evidence for the underpotential deposition of lead and silver in acidic (66.7-33.3 mol%) melt and tin in acidic and basic (44.4-55.6 mol%) melt was found at polycrystalline gold. Nucleation overpotentials were observed for the deposition of mercury on gold in basic melt. The deposition of lead and silver from acidic melt and the deposition of gold from basic melt on glassy carbon involves progressive 3-D nucleation on a large number of active sites with hemispherical diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei. The deposition of tin and and mercury from acidic melt exhibits progressive 3-D nucleation on a finite number of active sites. The deposition of tin and mercury from basic melt on glassy carbon involves instantaneous 3-D nucleation. The electrode-position of lead and silver from acidic melt on tungsten involves instantaneous 3-D nucleation, whereas the electrodeposition of gold and mercury from basic melt exhibits 3-D progressive nucleation. The deposition of lead and silver from acidic melt and the deposition of tin from both acidic and basic melt on platinum does not exhibit obvious evidence for either UPD or nucleation. The electrodeposition of gold and mercury on platinum from basic melt involves progressive 3-D nucleation. The voltammetric oxidation of Sn(II) to Sn(IV) is hindered by the weak adsorption of Sn(II). Sn(IV) is complexed as [SnCl[sub 6

  10. Preliminary Design For Conventional and Compact Secondary Heat Exchanger in a Molten Salt Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Ali Siahpush; Eung Soo Kim

    2012-07-01

    The strategic goal of the Advance Reactors such as AHTR is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy in the United States by producing power to meet growing energy demands and demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not being served by light water reactors

  11. Molten salt synthesis of nanocrystalline phase of high dielectric constant material CaCu3Ti4O12.

    PubMed

    Prakash, B Shri; Varma, K B R

    2008-11-01

    Nanocrystalline powders of giant dielectric constant material, CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO), have been prepared successfully by the molten salt synthesis (MSS) using KCl at 750 degrees C/10 h, which is significantly lower than the calcination temperature (approximately 1000 degrees C) that is employed to obtain phase pure CCTO in the conventional solid-state reaction route. The water washed molten salt synthesized powder, characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed to be a phase pure CCTO associated with approximately 150 nm sized crystallites of nearly spherical shape. The decrease in the formation temperature/duration of CCTO in MSS method was attributed to an increase in the diffusion rate or a decrease in the diffusion length of reacting ions in the molten salt medium. As a consequence of liquid phase sintering, pellets of as-synthesized KCl containing CCTO powder exhibited higher sinterability and grain size than that of KCl free CCTO samples prepared by both MSS method and conventional solid-state reaction route. The grain size and the dielectric constant of KCl containing CCTO ceramics increased with increasing sintering temperature (900 degrees C-1050 degrees C). Indeed the dielectric constants of these ceramics were higher than that of KCl free CCTO samples prepared by both MSS method and those obtained via the solid-state reaction route and sintered at the same temperature. Internal barrier layer capacitance (IBLC) model was invoked to correlate the observed dielectric constant with the grain size in these samples.

  12. Use of Molten Salt Fluxes and Cathodic Protection for Preventing the Oxidation of Titanium at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2014-12-01

    The current study demonstrates that it is possible to protect both solid and liquid titanium and titanium alloys from attack from air by cathodically polarizing the titanium component using an electro-active high-temperature molten salt flux and a moderate polarization potential. The electrolytic cell used comprises a cathode of either solid titanium or liquid titanium alloy, an electrolyte based on molten calcium chloride or fluoride salt, and an anode consisting of an inert oxygen-evolving material such as iridium metal. The new approach renders possible the processing of titanium at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen-containing atmospheres.

  13. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; von Winbush, Samuel

    1988-01-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500.degree. C., electrolysis at a voltage not more negative than about -1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  14. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  15. Thermal Stability of FeS2 Cathode Material in "Thermal" Batteries: Effect of Dissolved Oxides in Molten Salt Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masset, Patrick J.

    2008-09-01

    The thermal stability of FeS2 cathode material for thermal batteries is investigated in the LiCl-KCl eutectic containing up to 10 wt% Li2O (used as anti-peak). The results show that the decomposition of pyrite shifts to higher temperatures in the presence of molten salts as the S2 gas is repressed by the liquid phase. For high lithium oxide contents the decomposition temperature of pyrite decreases by 100 °C. In addition Li2FeS2 as reaction product is evidenced whereas Li3Fe2S4 is expected from literature data.

  16. Synthesis of functional carbon nanospheres by a composite-molten-salt method and amperometric sensing of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Hu, Chenguo; Xiong, Yufeng; Zhang, Cuiling

    2013-02-01

    Functional carbon nanospheres have been synthesized from analytically pure glucose by a composite-molten-salt (CMS) method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman and Fourier transformation infra-red spectroscopy indicate the carbon nanospheres are solid, bond hybridisation (sp2/sp3) and with many functional groups on their surfaces. Amperometric sensor based on the synthesized carbon nanospheres have been fabricated without pretreatment or modification. The detection of hydrogen peroxide exhibits high sensitivity and good selectivity. The electrochemical measurement of these nanospheres demonstrates much superior performance to those of the carbon nanospheres synthesized by hydrothermal method.

  17. A molecular dynamics study of the influence of ionic charge distribution on the dynamics of a molten salt.

    PubMed

    Li, Hualin; Kobrak, Mark N

    2009-11-21

    The distribution of charge in an ion of a fused salt is known to be an important determinant of liquid dynamics. However, the details of this relationship remain poorly understood. We present the results of molecular dynamics simulations on a model molten salt system and show that changes in the distribution of ionic charge can have a profound effect on liquid dynamics. In particular, we observe complex relationships between the distribution of charge, the rate of ionic rotation, and the translational diffusion of ions in the liquid.

  18. Molten salt-supported polycondensation of optically active diacid monomers with an aromatic thiazole-bearing diamine using microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Zadehnazari, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Microwave heating was used to prepare optically active thiazole-bearing poly(amide-imide)s. Polymerization reactions were carried out in the molten tetrabutylammonium bromide as a green molten salt medium and triphenyl phosphite as the homogenizer. Structural elucidation of the compounds was performed by Fourier transform infrared and NMR spectroscopic data and elemental analysis results. The polymeric samples were readily soluble in various organic solvents, forming low-colored and flexible thin films via solution casting. They showed high thermal stability with decomposition temperature being above 360 °C. They were assembled randomly in a nanoscale size.

  19. Molten salt-supported polycondensation of optically active diacid monomers with an aromatic thiazole-bearing diamine using microwave irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Zadehnazari, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Microwave heating was used to prepare optically active thiazole-bearing poly(amide-imide)s. Polymerization reactions were carried out in the molten tetrabutylammonium bromide as a green molten salt medium and triphenyl phosphite as the homogenizer. Structural elucidation of the compounds was performed by Fourier transform infrared and NMR spectroscopic data and elemental analysis results. The polymeric samples were readily soluble in various organic solvents, forming low-colored and flexible thin films via solution casting. They showed high thermal stability with decomposition temperature being above 360 °C. They were assembled randomly in a nanoscale size. PMID:25685498

  20. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  1. Experimental study of the Pb and Bi breeding zones effect on the neutron parameters of a molten-salt blanket in a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. M.; Sheehov, S. B.; Romodanov, V. L.; Zagryadsky, V. A.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.

    1980-07-01

    The fluorid salt melt of Li, Be, U and Th is considered as one of the possible coolants both for a "clean" and for a "hybrid" fusion reactor. The tritium reproduction coefficient Kτ is only a little greater than unity in the molten-salt blanket, because of inelastic scattering on a fluorine nucleus which depresses the 7Li(n, n' α) T reaction. To compensate for this effect the neu tron multiplication Pb, Be and 238U zones may be used [2,4]. This article is devoted to the experimental study of the Pb and Bi neutron multiplication zones in the molten-salt blanket model, consisting of an aluminium sphere, filled with a eutectical mixture of LiF and BeF 2. The blanket model diameter was 400 mm. The 23 mm multiplication zones were placed into the cavity of the model. The neutron generator NGI-200 was used as a 14 MeV neutron source. The neutron output was 10 10 n/s. The deuteron energy was 140 keV and the average target current value was 500 uA. The detection of neutrons was performed by small impulsive fission chambers KNT-2 with 232Th and KNT-5 with 235U. The neutron generator output measurements were made with the helpof the attendant α-particle technique using silicon semiconductor detector DKP25. It was experimentally shown that there is a noticeable influence of the Pb and Bi multiplication zones on the fission rates of 232Th and 235U. The spacial distribution of the fission rates of 232Th and 235U measured in this experiment was compared with that calculated by means of the program "BLANK". This comparison showed good agreement between experimental and calculated values at a large distance from the neutron source and a noticeable distinction near it. It was also shown that the experimental value of the Pb influence was larger by an average 15% for 232Th and less by an average 10% for 235U, than that calculated.

  2. Experimental investigation of the 19F( n, α)16N reaction excitation function in the neutron energy range of 4 to 7.35 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, I. P.; Khryachkov, V. A.; Ivanova, T. A.; Kuz'minov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    The interaction of neutrons with light nuclei study is of interest for understanding nuclear-reaction mechanisms. Fluorine nuclei are worth particular attention because they are abundant in the core of the promising molten-salt reactors and can noticeably affect the chain reaction kinetics. In this work we have experimentally investigated the 19F( n, α)16N reaction cross-section at neutron energies ranging from 4 to 7.35 MeV.

  3. Preparation of Ferrotitanium from Ilmenite by Electrolysis-Assisted Calciothermic Reduction in CaCl2-NaCl Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhongren; Hua, Yixin; Xu, Cunying; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; Gong, Kai; Ru, Juanjian; Xiong, Li

    2016-02-01

    Electrolysis-assisted calciothermic reduction method is proposed and successfully used to prepare ferrotitanium alloy from ilmenite by using equal-molar CaCl2-NaCl molten salt as electrolyte, molybdenum rod as cathode, and graphite as anode at 973 K with cell voltages of 3.2-4.4 V under inert atmosphere. Thermodynamics analysis of the process is presented, and the products obtained are examined with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the calciothermic reduction of ilmenite is a stepwise process since intermediate CaTiO3 is observed in the products partially reduced. In the calciothermic reduction process, the reduction of FeTiO3 first gives rise to the formation of Fe and CaTiO3, which as intermediates will further react with calcium metal to form ferrotitanium alloys. This is in good agreement with the prediction of thermodynamics. Experimental results also show that increasing cell voltage can accelerate the formation of calcium metal through electrolysis of CaO and CaCl2 and, hence, promote the calciothermic reduction of ilmenite. As the electrolytic zone and reduction zone are combined in the same bath, the theoretical energy requirement for the production of FeTi in the calciothermic process is lower than that in the aluminothermic process.

  4. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    The technical principles and practices of the civil nuclear industry are described with particular reference to fission and its products, natural and artificial radioactivity elements principally concerned and their relationships, main types of reactor, safety issues, the fuel cycle, waste management, issues related to weapon proliferation, environmental considerations and possible future developments.

  5. Radiation Damage and Tritium Breeding Study in a Fusion Reactor Using a Liquid Wall of Various Thorium Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    A new magnetic fusion reactor design, called APEX uses a liquid wall between fusion plasma and solid first wall to reach high neutron wall loads and eliminate the replacement of the first wall structure during the reactor's operation due to the radiation damage. In this paper, radiation damage behavior of the inboard and outboard first walls made of a ferritic steel, 9Cr-2WVTa, in the APEX blanket using various thorium molten salts, 75% LiF-25% ThF4, 75% LiF-24% ThF4-1% 233UF4 and 75% LiF-23% ThF4-2% 233UF4 was investigated. Furthermore, tritium breeding potential of these salts in such a blanket was also examined. Computations were carried out using the code Scale 4.3 by solving Boltzmann neutron transport equation. Numerical results brought out that only the liquid wall containing the molten salt, 75% LiF-23% ThF4-2% 233UF4 and having a thickness of ≥38 cm would be suitable to be used in the APEX reactor with respect to radiation damage criteria for the first wall structures and tritium self-sufficiency for the (DT) fusion driver.

  6. Thermal modeling of a secondary concentrator integrated with an open direct-absorption molten-salt volumetric receiver in a beam-down tower system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlou, Radia; Armstrong, Peter; Grange, Benjamin; Almheiri, Saif; Calvet, Nicolas; Slocum, Alexander; Shamim, Tariq

    2016-05-01

    An upward-facing three-dimensional secondary concentrator, herein termed Final Optical Element (FOE), is designed to be used in a beam-down tower in combination with an open volumetric direct-absorption molten-salt receiver tank acting simultaneously as a thermal energy storage system. It allows reducing thermal losses from the open receiver by decreasing its aperture area while keeping minimal spillage losses. The FOE is exposed to high solar fluxes, a part of which is absorbed by its reflector material, leading to material degradation by overheating. Consequently, the FOE may require active cooling. A thermal model of the FOE under passive cooling mechanism is proposed as a first step to evaluate its sensitivity to some design parameters. Then, it will be used to evaluate the requirements for the active cooling system. The model provides insights on the FOE thermal behavior and highlights the effectiveness of a design modification on passive cooling enhancement. First prototype tests under reduced flux and with no active cooling will be used for model adjustment.

  7. Fundamental electrochemical investigation of bromoaluminate and mixed chloro-bromoaluminate room-temperature molten-salt systems. Technical report, January 1987-August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Boon, J.A.; Wilkes, J.S.; Lanning, J.A.

    1989-03-01

    In this project, the chemical and electrochemical properties of the bromoaluminate molten-salt system were determined. With knowledge of the bromide system, the chemical and electrochemical properties of the mixed chloro-bromoaluminate molten salt system were determined, allowing further work on the applicability of these systems as electrolytes in high-density electrical storage devices. The qualitative electrochemical behavior of the bromide and chloride systems were compared. The systems were found to behave similarly, but the basic bromide system had two oxidative processes, compared to the single process of the chloride system. The bromide system was also shown to have a smaller electrochemical voltage window.

  8. Neutronics of accelerator-driven subcritical fission for burning transuranics in used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, A.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Baty, A.; Comeaux, J.; Gerity, J.; Kellams, J.; Mcintyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sooby, E.; Tsvetkov, P.; Rosaire, G.; Mann, T.

    2013-04-19

    We report the development of a conceptual design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). ADSMS is capable of destroying all of the transuranics at the same rate and proportion as they are produced in a conventional nuclear power plant. The ADSMS core is fueled solely by transuranics extracted from used nuclear fuel and reduces its radiotoxicity by a factor 10,000. ADSMS offers a way to close the nuclear fuel cycle so that the full energy potential in the fertile fuels uranium and thorium can be recovered.

  9. Neutronics of accelerator-driven subcritical fission for burning transuranics in used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattarov, A.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Baty, A.; Comeaux, J.; Gerity, J.; Kellams, J.; Mcintyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sooby, E.; Tsvetkov, P.; Rosaire, G.; Mann, T.

    2013-04-01

    We report the development of a conceptual design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). ADSMS is capable of destroying all of the transuranics at the same rate and proportion as they are produced in a conventional nuclear power plant. The ADSMS core is fueled solely by transuranics extracted from used nuclear fuel and reduces its radiotoxicity by a factor 10,000. ADSMS offers a way to close the nuclear fuel cycle so that the full energy potential in the fertile fuels uranium and thorium can be recovered.

  10. Evaluation of Static Thermophysical Properties of the Ternary Molten Salt System Li, Na and Be/F Based on the Modified Peng-Robinson Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dalin; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Jia, Dounan

    The static thermophysical properties of the molten salt system like LiF-NaF-BeF2 influence the design and construction of the fuel salt and coolant in the Molten Salt Reactor for the new generation. In this paper, the equation of state of the ternary system 0.15LiF-0.58NaF-0.27BeF2, over the temperature range from 873.15K to 1073.15K at one atmosphere pressure, is described by using modified Peng-Robinson equation. The density of the ternary system is evaluated by this equation directly, and compared with the experimental data. Base on the equation of state, the other static thermophysical properties such as the enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity at constant pressure are evaluated by the fugacity coefficient and residual function methods respectively. The density calculated by Peng-Robinson equation is in highly agreement with the experimental data, and the enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity evaluated by such two different methods are consistent with each other. It could be concluded that the modified Peng-Robinson equation could be applicable to estimate the density of the molten salt system, and the Peng-Robinson equation is recommended to be as the fundamental to evaluate the enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of the molten salt system.

  11. Facile molten salt synthesis of Li2NiTiO4 cathode material for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanming; Wang, Yajing; Wang, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Well-crystallized Li2NiTiO4 nanoparticles are rapidly synthesized by a molten salt method using a mixture of NaCl and KCl salts. X-ray diffraction pattern and scanning electron microscopic image show that Li2NiTiO4 has a cubic rock salt structure with an average particle size of ca. 50 nm. Conductive carbon-coated Li2NiTiO4 is obtained by a facile ball milling method. As a novel 4 V positive cathode material for Li-ion batteries, the Li2NiTiO4/C delivers high discharge capacities of 115 mAh g(-1) at room temperature and 138 mAh g(-1) and 50°C, along with a superior cyclability. PMID:24855459

  12. Development of a high-resolution Thomson scattering system for plasma interactions with molten salt (FLiNaK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. Y.

    2014-10-01

    A high-resolution Thomson scattering system is presently being developed to measure the electron temperature and density profile during plasma interaction with molten salt. The system uses a 20-Hz Nd:YAG laser operating at the second harmonic (532 nm). The collection lens, having a 1:10 magnification ratio, measures 63 points along the 10-cm profile. The scattered light is transmitted by using an optical-fiber bundle, and is analyzed with a triple-grating spectrometer to further reduce stray light. Its spectral resolution is expected to be 0.03 nm. An intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera consisting of a gated image intensifier coupled to the CCD camera is used to record the spectral distribution of the scattered light. An additional feature of operating the ICCD camera at 40-Hz to record the background signal is incorporated.

  13. Structural characteristics of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bifluoride: HF-deficient form of a highly conductive room temperature molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko; Tamada, Osamu

    2002-01-01

    EMIF·HF, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bifluoride, has been obtained by eliminating HF from a room temperature molten salt EMIF·2.3HF at around 400 K. EMIF·HF crystallizes in space group P2 1/m with a=7.281(1) Å, b=6.762(1) Å, c=8.403(1) Å, β=107.26(1)°, V=395.09(18) Å 3, Z=2 at room temperature. The cations are stacked in pillars via the hydrogen bonding between the C4 proton and the ring π-electrons of the adjacent cation. The cations and the anions coupled by strong hydrogen bondings are co-planar.

  14. Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

  15. Analysis of a helical coil once-through molten salt steam generator: Experimental results and heat transfer evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seubert, B.; Rojas, E.; Rivas, E.; Gaggioli, W.; Rinaldi, L.; Fluri, T.

    2016-05-01

    A molten salt helical coil steam generator is an alternative to kettle- or drum-type evaporators which are currently used in commercial-scale solar thermal power plants. A 300 kW prototype was tested during the OPTS project at ENEA. The experimental results presented in this paper have been used to validate a detailed heat transfer analysis of the whole system. The heat transfer analysis deals with the study of both the overall heat transfer coefficient and the shell-side heat transfer coefficient. Due to the specific features of this type of system, no correlations were available in the literature. A new numerical model to predict the performance of large-scale systems is also presented.

  16. Novel band gap-tunable K-Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride prepared by molten salt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiannan; Ma, Lin; Wang, Haoying; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Shaozheng

    2015-03-01

    Novel band gap-tunable K-Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride was prepared by molten salt method using melamine, KCl, and NaCl as precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption, Scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The CB and VB potentials of graphitic carbon nitride could be tuned from -1.09 and +1.55 eV to -0.29 and +2.25 eV by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. Besides, ions doping inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride, enhanced the surface area, and increased the separation rate of photogenerated electrons and holes. The visible-light-driven Rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation and mineralization performances were significantly improved after K-Na co-doping.

  17. Synthesis and optical properties of high-purity CoO nanowires prepared by an environmentally friendly molten salt route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenzhong; Zhang, Guling

    2009-08-01

    CoO nanowires with diameters of 50 _80 nm, and lengths of up to more than 5 μm have been successfully synthesized by a simple environmentally friendly molten salt route, in which the precursor CoCO 3 nanoparticles are decomposed to form high-purity CoO nanowires in NaCl flux. The structure features and morphology of the as-prepared CoO nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The chemical composition and oxidation state of the prepared nanowires were systemically studied by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and laser Raman spectroscopy. The results indicated that the as-prepared CoO nanowires were composed of pure cubic CoO phase. The growth mechanism of the synthesized nanowires was also discussed in detail based on the experimental results.

  18. Zr electrorefining process for the treatment of cladding hull waste in LiCl-KCl molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang Hwa; Lee, You Lee; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho; Choi, Yong Taek; Park, Geun Il

    2013-07-01

    Zr electrorefining for the treatment of Zircaloy-4 cladding hull waste is demonstrated in LiCl-KCl-ZrCl{sub 4} molten salts. Although a Zr oxide layer thicker than 5 μm strongly inhibits the Zr dissolution process, pre-treatment processes increases the dissolution kinetics. For 10 g-scale experiments, the purities of the recovered Zr were 99.54 wt.% and 99.74 wt.% for fresh and oxidized cladding tubes, respectively, with no electrical contact issue. The optimal condition for Zr electrorefining has been found to improve the morphological feature of the recovered Zr, which reduces the salt incorporation by examining the effect of the process parameters such as the ZrCl{sub 4} concentration and the applied potential.

  19. Facile molten salt synthesis of Li2NiTiO4 cathode material for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanming; Wang, Yajing; Wang, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Well-crystallized Li2NiTiO4 nanoparticles are rapidly synthesized by a molten salt method using a mixture of NaCl and KCl salts. X-ray diffraction pattern and scanning electron microscopic image show that Li2NiTiO4 has a cubic rock salt structure with an average particle size of ca. 50 nm. Conductive carbon-coated Li2NiTiO4 is obtained by a facile ball milling method. As a novel 4 V positive cathode material for Li-ion batteries, the Li2NiTiO4/C delivers high discharge capacities of 115 mAh g(-1) at room temperature and 138 mAh g(-1) and 50°C, along with a superior cyclability.

  20. Hydrogen-transparent metal surfaces produced by use of molten salts with very low oxygen and water activities

    SciTech Connect

    Deublein, G.; Huggins, R.A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1989-08-01

    One can employ simple thermodynamic principles to predict conditions under which metals will not form hydrogen-blocking surface oxide layers in electrolyte environments. These principles are used to show that very low oxygen and water activities can be produced in some halide-based molten salt systems by the incorporation of alkali hydrides. Under these conditions, some normally very reactive metals will not form oxide surface layers. As a result, rapid interfacial and surface/bulk equilibria with hydrogen can be attained. Experiments are presented that verify these principles in the titanium-hydrogen and vanadium-hydrogen systems by using electro chemical methods to measure the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the solution of hydrogen and the formation of metal hydrides. In addition, it is shown that interfacial equilibrium is obtained very rapidly upon iron and aluminum in such metals.

  1. MOLTEN SALT SYNTHESIS OF YF3:Yb3+/Ln3+(Ln = Er3+, Tm3+) MICROSHEETS WITH MULTICOLOR UPCONVERSION LUMINESCENCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingye; Lu, Chunhua; Cao, Linhai; Ni, Yaru; Xu, Zhongzi

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, highly crystalline YF3:Yb3+/Ln3+(Ln = Er3+, Tm3+) microsheets were successfully synthesized by a surfactant-free molten salt method for the first time. The results indicated that the as-obtained samples belonged to orthorhombic system and exhibited microsheets morphology with side lengths of 30 to 80 μm and wall thickness from 1 to 1.5 μm. By changing the dopant's species (Ln3+), multicolor (yellow and blue) upconversion emission can be observed in YF3:Yb3+/Ln3+ microsheets under 980 nm laser diode (LD) excitation. The upconversion mechanisms in co-doping YF3 samples were analyzed in detail based on the emission spectra. Importantly, this approach not only proposes a new alternative in synthesizing such materials, but also opens the possibility to meet the increasing commercial demand.

  2. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material

  3. An electrochemical study of the ruthenium (III) and (IV) hexachlorometallates in a basic room temperature chloroaluminate molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hussey, C.L.; Barnard, P.A.; Sun, I.W. ); Appleby, D.; Hitchcock, P.B.; Seddon, K.R.; Welton, T.; Zora, J.A. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the ruthenium (IV) complex, RuCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}, exhibits two successive voltammetric reduction waves with peak potentials of 0.34 and {minus} 1.09 V, respectively, in the 49.0/51.0 m/o aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride room temperature molten salt vs. the Al{sup 3+}/Al couple in the 66.7/33.3 m/o melt at 40{degrees}C. The first wave corresponds to the reversible uncomplicated reduction of RuCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} to RuCl{sub 6}{sup 3 {minus}}, and the second appears to arise from the multielectron reduction of the latter complex to produce more than one species. The formal potential of the RuCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}/3{minus}} redox system is 0.389 V, and the average Stokes-Einstein products of RuCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} and RuCl{sub 6}{sup 3{minus}} are 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} and 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} g cm s{sup {minus}2} K{sup {minus}1}, respectively, in this melt. The reversible half-wave potentials for a variety of 4d- and 5d-hexachlorometallate redox couples that were measured in this molten salt exhibit the same orderly trends with increasing atomic number found in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. This result was used in conjunction with the half-wave potential of the RuCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}/3 {minus}} couple to predict the potential of the (Tc)Cl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}/3{minus}} redox system in the melt.

  4. Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Brummond, W.A.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-09-08

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center (a partnership of Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories), is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Department of Energy has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The Department of Defense has several hundred million pounds of energetic materials in its demilitarization inventory, with millions more added each year.

  5. Improving Dielectric Properties of PVDF Composites by Employing Surface Modified Strong Polarized BaTiO₃ Particles Derived by Molten Salt Method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Hou, Yudong; Zheng, Mupeng; Wei, Qiaoyi; Zhu, Mankang; Yan, Hui

    2015-11-11

    BaTiO3/polyvinylidene fluoride (BT/PVDF) is the extensive reported composite material for application in modern electric devices. However, there still exists some obstacles prohibiting the further improvement of dielectric performance, such as poor interfacial compatibility and low dielectric constant. Therefore, in depth study of the size dependent polarization and surface modification of BT particle is of technological importance in developing high performance BT/PVDF composites. Here, a facile molten-salt synthetic method has been applied to prepare different grain sized BT particles through tailoring the calcination temperature. The size dependent spontaneous polarizationof BT particle was thoroughly investigated by theoretical calculation based on powder X-ray diffraction Rietveld refinement data. The results revealed that 600 nm sized BT particles possess the strong polarization, ascribing to the ferroelectric size effect. Furthermore, the surface of optimal BT particles has been modified by water-soluble polyvinylprrolidone (PVP) agent, and the coated particles exhibited fine core-shell structure and homogeneous dispersion in the PVDF matrix. The dielectric constant of the resulted composites increased significantly, especially, the prepared composite with 40 vol % BT loading exhibited the largest dielectric constant (65, 25 °C, 1 kHz) compared with the literature values of BT/PVDF at the same concentration of filler. Moreover, the energy storage density of the composites with tailored structure was largely enhanced at the low electric field, showing promising application as dielectric material in energy storage device. Our work suggested that introduction of strong polarized ferroelectric particles with optimal size and construction of core-shell structured coated fillers by PVP in the PVDF matrix are efficacious in improving dielectric performance of composites. The demonstrated approach can also be applied to the design and preparation of other polymers

  6. 100 MWe Baseload Molten Salt Plant Phase 1 & 2 Summary Report: Summary of Conceptual Design, Preliminary Design, Commercialization and Risk Reduction Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Tyner, Craig; Kraft, Dave; Moursund, Carter; Santelmann, Ken; Greaney, Andy; Zillmer, Andrew; Heap, Andy; Sakadjian, Bartev; Hannemann, Chris; Rogers, Dale; Gross, David; Wasyluk, David; Fondriest, Ed; Soni, Gaurav; Bindra, Hitesh; Marshall, Jason; Risner, Jeremy; Pacheco, Jim; Martin, Joe; Montesano, Kevin; Foder, Matt; Zavodny, Maximillian; Slack, Mike; Donnellan, Nathan; Sage, William

    2012-11-27

    This document describes steps taken to develop our conceptual and preliminary designs of a modular concept for deploying a 75% capacity factor, 100-MWe solar power plant. The modular approach consists of 14 solar power towers interconnected by hot and cold salt piping leading back to a central power block where the salt storage tanks and power generation systems are located. The plant is described in several sections. First, the overall plant is described, including the general arrangement, process and heat flow diagrams, system interface definitions, and electrical description. Next, each system is described in detail following the flow of energy from incident sunlight, through the plant, to the grid. These systems include the solar collector system (SCS), solar receiver system (SRS), thermal storage system (TSS), steam generator system (SGS), and power generation system (PGS). Then, the plant control system (PCS) and balance of plant (BOP) are discussed as supporting entities. Each system of the plant is described in sufficient detail to allow for the following to be developed: material cost, erection cost, project schedule, EPC bids, detailed performance modeling, and operations and maintenance cost. Cost, schedule, and performance estimates are not described in this document. Two approaches to demonstration of the technology are presented: a single tower integrated into an existing power block and a four tower stand alone 50 MWe power plant. Various demonstration partners have expressed interested in both approaches. The process by which a detailed plant performance model was developed is described to support the development of accurate LCOE data. Information on material and instrument testing is also provided for critical materials and instruments required for molten salt service.

  7. The electrodeposition of cobalt, iron, antimony and their aluminum alloys from acidic aluminum chloride 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride room-temperature molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, John Anthony

    The electrodeposition of cobalt, iron, antimony, and their aluminum alloys was investigated in the room-temperature molten salt, aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (AlClsb3-MeEtimCl). Solutions of Co(II), Fe(II), and Sb(III) were prepared by controlled-potential coulometric anodization of the respective metal in Lewis acidic melt. The plating and stripping of these metals was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk and rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry, controlled potential coulometry, and potential step chronoamperometry. Bulk deposits of the pure and aluminum-alloyed metals were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction methods. The underpotential co-deposition of aluminum was observed during the electrodeposition of cobalt and iron; however, this phenomenon did not occur during the electrodeposition of antimony. The results of this investigation suggest that both a positive work function difference between the transition metal and aluminum and the mutual solubility of these components determine whether or not the co-deposition of aluminum takes place. Two electroanalytical techniques were developed for the analysis of co-deposited aluminum alloys: the first was based on anodic linear sweep voltammetry at a rotating-ring-disk electrode. The second was derived from the transition metal ion concentration changes observed during bulk deposition experiments. In the first technique, an alloy deposit was stripped from the disk electrode while the ring potential was held at a value where only one of the ions oxidized from the alloy could be reduced. In the second technique, the concentration of transition metal ions was monitored in an undivided cell with an anode made from the depositing metal. The co-deposition of aluminum was signalled by an increase in the transition metal ion concentration. The alloy composition data resulting from

  8. Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

    1995-09-26

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center ( a partnership of Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories), is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. Major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Department of Energy has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The Department of Defense has several hundred million pounds of energetic materials in its demilitarization inventory, with millions more added each year. In addition, there are vast energetic materials demilitarization inventories world-wide, including those in the former Soviet Union and eastern Bloc countries. Although recycling and reusing is the preferred method of dealing with these surplus materials, there will always be the necessity of destroying intractable or unusable energetic materials. Traditionally, open bum/open detonation (OB/OD) has been the method of choice for the destruction of energetic materials. Public concerns and increasingly stringent environmental regulations have made open burning and open detonation of energetic materials increasingly costly and nearly unacceptable. Thus, the impetus to develop environmentally sound alternatives to dispose of energetic materials is great.

  9. Development of New Electrochemical Synthesis of Oxides: Electrolytic Deposition of La2CuO4 Thick Layer on Zirconia Surface in Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tetsurō; Natsuhara, Masuhiro; Kawaji, Hitoshi; Itoh, Mitsuru

    1991-08-01

    A new method for electrochemical synthesis of oxides in molten salt was developed. The following galvanic cell was assembled and electrolysis was carried out at 973 K between the electrodes LaB6 vs Pt/O2 and between Cu vs Pt/O2 simultaneously. Pt, LaB6 |80%KCl-14%NaCl-(6-x)%LaCl3-x%CuCl2|ZrO2(Y2O3)|O2, Pt Pt, Cu Formation of almost-single-phased La2CuO4 on the ZrO2(Y2O3) surface was confirmed when the ratio of electric currents passed through electrodes LaB6 vs Pt/O2 and Cu vs Pt/O2 was controlled to 3:1.1 and the molten salt composition was fixed at 80%KCl-14%NaCl-6%LaCl3.

  10. In situ NMR spectroscopy: inulin biomass conversion in ZnCl₂ molten salt hydrate medium-SnCl₄ addition controls product distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingxiong; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Qiao, Yan; Deng, Tiansheng; Shi, Jing; Hou, Xianglin

    2015-01-22

    The dehydration of inulin biomass to the platform chemicals, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium was investigated. The influence of the Lewis acid catalyst, SnCl4, on the product distribution was examined. An in situ(1)H NMR technique was employed to follow the reaction at the molecular level. The experimental results revealed that only 5-HMF was obtained from degradation of inulin biomass in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium, while the LA was gradually becoming the main product when the reaction temperature was increased in the presence of the Lewis acid catalyst SnCl4. In situ NMR spectroscopy could monitor the reaction and give valuable insight.

  11. Preparation of nanocrystalline silicon from SiCl4 at 200 °C in molten salt for high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Han, Ying; Wang, Liangbiao; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2015-03-16

    Crystalline Si nanoparticles are prepared by reduction of SiCl4 with metallic magnesium in the molten salt of AlCl3 at 200 °C in an autoclave. AlCl3 not only acts as molten salt, but also participates in the reaction. The related experiments confirm that metallic Mg reduces AlCl3 to create nascent Al which could immediately reduce SiCl4 to Si, and the by-product MgCl2 would combine with AlCl3 forming complex of MgAl2Cl8. As anode for rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the as-prepared Si delivers the reversible capacity of 3083 mAh g(-1) at 1.2 A g(-1) after 50 cycles, and 1180 mAh g(-1) at 3 A g(-1) over 500 cycles.

  12. In situ NMR spectroscopy: inulin biomass conversion in ZnCl₂ molten salt hydrate medium-SnCl₄ addition controls product distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingxiong; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Qiao, Yan; Deng, Tiansheng; Shi, Jing; Hou, Xianglin

    2015-01-22

    The dehydration of inulin biomass to the platform chemicals, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium was investigated. The influence of the Lewis acid catalyst, SnCl4, on the product distribution was examined. An in situ(1)H NMR technique was employed to follow the reaction at the molecular level. The experimental results revealed that only 5-HMF was obtained from degradation of inulin biomass in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium, while the LA was gradually becoming the main product when the reaction temperature was increased in the presence of the Lewis acid catalyst SnCl4. In situ NMR spectroscopy could monitor the reaction and give valuable insight. PMID:25439916

  13. A new simple synthesis of CdS nano-particles by composite-molten-salt method and their high photocatalytic degradation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Donghu; Zhu, Yabo; Cai, Cunjin; He, Zhanjun; Liu, Zhangsheng; Yin, Dagen; Luo, Jin

    2011-12-01

    Nano-CdS crystal has been succesfully synthesized by composite molten salt (CMS) method for the first time, using composite molten salt as a reaction solvent, sodium sulfide and cadmium nitrate hexahydrate as reactants at temperature of 200 °C for 24 h in the absence of organic dispersant or capping agents. X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images indicated that the as-synthesized product were well crystallized and belonged to nano-scale. Their UV-vis absorption spectrum demonstrated a band gap of 2.49 eV corresponding to the absorption edge of 499 nm. The experimental result of photocatalytic degradation on methyl orange by the nano-CdS showed much better photocatalysis than that by the commercial CdS powder under the irradiation of ultraviolet light source.

  14. Nuclear energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  15. Towards large scale preparation of graphene in molten salts and its use in the fabrication of highly toughened alumina ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Feighan, John; Fray, Derek J

    2016-08-15

    Highly crystalline graphene nanosheets were reproducibly generated by the electrochemical exfoliation of graphite electrodes in molten LiCl containing protons. The graphene product has been successfully applied in several applications. This paper discusses the effect of molten salt produced graphene on the microstructures and mechanical properties of alumina articles produced by slip casting and pressureless sintering, which is one of the most convenient methods for the commercial production of alumina ceramics. In addition to graphene, graphite powder and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were also used to prepare alumina articles for comparative purposes. A graphene strengthening effect was realized through microstructural refinement and by influencing the formation of alumina nanorods during the sintering of α-Al2O3 articles. The fracture toughness of the sintered alumina articles increased to an impressive value of 6.98 MPa m(1/2) by adding 0.5 wt% graphene nanosheets. This was attributed to the unique microstructure obtained, comprised of micrometer sized alumina grains separated by alumina nanorods. PMID:27231211

  16. Towards large scale preparation of graphene in molten salts and its use in the fabrication of highly toughened alumina ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Feighan, John; Fray, Derek J

    2016-08-15

    Highly crystalline graphene nanosheets were reproducibly generated by the electrochemical exfoliation of graphite electrodes in molten LiCl containing protons. The graphene product has been successfully applied in several applications. This paper discusses the effect of molten salt produced graphene on the microstructures and mechanical properties of alumina articles produced by slip casting and pressureless sintering, which is one of the most convenient methods for the commercial production of alumina ceramics. In addition to graphene, graphite powder and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were also used to prepare alumina articles for comparative purposes. A graphene strengthening effect was realized through microstructural refinement and by influencing the formation of alumina nanorods during the sintering of α-Al2O3 articles. The fracture toughness of the sintered alumina articles increased to an impressive value of 6.98 MPa m(1/2) by adding 0.5 wt% graphene nanosheets. This was attributed to the unique microstructure obtained, comprised of micrometer sized alumina grains separated by alumina nanorods.

  17. Steady state investigation on neutronics of a molten salt reactor considering the flow effect of fuel salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Lin; Qiu, Sui-Zheng; Liu, Chang-Liang; Su, Guang-Hui

    2008-08-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), one of the `Generation IV' concepts, is a liquid-fuel reactor, which is different from the conventional reactors using solid fissile materials due to the flow effect of fuel salt. The study on its neutronics considering the fuel salt flow, which is the base of the thermal-hydraulic calculation and safety analysis, must be done. In this paper, the theoretical model on neutronics under steady condition for a single-liquid-fueled MSR is conducted and calculated by numerical method. The neutronics model consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes, and balance equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors considering the flow effect of fuel salt. The spatial discretization of the above models is based on the finite volume method, and the discretization equations are computed by the source iteration method. The distributions of neutron fluxes and the distributions of the delayed neutron precursors in the core are obtained. The numerical calculated results show that, the fuel salt flow has little effect on the distribution of fast and thermal neutron fluxes and the effective multiplication factor; however, it affects the distribution of the delayed neutron precursors significantly, especially the long-lived one. In addition, it could be found that the delayed neutron precursors influence the neutronics slightly under the steady condition. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (10575079)

  18. Wetting behavior of dialkylimidazolium chloroaluminate, a room-temperature molten salt. Interim report, May-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, J.G.

    1985-08-01

    The wetting behavior of a battery electrolyte can have a dramatic effect on the internal resistance of the battery as well as its cycle life. Good wetting of battery separators by electrolyte is essential for easy passage of ions through the separator pores during charge and discharge. Porous, gas-diffusion electrodes require, on the other hand, a lesser degree of electrolyte wetting, so that the line of contact of three phases (reactive gas/liquid electrolyte/porous-electrode or current collector) can be maintained within the porous electrode through a balance of capillary and hydrostatic pressures. Advancing and receding contact angles were determined for diakylimidazolium chloroaluminate, room-temperature molten salts on various candidate battery separator and porous electrode materials. The wetting angles were determined for the binary 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride/aluminum chloride melt as a function of such variables as composition, chlorination of the imidazolium ion, replacement of AlCl3 by LiCl, solid porosity, and solid surface cleaning procedure. In nearly all cases involving AlCl3 as a second component, the melt easily wets the substrate.

  19. Iron, copper, and nickel behavior in buffered, neutral aluminum chloride:1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Pye, S.; Winnick, J.; Kohl, P.A.

    1997-06-01

    Iron, copper, and nickel electrodes were examined as possible metal/metal(II) chloride cathodes for the room temperature sodium/metal chloride battery in a molten salt composed of sodium chloride (NaCl), aluminum chloride (AlCl{sub 3}), and 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MEIC). The iron electrode was investigated in basic, neutral-like, and acidic MEIC:AlCl{sub 3} melts. The solubility and the kinetics of the reduction of Fe(II) was a function of acidity. In the basic melt, the FeCl{sub 2} was soluble; however, its reduction was not observed due to slow kinetics. In the neutral-like and acidic melts, the quasi-reversible reduction of Fe(II) to Fe(0) was observed. The redox potential of copper was approximately 1 V more positive of iron; however, the oxidized copper was soluble in the neutral-like melt, making it unacceptable without a separator. The oxidized and reduced forms of nickel were insoluble and the redox potential was 2.5 V positive of Na/Na{sup +}. The nickel electrode supported a charge density of 3.5 mC/cm{sup 2} at room temperature, suggesting that a high-surface-area electrode would be needed in a practical device.

  20. Multicomponent diffusion in molten salt LiF-BeF2: Dynamical correlations and Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-01

    Applying Green-Kubo formalism and equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have studied the dynamic correlation, Onsager coeeficients and Maxwell-Stefan (MS) Diffusivities of molten salt LiF-BeF2, which is used as coolant in high temperature reactor. All the diffusive flux correlations show back-scattering or cage dynamics which becomes pronouced at higher temperature. Although the MS diffusivities are expected to depend very lightly on the composition due to decoupling of thermodynamic factor, the diffusivity ĐLi-F and ĐBe-F decreases sharply for higher concentration of LiF and BeF2 respectively. Interestingly, all three MS diffusivities have highest magnitude for eutectic mixture at 1000K (except ĐBe-F at lower LiF mole fraction) which is desirable from coolant point of view. Although the diffusivity for positive-positive ion pair is negative it is not in violation of the second law of thermodynamics as it satisfies the non-negative entropic constraints.

  1. Theoretical studies of structure and dynamics of molten salts: the LiF-ThF4 system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Biao; Chen, Xin; Qiu, Yi-Heng; Xu, Chao-Fei; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Li, Jun

    2014-12-01

    LiF-ThF4 molten salt (MS) is the fuel for advanced MS reactors. Knowledge of the microscopic MS structure and dynamics is required for an understanding of the macroscopic physical and chemical properties of the MS phases. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations on LiF-ThF4 MS at different molar percentages (LiF/ThF4 = 20.0 to 0.5) and temperatures (1100 to 1400 K). Experimental deductions and recent theoretical results on the coordination structures and transport properties of the MS are well reproduced. The density of states of the [ThF8](4-) species and the character of the Th-F bonding are investigated. The interplay between the microscopic structures and the dynamical properties is elucidated. Corresponding to the smaller effective radius of Zr, the activation barrier of the M(4+)-F(-) dissociation and the lifetime of the first coordination shell of M(4+) are both smaller for M = Th than for M = Zr in the respective LiF-MF4 systems. The shorter Zr-F bond is stronger than the longer Th-F bond, while the coordination number of the predominant [ZrF7](3-) species is smaller than that of the dominant [ThF8](4-) species. An approximate formula is proposed for the lifetime of F(-) ions in the first solvation shell of molten MFn (M = Y, Zr, Th) in terms of the radial distribution function. PMID:25361071

  2. High Temperature Corrosion studies on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Alloy C-276 in Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.; Puneeth, T.; Sivakumar, N.; Murugan, B. Arul; Sathishkumar, M.; Sivalingam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Alloy C-276 is widely used in the power plant environment due to high strength and corrosion in highly aggressive environment. The investigation on high- temperature corrosion resistance of the alloy C-276 PCGTA weldment is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. Investigation has been carried out on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding by autogenous and different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERNiCrMo-4) under molten state of K2SO4-60% NaCl environment at 675oC under cyclic condition. Thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. Weight gained in the molten salt reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. PCGTA ERNiCrMo-3 shows the higher parabolic constant compared to others. The scale formed on the weldment samples upon hot corrosion was characterized by using X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDAX analysis to understand the degradation mechanisms. From the results of the experiment the major phases are identified as Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and NiCr2O4. The result showed that weld fabricated by ERNiCrMo-3 found to be more prone to degradation than base metal and ERNiCrMo-4 filler wire due to higher segregation of alloying element of Mo and W in the weldment

  3. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  4. Effect of titanium substitution in layered LiNiO 2 cathode material prepared by molten-salt synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Hyung-Wook; Jeong, Kyung Hee; Kim, Keon

    LiNi 1- xTi xO 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) compounds have been synthesized by a direct molten-salt method that uses a eutectic mixture of LiNO 3 and LiOH salts. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, these materials have a well-developed layered structure (R3-m) and are an isostructure of LiNiO 2. The LiNi 1- xTi xO 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) compounds have average particle sizes of 1-5 μm depending on the amount of Ti salt. Charge-discharge tests show that a LiNi 1- xTi xO 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) cathode prepared at 700 °C has an initial discharge capacity as high as 171 mA h g -1 and excellent capacity retention in the range 4.3-2.8 V at a current density of 0.2 mA cm -2.

  5. An investigation into the electrochemical recovery of rare earth ions in a CsCl-based molten salt.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shuqiang; Zhu, Hongmin

    2011-05-30

    A CsCl-based melt, was used as a supporting electrolyte for a fuel cycle in pyrochemical separation, as it has a high solubility for lanthanide oxide. Cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry were carried out to investigate the cathodic reduction of those rare earth ions. The results prove that the cathodic process of La(III) ions dissolved in a CsCl-based melt, with a one-step reduction La(3+)+3e(-)=La, and is similar to those of other reports which have utilised LiCl-KCl or CaCl(2)-KCl molten salt systems. However, for the Ce(III) ions that dissolved in a CsCl-based melt, there is a significant difference when compared with published literature as there are two reduction steps instead of the reported single step Ce(3+)+e(-)=Ce(2+) and Ce(2+)+2e(-)=Ce. In order to explain the novel result, a detailed investigation was focused on the cathodic process of Ce(III) in a CsCl-based melt. The identification of the M-O (M=La, Ce) compounds that are stable in the electrolyte, as well as the determination of their solubility products, were carried out by potentiometric titration using an oxide ion sensor. Furthermore, the E-pO(2-) (potential-oxide ion) diagram for the M-O stable compound was constructed by combining both theoretical and experimental data.

  6. Multicomponent diffusion in molten salt LiF-BeF{sub 2}: Dynamical correlations and Maxwell–Stefan diffusivities

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-24

    Applying Green–Kubo formalism and equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have studied the dynamic correlation, Onsager coeeficients and Maxwell–Stefan (MS) Diffusivities of molten salt LiF-BeF{sub 2}, which is used as coolant in high temperature reactor. All the diffusive flux correlations show back-scattering or cage dynamics which becomes pronouced at higher temperature. Although the MS diffusivities are expected to depend very lightly on the composition due to decoupling of thermodynamic factor, the diffusivity Đ{sub Li-F} and Đ{sub Be-F} decreases sharply for higher concentration of LiF and BeF{sub 2} respectively. Interestingly, all three MS diffusivities have highest magnitude for eutectic mixture at 1000K (except Đ{sub Be-F} at lower LiF mole fraction) which is desirable from coolant point of view. Although the diffusivity for positive-positive ion pair is negative it is not in violation of the second law of thermodynamics as it satisfies the non-negative entropic constraints.

  7. Computational verification of two universal relations for simple ionic liquids. Kinetic properties of a model 2:1 molten salt.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J A; Ballone, P

    2011-05-01

    Two semianalytical relations [Nature, 1996, 381, 137 and Phys. Rev. Lett. 2001, 87, 245901] predicting dynamical coefficients of simple liquids on the basis of structural properties have been tested by extensive molecular dynamics simulations for an idealized 2:1 model molten salt. In agreement with previous simulation studies, our results support the validity of the relation expressing the self-diffusion coefficient as a function of the radial distribution functions for all thermodynamic conditions such that the system is in the ionic (ie., fully dissociated) liquid state. Deviations are apparent for high-density samples in the amorphous state and in the low-density, low-temperature range, when ions condense into AB(2) molecules. A similar relation predicting the ionic conductivity is only partially validated by our data. The simulation results, covering 210 distinct thermodynamic states, represent an extended database to tune and validate semianalytical theories of dynamical properties and provide a baseline for the interpretation of properties of more complex systems such as the room-temperature ionic liquids.

  8. Remediation of 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene contaminated soil using a combined thermal desorption-molten salt oxidation reactor system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-hui; Sun, Xiao-fei; Yao, Zhi-tong; Zhao, Xiang-yang

    2014-02-01

    A combined thermal desorption (TD)-molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor system was applied to remediate the 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (1,2,3-TCB) contaminated soil. The TD reactor was used to enrich the contaminant from soil, and its dechlorination of the contaminant was achieved in the MSO reactor. The optimum operating conditions of TD, and the effects of MSO reactor temperatures, additive amounts of the TCB on destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of TCB and chlorine retention efficiency (CRE) were investigated. The reaction mechanism and pathway were proposed as well. The combined system could remediate the contaminated soil at a large scale of concentration from 5 to 25gkg(-1), and the DRE and CRE reached more than 99% and 95%, respectively, at temperatures above 850°C. The reaction emissions included C6H6, CH4, CO and CO2, and chlorinated species were not detected. It was found that a little increase in the temperature can considerably reduce the emission of C6H6, CH4, and CO, while the CO2 level increased.

  9. The Electrochemistry of Li-LiCl-Li2O Molten Salt Systems and the Role of Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gese, Natalie J.

    Uranium can be recovered from uranium-oxide (UO2) spent fuel through the combination of oxide reduction and electrorefining processes. During oxide reduction, the spent fuel is introduced to molten LiCl-Li 2O salt at 650°C, and the UO2 is reduced to uranium metal via two routes: (1) electrochemically, and (2) chemically by lithium metal (Li°) that is produced electrochemically. However, the hygroscopic nature of both LiCl and Li2O leads to the formation of LiOH, contributing hydroxyl anions (OH-), the reduction of which interferes with the Li° generation required for the chemical reduction of UO 2. In order for the oxide reduction process to be an effective method for the treatment of uranium-oxide fuel, the role of moisture in the LiCl-Li 2O system must be understood. The behavior of moisture in the LiCl-Li 2O molten-salt system was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and chronoamperometry while reduction to hydrogen was confirmed with gas chromatography.

  10. Al/Pb lightweight grids prepared by molten salt electroless plating for application in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bo; Jiang, Liangxing; Hao, Ketao; Liu, Fangyang; Yu, Xiaoying; Xue, Haitao; Li, Jie; Liu, Yexiang

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a lightweight Pb plated Al (Al/Pb) grid was prepared by molten salt electroless plating. The SEM and bonding strength test show that the lead coating is deposited with a smooth surface and firm combination. CV test shows that the electrochemical properties of Al/Pb electrodes are stable. 2.0 V single-cell flooded lead-acid batteries with Al/Pb grids as negative collectors are assembled and the performances including 20 h capacity, rate capacity, cycle life, internal resistance are investigated. The results show that the cycle life of Al/Pb-grid cells is about 475 cycles and can meet the requirement of lead-acid batteries. Al/Pb grids are conducive to the refinement of PbSO4 grain, and thereby reduce the internal resistance of battery and advance the utilization of active mass. Moreover, weight of Al/Pb grid is only 55.4% of the conventional-grid. In this way, mass specific capacity of Al/Pb-grid negatives is 17.8% higher and the utilization of active mass is 6.5% higher than conventional-grid negatives.

  11. Molten-salt synthesis and composition-dependent luminescent properties of barium tungsto-molybdate-based solid solution phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Hong, He; Zhao-Lian, Ye; Ming-Yun, Guan; Ning, Lian; Jian-Hua, Sun

    2016-02-01

    Pr3+-activated barium tungsto-molybdate solid solution phosphor Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ is successfully fabricated via a facile molten-salt approach. The as-synthesized microcrystal is of truncated octahedron and exhibits deep-red-emitting upon blue light excitation. Powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy techniques are utilized to investigate the formation of solid solution phosphor. The luminescence behaviors depend on the resulting composition of the microcrystals with fixed Pr3+-doping concentration, while the host lattices remain in a scheelite structure. The forming solid solution via the substitution of [WO4] for [MoO4] can significantly enhance its luminescence, which may be due to the fact that Ba(Mo1-zWz)O4:Pr3+ owns well-defined facets and uniform morphologies. Owing to its properties of high phase purity, well-defined facets, highly uniform morphologies, exceptional chemical and thermal stabilities, and stronger emission intensity, the resulting solid solution phosphor is expected to find potential applications in phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Project supported by the Construction Fund for Science and Technology Innovation Group from Jiangsu University of Technology, China, the Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, China (Grant No. KHK1409), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21373103).

  12. Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit. Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, M. H.

    1981-01-20

    This represents the second quarterly progress report on Phase 2 of the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) Program. Phase 1 of this program started in March 1976 and included the design, construction, and initial operation of the PDU. On June 25, 1980, Phase 2 of the program was initiated. It covers a 1-year operations program utilizing the existing PDU and is planned to include five runs with a targeted total operating time of 9 weeks. During this report period, Run 6, the initial run of the Phase 2 program was completed. The gasification system was operated for a total of 95 h at pressures up to 10 atm. Average product gas HHV values of 100 Btu/scf were recorded during 10-atm operation, while gasifying coal at a rate of 1100 lb/h. The run was terminated when the melt overflow system plugged after 60 continuous hours of overflow. Following this run, melt withdrawal system revisions were made, basically by changing the orifice materials from Monofrax to an 80 Cobalt-20 Chromium alloy. By the end of the report period, the PDU was being prepared for Run 7.

  13. Preparation of pyrolytic carbon coating on graphite for inhibiting liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration for molten salt breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinliang; Zhao, Yanling; He, Xiujie; Zhang, Baoliang; Xu, Li; He, Zhoutong; Zhang, DongSheng; Gao, Lina; Xia, Huihao; Zhou, Xingtai; Huai, Ping; Bai, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    A fixed-bed deposition method was used to prepare rough laminar pyrolytic carbon coating (RLPyC) on graphite for inhibiting liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration during use in molten salt breeder reactor. The RLPyC coating possessed a graphitization degree of 44% and had good contact with graphite substrate. A high-pressure reactor was constructed to evaluate the molten salt infiltration in the isostatic graphite (IG-110, TOYO TANSO CO., LTD.) and RLPyC coated graphite under 1.01, 1.52, 3.04, 5.07 and 10.13 × 105 Pa for 12 h. Mercury injection and molten-salt infiltration experiments indicated the porosity and the salt-infiltration amount of 18.4% and 13.5 wt% under 1.52 × 105 Pa of IG-110, which was much less than 1.2% and 0.06 wt% under 10.13 × 105 Pa of the RLPyC, respectively. A vacuum device was constructed to evaluate the Xe135 penetration in the graphite. The helium diffusion coefficient of RLPyC coated graphite was 2.16 × 10-12 m2/s, much less than 1.21 × 10-6 m2/s of the graphite. Thermal cycle experiment indicated the coatings possessed excellent thermal stability. The coated graphite could effectively inhibit the liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration.

  14. Theoretical investigation on local structure and transport properties of NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts under electric field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Xu, Zhenming; Li, Jie; Chen, Jiangan; Liu, Qingsheng

    2016-08-01

    The effect of electric field and molecular ratio CR (NaF/AlF3) on basic structure and transport properties of NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with the Buckingham potential model. The [AlF6]3- groups are the dominant specie in NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts at CR ≥ 2.6, and followed by the [AlF5]2- groups, while CR ≤ 2.4, [AlF5]2- groups are the protagonists up to 40%. In NaFsbnd AlF3 system, with the increase of CR, the proportion of Fb decreases slightly and the percentage of Ff increases dramatically. The Alsbnd F bonds have ionic characters as well as partial covalently characters due to the hybridization of F-2p and Al-3s, 3p orbitals. The order of ion diffusion ability follows as Na+ > F- > Al3+. Adding more NaF can break some F bridges of structure networks and decrease the polymerization degree of NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts, the viscosity reduces and ionic conductivity increases as a consequence. The calculated results of ionic conductivity are in agreement with the experimental results. Electric field has no significant impact on the local structure characters, while transport properties are not. The change of CR (NaF/AlF3) can significantly affect these characters of both the structure and transport.

  15. A novel process for recovery of iron, titanium, and vanadium from titanomagnetite concentrates: NaOH molten salt roasting and water leaching processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Desheng; Zhao, Longsheng; Liu, Yahui; Qi, Tao; Wang, Jianchong; Wang, Lina

    2013-01-15

    A novel process for recovering iron, titanium, and vanadium from titanomagnetite concentrates has been developed. In the present paper, the treatment of rich titanium-vanadium slag by NaOH molten salt roasting and water leaching processes is investigated. In the NaOH molten salt roasting process, the metallic iron is oxidized into ferriferous oxide, MgTi(2)O(5) is converted to NaCl-type structure of Na(2)TiO(3), and M(3)O(5) (M=Ti, Mg, Fe) is converted to α-NaFeO(2)-type structure of NaMO(2), respectively. Roasting temperature and NaOH-slag mass ratio played a considerable role in the conversion of titanium in the rich titanium-vanadium slag during the NaOH molten salt roasting process. Roasting at 500 °C for 60 min and a 1:1 NaOH-slag mass ratio produces 96.3% titanium conversion. In the water leaching process, the Na(+) was exchanged with H(+), Na(2)TiO(3) is converted to undefined structure of H(2)TiO(3), and NaMO(2) is converted to α-NaFeO(2)-type structure of HMO(2). Under the optimal conditions, 87.3% of the sodium, 42.3% of the silicon, 43.2% of the aluminum, 22.8% of the manganese, and 96.6% of the vanadium are leached out.

  16. Molten salt synthesis (MSS) of Cu{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}-New way for large-scale production of Chevrel phases

    SciTech Connect

    Lancry, E. . E-mail: eli.lancry@intel.com; Levi, E.; Mitelman, A.; Malovany, S.; Aurbach, D.

    2006-06-15

    The Chevrel phase (CP), Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}, was found to be an excellent cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries. Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} is obtained by a leaching process of Cu{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}, which removes the copper. A new method of Cu{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} production was developed. In contrast to the well-known solid-state synthesis of CP, the method is based on the reaction in a molten salt media (KCl). A fast kinetics of this reaction allows using less active, but more convenient precursors (sulfides instead of sulfur), decreasing temperature and synthesis duration, as well as operation in the inert atmosphere instead of dynamic evacuated systems. It was shown that the composition and the electrochemical behavior of the products obtained by MSS and by the solid-state synthesis are identical. Thus, the molten salt method is extremely attractive for the large-scale production of the active materials for Mg batteries. - Graphical abstract: The layout of the molten salt synthesis system.

  17. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  18. Fusion option to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and transuranic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    2000-02-10

    The fusion option is examined to solve the disposition problems of the spent nuclear fuel and the transuranic elements. The analysis of this report shows that the top rated solution, the elimination of the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products, can be achieved in a fusion reactor. A 167 MW of fusion power from a D-T plasma for sixty years with an availability factor of 0.75 can transmute all the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products of the 70,000 tons of the US inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. The operating time can be reduced to thirty years with use of 334 MW of fusion power, a system study is needed to define the optimum time. In addition, the fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future. Fusion blankets with a liquid carrier for the transuranic elements can achieve a transmutation rate for the transuranic elements up to 80 kg/MW.y of fusion power with k{sub eff} of 0.98. In addition, the liquid blankets have several advantages relative to the other blanket options. The energy from this transmutation is utilized to produce revenue for the system. Molten salt (Flibe) and lithium-lead eutectic are identified as the most promising liquids for this application, both materials are under development for future fusion blanket concepts. The Flibe molten salt with transuranic elements was developed and used successfully as nuclear fuel for the molten salt breeder reactor in the 1960's.

  19. Molten salt fuels for treatment of plutonium and radwastes in ADS critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor V.

    2000-07-01

    Introduction of the innovative reactor concept of the incinerator type in the future nuclear power system should provide the following: • Low Plutonium and Minor Actinides Total Inventory in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (M) • Reduced Actinides Total Losses to Waste (W) • Minimal Uranium-235 SupportMinimal Neutron Captures Outside Actinides (Coolant & Structural Material Activation Products). Estimations have shown strong dependence of the first two parameters (M and W), which are responsible for incinerator efficiency, from the burnup (c) reached in the core of an incinerator and the actinides mass flow rate in the fuel cycle (A(t)=G(t)/Q(t), where G(t)=amount of TRU fed to the process during t, and Q(t)=electricity produced during (t).

  20. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…