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Sample records for moltox oxygen process

  1. Air separation by the Moltox process

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D. C.

    1981-04-01

    The report describes results of a development program on a new and energy saving process for air separation. The Moltox process involves reversibly reacting oxygen in air with a recirculating salt solution, such that oxygen is extracted without depressurizing the remaining nitrogen. Energy savings of approximately 50% are indicated for this process compared to conventional cryogenic air separation. The development program consisted of design, construction, and operation of a 6 liter/minute pilot plant; optimization of the process flowsheet through computer modelling; investigation of engineering aspects of the process including corrosion, safety, and NO/sub x/ generation; and an economic comparison to conventional cryogenic practice. All objectives were satisfactorily achieved except for continuous operation of the pilot plant, and the modifications necessary to achieve that have been identified. Economically the Moltox process shows a substantial advantage over large scale cryogenic plants which are powered by fuel vice electricity.

  2. Air separation by the Moltox process. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.

    1981-04-01

    Results are described of a development program on a new and energy-saving process for air separation. The Moltox process involves reversibly reacting oxygen in air with a recirculating salt solution, such that oxygen is extracted without depressurizing the remaining nitrogen. Energy savings of approximately 50% are indicated for this process compared to conventional cryogenic air separation. The development program consisted of design, construction, and operation of a 6 liter/minute pilot plant; optimization of the process flowsheet through computer modelling; investigation of engineering aspects of the process including corrosion, safety, and NO/sub x/ generation; and an economic comparison to conventional cryogenic practice. All objectives were satisfactorily achieved except for continuous operation of the pilot plant, and the modifications necessary to achieve that have been identified. Economically the Moltox process shows a substantial advantage over large scale cryogenic plants which are powered by fuel vice electricity.

  3. Corrosion study in the chemical air separation (MOLTOX trademark ) process

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Doohee; Wong, Kai P.; Archer, R.A.; Cassano, A.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents the results of studies aimed at solving the corrosion problems encountered during operation of the MOLTOX{trademark} pilot plant. These studies concentrated on the screening of commercial and developmental alloys under conditions simulating operation conditions in this high temperature molten salt process. Process economic studies were preformed in parallel with the laboratory testing to ensure that an economically feasible solution would be achieved. In addition to the above DOE co-funded studies, Air Products and Chemicals pursued proprietary studies aimed at developing a less corrosive salt mixture which would potentially allow the use of chemurgically available alloys such as stainless steels throughout the system. These studies will not be reported here; however, the results of corrosion tests in the new less corrosive salt mixtures are reported. Because our own studies on salt chemistry impacts heavily on the overall process and thereby has an influence on the experimental work conducted under this contract, some of the studies discussed here were impacted by our own proprietary data. Therefore, the reasons behind some of the experiments presented herein will not be explained because that information is proprietary to Air Products. 14 refs., 42 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. DME-to-oxygenates process studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tartamella, T.L.; Sardesai, A.; Lee, S.; Kulik, C.J.

    1994-12-31

    The feasibility of the production of hydrocarbons from dimethyl ether (DNM) has been illustrated in a fixed bed micro-reactor as well as a bench scale fluidized bed reactor by the University of Akron/EPRI DME-to-Hydrocarbon (DTG) Process. The DTG process has distinct advantages over its methanol based counterpart. Specifically, the DTG process excels in the area of higher productivity, higher per-pass conversion, and lower heat duties than the MTG process. Also of special importance is the production of oxygenates -- including MTBE, ETBE, and TAME. DME may be reacted with isobutylene to produce a mixture of MTBE and ETBE. The properties of ETBE excel over MTBE in the areas of lower RVP and higher RON. According to industrial reports, MTBE is the fastest growing chemical (1992 US capacity 135,350 BPD, with expected growth of 34%/year to 1997). Also, recent renewed interest as an octane-enhancer and as a source of oxygen has spurred a growing interest in nonrefinery synthesis routes to ETBE. TAME, with its lower RVP and higher RON has proven useful as a gasoline blending agent and octane enhancer and may also be produced directly from DME. DME, therefore, serves as a valuable feedstock in the conversion of may oxygenates with wide-scale industrial importance. It should be also noted that the interest in the utilization of DME as process feedstock is based on the favorable process economics of EPRI/UA`s liquid phase DME process.

  5. Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Haiqing

    2011-11-15

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a

  6. A modified sulfate process to lunar oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    A modified sulfate process which produces oxygen from iron oxide-bearing minerals in lunar soil is under development. Reaction rates of ilmenite in varying strength sulfuric acid have been determined. Quantitative conversion of ilmenite to ferrous sulfate was observed over a range of temperatures and concentrations. Data has also been developed on the calcination of by-product sulfates. System engineering for overall operability and simplicity has begun, suggesting that a process separating the digestion and sulfate dissolution steps may offer an optimum process.

  7. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  8. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  9. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C.

    1984-01-01

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  10. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C. [Wilmington, DE; Baker, Richard W. [Palo Alto, CA

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  11. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 1 figure

  12. Nanoparticulate-catalyzed oxygen transfer processes

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Andrew T.; Breitkopf, Richard C.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticulates of oxygen transfer materials that are oxides of rare earth metals, combinations of rare earth metals, and combinations of transition metals and rare earth metals are used as catalysts in a variety of processes. Unexpectedly large thermal efficiencies are achieved relative to micron sized particulates. Processes that use these catalysts are exemplified in a multistage reactor. The exemplified reactor cracks C6 to C20 hydrocarbons, desulfurizes the hydrocarbon stream and reforms the hydrocarbons in the stream to produce hydrogen. In a first reactor stage the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate mixed rare earth metal oxide to crack larger hydrocarbon molecules. In a second stage, the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate material that desulfurizes the hydrocarbon. In a third stage, the hydrocarbon and steam are passed through a heated, mixed transition metal/rare earth metal oxide to reform the lower hydrocarbons and thereby produce hydrogen. Stages can be alone or combined. Parallel reactors can provide continuous reactant flow. Each of the processes can be carried out individually.

  13. Oxygen vacancy promoted methane partial oxidation over iron oxide oxygen carriers in the chemical looping process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Lang; Guo, Mengqing; Xu, Mingyuan; Fan, Jonathan A; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2016-11-30

    We perform ab initio DFT+U calculations and experimental studies of the partial oxidation of methane to syngas on iron oxide oxygen carriers to elucidate the role of oxygen vacancies in oxygen carrier reactivity. In particular, we explore the effect of oxygen vacancy concentration on sequential processes of methane dehydrogenation, and oxidation with lattice oxygen. We find that when CH4 adsorbs onto Fe atop sites without neighboring oxygen vacancies, it dehydrogenates with CHx radicals remaining on the same site and evolves into CO2via the complete oxidation pathway. In the presence of oxygen vacancies, on the other hand, the formed methyl (CH3) prefers to migrate onto the vacancy site while the H from CH4 dehydrogenation remains on the original Fe atop site, and evolves into CO via the partial oxidation pathway. The oxygen vacancies created in the oxidation process can be healed by lattice oxygen diffusion from the subsurface to the surface vacancy sites, and it is found that the outward diffusion of lattice oxygen atoms is more favorable than the horizontal diffusion on the same layer. Based on the proposed mechanism and energy profile, we identify the rate-limiting steps of the partial oxidation and complete oxidation pathways. Also, we find that increasing the oxygen vacancy concentration not only lowers the barriers of CH4 dehydrogenation but also the cleavage energy of Fe-C bonds. However, the barrier of the rate-limiting step cannot further decrease when the oxygen vacancy concentration reaches 2.5%. The fundamental insight into the oxygen vacancy effect on CH4 oxidation with iron oxide oxygen carriers can help guide the design and development of more efficient oxygen carriers and CLPO processes.

  14. New oxygen plasma process rivals laser cutting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fernicola, R.C. )

    1994-06-01

    For many years, oxygen plasma cutting has been looked upon as a desirable process for cutting steel but not practical in production because of very short consumable parts life. Recently, a number of technical advances in the oxygen plasma cutting process provides parts life several times that of older systems and cut quality approaching that of laser systems. This paper discusses these advances.

  15. Oxygen production on the Lunar materials processing frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenberg, Barbara H.

    1992-01-01

    During the pre-conceptual design phase of an initial lunar oxygen processing facility, it is essential to identify and compare the available processes and evaluate them in order to ensure the success of such an endeavor. The focus of this paper is to provide an overview of materials processing to produce lunar oxygen as one part of a given scenario of a developing lunar occupation. More than twenty-five techniques to produce oxygen from lunar materials have been identified. While it is important to continue research on any feasible method, not all methods can be implemented at the initial lunar facility. Hence, it is necessary during the pre-conceptual design phase to evaluate all methods and determine the leading processes for initial focus. Researchers have developed techniques for evaluating the numerous proposed methods in order to suggest which processes would be best to go to the Moon first. As one section in this paper, the recent evaluation procedures that have been presented in the literature are compared and contrasted. In general, the production methods for lunar oxygen fall into four categories: thermochemical, reactive solvent, pyrolytic, and electrochemical. Examples from two of the four categories are described, operating characteristics are contrasted, and terrestrial analogs are presented when possible. In addition to producing oxygen for use as a propellant and for life support, valuable co-products can be derived from some of the processes. This information is also highlighted in the description of a given process.

  16. Methane Post-Processing for Oxygen Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art United States Atmospheric Revitalization carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is based on the Sabatier reaction process, which recovers approximately 50% of the oxygen (O2) from crew metabolic CO2. Oxygen recovery from carbon dioxide is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing of methane to recover hydrogen with the Umpqua Research Company Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) has the potential to further close the Atmospheric Revitalization oxygen loop. The PPA decomposes methane into hydrogen and hydrocarbons, predominantly acetylene, and a small amount of solid carbon. The hydrogen must then be purified before it can be recycled for additional oxygen recovery. Long duration testing and evaluation of a four crew-member sized PPA and a discussion of hydrogen recycling system architectures are presented.

  17. Sulfur-oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of irradiated sulfur dioxide frost have found that sulfur trioxide should be formed as a consequence of the irradiation process. The spectral reflectance of solid sulfur trioxide was measured in the laboratory and it was found that the compound has strong absorption features at 3.37 and 3.70 microns. These features are not present in the spectral geometric albedo of Io. This is interpreted as an indication that sulfur trioxide may exist in such limited abundance that it is undetectable in disk averaged spectrophotometry. It is suggested that the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft should be able to identify condensed sulfur trioxide on Io particularly in regions bordering the sulfur dioxide deposits. The presence of elemental sulfur on Io's surface has been questioned on several grounds, most notably the suggested production process (quenched molten sulfur extrusions) and the effect of radiation (particularly X-rays) on some of the allotropes. Mixtures of sulfur allotropes were produced in the laboratory by quenching molten sulfur and it was found that the spectra indicate the presence of certain red-colored allotropes which are preserved upon quenching. The color of the sulfur glass produced is redder when the temperature of the original melt is higher. This is consistent with the suggestion that Io's spectral geometric albedo can be partly explained by the presence of quenched sulfur glasses.

  18. Automation and control of off-planet oxygen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.; Schooley, L. S.; Cellier, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the automation and control of off-planet production processes. First, a general approach to process automation and control is discussed from the viewpoint of translating human process control procedures into automated procedures. Second, the control issues for the automation and control of off-planet oxygen processes are discussed. Sensors, instruments, and components are defined and discussed in the context of off-planet applications, and the need for 'smart' components is clearly established.

  19. Processing of metal and oxygen from lunar deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Constance F.

    1992-01-01

    On the moon, some whole rocks may be ores for abundant elements, such as oxygen, but beneficiation will be important if metallic elements are sought from raw lunar dirt. In the extraction process, a beneficiated metallic ore, such as an oxide, sulfide, carbonate, or silicate mineral, is converted to reduced metal. A variety of plausible processing technologies, which includes recovery of meteoritic iron, and processing of lunar ilmenite, are described in this report.

  20. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    2001-01-09

    A high-yield process for converting lignin into reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline compositions of high quality is provided. The process is a two-stage catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage of the process, a lignin feed material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction, followed by a selective hydrocracking reaction which utilizes a superacid catalyst to produce a high oxygen-content depolymerized lignin product mainly composed of alkylated phenols, alkylated alkoxyphenols, and alkylbenzenes. In the second stage of the process, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to an exhaustive etherification reaction, optionally followed by a partial ring hydrogenation reaction, to produce a reformulated, partially oxygenated/etherified gasoline product, which includes a mixture of substituted phenyl/methyl ethers, cycloalkyl methyl ethers, C.sub.7 -C.sub.10 alkylbenzenes, C.sub.6 -C.sub.10 branched and multibranched paraffins, and alkylated and polyalkylated cycloalkanes.

  1. Oxygen production processes on the Moon: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Carrier, W. David, III

    1991-01-01

    The production of oxygen on the Moon utilizing indigenous material is paramount to a successful lunar colonization. Several processes were put forth to accomplish this. The lunar liquid oxygen (LLOX) generation schemes which have received the most study to date are those involving: (1) the reduction of ilmenite (FeTiO3) by H2, C, CO, CH4, CO-Cl2 plasma; (2) magma electrolysis, both unadulterated and fluoride-fluxed, and (3) several others, including carbo-chlorination, HF acid leaching, fluorine extraction, magma oxidation, and vapor pyrolysis. The H2 reduction of ilmenite and magma electrolysis processes have received the most study to date. At this stage of development, they both appear feasible schemes with various pros and cons. However, all processes should be addressed at least at the onset of the considerations. It is ultimatley the energy requirements of the entire process, including the acquisition of feedstock, which will determine the mode of oxygen productions. There is an obvious need for considerably more experimentation and study. Some of these requisite studies are in progress, and several of the most studied and feasible processes for winning oxygen from lunar materials are reviewed.

  2. Processing lunar soils for oxygen and other materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Christian W.; Gibson, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of lunar materials are excellent candidates for lunar oxygen production: ilmenite and silicates such as anorthite. Both are lunar surface minable, occurring in soils, breccias, and basalts. Because silicates are considerably more abundant than ilmenite, they may be preferred as source materials. Depending on the processing method chosen for oxygen production and the feedstock material, various useful metals and bulk materials can be produced as byproducts. Available processing techniques include hydrogen reduction of ilmenite and electrochemical and chemical reductions of silicates. Processes in these categories are generally in preliminary development stages and need significant research and development support to carry them to practical deployment, particularly as a lunar-based operation. The goal of beginning lunar processing operations by 2010 requires that planning and research and development emphasize the simplest processing schemes. However, more complex schemes that now appear to present difficult technical challenges may offer more valuable metal byproducts later. While they require more time and effort to perfect, the more complex or difficult schemes may provide important processing and product improvements with which to extend and elaborate the initial lunar processing facilities. A balanced R&D program should take this into account. The following topics are discussed: (1) ilmenite--semi-continuous process; (2) ilmenite--continuous fluid-bed reduction; (3) utilization of spent ilmenite to produce bulk materials; (4) silicates--electrochemical reduction; and (5) silicates--chemical reduction.

  3. Biological nitrification process simulation in groundwater with dissolved oxygen controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Jinlong

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays groundwater contamination by nitrogenous fertilizer is a globally growing problem, but groundwater always serves as an important water source, especially in rural area. In order to tackle this problem, biological nitrification and denitrification process has been widely used for removal of nitrogenous pollutants from polluted water. To improve removal efficiency, the dissolved oxygen (DO) controller is presented. And the control strategies for the activated sludge process have been developed and evaluated by simulation. The results also showed that the DO controller will be applied widely in the control and management of the decentralization water treatment.

  4. Temperature and oxygen visual estimator for carbonization process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Fredy; Martínez, Fernando; Montiel, Holman

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a visual estimator for temperature and oxygen content for closed loop control of carbonization furnace in the production of activated carbon. The carbonization process involves thermal decomposition of vegetal material in the absence of air; this requires rigorous sensing and control of these two variables. The system consists of two cameras, a thermographic camera to estimate the temperature, and a traditional digital camera to estimate the oxygen content. In both cases we use similarity measures between images to estimate the value of the variables into the furnace, estimation that is used to control the furnace flame. The algorithm is tested with reference photos taken at the production plant, and the experimental results prove the performance of the proposed technique.

  5. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon; Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R.; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-15

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye.

  6. Oxygen-producing inert anodes for SOM process

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B

    2014-02-25

    An electrolysis system for generating a metal and molecular oxygen includes a container for receiving a metal oxide containing a metallic species to be extracted, a cathode positioned to contact a metal oxide housed within the container; an oxygen-ion-conducting membrane positioned to contact a metal oxide housed within the container; an anode in contact with the oxygen-ion-conducting membrane and spaced apart from a metal oxide housed within the container, said anode selected from the group consisting of liquid metal silver, oxygen stable electronic oxides, oxygen stable crucible cermets, and stabilized zirconia composites with oxygen stable electronic oxides.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS): Beneficial Companions of Plants’ Developmental Processes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rachana; Singh, Samiksha; Parihar, Parul; Mishra, Rohit K.; Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Singh, Vijay P.; Chauhan, Devendra K.; Prasad, Sheo M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated inevitably in the redox reactions of plants, including respiration and photosynthesis. In earlier studies, ROS were considered as toxic by-products of aerobic pathways of the metabolism. But in recent years, concept about ROS has changed because they also participate in developmental processes of plants by acting as signaling molecules. In plants, ROS regulate many developmental processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, programmed cell death, seed germination, gravitropism, root hair growth and pollen tube development, senescence, etc. Despite much progress, a comprehensive update of advances in the understanding of the mechanisms evoked by ROS that mediate in cell proliferation and development are fragmentry and the matter of ROS perception and the signaling cascade remains open. Therefore, keeping in view the above facts, an attempt has been made in this article to summarize the recent findings regarding updates made in the regulatory action of ROS at various plant developmental stages, which are still not well-known. PMID:27729914

  8. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek; Pim , Aristidou; Aristos , Rush; Brian

    2007-06-19

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  9. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian

    2014-09-09

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  10. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian J.

    2016-08-30

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  11. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian

    2011-05-10

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  12. Singlet Oxygen Formation during the Charging Process of an Aprotic Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Wandt, Johannes; Jakes, Peter; Granwehr, Josef; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Eichel, Rüdiger-A

    2016-06-06

    Aprotic lithium-oxygen (Li-O2 ) batteries have attracted considerable attention in recent years owing to their outstanding theoretical energy density. A major challenge is their poor reversibility caused by degradation reactions, which mainly occur during battery charge and are still poorly understood. Herein, we show that singlet oxygen ((1) Δg ) is formed upon Li2 O2 oxidation at potentials above 3.5 V. Singlet oxygen was detected through a reaction with a spin trap to form a stable radical that was observed by time- and voltage-resolved in operando EPR spectroscopy in a purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell. According to our estimate, a lower limit of approximately 0.5 % of the evolved oxygen is singlet oxygen. The occurrence of highly reactive singlet oxygen might be the long-overlooked missing link in the understanding of the electrolyte degradation and carbon corrosion reactions that occur during the charging of Li-O2 cells.

  13. Trojan Horse Method for the Oxygen-Burning Process Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Burtebayev, N.; Aimaganbetov, A.; Artemov, S. V.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Igamov, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kiss, G. G.; Kubono, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Nassurlla, M.; Piasecki, E.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sakuta, S. B.; TrzciÅska, A.; Tumino, A.; Urkinbayev, A.; Zholdybayev, T.

    The 16O + 16O fusion reaction is important in terms of the explosive oxygen burning process during late evolution stage of massive stars as well as understanding of the mechanism of low-energy heavy-ion fusion reactions. The astrophysical S factor of such a heavy-ion fusion strongly depends on energy at corresponding stellar temperatures. For the 16O + 16O reaction cross section, there are larger discrepancies among different experimental data as the energy decreases, and a complete lack of data below Ec.m. = 7 MeV. We aim to determine the cross sections for the two main exit channels, α + 28Si and p + 31P, toward stellar energies. The measurements were performed indirectly by the Trojan horse method (THM) via the 16O(20Ne, α α )28Si and 16O(20Ne, pα )31P three-body reactions, respectively. We performed measurements twice using 20Ne beams at Heavy Ion Laboratory (E20Ne = 45 MeV) and at Gumilyov Eurasian National University (E20Ne = 35 MeV). We discuss the applicability of the THM to such a heavy nuclear system showing preliminary results of the momentum distribution of α -16O intercluster motion in the TH nucleus 20Ne observed for the first time, which implies a possibility of a multi-step breakup of the TH nucleus.

  14. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  15. Effect of bottom water oxygenation on oxygen consumption and benthic biogeochemical processes at the Crimean Shelf (Black Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtschlag, A.; Janssen, F.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Holtappels, M.; Struck, U.; Jessen, G.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxia occurs where oxygen concentrations fall below a physiological threshold of many animals, usually defined as <63 µmol L-1. Oxygen depletion can be caused by anthropogenic influences, such as global warming and eutrophication, but as well occurs naturally due to restricted water exchange in combination with high nutrient loads (e.g. upwelling). Bottom-water oxygen availability not only influences the composition of faunal communities, but is also one of the main factors controlling sediment-water exchange fluxes and organic carbon degradation in the sediment, usually shifting processes towards anaerobic mineralization pathways mediated by microorganisms. The Black Sea is one of the world's largest meromictic marine basins with an anoxic water column below 180m. The outer shelf edge, where anoxic waters meet the seafloor, is an ideal natural laboratory to study the response of benthic ecosystems to hypoxia, including benthic biogeochemical processes. During the MSM 15/1 expedition with the German research vessel MARIA S. MERIAN, the NW area of the Black Sea (Crimean Shelf) was studied. The study was set up to investigate the influence of bottom water oxygenation on, (1) the respective share of fauna-mediated oxygen uptake, microbial respiration, or re-oxidation of reduced compounds formed in the deeper sediments for the total oxygen flux and (2) on the efficiency of benthic biogeochemical cycles. During our study, oxygen consumption and pathways of organic carbon degradation were estimated from benthic chamber incubations, oxygen microprofiles measured in situ, and pore water and solid phase profiles measured on retrieved cores under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic water column conditions. Benthic oxygen fluxes measured in Crimean Shelf sediments in this study were comparable to fluxes from previous in situ and laboratory measurements at similar oxygen concentrations (total fluxes -8 to -12 mmol m-2 d-1; diffusive fluxes: -2 to -5 mmol m-2 d-1) with oxygen

  16. Venus's Mysterious Oxygen Green Line: An Auroral Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Candace L.; Chanover, Nancy; Slanger, Tom; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Hausler, Bernd; Tellmann, Silvia; Peter, Kerstin; Witasse, Olivier; Blelly, Pierre-Louise; Garcia-Munoz, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    Observations of nightglow (upper atmospheric emission from atoms and molecules on the nightside of a planet) allow for a multifaceted study of planetary atmospheres. Information on winds, chemistry, and solar effects is gained by observing temporal and spacial variation in nightglow intensity. One of the brightest nightglow features on Earth is the OI (1S) 557.7 nm line (oxygen green line). This emission is primarily due to photodissociation/transport but is also seen in the aurora as electron precipitation.Unlike Earth, the Venusian green line is highly temporally variable. The chemistry and mechanisms responsible are still unknown. We observe the Venusian nightglow before and after solar flares, which produce large amounts of EUV emission, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) impacts, which inject a large number of higher energy charged particles in the the Venusian atmosphere. We consistently detect green line emission after large charged particles injections from CMEs. However we do not detectthe OI (1D) red line at 630.0 nm, which is quenched below 150 km. We propose that the Venusian green line is an auroral-type emission due to electron precipitation and is occurring deep in the atmosphere, near 125 km.To investigate how CMEs and solar flares effect the electron energy, flux, and density in the Venusian nightside atmosphere, we compare data taken by ASPERA and ELS onboard Venus Express (VEX) before and after solar storms. We find that both electron energy and flux increase after CMEs, but onlyflux increases after solar flares. Additionally, the V1 ionospheric layer at 125 km increases in electron density while the V2 at 150 km decreases in density after CMEs but not after solar flares. We model the nightside Venusian ionosphere using the observed electron energy and fluxes from VEX in an effort to constrain the chemical processes and mechanisms responsible for green line emission. We will present the results of our ground-based observations and modeling.

  17. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-11-22

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figs.

  18. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  19. Effect of high-oxygen and oxygen-free modified atmosphere packaging on the spoilage process of poultry breast fillets.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Sonja; Klausmann, Sonja; Kreyenschmidt, Judith

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effect of atmospheres containing high oxygen (70% O2 and 30% CO2) or high nitrogen (70% N2 and 30% CO2) on the spoilage process during storage (at 4°C) of poultry fillets. Four samples of each gas atmosphere were analyzed at 7 sample points during storage. For this analysis, the growth of typical spoilage organisms (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Lactobacilli spp.) and total viable count (TVC) were analyzed and modeled by using the Gompertz function. Sensory analyses of the poultry samples were carried out by trained sensory panelists to analyze color, odor, texture, drip loss, and general appearance. The composition of the spoilage flora differed between the oxygen-free atmosphere and the high-oxygen atmosphere. Anaerobic conditions favored the growth of Lactobacilli spp., whereas aerobic gas composition favored the growth of B. thermosphacta. However, no significant difference (P<0.05) in TVC and sensory parameters were observed for poultry samples stored under a high-oxygen atmosphere in comparison to a high-nitrogen atmosphere. These results indicate that high-oxygen packaging has no additional beneficial effect on the quality maintenance and shelf life of fresh poultry fillets.

  20. [Tissue oxygen exchange and oxidative processes in long-livers: age peculiarities].

    PubMed

    Korkushko, O V; Ivanov, L A; Shatilo, V B

    2012-01-01

    This work was undertaken to study tissue oxygen exchange and oxidative processes in the long-lived individuals who were assumed as the physiologically aging individuals. Oxygen tension was assessed in forearm subcutaneous cellular tissue by means of the polarographic method while performing 10 min oxygen inhalation tests (with spontaneous oxygemogram recording) and a 10 min clamping of vessels. The obtained data served as the tissue oxygen exchange indicator. This approach made us possible to evaluate the oxygen delivery and oxygen uptake. To study qualitative characteristics of oxidative processes, we assessed vacat-oxygen of the blood and urine and estimated the underoxidation coefficient proposed by Muller. We have found that tissue respiration intensity falls, the amount of underoxidated products of the blood and urine rises, and the underoxidation coefficient increases in aging. The decrease of tissue oxygen respiration intensity in subcutaneous cellular tissue reflects the development of tissue hypoxia associated with reduced activity of the enzymes, being involved in oxygen exchange. An age-related decrease of tissue perfusion leads to the formation of circulatory hypoxia and also contributes considerably to tissue hypoxia formation. The revealed changes in the tissue oxygen exchange and oxidative processes in the long-livers are generally correspondent to those that can be seen in the people of 80-89 years. This finding speaks in favor of the physiological aging in the long-livers.

  1. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  2. The analysis and minimization of oxygen contamination in the powder processing of molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Kruse

    1994-04-24

    Problems with MoSi2 include low-temperature fracture toughness, high-temperature creep resistance, and ``pest`` phenomena. Oxygen introduced by powder processing may be the cause of some of these problems. This study led to the following conclusions: Supplied powders have significant oxygen present prior to processing (up to 2.5 %), in the form of silica on the surface. This oxygen contamination did not increase by exposure to air at room temperature. An improved powder processing method was developed that uses glass encapsulation. Analysis of microstructures created from powders that contained 4900 to 24,100 ppM oxygen showed that the silica was transferred to the fully dense MoSi2 as SiO2 inclusions. A method of producing MoSi2 with less oxygen was attempted.

  3. "Oxygen supply" as modulator of aging processes: hypoxia and hyperoxia models for aging studies.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Amelia; Di Giulio, Camillo

    2009-07-01

    Cell growth is regulated by several factors, including oxygen supply, which influence cell metabolism. Aging is characterized by decreased oxygen supply to tissue, a reduction of tissue PO(2) and of the activity of several enzymes and metabolic factors. The oxygen-gradient diffusion at capillary tissue level is essential for the cellular survival, while the homeostasis of the oxygen in the arterial blood is mediated by reflexes sensitive to oxygen decrease and by release of several factors. Aging is correlated with a reduction of cells' oxygen supply concomitant to a parallel decrease in oxygen demand by tissues. Both chronic hypoxia or hyperoxia are considered as stresses. Indeed, in both conditions, free radical species, which damage structural and functional components of the membrane, are generated. ROS (reactive oxygen species) are physiological products of aerobic life and their accumulation affects aging. Because hypoxia per se modulates mitochondria activity, influencing oxygen consumption, hypoxia and aging could share some link. Moreover, the observation that in hypoxia or hyperoxia there is an accumulation of lipofucsine as a general reaction to stress is consistent with the accumulation of such components during aging. Correlation between hypoxia-hyperoxia and life-span remains open until we solve the question of how and why do cells sense oxygen. In other words, to better understand aging we need to know what O(2) species are being sensed by cells. In conclusion, hypoxia and hyperoxia represent an experimental model adequate for studying aging processes.

  4. Numerical Study of the Reduction Process in an Oxygen Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    Based on computational fluid dynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, principles of transfer in metallurgy, and other principles, a multi-fluid model for a traditional blast furnace was established. The furnace conditions were simulated with this multi-fluid mathematical model, and the model was verified with the comparison of calculation and measurement. Then a multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace in the gasifier-full oxygen blast furnace process was established based on this traditional blast furnace model. With the established multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace, the basic characteristics of iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace were summarized, including the changing process of the iron ore reduction degree and the compositions of the burden, etc. The study found that compared to the traditional blast furnace, the magnetite reserve zone in the furnace shaft under oxygen blast furnace condition was significantly reduced, which is conducive to the efficient operation of blast furnace. In order to optimize the oxygen blast furnace design and operating parameters, the iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace was researched under different shaft tuyere positions, different recycling gas temperatures, and different allocation ratios of recycling gas between the hearth tuyere and the shaft tuyere. The results indicate that these three factors all have a substantial impact on the ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace. Moderate shaft tuyere position, high recycling gas temperature, and high recycling gas allocation ratio between hearth and shaft could significantly promote the reduction of iron ore, reduce the scope of the magnetite reserve zone, and improve the performance of oxygen blast furnace. Based on the above findings, the recommendations for improvement of the oxygen blast furnace design and operation were proposed.

  5. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  6. Evaluation of processing options for lunar oxygen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Andrew H.; Waldron, Robert D.

    Certain modifications of previously proposed space resource utilization processes, characterized as 'second generation' processes, are reviewed. Most notable are the hydrogen reduction of the iron-bearing materials class of processes, and the acid leach of the selected materials class of processes. The usual qualitative and quantitative criteria previously applied in the literature to comparisons between processes are much easier to apply in comparing very similar processes. This reasoning is applied to a few selected processes both to draw conclusions and to highlight the process by which they may be reached. Preliminary ranking of processes shows which new ones merit substantial further study; e.g., hydrogen reduction of mixed ferruginous feeds, integration of thermal cycle water splitting with sulfate leaching, and hydrochloric acid leaching of olivines are new processes that merit study, and it is argued that olivine reduction and the concurrent reduction of several iron-bearing materials instead of just one definitely rank higher than ilmenite reduction on the basis of present-day research.

  7. Production of oxygen on the moon - Which processes are best and why

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the 20 processes put forth for the liberation of oxygen from lunar materials has resulted in a ranking according to overall feasibility. At this time, the eight processes considered to be the most likely candidates for oxygen production on the moon are: ilmenite reduction with H2, CO, and CH4, glass reduction with H2, molten silicate electrolysis, fluxed molten silicate electrolysis, vapor pyrolysis, and ion plasma pyrolysis.

  8. Molecular Oxygen and Reactive Oxygen Species in Bread-making Processes: Scarce, but Nevertheless Important.

    PubMed

    Decamps, Karolien; Joye, Iris J; De Vos, Dirk E; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    In bread making, O2 is consumed by flour constituents, yeast, and, optionally, some additives optimizing dough processing and/or product quality. It plays a major role especially in the oxidation/reduction phenomena in dough, impacting gluten network structure. The O2 level is about 7.2 mmol/kg dough, of which a significant part stems from wheat flour. We speculate that O2 is quickly lost to the atmosphere during flour hydration. Later, when the gluten network structure develops, some O2 is incorporated in dough through mixing-in of air. O2 is consumed by yeast respiration and in a number of reactions catalyzed by a wide range of enzymes present or added. About 60% of the O2 consumption in yeastless dough is ascribed to oxidation of fatty acids by wheat lipoxygenase activity. In yeasted dough, about 70% of the O2 in dough is consumed by yeast and wheat lipoxygenase. This would leave only about 30% for other reactions. The severe competition between endogenous (and added) O2-consuming systems impacts the gluten network. Moreover, the scarce literature data available suggest that exogenous oxidative enzymes but not those in flour may promote crosslinking of arabinoxylan in yeastless dough. In any case, dough turns anaerobic during the first minutes of fermentation.

  9. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    The Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink while the well-developed pycnocline isolates autotrophic surface waters from the heterotrophic and hypoxic waters below. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e. primary production and water column respiration). In this experiment below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  10. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Louisiana shelf, in the northern Gulf of Mexico, receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year, except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers, where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e., primary production and water column respiration). With this experiment we show that below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes (advection and vertical diffusion) and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of the process of formation of sulfur compounds in oxygen gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    G.Ya. Gerasimov; T.M. Bogacheva

    2001-05-15

    A thermodynamic approach to the description of the behavior of the system fuel-oxidizer in oxygen gasification of coal is used to reveal the main mechanisms of the process of capture of sulfur by the mineral part of the coal and to determine the fundamental possibility of the process for coals from different coal fields.

  12. The feasibility of processes for the production of oxygen on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Carrier, W. D., III

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the perceived feasibility of 20 different processs for the production of oxygen on the moon is presented. Many of them are largely untested and/or extremely complicated and difficult to implement. Simplicity, low energy, easily attainable feedstock, and resupply mass are the principal criteria for the processes that will ultimately be selected for the initial production of oxygen on the moon. An evaluation of the 20 processes resulted in a ranking according to overall feasibility. The eight processes considered to be the most likely candidates, at this time, for oxygen production on the moon are: ilmenite reduction of H2, CO2, and CH4; glass reduction with H2; molten silicate electrolysis; fluxed molten silicate electrolysis; vapor pyrolysis; and ion plasma pyrolysis.

  13. Radiation processing of water, oxygen and ozone ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teolis, Benjamin D.

    solid. In solid O2, a fluence dependence in the sputtering yield was discovered (using 100 keV protons) and attributed to the production of trapped ozone, which enhanced the sputtering yield. The enhancement is due to the liberation of potential energy during radiolytic decomposition of O3 into O2, which contributes to the physical ejection of molecules from the solid; a physical phenomenon not previously observed in studies of sputtering. When irradiated O2 is warmed above ˜33 K, the O2 desorbs from the solid, leaving behind residual solid ozone that was found to possess a remarkably low density (˜0.34 g/cm 3). The discovery of a low density form of solid ozone can explain the temperature dependence in the infrared spectra of condensed ozone previously reported, but the molecular structure of the solid and the reason for its transformation to a high density form at ˜47 K are still open questions. Solid ozone was found to possess an extraordinarily high sputtering yield when irradiated by 100 keV protons at 30 K and above, second only to solid hydrogen. This is due to (i) the high chemical reactivity of the solid and (ii) the volatility of the decomposition product (O2). Laboratory simulations of processes on astronomical surfaces that use infrared reflectance spectroscopy of thin films to analyze their composition and structure often ignore important optical interference effects which often lead to erroneous measurements of absorption band strengths and give an apparent dependence of this quantity on film thickness, index of refraction and wavelength. In appendix 1, these interference effects are demonstrated experimentally and the optical depths of several absorption bands of thin water ice films on a gold mirror are shown to be disproportionate to film thickness. A way to remove interference effects by performing measurements with P-polarized light incident at Brewster's angle is proposed. Additionally, appendix 2 describes a computer program I created to perform

  14. Properties of Aluminum Deposited by a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fueled Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D; Lee, D

    2001-06-12

    Aluminum coatings deposited by a HVOF process have been demonstrated and relevant coating properties evaluated according to two deposition parameters, the spray distance and the oxygen-to-fuel flow ratio. The coating porosity, surface roughness, and microhardness are measured. The coating properties are fairly insensitive to spray distance, the distance between the nozzle and the workpiece, and fuel ratios, the oxygen-to-fuel flow. Increasing the fuel content does appear to improve the process productivity in terms of surface roughness. Minimization of nozzle loading is discussed.

  15. Stable Isotope Composition of Molecular Oxygen in Soil Gas and Groundwater: A Potentially Robust Tracer for Diffusion and Oxygen Consumption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Dillon, M. A.

    1998-02-01

    We have measured the concentration and isotopic composition of molecular oxygen in soil gas and groundwater. At a site near Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, soil gas oxygen concentrations ranged from 13.8 to 17.6% at depths of 3-4 m and the δ 18O values ranged mostly from 24.0 to 27.2‰ (SMOW). The concentration of dissolved oxygen in a perched aquifer in the Texas Panhandle (depth to water ˜76 m) was about 5 mg/L and the δ 18O values were 21.2-22.9‰. The δ 18O of soil gas oxygen in our study are higher and those of dissolved oxygen are lower than the δ 18O of atmospheric oxygen (23.5‰). A model for the oxygen concentration and isotopic composition in soil gas was developed using the molecular diffusion theory. The higher δ 18O values in soil gas at the Nebraska site can be explained by the effects of diffusion and soil respiration (plant root and bacterial) on the isotopic composition of molecular oxygen. The lower δ 18O of dissolved oxygen at the Texas site indicates that oxygen consumption below the root zone in the relatively thick unsaturated zone here may have occurred with a different fractionation factor (either due to inorganic consumption or due to low respiration rates) than that observed for the dominant pathways of plant root and bacterial respiration. It is concluded that the use of the concentration and isotopic composition of soil gas and dissolved oxygen should provide a robust tool for studying the subsurface gaseous diffusion and oxygen consumption processes.

  16. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  17. Modelling Oxygen Dynamics in an Intermittently Stratified Estuary: Estimation of Process Rates Using Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsuk, M. E.; Stow, C. A.; Luettich, R. A.; Paerl, H. W.; Pinckney, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between bottom water dissolved oxygen concentration, vertical stratification, and temperature was investigated for the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina, a shallow, intermittently-mixed estuary using approximately 10 years of weekly/biweekly, mid-channel data. A generalized additive model (GAM) was used to initially explore the major relationships among observed variables. The results of this statistical model guided the specification of a process-based model of oxygen dynamics that is consistent with theory yet simple enough to be parameterized using available field data. The nonlinear optimization procedure employed allows for the direct estimation of microbial oxygen consumption and physical reoxygenation rates, including the effects of temperature and vertical stratification. These estimated rates may better represent aggregate system behaviour than closed chamber measurements made in the laboratory and in situ. The resulting model describes 79% of the variation in dissolved oxygen concentration and is robust when compared across separate locations and time periods. Model predictions suggest that the spatial extent and duration of hypoxia in the bottom waters of the Neuse are controlled by the balance between the net oxygen depletion rate and the frequency of vertical mixing events. During cool months, oxygen consumption rates remain low enough to keep oxygen concentration well above levels of concern even under extended periods of stratification. A concentration below 4 mg l -1is only expected under extended periods without vertical mixing when bottom water temperature exceeds 15 °C, while a concentration below 2 mg l -1is only expected when water temperature exceeds 20 °C. To incorporate the effects of parameter uncertainty, model error, and natural variability on model prediction, we used Monte Carlo simulation to generate distributions for the predicted number of days of hypoxia during the summer season. The expected number of days with

  18. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on Cu Corrosion in Single Wafer Cleaning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yukinari; Futatsuki, Takashi; Shiohara, Morio; Kondo, Seiichi; Saito, Shuichi

    2009-04-01

    We investigated Cu corrosion at the via bottom of multi-layered Cu interconnects that occurred after post-etching wet cleaning and caused via open failures. We found that oxygen was dissolved into de-ionized water (DIW) on the wafer edge from the air atmosphere during the rinse step after chemical cleaning and that Cu was oxidized due to the high oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the rinse DIW. To prevent Cu interconnects from being corroded, control of the dissolved oxygen and the ORP of the rinse DIW by decreasing the oxygen concentration of the atmosphere in the cleaning machine as well as by using H2 water is required. This will become indispensable in the cleaning process of the next generation Cu interconnects.

  19. Process for selection of Oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; Seibert, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H.sub.2 -producing algal mutant cells comprising: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas; (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light. (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H.sub.2 -producing mutants.

  20. Activation processes on GaAs photocathode by different currents of oxygen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhuang; Shi, Feng; Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Shufei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Chang

    2015-04-01

    In order to know the influence of activation processes on GaAs photocathodes, three GaAs samples were activated by a fixed current of cesium source and different currents of oxygen source. The current of caesium source is same during activation to ensure initial adsorption of caesium quantum is similar, which is the base to show the difference during alternation activation of caesium and oxygen. Analysed with the activation data, it is indicated that Cs-to-O current ratio of 1.07 is the optimum ratio to obtain higher sensitivity and better stability. According to double dipole model, stable and uniform double dipole layers of GaAs-O-Cs:Cs-O-Cs are formed and negative electron affinity is achieved on GaAs surface by activation with cesium and oxygen. The analytical result is just coincident with the model. Thus there is an efficient technological method to improve sensitivity and stability of GaAs photocathode.

  1. Monitoring of singlet oxygen in the lower troposphere and processes of ozone depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iasenko, Egor; Chelibanov, Vladimir; Marugin, Alexander; Kozliner, Marat

    2016-04-01

    The processes of ozone depletion in the atmosphere are widely discussed now in a connection with the problem of a global climate changes. It is known fact that photolysis of ozone in the upper atmosphere is the source of metastable molecules of oxygen. But, metastable molecules of oxygen can be formed as a result of photo initiated heterogeneous oxidation of molecules adsorbed on the surface of natural aerosol particles. During the outdoor experiment, we observed a formation of Singlet oxygen (1Δg) at concentration level of 2 ... 5 ppb when ice crystals have been exposed to the sun light. In experiments, we used Analyzers of Singlet oxygen and Ozone (produced by JSC "OPTEC") that utilize solid-state chemiluminescence technology. We assumed that the singlet oxygen is formed in the active centers on the surface of ice crystals in the presence or absence of anthropogenic pollutants in the atmosphere. Identified efficiency of heterogeneous reaction of O2 (1Δg) formation suggests the importance of the additional channel O3 + O2 (1Δg) → 2O2 + O (3P) of atmospheric ozone removal comparable with other well known cycles of ozone depletion.

  2. Microstructural evolution in high oxygen fugacity processed bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, John J., Jr.

    A decomposition/reformation process that uses a high oxygen fugacity (2 MPa) heat treatment followed by low oxygen fugacity (<1 MPa) annealing was applied to silver-sheathed Bisb2Srsb2CaCusb2Osb{8±delta} (Bi-2212) tapes. The rate at which the Bi-2212 phase reforms was studied using X-ray diffractometry and image analyses. The kinetic data was fitted to an Avrami-type equation and was found to be consistent with that predicted for diffusion-controlled growth of plate-like grains. The effect of varying the oxygen fugacity during reformation annealing was also studied and the rate of Bi-2212 phase formation slowed considerably with increasing oxygen fugacity. The rate of oxygen exsolution from the core is a key parameter for the overall transformation kinetics. Two of the decomposition products produced by high-fOsb2 processing of the Bi-2212 compound are a copper-free alkaline-earth bismuthate (a Bisb9Srsb{11}Casb5Osb{x}-type) and CuO. Blended mixtures of these two compounds were used to form two-powder reaction couples used to study Bi-2212 phase formation. Samples were annealed in flowing oxygen at temperatures below the Bi-2212 solidus. The formation of apparent Bi-2212/Bi-2201 intergrowths along with some alkaline-earth cuprate phases were detected. The 14:24-type alkaline-earth cuprate phase was formed in fine CuO powder couples but not in couples containing large CuO particles. The reaction leading to Bi-2212 phase formation was confirmed to be solid-state at temperatures below 875sp°C. The development of c-axis grain alignment in high-fOsb2 decomposed Bi-2212 tapes that were reformed with low-fOsb2 annealing was studied. Such processing can produce enhanced 00l grain alignment and the evolution of this texture was examined in tapes at intermediate points in the reformation process. Some of the mechanisms associated with texture development in melt-processed tapes were found to be inadequate for describing the alignment in high-fOsb2 processed Bi-2212 grains

  3. Chlorination processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of chlorine to extract, reclaim, and purify metals has attractive possibilities for extraterrestrial processing of local planetary resources. While a complete cyclic process has been proposed for the recovery of metallurgically significant metals and oxygen, herein the chlorination step of the cycle is examined. An experimental apparatus for reacting refractory materials, such as ilmenite, in a microwave induced plasma is being built. Complex equilibria calculations reveal that stable refractory materials can, under the influence of a plasma, undergo chlorination and yield oxygen as a by-product. These issues and the potential advantages for plasma processing in space are reviewed. Also presented is a discussion of the complex equilibria program used in the analysis.

  4. Liquid PEG Polymers Containing Antioxidants: A Versatile Platform for Studying Oxygen-Sensitive Photochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Mongin, Cédric; Golden, Jessica H; Castellano, Felix N

    2016-09-14

    This article proposes the exploitation of widely available, inexpensive, innocuous "green" liquid polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers containing the oxygen scavenger oleic acid (OA) as promising media for studying oxygen-sensitive photochemical processes. Here we report the successful application of this media to detailed investigations of triplet-sensitized photochemical upconversion, previously established as being readily poisoned by dissolved oxygen. Three different PEG materials were investigated with increasing molecular weight from 200 to 600 g/mol, coded as PEG-200, PEG-400, and PEG-600. These fluidic polymers facilitate an oxygen-depleted environment in comparison to commonly employed organic solvents while providing high solubility and diffusion for the dissolved chromophores. Moreover, the low oxygen permeation afforded by these PEG solvents allows them to remain deoxygenated in open containers under ambient conditions for extended time periods. OA, 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA), and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) are shown to efficiently and quantitatively consume dissolved oxygen in the PEG environment in the presence of the photoactivated triplet sensitizer platinum(II) tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin (PtTPBP). Oxygen consumption was directly correlated with systematically increasing sensitizer excited-state lifetimes that eventually reach the same plateau as achieved through extensive N2 sparging. Diffusion-controlled bimolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer quenching between PtTPBP and the acceptor/annihilator 9,10-bisphenylethynylanthracene (BPEA) was observed in all three PEG formulations investigated. Subsequent triplet-triplet annihilation, between triplet excited BPEA acceptors, achieves bright and stable upconverted singlet fluorescence from BPEA with no decrease in intensity over 20 h under ambient conditions. In the champion composition (PEG 200), the upconversion quantum efficiency reached 31% under conditions where triplet-triplet annihilation

  5. Characterization of an oxygen plasma process for cleaning packaged semiconductor devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to experimentally determine the operating {open_quotes}window{close_quotes} for an oxygen plasma cleaning process to be used on microelectronics components just prior to wire bonding. The process was being developed to replace one that used vapor degreasing with trichlorotrifluoroethane, an ozone-depleting substance. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to generate data from which the oxygen plasma cleaning process could be characterized. Auger electron spectrophotometry was used to measure the contamination thickness on the dice after cleaning. An empirical equation correlating the contamination thickness on the die surface with the operating parameters of the plasma system was developed from the collected Auger data, and optimum settings for cleaning semiconductor devices were determined. Devices were also tested for undesirable changes in electrical parameters resulting from cleaning in the plasma system. An increase in leakage current occurred for bipolar transistors and diodes after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Although an increase in leakage current occurred, each device`s parameter remained well below the acceptable specification limit. Based upon the experimental results, the optimum settings for the plasma cleaning process were determined to be 200 watts of power applied for five minutes in an enclosure maintained at 0.7 torr. At these settings, all measurable contamination was removed without compromising the reliability of the devices.

  6. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Barger, Paul T.

    1996-01-01

    A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  7. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Barger, P.T.

    1996-09-24

    A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  8. Oxygen assisted laser cutting mechanism—a laminar boundary layer approach including the combustion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbaş, B. S.; Sahin, A. Z.

    1995-06-01

    The present study examines the combined effects of chemical reactions taking place between a gas jet and molten metal, the cooling effect of the jet and the evaporation of metal, during a CO 2 laser cutting process. A laminar boundary layer approach was used to develop a theoretical model for the oxygen gas jet laser cutting mechanism. An experiment was carried out to monitor the keyhole formation using a video recorder and detect the light emitted from the entrance and exist surfaces of the workpiece using a fibre-optic probe during the cutting process. The experimental study was extended to employ two different workpiece materials (stainless steel and mild steel) at two thicknesses, and varying oxygen assisting gas pressures. It is found that the theoretical model developed in the present study is valid for a cutting speed of about 30 mm s -1 and all jet velocities up to sonic, since the effect of shock is excluded in the model.

  9. Syngas chemical looping gasification process: oxygen carrier particle selection and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fanxing Li; Hyung Ray Kim; Deepak Sridhar; Fei Wang; Liang Zeng; Joseph Chen; L.-S. Fan

    2009-08-15

    The syngas chemical looping (SCL) process coproduces hydrogen and electricity. The process involves reducing metal oxides with syngas followed by regeneration of reduced metal oxides with steam and air in a cyclic manner. Iron oxide is determined to be a desired oxygen carrier for hydrogen production considering overall properties including oxygen carrying capacity, thermodynamic properties, reaction kinetics, physical strength, melting points, and environmental effects. An iron oxide based particle can maintain good reactivity for more than 100 reduction-oxidation (redox) cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The particle exhibits a good crushing strength (>20 MPa) and low attrition rate. Fixed bed experiments are carried out which reaffirm its reactivity. More than 99.75% of syngas is converted during the reduction stage. During the regeneration stage, hydrogen with an average purity of 99.8% is produced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Surface Processes: Oxygen Recombination on Silica Surfaces at High Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    size-scalable cluster approach with SixOy clusters of increasing size cleaved from the β- cristobalite unit cell. In this study the hybrid Hartree...values of the β- cristobalite cell and extending the Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Surface Processes: Oxygen Recombination on Silica Surfaces at... cristobalite surface is reported as a function of the distance of the N atom from the Si active atom. The dashed line shows the interaction

  11. Effect of shortening kraft pulping integrated with extended oxygen delignification on biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunyun; Hu, Huichao; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of shortening kraft pulping (KP) process integrated with extended oxygen delignification (OD) on the biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus. Data showed that using kraft pulps with high kappa number could improve the delignification efficiency of OD, reduce hexenuronic acid formation in kraft pulps. Pulp viscosity for a target kappa number of ∼10 was comparable to that obtained from conventional KP and OD process. The energy and alkali consumption in the integrated biorefinery process could be optimized when using a KP pulp with kappa number of ∼27. The process could minimize the overall methanol formation, but greater amounts of carbonate and oxalate were formed. The information from this study will be helpful to the future implementation of short-time KP integrated with extended OD process in actual pulp mill applications for biorefinery, aiming at further improvement in the biorefinery effectiveness of hardwood.

  12. Influence of the residual oxygen in the plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, M.; Silva, A. R.; Mello, Carina B.; Silva, G.; Reuther, H.; Oliveira, V. S.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of the contaminants present in the vacuum chamber of the PI3 system, in particular, the residual oxygen, which results in the formation of the oxide compounds on the surface and hence is responsible for the high implantation energies required to achieve reasonably thick treated layers. We used a mass spectrometer (RGA) with a quadruple filter to verify the composition of the residual vacuum and pressure of the elements present in the chamber. Initially we found a high proportion of residual oxygen in a vacuum with a pressure of 1 × 10 -3 Pa. Minimizing the residual oxygen percentage in about 80%, by efficient cleaning of the chamber walls and by improving the gas feeding process, we mitigated the formation of oxides during the PI3 process. Therefore we achieved a highly efficient PI3 processing obtaining implanted layers reaching about 50 nm, even in cases such as an aluminum alloy, where is very difficult to nitrogen implant at low energies. We performed nitrogen PI3 treatment of SS304 and Al7075 using pulses of only 3 kV and 15 × 10 -6 s at 1 kHz with an operating pressure of 1 Pa.

  13. Real-time observation of dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration in cerium oxides under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Kuo; Sun, Muhua; Huang, Qianming; Xu, Zhi E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn

    2015-11-23

    The dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration driven by the external electric field is directly observed at atomic scale in the cerium oxides (CeO{sub 2}) thin film by in-situ transmission electron microscopy method. When a bias voltage of a proper value is applied across the CeO{sub 2} film, the oxygen vacancies are formed near the interface of CeO{sub 2}/anode, followed by their migration along the direction of the external electric field. The structural modulation occurs in the [110] zone axis due to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The migration of oxygen vacancies results in the reversible structural transformation, i.e., releasing and storing oxygen processes in CeO{sub 2}, which is of great significance for the ionic and electronic applications of the cerium oxides materials, such as oxygen pump, gas sensor, resistive random access memory, etc.

  14. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  15. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  16. A foundational methodology for determining system static complexity using notional lunar oxygen production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nicholas James

    This thesis serves to develop a preliminary foundational methodology for evaluating the static complexity of future lunar oxygen production systems when extensive information is not yet available about the various systems under consideration. Evaluating static complexity, as part of a overall system complexity analysis, is an important consideration in ultimately selecting a process to be used in a lunar base. When system complexity is higher, there is generally an overall increase in risk which could impact the safety of astronauts and the economic performance of the mission. To evaluate static complexity in lunar oxygen production, static complexity is simplified and defined into its essential components. First, three essential dimensions of static complexity are investigated, including interconnective complexity, strength of connections, and complexity in variety. Then a set of methods is developed upon which to separately evaluate each dimension. Q-connectivity analysis is proposed as a means to evaluate interconnective complexity and strength of connections. The law of requisite variety originating from cybernetic theory is suggested to interpret complexity in variety. Secondly, a means to aggregate the results of each analysis is proposed to create holistic measurement for static complexity using the Single Multi-Attribute Ranking Technique (SMART). Each method of static complexity analysis and the aggregation technique is demonstrated using notional data for four lunar oxygen production processes.

  17. Evaluation of oxygen transfer efficiency under process conditions using the dynamic off-gas method.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, A; Libra, J A; Sahlmann, C; Wiesmann, U; Gnirss, R

    2007-05-01

    The off-gas method can be used to investigate standard oxygen transfer efficiencies under process conditions (alphaSOTE) over the operating life of an aeration system. A method to evaluate alphaSOTE is described in detail by US and German standards. The standards, however, do not describe how to evaluate dynamic changes in aSOTE over a day, which can be useful to uncover problems and unfavourable process conditions. Based on over three years experience gained in off-gas testing in Berlin wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) under operating conditions, a method to evaluate and interpret the dynamic changes in oxygen transfer is presented. The application of the dynamic off-gas method brings important additional information, which can be used to increase operational efficiency of the aeration basin and to increase process reliability, with a relatively small increase in effort. This paper shows how to perform dynamic measurements under process conditions. Some results of such measurements under dynamic process conditions, performed in a Berlin WWTP, are discussed.

  18. Near infrared image processing to quantitate and visualize oxygen saturation during vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Jalil, B; Salvetti, O; Potì, L; Hartwig, V; Marinelli, M; L'Abbate, A

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of microcirculation spatial heterogeneity on the hand skin is the main objective of this work. Near-infrared spectroscopy based 2D imaging is a non-invasive technique for the assessment of tissue oxygenation. The haemoglobin oxygen saturation images were acquired by a dedicated camera (Kent Imaging) during baseline, ischaemia (brachial artery cuff occlusion) and reperfusion. Acquired images underwent a preliminary restoration process aimed at removing degradations occurring during signal capturing. Then, wavelet transform based multiscale analysis was applied to identify edges by detecting local maxima and minima across successive scales. Segmentation of test areas during different conditions was obtained by thresholding-based region growing approach. The method identifies the differences in microcirculatory control of blood flow in different regions of the hand skin. The obtained results demonstrate the potential use of NIRS images for the clinical evaluation of skin disease and microcirculatory dysfunction.

  19. Do submesoscale frontal processes ventilate the oxygen minimum zone off Peru?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, S.; Kanzow, T.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Krahmann, G.; Engel, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Peruvian upwelling system encompasses the most intense and shallowest oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the ocean. This system shows pronounced submesoscale activity like filaments and fronts. We carried out glider-based observations off Peru during austral summer 2013 to investigate whether submesoscale frontal processes ventilate the Peruvian OMZ. We present observational evidence for the subduction of highly oxygenated surface water in a submesoscale cold filament. The subduction event ventilates the oxycline but does not reach OMZ core waters. In a regional submesoscale-permitting model we study the pathways of newly upwelled water. About 50% of upwelled virtual floats are subducted below the mixed layer within 5 days emphasizing a hitherto unrecognized importance of subduction for the ventilation of the Peruvian oxycline.

  20. Investigation of Nebular Processes Through Oxygen Isotopic Analysis of Primitive Meteorite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshin, Laurie

    2002-01-01

    As a direct result of support provided by this grant, precise and accurate determination of delta(18)O and delta(17)O in silicates (and other minerals) by ion microprobe (both IMS 6f and IMS 1270) are now being carried out in several laboratories, and these analyses, combined with application of laser fluorination techniques, have led to a proliferation of oxygen isotopic data in the past approx. 3 years. The applications of these techniques in cosmochemical research have been myriad, from understanding the most refractory objects in the nebula (CAIs) to the low temperature alteration processes on meteorite parent bodies. Here, we describe our progress in understanding the oxygen isotopic microdistributions in primitive meteorite materials, as directly supported by this Origins grant.

  1. CONTINUOUS PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE FROM URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE AND OXYGEN

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.B.; Bresee, J.C.; Ferris, L.M.

    1961-11-21

    A process for preparing UF/sub 6/ by reacting UF/sub 4/ and oxygen is described. The UF/sub 4/ and oxygen are continuously introduced into a fluidized bed of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ at a temperature of 600 to 900 deg C. The concentration of UF/sub 4/ in the bed is maintained below 25 weight per cent in order to avoid sintering and intermediate compound formation. By-product U0/sub 2/F/sub 2/ is continuously removed from the top of the bed recycled. In an alternative embodiment heat is supplied to the reaction bed by burning carbon monoxide in the bed. The product UF/sub 6/ is filtered to remove entrained particles and is recovered in cold traps and chemical traps. (AEC)

  2. Platinum Partitioning at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Implications for Core Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Lanziroti, A.; Newville, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements) are tracers of silicate / metal interactions during planetary processes. Since most core-formation models involve some state of equilibrium between liquid silicate and liquid metal, understanding the partioning of highly siderophile elements (HSE) between silicate and metallic melts is a key issue for models of core / mantle equilibria and for core formation scenarios. However, partitioning models for HSE are still inaccurate due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variable like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. In this abstract, we describe a self-consistent set of experiments aimed at determining the valence of platinum, one of the HSE, in silicate melts. This is a key information required to parameterize the evolution of platinum partitioning with oxygen fugacity.

  3. Processing and Evaluation of Next Generation Oxygen Carrier Materials for Chemical Looping Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi Rad, Mina

    This study follows two methods to achieve a modified CaMnO 3-delta structure with higher oxygen capacity and stability. The first method is replacement of manganese with iron as a cheaper alternative and the second method is size effect investigations of A-site dopants on CaMn 0.9Fe0.1O3-delta and its oxygen capacity and stability. Solid state reaction followed by mechanical extrusion is used as the preparation method. All synthesized perovskites are characterized by TGA and XRD analyses. The samples of highest oxygen capacity and stability are further characterized by SEM and BET analyses. Oxygen uncoupling behavior and reactivity of these samples are also examined using a fluidized bed reactor performing Chemical Looping Combustion. The temperature effect is also investigated during chemical looping process at temperatures of 800, 850, 900 and 950 °C. In the first method, since calcium could not be incorporated in the structure, strontium is used as the A-site cation. SrFeO3-delta has shown to be more stable than CaMnO3-delta. However, because of low oxygen capacity, it is doped on the A-site (La and Ba) and B-site (Al, Ti, Mn, Co) by 10 mol% (Sr0.9La0.1FeO3-delta, Sr0.9Ba0.1FeO3-delta, SrFe0.9Al 0.1O3-delta, SrFe0.9Ti0.1O3-delta , SrFe0.9Mn0.1O3-delta, SrFe 0.9Co0.1O3-delta). Results reveal that manganese doped structure (SrFe0.9Mn0.1O3-delta) has the highest oxygen capacity. Adding more manganese to the structure increases the oxygen capacity even further. The best iron-based structure has 30 mol% manganese, doped on the B-site, having 28% mass change in an inert atmosphere (SrFe0.7Mn0.3O3-delta, SFM73) and high stability. Results of conducted experiments in second method demonstrated that Strontium doped perovskite (Ca0.9Sr0.1Mn0.9Fe 0.1O3-delta, CS91MF91) is the best synthesized oxygen carrier among all synthesized manganese and iron-based perovskites. This material shows excellent oxygen uptake and release (1.78 wt. %) and high stability. The reactivity and

  4. An experimental research on the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zengqiang; Sang, Fengting; Zhang, Yuelong; Hui, Xiaokang; Xu, Mingxiu; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Weili; Fang, Benjie; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi

    2014-12-01

    The O2(1Δ)/I2 mixing process is one of the most important steps in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Based on the chemical fluorescence method (CFM), a diagnostic system was set up to image electronically excited fluorescent I2(B3П0) by means of a high speed camera. An optimized data analysis approach was proposed to analyze the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams, employing a set of qualitative and quantitative parameters and a proper percentage boundary threshold of the fluorescence zone. A slit nozzle bank with supersonic parallel streams and a trip tab set for enhancing the mixing process were designed and fabricated. With the diagnostic system and the data analysis approach, the performance of the trip tab set was examined and is demonstrated in this work. With the mixing enhancement, the fluorescence zone area was enlarged 3.75 times. We have studied the mixing process under different flow conditions and demonstrated the mixing properties with different iodine buffer gases, including N2, Ar, He and CO2. It was found that, among the four tested gases, Ar had the best penetration ability, whilst He showed the best free diffusion ability, and both of them could be well used as the buffer gas in our experiments. These experimental results can be useful for designing and optimizing COIL systems.

  5. Process for selection of oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H{sub 2}

    DOEpatents

    Ghirardi, M.L.; Seibert, M.

    1999-02-16

    A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H{sub 2}-producing algal mutant cells comprises: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas and (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light; (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H{sub 2}-producing mutants. 5 figs.

  6. The impacts of physical processes on oxygen variations in the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonasson, L.; Wan, Z.; Hansen, J. H. S.; She, J.

    2011-07-01

    The bottom water of the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition zone suffers from seasonal hypoxia, usually during late summer and autumn. These hypoxic events are critical for the benthic ecosystems and the concentration of dissolved oxygen is an important measure of the water quality. However, to model the subsurface dissolved oxygen is a major challenge, especially in estuaries and coastal regions. In this study a simple oxygen consumption model is coupled to a 3-D hydrodynamical model in order to analyse oxygen variations in the transition zone. The benthic and pelagic consumption of oxygen is modelled as a function of water temperature and oxygen concentration. A quantitative assessment of the model demonstrates that the model is able to resolve both seasonal and interannual variations in dissolved oxygen. Results from several experimental simulations highlight the importance of physical processes in the regulation of dissolved oxygen. Advective oxygen transport and wind induced mixing are two key processes that control the extent of hypoxia in the transition zone.

  7. The impacts of physical processes on oxygen variations in the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonasson, L.; Hansen, J. L. S.; Wan, Z.; She, J.

    2012-01-01

    The bottom water of the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition zone suffers from seasonal hypoxia, usually during late summer and autumn. These hypoxic events are critical for the benthic ecosystems and the concentration of dissolved oxygen is an important measure of the water quality. However, to model the subsurface dissolved oxygen is a major challenge, especially in estuaries and coastal regions. In this study a simple oxygen consumption model is coupled to a 3-D hydrodynamical model in order to analyse oxygen variations in the transition zone. The benthic and pelagic consumption of oxygen is modelled as a function of water temperature and oxygen concentration. A quantitative assessment of the model demonstrates that the model is able to resolve both seasonal and interannual variations in dissolved oxygen. Results from several experimental simulations highlight the importance of physical processes in the regulation of dissolved oxygen. Advective oxygen transport and wind induced mixing are two key processes that control the extent of hypoxia in the transition zone.

  8. Kinetic Model of Decarburization and Denitrogenation in Vacuum Oxygen Decarburization Process for Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingtie; Chen, Zhaoping; Zhang, Ge

    2009-06-01

    The characteristics and classification of decarburization and denitrogenation in the vacuum vessel for stainless steel production are analyzed. Based on the analysis of movements of the liquid steel and bubbles, the kinetics of decarburization and denitrogenation in the vacuum oxygen decarburization (VOD) process has been studied. A kinetic model of decarburization and denitrogenation has been developed to simulate the VOD process, considering each reaction zone as oxygen blowing crater, bottom blowing plume, steel/slag interface, and plume eye. As a result, it is possible to quantify the contribution of each reaction zone in decarburization and denitrogenation rate at a different stage in the VOD process. Specific trials at a vacuum induction furnace were performed to refine stainless steel in vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) and VOD style, respectively. The trial results are in good agreement with the model calculation. Combining the trials and the model calculation and the influence of temperature control, critical carbon content selection on the terminal total [C] + [N] content can be discussed further to provide a reasonable proposal for high-quality ferritic stainless steel production.

  9. Intrinsic and metal-doped gallium oxide based high-temperature oxygen sensors for combustion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Ernesto Javier

    Currently, there is enormous interest in research, development and optimization of the combustion processes for energy harvesting. Recent statistical and economic analyses estimated that by improving the coal-based firing/combustion processes in the power plants, savings up to $450-500 million yearly can be achieved. Advanced sensors and controls capable of withstanding extreme environments such as high temperatures, highly corrosive atmospheres, and high pressures are critical to such efficiency enhancement and cost savings. For instance, optimization of the combustion processes in power generation systems can be achieved by sensing, monitoring and control of oxygen, which is a measure of the completeness of the process and can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, despite the fact that there exists a very high demand for advanced sensors, the existing technologies suffer from poor 'response and recovery times' and 'long-term stability.' Motivated by the aforementioned technological challenges, the present work was focused on high-temperature (≥700 °C) oxygen sensors for application in power generation systems. The objective of the present work is to investigate nanostructured gallium oxide (2O3) based sensors for oxygen sensing, where we propose to conduct in-depth exploration of the role of refractory metal (tungsten, W, in this case) doping into 2O 3 to enhance the sensitivity, selectivity, stability ("3S" criteria) and reliability of such sensors while keeping cost economical. Tungsten (W) doped gallium oxide (2O3) thin films were deposited via rf-magnetron co-sputtering of W-metal and Ga2O3-ceramic targets. Films were produced by varying the sputtering power applied to the W-target in order to achieve variable W content into 2O3 films while substrate temperature was kept constant at 500 °C. Chemical composition, chemical valence states, microstructure and crystal structure of as-grown and post-annealed W-doped 2O3

  10. Plasma processing of ? in a hydrogen/oxygen radio-frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcicová, H.; Perina, V.; Vacík, J.; Cervená, J.; Zemek, J.; Zelezný, V.; Arend, H.

    1998-05-01

    Monocrystalline 0022-3727/31/9/004/img10 was processed in a radio-frequency (27.12 MHz) discharge in hydrogen and subsequently in oxygen and the composition of the thus produced surface layers evaluated. The hydrogen plasma treatment caused a heavy blackening of the sample due to chemical reduction. At low 0022-3727/31/9/004/img11 pressures (0022-3727/31/9/004/img12 Torr) the niobate structure on the sample surface was completely destroyed; only niobium and its oxides remained on the surface. At higher pressures (0022-3727/31/9/004/img13 Torr) the niobate structure was preserved. Hydrogenation of the surface layer was found which persisted up to 5000022-3727/31/9/004/img14C. Subsequent treatment in an oxygen plasma under similar processing conditions brought about the restoration of the transparency of the sample. The following methods were used for the modified surface structure analysis: neutron depth profiling, Rutherford backscattering, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and VIS and IR spectrometry.

  11. Cold plasma processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.; Bullard, D.; Ortega, R.

    1990-01-01

    The utilization of a cold plasma in chlorination processing is described. Essential equipment and instruments were received, the experimental apparatus assembled and tested, and preliminary experiments conducted. The results of the latter lend support to the original hypothesis: a cold plasma can both significantly enhance and bias chemical reactions. In two separate experiments, a cold plasma was used to reduce TiCl4 vapor and chlorinate ilmenite. The latter, reacted in an argon-chlorine plasma, yielded oxygen. The former experiment reveals that chlorine can be recovered as HCl vapor from metal chlorides in a hydrogen plasma. Furthermore, the success of the hydrogen experiments has lead to an analysis of the feasibility of direct hydrogen reduction of metal oxides in a cold plasma. That process would produce water vapor and numerous metal by-products.

  12. Action of oxygen and sodium carbonate in the urea-SNCR process

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Weijuan; Zhou, Junhu; Zhou, Zhijun; Chen, Zhenchao; Liu, Jianzhong; Cen, Kefa

    2009-09-15

    Experimental researches are focused on the effects of O{sub 2} concentration and sodium carbonate on Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) performance in a tube reactor, and plug flow reactor model and perfectly stirred reactor model in CHEMKIN are adopted to simulate the reactions processes. It is found that there is a conversion temperature point (CTP), on the two sides of which oxygen performs different effect. Below CTP, which is 1273 K in our experiments, higher NO reduction efficiency can be gained with higher oxygen concentration because more O{sub 2} results in more radicals to drive the reduction chain reactions by speeding up the reactions O{sub 2} + H = O + OH and H{sub 2}O + O = 2OH. At 1473 K without oxygen, 60% of NO reduction efficiency can be achieved and a 15 ppm Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition improves it to 90%. In this case the reaction H{sub 2}O + H = OH + H{sub 2} becomes fast enough to provide the radical OH without the aid of O{sub 2} to produce NH{sub 2} which reduces NO. And H{sub 2} is the byproduct of this reaction. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition shifts the optimal temperature of SNCR 50 K towards lower temperature and more NO is removed in the temperature window. The reactions NaO + H{sub 2}O = NaOH + OH and NaOH + O{sub 2} = NaO{sub 2} + OH and NaOH + M = Na + M + OH offer new pathways to produce OH radical, which results in more OH and more NH{sub 2} to reduce NO. The promotion effect of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is significant when temperature is lower or O{sub 2} concentration is lower, which means the radicals are insufficient. (author)

  13. Extraction processes for the production of aluminum, titanium, iron, magnesium, and oxygen and nonterrestrial sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Choudary, U. V.; Erstfeld, T. E.; Williams, R. J.; Chang, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    The suitability of existing terrestrial extractive metallurgical processes for the production of Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, and O2 from nonterrestrial resources is examined from both thermodynamic and kinetic points of view. Carbochlorination of lunar anorthite concentrate in conjunction with Alcoa electrolysis process for Al; carbochlorination of lunar ilmenite concentrate followed by Ca reduction of TiO2; and subsequent reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 for Ti and Fe, respectively, are suggested. Silicothermic reduction of olivine concentrate was found to be attractive for the extraction of Mg becaue of the technological knowhow of the process. Aluminothermic reduction of olivine is the other possible alternative for the production of magnesium. The large quantities of carbon monoxide generated in the metal extraction processes can be used to recover carbon and oxygen by a combination of the following methods: (1) simple disproportionation of CO,(2) methanation of CO and electrolysis of H2O, and (3) solid-state electrolysis of gas mixtures containing CO, CO2, and H2O. The research needed for the adoption of earth-based extraction processes for lunar and asteroidal minerals is outlined.

  14. The confines of triple oxygen isotope exponents in elemental and complex mass-dependent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in triple isotope relationships, or Δ17O in the case of oxygen, have been increasingly used to study a range of problems including hydrological cycles, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, biogeochemical pathways and fluxes, and the Moon's origin in the geochemical and cosmochemical communities. A Δ17O value depends on the triple isotope exponent θ of involved reaction steps. However, the probabilistic distribution of the intrinsic and apparent θ values has not been examined for elemental processes and for processes that are out of equilibrium or bearing reservoir-transport complexities. A lack of knowledge on the confines of θ may hamper our understanding of the subtle differences among mass-dependent processes and may result in mischaracterization of a set of mass-dependent processes as being in violation of mass-dependent rules. Here we advocate a reductionist approach and explore θ confines starting from kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) within the framework of transition state theory (TST). The advantage of our KIE approach is that any elemental or composite, equilibrium or non-equilibrium process can be reduced to a set of KIEs with corresponding θKIE. We establish that the KIE between a reactant and a transition state (TS) is intrinsic. Given a range of KIEs known for Earth processes involving oxygen, we use a Monte Carlo calculation method and a range of oxygen-bonded molecular masses to obtain a distribution of θKIE values and subsequently that of θeq. Next, complexities are examined by looking into expected effects due to reaction progress, unbalanced fluxes, and reference frame. Finally, compounded reservoir-transport effects are examined using two simple processes - Rayleigh Distillation (RD) and Fractional Distillation (FD). Our results show that the apparent θ values between two species or two states of the same evolving species have much broader confines than the commonly used "canonical" confines of 0.51-0.53, particularly

  15. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Oscillation of the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenthal, Hans-Juergen; Thiedemann, Uwe; Falkenreck, Udo; Schlueter, Jochen

    2010-04-01

    The oscillation of argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) converters is flow related and depends on the process parameters ( e.g., vessel geometry, melt fill height, process gas type and blowing rate, vessel tilting angle, as well as geometry, number, and arrangement of the side-wall nozzles). For a 120-ton AOD converter with seven submerged side-wall nozzles, plant tests, physical simulations on a 1:4 scale water model, and computational fluid dynamics simulations have been done. The investigations show that the penetration depth of an inert gas jet into the melt does not exceed approximately 0.4 m. The plumes are located close to the nozzle-side converter wall and induce a large-scale primary vortex as well as intensive surface movements; both are responsible for the oscillation. Several process mechanisms were investigated. The oscillation is highest in the last stage of the dynamic blow and is still high during the reduction stage. As the amount of inert gas increases, the vibration level also increases. Inert gas has a greater influence on the oscillation than oxygen. Tilting the converter around 8 deg clearly leads to more intensive oscillations. Increasing the blowing rate increases the forces and torques acting on the vessel, whereas the oscillation frequency remains nearly constant. A varying fill level does not influence the vibration level the same way as the blowing rate. The operational test shows, for example, that the maximum torque does not depend on the heat size when the latter varies between -8 pct and +21 pct of the nominal heat size. The water model test shows decreasing forces and torques with a rising fill level.

  16. Decoupling the influence of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    is instructive and essential to decouple the effects of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen condition, in order to understand their contribution to the interannual variability of hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s. A conceptual bottom DO budget model is applied, using the vertical exchange time scale (VET) to quantify the physical condition and net oxygen consumption rate to quantify biological activities. By combining observed DO data and modeled VET values along the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay, the monthly net bottom DO consumption rate was estimated for 1985-2012. The DO budget model results show that the interannual variations of physical conditions accounts for 88.8% of the interannual variations of observed DO. The high similarity between the VET spatial pattern and the observed DO suggests that physical processes play a key role in regulating the DO condition. Model results also show that long-term VET has a slight increase in summer, but no statistically significant trend is found. Correlations among southerly wind strength, North Atlantic Oscillation index, and VET demonstrate that the physical condition in the Chesapeake Bay is highly controlled by the large-scale climate variation. The relationship is most significant during the summer, when the southerly wind dominates throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The seasonal pattern of the averaged net bottom DO consumption rate (B'20) along the main stem coincides with that of the chlorophyll-a concentration. A significant correlation between nutrient loading and B'20 suggests that the biological processes in April-May are most sensitive to the nutrient loading.

  17. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  18. Multi-pollutant treatment of crystalline cellulosic effluent: Function of dissolved oxygen on process control.

    PubMed

    Shanthi Sravan, J; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of crystalline cellulose based wastewater was carried out in periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR). Specific influence of dissolved oxygen on treatment of crystalline cellulosic (CC) wastewater was evaluated in three different microenvironments such as aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic. PDBR-aerobic biosystem documented relatively higher substrate degradation [2.63kgCOD/m(3)-day (92%)] in comparison to PDBR-anoxic [2.12kgCOD/m(3)-day (71%)] and PDBR-anaerobic [1.81kgCOD/m(3)-day (63%)], which is in accordance with the observed DO levels. Similarly, multipollutants viz., phosphates and nitrates removal was observed to be higher in aerobic followed by anoxic and anaerobic operations. Higher nitrate removal in aerobic operation might be attributed to the efficient denitrification carried out by the biocatalyst, which utilizes both nitrates and oxygen as oxidizing agents. Multiscan spectral profiles depicted reduction in color intensity in all three microenvironments that correlated with the substrate degradation observed. Despite the high organic load, PDBR functioned well without exhibiting process inhibition.

  19. The structural features of hemicelluloses dissolved out at different cooking stages of active oxygen cooking process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianbin; Yang, Qiulin; Lin, Lu

    2014-04-15

    This work described the morphologic changes of corn stalk and the structural characterization of its hemicelluloses dissolved in yellow liquor at different cooking stages. The results showed that active oxygen cooking process was an efficient method to depolymerize the corn stalk into cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin as a pretreatment of biomass conversion. This cooking process can also be divided into three phases: bulk delignification, extended delignification, and residual delignification. During the heating-up period 57.67% of hemicelluloses and 62.31% of lignin were removed from the raw material. However, only 15% of hemicelluloses and 23.21% of lignin were removed during at temperature' period. The hemicelluloses from the corn stalk and yellow liquor were composed of (1→4)-β-D-xylopyranose backbones substituted with α-l-arabinofuranosyl, 4-O-methyl-α-D-glucuronic acid, and some methoxyl residues. The backbones of hemicelluloses were gradually cleaved during the cooking process. The acetyl groups substituted with xylopyranosyl residues were completely cleaved during the cooking process.

  20. Air separation process using packed columns for oxygen and argon recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Thorogood, R.M.; Bennett, D.L.; Allam, R.J.; Prentice, A.L.; Dawson, B.K.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for the separation of mixtures, which comprise oxygen, nitrogen, and argon, by cryogenic distillation in an integrated multi-column distillation system of at least three distillation columns, having a higher pressure column, low pressure column and an argon sidearm column. Wherein the argon sidearm column integrally communicates with the low pressure column. Wherein each column of the integrated distillation system, a liquid phase stream and a vapor phase stream are intimately contacted thereby allowing mass transfer. The improvement involves increasing argon recovery. It comprises effectuating the intimate contact of the liquid and vapor phase streams in the low pressure column and the argon sidearm column by utilizing a structured packing.

  1. Nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, Thulwaneng; Waldron, Howard; Vichi, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in some OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations occur below the detection limit in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding dominant nitrogen loss mechanisms through modeling studies in the Benguela OMZ. The coupled physical-biogeochemical model for eastern boundary upwelling systems (BioEBUS) using the Southern Africa experiment (SAfE) nested configuration is applied in the Benguela to study nitrite dynamics. Model results show nitrite maxima associated with the Angola-Benguela front region. The maxima are linked to poleward nutrient rich, oxygen-depleted south Atlantic central water (SACW) from the Angola gyre which favour denitrification on the shelf during summer to autumn. Ventilation of the shelf during winter to spring by the equatorward well-aerated eastern south Atlantic central water (ESACW) results in depleted nitrite concentrations. In addition to local circulation, Hovmuller analyses suggest that both primary and secondary nitrite maxima are driven by shelf biogeochemical processes and offshore advection. Vertical depth profiles show nitrite maxima at 17°S and depletion at 23°S attributed to denitrification and anammox, respectively. Model results suggest nitrogen in the Benguela OMZ is lost to anammox, denitrification and offshore advection, with denitrification as the dominant loss mechanism rather than anammox as previously documented. These results are key to understanding feedback processes from nitrogen loss in the Benguela OMZ and its impact on related biogeochemical cycles.

  2. Experimental evaluation of the ignition process of carbon monoxide and oxygen in a rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and oxygen ignition boundaries were determined in a spark torch igniter as a function of propellant inlet temperatures. The oxygen temperature was varied from ambient to -258 F, and the carbon monoxide temperature was varied from ambient to -241 F. With the oxygen and carbon monoxide at -253 F and -219 F, respectively, they successfully ignited between mixture ratios of 2.42 and 3.10. Analysis of the results indicated that the lower ignition boundary was more sensitive to oxygen temperature than to carbon monoxide temperature. Another series of tests was performed in a small simulated rocket engine with oxygen at -197 F and carbon monoxide at -193 F. An oxygen/hydrogen flame was used to initiate combustion of the oxygen and carbon monoxide. Tests performed at the optimum operating mixture ratio of 0.55 obtained steady-state combustion in every test.

  3. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  4. Magmatic differentiation processes at Merapi Volcano: inclusion petrology and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troll, Valentin R.; Deegan, Frances M.; Jolis, Ester M.; Harris, Chris; Chadwick, Jane P.; Gertisser, Ralf; Schwarzkopf, Lothar M.; Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Sumarti, Sri; Preece, Katie

    2013-07-01

    Indonesian volcano Merapi is one of the most hazardous volcanoes on the planet and is characterised by periods of active dome growth and intermittent explosive events. Merapi currently degasses continuously through high temperature fumaroles and erupts basaltic-andesite dome lavas and associated block-and-ash-flows that carry a large range of magmatic, coarsely crystalline plutonic, and meta-sedimentary inclusions. These inclusions are useful in order to evaluate magmatic processes that act within Merapi's plumbing system, and to help an assessment of which phenomena could trigger explosive eruptions. With the aid of petrological, textural, and oxygen isotope analysis we record a range of processes during crustal magma storage and transport, including mafic recharge, magma mixing, crystal fractionation, and country rock assimilation. Notably, abundant calc-silicate inclusions (true xenoliths) and elevated δ18O values in feldspar phenocrysts from 1994, 1998, 2006, and 2010 Merapi lavas suggest addition of limestone and calc-silicate materials to the Merapi magmas. Together with high δ13C values in fumarole gas, crustal additions to mantle and slab-derived magma and volatile sources are likely a steady state process at Merapi. This late crustal input could well represent an eruption trigger due to sudden over-pressurisation of the shallowest parts of the magma storage system independently of magmatic recharge and crystal fractionation. Limited seismic precursors may be associated with this type of eruption trigger, offering a potential explanation for the sometimes erratic behaviour of Merapi during volcanic crises.

  5. Mechanism of the cathodic process coupled to the oxidation of iron monosulfide by dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Duinea, Mădălina I; Costas, Andreea; Baibarac, Mihaela; Chiriță, Paul

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the mechanism of iron monosulfide (FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen (O2(aq)). Synthetic FeS was reacted with O2(aq) for 6days and at 25°C. We have characterized the initial and reacted FeS surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that during the aqueous oxidation of FeS new solid phases (disulfide, polysulfide, elemental sulfur, ferric oxyhydroxides and Fe3O4) develop on the mineral surface. The results of potentiodynamic polarization experiments show that after 2days of FeS electrode immersion in oxygen bearing solution (OBS) at initial pH 5.1 and 25°C the modulus of cathodic Tafel slopes dramatically decreases, from 393mV/dec to 86mV/dec. This decrease is ascribed to the change of the mechanism of electron transfer from cathodic sites to O2 (mechanism of cathodic process). The oxidation current densities (jox) indicate that mineral oxidative dissolution is not inhibited by pH increase up to 6.7. Another conclusion, which emerges from the analysis of jox, is that the dissolved Fe(3+) does not intermediate the aqueous oxidation of FeS. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) show that after 2days of contact between electrode and OBS the properties of FeS/water interface change. From the analysis of the EIS, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDX data we can conclude that the change of FeS/water interface properties accompanies the formation of new solid phases on the mineral surface. The new characteristics of the surface layer and FeS/water interface do not cause the inhibition of mineral oxidation.

  6. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  7. Two-level multivariable control system of dissolved oxygen tracking and aeration system for activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The problem of tracking dissolved oxygen is one of the most complex and fundamental issues related to biological processes. The dissolved oxygen level in aerobic tanks has a significant influence on the behavior and activity of microorganisms. Aerated tanks are supplied with air from an aeration system (blowers, pipes, throttling valves, and diffusers). It is a complex, dynamic system governed by nonlinear hybrid dynamics. Control of the aeration system is also difficult in terms of control of the dissolved oxygen. In this article, a two-level multivariable control system for tracking dissolved oxygen and controlling an aeration system is designed. A nonlinear model predictive control algorithm was applied to design controllers for each level. This overall hierarchical control system was validated by simulation based on real data records provided by a water resource recovery facility located in Kartuzy, Northern Poland. The effect of control system parameters and disturbances was also investigated.

  8. Mus308 Processes Oxygen and Nitrogen Ethylation DNA Damage in Germ Cells of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Comendador, Miguel A.; Sierra, L. María

    2010-01-01

    The D. melanogaster mus308 gene, highly conserved among higher eukaryotes, is implicated in the repair of cross-links and of O-ethylpyrimidine DNA damage, working in a DNA damage tolerance mechanism. However, despite its relevance, its possible role on the processing of different DNA ethylation damages is not clear. To obtain data on mutation frequency and on mutation spectra in mus308 deficient (mus308−) conditions, the ethylating agent diethyl sulfate (DES) was analysed in postmeiotic male germ cells. These data were compared with those corresponding to mus308 efficient conditions. Our results indicate that Mus308 is necessary for the processing of oxygen and N-ethylation damage, for the survival of fertilized eggs depending on the level of induced DNA damage, and for an influence of the DNA damage neighbouring sequence. These results support the role of mus308 in a tolerance mechanism linked to a translesion synthesis pathway and also to the alternative end-joinig system. PMID:20936147

  9. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  10. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed.

  11. Oxygen microprofile in the prepared sediments and its implication for the sediment oxygen consuming process in a heavily polluted river of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhai, Wanying; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) microprofiles of prepared sediments from 24 sampling sites in the Fuyang River were measured using a gold amalgam microelectrode in this study. The measured microprofiles can be divided into four types. In type I profiles, DO kept constant in the overlying water and decreased smoothly in the pore water; in type II profile, DO showed fluctuation in the pore water; in type III profiles, DO showed peak in the SWI; in type IV profiles, DO decreased obviously in the overlying water. Type I profiles indicated the absence of benthic organisms and thus the degradation of the sediment habitat. Type II and III profiles indicated the activity of benthic animal and epipelic algae, which is common in the healthy aquatic sediment. Type IV profiles indicated that the excessive accumulation of pollutants in the sediment and thus the serious sediment pollution. There are nine sites showing type I profile, three sites showing type II profile, nine sites showing type III profile, and three sites showing type IV profile in the Fuyang River. The dominance of type I and appearance of type IV indicated that sediment oxygen consumption processes in the Fuyang River were strongly influenced by the sediment pollutants release and the vanish of benthic organisms. The pharmacy, metallurgy, and curriery industries may contribute to the sediment deterioration and thus to the occurrence of type I and type IV oxygen profiles in the Fuyang River.

  12. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on the bioflocculation process in high loaded MBRs.

    PubMed

    Faust, L; Temmink, H; Zwijnenburg, A; Kemperman, A J B; Rijnaarts, H H M

    2014-12-01

    High-loaded membrane bioreactors (HL-MBRs), i.e. MBRs which are operated at extremely short sludge and hydraulic retention times, can be applied to flocculate and concentrate sewage organic matter. The concentrated organics can be used for energy recovery, or for the production of more valuable organic chemicals. Little is known about the effect of the dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) on this bioflocculation process. To examine this effect, two HL-MBRs were operated, respectively at a low (1 mg L(-1)) and a higher (4 mg L(-1)) DO. The higher DO resulted in a better flocculation efficiency, i.e. 92% of the colloidal COD in the sewage flocculated compared to 69% at the lower DO. The difference was attributed to a higher microbial production of extracellular polymeric substances at a DO of 4 mg L(-1) and to more multivalent cations (calcium, iron and aluminium) being distributed to the floc matrix. In addition, the HL-MBR that was operated at a DO of 4 mg L(-1) gave a bigger mean floc size, a lower supernatant turbidity, better settleability and better membrane filterability than the HL-MBR that was operated at a DO of 1 mg L(-1).

  13. Plasmachemical and heterogeneous processes in ozonizers with oxygen activation by a dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Voronina, E. N.; Poroykov, A. Yu.; Rakhimov, T. V.; Voloshin, D. G.; Chukalovsky, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Plasmachemical and heterogeneous processes of generation and loss of ozone in the atmosphericpressure dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen are studied theoretically. Plasmachemical and electronic kinetics in the stage of development and decay of a single plasma filament (microdischarge) are calculated numerically with and without allowance for the effects of ozone vibrational excitation and high initial ozone concentration. The developed analytical approach is applied to determine the output ozone concentration taking into account ozone heterogeneous losses on the Al2O3 dielectric surface. Using the results of quantummechanical calculations by the method of density functional theory, a multistage catalytic mechanism of heterogeneous ozone loss based on the initial passivation of a pure Al2O3 surface by ozone and the subsequent interaction of O3 molecules with the passivated surface is proposed. It is shown that the conversion reaction 2O3 → 3O2 of a gas-phase ozone molecule with a physically adsorbed ozone molecule can result in the saturation of the maximum achievable ozone concentration at high specific energy depositions, the nonstationarity of the output ozone concentration, and its dependence on the prehistory of ozonizer operation.

  14. The optimal dissolved oxygen profile in a nitrifying activated sludge process - comparisons with ammonium feedback control.

    PubMed

    Amand, L; Carlsson, B

    2013-01-01

    Ammonium feedback control is increasingly used to determine the dissolved oxygen (DO) set-point in aerated activated sludge processes for nitrogen removal. This study compares proportional-integral (PI) ammonium feedback control with a DO profile created from a mathematical minimisation of the daily air flow rate. All simulated scenarios are set to reach the same treatment level of ammonium, based on a daily average concentration. The influent includes daily variations only and the model has three aerated zones. Comparisons are made at different plant loads and DO concentrations, and the placement of the ammonium sensor is investigated. The results show that ammonium PI control can achieve the best performance if the DO set-point is limited at a maximum value and with little integral action in the controller. Compared with constant DO control the best-performing ammonium controller can achieve 1-3.5% savings in the air flow rate, while the optimal solution can achieve a 3-7% saving. Energy savings are larger when operating at higher DO concentrations.

  15. Role of Oxygen as Surface-Active Element in Linear GTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadaiah, Nirsanametla; Bag, Swarup

    2013-11-01

    Although the surface-active elements such as oxygen and sulfur have an adverse effect on momentum transport in liquid metals during fusion welding, such elements can be used beneficially up to a certain limit to increase the weld penetration in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The fluid flow pattern and consequently the weld penetration and width change due to a change in coefficient of surface tension from a negative value to a positive value. The present work is focused on the analysis of possible effects of surface-active elements to change the weld pool dimensions in linear GTA welding. A 3D finite element-based heat transfer and fluid flow model is developed to study the effect of surface-active elements on stainless steel plates. A velocity in the order of 180 mm/s due to surface tension force is estimated at an optimum concentration of surface-active elements. Further, the differential evolution-based global optimization algorithm is integrated with the numerical model to estimate uncertain model parameters such as arc efficiency, effective arc radius, and effective values of material properties at high temperatures. The effective values of thermal conductivity and viscosity are estimated to be enhanced nine and seven times, respectively, over corresponding room temperature values. An error analysis is also performed to find out the overall reliability of the computed results, and a maximum reliability of 0.94 is achieved.

  16. What processes control the oxygen isotopes of soil bio-available phosphate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Avner; Angert, Alon

    2015-06-01

    The biological availability of phosphorus (P) is considered to be the limiting factor for plant growth in many natural and agricultural soils. Recent studies demonstrated that valuable information on soil P dynamics can be gained from the stable oxygen isotopes of soil phosphate (δ18OP). However, to interpret this information correctly, our understanding of the processes that controls soil phosphate δ18OP values needs to be improved since most of the current data is based primarily on laboratory studies of pure microbial cultures and enzymatic assays and may not be relevant to soils. Here we designed a series of controlled soil incubation experiments to study the actual isotopic effects induced by abiotic reactions, biological uptake, microbial turnover and organic-P mineralization on soil phosphate δ18OP values. We used this data to estimate the role of these processes in mediating soil P availability. Our study was conducted on Mediterranean soils sampled from the same site during winter, spring and summer. The soils were incubated with various mineral and organic-P compounds and their bioavailable phosphate concentrations and δ18OP values were measured. We confirmed that the role of abiotic reactions on phosphate δ18OP values was negligible and that the δ18OP values of the added phosphate were rapidly driven towards isotopic equilibrium with soil water. We suggest this process was mediated by rapid microbial phosphate turnover. Yet, we did not detect the expected isotopic enrichment effect associated with phosphate biological uptake. In another set of incubation experiments we demonstrated that mineralization of phosphate from organic compounds, such as phospho-mono-ester (PME) and phosphor-di-ester (PDE), produced an offset from isotopic equilibrium, as a result of the strong isotopic fractionation associated with the mineralization process. However, the δ18OP values recorded by the mineralized phosphate were gradually driven back towards isotopic

  17. Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system for control of airborne microorganisms in meat processing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Serratia marcescens and lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were used to artificiall...

  18. Regenerable mixed copper-iron-inert support oxygen carriers for solid fuel chemical looping combustion process

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Tian, Hanjing

    2016-12-20

    The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier for a chemical looping cycle, such as the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The oxygen carrier is comprised of at least 24 weight % (wt %) CuO, at least 10 wt % Fe2O3, and an inert support, and is typically a calcine. The oxygen carrier exhibits a CuO crystalline structure and an absence of iron oxide crystalline structures under XRD crystallography, and provides an improved and sustained combustion reactivity in the temperature range of 600.degree. C.-1000.degree. C. particularly for solid fuels such as carbon and coal.

  19. Method for oxygen reduction in a uranium-recovery process. [US DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, F.J.; Brown, G.M.; Posey, F.A.

    1981-11-04

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous iron and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

  20. Removing oxygen from a solvent extractant in an uranium recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Fred J.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Posey, Franz A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

  1. An evaluation of physical and biogeochemical processes regulating the oxygen minimum zone in the water column of the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.

    2002-12-01

    Monthly oxygen budgets for the intermediate waters (100-1000 m) of the Bay of Bengal were constructed based on Modular Ocean Model (MOM) and oxygen data. The model results reveal that the oxygen levels in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Bay of Bengal are controlled by physical and the associated biological processes. It results in maintaining low oxygen levels, with no significant seasonal variability, in the subsurface layer throughout the year. Low oxygen levels in the OMZ are sustained during the period of increased supply of organic matter through river runoff by enhanced supply of oxygen by the physical pump and vice versa. Thus, low oxygen levels in the OMZ are maintained by supply of oxygen by the physical pump to meet the demands of the biological processes. The inconsistency observed among oxygen consumption rates derived based on the present oxygen budget, carbon regeneration rate, and oxygen consumption rates computed based on electron transport system technique could be due to inadequate knowledge of seasonal and spatial variability in oxygen consumption in the latter two estimates. The residence time of intermediate waters (OMZ) of Bay of Bengal was computed to be 12 years.

  2. BENTHIC-PELAGIC PROCESSES IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eutrophication caused by excess nutrients can exacerbate hypoxia by increasing bottom water and sediment respiration. However, in shallow sub-tropical estuaries, the euphotic zone often extends below the pycnocline allowing oxygen fluxes in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA. Measurements we...

  3. Effects of Nitrogen and Oxygen Radicals on Low-Temperature Bio-Molecule Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motrescu, Iuliana; Ogino, Akihisa; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Kodani, Shinya; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Popa, Gheorghe; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2011-08-01

    The mechanism by which microwave plasma is able to modify the structure and function of proteinaceous molecules is investigated. The biomolecule cystine, a dimer aminoacid, was exposed to microwave surface wave plasma produced in reactive gases, such as oxygen and nitrogen, in different conditions. Except for the physical interactions of the charged particles with the samples and the photophysical reactions induced mostly by ultraviolet radiation, these plasmas contain reactive species which promote chemical interactions. In this study we focus on the changes of biomolecules due to neutral particles inside reactive plasmas. The results proved that the effects of neutrals and charged species are not cumulative. Moreover, it seems that the charged species inside the nitrogen plasma promote nitrogen addition while the outcome of neutral exposure is cleavage. Strong oxidation occurs for oxygen treatments, most reactive species which cause oxygen addition being the oxygen molecular ions O2+.

  4. New data on the process of circulation and blood oxygenation in the lungs under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2013-02-01

    Blood flow through the human lungs weighing 600 g is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Blood capacity of human lung is about 500 ml. Therefore, 500 ml blood is oxygenated for 5 sec. Questions arise how such a large volume of blood passes through such a small mass of the lungs and what causes very rapid blood oxygenation. Since the structure of the lungs in mammals is almost the same, the work was carried out on rats (in rats 20-22 ml of blood per minute passes through the lungs weighing 1.5-2.0 g). Intensive blood circulation was proved to be linked with a large diameter pulmonary arterioles and high blood flow velocity in them. The oxygenation rate is explained by special structure of the alveoli and special blood flow conditions, which creates ideal conditions for oxygen diffusion.

  5. Evaluation of two oxygen analyzers by computerized data acquisition and processing.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, K; Jantzen, J P; Etz, C; Dick, W F

    1986-04-01

    Monitoring of inspired oxygen concentration during anesthesia with nitrous oxide is becoming accepted as essential. This type of monitoring demands accurate monitors that respond rapidly. We evaluated two such devices for their response patterns to rapid changes in oxygen concentration, a galvanic or "fuel cell" unit and a polarographic device. Data were stored after analog-to-digital conversion. The response patterns to stepwise changes in nitrous oxide and oxygen mixtures were recorded at flow rates ranging from 2 to 10 L/min. Both units responded accurately to all changes in the absolute oxygen concentration; the polarographic unit was, on average, twice as fast. Responsiveness to nitrous oxide was low (less than 0.4% at 100% nitrous oxide), and the stability of the signals was good. The 90% response time (T90) was consistent for any stepwise increase or decrease in oxygen concentration between 0, 21, 33, 50, and 100%. After a step change from 0 to 100% oxygen at a gas flow rate of 10 L/min, the T90 was 5.8 seconds in the polarographic device and 11.4 seconds in the galvanic device (p less than 0.01). After a decrease from 100 to 0% oxygen, the T90 was 0.6 second longer in both monitors. Comparing flow rates of 2 L/min with 10 L/min, the T90 was delayed by 1.1 and 2.3 seconds for an increase, and by 1.4 and 2.9 seconds for a decrease in oxygen concentration. Experimental data suggest that both sensors respond adequately during routine clinical use. The faster response of the polarographic device is probably of limited clinical relevance, but it may aid in calibration.

  6. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Ito, Taka; Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Valett, Jackie; Deutsch, Curtis

    2015-04-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  7. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, A.; Ito, T.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Valett, J.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  8. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation processes during speleothem growth: systematic investigation in novel laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, D.; Hansen, M.; Dreybrodt, W.

    2012-04-01

    The most widely applied climate proxies in speleothems are stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (δ13C and δ18O). The interpretation of the stable isotope signals in terms of past temperature and/or precipitation variability is complex because both δ18O and δ13C depend on a complex interplay of various processes occurring in the atmosphere, the soil and karst above the cave and inside the cave. Quantitative reconstruction of climate parameters such as temperature and precipitation has, thus, remained impossible so far. Here we present several novel laboratory experiments aiming to understand the basic physical and chemical processes affecting the δ18O and δ13C signals during precipitation of calcium carbonate on the stalagmite surface. In particular, we aim to quantify the influence of kinetic isotope fractionation and verify recently published modelling studies (Dreybrodt, 2008; Scholz et al., 2009, Dreybrodt and Scholz, 2011). Several experiments are conducted: Degassing of CO2 from a thin film of water sparged with CO2 flowing down an inclined glass plate. pH and electric conductivity are systematically documented in order to monitor degassing of CO2. The results show that degassing of CO2 is fast, and the pCO2 of the solution is in equilibrium with the atmosphere after a short distance of flow. Carbon isotope exchange between atmospheric CO2 and dissolved bicarbonate. The results show that carbon isotope exchange may have a significant effect on the δ13C value of the dissolved bicarbonate and, thus, speleothem calcite, in particular for slow drip rates. Degassing of CO2 and calcite precipitation from a thin film of water supersaturated with respect to calcite flowing down an inclined calcium carbonate plate. Drip water is sampled after different lengths of flow path and, thus, different residence times on the plate, and pH, electrical conductivity and the stable isotope composition of the water are determined. Decreasing conductivity with increasing distance

  9. Characterization of Endogenous and Reduced Promoters for Oxygen-Limited Processes Using Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lara, Alvaro R; Jaén, Karim E; Sigala, Juan-Carlos; Mühlmann, Martina; Regestein, Lars; Büchs, Jochen

    2017-02-17

    Oxygen limitation can be used as a simple environmental inducer for the expression of target genes. However, there is scarce information on the characteristics of microaerobic promoters potentially useful for cell engineering and synthetic biology applications. Here, we characterized the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin promoter (Pvgb) and a set of microaerobic endogenous promoters in Escherichia coli. Oxygen-limited cultures at different maximum oxygen transfer rates were carried out. The FMN-binding fluorescent protein (FbFP), which is a nonoxygen dependent marker protein, was used as a reporter. Fluorescence and fluorescence emission rates under oxygen-limited conditions were the highest when FbFP was under transcriptional control of PadhE, Ppfl and Pvgb. The lengths of the E. coli endogenous promoters were shortened by 60%, maintaining their key regulatory elements. This resulted in improved promoter activity in most cases, particularly for PadhE, Ppfl and PnarK. Selected promoters were also evaluated using an engineered E. coli strain expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb). The presence of the VHb resulted in a better repression using these promoters under aerobic conditions, and increased the specific growth and fluorescence emission rates under oxygen-limited conditions. These results are useful for the selection of promoters for specific applications and for the design of modified artificial promoters.

  10. On the chemical processing of hydrocarbon surfaces by fast oxygen ions.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Courtney; Yuan, Hanqiu; Sibener, S J; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2011-10-21

    Solid methane (CH(4)), ethane (C(2)H(6)), and ethylene (C(2)H(4)) ices (thickness: 120 ± 40 nm; 10 K), as well as high-density polyethylene (HDPE: [C(2)H(4)](n)) films (thickness: 130 ± 20 nm; 10, 100, and 300 K), were irradiated with mono-energetic oxygen ions (Φ ~ 6 × 10(15) cm(-2)) of a kinetic energy of 5 keV to simulate the exposure of Solar System hydrocarbon ices and aerospace polymers to oxygen ions sourced from the solar wind and planetary magnetospheres. On-line Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to identify the following O(+) induced reaction pathways in the solid-state: (i) ethane formation from methane ice via recombination of methyl (CH(3)) radicals, (ii) ethane conversion back to methane via methylene (CH(2)) retro-insertion, (iii) ethane decomposing to acetylene via ethylene through successive hydrogen elimination steps, and (iv) ethylene conversion to acetylene via hydrogen elimination. No changes were observed in the irradiated PE samples via infrared spectroscopy. In addition, mass spectrometry detected small abundances of methanol (CH(3)OH) sublimed from the irradiated methane and ethane condensates during controlled heating. The detection of methanol suggests an implantation and neutralization of the oxygen ions within the surface where atomic oxygen (O) then undergoes insertion into a C-H bond of methane. Atomic hydrogen (H) recombination in forming molecular hydrogen and recombination of implanted oxygen atoms to molecular oxygen (O(2)) are also inferred to proceed at high cross-sections. A comparison of the reaction rates and product yields to those obtained from experiments involving 5 keV electrons, suggests that the chemical alteration of the hydrocarbon ice samples is driven primarily by electronic stopping interactions and to a lesser extent by nuclear interactions.

  11. Growth of oxygen bubbles during recharge process in zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Chen, Huicui; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang; Xing, Haoqiang

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable zinc-air battery used for energy storage has a serious problem of charging capacity limited by oxygen bubble coalescence. Fast removal of oxygen bubbles adhered to the charging electrode surface is of great importance for improving the charging performance of the battery. Here we show that the law of oxygen bubble growth can be achieved by means of phase-field simulation, revealing two phenomena of bubble detachment and bubble coalescence located in the charging electrode on both sides. Hydrodynamic electrolyte and partial insulation structure of the charging electrode are investigated to solve the problem of oxygen bubble coalescence during charging. Two types of rechargeable zinc-air battery are developed on the basis of different tri-electrode configurations, demonstrating that the charging performance of the battery with electrolyte flow (Ⅰ) is better than that of the battery with the partially insulated electrode (Ⅱ), while the battery Ⅱ is superior to the battery Ⅰ in the discharging performance, cost and portability. The proposed solutions and results would be available for promoting commercial application of rechargeable zinc-air batteries or other metal-air batteries.

  12. Fast Oxidation Processes in a Naturally Reduced Aquifer Zone Caused by Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Jemison, N. E.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Bush, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is quite common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. The naturally reduced zones are heterogeneously dispersed in such aquifers and are characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon and reduced phases, including iron sulfides and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases that are found in association with these natural reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Three field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO wherein groundwater associated with naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in these field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Small concentrations of nitrate were also observed in the previously nitrate-free groundwater, and Fe(II) decreased to the detection limit. These results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS) rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table, and seasonal variations

  13. Human Factors Process Task Analysis: Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure at the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA). HF PFMEA includes the following 10 steps: Describe mission; Define System; Identify human-machine; List human actions; Identify potential errors; Identify factors that effect error; Determine likelihood of error; Determine potential effects of errors; Evaluate risk; Generate solutions (manage error). The presentation also describes how this analysis was applied to a liquid oxygen pump acceptance test.

  14. Influence of dissolved oxygen concentration on the start-up of the anammox-based process: ELAN®.

    PubMed

    Morales, N; Val del Río, A; Vázquez-Padín, J R; Gutiérrez, R; Fernández-González, R; Icaran, P; Rogalla, F; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-01-01

    The anammox-based process ELAN® was started-up in two different sequencing batch reactor (SBR) pilot plant reactors treating municipal anaerobic digester supernatant. The main difference in the operation of both reactors was the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the bulk liquid. SBR-1 was started at a DO value of 0.4 mg O2/L whereas SBR-2 was started at DO values of 3.0 mg O2/L. Despite both reactors working at a nitrogen removal rate of around 0.6 g N/(L d), in SBR-1, granules represented only a small fraction of the total biomass and reached a diameter of 1.1 mm after 7 months of operation, while in SBR-2 the biomass was mainly composed of granules with an average diameter of 3.2 mm after the same operational period. Oxygen microelectrode profiling revealed that granules from SBR-2 where only fully penetrated by oxygen with DO concentrations of 8 mg O2/L while granules from SBR-1 were already oxygen penetrated at DO concentrations of 1 mg O2/L. In this way granules from SBR-2 performed better due to the thick layer of ammonia oxidizing bacteria, which accounted for up to 20% of all the microbial populations, which protected the anammox bacteria from non-suitable liquid media conditions.

  15. Development of a Novel Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with an Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-31

    BOC, the world's second largest industrial gas company, has developed a novel high temperature sorption based technology referred to as CAR (Cyclic Autothermal Recovery) for oxygen production and supply to oxy-fuel boilers with flue gas recycle. This technology is based on sorption and storage of oxygen in a fixed bed containing mixed ionic and electronic conductor materials. The objective of the proposed work was to construct a CAR PDU that was capable of producing 10-scfm of oxygen, using steam or recycled flue gas as the sweep gas, and install it in the Combustion Test Facility. The unit was designed and fabricated at BOC/The Linde Group, Murray Hill, New Jersey. The unit was then shipped to WRI where the site had been prepared for the unit by installation of air, carbon dioxide, natural gas, nitrogen, computer, electrical and infrastructure systems. Initial experiments with the PDU consisted of flowing air into both sides of the absorption systems and using the air heaters to ramp up the bed temperatures. The two beds were tested individually to operational temperatures up to 900 C in air. The cycling process was tested where gases are flowed alternatively from the top then bottom of the beds. The PDU unit behaved properly with respect to flow, pressure and heat during tests. The PDU was advanced to the point where oxygen production testing could begin and integration to the combustion test facility could occur.

  16. Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Gregory L.; Levin, Lisa A.

    2009-03-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) impinging on continental margins present sharp gradients ideal for testing environmental factors thought to influence C cycling and other benthic processes, and for identifying the roles that biota play in these processes. Here we introduce the objectives and initial results of a multinational research program designed to address the influences of water depth, the OMZ (˜150-1300 m), and organic matter (OM) availability on benthic communities and processes across the Pakistan Margin of the Arabian Sea. Hydrologic, sediment, and faunal characterizations were combined with in-situ and shipboard experiments to quantify and compare biogeochemical processes and fluxes, OM burial efficiency, and the contributions of benthic communities, across the OMZ. In this introductory paper, we briefly review previous related work in the Arabian Sea, building the rationale for integrative biogeochemical and ecological process studies. This is followed by a summary of individual volume contributions and a brief synthesis of results. Five primary stations were studied, at 140, 300, 940, 1200 and 1850 m water depth, with sampling in March-May (intermonsoon) and August-October (late-to-postmonsoon) 2003. Taken together, the contributed papers demonstrate distinct cross-margin gradients, not only in oxygenation and sediment OM content, but in benthic community structure and function, including microbial processes, the extent of bioturbation, and faunal roles in C cycling. Hydrographic studies demonstrated changes in the intensity and extent of the OMZ during the SW monsoon, with a shoaling of the upper OMZ boundary that engulfed the previously oxygenated 140-m site. Oxygen profiling and microbial process rate determinations demonstrated dramatic differences in oxygen penetration and consumption across the margin, and in the relative importance of anaerobic processes, but surprisingly little seasonal change. A broad maximum in sediment OM content occurred on

  17. Process for spinning flame retardant elastomeric compositions. [fabricating synthetic fibers for high oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having halogen containing polyols incorporated into the polymer chain, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives were developed. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and manufactured articles as well as nonelastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, and nylons, for high oxygen environments.

  18. Maximizing biomass concentration in baker's yeast process by using a decoupled geometric controller for substrate and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Rathore, Anurag S; Gomes, James

    2015-11-01

    Biomass production by baker's yeast in a fed-batch reactor depends on the metabolic regime determined by the concentration of glucose and dissolved oxygen in the reactor. Achieving high biomass concentration in turn is dependent on the dynamic interaction between the glucose and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taking this into account, we present in this paper the implementation of a decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) for maximizing biomass in a fed-batch yeast process. The decoupling is based on the inversion of 2×2 input-output matrix resulting from global linearization. The DIOLC was implemented online using a platform created in LabVIEW employing a TCP/IP protocol via the reactor's built-in electronic system. An improvement in biomass yield by 23% was obtained compared to that using a PID controller. The results demonstrate superior capability of the DIOLC and that the cumulative effect of smoother control action contributes to biomass maximization.

  19. Study of both sunflower oil and its headspace throughout the oxidation process. Occurrence in the headspace of toxic oxygenated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Guillén, María D; Cabo, Nerea; Ibargoitia, María L; Ruiz, Ainhoa

    2005-02-23

    The static headspace composition of sunflower oil throughout the oxidation process at 70 degrees C with circulating air is studied by means of solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS); at the same time the liquid phase of the same oil is studied by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Each technique provides complementary information about the process; FITR spectroscopy detects changes in the functional groups of the liquid matrix in a global way and SPME/GC-MS provides information about the different components present in the volatile phase during the oxidation process. Concordance between the timing of the changes produced in both liquid and gaseous phases is observed, as well as agreement and complementarity in the results obtained from both phases. The formation of some well-known genotoxic and cytotoxic oxygenated aldehydes in this process and their presence in the oil headspace are proved.

  20. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  1. Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading: Liquid Transportation Fuel Production via Biomass-derived Oxygenated Intermediates Upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gray, Michel; Dagle, Robert; Padmaperuma, Asanga; Gerber, Mark; Sahir, Asad H.; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-09-27

    This paper presents a comparative techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five conversion pathways from biomass to gasoline-, jet-, and diesel-range hydrocarbons via indirect liquefaction with specific focus on pathways utilizing oxygenated intermediates. The four emerging pathways of interest are compared with one conventional pathway (Fischer-Tropsch) for the production of the hydrocarbon blendstocks. The processing steps of the four emerging pathways include: biomass to syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, conversion of syngas to alcohols/oxygenates followed by conversion of alcohols/oxygenates to hydrocarbon blendstocks via dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation. Conversion of biomass-derived syngas to oxygenated intermediates occurs via three different pathways, producing: 1) mixed alcohols over a MoS2 catalyst, 2) mixed oxygenates (a mixture of C2+ oxygenated compounds, predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate) using an Rh-based catalyst, and 3) ethanol from syngas fermentation. This is followed by the conversion of oxygenates/alcohols to fuel-range olefins in two approaches: 1) mixed alcohols/ethanol to 1-butanol rich mixture via Guerbet reaction, followed by alcohol dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation, and 2) mixed oxygenates/ethanol to isobutene rich mixture and followed by oligomerization and hydrogenation. The design features a processing capacity of 2,000 tonnes/day (2,205 short tons) of dry biomass. The minimum fuel selling prices (MFSPs) for the four developing pathways range from $3.40 to $5.04 per gasoline-gallon equivalent (GGE), in 2011 US dollars. Sensitivity studies show that MFSPs can be improved with co-product credits and are comparable to the commercial Fischer-Tropsch benchmark ($3.58/GGE). Overall, this comparative TEA study documents potential economics for the developmental biofuel pathways via mixed oxygenates.

  2. Singlet oxygen-induced photodegradation of the polymers and dyes in optical sensing materials and the effect of stabilizers on these processes.

    PubMed

    Enko, Barbara; Borisov, Sergey M; Regensburger, Johannes; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Gescheidt, Georg; Klimant, Ingo

    2013-09-12

    A comprehensive study of photodegradation processes in optical sensing materials caused by photosensitized singlet oxygen in different polymers is presented. The stabilities of the polymers are accessed in the oxygen consumption measurements performed with help of optical oxygen sensors. Polystyrene and poly(phenylsilesquioxane) are found to be the most stable among the polymers investigated, whereas poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) and particularly poly(methyl methacrylate) and their derivatives show the fastest oxygen consumption. The effect of the stabilizers (singlet oxygen quenchers) on the oxygen consumption rates, the photostability of the sensitizer, and the total photon emission (TPE) by singlet oxygen is studied. 1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) was found to significantly reduce both the TPE and the oxygen consumption rates, indicating its role as a physical quencher of singlet oxygen. The addition of DABCO also significantly improved the photostability of the sensitizer. The N-alkylated derivative of DABCO and DABCO covalently grafted to the polystyrene backbone are prepared in an attempt to overcome the volatility and water solubility of the quencher. These derivatives as well as other tertiary amines investigated were found to be inefficient as stabilizing agents, and some of them even negatively affected the oxygen consumption rates.

  3. Biomanufacturing process analytical technology (PAT) application for downstream processing: Using dissolved oxygen as an indicator of product quality for a protein refolding reaction.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Shelly A; Dinges, Rachel; Adams, Rachel; Sanchez, Ailen; Winter, Charles

    2009-10-01

    Process analytical technology (PAT) is an initiative from the US FDA combining analytical and statistical tools to improve manufacturing operations and ensure regulatory compliance. This work describes the use of a continuous monitoring system for a protein refolding reaction to provide consistency in product quality and process performance across batches. A small-scale bioreactor (3 L) is used to understand the impact of aeration for refolding recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) in a reducing environment. A reverse-phase HPLC assay is used to assess product quality. The goal in understanding the oxygen needs of the reaction and its impact to quality, is to make a product that is efficiently refolded to its native and active form with minimum oxidative degradation from batch to batch. Because this refolding process is heavily dependent on oxygen, the % dissolved oxygen (DO) profile is explored as a PAT tool to regulate process performance at commercial manufacturing scale. A dynamic gassing out approach using constant mass transfer (k(L)a) is used for scale-up of the aeration parameters to manufacturing scale tanks (2,000 L, 15,000 L). The resulting DO profiles of the refolding reaction show similar trends across scales and these are analyzed using rpHPLC. The desired product quality attributes are then achieved through alternating air and nitrogen sparging triggered by changes in the monitored DO profile. This approach mitigates the impact of differences in equipment or feedstock components between runs, and is directly inline with the key goal of PAT to "actively manage process variability using a knowledge-based approach."

  4. Investigations on the mechanism of oxygen-dependent plant processes: ethylene biosynthesis and cyanide-resistant respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Stegink, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Two oxygen-dependent plant processes were investigated. A cell-free preparation from pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska) was used to study ethylene biosynthesis from 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was investigated in studies with /sup 14/C-butyl gallate and other respiratory effectors. Ethylene biosynthesis was not due to a specific enzyme, or oxygen radicals. Rather, hydrogen peroxide, generated at low levels, coupled with endogenous manganese produced ethylene. /sup 14/C-butyl gallate bound specifically to mitochondria from cyanide-sensitive and -resistant higher plants and Neurospora crassa mitochondria. The amount of gallate bound was similar for all higher plant mitochondria. Rat liver mitochondria bound very little /sup 14/C-butyl gallate. Plant mitochondria in which cyanide-resistance was induced bound as much /sup 14/C-butyl gallate as before induction. However mitochondria from recently harvested white potato tubers did not bind the gallate. The observations suggest that an engaging factor couples with a gallate binding site in the mitochondrial membrane. With skunk cabbage spadix mitochondria the I/sub 5//sup 0/ for antimycin A inhibition of oxygen uptake was decreased by salicylhydroxamic acid pretreatment; this was also true for reverse order additions. No shift was observed with mung bean hypocotyl or Jerusalem artichoke tuber mitochondria.

  5. Modular continuous wavelet processing of biosignals: extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video signal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A novel method of extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video-based biosignal is described. The method comprises a novel modular continuous wavelet transform approach which includes: performing the transform, undertaking running wavelet archetyping to enhance the pulse information, extraction of the pulse ridge time–frequency information [and thus a heart rate (HRvid) signal], creation of a wavelet ratio surface, projection of the pulse ridge onto the ratio surface to determine the ratio of ratios from which a saturation trending signal is derived, and calibrating this signal to provide an absolute saturation signal (SvidO2). The method is illustrated through its application to a video photoplethysmogram acquired during a porcine model of acute desaturation. The modular continuous wavelet transform-based approach is advocated by the author as a powerful methodology to deal with noisy, non-stationary biosignals in general. PMID:27382479

  6. Modular continuous wavelet processing of biosignals: extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video signal.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    A novel method of extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video-based biosignal is described. The method comprises a novel modular continuous wavelet transform approach which includes: performing the transform, undertaking running wavelet archetyping to enhance the pulse information, extraction of the pulse ridge time-frequency information [and thus a heart rate (HRvid) signal], creation of a wavelet ratio surface, projection of the pulse ridge onto the ratio surface to determine the ratio of ratios from which a saturation trending signal is derived, and calibrating this signal to provide an absolute saturation signal (SvidO2). The method is illustrated through its application to a video photoplethysmogram acquired during a porcine model of acute desaturation. The modular continuous wavelet transform-based approach is advocated by the author as a powerful methodology to deal with noisy, non-stationary biosignals in general.

  7. Oxygen and Metals Processing on the Moon: Will Materials Science Change Our Future in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an In-Situ Resource Utilization infrastructure on the lunar surface, the production of oxygen and metals by various technologies is under development within NASA projects. Such an effort reflects the ambition to change paradigms in space exploration to enable human presence for the long-term. Sustaining such presence involves the acceptance of a new concept in space activities; crews must be able to generate some of their consumables from local resources. The balance between accepting early development risks and reducing long-term mission risks is at the core of the technology development approach. We will present an overview of the technologies involved and present their possible impact on the future of human expansion in the solar system.

  8. Effect of operational parameters on the removal of particulate chemical oxygen demand in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jose A; La Motta, Enrique J; Parker, Denny S

    2007-09-01

    The removal of particulate material in the aeration basin of the activated sludge process is mainly attributed to bioflocculation and hydrolysis of particulate substrate. The bioflocculation process in the aeration tank of the activated sludge process occurs only under favorable conditions in the system, and several common operational parameters affect its performance. The principal objective of this research was to observe the effect of mixed liquor suspended solids, solids retention time (SRT), and extracellular polymer substances on the removal of particulate substrate by bioflocculation. A first-order particulate removal expression, based on flocculation, accurately described the removal rates for supernatant suspended solids and colloidal chemical oxygen demand. Based on the results presented in this investigation, a mixed liquor concentration of approximately 2200 mg/L, an SRT of at least 3 days, and a contact time of 30 minutes are needed for relatively complete removal of the particulate substrate in a plug-flow reactor.

  9. Processes controlling dissolved oxygen and pH in the upper Willamette River basin, Oregon, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pogue, Ted R.; Anderson, Chauncey W.

    1995-01-01

    In July and August of 1994, the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) collected data to document the spatial extent and diel variability of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH levels in selected reaches of streams in the upper Willamette River Basin. These data were also collected to identify primary factors that control DO concentrations downstream from major point sources as well as to provide ODEQ with data to refine calibration of their steady-state DO and nutrient models for the upper Willamette River Basin. All of the reaches studied had diel variations in DO and pH. The magnitude of the diel variations in DO ranged from 0.2 to 3.9 milligrams per liter (7 to 50 percent-saturation units based on ambient water temperature and barometric pressure) and in pH from 0.3 to 1.4 units. However, of the reaches studied, only the Coast Fork Willamette River from river mile (RM) 21.7 to 12.5 and the Willamette River from RM 151 to 141.6 had field measured violations of State standards for DO and pH. DO concentration and pH in water depend on many factors. Data were collected to examine several major factors, including BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), carbonaceous BOD, nitrogenous BOD, and measures of photosynthetic activity. Of the four study reaches, only a short stretch of the Coast Fork Willamette River has potential for important levels of oxygen consumption from BOD or nitrification. Additionally, water-column primary-productivity measurements indicated that respiration and photosynthesis by free-floating algae did not explain the observed diel variations in DO in the study reaches. Results from a simple mathematical model incorporating measures of community respiration and net primary productivities indicated that periphyton are capable of producing a diel variation of the order of magnitude observed during the August study period. In the Willamette River near Peoria, the combined periphyton DO

  10. A high performance biometric signal and image processing method to reveal blood perfusion towards 3D oxygen saturation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imms, Ryan; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Trico, Michaël.; Summers, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) is a recent development in the field of physiological data acquisition, currently undergoing a large amount of research to characterize and define the range of its capabilities. Contact-based PPG techniques have been broadly used in clinical scenarios for a number of years to obtain direct information about the degree of oxygen saturation for patients. With the advent of imaging techniques, there is strong potential to enable access to additional information such as multi-dimensional blood perfusion and saturation mapping. The further development of effective opto-physiological monitoring techniques is dependent upon novel modelling techniques coupled with improved sensor design and effective signal processing methodologies. The biometric signal and imaging processing platform (bSIPP) provides a comprehensive set of features for extraction and analysis of recorded iPPG data, enabling direct comparison with other biomedical diagnostic tools such as ECG and EEG. Additionally, utilizing information about the nature of tissue structure has enabled the generation of an engineering model describing the behaviour of light during its travel through the biological tissue. This enables the estimation of the relative oxygen saturation and blood perfusion in different layers of the tissue to be calculated, which has the potential to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of chemical looping combustion process with calcium sulphate oxygen carrier - article no. A19

    SciTech Connect

    Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhongyi Deng; Qilei Song

    2009-07-01

    To concentrate CO{sub 2} in combustion processes by efficient and energy-saving ways is a first and very important step for its sequestration. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) could easily achieve this goal. A chemical-looping combustion system consists of a fuel reactor and an air reactor. Two reactors in the form of interconnected fluidized beds are used in the process: (1) a fuel reactor where the oxygen carrier is reduced by reaction with the fuel, and (2) an air reactor where the reduced oxygen carrier from the fuel reactor is oxidized with air. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the outlet gas stream from the air reactor contains only N{sub 2} and some unused O{sub 2}. The water in combustion products can be easily removed by condensation and pure carbon dioxide is obtained without any loss of energy for separation. Until now, there is little literature about mathematical modeling of chemical-looping combustion using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. In this work, the reaction kinetic model of the fuel reactor (CaSO{sub 4}+ H{sub 2}) is developed by means of the commercial code FLUENT and the effects of partial pressure of H{sub 2} (concentration of H{sub 2}) on chemical looping combustion performance are also studied. The results show that the concentration of H{sub 2} could enhance the CLC performance.

  12. Color analysis method for estimating the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using an image-input and processing system.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; Hata, R; Isomoto, A; Tyuma, I; Fukuda, M

    1987-04-01

    A color analysis method which enables both qualitative and quantitative analyses of an object's color was developed. The method uses a color image-input and processing system composed of a 3-tube video camera and a digital image analyzer, which quantizes a color image into values of red, green, and blue brightness, then processes these values. We introduced a spectrophotometric principle by the Beer-Lambert law, and were able to establish a color model to analyze an object's color. In the coordinate space based on our color model, the hue of the object's color is represented by the direction from the origin, and the density by the distance from the origin. This new method was used to analyze the colors of hemoglobin solutions at various oxygen saturations and concentrations. The results agreed with the known conditions, indicating the validity of the model and its usefulness for quantitative as well as qualitative analyses of color.

  13. Sliding mode control of dissolved oxygen in an integrated nitrogen removal process in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C; Young, H; Antileo, C; Bornhardt, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a sliding mode controller (SMC) for dissolved oxygen (DO) in an integrated nitrogen removal process carried out in a suspended biomass sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The SMC performance was compared against an auto-tuning PI controller with parameters adjusted at the beginning of the batch cycle. A method for cancelling the slow DO sensor dynamics was implemented by using a first order model of the sensor. Tests in a lab-scale reactor showed that the SMC offers a better disturbance rejection capability than the auto-tuning PI controller, furthermore providing reasonable performance in a wide range of operation. Thus, SMC becomes an effective robust nonlinear tool to the DO control in this process, being also simple from a computational point of view, allowing its implementation in devices such as industrial programmable logic controllers (PLCs).

  14. A Technique for Decreasing Reactivity of Coal Material to Suppress the Oxygen Absorption Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, S. S.; Lugovtsova, N. Yu; Gubanova, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper describes the mechanisms of self-ignition formation in coal liable to spontaneous combustion, on the basis of experimental works performed to analyze heat and mass transfer in the coal-air system. A new approach was developed to the coal self-heating suppression and thermodynamic control of the oxidation process. The influence of coal moisture content and thermal behaviour of air in the cooling process was studied during moisture evaporation.

  15. EVALUATION OF PHOSPHINE-OXYGEN DIFFUSION SYSTEM AS A PROCESS FOR SILICON INTEGRATED CIRCUIT FABRICATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Experimental conditions for the attainment of sheet resistance with high reproducibility at emitter doping levels have been obtained using the...gaseous PH3-O2 process. Under these conditions, the deposition sheet resistance follows an activation energy relationship with temperature (with E = 2.9 eV...1000C. The two-step process shows that the final diffused sheet resistance and junction depth can be predicted from the deposition sheet resistance . The

  16. High-strength wastewater treatment in a pure oxygen thermophilic process: 11-year operation and monitoring of different plant configurations.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, M C; Bertanza, G; Sordi, M; Pedrazzani, R

    2015-01-01

    This research was carried out on a full-scale pure oxygen thermophilic plant, operated and monitored throughout a period of 11 years. The plant treats 60,000 t y⁻¹ (year 2013) of high-strength industrial wastewaters deriving mainly from pharmaceuticals and detergents production and landfill leachate. Three different plant configurations were consecutively adopted: (1) biological reactor + final clarifier and sludge recirculation (2002-2005); (2) biological reactor + ultrafiltration: membrane biological reactor (MBR) (2006); and (3) MBR + nanofiltration (since 2007). Progressive plant upgrading yielded a performance improvement chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was enhanced by 17% and 12% after the first and second plant modification, respectively. Moreover, COD abatement efficiency exhibited a greater stability, notwithstanding high variability of the influent load. In addition, the following relevant outcomes appeared from the plant monitoring (present configuration): up to 96% removal of nitrate and nitrite, due to denitrification; low-specific biomass production (0.092 kgVSS kgCODremoved⁻¹), and biological treatability of residual COD under mesophilic conditions (BOD5/COD ratio = 0.25-0.50), thus showing the complementarity of the two biological processes.

  17. Angiotensin II-derived reactive oxygen species underpinning the processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Braga, Valdir A; Colombari, Eduardo; Jovita, Mariana G

    2011-08-01

    The brainstem is a major site in the central nervous system involved in the processing of the cardiovascular reflexes such as the baroreflex and the peripheral chemoreflex. The nucleus tractus solitarius and the rostral ventrolateral medulla are 2 important brainstem nuclei, and they play pivotal roles in autonomic cardiovascular regulation. Angiotensin II is one of the neurotransmitters involved in the processing of the cardiovascular reflexes within the brainstem. It is well-known that one of the mechanisms by which angiotensin II exerts its effect is via the activation of pathways that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the central nervous system, ROS are reported to be involved in several pathological diseases such as hypertension, heart failure and sleep apnea. However, little is known about the role of ROS in the processing of the cardiovascular reflexes within the brainstem. The present review mainly discussed some recent findings documenting a role for ROS in the processing of the baroreflex and the peripheral chemoreflex in the brainstem.

  18. Monitoring of anoxic/oxic process for nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand removal using fuzzy neural networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Ma, Yongwen

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a software sensor based on a fuzzy neural network (FNN) approach was proposed for the real-time estimation of nutrient concentrations and overcoming the problem of delayed measurements. To improve the FNN performance, fuzzy subtractive clustering was used to identify the model's architecture and optimize the fuzzy rule; meanwhile, a split network structure, applied separately for anaerobic and aerobic conditions, was used with dynamic modeling methods, such as an auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs. The proposed methodology was applied to a bench-scale anoxic/oxic process for biological nitrogen removal. It was possible to partially overcome the extrapolation problem of FNNs with the aid of multi-way principal component analysis, because it has the ability to detect abnormal situations, which could generate extrapolation. Real-time estimation of chemical oxygen demand, nitrate, and ammonium concentrations based on the model was successfully carried out with the simple online information of the anoxic/oxic system.

  19. Electrocoagulation process to Chemical and Biological Oxygen Demand treatment from carwash grey water in Ahvaz megacity, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Javad; Takdastan, Afshin; Jorfi, Sahand; Neisi, Abdolkazem; Farhadi, Majid; Yari, Ahmad Reza; Dobaradaran, Sina; Khaniabadi, Yusef Omidi

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we present the result of an electric coagulation process with iron and aluminum electrodes for removal of chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD and BOD) from grey water in different car washes of Ahvaz, Iran. Nowadays, one of the important dangerous that can contaminate water resources for drinking, agriculture and industrial is Car wash effluent [1,2]. In this study, initial COD and BOD concentration, pH of the solution, voltage power and reaction time was investigated. The concentration level of remaining COD and BOD in samples was measured, using DR/5000 UV-vis HACH spectrophotometer [3,4]. The effects of contact time, initial pH, electrical potential and voltage data on removal of COD and BOD were presented. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using Special Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 16).

  20. Cold plasma processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.; Bullard, D.; Ortega, R.

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of a cold or nonequilibrium plasma in chlorination processing is discussed. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was successfully chlorinated at temperatures between 700 and 900 C without the aid of carbon. In addition to these initial experiments, a technique was developed for determining the temperature of a specimen in a plasma. Development of that technique has required evaluating the emissivity of TiO2, ZrO2, and FeOTiO2 and analyzing the specimen temperature in a plasma as a function of both power absorbed by the plasma and the pressure of the plasma. The mass spectrometer was also calibrated with TiCl4 and CCl4 vapor.

  1. Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gray, Michel; Dagle, Robert; Padmaperuma, Asanga; Gerber, Mark; Sahir, Asad H.; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-09-27

    This paper presents a comparative techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five conversion pathways from biomass to gasoline-, jet-, and diesel-range hydrocarbons via indirect liquefaction with a specific focus on pathways utilizing oxygenated intermediates. The four emerging pathways of interest are compared with one conventional pathway (Fischer-Tropsch) for the production of the hydrocarbon blendstocks. The processing steps of the four emerging pathways include biomass-to-syngas via indirect gasification, syngas clean-up, conversion of syngas to alcohols/oxygenates followed by conversion of alcohols/oxygenates to hydrocarbon blendstocks via dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation. Conversion of biomass-derived syngas to oxygenated intermediates occurs via three different pathways, producing: (i) mixed alcohols over a MoS2 catalyst, (ii) mixed oxygenates (a mixture of C2+ oxygenated compounds, predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate) using an Rh-based catalyst, and (iii) ethanol from syngas fermentation. This is followed by the conversion of oxygenates/alcohols to fuel-range olefins in two approaches: (i) mixed alcohols/ethanol to 1-butanol rich mixture via Guerbet reaction, followed by alcohol dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation, and (ii) mixed oxygenates/ethanol to isobutene rich mixture and followed by oligomerization and hydrogenation. The design features a processing capacity of 2000 tonnes/day (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The minimum fuel selling prices (MFSPs) for the four developing pathways range from 3.40 dollars to 5.04 dollars per gasoline-gallon equivalent (GGE), in 2011 US dollars. Sensitivity studies show that MFSPs can be improved with co-product credits and are comparable to the commercial Fischer-Tropsch benchmark ($3.58/GGE). Altogether, this comparative TEA study documents potential economics for the developmental biofuel pathways via mixed oxygenates.

  2. Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Talmadge, Michael; ...

    2016-09-27

    This paper presents a comparative techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five conversion pathways from biomass to gasoline-, jet-, and diesel-range hydrocarbons via indirect liquefaction with a specific focus on pathways utilizing oxygenated intermediates. The four emerging pathways of interest are compared with one conventional pathway (Fischer-Tropsch) for the production of the hydrocarbon blendstocks. The processing steps of the four emerging pathways include biomass-to-syngas via indirect gasification, syngas clean-up, conversion of syngas to alcohols/oxygenates followed by conversion of alcohols/oxygenates to hydrocarbon blendstocks via dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation. Conversion of biomass-derived syngas to oxygenated intermediates occurs via three different pathways, producing: (i) mixedmore » alcohols over a MoS2 catalyst, (ii) mixed oxygenates (a mixture of C2+ oxygenated compounds, predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate) using an Rh-based catalyst, and (iii) ethanol from syngas fermentation. This is followed by the conversion of oxygenates/alcohols to fuel-range olefins in two approaches: (i) mixed alcohols/ethanol to 1-butanol rich mixture via Guerbet reaction, followed by alcohol dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation, and (ii) mixed oxygenates/ethanol to isobutene rich mixture and followed by oligomerization and hydrogenation. The design features a processing capacity of 2000 tonnes/day (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The minimum fuel selling prices (MFSPs) for the four developing pathways range from 3.40 dollars to 5.04 dollars per gasoline-gallon equivalent (GGE), in 2011 US dollars. Sensitivity studies show that MFSPs can be improved with co-product credits and are comparable to the commercial Fischer-Tropsch benchmark ($3.58/GGE). Altogether, this comparative TEA study documents potential economics for the developmental biofuel pathways via mixed oxygenates.« less

  3. Age-related increase of reactive oxygen generation in the brains of mammals and birds: is reactive oxygen a signaling molecule to determine the aging process and life span?

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toru; Unno, Keiko; Tahara, Shoichi; Kaneko, Takao

    2010-07-01

    Since Harman proposed the "free-radical theory of aging", oxidative stress has been postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. The accumulation of oxidative stress-induced oxidatively modified macromolecules, including protein, DNA and lipid, were found in tissues during the aging process; however, it is not necessarily clear which factor is more critical, an increase in endogenous reactive oxygen and/or a decrease in anti-oxidative defense, to the age-related increase in oxidative damage. To clarify the increasing production of reactive oxygen with age, we examined reactive oxygen-dependent chemiluminescent (CL) signals in ex vivo brain slices prepared from different-aged animal brains during hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment using a novel photonic imaging method. The CL signal was intensified during reoxygenation. The signals in SAMP10 (short-life strain) and SAMR1 (control) brain slices increased with aging. The slope of the increase of CL intensity with age in P10 was steeper than in R1. Age-dependent increase of CL intensity was also observed in C57BL/6 mice, Wistar rats and pigeons; however, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the brain did not change with age. These results suggest that reactive oxygen production itself increased with aging. The rate of age-related increases of CL intensity was inversely related to the maximum lifespan of animals. We speculate that reactive oxygen might be a signaling molecule and its levels in tissue might determine the aging process and lifespan. Decelerating age-related increases of reactive oxygen production are expected to be a potent strategy for anti-aging interventions.

  4. Role of DDL processes during electrolytic reduction of Cu(II) in a low oxygen environment.

    PubMed

    Brosky, Rebekah T; Pamukcu, Sibel

    2013-11-15

    Heavy metals typically accumulate in reduced bottom sediments after being discharged into waterways by industrial and municipal processes. A laboratory experiment was conducted in order to determine if abundance of clay in the bottom sediments of a Cu-contaminated aqueous ecosystem could enhance electrolytic reduction of the heavy metal. Cu(NO3)2 · 2.5H2O was added to simulate a moderately contaminated system with 650 μg Cu/ml kaolinite clay-water slurry. A constant electrical potential of 1.0 V/cm was applied across platinum wire electrodes inserted into the continuously stirred system for four days while the system ORP(2) was monitored and periodic sub-samples were taken for analysis. The electrical as well as the chemical results indicate that the quantity of Cu(II) being reduced to Cu(I), especially within the aqueous phase, is increased within the first 48 h of experimentation by the presence of kaolinite clay up to 0.05 mg clay/l slurry.

  5. Ion beam etching process for high-density spintronic devices and its damage recovery by the oxygen showering post-treatment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Junho; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2017-04-01

    The electric short fail trend of the perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs) caused by the ion beam etching (IBE) process is studied at various ion beam angles and cell-to-cell space widths. The number of electric short fails increases markedly at an ion beam angle greater than 35° and a cell-to-cell space width less than 30 nm at the assumed MTJ height including a hard mask (HM) of 20 nm. In order to recover these electric short fails, we propose the selective oxidation process called the oxygen showering post-treatment (OSP). By the OSP process, the number of electric short fails in sub-30-nm-spaced MTJ arrays is reduced from 25 to 0.8%, and the magnetoresistance (MR) is increased from 99 to 120%. By this result, we can verify that the damaged layer is recovered successfully by the OSP, and that the OSP can be a universal post-treatment process even beyond the 20 nm design rule for use in both reactive ion etching and IBE schemes.

  6. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  7. Hybrid artificial neural network genetic algorithm technique for modeling chemical oxygen demand removal in anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongwen; Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Huiping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid artificial neural network (ANN) - genetic algorithm (GA) numerical technique was successfully developed to deal with complicated problems that cannot be solved by conventional solutions. ANNs and Gas were used to model and simulate the process of removing chemical oxygen demand (COD) in an anoxic/oxic system. The minimization of the error function with respect to the network parameters (weights and biases) has been considered as training of the network. Real-coded genetic algorithm was used to train the network in an unsupervised manner. Meanwhile the important process parameters, such as the influent COD (COD(in)), reflux ratio (R(r)), carbon-nitrogen ratio (C/N) and the effluent COD (COD(out)) were considered. The result shows that compared with the performance of ANN model, the performance of the GA-ANN (genetic algorithm - artificial neural network) network was found to be more impressive. Using ANN, the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), mean squared error (MSE) and correlation coefficient (R) were 9.33×10(-4), 2.82 and 0.98596, respectively; while for the GA-ANN, they were converged to be 4.18×10(-4), 1.12 and 0.99476, respectively.

  8. Role of nano and micron-sized inclusions on the oxygen controlled preform optimized infiltration growth processed YBCO superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan Kumar Naik, S.; Bai, V. Seshu

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, with the aim of improving the local flux pinning at the unit cell level in the YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) bulk superconductors, 20 wt% of nanoscale Sm2O3 and micron sized (Nd, Sm, Gd)2BaCuO5 secondary phase particles were added to YBCO and processed in oxygen controlled preform optimized infiltration growth process. Nano Dispersive Sol Casting method is employed to homogeneously distribute the nano Sm2O3 particles of 30-50 nm without any agglomeration in the precursor powder. Microstructural investigations on doped samples show the chemical fluctuations as annuli cores in the 211 phase particles. The introduction of mixed rare earth elements at Y-site resulted in compositional fluctuations in the superconducting matrix. The associated lattice mismatch defects have provided flux pinning up to large magnetic fields. Magnetic field dependence of current density (Jc(H)) at different temperatures revealed that the dominant pinning mechanism is caused by spatial variations of critical temperatures, due to the spatial fluctuations in the matrix composition. As the number of rare earth elements increased in the YBCO, the peak field position in the scaling of the normalized pinning force density (Fp/Fp max) significantly gets shifted towards the higher fields. The curves of Jc(H) and Fp/Fp max at different temperatures clearly indicate the LRE substitution for LRE' or Ba-sites for δTc pinning.

  9. Heart Rate and Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Type 2 Diabetes Patients - A Pilot Study on the Influence of Cardiovascular Medication on Regulatory Processes.

    PubMed

    Koschate, Jessica; Drescher, Uwe; Baum, Klaus; Brinkmann, Christian; Schiffer, Thorsten; Latsch, Joachim; Brixius, Klara; Hoffmann, Uwe

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether there are differences in heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in type 2 diabetes patients, considering their cardiovascular medication. It was hypothesized that cardiovascular medication would affect heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics and that this could be detected using a standardized exercise test. 18 subjects were tested for maximal oxygen uptake. Kinetics were measured in a single test session with standardized, randomized moderate-intensity work rate changes. Time series analysis was used to estimate kinetics. Greater maxima in cross-correlation functions indicate faster kinetics. 6 patients did not take any cardiovascular medication, 6 subjects took peripherally acting medication and 6 patients were treated with centrally acting medication. Maximum oxygen uptake was not significantly different between groups. Significant main effects were identified regarding differences in muscular oxygen uptake kinetics and heart rate kinetics. Muscular oxygen uptake kinetics were significantly faster than heart rate kinetics in the group with no cardiovascular medication (maximum in cross-correlation function of muscular oxygen uptake vs. heart rate; 0.32±0.08 vs. 0.25±0.06; p=0.001) and in the group taking peripherally acting medication (0.34±0.05 vs. 0.28±0.05; p=0.009) but not in the patients taking centrally acting medication (0.28±0.05 vs. 0.30±0.07; n.s.). It can be concluded that regulatory processes for the achievement of a similar maximal oxygen uptake are different between the groups. The used standardized test provided plausible results for heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in a single measurement session in this patient group.

  10. Isotopic Responses to Processes Related to Oxygen Cycling During Diel Studies in the San Joaquin River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Stringfellow, W. T.

    2008-12-01

    Episodic conditions of low dissolved oxygen (DO) occurring in the San Joaquin River deep water shipping channel (DWSC) at Stockton, California inhibit salmon migration during late summer and early fall. As part of a CALFED study to determine the sources of organic matter and nutrients related to the low DO problem, four diel studies were undertaken: two at the DWSC in 2006 and 2007 and two about 40 miles upstream at Crows Landing in 2005 and 2007. The purpose of the diel studies was to gain a better understanding of the transient processes controlling oxygen concentrations and to compare the range of diel variations of various isotopic measurements with those collected on a less frequent basis. The DWSC is dredged to about 40 feet deep and is tidally influenced. The river at Crows Landing is about 5 feet deep and well above tidal influence. Crows Landing was therefore used for comparison with the DWSC as a hydrologically less complicated portion of the river that has not been dredged. Samples were collected at two hour intervals from a one meter depth at Crows Landing. Values of d18O-DO, DO concentrations and pH showed a strong diel response linked to photosynthesis and the effects of bacterial respiration. The d13C of POM (composed mostly of algae) increased at night as expected while the C:N ratio of POM unexpectedly decreases, possibly due to an increased presence of zooplankton at night. Opposing trends of d15N and d18O of nitrate unrelated to a diurnal cycle suggest that source mixing was largely responsible for nitrate composition and concentration through much of the study. Samples were collected at two hour intervals from 1, 5, and 8 meter depths at Rough and Ready Island in the DWSC. Isotope and concentration data showed a distinct diurnal photosynthetic response at the 1 meter depth only. The 2007 DIC and POM isotopic data suggested that nitrification was significantly responsible for oxygen consumption through the duration of the study. The particularly

  11. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, John C.; Jackson, Joshua G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca2+ signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca2+ channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca2+ indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca2+ signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca2+ through reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca2+ signaling in astrocytic processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the

  12. Dissolved oxygen as a factor influencing nitrogen removal rates in a one-stage system with partial nitritation and Anammox process.

    PubMed

    Cema, G; Płaza, E; Trela, J; Surmacz-Górska, J

    2011-01-01

    A biofilm system with Kaldnes biofilm carrier was used in these studies to cultivate bacteria responsible for both partial nitritation and Anammox processes. Due to co-existence of oxygen and oxygen-free zones within the biofilm depth, both processes can occur in a single reactor. Oxygen that inhibits the Anammox process is consumed in the outer layer of the biofilm and in this way Anammox bacteria are protected from oxygen. The impact of oxygen concentration on nitrogen removal rates was investigated in the pilot plant (2.1 m3), supplied with reject water from the Himmerfjärden Waste Water Treatment Plant. The results of batch tests showed that the highest nitrogen removal rates were obtained for a dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration around 3 g O2 m(-3) At a DO concentration of 4 g O2 m(-3), an increase of nitrite and nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the batch reactor were observed. The average nitrogen removal rate in the pilot plant during a whole operating period oscillated around 1.3 g N m(-2)d(-1) (0.3 +/- 0.1 kg N m(-3)d(-1)) at the average dissolved oxygen concentration of 2.3 g O2 m(-3). The maximum value of a nitrogen removal rate amounted to 1.9 g N m(-2)d(-1) (0.47 kg N m(-3)d(-1)) and was observed for a DO concentration equal to 2.5 g O2 m(-3). It was observed that increase of biofilm thickness during the operational period, had no influence on nitrogen removal rates in the pilot plant.

  13. Comparative toxicities of oxygen, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chlorine bleaching filtrates - microtox toxicities of raw and processed filtrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ard, T.A.; McDonough, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    It has claimed that effluents from the bleaching of kraft pulp with chlorine and its compounds have deleterious effects on the aquatic environment. It has been further suggested that bleaching without the use of chlorine or its compounds will produce innocuous effluents. To obtain information on the validity of these claims, we have conducted a laboratory study of the toxicity of filtrates from chlorine-based and nonchlorine bleaching processes. We have also examined two related issues. The first is whether any toxicants generated during bleaching are rendered harmless (by neutralization, storage, and biological treatment) before being discharged to the environment. The second related issue is whether any toxicity observed in mill effluents actually originates in the bleaching process, as opposed to being due to raw material components or compounds formed during the pulping step that precedes bleaching. Several conclusions were drawn from this study. (1) There is a background level of toxicity which originates in the oxygen stage, process steps prior to bleaching, or in the wood raw material. It is decreased by neutralization and storage, but residual toxicity may still be detected after two weeks. (2) If the sum of the first and second stage toxicities is taken as an indicator of overall toxicity, the untreated filtrates may be ranked as follows: Control (Background) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > C(EO). However, these toxicities are of no importance in regard to environmental effects because of their ephemeral nature and the likelihood of their being reduced or eliminated prior to effluent discharge. Evidence for this statement is the ease with which all except the C(EO) were detoxified by neutralization and storage. (3) After neutralization and storage for two weeks at room temperature the ranking of toxicities becomes: C(EO) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > Background. The last three are similar in magnitude.

  14. Role of oxygen vacancies on the bias illumination stress stability of solution-processed zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li-Chih; Chen, Jen-Sue E-mail: jsjeng@mail.nutn.edu.tw; Jeng, Jiann-Shing E-mail: jsjeng@mail.nutn.edu.tw

    2014-07-14

    Solution-processed ultra-thin (∼3 nm) zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) with a mobility of 8 cm{sup 2}/Vs are obtained with post spin-coating annealing at only 350 °C. The effect of light illumination (at wavelengths of 405 nm or 532 nm) on the stability of TFT transfer characteristics under various gate bias stress conditions (zero, positive, and negative) is investigated. It is found that the ΔV{sub th} (V{sub th}{sup stress} {sup 3400} {sup s − stress} {sup 0} {sup s}) window is significantly positive when ZTO TFTs are under positive bias stress (PBS, ΔV{sub th} = 9.98 V) and positive bias illumination stress (λ = 405 nm and ΔV{sub th} = 6.96 V), but ΔV{sub th} is slightly negative under only light illumination stress (λ = 405 nm and ΔV{sub th} = −2.02 V) or negative bias stress (ΔV{sub th} = −2.27 V). However, the ΔV{sub th} of ZTO TFT under negative bias illumination stress is substantial, and it will efficiently recover the ΔV{sub th} caused by PBS. The result is attributed to the photo-ionization and subsequent transition of electronic states of oxygen vacancies (i.e., V{sub o}, V{sub o}{sup +}, and V{sub o}{sup ++}) in ZTO. A detailed mechanism is discussed to better understand the bias stress stability of solution processed ZTO TFTs.

  15. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  16. Regulatory Effect of Low-Intensity Optical Radiation on Oxygenation of Blood Irradiated In Vivo and Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    For three series of blood samples, we have studied the effect of therapeutic doses of low-intensity optical radiation (LOR) on oxygenation parameters of blood irradiated in vivo, and also on the levels of some metabolites: lactate, glucose, cholesterol. The quality of blood oxygenation was assessed using three parameters: the partial pressure of oxygen pVO2, the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin SVO2, and the oxygen level in arterial and venous blood, varying under the influence of low-intensity optical radiation due to photodissociation of hemoglobin/ligand complexes. We have established that during photohemotherapy (PHT), including extracorporeal, supravascular, and intravenous blood irradiation, positive changes occur in the oxygenation parameters and the metabolite levels, while after the courses of PHT have been completed, the individual changes in such parameters in individual patients were both positive and negative. The regulatory effect of PHT was apparent in the tendency toward a decrease in high initial values and an increase in low initial values both for the oxygenation parameters and for the metabolites; but at the doses recommended for use, PHT had a regulatory but still not a normalizing effect.

  17. Solid State Thermal Gradient Processing of YTTRIUM(1) BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(7-X)/SILVER Superconducting Composite Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaforey, Monica L.

    The effect of solid state thermal gradient processing on microstructure was examined experimentally and theoretically. The starting material Y_1Ba_2Cu _3Ag_{15} was used to produce Y_1Ba_2Cu_3O_ {7-x}/Ag superconducting composite ribbons. During the low temperature oxidation stage, internal oxidation resulted in the formation of elemental oxides Y_2O_3, BaO, and CuO in Ag. The low temperature oxidation treatment had a very strong influence on the microstructure of the final ribbon, with the tendency for forming Ag bands being stronger in samples subjected to longer oxidation stage treatments. Ag nodules formed at the surfaces due to stress relief and an Ag band formed at the center of samples due to outward solute diffusion in samples that were completely oxidized. Complete oxidation was achieved by heating the samples in flowing oxygen 5^circC/min to 140 ^circC, 0.5^ circC/min to 420^circ C, and holding for 13 hours. The high temperature transformation stage enabled the elemental oxides to transform to the superconducting oxide Y_1Ba_2Cu_3O _{7-x}. During the high temperature transformation treatment, the Ag nodules on the surface spread out to become a surface band of Ag. Coarsening resulted in an increase in the average oxide particle size and a thickening of the Ag bands as the hold time increased, with temperatures in the range of 890^circ C to 900^circC. The superconducting properties of the composite Y_1Ba_2Cu_3O_ {7-x}/Ag ribbons were tested after oxygenation. The samples were found to contain superconducting Y _1Ba_2Cu_3O_{7 -x} with a critical transition temperature in the range of 86 K to 90 K. The samples were found to be unable to support a supercurrent at either 77 K or 4.2 K. The use of solid state thermal gradient processing to produce textured Y_1Ba_2Cu _3O_{7-x}/Ag composite superconducting ribbons during the high temperature transformation stage was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, no significant amount of either

  18. Different hydrodynamic processes regulated on water quality (nutrients, dissolved oxygen, and phytoplankton biomass) in three contrasting waters of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Long, Aimin; Huang, Hui; Yue, Weizhong

    2014-03-01

    The subtropical Hong Kong (HK) waters are located at the eastern side of the Pearl River Estuary. Monthly changes of water quality, including nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a) were routinely investigated in 2003 by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in three contrasting waters of HK with different prevailing hydrodynamic processes. The western, eastern, and southern waters were mainly dominated by nutrient-replete Pearl River discharge, the nutrient-poor coastal/shelf oceanic waters, and mixtures of estuarine and coastal seawater and sewage effluent of Hong Kong, respectively. Acting in response, the water quality in these three contrasting areas showed apparently spatial–temporal variation pattern. Nutrients usually decreased along western waters to eastern waters. In the dry season, the water column was strongly mixed by monsoon winds and tidal currents, which resulted in relatively low Chl-a (<5 μg l(−1)) and high bottom DO (>4 mg l(−1)), suggesting that mixing enhanced the buffering capacity of eutrophication in HK waters. However, in the wet season, surface Chl-a was generally >10 μg l(−1) in southern waters in summer due to halocline and thermohaline stratification, adequate nutrients, and light availability. Although summer hypoxia (DO <2 mg l(−1)) was episodically observed near sewage effluent site and in southern waters induced by vertical stratification, the eutrophication impacts in HK waters were not as severe as expected owing to P limitation and short water residence time in the wet season.

  19. Excitations From Impact: The Affect of CMEs on Venus' Mysterious Oxygen Green Line and Ionospheric Electrons. An Auroral Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C.; Chanover, N.; Slanger, T. G.; Molaverdikhani, K.; Häusler, B.; Tellmann, S.; Peter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of nightglow (upper atmospheric emission from atoms and molecules on the nightside of a planet) allow for a multifaceted study of planetary atmospheres. Information on winds, chemistry, and solar effects is gained by observing temporal and spatial variation in nightglow intensity. One of the brightest nightglow features on Earth is the OI (1S-1D) 557.7 nm line (oxygen green line). This emission is primarily due to photodissociation/transport but is also seen in the aurora as electron precipitation. Unlike Earth, the Venusian green line is highly temporally variable. The chemistry and mechanisms responsible are still unknown. We observe the Venusian nightglow before and after solar flares, which produce large amounts of EUV emission, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) impacts, which inject a large number of higher energy charged particles in the the Venusian atmosphere. We consistently detect green line emission after large charged particles injections from CMEs. However we do not detect the OI (1D) red line at 630.0 nm, which is quenched below 150 km. We propose that the Venusian green line is an auroral-type emission due to electron precipitation and is occurring deep in the atmosphere, near 125 km. To investigate how CMEs and solar flares affect the electron energy, flux, and density in the Venusian nightside atmosphere, we compare data taken by ASPERA and ELS onboard Venus Express (VEX) before and after solar storms. We find that both electron energy and flux increase after CMEs, but only flux increases after solar flares. Additionally, the V1 ionospheric layer at 125 km increases in electron density while the V2 at 150 km decreases in density after CMEs but not after solar flares. We model the nightside Venusian ionosphere using the observed electron energy and fluxes from VEX in an effort to constrain the chemical processes and mechanisms responsible for green line emission. We will present the results of our ground-based observations and modeling.

  20. Oxygen sensitive microwells.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David T

    2010-12-07

    Oxygen tension is critical in a number of cell pathways but is often overlooked in cell culture. One reason for this is the difficulty in modulating and assessing oxygen tensions without disturbing the culture conditions. Toward this end, a simple method to generate oxygen-sensitive microwells was developed through embossing polystyrene (PS) and platinum(ii) octaethylporphyrin ketone (PtOEPK) thin films. In addition to monitoring the oxygen tension, microwells were employed in order to isolate uniform clusters of cells in microwells. The depth and width of the microwells can be adapted to different experimental parameters easily by altering the thin film processing or embossing stamp geometries. The thin oxygen sensitive microwell substrate is also compatible with high magnification modalities such as confocal imaging. The incorporation of the oxygen sensor into the microwells produces measurements of the oxygen tension near the cell surface. The oxygen sensitive microwells were calibrated and used to monitor oxygen tensions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells (MDCKs) cultured at high and low densities as a proof of concept. Wells 500 µm in diameter seeded with an average of 330 cells exhibited an oxygen level of 12.6% whereas wells seeded with an average of 20 cells per well exhibited an oxygen level of 19.5%, a 35.7% difference. This platform represents a new tool for culturing cells in microwells in a format amenable to high magnification imaging while monitoring the oxygen state of the culture media.

  1. Anionic Pt in Silicate Melts at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Speciation, Partitioning and Implications for Core Formation Processes on Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Malouta, A.; Lee, C.-T.

    2017-01-01

    Most siderophile element concentrations in planetary mantles can be explained by metal/ silicate equilibration at high temperature and pressure during core formation. Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements), however, usually have higher mantle abundances than predicted by partitioning models, suggesting that their concentrations have been set by late accretion of material that did not equilibrate with the core. The partitioning of HSE at the low oxygen fugacities relevant for core formation is however poorly constrained due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variables like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. To better understand the relative roles of metal/silicate partitioning and late accretion, we performed a self-consistent set of experiments that parameterizes the influence of oxygen fugacity, temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of Pt, one of the HSE, between metal and silicate melts. The major outcome of this project is the fact that Pt dissolves in an anionic form in silicate melts, causing a dependence of partitioning on oxygen fugacity opposite to that reported in previous studies.

  2. Oxygen Isotopic Signature of 4.4-3.9 Ga Zircons as a Monitor of Differentiation Processes on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report oxygen isotopic compositions for 14 zircon grains from a sample of sawdust from lunar breccia 14321. The zircons range in age from approx.4.4 to 3.9 Ga and in U and Th content from a few to several hundred ppm. As such these grains represent a range of possible source rocks, from granophyric to mafic composition, and cover the total age range of the major initial lunar bombardment. Nevertheless, results show that the oxygen isotopic compositions of the zircons fall within a narrow range of (delta18)O of about 1 per mil and have (delta18)O values indistinguishable from those observed for terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalts confirming the coincidence of lunar and Earth oxygen isotopic compositions. In the (delta17)O vs. (delta18)O, coordinates data form a tight group with a limited trend on the terrestrial fractionation line. The zircon oxygen isotopes show minimal evidence of the extreme and variable mineral differentiation and element fractionation that have contributed to the formation of their parent rocks.

  3. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon: Moessbauer Spectroscopy as a Process Monitor for Oxygen Production. Results from a Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R.V.; Schroder, C.; Graff, T.G.; Sanders, G.B.; Lee, K.A.; Simon, T.M.; Larson, W.E.; Quinn, J.W.; Clark, L.D.; Caruso, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Essential consumables like oxygen must to be produced from materials on the lunar surface to enable a sustained, long-term presence of humans on the Moon. The Outpost Precursor for ISRU and Modular Architecture (OPTIMA) field test on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, facilitated by the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) of the University of Hawaii at Hilo, was designed to test the implementation of three hardware concepts to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith: Precursor ISRU Lunar Oxygen Testbed (PILOT) developed by Lockheed Martin in Littleton, CO; Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) developed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, FL; and ROxygen developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. The three concepts differ in design, but all rely on the same general principle: hydrogen reduction of metal cations (primarily Fe2+) bonded to oxygen to metal (e.g., Fe0) with the production of water. The hydrogen source is residual hydrogen in the fuel tanks of lunar landers. Electrolysis of the water produces oxygen and hydrogen (which is recycled). We used the miniaturized M ssbauer spectrometer MIMOS II to quantify the yield of this process on the basis of the quantity of Fe0 produced. Iron M ssbauer spectroscopy identifies iron-bearing phases, determines iron oxidation states, and quantifies the distribution of iron between mineral phases and oxidation states. The oxygen yield can be calculated by quantitative measurements of the distribution of Fe among oxidation states in the regolith before and after hydrogen reduction. A M ssbauer spectrometer can also be used as a prospecting tool to select the optimum feedstock for the oxygen production plants (e.g., high total Fe content and easily reduced phases). As a demonstration, a MIMOS II backscatter spectrometer (SPESI, Germany) was mounted on the Cratos rover (NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH), which is one of

  4. A study of injection processes for 15-percent fluorine - 85-percent oxygen and heptane in a 200-pound-thrust rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, M F

    1957-01-01

    Characteristic exhaust velocity over a range of mixture ratios and variations in gas velocity with distance from the injector were measured for six injectors. Comparisons of injector performance showed the gains obtained from oxidant atomization, fuel atomization, and propellant mixing. The results are compared with oxygen and heptane performance and show the effect, which is qualitatively small, of spontaneous propellant ignition on the relation between injection processes and engine performance.

  5. A study of alternative methods for reclaiming oxygen from carbon dioxide and water by a solid-electrolyte process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Two alternative technical approaches were studied for application of an electrochemical process using a solid oxide electrolyte (zirconia stabilized by yttria or scandia) to oxygen reclamation from carbon dioxide and water, for spacecraft life support systems. Among the topics considered are the advisability of proceeding to engineering prototype development and fabrication of a full scale model for the system concept, the optimum choice of method or approach to be carried into prototype development, and the technical problem areas which exist.

  6. Treatment of experimental avascular necrosis of the femoral head with hyperbaric oxygen in rats: histological evaluation of the femoral heads during the early phase of the reparative process.

    PubMed

    Levin, D; Norman, D; Zinman, C; Rubinstein, L; Sabo, E; Misselevich, I; Reis, D; Boss, J H

    1999-10-01

    The healing of vascular deprivation-induced necrosis of the femoral head of rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen was compared with that in untreated rats. The amount of necrotic bone, extent of osteoneogenesis, degree of remodeling, and changes of the articular cartilage were histologically graded on a semiquantitative scale of 0 to 3+. On the 2nd, 7th, and 21st postoperative days, there were no differences between the two groups. Newly formed appositional and intramembranous bone was more abundant and remodeling was more advanced in the femoral heads of the hyperbaric oxygen-treated than untreated rats sacrificed on the 42nd postoperative day; also there was less necrotic debris in the femoral heads of the treated rats. There were no differences in the severity of the degenerative changes of the articular cartilage of the treated and untreated rats. Exposure of rats to hyperbaric oxygen does not preserve tissue viability after all arteries supplying the femoral head are severed. Yet, resulting in an increased oxygen tension of the tissues, it seems to provide the optimal settings for reparative processes. The results suggest that hyperoxygenation-mediated relief of ischemia enhances the fibroblastic, angioblastic, osteoblastic, and osteoclastic activities such that healing of the rats' necrotic femoral heads is expedited.

  7. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen - home use; COPD - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive airways disease - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive lung disease - home oxygen; Chronic bronchitis - home oxygen; Emphysema - home oxygen; Chronic respiratory ...

  8. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

    2008-09-30

    In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW

  9. Final report on the project entitled: Highly Preheated Combustion Air System with/without Oxygen Enrichment for Metal Processing Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Arvind Atreya

    2007-02-16

    This work develops and demonstrates a laboratory-scale high temperature natural gas furnace that can operate with/without oxygen enrichment to significantly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. The laboratory-scale is 5ft in diameter & 8ft tall. This furnace was constructed and tested. This report demonstrates the efficiency and pollutant prevention capabilities of this test furnace. The project also developed optical detection technology to control the furnace output.

  10. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  11. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stored as a gas or liquid in special tanks. These tanks can be delivered to your home and contain ... they won’t run out of oxygen. Portable tanks and oxygen concentrators may make it easier for ...

  12. Enhancing dissolved oxygen control using an on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    An on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system was developed to optimize dissolved oxygen concentration in a bench-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process. In order to improve the performance of the control system, a self-adapted fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm and adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were employed. The proposed control system permits the on-line implementation of every operating strategy of the experimental system. A set of experiments involving variable hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent pH (pH), dissolved oxygen in the aerobic reactor (DO), and mixed-liquid return ratio (r) was carried out. Using the proposed system, the amount of COD in the effluent stabilized at the set-point and below. The improvement was achieved with optimum dissolved oxygen concentration because the performance of the treatment process was optimized using operating rules implemented in real time. The system allows various expert operational approaches to be deployed with the goal of minimizing organic substances in the outlet while using the minimum amount of energy.

  13. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads.

  14. Hydrogen production from a combination of the water-gas shift and redox cycle process of methane partial oxidation via lattice oxygen over LaFeO3 perovskite catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao Ping; Wu, Qiong; Li, Ran Jia; Yu, Chang Chun; Hao, Zheng Ping

    2006-12-28

    A redox cycle process, in which CH4 and air are periodically brought into contact with a solid oxide packed in a fixed-bed reactor, combined with the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, is proposed for hydrogen production. The sole oxidant for partial oxidation of methane (POM) is found to be lattice oxygen instead of gaseous oxygen. A perovskite-type LaFeO3 oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method and employed as an oxygen storage material in this process. The results indicate that, under appropriate reaction conditions, methane can be oxidized to CO and H2 by the lattice oxygen of LaFeO3 perovskite oxide with a selectivity higher than 95% and the consumed lattice oxygen can be replenished in a reoxidation procedure by a redox operation. It is suggested that the POM to H2/CO by using the lattice oxygen of the oxygen storage materials instead of gaseous oxygen should be possibly applicable. The LaFeO3 perovskite oxide maintained relatively high catalytic activity and structural stability, while the carbonaceous deposits, which come from the dissociation of CH4 in the pulse reaction, occurred due to the low migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. A new dissociation-oxidation mechanism for this POM without gaseous oxygen is proposed based on the transient responses of the products checked at different surface states via both pulse reaction and switch reaction over the LaFeO3 catalyst. In the absence of gaseous-phase oxygen, the rate-determining step of methane conversion is the migration rate of lattice oxygen, but the process can be carried out in optimized cycles. The product distribution for POM over LaFeO3 catalyst in the absence of gaseous oxygen was determined by the concentration of surface oxygen, which is relevant with the migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. This process of hydrogen production via selective oxidation of methane by lattice oxygen is better in avoiding the deep oxidation (to CO2) and

  15. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    PubMed

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues.

  16. [Apneic oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, A V; Vyzhigina, M A; Parshin, V D; Fedorov, D S

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances in thoracic and tracheal surgery make the anaesthesiologist use different respiratory techniques during the operation. Apneic oxygenation is a one of alternative techniques. This method is relatively easy in use, does not require special expensive equipment and is the only possible technique in several clinical situations when other respiratory methods are undesirable or cannot be used. However there is no enough information about apneic oxygenation in Russian. This article reviews publications about apneic oxygenation. The review deals with experiments on diffusion respiration in animals, physiological changes during apneic oxygenation in man and defines clinical cases when apneic oxygenation can be used.

  17. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  18. Characterization of refractory matters in dyeing wastewater during a full-scale Fenton process following pure-oxygen activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Bae, Wookeun; Won, Hosik; Hwang, Byungho; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Chung, Jinwook; Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae

    2015-04-28

    Refractory pollutants in raw and treated dyeing wastewaters were characterized using fractional molecular weight cut-off, Ultraviolet-vis spectrophotometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS). Significant organics and color compounds remained after biological (pure-oxygen activated sludge) and chemical (Fenton) treatments at a dyeing wastewater treatment plant (flow rate ∼100,000m(3)/d). HPLC-ESI/MS analysis revealed that some organic compounds disappeared after the biological treatment but reappeared after the chemical oxidation process, and some of that were originally absent in the raw dyeing wastewater was formed after the biological or chemical treatment. It appeared that the Fenton process merely impaired the color-imparting bonds in the dye materials instead of completely degrading them. Nevertheless, this process did significantly reduce the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD, 66%) and color (73%) remaining after initial biological treatment which reduced SCOD by 53% and color by 13% in raw wastewater. Biological treatment decreased the degradable compounds substantially, in such a way that the following Fenton process could effectively remove recalcitrant compounds, making the overall hybrid system more economical. In addition, ferric ion inherent to the Fenton reaction effectively coagulated particulate matters not removed via biological and chemical oxidation.

  19. Optical Measurements Reveal Interplay Between Surface and Bottom Processes Involving Phytoplankton, Organic Carbon, Iron, Light, and Oxygen in Two Stratified Mesotrophic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.; Vaidya, A.; Wiles, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Water column distribution of phytoplankton, organic carbon, particulate and dissolved iron are described through detailed vertical optical measurements that include downwelling cosine irradiance, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence by CDOM, Chl-a, phycobilin pigments, and diffuse attenuation for several UV wavebands, plus pH, temperature, and specific conductance. These measurements were completed with a group of profiling instruments during summer in two mid-latitude small lakes. Special calibration allowed for correcting the impact of CDOM and turbidity on the pigment fluorescence signals. These in situ data were combined with laboratory analysis of discrete water column samples for methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a, spectral absorbance of particles, concentration of particulates (dry mass and ash-free mass), total particulate and "dissolved" iron, DOC and CDOM (the "dissolved fraction" passes through a GF/F filter). Surface processes revealed by these measurement include solar heating and photobleaching of CDOM (partly distributed by wind-driven mixing), and nonphotochemical quenching of phytoplankton chlorophyll-a fluorescence. Bottom processes revealed by these measurements include oxygen consumption by net heterotrophic metabolism, release of DOC, CDOM, and iron from anoxic bottom sediments, and the development of a biological community structured by the light and temperature gradients and absence or scarcity of dissolved oxygen near the bottom. The iron associated with CDOM and particles in the deep samples substantially increased the latter's DOC-specific absorption once there was an opportunity for oxidation. A model for mass-specific spectral absorption of particulates accounts for the contribution of organic matter and iron associated with the particles. A detailed hydrologic budget for one of the lakes will allow the water column processes to be explored further by accounting for inputs and outputs of water and organic carbon (via precipitation

  20. Monitoring Oxygen Status.

    PubMed

    Toffaletti, J G; Rackley, C R

    Although part of a common "blood gas" test panel with pH and pCO2, the pO2, %O2Hb, and related parameters are independently used to detect and monitor oxygen deficits from a variety of causes. Measurement of blood gases and cooximetry may be done by laboratory analyzers, point of care testing, noninvasive pulse oximetry, and transcutaneous blood gases. The specimen type and mode of monitoring oxygenation that are chosen may be based on a combination of urgency, practicality, clinical need, and therapeutic objectives. Because oxygen concentrations in blood are extremely labile, there are several highly important preanalytical practices necessary to prevent errors in oxygen and cooximetry results. Effective utilization of oxygen requires binding by hemoglobin in the lungs, transport in the blood, and release to tissues, where cellular respiration occurs. Hydrogen ion (pH), CO2, temperature, and 2,3-DPG all play important roles in these processes. Additional measurements and calculations are often used to interpret and locate the cause and source of an oxygen deficit. These include the Hb concentration, Alveolar-arterial pO2 gradient, pO2:FIO2 ratio, oxygenation index, O2 content and O2 delivery, and pulmonary dead space and intrapulmonary shunting. The causes of hypoxemia will be covered and, to illustrate how the oxygen parameters are used clinically in the diagnosis and management of patients with abnormal oxygenation, two clinical cases will be presented and described.

  1. Processes of chemoionization in the course of inflammation of a methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current gliding surface discharge in a closed chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Artem’ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kossyi, I. A. Misakyan, M. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2015-05-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the inflammation of a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current multielectrode spark-gap in a closed cylindrical chamber. It is shown that, in both the preflame and well-developed flame stages, the gas medium is characterized by a high degree of ionization (n{sub e} ≈ 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}) due to chemoionization processes and a high electron-neutral collision frequency (ν{sub e0} ≈ 10{sup 12} s{sup −1})

  2. Effect of dissolved oxygen on elemental sulfur generation in sulfide and nitrate removal process: characterization, pathway, and microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti

    2016-03-01

    Microaerobic bioreactor treatment for enriched sulfide and nitrate has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to improve the efficiencies of elemental sulfur (S(0)) generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction. However, there is little detailed information for the effect and mechanism of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the variations of microbial community in sulfur generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction systems. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was employed to evaluate the variations of microbial community structures in a sulfide oxidation and nitrate reduction reactor under different DO conditions (DO 0-0.7 mg · L(-1)). Experimental results revealed that the activity of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) could be greatly stimulated in 0.1-0.3 mg-DO · L(-1). However, when the DO concentration was further elevated to more than 0.5 mg · L(-1), the abundance of NRB was markedly decreased, while the heterotrophic microorganisms, especially carbon degradation species, were enriched. The reaction pathways for sulfide and nitrate removal under microaerobic conditions were also deduced by combining batch experiments with functional species analysis. It was likely that the oxidation of sulfide to sulfur could be performed by both aerobic heterotrophic SOB and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification bacteria with oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptor, respectively. The nitrate could be reduced to nitrite by both autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification, and then the generated nitrite could be completely converted to nitrogen gas via heterotrophic denitrification. This study provides new insights into the impacts of microaerobic conditions on the microbial community functional structures of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing, and sulfur-producing bioreactors, which revealing the potential linkage between functional microbial communities and

  3. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  4. Electroless Pt deposition on Mn3O4 nanoparticles via the galvanic replacement process: electrocatalytic nanocomposite with enhanced performance for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woong; Kim, Soo Min; Choi, Suhee; Kim, Jongwon; Lee, In Su

    2012-06-26

    A novel electroless Pt deposition method was exploited by employing the galvanic replacement process occurring between the Mn(3)O(4) surface and PtCl(4)(2-) complexes. The newly discovered process provides a simple protocol to produce the catalytic nanocomposite, in which a high density of ultrafine Pt nanocrystals is stably immobilized in a homogeneously dispersive state on the surface of Mn(3)O(4) nanoparticles. When the eletrocatalytic activity was tested for the oxygen reduction reaction, which limits the rate of the overall process in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, the resulting Pt/Mn(3)O(4) nanocomposite showed highly enhanced specific activity and durability, compared with those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  5. The interactive effects of exercise and feeding on oxygen uptake, activity levels, and gastric processing in the graceful crab Cancer gracilis.

    PubMed

    McGaw, Iain J

    2007-01-01

    Exercise and digestive processes are known to elevate the metabolic rate of organisms independently. In this study, the effects of simultaneous exercise and digestion were examined in the graceful crab Cancer gracilis. This species exhibited resting oxygen uptake levels between 29 and 42 mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1). In postprandial crabs, oxygen uptake was approximately double that of unfed crabs. During exercise, oxygen uptake increased three- to fourfold, reaching maximal levels of more than 130 mg O(2) kg(-1 ) h(-1). However, there was no difference in oxygen uptake during activity between unfed and postprandial animals. There was also no difference in exercise endurance levels between unfed and postprandial animals; both sets of animals were unable to right themselves after being turned on their backs, reaching exhaustion after 13-15 attempts. To determine whether increased activity affected gastric processes, the passage of a meal through the digestive system was followed using a fluoroscope. Passage of digesta through the gut system was slower in active animals than in resting crabs. Resting crabs cleared the foregut after approximately 18 h, which was significantly faster than the 34.5 h for constantly active animals. Likewise, the midgut region of resting animals was cleared at a faster rate than that of active animals. Because of residual amounts of digesta remaining in the hindgut, no difference in clearance rates of this section of the gut was evident. The slower clearance times of the foregut were due to a significantly slower rate of mastication of food, as evidenced by a lower cardiac stomach contraction rate. Contraction of the pyloric region of the foregut functions to move the digesta along the midgut, and there was a direct correlation between slower contraction rates of this region and the increased time of passage for digesta through the midgut of active animals. Because increased activity levels affected gastric processing, the crabs exhibited a

  6. Impact of oxygen plasma postoxidation process on Al2O3/n-In0.53Ga0.47As metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechaux, Y.; Fadjie-Djomkam, A. B.; Bollaert, S.; Wichmann, N.

    2016-09-01

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis were performed in order to investigate the effect of a oxygen (O2) plasma after oxide deposition on the Al2O3/n-In0.53Ga0.47As metal-oxide-semiconductor structure passivated with ammonia NH4OH solution. From C-V measurements, an improvement of charge control is observed using the O2 plasma postoxidation process on In0.53Ga0.47As, while the minimum of interface trap density remains at a good value lower than 1 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1. From XPS measurements, we found that NH4OH passivation removes drastically the Ga and As native oxides on the In0.53Ga0.47As surface and the O2 plasma postoxidation process enables the reduction of interface re-oxidation after post deposition annealing (PDA) of the oxide. The advanced hypothesis is the formation of interfacial barrier between Al2O3 and In0.53Ga0.47As which prevents the diffusion of oxygen species into the semiconductor surface during PDA.

  7. Low-Temperature Crystallization of PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3 Film Induced by High-Oxygen-Pressure Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sun, Jinglan; Lin, Tie; Ma, Jianhua; Chu, Junhao; Dho, Joonghoe

    2008-09-01

    A 300-nm-thick PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3 [PZT(30/70)] film was sputtered onto LaNiO3 (LNO)/Si(100) substrates at a substrate temperature of 200 °C and then annealed under an oxygen pressure of 4 MPa at 400 °C. The amorphous phase of the as-sputtered PZT(30/70) film was transformed to a highly (h00)-oriented perovskite phase by high-oxygen-pressure-processing (HOPP). The results of electrical measurements such as of polarization (P) as functions of applied electric field (E) (P-E hysteresis loops), the capacitance as functions of the applied dc electric field (C-E loops), and the dielectric constant (ɛr) and dissipation factor (tan δ) suggested that ferroelectric properties of PZT(30/70) films were largely improved by HOPP. We consider that HOPP is compatible with currently existing silicon-based technology, which is characterized by incorporating sputtering and a processing temperature limit of ˜450 °C. The P-E hyteresis loops obtained from a prototype of 128 ×128 uncooled infrared detector arrays prepared by HOPP supported the good ferroelectricity with a high pyroelectric coefficient.

  8. Processing of low carbon content interstellar ice analogues by cosmic rays: implications for the chemistry around oxygen-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Pilling, S.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Radiolysis of a homogeneous H2O:H2CO:CH3OH (100:2:0.8) ice mixture by fast heavy ions is performed in the laboratory in an attempt to simulate the interaction of cosmic rays with frozen surfaces at 15 K. Bombarded by 220-MeV 16O7 + ions, the ice layer is thin enough to be traversed by projectiles at approximately constant velocity and with charge states close to the equilibrium one. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) reveals that the molecular species formed are CH4, CO2, CO, HCO, HCOO- and CH3OCHO. The formation and dissociation cross-sections of all observed daughter molecules are determined. As a control procedure, a carbon budget is performed as the beam fluence increases. The observed radiation effects lead to a general observation that the destruction cross-sections of condensed gases by heavy ions are ruled by a power law that is a function of the electronic stopping power: σd ˜ Sn_e, where n is approximately 3/2. This relation is observed for the destruction of precursor H2CO molecules and for the formation of daughter species. The present results help our understanding of the chemical and physicochemical interactions induced by heavy cosmic rays in cold astrophysical environments with low carbon contents, such as those around oxygen-rich stars.

  9. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  10. Assessing the effect of natural attenuation on oxygen consumption processes in a sewage-contaminated aquifer by use of a natural-gradient tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathisen, P. P.; Kent, D. B.; Smith, R. L.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.; Metge, D. W.; Hess, K. M.; Leblanc, D. R.; Koch, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Processes associated with aquifer restoration subsequent to cessation of treated-sewage loading in a sand and gravel aquifer are being investigated at the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Site on Cape Cod, MA. Restoration has been slow because of significant oxygen depletion resulting from biogeochemical processes associated with residual sorbed pools of organic carbon, ammonium, and reduced metals in the aquifer. The in situ interaction of the physical, chemical, and biological processes governing oxygen consumption was examined by using a natural-gradient tracer test in fall 2001, 6 years after sewage disposal had been discontinued. Ground water with a high dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was withdrawn from an uncontaminated zone of the aquifer and re-injected with a conservative tracer, bromide, into an anoxic zone directly below a former sewage-effluent disposal bed where Fe and sulfide concentrations were below detection and the DO was less than 5 uM. An injection with negligible ammonium, a nitrate concentration of 22 uM, and DO of approximately 260 uM was maintained at approximately 15 L/hr for a period of 75 days. An array of multi-level samplers (MLS), placed at distances ranging from 1 to 7 m down-gradient from the injection well, was sampled prior to and throughout the 75-day injection, and during a 25-day period after the injection. Water samples from the MLS were analyzed for DO and a variety of aqueous constituents. The DO decreased from approximately 260 uM to 210 uM over 7 m of transport, indicating the presence of rate-limited oxygen consumption. An increase in nitrate from 22 to approximately 36 uM indicated the presence of rate-limited ammonium oxidation. However, this ammonium oxidation was not sufficient to account for all of the DO consumption. Further characterization of these processes was accomplished by use of PHREEQC, a one-dimensional, geochemical reactive transport model. The 1D model is based on an ion association model for aqueous

  11. TiC supported Pt-Ir electrocatalyst prepared by a plasma process for the oxygen electrode in unitized regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Sheng; Ma, Lirong; Zhai, Yuchun

    Unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs) have become more attractive for some time due to its potentially wide energy storage application such as in fields of space and renewable energy. In this study, TiC supported Pt-Ir electrocatalysts (Pt-Ir/TiC) for oxygen electrode in URFCs were synthesized, respectively, by chemical reduction process and plasma reduction process. Their physical and electrochemical properties are characterized and compared using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammogram (CV), potentiostatic technique, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results from XRD, XPS and TEM demonstrate that the plasma process gives a finer metal crystals and higher metal dispersion on the TiC support. The CV, polarization, potentiostatic and EIS results show that the Pt-Ir/TiC electrocatalyst prepared by the plasma reduction process is obviously more active than that by the chemical reduction process, in agreement with the above metal-dispersion observations. The plasma process is a promising way for the preparation of supported electrocatalysts.

  12. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had δ18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in δ18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that

  13. Attempts to comprehend Martian surface processes through interpretation of the oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Grady, Monica M.

    1992-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are known to contain trace quantities of a variety of secondary minerals such as carbonates, sulfates, and aluminosilicates. Since these constituents are thought to be mostly preterrestrial in origin, their study has the potential to provide rigorous constraints on the nature of martian weathering processes. However, this line of investigation is potentially complicated by the presence within the meteorite samples of any additional weathering products produced by terrestrial processes. Examination of such terrestrial components is important since weathering processes that affect meteorite samples following their fall to Earth might have some bearing on the nature of analogous processes at the surface of Mars. It is obviously necessary to try and distinguish which secondary components in SNC meteorites are terrestrial in origin from those that are preterrestrial. Herein consideration is made of the stable isotopic compositions of weathering products in two SNC meteorites: EET A79001 (a sample collected from Antarctica) and Nakhla (a fall from Egypt, 1911).

  14. Oxygen "getter" effects on microstructure and carrier transport in low temperature combustion-processed a-InXZnO (X = Ga, Sc, Y, La) transistors.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Smith, Jeremy; Yan, Aiming; Kim, Myung-Gil; Zhao, Wei; Dravid, Vinayak P; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2013-07-24

    In oxide semiconductors, such as those based on indium zinc oxide (IXZO), a strong oxygen binding metal ion ("oxygen getter"), X, functions to control O vacancies and enhance lattice formation, hence tune carrier concentration and transport properties. Here we systematically study, in the IXZO series, the role of X = Ga(3+) versus the progression X = Sc(3+) → Y(3+) → La(3+), having similar chemical characteristics but increasing ionic radii. IXZO films are prepared from solution over broad composition ranges for the first time via low-temperature combustion synthesis. The films are characterized via thermal analysis of the precursor solutions, grazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction (GIAXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging. Excellent thin-film transistor (TFT) performance is achieved for all X, with optimal compositions after 300 °C processing exhibiting electron mobilities of 5.4, 2.6, 2.4, and 1.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for Ga(3+), Sc(3+), Y(3+), and La(3+), respectively, and with I(on)/I(off) = 10(7)-10(8). Analysis of the IXZO TFT positive bias stress response shows X = Ga(3+) to be superior with mobilities (μ) retaining >95% of the prestress values and threshold voltage shifts (ΔV(T)) of <1.6 V, versus <85% μ retention and ΔV(T) ≈ 20 V for the other trivalent ions. Detailed microstructural analysis indicates that Ga(3+) most effectively promotes oxide lattice formation. We conclude that the metal oxide lattice formation enthalpy (ΔH(L)) and metal ionic radius are the best predictors of IXZO oxygen getter efficacy.

  15. Mass independent oxygen and sulfur isotopic compositions of environmental sulfate and nitrate. A new probe of atmospheric, hydrospheric and geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M.; Michalski, G.; Romero, A.; McCabe, J.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol sulfate is well known to exert a significant influence on the Earth’s atmosphere and surface. They mediate climate in its capacity as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and as a visible light scattering agent. These particles are respirable, with severe cardiovascular disease consequences. Removal by wet and dry depositions is well known to cause surficial damage to biota, biodiversity, and structures. Despite decades of high precision global concentration measurements, single isotope ratio measurements (d18O, d34S) and high quality modeling efforts, there remain unresolved issues with respect to resolution of relative oxidative processes (homogenous vs. heterogeneous), transformation mechanisms, and identification of sources, proximal and distal. Mass independent oxygen isotopic compositions have added new insights un attainable by other techniques. These observations ideally complement other measurements in an effort to improve parameters used in modeling aerosols and climate. Recent sulfur mass independent compositions have potentially added a new means to recognize upper atmospheric photolytic processes. Aerosol nitrate is estimated to nearly double in the next half century, with potentially severe consequences which include soil acidification, loss of biodiversity, eutrophication of coastal and freshwaters, and, human cardiovascular disease. Loss of fresh water lake clarity, e.g. Lake Tahoe is also believed to occur due to increased nitrogen levels. As in the case of atmospheric sulfate, mass independent oxygen isotopic signatures have been observed in nitrate. The D17O is one of the largest mass independent isotopic signatures observed in any environmental species with the exception of ozone. These measurements have demonstrated the ability to provide new insight into the nitrogen cycle, including atmospheric, hydrospheric and geologic processes.

  16. Identification and roles of nonstoichiometric oxygen in amorphous Ta2O5 thin films deposited by electron beam and sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannequin, Cedric; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    The morphology and composition of tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) thin films prepared by electron-beam (EB) evaporation and radio-frequency sputtering (SP) were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray reflectometry (XRR), atomic force microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). GIXRD revealed an amorphous nature for both films, and XRR showed that the density of the Ta2O5-EB films was lower than that of the Ta2O5-SP films; both films have lower density than the bulk value. A larger amount of molecular water and peroxo species were detected for the Ta2O5-EB films by FTIR performed in ambient atmosphere. XPS analyses performed in vacuum confirmed the presence of hydroxyl groups, but no trace of chemisorbed molecular water was detected. In addition, a higher oxygen nonstoichiometry (higher O/Ta ratio) was found for the EB films. From these results, we conclude that the oxygen nonstoichiometry of the EB film accounted for its lower density and higher amount of absorbed molecular water. The results also suggest the importance of understanding the dependence of the structural and chemical properties of thin amorphous oxide films on the deposition process.

  17. Melt processing of the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} superconductor in oxygen and argon atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J.; Chumbley, L.S.

    1992-08-01

    Solidification and subsequent annealing of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (2212) in oxygen and argon atmospheres were investigated in order to identify alternative processing routes for controlling microstructures and superconducting properties. In addition to 2212, several other phases formed on cooling in O{sub 2} and did not disappear upon subsequent annealing. Crystallization in Ar resulted in a divorced eutetic structure of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 3-x}Ca{sub x}O{sub y} and Cu{sub 2}O/CuO. The superconductor was formed on subsequent anneals. Samples melted in Ar and then annealed generally possessed a more uniform microstructure compared with samples that were melted in oxygen and annealed. Compositional measurements of the 2212 phase suggest that CaO segregation in the melt may be minimized with an overall composition such as Bi{sub 2.15}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.85}Cu{sub 2}O{sub y}.

  18. Melt processing of the Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub y] superconductor in oxygen and argon atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J. ); Chumbley, L.S. )

    1992-08-01

    Solidification and subsequent annealing of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub y] (2212) in oxygen and argon atmospheres were investigated in order to identify alternative processing routes for controlling microstructures and superconducting properties. In addition to 2212, several other phases formed on cooling in O[sub 2] and did not disappear upon subsequent annealing. Crystallization in Ar resulted in a divorced eutetic structure of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 3-x]Ca[sub x]O[sub y] and Cu[sub 2]O/CuO. The superconductor was formed on subsequent anneals. Samples melted in Ar and then annealed generally possessed a more uniform microstructure compared with samples that were melted in oxygen and annealed. Compositional measurements of the 2212 phase suggest that CaO segregation in the melt may be minimized with an overall composition such as Bi[sub 2.15]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub 0.85]Cu[sub 2]O[sub y].

  19. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... with electric motors Electric baseboard or space heaters Wood stoves, fireplaces, candles Electric blankets Hairdryers, electric razors, ... Therapy.aspx . Accessed February 9, 2016. National Fire Protection Association. Medical oxygen. Updated July 2013. www.nfpa. ...

  20. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  1. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  2. Enhanced neuropeptide Y synthesis during intermittent hypoxia in the rat adrenal medulla: role of reactive oxygen species-dependent alterations in precursor peptide processing.

    PubMed

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Kalari, Apeksha; Dhingra, Rishi; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Kumar, Ganesh K

    2011-04-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with recurrent apneas often leads to cardiovascular abnormalities. Previously, we showed that IH treatment elevates blood pressure and increases plasma catecholamines (CAs) in rats via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent enhanced synthesis and secretion from the adrenal medulla (AM). Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a sympathetic neurotransmitter that colocalizes with CA in the AM, has been implicated in blood pressure regulation during persistent stress. Here, we investigated whether IH facilitates NPY synthesis in the rat AM and assessed the role of ROS signaling. IH increased NPY-like immunoreactivity in many dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing chromaffin cells with a parallel increase in preproNPY mRNA and protein. IH increased the activities of proNPY-processing enzymes, which were due, in part, to elevated protein expression and increased proteolytic processing. IH increased ROS generation, and antioxidants reversed IH-induced increases in ROS, preproNPY, and its processing to bioactive NPY in the AM. IH treatment increased blood pressure and antioxidants and inhibition of NPY amidation prevented this response. These findings suggest that IH-induced elevation in NPY expression in the rat AM is mediated by ROS-dependent augmentation of preproNPY mRNA expression and proNPY-processing enzyme activities and contributes to IH-induced elevation of blood pressure.

  3. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  4. Effects of dissolved oxygen on performance and microbial community structure in a micro-aerobic hydrolysis sludge in situ reduction process.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhao; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Xuelian; Qiao, Weimin; Jiang, Lu-Man; Pan, Wei; Zhou, Jijun

    2016-03-01

    A sludge process reduction activated sludge (SPRAS), with a sludge process reduction module composed of a micro-aerobic tank and a settler positioned before conventional activated sludge process, showed good performance of pollutant removal and sludge reduction. Two SPRAS systems were operated to investigate effects of micro-aeration on sludge reduction performance and microbial community structure. When dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the micro-aerobic tank decreased from 2.5 (SPH) to 0.5 (SPL) mg/L, the sludge reduction efficiency increased from 42.9% to 68.3%. Compared to SPH, activated sludge in SPL showed higher contents of extracellular polymeric substances and dissolved organic matter. Destabilization of floc structure in the settler, and cell lysis in the sludge process reduction module were two major reasons for sludge reduction. Illumina-MiSeq sequencing showed that microbial diversity decreased under high DO concentration. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi were the most abundant phyla in the SPRAS. Specific comparisons down to the class and genus level showed that fermentative, predatory and slow-growing bacteria in SPL community were more abundant than in SPH. The results revealed that micro-aeration in the SPRAS improved hydrolysis efficiency and enriched fermentative and predatory bacteria responsible for sludge reduction.

  5. Reduction of N2O and NO generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) biological wastewater treatment process by using sludge alkaline fermentation liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yinguang

    2011-03-15

    This paper reported an efficient method to significantly reduce nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and nitric oxide (NO) generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) processes. It was found that by the use of waste-activated sludge alkaline fermentation liquid as the synthetic wastewater-carbon source, compared with the commonly used carbon source in the literature (e.g., acetic acid), the generation of N(2)O and NO was reduced by 68.7% and 50.0%, respectively, but the removal efficiencies of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were improved. Both N(2)O and NO were produced in the low dissolved oxygen (DO) stage, and the use of sludge fermentation liquid greatly reduced their generation from the denitrification. The presences of Cu(2+) and propionic acid in fermentation liquid were observed to play an important role in the reduction of N(2)O and NO generation. The analysis of the activities of denitrifying enzymes suggested that sludge fermentation liquid caused the significant decrease of both nitrite reductase activity to NO reductase activity ratio and NO reductase activity to N(2)O reductase activity ratio, which resulted in the lower generation of NO and N(2)O. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the number of glycogen accumulating bacteria, which was reported to be relevant to nitrous oxide generation, in sludge fermentation liquid reactor was much lower than that in acetic acid reactor. The quantitative detection of the nosZ gene, encoding nitrous oxide reductase, showed that the use of fermentation liquid increased the number of bacteria capable of reducing N(2)O to N(2). The feasibility of using sludge fermentation liquid to reduce NO and N(2)O generation in an anaerobic-low DO process was finally confirmed for a municipal wastewater.

  6. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-07-01

    In the present quarter, oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  7. Flux Pinning and Properties of Solid-Solution (Y,Nd)1+XBa2-x Cu3O7-delta Superconductors Processed in Air and Partial Oxygen Atmospheres (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2006-204 FLUX PINNING AND PROPERTIES OF SOLID - SOLUTION (Y,Nd)1+XBa2-xCu3O7-δ SUPERCONDUCTORS PROCESSED IN AIR AND PARTIAL...SUBTITLE FLUX PINNING AND PROPERTIES OF SOLID - SOLUTION (Y,Nd)i+),(Ba,_„ Cu3 07_5 SUPERCONDUCTORS PROCESSED IN AIR AND PARTIAL OXYGEN ATMOSPHERES (PREPRINT

  8. Processes affecting oxygen isotope ratios of atmospheric and ecosystem sulfate in two contrasting forest catchments in Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Novak; Myron J. Mitchell; Iva Jackova; Frantisek Buzek; Jana Schweigstillova; Lucie Erbanova; Richard Prikryl; Daniela Fottova

    2007-02-15

    Sulfate aerosols are harmful as respirable particles. They also play a role as cloud condensation nuclei and have radiative effects on global climate. A combination of {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} data with catchment sulfur mass balances was used to constrain processes affecting S cycling in the atmosphere and spruce forests of the Czech Republic. Extremely high S fluxes via spruce throughfall and runoff were measured at Jezeri (49 and 80 kg S ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively). The second catchment, Na Lizu, was 10 times less polluted. In both catchments, {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} decreased in the following order: open-area precipitation {gt} throughfall {gt} runoff. The 180-SO{sub 4} values of throughfall exhibited a seasonal pattern at both sites, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. This seasonal pattern paralleled {delta}{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O values, which were offset by -18{per_thousand}. Sulfate in throughfall was predominantly formed by heterogeneous (aqueous) oxidation of SO{sub 2}. Wet-deposited sulfate in an open area did not show systematic {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} trends, suggesting formation by homogeneous (gaseous) oxidation and/or transport from large distances. The percentage of incoming S that is organically cycled in soil was similar under the high and the low pollution. High-temperature {sup 18}O-rich sulfate was not detected, which contrasts with North American industrial sites. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Numerical Simulation of the Interaction Between Supersonic Oxygen Jets and Molten Slag-Metal Bath in Steelmaking BOF Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Mingming; Kuang, Shibo; Zou, Zongshu

    2015-02-01

    The impinging of multiple jets onto the molten bath in the BOF steelmaking process plays a crucial role in reactor performance but is not clearly understood. This paper presents a numerical study of the interaction between the multiple jets and slag-metal bath in a BOF by means of the three-phase volume of fluid model. The validity of the model is first examined by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurement of time-averaged cavity dimensions through a scaled-down water model. The calculated results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental data. The mathematical model is then used to investigate the primary transport phenomena of the jets-bath interaction inside a 150-ton commercial BOF under steelmaking conditions. The numerical results show that the cavity profile and interface of slag/metal/gas remain unstable as a result of the propagation of surface waves, which, likely as a major factor, governs the generation of metal droplets and their initial spatiotemporal distribution. The total momentum transferred from the jets into the bath is consumed about a half to drive the movement of slag, rather than fully converted as the stirring power for the metal bath. Finally, the effects of operational conditions and fluid properties are quantified. It is shown that compared to viscosity and surface tension of the melts, operating pressure and lance height have a much more significant impact on the slag-metal interface behavior and cavity shape as well as the fluid dynamics in the molten bath.

  10. Partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate using a pilot-scale continuous activated sludge process at low dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, YongYuan; Mirino, Markus W; Yuan, Yanlei

    2016-10-01

    Controlling of low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.1-0.5mg/L), a cost-effective strategy, was applied to a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic-oxic-anoxic process for partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate. High ammonium removal efficiency, stable nitrite accumulation rate and total nitrogen removal efficiency was higher than 95.0%, 90.0% and 66.4%, respectively, implying potential application of this process for nitrogen removal of mature landfill leachate. Efficient nitrite accumulation in the first oxic reactor depended on low DO conditions and sufficient alkalinity. However, operational limit was mainly decided by actual hydraulic retention time (AHRT) of the first oxic reactor and appeared with AHRT less than 13.9h under DO of 0.3-0.5mg/L. High-throughput sequencing analysis demonstrated significant change of bacterial diversity in the first oxic reactor after a long-term operation and dominant bacteria genus Nitrosomonas was shown to be responsible for NH4(+)-N removal and nitrite accumulation under low DO levels.

  11. Improved curdlan fermentation process based on optimization of dissolved oxygen combined with pH control and metabolic characterization of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jian-Rong; English, Nike; Yu, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    A significant problem in scale-down cultures, rarely studied for metabolic characterization and curdlan-producing Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749, is the presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) gradients combined with pH control. Constant DO, between 5% and 75%, was maintained during batch fermentations by manipulating the agitation with PID system. Fermentation, metabolic and kinetic characterization studies were conducted in a scale-down system. The curdlan yield, intracellular nucleotide levels and glucose conversion efficiency into curdlan were significantly affected by DO concentrations. The optimum DO concentrations for curdlan production were 45-60%. The average curdlan yield, curdlan productivity and glucose conversion efficiency into curdlan were enhanced by 80%, 66% and 32%, respectively, compared to that at 15% DO. No apparent difference in the gel strength of the resulting curdlan was detected. The comparison of curdlan biosynthesis and cellular nucleotide levels showed that curdlan production had positive relationship with intracellular levels of UTP, ADP, AMP, NAD(+), NADH and UDP-glucose. The curdlan productivity under 45% DO and 60% DO was different during 20-50 h. However, after 60 h curdlan productivity of both conditions was similar. On that basis, a simple and reproducible two-stage DO control process for curdlan production was developed. Curdlan production yield reached 42.8 g/l, an increase of 30% compared to that of the single agitation speed control process.

  12. Low Friction Property of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating Films and Oxygen Transmission Ratio of Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Advanced Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    The topics of the applied technology of amorphous carbon film to reduce friction using diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated by the vacuum arc ion plating process and to improve the gas barrier property using the amorphous carbon film by the atmospheric pressure plasma process are introduced with the basic experimental results. For reducing friction, the super low friction coefficient below 0.01 has been found when the tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating deposited by T-shape filtered arc deposition method [ta-C(T)] was evaluated the friction property under oleic acid lubrication at pure sliding condition. It was thought that the low share strength tribofilm composed of water and oleic acid mono-layer seemed to be formed on the sliding interface. For gas barrier performance, the amorphous carbon film deposited by the atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate was improved the oxygen transmission ratio (OTR) around 30% compared with that of uncoated PET substrate. These advanced performance obtained by the optimum material combination of DLC with lubricant and the original atmospheric pressure plasma CVD technique are expected to be applied on the actual application for the different types of the industrial fields in near future.

  13. Effects of pH, Temperature, Dissolved Oxygen, and Flow Rate on Phosphorus Release Processes at the Sediment and Water Interface in Storm Sewer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan; Li, Mingyi; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and flow rate on the phosphorus (P) release processes at the sediment and water interface in rainwater pipes were investigated. The sampling was conducted in a residential storm sewer of North Li Shi Road in Xi Cheng District of Beijing on August 3, 2011. The release rate of P increased with the increase of pH from 8 to 10. High temperature is favorable for the release of P. The concentration of total phosphorus (TP) in the overlying water increased as the concentration of DO decreased. With the increase of flow rate from 0.7 m s−1 to 1.1 m s−1, the concentration of TP in the overlying water increased and then tends to be stable. Among all the factors examined in the present study, the flow rate is the primary influence factor on P release. The cumulative amount of P release increased with the process of pipeline runoff in the rainfall events with high intensities and shorter durations. Feasible measures such as best management practices and low-impact development can be conducted to control the P release on urban sediments by slowing down the flow rate. PMID:24349823

  14. Dissolved oxygen: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senn, David; Downing-Kunz, Maureen; Novick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration serves as an important indicator of estuarine habitat condition, because all aquatic macro-organisms require some minimum DO level to survive and prosper. The instantaneous DO concentration, measured at a specific location in the water column, results from a balance between multiple processes that add or remove oxygen (Figure 6.1): primary production produces O2; aerobic respiration in the water column and sediments consumes O2; abiotic or microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions utilize O2 as an oxidant (e.g., oxidation of ammonium, sulfide, and ferrous iron); O2 exchange occurs across the air:water interface in response to under- or oversaturated DO concentrations in the water column; and water currents and turbulent mixing transport DO into and out of zones in the water column. If the oxygen loss rate exceeds the oxygen production or input rate, DO concentration decreases. When DO losses exceed production or input over a prolonged enough period of time, hypoxia ((<2-3 mg/L) or anoxia can develop. Persistent hypoxia or anoxia causes stress or death in aquatic organism populations, or for organisms that can escape a hypoxic or anoxic area, the loss of habitat. In addition, sulfide, which is toxic to aquatic organisms and causes odor problems, escapes from sediments under low oxygen conditions. Low dissolved oxygen is a common aquatic ecosystem response to elevated organic

  15. Determining Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Systematics in Brines at Elevated p/T Conditions to Enhance Monitoring of CO2 Induced Processes in Carbon Storage Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, V.; Myrttinen, A.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) are a powerful tool for inferring carbon sources and mixing ratios of injected and baseline CO2 in storage reservoirs. Furthermore, CO2 releasing and consuming processes can be deduced if the isotopic compositions of end-members are known. At low CO2 pressures (pCO2), oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of CO2 usually assume the δ18O of the water plus a temperature-dependent isotope fractionation factor. However, at very high CO2 pressures as they occur in CO2 storage reservoirs, the δ18O of the injected CO2 may in fact change the δ18O of the reservoir brine. Hence, changing δ18O of brine constitutes an additional tracer for reservoir-internal carbon dynamics and allows the determination of the amount of free phase CO2 present in the reservoir (Johnson et al. 2011). Further systematic research to quantify carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation between the involved inorganic carbon species (CO2, H2CO3, HCO3-, CO32-, carbonate minerals) and kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects during gas-water-rock interactions is necessary because p/T conditions and salinities in CO2 storage reservoirs may exceed the boundary conditions of typical environmental isotope applications, thereby limiting the accuracy of stable isotope monitoring approaches in deep saline formations (Becker et al. 2011). In doing so, it is crucial to compare isotopic patterns observed in laboratory experiments with artificial brines to similar experiments with original fluids from representative field sites to account for reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with minor brine components. In the CO2ISO-LABEL project, funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research, multiple series of laboratory experiments are conducted to determine the influence of pressure, temperature and brine composition on the δ13C of DIC and the δ18O of brines in water-CO2-rock reactions with special focus placed on kinetics and stable oxygen and carbon isotope fractionation

  16. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  17. Process for the synthesis of symmetric and unsymmetric oxygen bridged dimers of boron subphthalocyanines (μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2s).

    PubMed

    Dang, Jeremy D; Fulford, Mabel V; Kamino, Brett A; Paton, Andrew S; Bender, Timothy P

    2015-03-07

    A process for the gram scale synthesis of the oxygen bridged dimer of boron subphthalocyanine, μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2, has been developed. During the development it was found that a wide range of reaction pathways under diverse conditions lead to μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 formation. However, obtaining μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 as the main reaction product in appreciable yields and its subsequent isolation were extremely challenging. The best balance of purity, yield and conversion was achieved with a time controlled reaction of an equimolar reaction of HO-BsubPc with Br-BsubPc in the presence of K3PO4. The purification involved sequentially Soxhlet extraction, Kauffman column chromatography and train sublimation. We have repeated the process and yields ranged from 27 to 30% of pure, doubly-sublimed μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2. This process also enabled the synthesis of unsymmetric μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2s by reaction of HO-BsubPc with Br-F12BsubPc, Cl-Cl6BsubPc and Cl-Cl12BsubPc. After synthesis the solution-state properties of the unsymmetric μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2s were investigated, and compared to the symmetric μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 and more broadly to other BsubPcs. The electronic properties of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 were found to differ from its unsymmetric counterparts, but were found to be similar to halo-BsubPcs. Furthermore, the photophysical properties of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2, both symmetric and unsymmetric, differed greatly from all other known BsubPcs.

  18. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and wound healing: the functional role of ROS and emerging ROS-modulating technologies for augmentation of the healing process.

    PubMed

    Dunnill, Christopher; Patton, Thomas; Brennan, James; Barrett, John; Dryden, Matthew; Cooke, Jonathan; Leaper, David; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos T

    2017-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of the normal wound-healing response. They act as secondary messengers to many immunocytes and non-lymphoid cells, which are involved in the repair process, and appear to be important in coordinating the recruitment of lymphoid cells to the wound site and effective tissue repair. ROS also possess the ability to regulate the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) at the wound site and the optimal perfusion of blood into the wound-healing area. ROS act in the host's defence through phagocytes that induce an ROS burst onto the pathogens present in wounds, leading to their destruction, and during this period, excess ROS leakage into the surrounding environment has further bacteriostatic effects. In light of these important roles of ROS in wound healing and the continued quest for therapeutic strategies to treat wounds in general and chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous and arterial leg ulcers and pressure ulcers in particular, the manipulation of ROS represents a promising avenue for improving wound-healing responses when they are stalled. This article presents a review of the evidence supporting the critical role of ROS in wound healing and infection control at the wound site, and some of the new emerging concepts associated with ROS modulation and its potential in improving wound healing are discussed.

  19. The observation research of the differences in cell death and reactive oxygen species in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, HuaBin; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Objective: To observe the differences of cell death and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), it will be of great importance to research the role of plant disease resistance and defense response. Methods: Using WT, AtrbohD and AtrbohF mutant as experimental materials, we discuss the impact of cell death and ROS on the leaves of Arabidopsis infected with avirulent Pst DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), observed by spectral analysis and visualized by DAB and trypan blue stain. Results: When infected with avirulent Pst DC3000, both WT and AtrbohF mutant line behaved resistance that exhibited burst of ROS and HR occur, limit senescence and pathogen induced chlorotic cell death. Paradoxically, AtrbohD mutant behaved susceptible characters that exhibited a small quantity of ROS accumulated and enhanced cell death. Conclusion: After infection of Arabidopsis with avirulent Pst DC3000, WT exhibited more ROS accumulation than AtrbohF, and AtrbohD eliminated the majority of total ROS production. Although both WT and AtrbohF mutant exhibited HR occur, enhanced cell death in AtrbohD mutant.

  20. Enhanced removal of chemical oxygen demand, nitrogen and phosphorus using the ameliorative anoxic/anaerobic/oxic process and micro-electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, K Q; Gao, J Q; Wang, Z B; Zhang, R Q; Zhang, Z Y; Sugiura, N

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic wastewater was treated using a novel system integrating the reversed anoxic/anaerobic/oxic (RAAO) process, a micro-electrolysis (ME) bed and complex biological media. The system showed superior chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) removal rates. Performance of the system was optimised by considering the influences of three major controlling factors, namely, hydraulic retention time (HRT), organic loading rate (OLR) and mixed liquor recirculation (MLR). TP removal efficiencies were 69, 87, 87 and 83% under the HRTs of 4, 8, 12 and 16 h. In contrast, HRT had negligible effects on the COD and TN removal efficiencies. COD, TN and TP removal efficiencies from synthetic wastewater were 95, 63 and 87%, respectively, at an OLR of 1.9 g/(L·d). The concentrations of COD, TN and TP in the effluent were less than 50, 15 and 1 mg/L, respectively, at the controlled MLR range of 75-100%. In this system, organics, TN and TP were primarily removed from anoxic tank regardless of the operational conditions.

  1. Influence of wastewater type on the impact generated by TiO2 nanoparticles on the oxygen uptake rate in activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Avilés, Pabel; Camarillo Piñas, Nayeli; Ida, Junichi; Cuevas-Rodríguez, Germán

    2017-04-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of wastewater have a relationship with the stability of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs). This in turn has an effect on the toxicity of TiO2 NPs in microorganisms. In this work, the effect of TiO2 NPs on activated sludge process was evaluated using three different types of wastewater: synthetic, raw, and filtered. The results showed that aggregate size of TiO2 NPs and their specific adsorption of substrates were influenced by the type of substrates and the presence of suspended solids in the wastewater. It was also shown that TiO2 NPs in raw wastewater severely inhibited oxygen uptake by microorganisms as compared to uptake in synthetic or filtered wastewater. The attachment of TiO2 NP aggregates on cell membranes was observed for all types of wastewater. However, the internalization of TiO2 NPs by microorganisms was observed only for raw and filtered wastewater. These results indicate that the effects caused by TiO2 NPs on activated sludge were different depending on the wastewater used for the experiment.

  2. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO₃-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Spassova, Maria A; Miller, David J; Nikolov, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events.

  3. Economic process to co-produce poly(ε-l-lysine) and poly(l-diaminopropionic acid) by a pH and dissolved oxygen control strategy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaoxian; Feng, Xiaohai; Sun, Zhuzhen; Cao, Changhong; Li, Sha; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Zongqi; Bo, Fangfang; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study tended to apply biorefinery of indigenous microbes to the fermentation of target-product generation through a novel control strategy. A novel strategy for co-producing two valuable homopoly(amino acid)s, poly(ε-l-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(l-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP), was developed by controlling pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations in Streptomyces albulus PD-1 fermentation. The production of ε-PL and PDAP got 29.4 and 9.6gL(-1), respectively, via fed-batch cultivation in a 5L bioreactor. What is more, the highest production yield (21.8%) of similar production systems was achieved by using this novel strategy. To consider the economic-feasibility, large-scale production in a 1t fermentor was also implemented, which would increase the gross profit of 54,243.5USD from one fed-batch bioprocess. This type of fermentation, which produces multiple commercial products from a unified process is attractive, because it will improve the utilization rate of raw materials, enhance production value and enrich product variety.

  4. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of oxygen vacancy ordering and dislocation annihilation in undoped and Sm-doped CeO2 ceramics during redox processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yong; Chen, Yu; Pradel, Ken C.; Liu, Meilin; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Ceria (CeO2) based ceramics have been widely used for many applications due to their unique ionic, electronic, and catalytic properties. Here, we report our findings in investigating into the redox processes of undoped and Sm-doped CeO2 ceramics stimulated by high-energy electron beam irradiation within a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The reduced structure with oxygen vacancy ordering has been identified as the CeO1.68 (C-Ce2O3+δ) phase via high-resolution TEM. The reduction of Ce4+ to Ce3+ has been monitored by electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The decreased electronic conductivity of the Sm-doped CeO2 (Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9, SDC) is revealed by electron holography, as positive electrostatic charges accumulated at the surfaces of SDC grains under electron beam irradiation, but not at CeO2 grains. The formation of the reduced CeO1.68 domains corresponds to lattice expansion compared to the CeO2 matrix. Therefore, the growth of CeO1.68 nuclei builds up strain inside the matrix, causing annihilation of dislocations inside the grains. By using in-situ high-resolution TEM and a fast OneView camera recording system, we investigated dislocation motion inside both CeO2 and SDC grains under electron beam irradiation. The dislocations prefer to dissociate into Shockley partials bounded by stacking faults. Then, the partials can easily glide in the {111} planes to reach the grain surfaces. Even the Lomer-Cottrell lock can be swept away by the phase change induced strain field. Our results revealed the high mobility of dislocations inside CeO2 and SDC grains during their respective redox processes.

  5. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  6. The natural history of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dole, M

    1965-09-01

    The nuclear reactions occurring in the cores of stars which are believed to produce the element oxygen are first described. Evidence for the absence of free oxygen in the early atmosphere of the earth is reviewed. Mechanisms of creation of atmospheric oxygen by photochemical processes are then discussed in detail. Uncertainty regarding the rate of diffusion of water vapor through the cold trap at 70 km altitude in calculating the rate of the photochemical production of oxygen is avoided by using data for the concentration of hydrogen atoms at 90 km obtained from the Meinel OH absorption bands. It is estimated that the present atmospheric oxygen content could have been produced five to ten times during the earth's history. It is shown that the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen is not that of photosynthetic oxygen. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes by organic respiration and oxidation occurs in a direction to enhance the O(18) content of the atmosphere and compensates for the O(18) dilution resulting from photosynthetic oxygen. Thus, an oxygen isotope cycle exists in nature.

  7. The Natural History of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dole, Malcolm

    1965-01-01

    The nuclear reactions occurring in the cores of stars which are believed to produce the element oxygen are first described. Evidence for the absence of free oxygen in the early atmosphere of the earth is reviewed. Mechanisms of creation of atmospheric oxygen by photochemical processes are then discussed in detail. Uncertainty regarding the rate of diffusion of water vapor through the cold trap at 70 km altitude in calculating the rate of the photochemical production of oxygen is avoided by using data for the concentration of hydrogen atoms at 90 km obtained from the Meinel OH absorption bands. It is estimated that the present atmospheric oxygen content could have been produced five to ten times during the earth's history. It is shown that the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen is not that of photosynthetic oxygen. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes by organic respiration and oxidation occurs in a direction to enhance the O18 content of the atmosphere and compensates for the O18 dilution resulting from photosynthetic oxygen. Thus, an oxygen isotope cycle exists in nature. PMID:5859927

  8. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  9. Novel nanostructured oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Alan James

    New government regulations and industry requirements for medical oxygen sensors require the development of alternate materials and process optimization of primary sensor components. Current oxygen sensors are not compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive. This work focused on two areas. First, was finding suitable readily available materials for the sensor anodes. Second was optimizing the processing of the sensor cathode membrane for reduced delamination. Oxygen sensors were made using tin (Sn) and bismuth (Bi) electrodes, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) electrolytes with platinum (Pt) and gold (Au) reference electrodes. Bi electrodes were fabricated by casting and pressing processes. Electrochemical characterization of the Sn and Bi electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and sensing characterization per BSEN ISO 21647:2009 at various oxygen percentages, 0%, 20.9% and 100% oxygen levels with an automated test apparatus. The Sn anode with both electrolyte solutions showed good oxygen sensing properties and performance in a sensor. This system shows promise for replacement of Pb electrodes as required by the RoHS Directive. The Bi anode with Au cathode in both KOH and CH3COOH electrolytes showed acceptable performance and oxygen sensing properties. The Bi anodes fabricated by separate manufacturing methods demonstrated effectiveness for use in medical oxygen sensors. Gold thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Flouroethylene Polymer (FEP) films. The FEP substrate temperature ranged from -77°C to 50°C. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and 4-point resistivity characterized the effects of substrate temperature to Au thin film particle size. XRD peak broadening and resistivity measurements showed a strong correlation of particle size to FEP substrate temperature. Particle size at 50°C was 594A and the -77°C particle size was 2.4 x 103A. Substrate

  10. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 1 of 6: Optical Sensors and Controls for Improved Basic Oxygen Furnace Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Allendorf; David Ottesen; Donald Hardesty

    2002-01-31

    The development of an optical sensor for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) off-gas composition and temperature in this Advanced Process Control project has been a laboratory spectroscopic method evolve into a pre-commercialization prototype sensor system. The sensor simultaneously detects an infrared tunable diode laser ITDL beam transmitted through the process off-gas directly above the furnace mouth, and the infrared greybody emission from the particulate-laden off-gas stream. Following developmental laboratory and field-testing, the sensor prototype was successfully tested in four long-term field trials at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore, MD> The resulting optical data were analyzed and reveal correlations with four important process variables: (1) bath turndown temperature; (2) carbon monoxide post-combustion control; (2) bath carbon concentration; and (4) furnace slopping behavior. The optical sensor measurement of the off-gas temperature is modestly correlated with bath turndown temperature. A detailed regression analysis of over 200 heats suggests that a dynamic control level of +25 Degree F can be attained with a stand-alone laser-based optical sensor. The ability to track off-gas temperatures to control post-combustion lance practice is also demonstrated, and may be of great use in optimizing post-combustion efficiency in electric furnace steelmaking operations. In addition to the laser-based absorption spectroscopy data collected by this sensor, a concurrent signal generated by greybody emission from the particle-laden off-gas was collected and analyzed. A detailed regression analysis shows an excellent correlation of a single variable with final bath turndown carbon concentration. Extended field trials in 1998 and early 1999 show a response range from below 0.03% to a least 0.15% carbon concentration with a precision of +0.0007%. Finally, a strong correlation between prolonged drops in the off-gas emission signal and furnace slopping events

  11. Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1998-01-01

    A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

  12. Oxygen Extraction from Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen, whether used as part of rocket bipropellant or for astronaut life support, is a key consumable for space exploration and commercialization. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) has been proposed many times as a method for making space exploration more cost effective and sustainable. On planetary and asteroid surfaces the presence of minerals in the regolith that contain oxygen is very common, making them a potential oxygen resource. The majority of research and development for oxygen extraction from minerals has been for lunar regolith although this work would generally be applicable to regolith at other locations in space. This presentation will briefly survey the major methods investigated for oxygen extraction from regolith with a focus on the current status of those methods and possible future development pathways. The major oxygen production methods are (1) extraction from lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide, (2) carbothermal reduction of iron oxides and silicates with methane, and (3) molten regolith electrolysis (MRE) of silicates. Methods (1) and (2) have also been investigated in a two-step process using CO reduction and carbon deposition followed by carbothermal reduction. All three processes have byproducts that could also be used as resources. Hydrogen or carbon monoxide reduction produce iron metal in small amounts that could potentially be used as construction material. Carbothermal reduction also makes iron metal along with silicon metal and a glass with possible applications. MRE produces iron, silicon, aluminum, titanium, and glass, with higher silicon yields than carbothermal reduction. On Mars and possibly on some moons and asteroids, water is present in the form of mineral hydrates, hydroxyl (-OH) groups on minerals, andor water adsorbed on mineral surfaces. Heating of the minerals can liberate the water which can be electrolyzed to provide a source of oxygen as well. The chemistry of these processes, some key

  13. Mechanisms of Oxidation with Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Henry

    1965-01-01

    Several topics are dealt with in discussing the reactions of molecular oxygen, but a common goal is pursued in each: to try to understand the reactions in terms of the fundamental properties of the oxygen molecule, and of the other reactants. The paper first describes the electronic structure of oxygen and of two low-lying electronically excited states. Concern with the low-lying electronically excited states is no longer the sole property of spectroscopists; recently, evidence has been presented for the participation of such activated molecules in chemical reactions. The chemistry of oxygen is dominated by the fact that the molecule in the ground state has two unpaired electrons, whereas the products of oxidation in many important reactions have zero spin. In its reactions with transition metal ions the restrictions imposed by the spin state of the oxygen molecule are easily circumvented. A number of reactions of oxygen with metal ions have been studied in considerable detail; conclusions on basic aspects of the reaction mechanism are outlined. Among the most interesting reactions of oxygen are those in which it is reversibly absorbed by reducing agents. Reversible absorption to form a peroxide in the bound state is possible; some of the conditions which must be fulfilled by a reducing system to qualify as storing oxygen in this way are reasonably well understood and are here enunciated. Little has been done on the formation of oxygen from water; some factors involved in this process are discussed. PMID:5859925

  14. Oxygenated fraction and mass of organic aerosol from direct emission and atmospheric processing measured on the R/V Ronald Brown during TEXAQS/GoMACCS 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Takahama, S.; Liu, S.; Hawkins, L. N.; Covert, D. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2009-04-01

    masses. Organosulfate groups were found in GAM and SAM, accounting for 1% and 3% of OM, respectively. Two thirds of the OM and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) measured could be attributed to oil and wood combustion sources on the basis of mild or strong correlations to coemitted, nonvolatile trace metals, with the remaining one third being associated with atmospherically processed organic aerosol. The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) fraction (normalized by total condensation nuclei) had weak correlations to the alcohol and amine group fractions and mild correlation with O/C, also varying inversely with alkane group fraction. The chemical components that influenced f(RH) were sulfate, organic, and nitrate fraction, but this contrast is consistent with the size-distribution dependence of CCN counters and nephelometers.

  15. A comparative study of the processes of generation of singlet oxygen upon irradiation of aqueous preparations on the basis of chlorin e6 and coproporphyrin III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, I. V.; Belousova, I. M.; Gorelov, S. I.; Dobrun, M. V.; Kiselev, V. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Kris'ko, A. V.; Kris'ko, T. K.

    2017-02-01

    The photosensitizing ability of an agent based on chlorin e6 (Photoditazin), which is used for photodynamic diagnosis and therapy, is compared with that of a new preparation on the basis of coproporphyrin III in the environment of a phosphate buffer and a simulated biological environment (albumin solution). The efficiency of singlet-oxygen production was estimated by EPR spectroscopy and spectroscopy in the UV and visible ranges with the use of "chemical traps" of singlet oxygen. By irradiating drugs with LED emission centered at λmax = 520 nm, we determined the quantum yield of singlet-oxygen production in a buffer solution; the obtained values are 0.60 and 0.37 for chlorine and coproporphyrin, respectively. The steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen upon irradiation of solutions of the studied photosensitizers with concentrations of 12-43 μM and the density of radiation power within the 6-96 W/cm2 region was found to be in the region of 1010-1011 molecules/cm3. It is shown that the introduction into the solution of egg albumin (0.1%) reduces the sensitizing properties of the two drugs by two to three times, while the efficiencies of the preparations with respect to singlet-oxygen production become almost identical (0.19 and 0.17).

  16. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. Technical progress achieved during the first two months of the program is summarized.

  17. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. The results of the checkout, shakedown, and initial parametric tests are summarized.

  18. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  19. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  20. Oxygen detection using evanescent fields

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Cao, Weenqing

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus and method for the detection of oxygen using optical fiber based evanescent light absorption. Methylene blue was immobilized using a sol-gel process on a portion of the exterior surface of an optical fiber for which the cladding has been removed, thereby forming an optical oxygen sensor. When light is directed through the optical fiber, transmitted light intensity varies as a result of changes in the absorption of evanescent light by the methylene blue in response to the oxygen concentration to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor was found to have a linear response to oxygen concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale within the oxygen concentration range between 0.6% and 20.9%, a response time and a recovery time of about 3 s, ant to exhibit good reversibility and repeatability. An increase in temperature from 21.degree. C. to 35.degree. C. does not affect the net absorption of the sensor.

  1. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.

    2012-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these oxygenated compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing.

  2. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these "oxygenated" compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing

  3. Oxygen saturation and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jan; Berggren, Peter; Grönkvist, Mikael; Magnusson, Staffan; Svensson, Erland

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to investigate how inhalation of 100% oxygen affected cognitive performance. A test battery was developed that was designed to capture different aspects of cognitive processes, i.e., perception, attention, working memory, long-term memory and prospective memory. All tests were verbally based, thus reducing cognitive spatial processes to a minimum. In experiment 1, 48 participants volunteered in a complete factorial within-participant design. Two different conditions for type of gas were used, inhalation of 100% oxygen and inhalation of breathing air (approximately 21% oxygen balanced with nitrogen). The inhalation was performed during the 1 min prior to starting each separate test. The instructions for each test were given during the inhalation period. All participants inhaled oxygen or breathing air through a Swedish military pilot mask. Physiological (heartbeats per minute and blood oxygen saturation level) reactions were recorded continuously throughout the session. Participants also completed a mood-state questionnaire before and after the test battery. The results revealed that cognitive performance were not affected by inhalation. Hence, this experiment does not replicate previous findings that suggest that inhalation of 100% oxygen could increase cognitive performance. Another experiment was performed to control for methodological issues. Experiment 2 revealed exactly the same pattern, i.e., inhalation of oxygen did not affect cognitive functioning.

  4. Treatment of real coal gasification wastewater using a novel integrated system of anoxic hybrid two stage aerobic processes: performance and the role of pure oxygen microbubble.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Shan, Shengdao

    2016-06-01

    A novel integrated system of anoxic-pure oxygen microbubble-activated sludge reactor-moving bed biofilm reactor was employed in treatment of real coal gasification wastewater. The results showed the integrated system had efficient performance of pollutants removal in short hydraulic retention time. While pure oxygen microbubble with the flow rate of 1.5 L/h and NaHCO3 dosage ratio of 2:1 (amount NaHCO3 to NH4 (+)-N ratio, mol: mol) were used, the removal efficiencies of COD, total phenols (TPh) and NH4 (+)-N reached 90, 95, and 95 %, respectively, with the influent loading rates of 3.4 kg COD/(m(3) d), 0.81 kg TPh/(m(3) d), and 0.28 kg NH4 (+)-N/(m(3) d). With the recycle ratio of 300 %, the concentrations of NO2 (-)-N and NO3 (-)-N in effluent decreased to 12 and 59 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile, pure oxygen microbubble significantly improved the enzymatic activities and affected the effluent organic compositions and reduced the foam expansion. Thus, the novel integrated system with efficient, stable, and economical advantages was suitable for engineering application.

  5. Home Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen is rarely delivered in the older large, steel gas cylinders any longer since frequent and costly ... just like the compressed oxygen in the older steel cylinders. An important advantage of liquid oxygen is ...

  6. Changes of the surface structure of corn stalk in the cooking process with active oxygen and MgO-based solid alkali as a pretreatment of its biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chunsheng; Xie, Tujun; Lin, Lu; Zhuang, Junping; Liu, Ying; Shi, Jianbin; Yang, Qiulin

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a novel, efficient and environmentally friendly process for the cooking of corn stalk that uses active oxygen (O2 and H2O2) and a recoverable solid alkali (MgO). The structural changes on the surface of corn stalk before and after cooking were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The results showed that lignin and extractives were effectively removed, especially those on the surface of corn stalk. Additionally, the changes included becoming fibrillar, the exposure of cellulose and hemi-cellulose and the pitting corrosion on the surface, etc. The results also showed that the removal reaction is from outside to inside, but the main reaction is possibly on the surface. Furthermore, the results of active oxygen cooking with a solid alkali are compared with those of alkaline cooking in the paper.

  7. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The use of selective chemical reactions and carbon NMR spectroscopy in the speciation and quantification of oxygen functional groups in coal resids

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Cheng, C. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using phase-transfer methylation reactions for the derivatization of hydroxyl functionalities and single-electron transfer reactions to cleave ether groups in distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. [sup 13]C-NMR was used to analyze the reaction products. It was demonstrated that the techniques can be used to speciate and quantify about half of the oxygen in resids. The remaining half of the oxygen is presumed to be present as unreactive ethers, probably dibenzofurans. Hydroxyl concentrations were determined on five resid samples and ether cleavage reactions were conducted on three of those five. Further development of this general analytical strategy as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  8. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The use of selective chemical reactions and carbon NMR spectroscopy in the speciation and quantification of oxygen functional groups in coal resids

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Cheng, C.

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using phase-transfer methylation reactions for the derivatization of hydroxyl functionalities and single-electron transfer reactions to cleave ether groups in distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. {sup 13}C-NMR was used to analyze the reaction products. It was demonstrated that the techniques can be used to speciate and quantify about half of the oxygen in resids. The remaining half of the oxygen is presumed to be present as unreactive ethers, probably dibenzofurans. Hydroxyl concentrations were determined on five resid samples and ether cleavage reactions were conducted on three of those five. Further development of this general analytical strategy as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  9. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (<8 solar masses), and 18O coming primarily from high-mass stars (Prantzos et al., 1996). These differences in type of stellar source result in large observable variations in stellar isotopic abundances as functions of age, size, metallicity, and galactic location ( Prantzos

  10. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  11. Energy management study for lunar oxygen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazzolare, R. A.; Wong-Swanson, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Energy management opportunities in the process of hydrogen reduction of ilmenite for lunar oxygen production are being investigated. An optimal energy system to supply the power requirements for the process will be determined.

  12. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  13. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Gregg L.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology. PMID:26328879

  14. [Use of hyperbaric oxygenation for wound management].

    PubMed

    Berner, Juan Enrique; Vidal, Pedro; Will, Patrick; Castillo, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygenation consists in exposing patients to increased gas pressures while inhaling pure oxygen. It involves the use of hyperbaric chambers that can double or triple gas pressure inside them. Hyperbaric oxygenation may be useful in different clinical situations, but mostly for the treatment of decompression syndrome. In the last decades, it has been used for the management of different kinds of wounds. Hyperbaric oxygenation not only increases the delivery of oxygen to damaged tissues, but also stimulates angiogenesis, collagen synthesis, stem cell migration and local immune response. Clinical trials that have addressed the use of hyperbaric oxygenation are difficult to compare due to their heterogeneity in terms of experimental design, kind of injuries involved and assessment of outcome. Even though, most studies support the concept that hyperbaric oxygenation accelerates the healing process.

  15. Preparation of perovskite-type oxides of cobalt by the malic acid aided process and their electrocatalytic surface properties in relation to oxygen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, S.K.; Chartier, P.; Singh, R.N. . Electrochemical Lab.)

    1995-01-01

    The electrocatalytic properties of perovskite-type cobalt oxides (La[sub 1[minus]x]Sr[sub x]CoO[sub 3], where x = 0, 0.2, 0.4), in the form of thin films on conductive supports, were studied by cyclic voltammetry and Tafel polarization techniques. The films had conductive and satisfactory adherent properties. The oxides were synthesized by a low temperature malic acid aided method. The cyclic voltammetry showed a pair of redox peaks prior to the onset of oxygen evolution on the oxide film with nickel support, while similar peaks were absent in the same oxide film on Pt and Ti. The anodic polarization studies indicated two Tafel slopes: 57 to 64 mV/decade at low and 100 to 130 mV/decade at high overpotentials, and first-order kinetics with respect to OH[sup [minus

  16. [How did the earth's oxygen atmosphere originate?].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, G

    2004-09-01

    The planet earth did not carry an oxygen atmosphere from the beginning. Though oxygen could arise from radiation mediated water splitting, these processes were not efficient enough to create a global gas atmosphere. Oxygen in the latter is a product of the photosynthetic activity of early green organisms. Only after biological mass-formation of oxygen the UV-protective ozone layer could develop, then enabeling life to move from water onto land. This took billions of years. The basics of the processes of biological oxygen liberation and utilization are described in the following as well as the importance of their steady state equilibrium. Also a hint is given to oxygen as a toxic compound though being a chemical prerequisite for aerobic life on earth.

  17. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  18. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  19. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  20. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  1. Phase equilibria in the YBCuO system and melt processing of Ag clad Y 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- x tapes at reduced oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Bravman, J. C.; Beyers, R. B.

    1995-02-01

    We have undertaken phase-stability studies of Y 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- x(+Ag) and BaCu 2O 2 (+Ag) over the temperature range 780°C-950°C and oxygen partial pressure range 1.0 × 10 -6-2.0 × 10 -1 atm. Ag was found to have no effect on the thermodynamic stability of either phase. Partial melting of YBCO was found at temperatures as low as 800°C ± 10°C, with significant peritectic melting at temperatures as low as 900°C ± 10°C. These thermochemical studies have enabled us to determine the optimum conditions for reduced temperature and pressure (RTP) processing of Ag clad Y 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- x pellets and tapes. The classic domain structure with strong texturing over short lengths was produced in samples melt processed by controlling oxygen partial pressure at a fixed temperature. The RTP method has the advantage that the second phase Y 2BaCuO 5 particle size can be controlled. Moreover, the technique offers the promise of long lengths of flexible Y 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- x tapes with high current carrying capability.

  2. Mechanical and photo-fragmentation processes for nanonization of melanin to improve its efficacy in protecting cells from reactive oxygen species stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Sih-Min; Liu, Jhong-Han; Hsu, Hsiang-Wei; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2015-02-01

    It has been well established ex vivo that melanin has the ability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), besides other functions. Therefore, we propose to utilize nanonized melanin as medication against acute oxidative stress. For this purpose, we developed and characterized two techniques based on mechanical stir and photo-fragmentation using femtosecond laser pulses, respectively, for disintegration of suspended melanin powder to produce nanometer-sized and water-dispersible melanin. This resolves a major obstacle in the medical and industrial applications of melanin. The viabilities of cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to exogenous H2O2 stress and treated with various conditions of melanin and irradiation were compared. It was found that melanin could be nanonized very effectively with the techniques, and nanonized melanin exhibited a much stronger effect than unprocessed melanin on raising the viability of cultured RPE cells under acute ROS stress. The effect was even more prominent without simultaneous light irradiation, promising for effective in vivo application to the whole body.

  3. Mechanical and photo-fragmentation processes for nanonization of melanin to improve its efficacy in protecting cells from reactive oxygen species stress

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Sih-Min; Liu, Jhong-Han; Hsu, Hsiang-Wei; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2015-02-14

    It has been well established ex vivo that melanin has the ability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), besides other functions. Therefore, we propose to utilize nanonized melanin as medication against acute oxidative stress. For this purpose, we developed and characterized two techniques based on mechanical stir and photo-fragmentation using femtosecond laser pulses, respectively, for disintegration of suspended melanin powder to produce nanometer-sized and water-dispersible melanin. This resolves a major obstacle in the medical and industrial applications of melanin. The viabilities of cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress and treated with various conditions of melanin and irradiation were compared. It was found that melanin could be nanonized very effectively with the techniques, and nanonized melanin exhibited a much stronger effect than unprocessed melanin on raising the viability of cultured RPE cells under acute ROS stress. The effect was even more prominent without simultaneous light irradiation, promising for effective in vivo application to the whole body.

  4. Factors controlling oxygen utilization.

    PubMed

    Biaglow, John; Dewhirst, Mark; Leeper, Dennis; Burd, Randy; Tuttle, Steve

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate, theoretically, that oxygen diffusion distance is related to the metabolic rate of tumors (QO2) as well as the oxygen tension. The difference in QO2 rate between tumors can vary by as much as 80-fold. Inhibition of oxygen utilization by glucose or chemical inhibitors can improve the diffusion distance. Combining respiratory inhibitors with increased availability of oxygen will further improve the oxygen diffusion distance for all tumors. A simple means for inhibiting oxygen consumption is the use of glucose (the Crabtree effect). The inhibition of tumor oxygen utilization by glucose occurs in R323OAc mammary carcinoma and 9L glioma cells. However, stimulation of oxygen consumption is observed with glucose in the Q7 hepatoma cell line. MIBG, a known inhibitor of oxygen utilization, blocks oxygen consumption in 9L, but is weakly inhibitory with the Q7. Q7 tumor cells demonstrate an anomalous behavior of glucose and MIBG on oxygen consumption. Our results clearly demonstrate the necessity for comparing effects of different agents on different tumor cells. Generalizations cannot be made with respect to the choice of inhibitor for in vivo use. Our work shows that oxygen consumption also can be inhibited with malonate and chlorosuccinate. These substrates may be effective in vivo, where glucose is low and glutamine is the major substrate. Our results indicate that information about individual tumor substrate-linked metabolic controls may be necessary before attempting to inhibit oxygen utilization in vivo for therapeutic benefit.

  5. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-12-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  6. Glovebox oxygen monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, R.

    1993-08-01

    This system is located in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site of the US Department of Energy. The basic system consists of an oxygen sensor module located inside the glovebox and a wall mounted panel located outside the glovebox that contains an electronics package that displays the oxygen level, displays alarms, and sends signals to a facility Distributed Control System (DCS). RTF is a new facility that will be used primarily to load and unload tritium reservoirs, and recycle the tritium for use in existing or new reservoirs. Tritium, an oderless, colorless, gas is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen that is used in modern thermonuclear weapons. Once on-line, RTF will replace other tritium facilities that have been in existence since the 1950`s. Since the entire process at RTF is contained in nitrogen blanketed gloveboxes and features have been provided to recapture fugitive tritium, environmental releases and worker exposure to tritium will be reduced compared to the old facilities.

  7. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  8. Workshop on Oxygen in Asteroids and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Constraints on the detection of solar nebula's oxidation state through asteroid observation. Oxidation/Reduction Processes in Primitive Achondrites. Low-Temperature Chemical Processing on Asteroids. On the Formation Location of Asteroids and Meteorites. The Spectral Properties of Angritic Basalts. Correlation Between Chemical and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions in Chondrites. Effect of In-Situ Aqueous Alteration on Thermal Model Heat Budgets. Oxidation-Reduction in Meteorites: The Case of High-Ni Irons. Ureilite Atmospherics: Coming up for Air on a Parent Body. High Temperature Effects Including Oxygen Fugacity, in Pre-Planetary and Planetary Meteorites and Asteroids. Oxygen Isotopic Variation of Asteroidal Materials. High-Temperature Chemical Processing on Asteroids: An Oxygen Isotope Perspective. Oxygen Isotopes and Origin of Opaque Assemblages from the Ningqiang Carbonaceous Chondrite. Water Distribution in the Asteroid Belt. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: V Systematics in Planetary Pyroxenes and fo 2 Estimates for Basalts from Vesta.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002375.htm Hyperbaric oxygen therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase ...

  10. Pilot Plant Makes Oxygen Difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F.; Lawton, Emil A.

    1989-01-01

    Pilot plant makes oxygen difluoride highly-energetic, space-storable oxidizer not made commercially. Designed to handle reactants, product, and byproduct, most of which highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic. Oxygen difluoride evolves continuously from reactor containing potassium hydroxide in water at 10 degree C. Collection tanks alternated; one filled while other drained to storage cylinder. Excess OF2 and F2 dissipated in combustion of charcoal in burn barrel. Toxic byproduct, potassium fluoride, reacted with calcium hydroxide to form nontoxic calcium fluoride and to regenerate potassium hydroxide. Equipment processes toxic, difficult-to-make substance efficiently and safely.

  11. The distribution pattern of the red tide and the process of oxygen depletion in the coastal brackish Lake Nakaumi, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, K.; Miyagi, H.; Katsuki, K.; Takata, H.; Dettman, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    Lake Nakaumi is a coastal brackish water lake formed by the Yumigahama peninsula. The water mass of Lake Nakaumi has two-layer structures. The main halocline divided to Nakaumi Surface Water (NSW) of the intermediate saline water (around 15psu) and Nakaumi Bottom Water (NBW) of the high saline water (about 30psu). Recently, the occurrence of red tide bloom is frequently observed in the lake. The main purpose of this study is to understand the influence of the red tide on the lake environment (The especially, dissolved oxygen in NBW). In this study, we investigated the water quality during April to June 2006 when the lake has experienced extensive occurrence of red tide, and we also monitored the chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) distribution by in vivo fluorometric method. ? Red tide blooms were observed almost in the entire area of Lake Nakaumi in spring, 2006. The water surface showed reddish brown color due to the occurrence of red tide. In the composition of the phytoplankton, Prorocentrum minimum was the dominant species during the red tide. The composition of the phytoplankton rapidly changed during May 27 to 30, and it shifts to the community in which Cyanophyceae is dominant. During that time, the Chl-a concentration rapidly decreased. Based on the vertical distribution of the Chl-a concentration, the red tide at our observation period was divided to 3 phases. In Phase I (March 18th to April 22nd), the Chl-a concentration was relatively low, and homogenous distribution in NSW. In Phase II (April 22nd to May 10th), the Chl-a concentration shows high value, and the peak of Chl-a concentration was present at small-scale and main halocline in the whole water column. In Phase III (May 10th to May 27th), the peak concentrations of Chl-a were distributed around small-scale halocline in NSW and main halocline. In NBW, the Chl-a concentration was low. In Phase I, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of NBW shows 5~7mg/l. During Phase II, DO in NBW decreased. The decreasing

  12. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  13. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  14. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  15. Corrosion of copper in oxygen-deficient groundwater with and without deep bedrock micro-organisms: Characterisation of microbial communities and surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen-Saarivirta, E.; Rajala, P.; Bomberg, M.; Carpén, L.

    2017-02-01

    Copper specimens were exposed to oxygen-deficient artificial groundwater in the presence and absence of micro-organisms enriched from the deep bedrock of the planned nuclear waste repository site at Olkiluoto island on the western coast of Finland. During the exposure periods of 4 and 10 months, the copper specimens were subjected to electrochemical measurements. The biofilm developed on the specimens and the water used in the exposures were subjected to microbiological analyses. Changes in the water chemistry were also determined and surfaces of the copper specimens were characterized with respect to the morphology and composition of the formed corrosion products. The results showed that under biotic conditions, redox of the water and open circuit potential (OCP) of the copper specimens were generally negative and resulted in the build-up of a copper sulphide, Cu2S, layer due to the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) that were included in the system. In the 4-month test, the electrochemical behaviour of the specimens changed during the exposure and alphaproteobactria Rhizobiales were the dominant bacterial group in the biofilm where the highest corrosion rate was observed. In the 10-month test, however, deltaproteobacteria SRB flourished and the initial electrochemical behaviour and the low corrosion rate of the copper were retained until the end of the test period. Under abiotic conditions, the positive water redox potential and specimen OCP correlated with the formation of copper oxide, Cu2O. Furthermore, in the absence of SRB, Cu2O provided slightly inferior protection against corrosion compared to that by Cu2S in the presence of SRB. The obtained results show that the presence of microorganisms may enhance the passivity of copper. In addition, the identification of key microbial species, such as SRB thriving on copper for long time periods, is important for successful prediction of the behaviour of copper.

  16. Oxygen electrode in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, B.B.; White, R.E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Srinivasan, S; Appleby, A.J. . Center for Electrochemical Systems and Hydrogen Research)

    1990-01-01

    During this quarter, impedance data were analyzed for oxygen reduction process in molten carbonate electrolyte and a manuscript, Impedance Analysis for Oxygen Reduction in a Lithium Carbonate Melt: Effects of Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide and Temperature,'' was prepared which will be submitted to Journal of the Electrochemical Society for publication. 31 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Oxygen boost pump study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An oxygen boost pump is described which can be used to charge the high pressure oxygen tank in the extravehicular activity equipment from spacecraft supply. The only interface with the spacecraft is the +06 6.205 Pa supply line. The breadboard study results and oxygen tank survey are summarized and the results of the flight-type prototype design and analysis are presented.

  18. Indicators: Dissolved Oxygen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is the amount of oxygen that is present in water. It is an important measure of water quality as it indicates a water body's ability to support aquatic life. Water bodies receive oxygen from the atmosphere and from aquatic plants.

  19. Hypoxemia (Low Blood Oxygen)

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) By Mayo Clinic Staff Hypoxemia is a below-normal level of oxygen in your blood, specifically in the arteries. Hypoxemia ... of breath. Hypoxemia is determined by measuring the oxygen level in a blood sample taken from an ...

  20. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  1. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  2. The Role of Oxygen during Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chuanyong; Saless, Neema; Wang, Xiaodong; Sinha, Arjun; Decker, Sebastian; Kazakia, Galateia; Hou, Huagang; Williams, Benjamin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen affects the activity of multiple skeletogenic cells and is involved in many processes that are important for fracture healing. However, the role of oxygen in fracture healing has not been fully studied. Here we systematically examine the effects of oxygen tension on fracture healing and test the ability of hyperoxia to rescue healing defects in a mouse model of ischemic fracture healing. Mice with tibia fracture were housed in custom-built gas chambers and groups breathed a constant atmosphere of 13% oxygen (hypoxia), 21% oxygen (normoxia), or 50% oxygen (hyperoxia). The influx of inflammatory cells to the fracture site, stem cell differentiation, tissue vascularization, and fracture healing were analyzed. In addition, the efficacy of hyperoxia (50% breathing oxygen) as a treatment regimen for fracture nonunion was tested. Hypoxic animals had decreased tissue vascularity, decreased bone formation, and delayed callus remodeling. Hyperoxia increased tissue vascularization, altered fracture healing in un-complicated fractures, and improved bone repair in ischemia-induced delayed fracture union. However, neither hypoxia nor hyperoxia significantly altered chondrogenesis or osteogenesis during early stages of fracture healing, and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils was not affected by environmental oxygen after bone injury. In conclusion, our results indicate that environmental oxygen levels affect tissue vascularization and fracture healing, and that providing oxygen to patients with fractures accompanied by ischemia may be beneficial. PMID:23063782

  3. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  4. Oxygen diffusion barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, Jalaiah (Inventor); Clark, Ronald K. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method for coating a titanium panel or foil with aluminum and amorphous silicon to provide an oxygen barrier abrogating oxidation of the substrate metal is developed. The process is accomplished with known inexpensive procedures common in materials research laboratories, i.e., electron beam deposition and sputtering. The procedures are conductive to treating foil gage titanium and result in submicron layers which virtually add no weight to the titanium. There are no costly heating steps. The coatings blend with the substrate titanium until separate mechanical properties are subsumed by those of the substrate without cracking or spallation. This method appreciably increases the ability of titanium to mechanically perform in high thermal environments such as those witnessed on structures of space vehicles during re-entry

  5. A Survey of Alternative Oxygen Production Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.; Parrish, Clyde F.; Buttner, William J.; Surma, Jan M.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Utilization of the Martian atmosphere for the production of fuel and oxygen has been extensively studied. The baseline fuel production process is a Sabatier reactor, which produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The oxygen produced from the electrolysis of the water is only half of that needed for methane-based rocket propellant, and additional oxygen is needed for breathing air, fuel cells and other energy sources. Zirconia electrolysis cells for the direct reduction of CO2 are being developed as an alternative means of producing oxygen, but present many challenges for a large-scale oxygen production system. The very high operating temperatures and fragile nature of the cells coupled with fairly high operating voltages leave room for improvement. This paper will survey alternative oxygen production technologies, present data on operating characteristics, materials of construction, and some preliminary laboratory results on attempts to implement each.

  6. A survey of alternative oxygen production technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, Dale E.; Parrish, Clyde F.; Buttner, William J.; Surma, Jan M.

    2001-02-01

    Utilization of the Martian atmosphere for the production of fuel and oxygen has been extensively studied. The baseline fuel production process is a Sabatier reactor, which produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The oxygen produced from the electrolysis of the water is only half of that needed for methane-based rocket propellant, and additional oxygen is needed for breathing air, fuel cells and other energy sources. Zirconia electrolysis cells for the direct reduction of CO2 are being developed as an alternative means of producing oxygen, but present many challenges for a large-scale oxygen production system. The very high operating temperatures and fragile nature of the cells coupled with fairly high operating voltages leave room for improvement. This paper will survey alternative oxygen production technologies, present data on operating characteristics, materials of construction, and some preliminary laboratory results on attempts to implement each. .

  7. Diffusion and solubility of oxygen in silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenauer, W.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion and solubility of oxygen in Ag in the temperature range between 412 and 862 C was determined. The following interpolation formula was found for the solubility: L = 8.19.1/100.exp(-11 860/RT)Mol O2/g.At.Ag.at 1/.5. The process obeys the Sieverts square root law within the limits of error. The dissolution of oxygen in Ag may be accompanied by the dissociation of the oxygen molecules into atoms. The tests on Ag-foils reveal that below a temperature of about 500 C a higher solubility is simulated by the adsorption of oxygen. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in silver obeys the following equation: D = 2.72.1/100.exp(-11 000/RT)sq cm/s. The relatively low activation energy of 11 kcal/g.At suggests that the diffusion of oxygen takes places over interstitial sites.

  8. Effects of oxygen concentration on atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in Argon-Oxygen Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechun; Li, Dian; Wang, Younian

    2016-09-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can generate a low-temperature plasma easily at atmospheric pressure and has been investigated for applications in trials in cancer therapy, sterilization, air pollution control, etc. It has been confirmed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the processes. In this work, we use a fluid model to simulate the plasma characteristics for DBD in argon-oxygen mixture. The effects of oxygen concentration on the plasma characteristics have been discussed. The evolution mechanism of ROS has been systematically analyzed. It was found that the ground state oxygen atoms and oxygen molecular ions are the dominated oxygen species under the considered oxygen concentrations. With the oxygen concentration increasing, the densities of electrons, argon atomic ions, resonance state argon atoms, metastable state argon atoms and excited state argon atoms all show a trend of decline. The oxygen molecular ions density is high and little influenced by the oxygen concentration. Ground state oxygen atoms density tends to increase before falling. The ozone density increases significantly. Increasing the oxygen concentration, the discharge mode begins to change gradually from the glow discharge mode to Townsend discharge mode. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11175034).

  9. Nitrate-nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios for identification of nitrate sources and dominant nitrogen cycle processes in a tile-drained dryland agricultural field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural systems are a leading source of reactive nitrogen to aquatic and atmospheric ecosystems. Natural d15Nnitrate and d18Onitrate are used to identify the dominant nitrogen cycle processes and sources of NO3- leached from a tile-drained, dryland agricultural field. Tile-drain water discharge...

  10. Singlet oxygen in photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Moan, Johan; Juzenas, Petras

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen is a ubiquitous element and a vitally important substance for life on the Earth, and especially for human life. Living organisms need oxygen for most, if not all, of their cellular functions. On the other hand, oxygen can produce metabolites that are toxic and potentially lethal to the same cells. Being reactive and chemically unstable reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the most important metabolites that initiate reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions under physiological conditions. Oxygen in its excited singlet state (1O2) is probably the most important intermediate in such reactions. Since the discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1775 it has been recognized that oxygen can be both beneficial and harmful to life.

  11. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  12. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  13. Solar Energy Systems for Lunar Oxygen Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Heller, Richard S.; Wong, Wayne A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2010-01-01

    An evaluation of several solar concentrator-based systems for producing oxygen from lunar regolith was performed. The systems utilize a solar concentrator mirror to provide thermal energy for the oxygen production process. Thermal energy to power a Stirling heat engine and photovoltaics are compared for the production of electricity. The electricity produced is utilized to operate the equipment needed in the oxygen production process. The initial oxygen production method utilized in the analysis is hydrogen reduction of ilmenite. Utilizing this method of oxygen production a baseline system design was produced. This baseline system had an oxygen production rate of 0.6 kg/hr with a concentrator mirror size of 5 m. Variations were performed on the baseline design to show how changes in the system size and process (rate) affected the oxygen production rate. An evaluation of the power requirements for a carbothermal lunar regolith reduction reactor has also been conducted. The reactor had a total power requirement between 8,320 to 9,961 W when producing 1000 kg/year of oxygen. The solar concentrator used to provide the thermal power (over 82 percent of the total energy requirement) would have a diameter of less than 4 m.

  14. Enhanced humification by carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag--II. Process characterization and the role of inorganic components in the formation of humic-like substances.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Fukushima, Masami; Fukuchi, Shigeki; Nishimoto, Ryo; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced humification by abiotic catalysts is a potentially promising supplementary composting method for stabilizing organic carbon from biowastes. In this study, the role of steel slag in the transformation of humic precursors was directly characterized by measuring the variance in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), spectroscopic parameters (E(600)), and the concentration and molecular weight change of humic-like substances (HLS) during the process. In addition, a mechanistic study of the process was explored. The results directly showed that steel slag greatly accelerated the formation of HLS. The findings indicate that Fe(III)-and Mn(IV)-oxides in steel slag act as oxidants and substantially enhance the polycondensation of humic precursors. Moreover, the reaction appears to suppress the release of metals from steel slag to a certain extent under acidic conditions. This can be attributed to the cover of HLS on the external surface of steel slag, which is significant for its environmentally sound reuse.

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals.

  16. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur J. Ragauskas Lucian A. Lucia Hasan Jameel

    2005-09-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in

  17. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly...

  18. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly fee schedule...

  19. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly...

  20. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices, and Surgical Dressings § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is...

  1. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly fee schedule...

  2. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases are sensors of energy metabolism, oxygen availability, and iron homeostasis: potential role in the regulation of aging process.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the members of an ancient family of nonheme Fe(2+)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDO) are involved in the functions associated with the aging process. 2-Oxoglutarate and O2 are the obligatory substrates and Fe(2+) a cofactor in the activation of 2-OGDO enzymes, which can induce the hydroxylation of distinct proteins and the demethylation of DNA and histones. For instance, ten-eleven translocation 1-3 (TET1-3) are the demethylases of DNA, whereas Jumonji C domain-containing histone lysine demethylases (KDM2-7) are the major epigenetic regulators of chromatin landscape, known to be altered with aging. The functions of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) as well as those of collagen hydroxylases are associated with age-related degeneration. Moreover, the ribosomal hydroxylase OGFOD1 controls mRNA translation, which is known to decline with aging. 2-OGDO enzymes are the sensors of energy metabolism, since the Krebs cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate is an activator whereas succinate and fumarate are the potent inhibitors of 2-OGDO enzymes. In addition, O2 availability and iron redox homeostasis control the activities of 2-OGDO enzymes in tissues. We will briefly elucidate the catalytic mechanisms of 2-OGDO enzymes and then review the potential functions of the above-mentioned 2-OGDO enzymes in the control of the aging process.

  3. Hadean Crustal Processes Revealed from Oxygen Isotopes and U-Th-Pb Depth Profiling of Pre-4.0 Ga Detrital Zircons from Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trail, D.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Harrison, T. M.

    2005-01-01

    Because physical and chemical processes of the past are determined from analysis of a preserved geologic record, little is known about terrestrial crustal processes of the first 500 Ma during the so-called Hadean Eon. What is known from direct measurements has been derived almost exclusively from the study of greater than 4.0 Ga detrital zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia. The geochemistry of these zircons has direct application to understanding the origin and evolution of the rocks during the Hadean because: (i) U-Th-Pb age determinations by ion microprobe suggests the presence of crust as early as 4.37 Ga, or shortly after lunar formation; (ii) high-resolution U-Th-Pb zircon depth profiles reported here reveal several episodes of zircon growth in the Hadean previously unrecognized; (iii) core regions of pre-4.0 Ga zircons with igneous compositions are enriched in O-18 and contain metaluminous and peraluminous mineral inclusions, both features indicative of S-type grainitod protoliths. Study of these ancient zircons provides a unique window into the first half billion years that permits assessment of the potential of the Hadean Earth to host an emergent biosphere.

  4. Excitation-ionization processes in K-shell vacancy production in Li by fast bare oxygen ions: doubly-differential cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śpiewanowski, M. D.; Gulyás, L.; Horbatsch, M.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    Recent theoretical work has demonstrated that K-shell vacancy production in Li by 1.5 MeV/amu O8+ impact cannot be understood as a simple one-electron process. Rather, a certain two-electron excitation-ionization process, in which the valence electron is removed, while one of the K-shell electrons makes a transition to an excited state, was found to give the dominant contribution to the singly-differential cross section at low to intermediate energies of the outgoing electron. In this work, we extend the calculations to the doubly-differential level and present cross sections which are differential in the electron energy and the transverse momentum transfer. The calculation involves the combination of impact-parameter-dependent single-electron amplitudes and a two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the resulting multielectron amplitudes to obtain momentum-transfer-dependent transition matrix elements. Results are found to be in good agreement with recent measurements, especially at low outgoing electron energy, and underline the importance of two-electron excitation ionization in this collision system. Work supported by NSERC, Canada and the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund.

  5. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth’s surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850–542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635–542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5–4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth. PMID:24550467

  6. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-03-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  7. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals.

    PubMed

    Mills, Daniel B; Ward, Lewis M; Jones, Carriayne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H; Canfield, Donald E

    2014-03-18

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  8. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  9. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  10. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  11. Oxygen, a paradoxical element?

    PubMed

    Greabu, Maria; Battino, M; Mohora, Maria; Olinescu, R; Totan, Alexandra; Didilescu, Andreea

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential element for life on earth. No life may exist without oxygen. But in the last forty years, conclusive evidence demonstrated the double-edge sword of this element. In certain conditions, oxygen may produce reactive species, even free radicals. More, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) takes place everywhere: in air, nature or inside human bodies. The paradox of oxygen atom is entirely due to its peculiar electronic structure. But life began on earth, only when nature found efficient weapons against ROS, these antioxidants, which all creatures are extensibly endowed with. The consequences of oxygen activation in human bodies are only partly known, in spite of extensive scientific research on theoretical, experimental and clinical domains.

  12. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  13. Continuous home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega Ruiz, Francisco; Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Galdiz Iturri, Juan Bautista; García Rio, Francisco; Güell Rous, Rosa; Morante Velez, Fátima; Puente Maestu, Luis; Tàrrega Camarasa, Julia

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen therapy is defined as the therapeutic use of oxygen and consists of administering oxygen at higher concentrations than those found in room air, with the aim of treating or preventing hypoxia. This therapeutic intervention has been shown to increase survival in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and respiratory failure. Although this concept has been extended by analogy to chronic respiratory failure caused by respiratory and non-respiratory diseases, continuous oxygen therapy has not been shown to be effective in other disorders. Oxygen therapy has not been shown to improve survival in patients with COPD and moderate hypoxaemia, nor is there consensus regarding its use during nocturnal desaturations in COPD or desaturations caused by effort. The choice of the oxygen source must be made on the basis of criteria such as technical issues, patient comfort and adaptability and cost. Flow must be adjusted to achieve appropriate transcutaneous oxyhaemoglobin saturation correction.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  15. Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets, July 20-23,2004, Santa Fe, New Mexico. The contents include: 1) Experimental Constraints on Oxygen and Other Light Element Partitioning During Planetary Core Formation; 2) In Situ Determination of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe of Spinels by Electron Microprobe: An Evaluation of the Flank Method; 3) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Large-Strain Deformation and Recrystallization of Olivine; 4) Plagioclase-Liquid Trace Element Oxygen Barometry and Oxygen Behaviour in Closed and Open System Magmatic Processes; 5) Core Formation in the Earth: Constraints from Ni and Co; 6) Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of the Terrestrial Planets; 7) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Electrical Conduction of Olivine and Implications for Earth s Mantle; 8) Redox Chemical Diffusion in Silicate Melts: The Impact of the Semiconductor Condition; 9) Ultra-High Temperature Effects in Earth s Magma Ocean: Pt and W Partitioning; 10) Terrestrial Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Variations: Primordial Values, Systematics, Subsolidus Effects, Planetary Comparisons, and the Role of Water; 11) Redox State of the Moon s Interior; 12) How did the Terrestrial Planets Acquire Their Water?; 13) Molecular Oxygen Mixing Ratio and Its Seasonal Variability in the Martian Atmosphere; 14) Exchange Between the Atmosphere and the Regolith of Mars: Discussion of Oxygen and Sulfur Isotope Evidence; 15) Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Systematics of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Meteoric Waters: Evidence from North Texas; 16) Implications of Isotopic and Redox Heterogeneities in Silicate Reservoirs on Mars; 17) Oxygen Isotopic Variation of the Terrestrial Planets; 18) Redox Exchanges in Hydrous Magma; 19) Hydrothermal Systems on Terrestrial Planets: Lessons from Earth; 20) Oxygen in Martian Meteorites: A Review of Results from Mineral Equilibria Oxybarometers; 21) Non-Linear Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes Implanted in

  16. Measuring Traces Of Oxygen By Resonant Electron Attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Boumsellek, Said; Chutjian, Ara

    1995-01-01

    Method of detecting trace amounts of oxygen based on dissociative attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules followed by measurement of resulting flux of negative oxygen ions in mass spectrometer. High sensitivity achieved in method by exploiting resonance in dissociative attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules: electron-attachment cross section rises to high peak at incident electron kinetic energy of 6.2 eV. Relative concentrations below 1 ppb detected. Devised to increase sensitivity of detection of oxygen in processing chambers in which oxygen regarded as contaminant; for example, chambers used in making semiconductor devices and in growing high-purity crystals.

  17. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  18. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  19. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  20. Oxygen separation from air using zirconia solid electrolyte membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suitor, J. W.; Marner, W. J.; Schroeder, J. E.; Losey, R. W.; Ferrall, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Air separation using a zirconia solid electrolyte membrane is a possible alternative source of oxygen. The process of zirconia oxygen separation is reviewed, and an oxygen plant concept using such separation is described. Potential cell designs, stack designs, and testing procedures are examined. Fabrication of the materials used in a zirconia module as well as distribution plate design and fabrication are examined.

  1. 1. LOOKING NORTH AT THE BASIC OXYGEN STEELMAKING PLANT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH AT THE BASIC OXYGEN STEELMAKING PLANT. THE FLUX HANDLING BUILDING IS ON THE RIGHT, THE MOULD CONDITIONING BUILDING IS IN THE CENTER, THE BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS (BOP) SHOP IS IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND, AND OPEN HEARTH No. 2 BUILDING IS ON THE LEFT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  2. Oxygen production by pyrolysis of lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, Constance L.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen was identified as the most important product of initial lunar materials processing efforts. A source of oxygen on the Moon provides an alternative to the costly transport of propellant to the Moon or to low earth orbit. Pyrolysis, or vapor-phase reduction, involves heating a feedstock to temperatures sufficient to decompose the constituent metal oxides and release oxygen. The process relies on the vaporization of metal oxides in the form of reduced suboxides or atomic species. The reduced species must then be condensed without re-oxidizing, yielding oxygen in the gas phase. The feasibility of obtaining oxygen from common lunar minerals was demonstrated using solar furnace experiments. These results are discussed together with chemical equilibrium models which were extended to include the multicomponent oxides used in experiments. For the first time, both experiments and theoretical models dealt with the complex oxides that make up potential lunar feedstocks. Two major conclusions are drawn from this preliminary work. First, unbeneficiated regolith is a suitable feedstock for pyrolysis. Second, the process can operate at moderate temperatures, circa 2000 K, which could be supplied by direct solar or electrical energy. In addition to these advantages in choice of feedstock and energy source, the pyrolysis process requires no chemicals or reagents, making it an attractive process for lunar oxygen production.

  3. Kinetic analysis of the temperature dependence of PbSe colloidal quantum dot photoluminescence: Effects of synthesis process and oxygen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles A.; Abel, Keith A.; van Veggel, Frank C. J. M.; Young, Jeff F.

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic model is derived and used to analyze recently published works and new data on the temperature dependence of the spectrally integrated photoluminescence (PL) from thick-film formulations of PbSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs), with particular attention to the effects of air exposure. The model assumes that the excitons thermalize within a ground-state manifold of states and treats the distribution of radiative and nonradiative decay rates within the distribution as generally as possible, while using a minimal number of free parameters. By adjusting the parameters of the model, good fits are obtained for the wide range of integrated PL behaviors reported in [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 889 (2011), 10.1021/jz2001979; ACS Nano 6, 5498 (2012), 10.1021/nn301405j; Phys. Rev. B 82, 165435 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.165435] and the new data presented in this manuscript. By comparing the extracted parameters we deduce the following: (i) All of the samples in the first two references emit from two distinct clusters of states separated by an energy of 55 to 80 meV regardless of air exposure, while there is only one cluster of emissive states that contributes to the emission reported in the third reference. (ii) In the absence of intentional air exposure, the nonradiative decay from all samples can be described by a single Arrhenius-like process. (iii) Although air-exposure effects are reversible in some samples and irreversible in others, the changes in integrated PL behavior brought about by air-exposure forces the introduction of a common, low-activation-energy nonradiative pathway in all cases. (iv) The low-lying emissive cluster of the two-emissive-cluster samples exhibits behavior similar to the single emissive cluster of the other samples. (v) Many hours of air exposure do not trend either the radiative or nonradiative behavior of the dual-emissive-cluster samples towards the behavior of the single-emissive-cluster samples.

  4. Additively Manufactured Metals in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Metals produced by additive manufacturing methods, such as Powder Bed Fusion Technology, are now mature enough to be considered for qualification in human spaceflight oxygen systems. The mechanical properties of metals produced through AM processes are being systematically studied. However, it is unknown whether AM metals in oxygen applications may present an increased risk of flammability or ignition as compared to wrought metals of the same metallurgical composition due to increased porosity. Per NASA-STD-6001B materials to be used in oxygen system applications shall be based on flammability and combustion test data, followed by a flammability assessment. Without systematic flammability and ignition testing in oxygen there is no credible method for NASA to accurately evaluate the risk of using AM metals in oxygen systems.

  5. Oxygen sensitive paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whidby, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Paper is impregnated with mixture of methylene blue and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Methylene blue is photo-reduced to leuco-form. Paper is kept isolated from oxygen until ready for use. Paper can be reused by photo-reduction after oxygen exposure.

  6. Durability of oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of dynamometer and vehicle durability testing from a variety of sources, as well as common causes of failure for oxygen sensors. The data indicates that oxygen sensors show low failure rates, even at mileages of 80,000 miles and beyond.

  7. How plasma induced oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation influences viability of skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Strudwick, Xanthe; Short, Robert D.; Ogawa, Kotaro; Hatta, Akimitsu; Furuta, Hiroshi; Gaur, Nishtha; Hong, Sung-Ha; Cowin, Allison J.; Fukuhara, Hideo; Inoue, Keiji; Ito, Masafumi; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick W.; Bradley, James W.; Graves, David B.; Szili, Endre J.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation arising from He gas jet and He plasma jet treatments on the viability of skin cells cultured in vitro has been investigated. He gas jet treatment de-oxygenated cell culture medium in a process referred to as "sparging." He plasma jet treatments oxidized, as well as oxygenated or de-oxygenated cell culture medium depending on the dissolved oxygen concentration at the time of treatment. He gas and plasma jets were shown to have beneficial or deleterious effects on skin cells depending on the concentration of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules at the time of treatment. Different combinations of treatments with He gas and plasma jets can be used to modulate the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules to influence cell viability. This study highlights the importance of a priori knowledge of the concentration of dissolved oxygen at the time of plasma jet treatment, given the potential for significant impact on the biological or medical outcome. Monitoring and controlling the dynamic changes in dissolved oxygen is essential in order to develop effective strategies for the use of cold atmospheric plasma jets in biology and medicine.

  8. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  9. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  10. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  11. Synthetic carriers of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dellacherie, E; Labrude, P; Vigneron, C; Riess, J G

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade, construction of artificial carriers of oxygen for transfusion purposes has evolved in three main directions, which can be reviewed as follows. The first approach consists of modifying hemoglobin (Hb), the natural oxygen carrier, in order to lower its oxygen affinity and increase its intravascular persistence. To achieve this aim, two basic procedures have been used: molecular and environmental modification. In the first case, Hb is modified with chemical reagents; the second requires encapsulation of Hb to obtain artificial erythrocytes. The second approach is based on the use of synthetic oxygen-carrying chelates that mimic the oxygenation function of Hb. The main products in this class are metalloporphyrins, whose chemical environment is designed to render them efficient as reversible carriers of oxygen in vivo. Finally, the third approach deals with the perfluorochemicals used in emulsified form. Perfluorochemical liquids are excellent gas solvents, but some problems remain unsolved with regard to their development as oxygen carriers in vivo: low O2 dissolving capacity, toxicity, and excretion.

  12. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O3(υ) formed in O + O2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O3(υ ⩾ 2) + O2(a1Δ) → 2O2 + O is the main O2(a1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O2(a1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Electrochemical oxygen concentrator as an oxygen compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) oxygen compressor is described which generates pressures of 3000 psi. The SPE is a cation exchange membrane with chemical compatibility, and has the capability of withstanding 5000 psi. Other features of the compressor described include: gasketless sealing, porus plate cell supports, and conductive cooling. Results are presented of a computer program which defines the power of the system as a function of density, temperature, pressure, membrane thickness, and water content.

  14. Acceleration of the aging process by oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Lunderen, P. R.; Bensch, K. G.

    1975-01-01

    Tissue changes induced by hyperoxia have been compared with those of normal aging. Results of investigations using male flies prompt conclusion that normal aging, radiation syndrome, and hyperoxic injury share at least one common feature--lipid peroxidation damage to all mambranes resulting in accumulation of age pigment.

  15. Discharge Processes in the Oxygen Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    oJ -k .* I L1La 86 •t-,; out put was :oniWected to one inl1lUt 0’[ a different.i.al am- 1) liit or. ’ rOhe reflected oneorqy froem the cavity was...of Chemco with experiments and with electron current continuity calcula- tions. The experimental results were obtained from the mi - crowave cavity...4 08 0 195 40i 60 mi 80mi i at high E/N values. The 03 density was calculated to be several orders of magnitude lower than that of the other neutral

  16. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2004-04-01

    Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this

  17. Method for producing oxygen from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is related to producing oxygen from lunar or Martian materials, particularly from lunar ilmenite in situ. The process includes producing a slurry of the minerals and hot sulfuric acid, the acid and minerals reacting to form sulfates of the metal. Water is added to the slurry to dissolve the minerals into an aqueous solution, the first aqueous solution is separated from unreacted minerals from the slurry, and the aqueous solution is electrolyzed to produce the metal and oxygen.

  18. A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water

    PubMed Central

    Faschinger, Felix; Chattopadhyay, Samir; Bhakta, Snehadri; Mondal, Biswajit; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Koch, Reinhold; Klappenberger, Florian; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Barth, Johannes V.; Rauls, Eva; Aldahhak, Hazem; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxygen reduction and water oxidation are two key processes in fuel cell applications. The oxidation of water to dioxygen is a 4 H+/4 e− process, while oxygen can be fully reduced to water by a 4 e−/4 H+ process or partially reduced by fewer electrons to reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 and O2 −. We demonstrate that a novel manganese corrole complex behaves as a bifunctional catalyst for both the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen as well as the reduction of dioxygen in aqueous media. Furthermore, our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical study of manganese corroles adsorbed on different electrode materials (down to a submolecular level) reveals mechanistic details of the oxygen evolution and reduction processes. PMID:26773287

  19. A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water

    PubMed Central

    Faschinger, Felix; Chattopadhyay, Samir; Bhakta, Snehadri; Mondal, Biswajit; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Koch, Reinhold; Klappenberger, Florian; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Barth, Johannes V.; Rauls, Eva; Aldahhak, Hazem; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxygen reduction and water oxidation are two key processes in fuel cell applications. The oxidation of water to dioxygen is a 4 H+/4 e− process, while oxygen can be fully reduced to water by a 4 e−/4 H+ process or partially reduced by fewer electrons to reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 and O2 −. We demonstrate that a novel manganese corrole complex behaves as a bifunctional catalyst for both the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen as well as the reduction of dioxygen in aqueous media. Furthermore, our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical study of manganese corroles adsorbed on different electrode materials (down to a submolecular level) reveals mechanistic details of the oxygen evolution and reduction processes. PMID:27478281

  20. Southern Ocean biological impacts on global ocean oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, David P.; Kriest, Iris; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Southern Ocean (SO) physical and biological processes are known to have a large impact on global biogeochemistry. However, the role that SO biology plays in determining ocean oxygen concentrations is not completely understood. These dynamics are investigated here by shutting off SO biology in two marine biogeochemical models. The results suggest that SO biological processes reduce the ocean's oxygen content, mainly in the deep ocean, by 14 to 19%. However, since these processes also trap nutrients that would otherwise be transported northward to fuel productivity and subsequent organic matter export, consumption, and the accompanying oxygen consumption in midlatitude to low-latitude waters, SO biology helps to maintain higher oxygen concentrations in these subsurface waters. Thereby, SO biology can influence the size of the tropical oxygen minimum zones. As a result of ocean circulation the link between SO biological processes and remote oxygen changes operates on decadal to centennial time scales.

  1. Oxygen and Biological Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the evolution of aerobic organisms from anaerobic organisms and the accompanying biochemistry that developed to motivate and enable this evolution. Uses of oxygen by aerobic organisms are described. (CW)

  2. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes tissue death Nonhealing wounds, such as a diabetic foot ulcer Radiation injury Skin graft or skin flap ... hyperbaric oxygenation therapy in the management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2013;88:166. Indications ...

  3. Medical Oxygen Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and deaths. from a heat source, open flames or electrical devices. KKK Body oil, hand lotion ... the oxygen. Post No Smoking and No Open Flames signs in and outside the home to remind ...

  4. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

  5. Determination of local concentration of H2O molecules and gas temperature in the process of hydrogen - oxygen gas mixture heating by means of linear and nonlinear laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, D. N.; Kobtsev, V. D.; Stel'makh, O. M.; Smirnov, Valery V.; Stepanov, E. V.

    2013-01-01

    Employing the methods of linear absorption spectroscopy and nonlinear four-wave mixing spectroscopy using laserinduced gratings we have simultaneously measured the local concentrations of H2O molecules and the gas temperature in the process of the H2 - O2 mixture heating. During the measurements of the deactivation rates of pulsed-laser excited singlet oxygen O2 (b 1Σ+g) in collisions with H2 in the range 294 - 850 K, the joint use of the two methods made it possible to determine the degree of hydrogen oxidation at a given temperature. As the mixture is heated, H2O molecules are formed by 'dark' reactions of H2 with O2 in the ground state. The experiments have shown that the measurements of tunable diode laser radiation absorption along an optical path through the inhomogeneously heated gas mixture in a cell allows high-accuracy determination of the local H2O concentration in the O2 laser excitation volume, if the gas temperature in this volume is known. When studying the collisional deactivation of O2 (b 1Σ+g) molecules, the necessary measurements of the local temperature can be implemented using laser-induced gratings, arising due to spatially periodic excitation of O2 (X3Σ-g) molecules to the b 1Σ+g state by radiation of the pump laser of the four-wave mixing spectrometer.

  6. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO3-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Spassova, Maria A.; Miller, David J.; Nikolov, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events. PMID:26448819

  7. Visualization of oxygen transfer across the air-water interface using a fluorescence oxygen visualization method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee

    2002-04-01

    Oxygen concentration fields in a water body were visualized by the fluorescence oxygen visualization (FOV) method. Pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used as a fluorescent indicator of oxygen, and an intensive charge coupled-device (ICCD) camera as an image detector. Sequential images (over 2000 images) of the oxygen concentration field around the surface water of the tank (1 x 1 x 0.75 m3) were produced during the 3 h experiment. From image processing, the accurate pathway of oxygen-rich, cold water at the water surface was also visualized. The amount of oxygen transferred through the air-water interface during the experiment was measured and the oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)) was determined as 0.22 m/d, which was much higher than that is expected in molecular diffusion. Results suggest that vertical penetration of cold water was the main pathway of oxygen in the water body in the tank. The average velocity of cold water penetrating downward in water body was also measured from consecutive images and the value was 0.3-0.6 mm/s. The FOV method used in this research should have wide application in experimental fluid mechanics and can also provide a phenomenological description of oxygen transfer under physically realizable natural conditions in lakes and reservoirs.

  8. Methods for separating oxygen from oxygen-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Mackay, Richard; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    This invention provides mixed conducting metal oxides particularly useful for the manufacture of catalytic membranes for gas-phase oxygen separation processes. The materials of this invention have the general formula: A.sub.x A'.sub.x A".sub.2-(x+x') B.sub.y B'.sub.y B".sub.2-(y+y') O.sub.5+z ; where x and x' are greater than 0; y and y' are greater than 0; x+x' is less than or equal to 2; y+y' is less than or equal to 2; z is a number that makes the metal oxide charge neutral; A is an element selected from the f block lanthanide elements; A' is an element selected from Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; A" is an element selected from the f block lanthanides or Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; B is an element selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; and B' and B" are different elements and are independently selected from the group of elements Mg or the d-block transition elements. The invention also provides methods for oxygen separation and oxygen enrichment of oxygen deficient gases which employ mixed conducting metal oxides of the above formula. Examples of the materials used for the preparation of the membrane include A.sub.x Sr.sub.x' B.sub.y Fe.sub.y' Co.sub.2-(y+y') O.sub.5+z, where x is about 0.3 to about 0.5, x' is about 1.5 to about 1.7, y is 0.6, y' is between about 1.0 and 1.4 and B is Ga or Al.

  9. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  10. [Oxygen Leukocyte Larceny].

    PubMed

    Pinto da Costa, Miguel; Pimenta Coelho, Henrique

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, who was admitted to the Emergency Room with dyspnea. The initial evaluation revealed severe anemia (Hgb = 5.0 g/dL) with hyperleukocytosis (800.000/µL), nearly all of the cells being mature lymphocytes, a normal chest X-ray and a low arterial oxygen saturation (89%; pulse oximetry). After red blood cell transfusion, Hgb values rose (9.0 g/dL) and there was a complete reversion of the dyspnea. Yet, subsequent arterial blood gas analysis, without the administration of supplemental oxygen, systematically revealed very low oxygen saturation values (~ 46%), which was inconsistent with the patientâs clinical state and his pulse oximetry values (~ 87%), and these values were not corrected by the administration of oxygen via non-rebreather mask. The investigation performed allowed to establish the diagnosis of oxygen leukocyte larceny, a phenomenon which conceals the true oxygen saturation due to peripheral consumption by leukocytes.

  11. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queste, B. Y.; Fernand, L.; Jickells, T. D.; Heywood, K. J.; Hind, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≈ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of CTD, dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter and fluorescence during a three day deployment. The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small scale events that supply oxygenated water into the bottom layer at a rate of 2±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. Benthic and pelagic oxygen sinks, quantified through glider observations and past studies, indicate more gradual background consumption rates of 2.5±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. This budget revealed that the balance of oxygen supply and demand is in agreement with previous studies of the North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8±0.3 μmol dm-3 day-1 indicating a localised or short-lived increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localised depocentres and rapid remineralisation of resuspensded organic matter. The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date rates to be used in the development of ecosystem models.

  12. Oxygen production System Models for Lunar ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) seeks to make human space exploration feasible; by using available resources from a planet or the moon to produce consumables, parts, and structures that otherwise would be brought from Earth. Producing these in situ reduces the mass of such that must be launched and doing so allows more payload mass' for each mission. The production of oxygen from lunar regolith, for life support and propellant, is one of the tasks being studied under ISRU. NASA is currently funding three processes that have shown technical merit for the production of oxygen from regolith: Molten Salt Electrolysis, Hydrogen Reduction of Ilmenite, and Carbothermal Reduction. The ISRU program is currently developing system models of, the , abovementioned processes to: (1) help NASA in the evaluation process to select the most cost-effective and efficient process for further prototype development, (2) identify key parameters, (3) optimize the oxygen production process, (4) provide estimates on energy and power requirements, mass and volume.of the system, oxygen production rate, mass of regolith required, mass of consumables, and other important parameters, and (5) integrate into the overall end-to-end ISRU system model, which could be integrated with mission architecture models. The oxygen production system model is divided into modules that represent unit operations (e.g., reactor, water electrolyzer, heat exchanger). Each module is modeled theoretically using Excel and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), and will be validated using experimental data from on-going laboratory work. This modularity (plug-n-play) feature of each unit operation allows the use of the same model on different oxygen production systems simulations resulting in comparable results. In this presentation, preliminary results for mass, power, volume will be presented along with brief description of the oxygen production system model.

  13. Design of a lunar oxygen production plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam

    1990-01-01

    To achieve permanent human presence and activity on the moon, oxygen is required for both life support and propulsion. Lunar oxygen production using resources existing on the moon will reduce or eliminate the need to transport liquid oxygen from earth. In addition, the co-products of oxygen production will provide metals, structural ceramics, and other volatile compounds. This will enable development of even greater self-sufficiency as the lunar outpost evolves. Ilmenite is the most abundant metal-oxide mineral in the lunar regolith. A process involving the reaction of ilmenite with hydrogen at 1000 C to produce water, followed by the electrolysis of this water to provide oxygen and recycle the hydrogen has been explored. The objective of this 1990 Summer Faculty Project was to design a lunar oxygen-production plant to provide 5 metric tons of liquid oxygen per year from lunar soil. The results of this study describe the size and mass of the equipment, the power needs, feedstock quantity and the engineering details of the plant.

  14. Experimental Simulation of Turbine-Exhaust Oxygen Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jim A.; Branch, Ryan W.

    2004-01-01

    In some liquid-propellant rocket engines, the liquid-oxygen boost pump is driven by a turbine that is powered by high-pressure gaseous oxygen. Once it exits the turbine, this gaseous oxygen can be salvaged by injecting it into the subcooled liquid oxygen exiting the boost pump. If the main LOX pump is to function correctly under these circumstances, complete condensation of the gaseous oxygen must quickly follow its injection into the boost-pump discharge. The current investigation uses steam and water in a simple rig that allows the condensation process to be visualized and quantified. This paper offers dimensionless-parameter correlations of the data and trends observed.

  15. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  16. Metered oxygen supply aids treatment of domestic sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weliky, N.; Hooper, T. J.; Silverman, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Microbiological fixed-bed process was developed in which supplementary oxygen required by microbial species is supplied by electrochemical device. Rate of addition of oxygen to waste treatment process is controlled to maintain aerobic metabolism and prevent anaerobic metabolisms which produce odorous or toxic products.

  17. Isotopic Composition of Oxygen in Lunar Zircons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2005-01-01

    The recent discovery of heavy oxygen in zircons from the Jack Hills conglomerates Wilde et al. and Mojzsis et al. was interpreted as an indication of presence of liquid water on the surface of Early Earth. The distribution of ages of Jack Hills zircons and lunar zircons appears to be very similar and therefore analysis of oxygen in the lunar grains may provide a reference frame for further study of the early history of the Earth as well as give additional information regarding processes that operated on the Moon. In the present study we have analysed the oxygen isotopic composition of zircon grains from three lunar samples using the Swedish Museum of Natural History CAMECA 1270 ion microprobe. The samples were selected as likely tests for variations in lunar oxygen isotopic composition. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  18. The Antitumor Effect of Singlet Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2016-11-01

    Tumor cells are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase and superoxide dismutase. Exogenous singlet oxygen derived from activated photosensitizers or from cold atmospheric plasma causes local inactivation of protective catalase which is followed by the generation of secondary extracellular singlet oxygen. This process is specific for tumor cells and is driven by a complex interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Secondary singlet oxygen has the potential for autoamplification of its generation, resulting in optimal inactivation of protective catalase and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. An increase in the endogenous NO concentration also causes inactivation of catalase and autoamplificatory generation of secondary singlet oxygen. This principle is essential for the antitumor activity of secondary plant products, such as cyanidins and other inhibitors of NO dioxygenase. It seems that the action of the established chemotherapeutic taxol and the recently established antitumor effect of certain azoles are based on the same principles.

  19. Singlet molecular oxygen generated by biological hydroperoxides.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sayuri; Martinez, Glaucia R; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-10-05

    The chemistry behind the phenomenon of ultra-weak photon emission has been subject of considerable interest for decades. Great progress has been made on the understanding of the chemical generation of electronically excited states that are involved in these processes. Proposed mechanisms implicated the production of excited carbonyl species and singlet molecular oxygen in the mechanism of generation of chemiluminescence in biological system. In particular, attention has been focused on the potential generation of singlet molecular oxygen in the recombination reaction of peroxyl radicals by the Russell mechanism. In the last ten years, our group has demonstrated the generation of singlet molecular oxygen from reactions involving the decomposition of biologically relevant hydroperoxides, especially from lipid hydroperoxides in the presence of metal ions, peroxynitrite, HOCl and cytochrome c. In this review we will discuss details on the chemical aspects related to the mechanism of singlet molecular oxygen generation from different biological hydroperoxides.

  20. Atomic oxygen effects on materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Brady, Joyce A.; Merrow, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Understanding of the basic processes of atomic oxygen interaction is currently at a very elementary level. However, measurement of erosion yields, surface morphology, and optical properties for low fluences have brought about much progress in the past decade. Understanding the mechanisms and those factors that are important for proper simulation of low Earth orbit is at a much lower level of understanding. The ability to use laboratory simulations with confidence to quantifiably address the functional performance and durability of materials in low Earth orbit will be necessary to assure long-term survivability to the natural space environment.

  1. Gas treating process

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.

    1990-01-09

    This patent describes a process for preventing oxygen from deactivating a catalyst susceptible to deactivation by oxygen. It comprises: scavenging oxygen contained in a feed gas stream comprising carbon monoxide and water vapor as reactant gases in the presence of an oxidation catalyst under conditions which remove essentially all of the oxygen by reaction with hydrogen sulfide and contacting the resultant gas stream, containing the reactants but essentially free of oxygen, with a catalyst susceptible to deactivation by oxygen but active for the water gas shift reaction. The contacting being under conditions resulting in the conversion of at least some of the carbon monoxide and water vapor to hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

  2. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation.

  3. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, P.

    1997-07-22

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

  4. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  5. Electrochemical cell for obtaining oxygen from carbon dioxide atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, M. W.; Rast, H. E.; Rogers, D. K.

    1989-01-01

    For manned missions to Mars to become a reality, an efficient and reliable means of obtaining oxygen from the carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere will be required. Otherwise, the high cost of transporting the oxygen needed to sustain the astronauts will severely restrict the expedition to the martian surface. Recently, the use of electrochemical devices has been explored as a means of obtaining oxygen from the carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. In these devices, oxygen ions diffuse through solid oxide membranes, thus, separating oxygen from the other gases presented. This phenomenon has only recently been explored as a means of obtaining large quantities of oxygen from toxic atmospheres, although first observed by Walter nernst in 1899. Nernst observed that stabilized zirconia will conduct oxygen ions when an electrical potential is applied across metallic electrodes applied to the ceramic membrane. Diatomic oxygen molecules are dissociated at the positive electrode/electrolyte interface. The oxygen ions enter the ceramic body due to the ion density gradient which is produced by the electrical potential across the electrolytic membrane. Once the ions have diffused through the membrane, they reform diatomic oxygen molecules at the anode. The separation of oxygen from carbon dioxide is achieved by the combination of thermal and electrochemical processes. The thermal decomposition of carbon dioxide (at 1000 C) results in the production of carbon monoxide and oxygen by the reaction.

  6. Metastable Oxygen Production by Electron-Impact of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. D.; Malone, C. P.; Kanik, I.; Johnson, P. V.

    2013-12-01

    Electron-impact excitation processes involving atomic and molecular oxygen are important in atmospheric interactions. The production of long-lived metastable O(1S) and O(1D) through electron impact of atomic O and molecular O2 play a significant role in the dynamics of oxygen-containing atmospheres (Earth, Europa, Io). Emissions from metastable O (1S → 1D) produce the well-recognized green light from terrestrial aurora. Electron-impact excitation to 1S and 1D are sensitive channels for determining energy partitioning and dynamics from space weather. Electron-impact excitation cross sections determined through fundamental experimental studies are necessary for modeling of natural phenomena and observation data. The detection of metastable states in laboratory experiments requires a novel approach, since typical detection techniques (e.g., fluorescence by radiative de-excitation) cannot be performed due to the long-lived nature of the excited species. In this work, metastable O is incident on a cryogenically cooled rare gas matrix, where excimer production and subsequent rapid radiative de-excitation provides measurable signal that is directly related to the originating electron-impact excitation process.

  7. Ultraviolet assisted processing: A unique approach to mitigate oxygen vacancies and attain low loss highly tunable Ba0.60Sr0.40TiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. W.; Toonen, R. C.; Ivill, M.; Hirsch, S. G.; Ngo, E.; Hubbard, C.

    2011-12-01

    Isothermal (700 °C) ultraviolet annealing (UVA) processing of crystallized Ba0.60Sr0.40TiO3 (BST) thin films for exposure times up to 225 min films has been studied. The BST films, grown on PtSi wafers via the metalorganic solution deposition (MOSD) technique, were crystallized via conventional furnace annealing (CFA) prior to UVA treatment, and the effects of UV annealing time on the structural, dielectric, and insulation properties were evaluated. The experimental results demonstrated significantly improved structural, dielectric, and insulation properties for the UVA films. Specifically, lattice parameter contraction (toward that of bulk BST60/40) and a 20% reduction in loss were observed for the UVA treated films with respect to the CFA/control film. Leakage current characteristics were found to be the most sensitive characterization technique to access material property modification as a result of UVA exposure time. Specifically, the 225 min UVA exposure time resulted in a three-order of magnitude reduction in leakage current density compared to the CFA film, and the lowest value observed was 1.06 × 10-7 A/cm2 at E = 300 kV/cm. The useable tunability (tunability value at the maximum acceptable leakage current, 500 pA) was found to be elevated by a factor of two with respect to that of the CFA/control BST film (52.31%/UVA film vs. 18.5%/control film). It is suggested that the improved material properties are due to the mitigation of unwanted oxygen vacancies within the film after UV-annealing. A mechanistic model is presented and discussed.

  8. Monolithic solid electrolyte oxygen pump

    DOEpatents

    Fee, Darrell C.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Easler, Timothy E.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-layer oxygen pump having a one-piece, monolithic ceramic structure affords high oxygen production per unit weight and volume and is thus particularly adapted for use as a portable oxygen supply. The oxygen pump is comprised of a large number of small cells on the order of 1-2 millimeters in diameter which form the walls of the pump and which are comprised of thin, i.e., 25-50 micrometers, ceramic layers of cell components. The cell components include an air electrode, an oxygen electrode, an electrolyte and interconnection materials. The cell walls form the passages for input air and for exhausting the oxygen which is transferred from a relatively dilute gaseous mixture to a higher concentration by applying a DC voltage across the electrodes so as to ionize the oxygen at the air electrode, whereupon the ionized oxygen travels through the electrolyte and is converted to oxygen gas at the oxygen electrode.

  9. Neurological oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Farmery, Scott; Sykes, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    SCUBA diving has several risks associated with it from breathing air under pressure--nitrogen narcosis, barotrauma and decompression sickness (the bends). Trimix SCUBA diving involves regulating mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen and helium in an attempt to overcome the risks of narcosis and decompression sickness during deep dives, but introduces other potential hazards such as hypoxia and oxygen toxicity convulsions. This study reports on a seizure during the ascent phase, its potential causes and management and discusses the hazards posed to the diver and his rescuer by an emergency ascent to the surface.

  10. Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Fulgurites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, F.; Javoy, M.

    1992-07-01

    Two occurrences of vitreous rocks (fulgurites) that have resulted from the fusion of Etnean lavas, have been ascribed to the result of lightning striking the basalts and melting fresh volcanic rocks [1]. Rapidly quenched melts appear as tubular cavities that preserve the path of the discharge. Glass droplets (D <= 500 micrometers) are always dispersed around the fused lava tube and show several petrographic similarities with chondrules found in ordinary chondrites (presence of melilite, radiating skeletal fassaite, etc). In this process, high temperatures (T>1800 K) have probably been reached during timescales <=10 sec. Because it has been suggested that lightning discharges may have played an important role in the formation of chondrules [2], we have analyzed the oxygen isotope compositions of these fulgurites (our experimental protocol is described elsewhere [3]). The glass (free from any contamination from the unmelted basalt) is 1.5o/oo depleted in ^18O relative to its measured initial isotopic composition (delta^18O = +5.6o/oo); most of the data define a mass-dependent fractionation relationship (i.e. delta^17O = 0.52 x delta^18O). Therefore the data clearly do not reproduce the oxygen isotope anomaly defined for meteorites, which has a slope of 1 in the diagram delta^17O versus delta^18O (i.e. delta^17O = 1.0 x delta^18O). Nevertheless, it should be noted that some glass samples scatter around this canonical value of 0.52 with minor departures from a purely mass-dependent fractionation. If these results are confirmed by additional determinations (now in progress) on the separated glassy droplets, the following conclusions can be proposed: 1) lightning discharges do not yield oxygen isotope anomalies similar to those measured in chondrules and 2) an isotope exchange between hot chondrules and their parent nebular gas--presumably "anomalous" in its oxygen isotopes-- seems difficult to achieve within the duration of the rapid cooling of the melt. This last point

  11. Oxidation mechanism of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen species, the spores were treated with an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source and observed in-situ using a fluorescent confocal-laser microscope. The treated spores were stained with two fluorescent dyes, 1,1‧-dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3‧-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP). The intracellular organelles as well as the cell membranes in the spores treated with the oxygen radical source were stained with DiI without a major morphological change of the membranes. DPPP staining revealed that the organelles were oxidized by the oxygen radical treatment. These results suggest that neutral oxygen species, especially atomic oxygen, induce a minor structural change or functional inhibition of cell membranes, which leads to the oxidation of the intracellular organelles through the penetration of reactive oxygen species into the cell.

  12. Singlet Oxygen Photosensitization by EGFP and its Chromophore HBDI

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Banzo, Ana; Nonell, Santi; Hofkens, Johan; Flors, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The photosensitization of reactive oxygen species and, in particular, singlet oxygen by proteins from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family influences important processes such as photobleaching and genetically targeted chromophore-assisted light inactivation. In this article, we report an investigation of singlet oxygen photoproduction by GFPs using time-resolved detection of the NIR phosphorescence of singlet oxygen at 1275 nm. We have detected singlet oxygen generated by enhanced (E)GFP, and measured a lifetime of 4 μs in deuterated solution. By comparison with the model compound of the EGFP fluorophore 4-hydroxybenzylidene-1,2-dimethylimidazoline (HBDI), our results confirm that the β-can of EGFP provides shielding of the fluorophore and reduces the production of this reactive oxygen species. In addition, our results yield new information about the triplet state of these proteins. The quantum yield for singlet oxygen photosensitization by the model chromophore HBDI is 0.004. PMID:17766345

  13. The Oxygen Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Gary D.

    Produced for primary grades, this booklet provides study of the oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle in nature. Line drawings, a minimum amount of narrative, and a glossary of terms make up its content. The booklet is designed to be used as reading material, a coloring book, or for dramatic arts with students acting out parts of the cycle. This work was…

  14. The Oxygen Flask Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses application of Schoniger's method of quantitative organic elemental analysis in teaching of qualitative analysis of the halogens, nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus. Indicates that the oxygen flask method is safe and suitable for both high school and college courses because of simple apparatus requirements. (CC)

  15. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  16. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, Paul

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  17. Hybrid Oxygen System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    otherwise in any manner construed, as licensing the holder or any other person or corporation ; or as conveying any rights or permission to manufacture, use...12 Modest Activity 2 12 24 Comnat ane G’s Average 5 32 64 Peak Activity (NATO) 10 50 Instantaneous Peak Flow N/A 150-20W_ Published oxygen flow rates

  18. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  19. K-alpha X-rays from cosmic-ray oxygen. [subrelativistic interstellar oxygen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium charge fractions are calculated for subrelativistic cosmic-ray oxygen ions in the interstellar medium. These are used to determine the expected flux of K-alpha rays arising from atomic processes for a number of different postulated interstellar oxygen spectra. Relation of these results to the diffuse X-ray background measured at the appropriate energy (about 0.6 keV) suggests an observable broadened line feature.

  20. The onsite manufacture of propellant oxygen from lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Sanders D.; Beegle, Robert L., Jr.; Guter, Gerald A.; Miller, Frederick E.; Rothenberg, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The Aerojet carbothermal process for the manufacture of oxygen from lunar materials has three essential steps: the reduction of silicate with methane to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen; the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen to form methane and water; and the electrolysis of water to form hydrogen and oxygen. The reactions and the overall process are shown. It is shown with laboratory experimentation that the carbothermal process is feasible. Natural silicates can be reduced with carbon or methane. The important products are carbon monoxide, metal, and slag. The carbon monoxide can be completely reduced to form methane and water. The water can be electrolyzed to produce hydrogen and oxygen. A preliminary engineering study shows that the operation of plants using this process for the manufacture of propellant oxygen has a large economic advantage when the cost of the plant and its operation is compared to the cost of delivering oxygen from Earth.

  1. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  2. A Survey of Alternative Oxygen Production Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.; Parrish, Clyde F.; Buttner, William J.; Surma, Jan M.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Utilization of the Martian atmosphere for the production of fuel and oxygen has been extensively studied. The baseline fuel production process is a Sabatier reactor, which produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The oxygen produced from the electrolysis of the water is only half of that needed for methane-based rocket propellant, and additional oxygen is needed for breathing air, fuel cells and other energy sources. Zirconia electrolysis cells for the direct reduction of CO2 arc being developed as an alternative means of producing oxygen, but present many challenges for a large-scale oxygen production system. The very high operating temperatures and fragile nature of the cells coupled with fairly high operating voltages leave room for improvement. This paper will survey alternative oxygen production technologies, present data on operating characteristics, materials of construction, and some preliminary laboratory results on attempts to implement each. Our goal is to significantly improve upon the characteristics of proposed zirconia cells for oxygen production. To achieve that goal we are looking at electrolytic systems that operate at significantly lower temperatures, preferably below 31C to allow the incorporation of liquid CO2 in the electrolyte. Our preliminary results indicate that such a system will have much higher current densities and have simpler cathode construction than a porous gas feed electrode system. Such a system could be achieved based on nonaqueous electrolytes or ionic liquids. We are focusing our research on the anode reaction that will produce oxygen from a product generated at the cathode using CO2 as the feed. Operation at low temperatures also will open up the full range of polymer and metal materials, allowing a more robust system design to withstand the rigors of flight, landing, and long term unattended operation on the surface of Mars.

  3. Oxygen cycling in the northern Benguela Upwelling System: Modelling oxygen sources and sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Martin; Eggert, Anja

    2016-12-01

    This paper elucidates the oxygen dynamics in the northern Benguela Upwelling System by means of process oriented, numerical modelling. Owing to the complex physical-biological interaction in this system, a coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model is required to grasp the various aspects of the oxygen dynamics. We used high-resolution atmospheric fields derived from observations to force our model, available since 1999. The model results represent a 15 years, consistent data set of realistic hydrographic and ecosystem variables, including oxygen distribution patterns. After a concise description of the main aspects of the model, we use the model data to analyse the components contributing to the oxygen dynamics, namely, the ocean circulation, the exchange between ocean and atmosphere as well as the local biogeochemical oxygen cycling in the system. We thoroughly validate the model with available field observations and remote sensing data. The strengths of coastal upwelling, which controls the nutrient supply to the euphotic zone, as well as the poleward undercurrent that carries oxygen and nutrients to the shelf in the northern Benguela Upwelling System are well reproduced in the model. Among the biological oxygen sinks, mineralisation in the sediment, respiration of zooplankton and nitrification in the water column are important. We also found that vertical migration of zooplankton in response to the oxygen conditions provides a regulating feedback, which may prevent a complete deoxygenation of suboxic waters. As long as oxygen or nitrate are available in the bottom waters, the activities of chemolithoautotrophic sulphur bacteria on the sediment surface keep the redoxcline within the sediment and prevent the release of hydrogen sulphide into the water column. By horizontal integration of the simulated ocean-atmosphere oxygen flux, it can be shown that the Kunene upwelling cell between 16 ° S and 18 ° S is a boundary between the equatorial ocean, characterise by

  4. Determining the Source of Water Vapor in a Cerium Oxide Electrochemical Oxygen Separator to Achieve Aviator Grade Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John; Taylor, Dale; Martinez, James

    2014-01-01

    ]. Combined with a mechanical compressor, a Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Separator (SEOS) should be capable of producing ABO grade oxygen at pressures >2400 psia, on the space station. Feasibility tests using a SEOS integrated with a mechanical compressor identified an unexpected contaminant in the oxygen: water vapour was found in the oxygen product, sometimes at concentrations higher than 40 ppm (the ABO limit for water vapour is 7 ppm). If solid electrolyte membranes are really "infinitely selective" to oxygen as they are reported to be, where did the water come from? If water is getting into the oxygen, what other contaminants might get into the oxygen? Microscopic analyses of wafers, welds, and oxygen delivery tubes were performed in an attempt to find the source of the water vapour contamination. Hot and cold pressure decay tests were performed. Measurements of water vapour as a function of O2 delivery rate, O2 delivery pressure, and process air humidity levels were the most instructive in finding the source of water contamination (Fig 3). Water contamination was directly affected by oxygen delivery rate (doubling the oxygen production rate cut the water level in half). Water was affected by process air humidity levels and delivery pressure in a way that indicates the water was diffusing into the oxygen delivery system.

  5. Osmotic phenomena in application for hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    PubMed

    Babchin, A; Levich, E; Melamed M D, Y; Sivashinsky, G

    2011-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment defines the medical procedure when the patient inhales pure oxygen at elevated pressure conditions. Many diseases and all injuries are associated with a lack of oxygen in tissues, known as hypoxia. HBO provides an effective method for fast oxygen delivery in medical practice. The exact mechanism of the oxygen transport under HBO conditions is not fully identified. The objective of this article is to extend the colloid and surface science basis for the oxygen transport in HBO conditions beyond the molecular diffusion transport mechanism. At a pressure in the hyperbaric chamber of two atmospheres, the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood plasma increases 10 times. The sharp increase of oxygen concentration in the blood plasma creates a considerable concentration gradient between the oxygen dissolved in the plasma and in the tissue. The concentration gradient of oxygen as a non-electrolyte solute causes an osmotic flow of blood plasma with dissolved oxygen. In other words, the molecular diffusion transport of oxygen is supplemented by the convective diffusion raised due to the osmotic flow, accelerating the oxygen delivery from blood to tissue. A non steady state equation for non-electrolyte osmosis is solved asymptotically. The solution clearly demonstrates two modes of osmotic flow: normal osmosis, directed from lower to higher solute concentrations, and anomalous osmosis, directed from higher to lower solute concentrations. The fast delivery of oxygen from blood to tissue is explained on the basis of the strong molecular interaction between the oxygen and the tissue, causing an influx of oxygen into the tissue by convective diffusion in the anomalous osmosis process. The transport of the second gas, nitrogen, dissolved in the blood plasma, is also taken into the consideration. As the patient does not inhale nitrogen during HBO treatment, but exhales it along with oxygen and carbon dioxide, the concentration of nitrogen in blood

  6. Oxygen isotope fractionation of dissolved oxygen during reduction by ferrous iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Poulson, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation factor of dissolved oxygen gas has been measured during inorganic reduction by aqueous FeSO 4 at 10-54 °C under neutral (pH 7) and acidic (pH 2) conditions, with Fe(II) concentrations ranging up to 0.67 mol L -1, in order to better understand the geochemical behavior of oxygen in ferrous iron-rich groundwater and acidic mine pit lakes. The rate of oxygen reduction increased with increasing temperature and increasing Fe(II) concentration, with the pseudo-first-order rate constant k ranging from 2.3 to 82.9 × 10 -6 s -1 under neutral conditions and 2.1 to 37.4 × 10 -7 s -1 under acidic conditions. The activation energy of oxygen reduction was 30.9 ± 6.6 kJ mol -1 and 49.7 ± 13.0 kJ mol -1 under neutral and acidic conditions, respectively. Oxygen isotope enrichment factors ( ɛ) become smaller with increasing temperature, increasing ferrous iron concentration, and increasing reaction rate under acidic conditions, with ɛ values ranging from -4.5‰ to -11.6‰. Under neutral conditions, ɛ does not show any systematic trends vs. temperature or ferrous iron concentration, with ɛ values ranging from -7.3 to -10.3‰. Characterization of the oxygen isotope fractionation factor associated with O 2 reduction by Fe(II) will have application to elucidating the process or processes responsible for oxygen consumption in environments such as groundwater and acidic mine pit lakes, where a number of possible processes (e.g. biological respiration, reduction by reduced species) may have taken place.

  7. Safety of Propofol for Oxygenator Exchange in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Szumita, Paul M; Lagambina, Susan; Weinhouse, Gerald; Degrado, Jeremy R

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the safety of propofol administration in adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) patients. We performed a prospective cohort analysis of patients using ECMO at Brigham and Women's Hospital between February 2013 and October 2015. Patients were included if they used ECMO for at least 48 hours. The major end-point of the analysis was the median oxygenator lifespan. Oxygenator exchanges were analyzed by the number of patients requiring an oxygenator exchange and the number of oxygenator exchanges per ECMO day. A priori analysis was performed by comparing the outcomes between patients who did and did not receive propofol during their ECMO course. During the study, 43 patients were included in the analysis. Sixteen patients used propofol during their ECMO course. There were 12 oxygenator exchanges during therapy. Oxygenator exchange occurred on 1.8% of ECMO days. The median oxygenator lifespan was 7 days. Patients who used propofol had a significantly longer oxygenator lifespan (p = 0.02). Among patients who received propofol, patients who required oxygenator exchange used a significantly lower median daily dose of propofol (p < 0.001). The use of propofol appears safe in ECMO with regards to oxygenator viability. Contrary to expected, oxygenator lifespan was significantly longer among patients who received propofol.

  8. Redox activity of surface oxygen anions in oxygen-deficient perovskite oxides during electrochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, David N; Machala, Michael L; Bluhm, Hendrik; Chueh, William C

    2015-01-19

    Surface redox-active centres in transition-metal oxides play a key role in determining the efficacy of electrocatalysts. The extreme sensitivity of surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Here we report the direct observation of surface redox processes by surface-sensitive, operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy using thin-film iron and cobalt perovskite oxides as model electrodes for elevated-temperature oxygen incorporation and evolution reactions. In contrast to the conventional view that the transition metal cations are the dominant redox-active centres, we find that the oxygen anions near the surface are a significant redox partner to molecular oxygen due to the strong hybridization between oxygen 2p and transition metal 3d electronic states. We propose that a narrow electronic state of significant oxygen 2p character near the Fermi level exchanges electrons with the oxygen adsorbates. This result highlights the importance of surface anion-redox chemistry in oxygen-deficient transition-metal oxides.

  9. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  10. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  11. Oxygenic photosynthesis without galactolipids

    PubMed Central

    Awai, Koichiro; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The thylakoid membranes of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are dominated by the galactolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). In cyanobacteria, MGDG is synthesized via monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (GlcDG). However, the putative epimerase involved in the conversion of GlcDG to MGDG has not been identified. Here we report the identification of the gene for the glucolipid epimerase (mgdE) by comparative genomic analysis. Knockout mutants of mgdE in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacked both MGDG and DGDG and accumulated GlcDG. The mutants did possess thylakoid membranes and showed normal maximal photosynthetic activity, albeit with reduced utilization of light energy. These results cast doubt on the long-standing belief that oxygenic photosynthesis is absolutely dependent on galactolipids. PMID:25197079

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  13. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  14. Transport properties of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, H. M.

    1983-01-01

    Tables of viscosity, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity of oxygen as a function of temperature and pressure from the triple point to 320 K and at pressures to 100 MPa are presented. Auxiliary tables in engineering units are also given. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are calculated from published correlations. Density and specific heat at constant pressure, required to calculate thermal diffusivity, are obtained from an equation of state. The Prandtl number can be obtained quite easily from the values tabulated.

  15. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOEpatents

    Shanks, H.R.; Bevolo, A.J.; Danielson, G.C.; Weber, M.F.

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A/sub x/WO/sub 3/ where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt/sub y/WO/sub 3/ where y is at least 0.8.

  16. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOEpatents

    Shanks, Howard R.; Bevolo, Albert J.; Danielson, Gordon C.; Weber, Michael F.

    1980-11-04

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

  17. Studies of oxygen-related and carbon-related defects in high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon related defects in silicon, particularly as related to high-efficiency silicon solar cells were studied. A summary of oxygen processes in silicon versus process temperature was shown along with experimental results. The anamolous diffusion of oxygen was explained by the dissociation of the center allowing O sub i to move through the lattices.

  18. Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2016-06-01

    The origin of oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important metabolic innovation in Earth history. It allowed life to generate energy and reducing power directly from sunlight and water, freeing it from the limited resources of geochemically derived reductants. This greatly increased global primary productivity and restructured ecosystems. The release of O2 as an end product of water oxidation led to the rise of oxygen, which dramatically altered the redox state of Earth's atmosphere and oceans and permanently changed all major biogeochemical cycles. Furthermore, the biological availability of O2 allowed for the evolution of aerobic respiration and novel biosynthetic pathways, facilitating much of the richness we associate with modern biology, including complex multicellularity. Here we critically review and synthesize information from the geological and biological records for the origin and evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Data from both of these archives illustrate that this metabolism first appeared in early Paleoproterozoic time and, despite its biogeochemical prominence, is a relatively late invention in the context of our planet's history.

  19. Atmospheric Oxygen Photoabsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, Tom G.

    1996-01-01

    The work conducted on this grant was devoted to various aspects of the photophysics and photochemistry of the oxygen molecule. Predissociation linewidths were measured for several vibrational levels in the O2(B3 Sigma(sub u)(sup -)) state, providing good agreement with other groups working on this important problem. Extensive measurements were made on the loss kinetics of vibrationally excited oxygen, where levels between v = 5 and v = 22 were investigated. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to measure oscillator strengths in the oxygen Herzberg bands. The great sensitivity of this technique made it possible to extend the known absorption bands to the dissociation limit as well as providing many new absorption lines that seem to be associated with new O2 transitions. The literature concerning the Herzberg band strengths was evaluated in light of our new measurements, and we made recommendations for the appropriate Herzberg continuum cross sections to be used in stratospheric chemistry. The transition probabilities for all three Herzberg band systems were re-evaluated, and we are recommending a new set of values.

  20. Transtracheal oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Kent L; Schwartz, Michael D

    2011-02-01

    Transtracheal oxygen therapy (TTO) has been used for long-term oxygen therapy for nearly 30 years. Numerous investigators have explored the potential benefits of TTO. Those results are reviewed in this article. TTO is best viewed not as a catheter but as a program for care. This article discusses patient selection for TTO. Publications evaluating complications are reviewed. In the past, a modified Seldinger technique (MST) was used for the creation of the tracheocutaneous fistula. The rather long program required for tract maturation with MST was labor-intensive and required substantial patient education and monitoring, particularly during the immature tract phase. Minor complications were not infrequent. More recently, the Lipkin method has been used to create a surgical tract under conscious sedation with topical anesthesia. The procedure is safe and well tolerated. Transtracheal oxygen is initiated the day following the procedure. Similarly, the tract matures in 7 to 10 days rather than the 6 to 8 weeks with MST. More rapid healing time and superior tract characteristics substantially reduce complications. The TTO program tailored for the Lipkin procedure is shortened, streamlined, and much less labor-intensive. Optimal outcomes with the TTO program require a committed pulmonologist, respiratory therapist, nurse, and surgeon (for the Lipkin procedure). This article discusses new directions in the use of transtracheal gas delivery, including the management of obstructive sleep apnea. Preliminary investigations regarding transtracheal augmented ventilation are presented. These include nocturnal use in severe chronic lung disease and liberation from prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  1. Ancient Oceans Had Less Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of dissolved oxygen in the oceans in the mid-Proterozoic period has evolutionary implications since essential trace metals are redox sensitive. The findings suggest that there is global lack of oxygen in seawater.

  2. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  3. Lunar production of oxygen by electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Rudolf

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches to prepare oxygen from lunar resources by direct electrolysis are discussed. Silicates can be melted or dissolved in a fused salt and electrolyzed with oxygen evolved at the anode. Direct melting and electrolysis is potentially a very simple process, but high temperatures of 1400-1500 C are required, which aggravates materials problems. Operating temperatures can be lowered to about 1000 C by employing a molten salt flux. In this case, however, losses of electrolyte components must be avoided. Experimentation on both approaches is progressing.

  4. Atomic Oxygen Used to Restore Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Techniques developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to produce atomic oxygen in order to simulate the low-Earth-orbit environment for spacecraft materials testing can also be applied in the field of art restoration. Defaced or fire-damaged artwork can be treated with atomic oxygen to remove the damage and enable restoration that could not be accomplished with conventional methods. The process has been patented (U.S. Patents 5,560,781 and 5,693,241) and has been used to restore several works of art.

  5. Oxygen consumption by conserved archaeological wood.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin N; Matthiesen, Henning

    2013-07-01

    Rates of oxygen consumption have been measured over extended time periods for 29 whole samples of conserved, archaeological wood and four samples of fresh, unconserved wood, at 50% relative humidity and room temperature. Samples from the Swedish Warship Vasa and the Danish Skuldelev Viking ships are included. Most rates were close to 1 μg O2 (g wood)(-1) day(-1) and the process persisted for several years at least. Consumption of oxygen is related to change in chemical composition, which is, in turn, related to degradation. It is thus demonstrated that despite conservation, waterlogged archaeological wood continues to degrade in a museum climate.

  6. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  7. The influence of reactive oxygen species on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Redox conditions in natural waters are a fundamental control on biogeochemical processes and ultimately many ecosystem functions. While the dioxygen/water redox couple controls redox thermodynamics in oxygenated aquatic environments on geological timescales, it is kinetically inert in the extracellular environment on the much shorter timescales on which many biogeochemical processes occur. Instead, electron transfer processes on these timescales are primarily mediated by a relatively small group of trace metals and stable radicals, including the reactive oxygen species superoxide. Such processes are of critical biogeochemical importance because many of these chemical species are scarce nutrients, but may also be toxic at high concentrations. Furthermore, their bioavailability and potentially toxicity is typically strongly influenced by their redox state. In this paper, I examine to what extent redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters are expected to be reflected in the redox states of labile redox-active compounds that readily exchange electrons with the dioxygen/superoxide redox couple, and potentially with each other. Additionally, I present the hypothesis that that the relative importance of the dioxygen/superoxide and superoxide/hydrogen peroxide redox couples exerts a governing control on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters on biogeochemically important timescales. Given the recent discovery of widespread extracellular superoxide production by a diverse range of organisms, this suggests the existence of a fundamental mechanism for organisms to tightly regulate local redox conditions in their extracellular environment in oxygenated natural waters.

  8. Oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Accepting that oxygen, rather than gigantic gems or gold, is likely to make the Moon's Klondike, the extraction of oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis has chosen to be investigated. Process theory and proposed lunar factory are addressed.

  9. Oxygen generator for medical applications (USIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    The overall Project objective is to develop a portable, non-cryogenic oxygen generator capable of supplying medical grade oxygen at sufficient flow rates to allow the field application of the Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT{reg_sign}) developed by Numotech, Inc. This project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) and is managed by collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Numotech, Inc, and LLC SPE 'Spektr-Conversion.' The project had two phases, with the objective of Phase I being to develop, build and test a laboratory prototype of the membrane-pressure swing adsorber (PSA) system producing at 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum of 98% oxygen purity. Phase II objectives were to further refine and identify the pre-requisites needed for a commercial product and to determine the feasibility of producing 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum oxygen purity of 99%. In Phase I, Spektr built up the necessary infrastructure to perform experimental work and proceeded to build and demonstrate a membrane-PSA laboratory prototype capable of producing 98% purity oxygen at a flow rate of 5 L/min. Spektr offered a plausible path to scale up the process for 15 L/min. Based on the success and experimental results obtained in Phase I, Spektr performed work in three areas for Phase II: construction of a 15 L/min PSA; investigation of compressor requirements for the front end of the membrane/PSA system; and performing modeling and simulation of assess the feasibility of producing oxygen with a purity greater than 99%. Spektr successfully completed all of the tasks under Phase II. A prototype 15 L/min PSA was constructed and operated. Spektr determined that no 'off the shelf' air compressors met all of the specifications required for the membrane-PSA, so a custom compressor will likely need to be built. Modeling and simulation concluded that production of oxygen with purities greater than 99% was possible

  10. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  11. Oxygen Sag and Stream Purification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry; Herwig, Roy

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of water quality related to oxygen sag and stream purification, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) self-purification models; (2) oxygen demand; and (3) reaeration and oxygen transfer. A list of 60 references is also presented. (HM)

  12. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

  13. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Watkins, Casey N.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight-saving potential for aerospace applications in propellant and oxidizer tanks. This application for oxygen tanks presents the challenge of being oxygen compatible in addition to complying with the other required material characteristics. This effort reports on the testing procedures and data obtained in examining and selecting potential composite materials for oxygen tank usage. Impact testing of composites has shown that most of these materials initiate a combustion event when impacted at 72 ft-lbf in the presence of liquid oxygen, though testing has also shown substantial variability in reaction sensitivities to impact. Data for screening of 14 potential composites using the Bruceton method is given herein and shows that the 50-percent reaction frequencies range from 17 to 67 ft-lbf. The pressure and temperature rises for several composite materials were recorded to compare the energy releases as functions of the combustion reactions with their respective reaction probabilities. The test data presented are primarily for a test pressure of 300 psia in liquid oxygen. The impact screening process is compared with oxygen index and autogenous ignition test data for both the composite and the basic resin. The usefulness of these supplemental tests in helping select the most oxygen compatible materials is explored. The propensity for mechanical impact ignition of the composite compared with the resin alone is also examined. Since an ignition-free composite material at the peak impact energy of 72 ft-lbf has not been identified, composite reactivity must be characterized over the impact energy level and operating pressure ranges to provide data for hazard analyses in selecting the best potential material for liquid tank usage.

  14. Where is the oxygen in protostellar outflows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Oxygen (O) is the third-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and helium. Despite its high elemental abundance, a good picture of where oxygen is located in low-mass protostellar outflows and jets is missing: we cannot account for > 60% of the oxygen budget in these objects. This hole in our picture means that we currently do not have a good understanding of the dominant cooling processes in outflows jets, despite the fact that [O I] emission at 63 micron is one of the dominant cooling lines, nor how cooling processes evolve with protostellar evolution. To shed light on these processes, we propose to observe the [O I] 63 micron line with SOFIA-GREAT toward five low-mass protostars. As a first step, the velocity-resolved line profile will be decomposed into its constituent components to isolate the relative contributions from the jet and the irradiated outflow. Second, the [O I] line profile will be compared to those of H2O, OH and CO to obtain the relative atomic O abundance with respect to CO, H2O, and OH. Third, the effects of evolution will be examined by observing protostars at different evolutionary stages. These three approaches will allow us to quantify: the oxygen chemistry in warm and hot gas, the relative amounts of material in the outflow and the jet, and finally to start tracing the evolutionary sequence of how feedback evolves with time.

  15. Where is the oxygen in protostellar outflows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars

    Oxygen (O) is the third-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and helium. Despite its high elemental abundance, a good picture of where oxygen is located in low-mass protostellar outflows and jets is missing: we cannot account for > 60% of the oxygen budget in these objects. This hole in our picture means that we currently do not have a good understanding of the dominant cooling processes in outflows jets, despite the fact that [O I] emission at 63 micron is one of the dominant cooling lines, nor how cooling processes evolve with protostellar evolution. To shed light on these processes, we propose to observe the [O I] 63 micron line with SOFIA-GREAT toward seven low-mass protostars. As a first step, the velocity-resolved line profile will be decomposed into its constituent components to isolate the relative contributions from the jet and the irradiated outflow. Second, the [O I] line profile will be compared to those of H2O, OH and CO to obtain the relative atomic O abundance with respect to CO, H2O, and OH. Third, the effects of evolution will be examined by observing protostars at different evolutionary stages. These three approaches will allow us to quantify: the oxygen chemistry in warm and hot gas, the relative amounts of material in the outflow and the jet, and finally to start tracing the evolutionary sequence of how feedback evolves with time.

  16. Oxygen Compatibility Assessment of Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel; Sparks, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Fire hazards are inherent in oxygen systems and a storied history of fires in rocket engine propulsion components exists. To detect and mitigate these fire hazards requires careful, detailed, and thorough analyses applied during the design process. The oxygen compatibility assessment (OCA) process designed by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) can be used to determine the presence of fire hazards in oxygen systems and the likelihood of a fire. This process may be used as both a design guide and during the approval process to ensure proper design features and material selection. The procedure for performing an OCA is a structured step-by-step process to determine the most severe operating conditions; assess the flammability of the system materials at the use conditions; evaluate the presence and efficacy of ignition mechanisms; assess the potential for a fire to breach the system; and determine the reaction effect (the potential loss of life, mission, and system functionality as the result of a fire). This process should be performed for each component in a system. The results of each component assessment, and the overall system assessment, should be recorded in a report that can be used in the short term to communicate hazards and their mitigation and to aid in system/component development and, in the long term, to solve anomalies that occur during engine testing and operation.

  17. Mixed oxygen ion/electron-conducting ceramics for oxygen separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Armstrong, B.L.

    1996-08-01

    Mixed oxygen ion and electron-conducting ceramics are unique materials that can passively separate high purity oxygen from air. Oxygen ions move through a fully dense ceramic in response to an oxygen concentration gradient, charge-compensated by an electron flux in the opposite direction. Compositions in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, perovskites where M=Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N=Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, have been prepared and their electrical, oxygen permeation, oxygen vacancy equilibria, and catalytic properties evaluated. Tubular forms, disks, and asymmetric membrane structures, a thin dense layer on a porous support of the same composition, have been fabricated for testing purposes. In an oxygen partial gradient, the passive oxygen flux through fully dense structures was highly dependent on composition. An increase in oxygen permeation with increased temperature is attributed to both enhanced oxygen vacancy mobility and higher vacancy populations. Highly acceptor-doped compositions resulted in oxygen ion mobilities more than an order of magnitude higher than yttria-stabilized zirconia. The mixed conducting ceramics have been utilized in a membrane reactor configuration to upgrade methane to ethane and ethylene. Conditions were established to balance selectivity and throughput in a catalytic membrane reactor constructed from mixed conducting ceramics.

  18. Lunar oxygen production by pyrolysis of regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, Constance L.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen represents one of the most desirable products of lunar mining and manufacturing. Among the many processes which have been proposed for oxygen production, pyrolysis stands out as one which is uncomplicated and easy to bootstrap. Pyrolysis or vapor-phase reduction involves heating regolith to temperatures sufficient to allow partial decomposition and vaporization. Some metal oxides give up oxygen upon heating, either in the gas phase to form reduced gaseous species or in the condensed phase to form a metallic phase. Based on preliminary experiments and equilibrium calculations, the temperatures needed for pyrolysis are expected to be in the range of 2000 to 2200 K, giving total gas pressures of 0.001 to 0.1 torr. Bulk regolith can be used as a feedstock without beneficiation with concentrated solar radiation supplying most of energy needed. Further, selective condensation of metal-containing species from the gas phase may yield metallic iron and silicon as byproducts.

  19. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon

    1991-01-01

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  20. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  1. First oxygen from lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, M. A.; Knudsen, C. W.; Brueneman, D. J.; Kanamori, H.; Ness, R. O.; Sharp, L. L.; Brekke, D. W.; Allen, C. C.; Morris, R. V.; Keller, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Carbotek/Shimizu process to produce oxygen from lunar soils has been successfully demonstrated on actual lunar samples in laboratory facilities at Carbotek with Shimizu funding and support. Apollo sample 70035 containing approximately 25 percent ilmenite (FeTiO3) was used in seven separate reactions with hydrogen varying temperature and pressure: FeTiO3 + H2 yields Fe + TiO2 + H2O. The experiments gave extremely encouraging results as all ilmenite was reduced in every experiment. The lunar ilmenite was found to be about twice as reactive as terrestrial ilmenite samples. Analytical techniques of the lunar and terrestrial ilmenite experiments performed by NASA Johnson Space Center include iron Mossbauer spectroscopy (FeMS), optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and XRD. The Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota performed three SEM techniques (point count method, morphology determination, elemental mapping), XRD, and optical microscopy.

  2. Experimental sensitivity analysis of oxygen transfer in the capillary fringe.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Christina M; Cirpka, Olaf A; Rolle, Massimo; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen transfer in the capillary fringe (CF) is of primary importance for a wide variety of biogeochemical processes occurring in shallow groundwater systems. In case of a fluctuating groundwater table two distinct mechanisms of oxygen transfer within the capillary zone can be identified: vertical predominantly diffusive mass flux of oxygen, and mass transfer between entrapped gas and groundwater. In this study, we perform a systematic experimental sensitivity analysis in order to assess the influence of different parameters on oxygen transfer from entrapped air within the CF to underlying anoxic groundwater. We carry out quasi two-dimensional flow-through experiments focusing on the transient phase following imbibition to investigate the influence of the horizontal flow velocity, the average grain diameter of the porous medium, as well as the magnitude and the speed of the water table rise. We present a numerical flow and transport model that quantitatively represents the main mechanisms governing oxygen transfer. Assuming local equilibrium between the aqueous and the gaseous phase, the partitioning process from entrapped air can be satisfactorily simulated. The different experiments are monitored by measuring vertical oxygen concentration profiles at high spatial resolution with a noninvasive optode technique as well as by determining oxygen fluxes at the outlet of the flow-through chamber. The results show that all parameters investigated have a significant effect and determine different amounts of oxygen transferred to the oxygen-depleted groundwater. Particularly relevant are the magnitude of the water table rise and the grain size of the porous medium.

  3. A simple, inexpensive, hyperthermal atomic oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. P.; Pettigrew, P. J.; Raikar, G. N.; Gregory, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    With the increasing duration of space flights, the development of a permanent facility in space, and the increasing use of ground-based hyperthermal atomic oxygen sources there is a need for a simple instrument to provide long-term monitoring of the beam flux. Such an instrument can also be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate the material degradation process. Reliance on models of the upper atmosphere to determine the fluence of atomic oxygen is not only necessarily complex but also imprecise due to the strong dependence of oxygen concentration on day/night, latitude, and solar activity. Mass spectroscopy, the traditional method for determining the gas phase species densities at low pressure, is not only expensive but is limited in the area that it can monitor as well as subject to effects of material degradation. Our group has developed a simple and inexpensive dosimeter to measure the atomic oxygen fluence via the change in resistance as the sensor element is gradually oxidized. The sensors consist of thin-film circuit elements of selected material deposited on a suitable substrate. Four-point resistance measurements are used to monitor the change in sensor resistance with respect to time. Results obtained from silver and carbon dosimeters flown on STS-46 (CONCAP-II-01) indicate that such sensors are sensitive enough to monitor the diurnal variations in atomic oxygen distribution and sufficiently durable to last the lifetime of a mission.

  4. Oxygen and the evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    While a considerable amount of evidence has been accumulated about the history of oxygen on this planet, little is known about the relative amounts to which primitive cells might have been exposed. One clue may be found in the metabolic pathways of extant microorganisms. While eucaryotes are principally aerobic organisms, a number are capable of anaerobic growth by fermentation. One such eucaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, will grow in the complete absence of oxygen when supplemented with unsaturated fatty acid and sterol. Oxygen-requiring enzymes are involved in the synthesis of both of these compounds. Studies have demonstrated that the oxidative desaturation of palmitic acid and the conversion of squalene to sterols occur in the range of 10-(3) to 10(-2) PAL. Thus, if the oxygen requirements of these enzymatic processes are an indication, eucaryotes might be more primitive than anticipated from the microfossil record. Results of studies on the oxygen requirements for sterol and unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in a more primitive procaryotic system are also discussed.

  5. Oxygen extraction from lunar soil by fluorination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seboldt, W.; Lingner, S.; Hoernes, S.; Grimmeisen, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mining and processing of lunar material could possibly lead to more cost-efficient scenarios for permanent presence of man in space and on the Moon. Production of oxygen for use as propellant seems especially important. Different candidate processes for oxygen-extraction from lunar soil were proposed, of which the reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen was studied most. This process, however, needs the concentration of ilmenite from lunar regolith to a large extent and releases oxygen only with low efficiency. Another possibility - the fluorination method - which works with lunar bulk material as feedstock is discussed. Liberation of oxygen from silicate or oxide materials by fluorination methods has been applied in geoscience since the early sixties. The fact that even at moderate temperatures 98 to 100 percent yields can be attained, suggests that fluorination of lunar regolith could be an effective way of propellant production. Lunar soil contains about 50 percent oxygen by weight which is gained nearly completely through this process as O2 gas. The second-most element Si is liberated as gaseous SiF4. It could be used for production of Si-metal and fluorine-recycling. All other main elements of lunar soil will be converted into solid fluorides which also can be used for metal-production and fluorine-recycling. Preliminary results of small scale experiments with different materials are discussed, giving information on specific oxygen-yields and amounts of by-products as functions of temperature. These experiments were performed with an already existing fluorine extraction and collection device at the University of Bonn, normally used for determination of oxygen-isotopic abundances. Optimum conditions, especially concerning energy consumption, are investigated. Extrapolation of the experimental results to large industrial-type plants on the Moon is tried and seems to be promising at first sight. The recycling of the fluorine is, however, crucial for the process. It

  6. Recent advances in the evaluation of the oxygen transfer rate in oak barrels.

    PubMed

    del Alamo-Sanza, María; Nevares, Ignacio

    2014-09-03

    The entry of atmospheric oxygen into wine barrels is a desirable characteristic of the wine aging process. The oxygen transfer rate regulates changes in wine affecting aging rates because some barrels may undergo a greater wine oxygenation. This study measured the transfer rate and oxygen distribution within a barrel. The analysis confirmed the presence of a dissolved oxygen concentration gradient in the liquid, with greater concentrations near the bung. The study of the transfer rate of oxygen over time, in 12 barrels of different types, showed that wetting wood reduces oxygen diffusion and the oxygen transfer rate (OTR). These results are the first to determine the kinetics of oxygen entry into wine barrels and can be used to quantify the annual rate of oxygen entry into wine barrels.

  7. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, Srikanth

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  9. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    FOXY system, on various rat breast tumor size (months 14- 30). Instead of single-channel NIRS, steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SSDRS...combination of normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen interventions) simultaneously monitored by steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SSDRS) and...simultaneously by steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SSDRS) and FOXY oxygen sensor in response to normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen

  10. Solar Forbidden Oxygen, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-10-01

    Recent large reductions in the solar oxygen abundance, based on synthesis of photospheric O I, OH, and CO absorptions with 3D convection models, have provoked consternation in the helioseismology community: the previous excellent agreement between measured p-mode oscillation frequencies and predictions based on the recommended epsilonO of a decade ago (680 parts per million [ppm] relative to hydrogen) unravels at the new low value (460 ppm). In an attempt to reconcile these conflicting results, the formation of pivotal [O I] λ6300, which is blended with a weak Ni I line, has been reconsidered, exploiting an alternative 3D model (albeit only a single temporal snapshot). And while there are several areas of agreement with the earlier [O I] studies of Allende Prieto, Asplund, and others, there is one crucial point of disagreement: the epsilonO derived here is significantly larger, 650 +/- 65 ppm (although at the expense of a ~30% weaker Ni I line than expected from the recommended nickel abundance). One innovation is a more robust treatment of the solar wavelengths: the balance between the components of the [O I] + Ni I blend is sensitive to velocity errors of only a few hundred m s-1. A second improvement is enforcement of a "continuum calibration" to ensure a self-consistent 3D temperature scale. Because of the renewed agreement between the linchpin tracer [O I] and seismic oxygen, the proposed downward slump of the solar metallicity and the perceived "oxygen crisis" now can be said to rest on less secure footings.

  11. Oxygen supplies in disaster management.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Thomas C; Branson, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Mass casualty events and disasters, both natural and human-generated, occur frequently around the world and can generate scores of injured or ill victims in need of resources. Of the available medical supplies, oxygen remains the critical consumable resource in disaster management. Strategic management of oxygen supplies in disaster scenarios remains a priority. Hospitals have large supplies of liquid oxygen and a supply of compressed gas oxygen cylinders that allow several days of reserve, but a large influx of patients from a disaster can strain these resources. Most backup liquid oxygen supplies are attached to the main liquid system and supply line. In the event of damage to the main system, the reserve supply is rendered useless. The Strategic National Stockpile supplies medications, medical supplies, and equipment to disaster areas, but it does not supply oxygen. Contracted vendors can deliver oxygen to alternate care facilities in disaster areas, in the form of concentrators, compressed gas cylinders, and liquid oxygen. Planning for oxygen needs following a disaster still presents a substantial challenge, but alternate care facilities have proven to be valuable in relieving pressure from the mass influx of patients into hospitals, especially for those on home oxygen who require only an electrical source to power their oxygen concentrator.

  12. Biological oxygen productivity during the last 60,000 years from triple oxygen isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunier, Thomas; Barnett, Bruce; Bender, Michael L.; Hendricks, Melissa B.

    2002-07-01

    The oxygen isotope signature of atmospheric O2 is linked to the isotopic signature of seawater (H2O) through photosynthesis and respiration. Fractionation during these processes is mass dependent, affecting δ17O about half as much as δ18O. An ``anomalous'' fractionation process, which changes δ17O and δ18O of O2 about equally, takes place during isotope exchange between O2 and CO2 in the stratosphere. The relative rates of biologic O2 production and stratospheric processing determine the relationship between δ17O and δ18O of O2 in the atmosphere. Variations of this relationship thus allow us to estimate changes in the rate of mass-dependent O2 production by photosynthesis versus the rate of O2-CO2 exchange in the stratosphere with about equal fractionations of δ17O and δ18O. In this study we reconstruct total oxygen productivity for the last glacial, the last glacial termination, and the early Holocene from the triple isotope composition of atmospheric oxygen trapped in ice cores. With a box model we estimate that total biogenic productivity was only ~76-83% of today for the glacial and was probably lower than today during the glacial-interglacial transition and the early Holocene. Depending on how reduced the oxygen flux from the land biosphere was during the glacial, the oxygen flux from the glacial ocean biosphere was 88-140% of its present value.

  13. Timescales of Oxygenation Following the Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lewis M; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-03-01

    Among the most important bioenergetic innovations in the history of life was the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis-autotrophic growth by splitting water with sunlight-by Cyanobacteria. It is widely accepted that the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis ultimately resulted in the rise of oxygen by ca. 2.35 Gya, but it is debated whether this occurred more or less immediately as a proximal result of the evolution of oxygenic Cyanobacteria or whether they originated several hundred million to more than one billion years earlier in Earth history. The latter hypothesis involves a prolonged period during which oxygen production rates were insufficient to oxidize the atmosphere, potentially due to redox buffering by reduced species such as higher concentrations of ferrous iron in seawater. To examine the characteristic timescales for environmental oxygenation following the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, we applied a simple mathematical approach that captures many of the salient features of the major biogeochemical fluxes and reservoirs present in Archean and early Paleoproterozoic surface environments. Calculations illustrate that oxygenation would have overwhelmed redox buffers within ~100 kyr following the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, a geologically short amount of time unless rates of primary production were far lower than commonly expected. Fundamentally, this result arises because of the multiscale nature of the carbon and oxygen cycles: rates of gross primary production are orders of magnitude too fast for oxygen to be masked by Earth's geological buffers, and can only be effectively matched by respiration at non-negligible O2 concentrations. These results suggest that oxygenic photosynthesis arose shortly before the rise of oxygen, not hundreds of millions of years before it.

  14. Timescales of Oxygenation Following the Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Lewis M.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-03-01

    Among the most important bioenergetic innovations in the history of life was the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis—autotrophic growth by splitting water with sunlight—by Cyanobacteria. It is widely accepted that the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis ultimately resulted in the rise of oxygen by ca. 2.35 Gya, but it is debated whether this occurred more or less immediately as a proximal result of the evolution of oxygenic Cyanobacteria or whether they originated several hundred million to more than one billion years earlier in Earth history. The latter hypothesis involves a prolonged period during which oxygen production rates were insufficient to oxidize the atmosphere, potentially due to redox buffering by reduced species such as higher concentrations of ferrous iron in seawater. To examine the characteristic timescales for environmental oxygenation following the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, we applied a simple mathematical approach that captures many of the salient features of the major biogeochemical fluxes and reservoirs present in Archean and early Paleoproterozoic surface environments. Calculations illustrate that oxygenation would have overwhelmed redox buffers within ~100 kyr following the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, a geologically short amount of time unless rates of primary production were far lower than commonly expected. Fundamentally, this result arises because of the multiscale nature of the carbon and oxygen cycles: rates of gross primary production are orders of magnitude too fast for oxygen to be masked by Earth's geological buffers, and can only be effectively matched by respiration at non-negligible O2 concentrations. These results suggest that oxygenic photosynthesis arose shortly before the rise of oxygen, not hundreds of millions of years before it.

  15. Simulation of the kinetics of oxygen complexes in crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo Lee, Young; von Boehm, J.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2002-10-01

    The formation kinetics of thermal double donors (TDD's) is studied by a general kinetic model with parameters based on accurate ab initio total-energy calculations. The kinetic model includes all relevant association, dissociation, and restructuring processes. The simulated kinetics agrees qualitatively and in most cases quantitatively with the experimentally found consecutive kinetics of TDD's. It also supports our earlier assignments of the ring-type oxygen chains to TDD's [Pesola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5343 (2000)]. We demonstrate with the kinetic model that the most common assumption that only the O2 dimer acts as a fast diffusing species would lead to an unrealistic steady increase of the concentration of O3. The neglect of restructuring processes leads to an anomalous increase of oxygen dimers and negligible concentrations of TDD's. The capture of interstitial oxygens by diffusing oxygen chains and the escaping of interstitial oxygens from the chains fully dominate the formation kinetics.

  16. Hyperthermal atomic oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Wu, Dongchuan

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the transport properties of oxygen through silver was continued. Specifically, experiments measuring the transport through Ag(111), Ag(110), Ag(100) single crystals and through Ag0.05 Zr alloy were completed. In addition, experiments using glow discharge excitation of oxygen to assist in the transport were completed. It was found that the permeability through the different orientations of single crystal Ag was the same, but significant differences existed in the diffusivity. The experimental ratio of diffusivities, however, was in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates. Since the solubilities of orientations must be the same, this suggests some problems with the assumption K = DS. The glow discharge experiments show that there is a substantial increase in transport (factor of six) when the upstream pressure is dissociated to some fraction of atoms (which have a much higher sticking coefficient). These results indicate that there is a significant surface limitation because of dissociative adsorption of the molecules. Experiments with the Ag0.05 Zr alloy and its high-grain boundary and defect density show a permeability of greater than a factor of two over ordinary polycrystalline Ag, but it is unclear as to whether this is because of enhanced transport through these defects or whether the Zr and defects on the surface increased the sticking coefficient and therefore the transport.

  17. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zigui; Plonczak, Pawel J.; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2016-11-08

    A method is described of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.7Fe.sub.0.3O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation layer, (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer, and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.3Fe.sub.0.7O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous surface exchange layer. Firing the said fuel activation and separation layers in nitrogen atmosphere unexpectedly allows the separation layer to sinter into a fully densified mass.

  18. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  19. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2016-11-15

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  20. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2014-08-05

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  1. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  2. VERTEX: manganese transport through oxygen minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John H.; Knauer, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Manganese transport through a well-developed oxygen minimum was studied off central Mexico (18°N, 108°W) in October-November 1981 as part of the VERTEX (Vertical Transport and Exchange) research program. Refractory, leachable and dissolved Mn fractions associated with particulates caught in traps set at eight depths (120-1950 m) were analyzed. Particles entering the oxygen minimum had relatively large Mn loads; however, as the particulates sank further into the minimum, total Mn fluxes steadily decreased from 190 nmol m -2 day -1 at 120 m to 36 nmol m -2 day -1 at 400 m. Manganese fluxes then steadily increased in the remaining 800-1950 m, reaching rates of up to 230 nmol m -2 day -1 at 1950 m. Manganese concentrations were also measured in the water column. Dissolved Mn levels < 3.0 nmol kg -1 were consistently observed within the 150-600 m depth interval. In contrast, suspended particulate leachable Mn amounts were especially low at those depths, and never exceeded 0.04 nmol kg -1. The combined water column and particle trap data clearly indicate that Mn is released from particles as they sink through the oxygen minimum. Rate-of-change estimates based on trap flux data yield regeneration rates of up to 0.44 nmol kg -1 yr -1 in the upper oxygen minimum (120-200 m). However, only 30% of the dissolved Mn in the oxygen minimum appears to be from sinking particulate regeneration; the other 70% probably results from continental-slope-release-horizontal-transport processes. Dissolved Mn scavenges back onto particles as oxygen levels begin to increase with depth. Scavenging rates ranging from -0.03 to -0.09 nmol kg -1 yr -1 were observed at depths from 700 to 1950 m. These scavenging rates result in Mn residence times of 16-19 years, and scavenging rate constants on the order of 0.057 yr -1. Manganese removal via scavenging on sinking particles below the oxygen minimum is balanced by Mn released along continental boundaries and transported horizontally via advective

  3. The mechanism of the reaction of hard coal with oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Kucher, R.V.; Saranchuk, V.I.; Opeida, I.A.; Dumbai, I.N.; Galushko, L.Ya.

    1982-01-01

    Chemi-luminescent methods, gas-liquid chromatography and microcolorimetric measurements have been used to elucidate the effects of initiators and inhibitors on the process of oxidation of bituminous coal with oxygen.

  4. Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfpa.org Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen The air is normally 21% oxygen. Oxygen is not flammable, but fire needs it to burn. ¾ When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn ...

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-05-01

    been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  6. Collisions of Electrons with Atomic Oxygen: Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. V.; Kanik, I.; Tayal, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1990, two significant reviews of electron-atomic-oxygen collision processes were published. Since that time, a large volume of both experimental and theoretical research into these processes has occurred. These data are reviewed and recommendations regarding existing data sets and future research in this area are made. Attention is given to the challenges associated with handling atomic oxygen in terms of both experiment and theory.

  7. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queste, Bastien Y.; Fernand, Liam; Jickells, Timothy D.; Heywood, Karen J.; Hind, Andrew J.

    2016-02-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≍ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high-resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD), dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter, and fluorescence during a 3-day deployment.The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small-scale events (< 200 m or 6 h) that supply oxygenated water to the bottom layer at a rate of 2 ± 1 µmol dm-3 day-1. Benthic and pelagic oxygen sinks, quantified through glider observations and past studies, indicate more gradual background consumption rates of 2.5 ± 1 µmol dm-3 day-1. This budget revealed that the balance of oxygen supply and demand is in agreement with previous studies of the North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8 ± 0.3 µmol dm-3 day-1, indicating a localized or short-lived (< 200 m or 6 h) increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localized depocentres and rapid remineralization of resuspended organic matter.The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date

  8. Guide for Oxygen Compatibility Assessments on Oxygen Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and preventing fire hazards is necessary when designing, maintaining, and operating oxygen systems. Ignition risks can be minimized by controlling heat sources and using materials that will not ignite or will not support burning in the end-use environment. Because certain materials are more susceptible to ignition in oxygen-enriched environments, a compatibility assessment should be performed before the component is introduced into an oxygen system. This document provides an overview of oxygen fire hazards and procedures that are consistent with the latest versions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards G63 (1999) and G94 (2005) to address fire hazards associated with oxygen systems. This document supersedes the previous edition, NASA Technical Memorandum 104823, Guide for Oxygen Hazards Analyses on Components and Systems (1996). The step-by-step oxygen compatibility assessment method described herein (see Section 4) enables oxygen-system designers, system engineers, and facility managers to determine areas of concern with respect to oxygen compatibility and, ultimately, prevent damage to a system or injury to personnel.

  9. Molecular oxygen observed by direct photoproduction from carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Erattupuzha, Sonia; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Baltuška, Andrius; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2017-01-01

    We report experiments on the direct observation of molecular oxygen formation from CO2 in strong laser fields with a reaction microscope. Our accompanying simulations and pump-probe measurements suggest that CO2 molecules undergo bending motion during strong-field ionization which supports the molecular oxygen formation process. The observation of molecular oxygen formation from CO2 may trigger further experimental and theoretical studies on such processes with laser pulses, and provides hints in studies of the O2 and O2+ abundance in CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres.

  10. Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  11. Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Zhang, Liping; Benemann, John R.; Forestier, Marc; Ghirardi, Maria; Seibert, Michael

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  12. Oxygen-transfer reactions of methylrhenium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Omar, M.M.; Espenson, J.H.; Appelman, E.H.

    1996-12-18

    Methylrhenium dioxide, CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 2} (or MDO), is produced from methylrhenium trioxide, CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} (or MTO), and hypophosphorous acid in acidic aqueous medium. Its mechanism is discussed in light of MTO`s coordination ability and the inverse kinetic isotope effect (kie): H{sub 2}P(O)OH, k = 0.028 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}; D{sub 2}P(O)OH, k = 0.039 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The Re(V) complex, MDO, reduces perchlorate and other inorganic oxoanions (XO{sub n}{sup -}, where X = Cl, Br, or I and N = 4 or 3). The rate is controlled by the first oxygen abstraction from perchlorate to give chlorate, with a second-order rate constant at pH 0 and 25 {degrees}C of 7.3 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Organic oxygen-donors such as sulfoxides and pyridine N-oxides oxidize MDO to MTO as do metal oxo complexes: VO{sup 2+}{sub (aq)}, VO{sub 2}{sup +}{sub (aq)}, HOMoO{sub 2}{sup +}{sub (aq)}, and MnO{sub 4}{sup -}. The reaction between V{sup 2+}{sub (aq)} with MTO and the reduction of VO{sup 2+} with MDO made it possible to determine the free energy for MDO/MTO. Oxygen-atom transfer from oxygen-donors to MDO involves nucleophilic attack of X-O on the electrophilic Re(V) center of MDO; the reaction proceeds via an [MDO{center_dot}XO] adduct, which is supported by the saturation kinetics observed for some. The parameters that control and facilitate the kinetics of such oxygen-transfer processes are suggested and include the force constant for the asymmetric stretching of the element-oxygen bond.

  13. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  14. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report

  15. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation.

  16. Measurement of oxygen transfer from air into organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Hobisch, Mathias; Borisov, Sergey; Klimant, Ingo; Krühne, Ulrich; Woodley, John M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The use of non‐aqueous organic media is becoming increasingly important in many biotechnological applications in order to achieve process intensification. Such media can be used, for example, to directly extract poorly water‐soluble toxic products from fermentations. Likewise many biological reactions require the supply of oxygen, most normally from air. However, reliable online measurements of oxygen concentration in organic solvents (and hence oxygen transfer rates from air to the solvent) has to date proven impossible due to limitations in the current analytical methods. RESULTS For the first time, online oxygen measurements in non‐aqueous media using a novel optical sensor are demonstrated. The sensor was used to measure oxygen concentration in various organic solvents including toluene, THF, isooctane, DMF, heptane and hexane (which have all been shown suitable for several biological applications). Subsequently, the oxygen transfer rates from air into these organic solvents were measured. CONCLUSION The measurement of oxygen transfer rates from air into organic solvents using the dynamic method was established using the solvent resistant optical sensor. The feasibility of online oxygen measurements in organic solvents has also been demonstrated, paving the way for new opportunities in process control. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27773958

  17. The oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex

    The properties of the oxygen isotopes provide diverse examples of progress made in experiments and theory. This chain of isotopes has been studied from beyond the proton drip line in 12O to beyond the neutron drip line in 25,26O. This short survey starts with the microscopic G matrix approach for 18O of Kuo and Brown in the 1960’s and shows how theory has evolved. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 24O is particularly simple in terms of the nuclear shell model. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 16O exhibits the coexistence of single-particle and collective structure.

  18. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  19. A Small Oxygen Concentrator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    150- S40- 20- 10 0 0 10 i0 30 40 NUIT PRESS=R (psig Figure 7. Percentage of oxygen. versus inlet pressure when using Soc with 131 molecular s ieve. 70...chick valve ano *move the plunger and spring. Disca the plunger; the spring will W• reused. Mill a SS sleeve to 0.535" 0.0. and 0.50" I.D. and press tit...the fjur 1" caps. The i n- side of two of the caps is milled flat to a diameteýr of 7/8". P-Kace one ena of a 10’, length of 1/2" SS tube in each Of

  20. Microdistribution of oxygen in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgai, A.; Chi, J. Y.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    The microdistribution of oxygen in Czochralskii-grown, p-type silicon crystals was determined by using the SEM in the EBIC mode in conjunction with spreading resistance measurements. When the conductivity remained p-type, bands of contrast were observed in the EBIC image which corresponded to maxima in resistivity. When at the oxygen concentration maxima the oxygen donor concentration exceeded the p-type dopant concentration, an inversion of the conductivity occurred. It resulted in the formation of p-n junctions in a striated configuration and the local inversion of the EBIC image contrast. By heat-treating silicon at 1000 C prior to the activation of oxygen donors, some silicon-oxygen micro-precipitates were observed in the EBIC image within the striated oxygen concentration maxima.

  1. Saturn's Stratospheric Oxygen Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Paul N.; Delgado Díaz, Héctor E.; Bjoraker, Gordon; Hesman, Brigette; Achterberg, Richard

    2016-10-01

    There are three known oxygenated species present in Saturn's upper atmosphere: H2O, CO and CO2. The ultimate source of the water must be external to Saturn as Saturn's cold tropopause effectively prevents any internal water from reaching the upper atmosphere. The carbon monoxide and dioxide source(s) could be internal, external, produced by the photochemical interaction of water with Saturn's stratospheric hydrocarbons or some combination of all of these. At this point it is not clear what the external source(s) are.Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O and CO2 (Hesman et al., DPS 2015, 311.16 & Abbas et al. 2013, Ap. J. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/776/2/73) on Saturn. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using CIRS retrieved temperatures, the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level can be retrieved and the CO2 mole fraction at ~1-10 mbar. Coupled with ground based observations of CO (Cavalié et al., 2010, A&A, DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/200912909) these observations provide a complete oxygen compound data set to test photochemical models.Preliminary results will be presented with an emphasis on upper limit analysis to determine the percentage of stratospheric CO and CO2 that can be produced photochemically from CIRS observational constraints on the H2O profile.

  2. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies.

  3. Hot oxygen corona of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.H.

    1988-10-01

    Electron dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions in the Venus ionosphere, which may be an important source of suprathermal atomic oxygen, is presently considered as a factor in the Mars exosphere; due to the weaker surface gravitational attraction of Mars, a hot oxygen corona thus formed would be denser than that of Venus at altitudes greater than 2000 km despite Mars' lower ionospheric content. If such an extended oxygen corona does exist on Mars, its collisional interaction with Phobos would lead to the formation of an oxygen gas torus whose average number density is of the order of only 1-2/cu cm along the Phobos orbit. 51 references.

  4. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  6. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: pulsing experiments for cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses for 0.566 ≤ k ≤ 2.3 in oxygenated and deoxygenated sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Doe W; Montague, Fred W; Hudak, Eric M; Mortimer, J Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The application of a train of cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses applied to a platinum electrode resulted in a positive creep of the anodic phase potential that increases with increasing charge injection but reaches a steady-state value before 1000 pulses have been delivered. The increase follows from the fact that charge going into irreversible reactions occurring during the anodic phase must equal the charge going into irreversible reactions during the cathodic phase for charge-balanced pulses. In an oxygenated electrolyte the drift of the measured positive potential moved into the platinum oxidation region of the i(V e) profile when the charge injection level exceeds k = 1.75. Platinum dissolution may occur in this region and k = 1.75 defines a boundary between damaging and non-damaging levels on the Shannon Plot. In a very low oxygen environment, the positive potential remained below the platinum oxidation region for the highest charge injection values studied, k = 2.3. The results support the hypothesis that platinum dissolution is the defining factor for the Shannon limit, k = 1.75. Numerous instrumentation issues were encountered in the course of making measurements. The solutions to these issues are provided.

  7. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: pulsing experiments for cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses for 0.566 ≤ k ≥ 2.3 in oxygenated and deoxygenated sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumsa, Doe W.; Montague, Fred W.; Hudak, Eric M.; Mortimer, J. Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The application of a train of cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses applied to a platinum electrode resulted in a positive creep of the anodic phase potential that increases with increasing charge injection but reaches a steady-state value before 1000 pulses have been delivered. The increase follows from the fact that charge going into irreversible reactions occurring during the anodic phase must equal the charge going into irreversible reactions during the cathodic phase for charge-balanced pulses. In an oxygenated electrolyte the drift of the measured positive potential moved into the platinum oxidation region of the i(V e) profile when the charge injection level exceeds k = 1.75. Platinum dissolution may occur in this region and k = 1.75 defines a boundary between damaging and non-damaging levels on the Shannon Plot. In a very low oxygen environment, the positive potential remained below the platinum oxidation region for the highest charge injection values studied, k = 2.3. The results support the hypothesis that platinum dissolution is the defining factor for the Shannon limit, k = 1.75. Numerous instrumentation issues were encountered in the course of making measurements. The solutions to these issues are provided.

  8. Extreme ultraviolet photodissociative excitation of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Photodissociation processes in molecular oxygen occurring in the wavelength range from 500 to 900 A, investigated through observations of the resulting atomic fluorescence radiation, are reported. The dispersed radiation from a continuous light source was used to excite the gas, and the resulting fluorescence radiation was observed in the ultraviolet and infrared. The results obtained are compared with the dissociation cross sections derived by Matsunaga and Watanabe (1967).

  9. Extraction of Oxygen from the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanical process was designed for direct extraction of molecular oxygen from the martian atmosphere based on liquefaction of the majority component, CO2, followed by separation of the lower-boiling components. The atmospheric gases are compressed from about 0.007 bar to 13 bar and then cooled to liquefy most of the CO2. The uncondensed gases are further compressed to 30 bar or more, and then cooled again to recover water as ice and to remove much of the remaining CO2. The final gaseous products consisting mostly of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon monoxide are liquefied and purified by cryogenic distillation. The liquefied CO2 is expanded back to the low-pressure atmosphere with the addition of heat to recover a majority of the compression energy and to produce the needed mechanical work. Energy for the process is needed primarily as heat to drive the CO2-based expansion power system. When properly configured, the extraction process can be a net producer of electricity. The conceptual design, termed 'MARRS' for Mars Atmosphere Resource Recovery System, was based on the NASA/JSC Mars Reference Mission (MRM) requirement for oxygen. This mission requires both liquid oxygen for propellant, and gaseous oxygen as a component of air for the mission crew. With single redundancy both for propellant and crew air, the oxygen requirement for the MRM is estimated at 5.8 kg/hr. The process thermal power needed is about 120 kW, which can be provided at 300-500 C. A lower-cost nuclear reactor made largely of stainless steel could serve as the heat source. The chief development needed for MARRS is an efficient atmospheric compression technology, all other steps being derived from conventional chemical engineering separations. The conceptual design describes an exceptionally low-mass compression system that can be made from ultra-lightweight and deployable structures. This system adapts to the rapidly changing martian environment to supply the atmospheric resource to MARRS at

  10. Evolving Oxygen Landscape of the Early Atmosphere and Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, T. W.; Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable advances in our understanding of oxygen on the early Earth, and a new framework, the topic of this presentation, is now in place to address the controls on spatiotemporal distributions of oxygen and their potential relationships to deep-Earth processes. Recent challenges to the Archean biomarker record have put an added burden on inorganic geochemistry to fingerprint and quantify the early production, accumulation, and variation of biospheric oxygen. Fortunately, a wide variety of techniques now point convincingly to photosynthetic oxygen production and dynamic accumulation well before the canonical Great Oxidation Event (GOE). Recent modeling of sulfur recycling over this interval allows for transient oxygen accumulation in the atmosphere without the disappearance of non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulfur isotope anomalies from the stratigraphic record and further allows for persistent accumulation in the atmosphere well before the permanent disappearance of NMD signals. This recent work suggests that the initial rise of oxygen may have occurred in fits and starts rather than a single step, and that once permanently present in the atmosphere, oxygen likely rose to high levels and then plummeted, in phase with the Paleoproterozoic Lomagundi positive carbon isotope excursion. More than a billion years of oxygen-free conditions in the deep ocean followed and set a challenging course for life, including limited abundances and diversity of eukaryotic organisms. Despite this widespread anoxia, sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were likely limited to productive ocean margins. Nevertheless, euxinia was sufficiently widespread to impact redox-dependent nutrient relationships, particularly the availability of bioessential trace metals critical in the nitrogen cycle, which spawned feedbacks that likely maintained oxygen at very low levels in the ocean and atmosphere and delayed the arrival of animals. Then, in the mid, pre-glacial Neoproterozoic

  11. Sources of dissolved oxygen in monitoring and pumping wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, Matthijs; Wols, Bas; Maas, Kees; Stuyfzand, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Groundwater monitoring and pumping wells set in anoxic aquifers require attention to keep the groundwater free of dissolved oxygen (DO). In properly constructed monitoring or pumping wells, two processes can however still introduce oxygen to anoxic groundwater: (1) permeation of oxygen through polymer materials such as silicone, PVC, HDPE or Teflon, and (2) thermally driven convection, which can occur in all types of piezometers or wells, regardless of construction material, when the water table or pressure head is close (<10 m) to the land surface. Here, field measurements (temperature and DO well loggings) from a monitoring well in Bilthoven, the Netherlands, are combined with analytical and numerical modelling to investigate the role of both processes on oxygenation of anoxic groundwater in wells. The results of numerical and analytical modeling show that both permeation and convection can introduce oxygen into anoxic wells to near saturation concentrations. In the field data gathered, convection is primarily responsible for oxygen intrusion up to a depth of around 12 m. Oxygen intrusion through convection and permeation in monitoring and pumping wells may influence groundwater sampling and analyses, and may contribute to well clogging, depending on site conditions. The combination of field and modelling provides new insights into these processes, which can be used for both groundwater sampling and pumping well design.

  12. Oxygen limitation within a bacterial aggregate.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Aimee K; Arshad, Talha A; Fitzpatrick, Mignon; Connell, Jodi L; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Shear, Jason B; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-04-15

    ABSTRACT Cells within biofilms exhibit physiological heterogeneity, in part because of chemical gradients existing within these spatially structured communities. Previous work has examined how chemical gradients develop in large biofilms containing >10(8) cells. However, many bacterial communities in nature are composed of small, densely packed aggregates of cells (≤ 10(5) bacteria). Using a gelatin-based three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy, we confined the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa within picoliter-sized 3D "microtraps" that are permeable to nutrients, waste products, and other bioactive small molecules. We show that as a single bacterium grows into a maximally dense (10(12) cells ml(-1)) clonal population, a localized depletion of oxygen develops when it reaches a critical aggregate size of ~55 pl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that chemical and phenotypic heterogeneity exists on the micrometer scale within small aggregate populations. IMPORTANCE Before developing into large, complex communities, microbes initially cluster into aggregates, and it is unclear if chemical heterogeneity exists in these ubiquitous micrometer-scale aggregates. We chose to examine oxygen availability within an aggregate since oxygen concentration impacts a number of important bacterial processes, including metabolism, social behaviors, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. By determining that oxygen availability can vary within aggregates containing ≤ 10(5) bacteria, we establish that physiological heterogeneity exists within P. aeruginosa aggregates, suggesting that such heterogeneity frequently exists in many naturally occurring small populations.

  13. Nitrogen and Oxygen Photochemistry following SL9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Allen, Mark; Gladstone, G. Randall

    1995-01-01

    The collision of Shoemaker Levy 9 (SL9) with Jupiter caused many new molecular species to be deposited in the Jovian stratosphere. We use a photochemical model to follow the evolution of the impact derived species. Our results regarding the nitrogen and oxygen compounds are presented here. NH3 photolysis initiates the nitrogen photochemistry. Much of the nitrogen ends up in N2, nitrogen-sulfur compounds, and HCN, but NH3 and nitriles such as C2H3CN may also exist in observable quantities for a year or so after the impacts. Oxygen species survive for a long time in the Jovian stratosphere. The only major oxygen containing compounds that exhibit dramatic changes in the lower stratosphere in the first year following the impacts are SO, SO2, and OCS - H2O, CO2, and CO are comparatively stable. We discuss the important photochemical processes operating on the nitrogen and oxygen species in the Jovian stratosphere, make prediction concerning the temporal variation of the major species, and identify molecules that might act as good tracers for atmospheric dynamics.

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and preconditioning for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng-li; Feng, Hua; Xi, Guo-hua

    2016-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic methods for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are still limited. The lack of oxygen supply is critical for brain injury following stroke. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), an approach through a process in which patients breathe in 100% pure oxygen at over 101 kPa, has been shown to facilitate oxygen delivery and increase oxygen supply. Hence, HBO possesses the potentials to produce beneficial effects on stroke. Actually, accumulated basic and clinical evidences have demonstrated that HBO therapy and preconditioning could induce neuroprotective functions via different mechanisms. Nevertheless, the lack of clinical translational study limits the application of HBO. More translational studies and clinical trials are needed in the future to develop effective HBO protocols. PMID:28217297

  15. S-nitrosylation: integrator of cardiovascular performance and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Saptarsi M; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of oxygen to tissues is the primary function of the cardiovascular system. NO, a gasotransmitter that signals predominantly through protein S-nitrosylation to form S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in target proteins, operates coordinately with oxygen in mammalian cellular systems. From this perspective, SNO-based signaling may have evolved as a major transducer of the cellular oxygen-sensing machinery that underlies global cardiovascular function. Here we review mechanisms that regulate S-nitrosylation in the context of its essential role in "systems-level" control of oxygen sensing, delivery, and utilization in the cardiovascular system, and we highlight examples of aberrant S-nitrosylation that may lead to altered oxygen homeostasis in cardiovascular diseases. Thus, through a bird's-eye view of S-nitrosylation in the cardiovascular system, we provide a conceptual framework that may be broadly applicable to the functioning of other cellular systems and physiological processes and that illuminates new therapeutic promise in cardiovascular medicine.

  16. Oxygen Compatibility of Brass-Filled PTFE Compared to Commonly Used Fluorinated Polymers for Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herald, Stephen D.; Frisby, Paul M.; Davis, Samuel Eddie

    2009-01-01

    Safe and reliable seal materials for high-pressure oxygen systems sometimes appear to be extinct species when sought out by oxygen systems designers. Materials that seal well are easy to find, but these materials are typically incompatible with oxygen, especially in cryogenic liquid form. This incompatibility can result in seals that leak, or much worse, seals that easily ignite and burn during use. Materials that are compatible with oxygen are easy to find, such as the long list of compatible metals, but these metallic materials are limiting as seal materials. A material that seals well and is oxygen compatible has been the big game in the designer's safari. Scientists at the Materials Combustion Research Facility (MCRF), part of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are constantly searching for better materials and processes to improve the safety of oxygen systems. One focus of this effort is improving the characteristics of polymers used in the presence of an oxygen enriched environment. Very few systems can be built which contain no polymeric materials; therefore, materials which have good impact resistance, low heat of combustion, high auto-ignition temperature and that maintain good mechanical properties are essential. The scientists and engineers at the Materials Combustion Research Facility, in cooperation with seal suppliers, are currently testing a new formulation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Brass filler. This Brass-filled PTFE is showing great promise as a seal and seat material for high pressure oxygen systems. Early research has demonstrated very encouraging results, which could rank this material as one of the best fluorinated polymers ever tested. This paper will compare the data obtained for Brass-filled PTFE with other fluorinated polymers, such as TFE-Teflon (PTFE) , Kel-F 81, Viton A, Viton A-500, Fluorel , and Algoflon . A similar metal filled fluorinated polymer, Salox-M , was tested in comparison to Brass-filled PTFE to

  17. Mars oxygen production system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Charles E.; Pillow, Linda K.; Perkinson, Robert C.; Brownlie, R. P.; Chwalowski, P.; Carmona, M. F.; Coopersmith, J. P.; Goff, J. C.; Harvey, L. L.; Kovacs, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and construction phase is summarized of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere was assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer compatible data acquisition and control instrumentation is ongoing.

  18. Environmental science: Oceans lose oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Oxygen is essential to most life in the ocean. An analysis shows that oxygen levels have declined by 2% in the global ocean over the past five decades, probably causing habitat loss for many fish and invertebrate species. See Letter p.335

  19. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR FUEL OXYGENATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE (and potentially any other oxygenate) may be present at any petroleum UST site, whether the release is new or old, virtually anywhere in the United States. Consequently, it is prudent to analyze samples for the entire suite of oxygenates as identified in this protocol (i.e....

  20. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-07-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes.