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Sample records for moltox oxygen process

  1. Corrosion study in the chemical air separation (MOLTOX trademark ) process

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Doohee; Wong, Kai P.; Archer, R.A.; Cassano, A.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents the results of studies aimed at solving the corrosion problems encountered during operation of the MOLTOX{trademark} pilot plant. These studies concentrated on the screening of commercial and developmental alloys under conditions simulating operation conditions in this high temperature molten salt process. Process economic studies were preformed in parallel with the laboratory testing to ensure that an economically feasible solution would be achieved. In addition to the above DOE co-funded studies, Air Products and Chemicals pursued proprietary studies aimed at developing a less corrosive salt mixture which would potentially allow the use of chemurgically available alloys such as stainless steels throughout the system. These studies will not be reported here; however, the results of corrosion tests in the new less corrosive salt mixtures are reported. Because our own studies on salt chemistry impacts heavily on the overall process and thereby has an influence on the experimental work conducted under this contract, some of the studies discussed here were impacted by our own proprietary data. Therefore, the reasons behind some of the experiments presented herein will not be explained because that information is proprietary to Air Products. 14 refs., 42 figs., 21 tabs.

  2. Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Haiqing

    2011-11-15

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a

  3. A modified sulfate process to lunar oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    A modified sulfate process which produces oxygen from iron oxide-bearing minerals in lunar soil is under development. Reaction rates of ilmenite in varying strength sulfuric acid have been determined. Quantitative conversion of ilmenite to ferrous sulfate was observed over a range of temperatures and concentrations. Data has also been developed on the calcination of by-product sulfates. System engineering for overall operability and simplicity has begun, suggesting that a process separating the digestion and sulfate dissolution steps may offer an optimum process.

  4. Integrated etherification and oxygenates to gasoline process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-05-02

    An integrated once through process for the production of ether-rich liquid fuels is described comprising: (a) reacting a fresh mixture of excess methanol in a hydrocarbon feedstock containing C/sub 4/+ isoalkenes in the presence of acidic etherification catalyst under etherification conditions whereby an etherification effluent stream containing methyl tertiary alkyl ethers is produced; (b) separating the etherification effluent stream to provide a first stream comprising ether-rich gasoline and a second stream comprising unreacted methanol and olefinic hydrocarbons; and (c) contacting the second stream with an acidic metallosilicate catalyst under olefinic and oxygenates conversion conditions at elevated temperature whereby C/sub 6/+ gasoline is produced.

  5. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  6. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  7. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process for recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide. The process consists the steps of: introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water and which is divided into a recycle portion and a tailgas portion; converting substantially all sulfur species in the recycle portion of the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide to thereby form condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; removing water from the recycle portion of the condenser; and moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried recycle condenser, as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace.

  8. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, the process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising (1) the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and (2) an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; (b) combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (c) introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; (d) subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (e) introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water; (f) converting substantially all sulfur species in the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide, to thereby form a condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; (g) removing water from the condenser effluent from step (f); and (h) moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried condenser effluent from step (g), as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace in step (a) above.

  9. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C. [Wilmington, DE; Baker, Richard W. [Palo Alto, CA

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  10. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C.

    1984-01-01

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  11. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 1 figure

  12. Nanoparticulate-catalyzed oxygen transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Andrew T.; Breitkopf, Richard C.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticulates of oxygen transfer materials that are oxides of rare earth metals, combinations of rare earth metals, and combinations of transition metals and rare earth metals are used as catalysts in a variety of processes. Unexpectedly large thermal efficiencies are achieved relative to micron sized particulates. Processes that use these catalysts are exemplified in a multistage reactor. The exemplified reactor cracks C6 to C20 hydrocarbons, desulfurizes the hydrocarbon stream and reforms the hydrocarbons in the stream to produce hydrogen. In a first reactor stage the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate mixed rare earth metal oxide to crack larger hydrocarbon molecules. In a second stage, the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate material that desulfurizes the hydrocarbon. In a third stage, the hydrocarbon and steam are passed through a heated, mixed transition metal/rare earth metal oxide to reform the lower hydrocarbons and thereby produce hydrogen. Stages can be alone or combined. Parallel reactors can provide continuous reactant flow. Each of the processes can be carried out individually.

  13. Efficiency evaluation of oxygen enrichment in energy conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bomelburg, H.J.

    1983-12-01

    The extent to which energy conversion efficiencies can be increased by using oxygen or oxygen-enriched air for combustion was studied. Combustion of most fuels with oxygen instead of air was found to have five advantages: increases combustion temperature and efficiency, improves heat transfer at high temperatures, reduces nitrous oxide emissions, permits a high ration of exhaust gas recirculation and allows combustion of certain materials not combustible in air. The same advantages, although to a lesser degree, are apparent with oxygen-enriched air. The cost-effectiveness of the process must necessarily be improved by about 10% when using oxygen instead of air before such use could become justifiable on purely economic terms. Although such a modest increase appears to be attainable in real situations, this study ascertained that it is not possible to generally assess the economic gains. Rather, each case requires its own evaluation. For certain processes industry has already proven that the use of oxygen leads to more efficient plant operation. Several ideas for essentially new applications are described. Specifically, when oxygen is used with exhaust gas recirculation in external or internal combustion engines. It appears also that the advantages of pulse combustion can be amplified further if oxygen is used. When burning wet fuels with oxygen, direct steam generation becomes possible. Oxygen combustion could also improve processes for in situ gasification of coals, oil shales, peats, and other wet fuels. Enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding methods might also become more effective if oxygen is used. The cold energy contained in liquid oxygen can be substantially recovered in the low end of certain thermodynamic cycles. Further efforts to develop certain schemes for using oxygen for combustion appear to be justified from both the technical and economic viewpoints.

  14. Oxygen production on the Lunar materials processing frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenberg, Barbara H.

    1992-01-01

    During the pre-conceptual design phase of an initial lunar oxygen processing facility, it is essential to identify and compare the available processes and evaluate them in order to ensure the success of such an endeavor. The focus of this paper is to provide an overview of materials processing to produce lunar oxygen as one part of a given scenario of a developing lunar occupation. More than twenty-five techniques to produce oxygen from lunar materials have been identified. While it is important to continue research on any feasible method, not all methods can be implemented at the initial lunar facility. Hence, it is necessary during the pre-conceptual design phase to evaluate all methods and determine the leading processes for initial focus. Researchers have developed techniques for evaluating the numerous proposed methods in order to suggest which processes would be best to go to the Moon first. As one section in this paper, the recent evaluation procedures that have been presented in the literature are compared and contrasted. In general, the production methods for lunar oxygen fall into four categories: thermochemical, reactive solvent, pyrolytic, and electrochemical. Examples from two of the four categories are described, operating characteristics are contrasted, and terrestrial analogs are presented when possible. In addition to producing oxygen for use as a propellant and for life support, valuable co-products can be derived from some of the processes. This information is also highlighted in the description of a given process.

  15. Methane Post-Processing for Oxygen Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art United States Atmospheric Revitalization carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is based on the Sabatier reaction process, which recovers approximately 50% of the oxygen (O2) from crew metabolic CO2. Oxygen recovery from carbon dioxide is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing of methane to recover hydrogen with the Umpqua Research Company Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) has the potential to further close the Atmospheric Revitalization oxygen loop. The PPA decomposes methane into hydrogen and hydrocarbons, predominantly acetylene, and a small amount of solid carbon. The hydrogen must then be purified before it can be recycled for additional oxygen recovery. Long duration testing and evaluation of a four crew-member sized PPA and a discussion of hydrogen recycling system architectures are presented.

  16. [Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in inflammatory process].

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Ryszard; Pancewicz, Sławomir A; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Rutkowska, Joanna

    2007-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in every cell during normal oxidation. The most important ROS include: superoxide anion (O2*-), hydroxyl radical (OH*), hydroperoxyl radical (HO2*), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2*-). Reactive oxygen species can react with key cellular structures and molecules altering their biological function. Similarly reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (NO) or peroxinitrite anion (ONOO-) have physiological activity or reacts with different types of molecules to form toxic products. ROS and RNS are important in process of energy generation, lipids peroxidation, protein and DNA oxidation, nitration, nitrosation or nitrosylation and catecholamine response. Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are neutralized by enzymatic activity or natural antioxidants that stop the initial formation of radicals. Overproduction of ROS or RNS results in "oxidative" or "nitrosative" stress which contributes to variety of pathological processes typical for different cancer, neurodegenerative, viral, toxic or inflammatory diseases. PMID:18044345

  17. Sulfur-oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of irradiated sulfur dioxide frost have found that sulfur trioxide should be formed as a consequence of the irradiation process. The spectral reflectance of solid sulfur trioxide was measured in the laboratory and it was found that the compound has strong absorption features at 3.37 and 3.70 microns. These features are not present in the spectral geometric albedo of Io. This is interpreted as an indication that sulfur trioxide may exist in such limited abundance that it is undetectable in disk averaged spectrophotometry. It is suggested that the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft should be able to identify condensed sulfur trioxide on Io particularly in regions bordering the sulfur dioxide deposits. The presence of elemental sulfur on Io's surface has been questioned on several grounds, most notably the suggested production process (quenched molten sulfur extrusions) and the effect of radiation (particularly X-rays) on some of the allotropes. Mixtures of sulfur allotropes were produced in the laboratory by quenching molten sulfur and it was found that the spectra indicate the presence of certain red-colored allotropes which are preserved upon quenching. The color of the sulfur glass produced is redder when the temperature of the original melt is higher. This is consistent with the suggestion that Io's spectral geometric albedo can be partly explained by the presence of quenched sulfur glasses.

  18. Automation and control of off-planet oxygen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.; Schooley, L. S.; Cellier, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the automation and control of off-planet production processes. First, a general approach to process automation and control is discussed from the viewpoint of translating human process control procedures into automated procedures. Second, the control issues for the automation and control of off-planet oxygen processes are discussed. Sensors, instruments, and components are defined and discussed in the context of off-planet applications, and the need for 'smart' components is clearly established.

  19. Processing of metal and oxygen from lunar deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Constance F.

    1992-01-01

    On the moon, some whole rocks may be ores for abundant elements, such as oxygen, but beneficiation will be important if metallic elements are sought from raw lunar dirt. In the extraction process, a beneficiated metallic ore, such as an oxide, sulfide, carbonate, or silicate mineral, is converted to reduced metal. A variety of plausible processing technologies, which includes recovery of meteoritic iron, and processing of lunar ilmenite, are described in this report.

  20. Oxygen production processes on the Moon: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Carrier, W. David, III

    1991-01-01

    The production of oxygen on the Moon utilizing indigenous material is paramount to a successful lunar colonization. Several processes were put forth to accomplish this. The lunar liquid oxygen (LLOX) generation schemes which have received the most study to date are those involving: (1) the reduction of ilmenite (FeTiO3) by H2, C, CO, CH4, CO-Cl2 plasma; (2) magma electrolysis, both unadulterated and fluoride-fluxed, and (3) several others, including carbo-chlorination, HF acid leaching, fluorine extraction, magma oxidation, and vapor pyrolysis. The H2 reduction of ilmenite and magma electrolysis processes have received the most study to date. At this stage of development, they both appear feasible schemes with various pros and cons. However, all processes should be addressed at least at the onset of the considerations. It is ultimatley the energy requirements of the entire process, including the acquisition of feedstock, which will determine the mode of oxygen productions. There is an obvious need for considerably more experimentation and study. Some of these requisite studies are in progress, and several of the most studied and feasible processes for winning oxygen from lunar materials are reviewed.

  1. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    2001-01-09

    A high-yield process for converting lignin into reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline compositions of high quality is provided. The process is a two-stage catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage of the process, a lignin feed material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction, followed by a selective hydrocracking reaction which utilizes a superacid catalyst to produce a high oxygen-content depolymerized lignin product mainly composed of alkylated phenols, alkylated alkoxyphenols, and alkylbenzenes. In the second stage of the process, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to an exhaustive etherification reaction, optionally followed by a partial ring hydrogenation reaction, to produce a reformulated, partially oxygenated/etherified gasoline product, which includes a mixture of substituted phenyl/methyl ethers, cycloalkyl methyl ethers, C.sub.7 -C.sub.10 alkylbenzenes, C.sub.6 -C.sub.10 branched and multibranched paraffins, and alkylated and polyalkylated cycloalkanes.

  2. Processing lunar soils for oxygen and other materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Christian W.; Gibson, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of lunar materials are excellent candidates for lunar oxygen production: ilmenite and silicates such as anorthite. Both are lunar surface minable, occurring in soils, breccias, and basalts. Because silicates are considerably more abundant than ilmenite, they may be preferred as source materials. Depending on the processing method chosen for oxygen production and the feedstock material, various useful metals and bulk materials can be produced as byproducts. Available processing techniques include hydrogen reduction of ilmenite and electrochemical and chemical reductions of silicates. Processes in these categories are generally in preliminary development stages and need significant research and development support to carry them to practical deployment, particularly as a lunar-based operation. The goal of beginning lunar processing operations by 2010 requires that planning and research and development emphasize the simplest processing schemes. However, more complex schemes that now appear to present difficult technical challenges may offer more valuable metal byproducts later. While they require more time and effort to perfect, the more complex or difficult schemes may provide important processing and product improvements with which to extend and elaborate the initial lunar processing facilities. A balanced R&D program should take this into account. The following topics are discussed: (1) ilmenite--semi-continuous process; (2) ilmenite--continuous fluid-bed reduction; (3) utilization of spent ilmenite to produce bulk materials; (4) silicates--electrochemical reduction; and (5) silicates--chemical reduction.

  3. Redox Processes in Neurodegenerative Disease Involving Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2012-01-01

    Much attention has been devoted to neurodegenerative diseases involving redox processes. This review comprises an update involving redox processes reported in the considerable literature in recent years. The mechanism involves reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, usually in the brain. There are many examples including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, prions, Down’s syndrome, ataxia, multiple sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and Tardive Dyskinesia. Evidence indicates a protective role for antioxidants, which may have clinical implications. A multifaceted approach to mode of action appears reasonable. PMID:23730253

  4. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon; Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R.; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-15

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye.

  5. Oxygen-producing inert anodes for SOM process

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B

    2014-02-25

    An electrolysis system for generating a metal and molecular oxygen includes a container for receiving a metal oxide containing a metallic species to be extracted, a cathode positioned to contact a metal oxide housed within the container; an oxygen-ion-conducting membrane positioned to contact a metal oxide housed within the container; an anode in contact with the oxygen-ion-conducting membrane and spaced apart from a metal oxide housed within the container, said anode selected from the group consisting of liquid metal silver, oxygen stable electronic oxides, oxygen stable crucible cermets, and stabilized zirconia composites with oxygen stable electronic oxides.

  6. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS): Beneficial Companions of Plants’ Developmental Processes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rachana; Singh, Samiksha; Parihar, Parul; Mishra, Rohit K.; Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Singh, Vijay P.; Chauhan, Devendra K.; Prasad, Sheo M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated inevitably in the redox reactions of plants, including respiration and photosynthesis. In earlier studies, ROS were considered as toxic by-products of aerobic pathways of the metabolism. But in recent years, concept about ROS has changed because they also participate in developmental processes of plants by acting as signaling molecules. In plants, ROS regulate many developmental processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, programmed cell death, seed germination, gravitropism, root hair growth and pollen tube development, senescence, etc. Despite much progress, a comprehensive update of advances in the understanding of the mechanisms evoked by ROS that mediate in cell proliferation and development are fragmentry and the matter of ROS perception and the signaling cascade remains open. Therefore, keeping in view the above facts, an attempt has been made in this article to summarize the recent findings regarding updates made in the regulatory action of ROS at various plant developmental stages, which are still not well-known. PMID:27729914

  8. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian

    2014-09-09

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  9. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian

    2011-05-10

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  10. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian J.

    2016-08-30

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  11. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek; Pim , Aristidou; Aristos , Rush; Brian

    2007-06-19

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  12. Singlet Oxygen Formation during the Charging Process of an Aprotic Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Wandt, Johannes; Jakes, Peter; Granwehr, Josef; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Eichel, Rüdiger-A

    2016-06-01

    Aprotic lithium-oxygen (Li-O2 ) batteries have attracted considerable attention in recent years owing to their outstanding theoretical energy density. A major challenge is their poor reversibility caused by degradation reactions, which mainly occur during battery charge and are still poorly understood. Herein, we show that singlet oxygen ((1) Δg ) is formed upon Li2 O2 oxidation at potentials above 3.5 V. Singlet oxygen was detected through a reaction with a spin trap to form a stable radical that was observed by time- and voltage-resolved in operando EPR spectroscopy in a purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell. According to our estimate, a lower limit of approximately 0.5 % of the evolved oxygen is singlet oxygen. The occurrence of highly reactive singlet oxygen might be the long-overlooked missing link in the understanding of the electrolyte degradation and carbon corrosion reactions that occur during the charging of Li-O2 cells.

  13. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  14. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  15. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  16. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-11-22

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figs.

  17. The reaction pathways of the oxygen plasma pulse in the hafnium oxide atomic layer deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Hyeongtag; Won, Youngdo

    2008-09-22

    The plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process for the HfO{sub 2} thin film is modeled as simple reactions between Hf(OH){sub 3}NH{sub 2} and reactive oxygen species. The density functional theory calculation was performed for plausible reaction pathways to construct the reaction profile. While the triplet molecular oxygen is unlikely to form a reactive complex, the singlet molecular oxygen forms the stable adduct that goes through the transition state and completes the reaction pathway to the products. Either two singlet or two triplet oxygen atoms make the singlet adduct complex, which follows the same pathway to the product as the singlet molecular oxygen reacts.

  18. Effect of high-oxygen and oxygen-free modified atmosphere packaging on the spoilage process of poultry breast fillets.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Sonja; Klausmann, Sonja; Kreyenschmidt, Judith

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effect of atmospheres containing high oxygen (70% O2 and 30% CO2) or high nitrogen (70% N2 and 30% CO2) on the spoilage process during storage (at 4°C) of poultry fillets. Four samples of each gas atmosphere were analyzed at 7 sample points during storage. For this analysis, the growth of typical spoilage organisms (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Lactobacilli spp.) and total viable count (TVC) were analyzed and modeled by using the Gompertz function. Sensory analyses of the poultry samples were carried out by trained sensory panelists to analyze color, odor, texture, drip loss, and general appearance. The composition of the spoilage flora differed between the oxygen-free atmosphere and the high-oxygen atmosphere. Anaerobic conditions favored the growth of Lactobacilli spp., whereas aerobic gas composition favored the growth of B. thermosphacta. However, no significant difference (P<0.05) in TVC and sensory parameters were observed for poultry samples stored under a high-oxygen atmosphere in comparison to a high-nitrogen atmosphere. These results indicate that high-oxygen packaging has no additional beneficial effect on the quality maintenance and shelf life of fresh poultry fillets.

  19. Reaction kinetics for the oxygen hydrogenation process on Pt(111) derived from temperature-programmed XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, Lars-Åke

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen hydrogenation under ultra high vacuum conditions at the platinum surface was explored using temperature-programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Through modeling of the oxygen consumption, information on the reaction kinetics was obtained indicating that the reaction rate of the oxygen hydrogenation process depends on the hydrogen diffusion and on the lifetime of hydroxyl intermediates. The reaction rate is, however, enhanced when an autocatalytic process stabilizes the hydroxyl intermediates through hydrogen bonding to neighboring water molecules. The overall activation energy for the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen to form water was determined to be 0.20 eV with a frequency factor of only 103 s- 1.

  20. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  1. The analysis and minimization of oxygen contamination in the powder processing of molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, K.

    1994-04-24

    Problems with MoSi{sub 2} include low-temperature fracture toughness, high-temperature creep resistance, and ``pest`` phenomena. Oxygen introduced by powder processing may be the cause of some of these problems. This study led to the following conclusions: Supplied powders have significant oxygen present prior to processing (up to 2.5 %), in the form of silica on the surface. This oxygen contamination did not increase by exposure to air at room temperature. An improved powder processing method was developed that uses glass encapsulation. Analysis of microstructures created from powders that contained 4900 to 24,100 ppM oxygen showed that the silica was transferred to the fully dense MoSi{sub 2} as SiO{sub 2} inclusions. A method of producing MoSi{sub 2} with less oxygen was attempted.

  2. Participation of oxygen, having diffused through a silver membrane catalyst, in heterogeneous oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gryaznov, V.M.; Gul'yanova, S.G.; Vedernikov, V.I.

    1986-08-01

    On the basis of an investigation of the characteristics of oxidation of hydrocarbons, alcohols and ammonia on a silver membrane catalyst, and also changes of its oxygen permeability proposals have been made in relation to participation of various forms of adsorbed oxygen in the limiting stage of its transfer through silver membranes in heterogeneous oxidation processes.

  3. Numerical Study of the Reduction Process in an Oxygen Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    Based on computational fluid dynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, principles of transfer in metallurgy, and other principles, a multi-fluid model for a traditional blast furnace was established. The furnace conditions were simulated with this multi-fluid mathematical model, and the model was verified with the comparison of calculation and measurement. Then a multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace in the gasifier-full oxygen blast furnace process was established based on this traditional blast furnace model. With the established multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace, the basic characteristics of iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace were summarized, including the changing process of the iron ore reduction degree and the compositions of the burden, etc. The study found that compared to the traditional blast furnace, the magnetite reserve zone in the furnace shaft under oxygen blast furnace condition was significantly reduced, which is conducive to the efficient operation of blast furnace. In order to optimize the oxygen blast furnace design and operating parameters, the iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace was researched under different shaft tuyere positions, different recycling gas temperatures, and different allocation ratios of recycling gas between the hearth tuyere and the shaft tuyere. The results indicate that these three factors all have a substantial impact on the ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace. Moderate shaft tuyere position, high recycling gas temperature, and high recycling gas allocation ratio between hearth and shaft could significantly promote the reduction of iron ore, reduce the scope of the magnetite reserve zone, and improve the performance of oxygen blast furnace. Based on the above findings, the recommendations for improvement of the oxygen blast furnace design and operation were proposed.

  4. Impact of hydrogen peroxide oxygen transfer tests on the performance of the biological nutrient removal process.

    PubMed

    Mahendraker, V; Mavinic, D S; Rabinowitz, B

    2002-02-01

    Knowledge of in-process oxygen transfer is essential to the optimum design and operation of aeration systems in activated sludge processes. In this study, non-steady state H2O2 oxygen transfer tests were performed in a laboratory scale, University of Cape Town configuration biological nutrient removal process (BNR) to measure the in-process oxygen transfer rates. Given the small quantity (about 1 ml @30% concentration) of H2O2 used in the aerobic reactor with a mixed liquor volume of 161 (total system working volume of 33.65 l), no effect on the process performance itself was expected. However, the process performance data obtained indicated results to the contrary. Use of H2O2 in measuring process oxygen transfer rates may not be suitable for BNR processes, as all the major process performance indicators (carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal by the system and carbon uptake and phosphorus release in the anaerobic zone) were negatively affected. Evidence in thiswork leads to the conclusion that external addition of H2O2 leads to excessive production of the hydroxyl radical. Since microorganisms do not have enzyme systems capable of acting upon this additional reactive radical, it resulted in loss of process performance. It is also possible that H2O2 could have upset the normal aerobic respiration process by introducing oxidative stress conditions on the catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes that deal with other oxygen radicals generated as part of the overall process of reducing oxygen to water. Any test that interferes with the system in which the test is being performed is suspect. Therefore, in light of these results, the H2O2 method to test in-process oxygen transfer should be re-evaluated.

  5. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  6. Processing of pulse oximeter signals using adaptive filtering and autocorrelation to isolate perfusion and oxygenation components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett; Subramanian, Hariharan; Ericson, Nance; Xu, Weijian; Wilson, Mark; Cote, Gerard L.

    2005-03-01

    A blood perfusion and oxygenation sensor has been developed for in situ monitoring of transplanted organs. In processing in situ data, motion artifacts due to increased perfusion can create invalid oxygenation saturation values. In order to remove the unwanted artifacts from the pulsatile signal, adaptive filtering was employed using a third wavelength source centered at 810nm as a reference signal. The 810 nm source resides approximately at the isosbestic point in the hemoglobin absorption curve where the absorbance of light is nearly equal for oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. Using an autocorrelation based algorithm oxygenation saturation values can be obtained without the need for large sampling data sets allowing for near real-time processing. This technique has been shown to be more reliable than traditional techniques and proven to adequately improve the measurement of oxygenation values in varying perfusion states.

  7. Production of oxygen on the moon - Which processes are best and why

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the 20 processes put forth for the liberation of oxygen from lunar materials has resulted in a ranking according to overall feasibility. At this time, the eight processes considered to be the most likely candidates for oxygen production on the moon are: ilmenite reduction with H2, CO, and CH4, glass reduction with H2, molten silicate electrolysis, fluxed molten silicate electrolysis, vapor pyrolysis, and ion plasma pyrolysis.

  8. Singlet molecular oxygen generated in dark biological process.

    PubMed

    Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2014-10-01

    Ultraweak chemiluminescence arising from biomolecules oxidation has been attributed to the radiative deactivation of singlet molecular oxygen [(1)O2] and electronically excited triplet carbonyl products involving dioxetane intermediates. As examples, we will discuss the generation of (1)O2 from lipid hydroperoxides, which involves a cyclic mechanism from a linear tetraoxide intermediate. The generation of (1)O2 in aqueous solution via energy transfer from the excited triplet acetone arising from the thermodecomposition of dioxetane a chemical source, and horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-methylpropanal, as an enzymatic source, will also be discussed. The approach used to unequivocally demonstrate the generation of (1)O2 in these reactions is the use of (18)O-labeled hydroperoxide / triplet dioxygen ((18)[(3)O2]), the detection of labeled compounds by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and the direct spectroscopic detection and characterization of (1)O2 light emission. Characteristic light emission at 1,270nm, corresponding to the singlet delta state monomolecular decay was observed. Using(18)[(3)O2], we observed the formation of (18)O-labeled (1)O2 ((18)[(1)O2]) by the chemical trapping of (18)[(1)O2]with the anthracene-9,10-diyldiethane-2,1-diyl disulfate disodium salt (EAS) and detected the corresponding (18)O-labeled EAS endoperoxide usingHPLC-MS/MS. The combined use of the thermolysis of a water-soluble naphthalene endoperoxide as a generator of (18)O labeled (1)O2 and the sensitivity of HPLC-MS/MS allowed the study of (1)O2reactivity toward biomolecules. Photoemission properties and chemical trapping clearly demonstrate that the production of hydroperoxide and excited carbonyls generates (18)[(1)O2], and points to the involvement of (1)O2 in physiological and pathophysiological mechanism. Supported by FAPESP (2012/12663-1), CAPES, INCT Redoxoma (FAPESP/CNPq/CAPES; 573530/2008-4), NAP Redoxoma (PRPUSP; 2011.1.9352.1.8), CEPID

  9. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Louisiana shelf, in the northern Gulf of Mexico, receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year, except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers, where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e., primary production and water column respiration). With this experiment we show that below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes (advection and vertical diffusion) and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  10. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    The Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink while the well-developed pycnocline isolates autotrophic surface waters from the heterotrophic and hypoxic waters below. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e. primary production and water column respiration). In this experiment below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of the process of formation of sulfur compounds in oxygen gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    G.Ya. Gerasimov; T.M. Bogacheva

    2001-05-15

    A thermodynamic approach to the description of the behavior of the system fuel-oxidizer in oxygen gasification of coal is used to reveal the main mechanisms of the process of capture of sulfur by the mineral part of the coal and to determine the fundamental possibility of the process for coals from different coal fields.

  12. The feasibility of processes for the production of oxygen on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Carrier, W. D., III

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the perceived feasibility of 20 different processs for the production of oxygen on the moon is presented. Many of them are largely untested and/or extremely complicated and difficult to implement. Simplicity, low energy, easily attainable feedstock, and resupply mass are the principal criteria for the processes that will ultimately be selected for the initial production of oxygen on the moon. An evaluation of the 20 processes resulted in a ranking according to overall feasibility. The eight processes considered to be the most likely candidates, at this time, for oxygen production on the moon are: ilmenite reduction of H2, CO2, and CH4; glass reduction with H2; molten silicate electrolysis; fluxed molten silicate electrolysis; vapor pyrolysis; and ion plasma pyrolysis.

  13. Properties of Aluminum Deposited by a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fueled Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D; Lee, D

    2001-06-12

    Aluminum coatings deposited by a HVOF process have been demonstrated and relevant coating properties evaluated according to two deposition parameters, the spray distance and the oxygen-to-fuel flow ratio. The coating porosity, surface roughness, and microhardness are measured. The coating properties are fairly insensitive to spray distance, the distance between the nozzle and the workpiece, and fuel ratios, the oxygen-to-fuel flow. Increasing the fuel content does appear to improve the process productivity in terms of surface roughness. Minimization of nozzle loading is discussed.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Density Measurements in a Low Pressure Textile Processing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, S.; Steen, P. G.; Graham, W. G.

    1999-10-01

    There is increasing interest in plasma processing of textile materials. Here the effect of textile materials on low pressure oxygen plasmas has been investigated. In particular laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the atomic oxygen density with and without textile samples are presented. Polypropylene and polyester samples were placed on the lower electrode of an inductively coupled Gaseous Electronic Conference (GEC) reactor. This had to be operated at low power and hence in the capacitive mode to avoid toasting the material. Operation with a bare stainless steel electrode and one loaded with the sample materials is contrasted by comparing spatially resolved LIF measurements of atomic oxygen under a wide range of pressures and powers, from a few Pa to 133 Pa, and from 10 to 300 W. Atomic oxygen densities with samples present are around one third lower than those without samples, and in both cases the atomic oxygen density increases linearly with gas pressure. Previous optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements indicate that plasma interaction with the substrate commences a few seconds after plasma turn on. Similar trends are observed with time resolved LIF measurements of the atomic oxygen.

  15. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  16. Modelling Oxygen Dynamics in an Intermittently Stratified Estuary: Estimation of Process Rates Using Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsuk, M. E.; Stow, C. A.; Luettich, R. A.; Paerl, H. W.; Pinckney, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between bottom water dissolved oxygen concentration, vertical stratification, and temperature was investigated for the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina, a shallow, intermittently-mixed estuary using approximately 10 years of weekly/biweekly, mid-channel data. A generalized additive model (GAM) was used to initially explore the major relationships among observed variables. The results of this statistical model guided the specification of a process-based model of oxygen dynamics that is consistent with theory yet simple enough to be parameterized using available field data. The nonlinear optimization procedure employed allows for the direct estimation of microbial oxygen consumption and physical reoxygenation rates, including the effects of temperature and vertical stratification. These estimated rates may better represent aggregate system behaviour than closed chamber measurements made in the laboratory and in situ. The resulting model describes 79% of the variation in dissolved oxygen concentration and is robust when compared across separate locations and time periods. Model predictions suggest that the spatial extent and duration of hypoxia in the bottom waters of the Neuse are controlled by the balance between the net oxygen depletion rate and the frequency of vertical mixing events. During cool months, oxygen consumption rates remain low enough to keep oxygen concentration well above levels of concern even under extended periods of stratification. A concentration below 4 mg l -1is only expected under extended periods without vertical mixing when bottom water temperature exceeds 15 °C, while a concentration below 2 mg l -1is only expected when water temperature exceeds 20 °C. To incorporate the effects of parameter uncertainty, model error, and natural variability on model prediction, we used Monte Carlo simulation to generate distributions for the predicted number of days of hypoxia during the summer season. The expected number of days with

  17. Process for selection of Oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; Seibert, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H.sub.2 -producing algal mutant cells comprising: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas; (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light. (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H.sub.2 -producing mutants.

  18. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on Cu Corrosion in Single Wafer Cleaning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yukinari; Futatsuki, Takashi; Shiohara, Morio; Kondo, Seiichi; Saito, Shuichi

    2009-04-01

    We investigated Cu corrosion at the via bottom of multi-layered Cu interconnects that occurred after post-etching wet cleaning and caused via open failures. We found that oxygen was dissolved into de-ionized water (DIW) on the wafer edge from the air atmosphere during the rinse step after chemical cleaning and that Cu was oxidized due to the high oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the rinse DIW. To prevent Cu interconnects from being corroded, control of the dissolved oxygen and the ORP of the rinse DIW by decreasing the oxygen concentration of the atmosphere in the cleaning machine as well as by using H2 water is required. This will become indispensable in the cleaning process of the next generation Cu interconnects.

  19. Monitoring of singlet oxygen in the lower troposphere and processes of ozone depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iasenko, Egor; Chelibanov, Vladimir; Marugin, Alexander; Kozliner, Marat

    2016-04-01

    The processes of ozone depletion in the atmosphere are widely discussed now in a connection with the problem of a global climate changes. It is known fact that photolysis of ozone in the upper atmosphere is the source of metastable molecules of oxygen. But, metastable molecules of oxygen can be formed as a result of photo initiated heterogeneous oxidation of molecules adsorbed on the surface of natural aerosol particles. During the outdoor experiment, we observed a formation of Singlet oxygen (1Δg) at concentration level of 2 ... 5 ppb when ice crystals have been exposed to the sun light. In experiments, we used Analyzers of Singlet oxygen and Ozone (produced by JSC "OPTEC") that utilize solid-state chemiluminescence technology. We assumed that the singlet oxygen is formed in the active centers on the surface of ice crystals in the presence or absence of anthropogenic pollutants in the atmosphere. Identified efficiency of heterogeneous reaction of O2 (1Δg) formation suggests the importance of the additional channel O3 + O2 (1Δg) → 2O2 + O (3P) of atmospheric ozone removal comparable with other well known cycles of ozone depletion.

  20. A Test of Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratio Process Models in Tree Rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, J. S.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes ratios of carbon and oxygen in tree ring cellulose have been used to infer environmental change. Process-based models have been developed to clarify the potential of historic tree ring records for meaningful paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, isotopic variation can be influenced by multiple environmental factors making simplistic interpretations problematic. Recently, the dual isotope approach, where the variation in one stable isotope ratio (e.g. oxygen) is used to constrain the interpretation of variation in another (e.g. carbon), has been shown to have the potential to de-convolute isotopic analysis. However, this approach requires further testing to determine its applicability for paleo-reconstructions using tree-ring time series. We present a study where the information needed to parameterize mechanistic models for both carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios were collected in controlled environment chambers for two species (Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus globulus). The seedlings were exposed to treatments designed to modify leaf temperature, transpiration rates, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Both species were grown for over 100 days under two humidity regimes that differed by 20%. Stomatal conductance was significantly different between species and for seedlings under drought conditions but not between other treatments or humidity regimes. The treatments produced large differences in transpiration rate and photosynthesis. Treatments that effected photosynthetic rates but not stomatal conductance influenced carbon isotope discrimination more than those that influenced primarily conductance. The various treatments produced a range in oxygen isotope ratios of 7 ‰. Process models predicted greater oxygen isotope enrichment in tree ring cellulose than observed. The oxygen isotope ratios of bulk leaf water were reasonably well predicted by current steady-state models. However, the fractional difference between models that

  1. Chlorination processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of chlorine to extract, reclaim, and purify metals has attractive possibilities for extraterrestrial processing of local planetary resources. While a complete cyclic process has been proposed for the recovery of metallurgically significant metals and oxygen, herein the chlorination step of the cycle is examined. An experimental apparatus for reacting refractory materials, such as ilmenite, in a microwave induced plasma is being built. Complex equilibria calculations reveal that stable refractory materials can, under the influence of a plasma, undergo chlorination and yield oxygen as a by-product. These issues and the potential advantages for plasma processing in space are reviewed. Also presented is a discussion of the complex equilibria program used in the analysis.

  2. Role of Mobile Interstitial Oxygen Atoms in Defect Processes in Oxides: Interconversion between Oxygen-Associated Defects in SiO2 Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    The role of mobile interstitial oxygen atoms (O0) in defect processes in oxides is demonstrated by interconversion between the oxygen dangling bond and the peroxy radical (POR) in SiO2 glass. Superstoichiometric O0 was created by F2 laser photolysis of the interstitial O2. On annealing above 300 °C, O0 migrated and converted the oxygen dangling bond to POR. Exposure to 5.0eV light converted POR back to a pair of the oxygen dangling bond and O0 (quantum yield: ˜0.1). These findings suggest that various defect processes typically occurring in SiO2 glass at ˜300 500 °C are related to migration of O0, which exists in the glass network in the peroxy linkage form.

  3. Bio-physical processes contribution to oxygen budget in the ETNA OMZ: a model based analysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koku Apetcho, Eyram; Montes, Ivonne; Fennel, Katja; Schneider, Birgit; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the influence of physical processes on the oxygen distribution in the Eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and their contribution to the oxygen budget in the oxygen minimum layer. A validation of the model shows a realistic representation of the main features. An improvement of the relative weak velocity observed in the model by a combination of higher resolution and appropriate wind forcing is proposed. The model diagnostics reveals that oxygen supply is mainly driven by advection. However, the importance of small scale processes is highlighted and it is observed that they potentially could hinder oxygen supply and thus contribute to ongoing depletion of oxygen. The main consumption mechanisms found in this modeling study are remineralization of DON and the 2 stages of nitrification.

  4. Liquid PEG Polymers Containing Antioxidants: A Versatile Platform for Studying Oxygen-Sensitive Photochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Mongin, Cédric; Golden, Jessica H; Castellano, Felix N

    2016-09-14

    This article proposes the exploitation of widely available, inexpensive, innocuous "green" liquid polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers containing the oxygen scavenger oleic acid (OA) as promising media for studying oxygen-sensitive photochemical processes. Here we report the successful application of this media to detailed investigations of triplet-sensitized photochemical upconversion, previously established as being readily poisoned by dissolved oxygen. Three different PEG materials were investigated with increasing molecular weight from 200 to 600 g/mol, coded as PEG-200, PEG-400, and PEG-600. These fluidic polymers facilitate an oxygen-depleted environment in comparison to commonly employed organic solvents while providing high solubility and diffusion for the dissolved chromophores. Moreover, the low oxygen permeation afforded by these PEG solvents allows them to remain deoxygenated in open containers under ambient conditions for extended time periods. OA, 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA), and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) are shown to efficiently and quantitatively consume dissolved oxygen in the PEG environment in the presence of the photoactivated triplet sensitizer platinum(II) tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin (PtTPBP). Oxygen consumption was directly correlated with systematically increasing sensitizer excited-state lifetimes that eventually reach the same plateau as achieved through extensive N2 sparging. Diffusion-controlled bimolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer quenching between PtTPBP and the acceptor/annihilator 9,10-bisphenylethynylanthracene (BPEA) was observed in all three PEG formulations investigated. Subsequent triplet-triplet annihilation, between triplet excited BPEA acceptors, achieves bright and stable upconverted singlet fluorescence from BPEA with no decrease in intensity over 20 h under ambient conditions. In the champion composition (PEG 200), the upconversion quantum efficiency reached 31% under conditions where triplet-triplet annihilation

  5. Characterization of an oxygen plasma process for cleaning packaged semiconductor devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to experimentally determine the operating {open_quotes}window{close_quotes} for an oxygen plasma cleaning process to be used on microelectronics components just prior to wire bonding. The process was being developed to replace one that used vapor degreasing with trichlorotrifluoroethane, an ozone-depleting substance. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to generate data from which the oxygen plasma cleaning process could be characterized. Auger electron spectrophotometry was used to measure the contamination thickness on the dice after cleaning. An empirical equation correlating the contamination thickness on the die surface with the operating parameters of the plasma system was developed from the collected Auger data, and optimum settings for cleaning semiconductor devices were determined. Devices were also tested for undesirable changes in electrical parameters resulting from cleaning in the plasma system. An increase in leakage current occurred for bipolar transistors and diodes after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Although an increase in leakage current occurred, each device`s parameter remained well below the acceptable specification limit. Based upon the experimental results, the optimum settings for the plasma cleaning process were determined to be 200 watts of power applied for five minutes in an enclosure maintained at 0.7 torr. At these settings, all measurable contamination was removed without compromising the reliability of the devices.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cells developed by the sol-gel process for oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Joshua S.

    Electrochemical fuel cells convert chemical energy directly to electrical energy through the reaction of a fuel and an oxidant. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are solid-state devices that operate at temperatures around 800°C, using a solid oxygen electrolyte. The goal of this thesis is to prepare a defect-free solid oxygen electrolyte by a sol-gel process that is capable of (a) functioning in a fuel cell; and (b) producing measurable oxygen when operated as an oxygen generator. Sol-gel processing was chosen for membrane development because it offers a means of applying high-purity layers with controlled doping and a variety of geometries. In this study, the sol-gel process was used to produce yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte membranes as well as the electrodes required for an operational fuel cell. Zirconium oxychloride (ZOC) was used as the precursor material for the electrolyte. The YSZ solution was prepared by mixing yttrium nitrate and ZOC in a 50/50 ETOH and water solvent. The reaction was catalyzed with 1.5M NH4OH. Viscosity and solution application techniques were varied to monitor the effect on membrane development. The YSZ layer was sintered to full density. The sol-gel process was used to synthesize supported lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM) electrodes separated by a YSZ electrolyte. The LSM solution was made by mixing strontium nitrate, lanthanum chloride, and manganese acetate solutions. The LSM layers were sintered but were porous. After the membranes were assembled by successive layering and sintering, the membranes and completed fuel cells were characterized using TGA, XRD, FE-SEM, a gas pressurization technique, and electrochemical testing. The YSZ membrane exhibited a stable tetragonal crystal phase and formed a triple phase boundary (TPB) with the cathode. The three phases are the electrode, the electrolyte, and air. Electrochemical testing showed successful membrane development. Although oxygen production was not measured

  7. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Barger, P.T.

    1996-09-24

    A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  8. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Barger, Paul T.

    1996-01-01

    A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  9. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  10. Effect of shortening kraft pulping integrated with extended oxygen delignification on biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunyun; Hu, Huichao; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of shortening kraft pulping (KP) process integrated with extended oxygen delignification (OD) on the biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus. Data showed that using kraft pulps with high kappa number could improve the delignification efficiency of OD, reduce hexenuronic acid formation in kraft pulps. Pulp viscosity for a target kappa number of ∼10 was comparable to that obtained from conventional KP and OD process. The energy and alkali consumption in the integrated biorefinery process could be optimized when using a KP pulp with kappa number of ∼27. The process could minimize the overall methanol formation, but greater amounts of carbonate and oxalate were formed. The information from this study will be helpful to the future implementation of short-time KP integrated with extended OD process in actual pulp mill applications for biorefinery, aiming at further improvement in the biorefinery effectiveness of hardwood.

  11. Influence of the residual oxygen in the plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, M.; Silva, A. R.; Mello, Carina B.; Silva, G.; Reuther, H.; Oliveira, V. S.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of the contaminants present in the vacuum chamber of the PI3 system, in particular, the residual oxygen, which results in the formation of the oxide compounds on the surface and hence is responsible for the high implantation energies required to achieve reasonably thick treated layers. We used a mass spectrometer (RGA) with a quadruple filter to verify the composition of the residual vacuum and pressure of the elements present in the chamber. Initially we found a high proportion of residual oxygen in a vacuum with a pressure of 1 × 10 -3 Pa. Minimizing the residual oxygen percentage in about 80%, by efficient cleaning of the chamber walls and by improving the gas feeding process, we mitigated the formation of oxides during the PI3 process. Therefore we achieved a highly efficient PI3 processing obtaining implanted layers reaching about 50 nm, even in cases such as an aluminum alloy, where is very difficult to nitrogen implant at low energies. We performed nitrogen PI3 treatment of SS304 and Al7075 using pulses of only 3 kV and 15 × 10 -6 s at 1 kHz with an operating pressure of 1 Pa.

  12. Real-time observation of dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration in cerium oxides under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Kuo; Sun, Muhua; Huang, Qianming; Xu, Zhi E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn

    2015-11-23

    The dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration driven by the external electric field is directly observed at atomic scale in the cerium oxides (CeO{sub 2}) thin film by in-situ transmission electron microscopy method. When a bias voltage of a proper value is applied across the CeO{sub 2} film, the oxygen vacancies are formed near the interface of CeO{sub 2}/anode, followed by their migration along the direction of the external electric field. The structural modulation occurs in the [110] zone axis due to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The migration of oxygen vacancies results in the reversible structural transformation, i.e., releasing and storing oxygen processes in CeO{sub 2}, which is of great significance for the ionic and electronic applications of the cerium oxides materials, such as oxygen pump, gas sensor, resistive random access memory, etc.

  13. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  14. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  15. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  16. Investigation on Carbon-Deposition Behavior from Heating Cycle Gas in Oxygen Blast Furnace Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhou; Wang, Jingsong; She, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shiyang; Xue, Qingguo

    2015-02-01

    Among the different ways to study carbon deposition in the ironmaking process, not much attention was paid to that of heating the gas mixture, especially cycle gas in an oxygen blast furnace. In this work, the carbon-deposition characteristics of heating 100 pct CO, CO-H2 gas mixture, and cycle gas in the oxygen blast furnace process were, respectively, experimentally and theoretically investigated. First, the thermodynamics on carbon-deposition reactions were calculated. Then, the impacts of discharging operation temperature, the proportion of CO/H2 in heating the CO-H2 gas mixture, and the CO2 concentration in heating the cycle gas of an oxygen blast furnace on the carbon deposition were tested and investigated. Furthermore, the carbon-deposition behaviors in heating the CO-H2 gas mixture were compared with the thermodynamic calculation results for discussing the role of H2. In addition, carbon deposition in heating cycle gas includes CO decomposition and a carbon-deposition reaction by hybrid of CO and H2; the possible roles of each were analyzed by comparing thermodynamic calculation and experimental results. The deposited carbon was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze the deposited carbon microstructure.

  17. An aeration control strategy for oxidation ditch processes based on online oxygen requirement estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, J X; Ikehata, M; Mayuzumi, M; Koizumi, E; Kawaguchi, Y; Hashimoto, T

    2013-01-01

    A feedforward-feedback aeration control strategy based on online oxygen requirements (OR) estimation is proposed for oxidation ditch (OD) processes, and it is further developed for intermittent aeration OD processes, which are the most popular type in Japan. For calculating OR, concentrations of influent biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) are estimated online by the measurement of suspended solids (SS) and sometimes TKN is estimated by NH4-N. Mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and temperature are used to estimate the required oxygen for endogenous respiration. A straightforward parameter named aeration coefficient, Ka, is introduced as the only parameter that can be tuned automatically by feedback control or manually by the operators. Simulation with an activated sludge model was performed in comparison to fixed-interval aeration and satisfying result of OR control strategy was obtained. The OR control strategy has been implemented at seven full-scale OD plants and improvements in nitrogen removal are obtained in all these plants. Among them, the results obtained in Yumoto wastewater treatment plant were presented, in which continuous aeration was applied previously. After implementing intermittent OR control, the total nitrogen concentration was reduced from more than 5 mg/L to under 2 mg/L, and the electricity consumption was reduced by 61.2% for aeration or 21.5% for the whole plant. PMID:23823542

  18. A foundational methodology for determining system static complexity using notional lunar oxygen production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nicholas James

    This thesis serves to develop a preliminary foundational methodology for evaluating the static complexity of future lunar oxygen production systems when extensive information is not yet available about the various systems under consideration. Evaluating static complexity, as part of a overall system complexity analysis, is an important consideration in ultimately selecting a process to be used in a lunar base. When system complexity is higher, there is generally an overall increase in risk which could impact the safety of astronauts and the economic performance of the mission. To evaluate static complexity in lunar oxygen production, static complexity is simplified and defined into its essential components. First, three essential dimensions of static complexity are investigated, including interconnective complexity, strength of connections, and complexity in variety. Then a set of methods is developed upon which to separately evaluate each dimension. Q-connectivity analysis is proposed as a means to evaluate interconnective complexity and strength of connections. The law of requisite variety originating from cybernetic theory is suggested to interpret complexity in variety. Secondly, a means to aggregate the results of each analysis is proposed to create holistic measurement for static complexity using the Single Multi-Attribute Ranking Technique (SMART). Each method of static complexity analysis and the aggregation technique is demonstrated using notional data for four lunar oxygen production processes.

  19. Platinum Partitioning at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Implications for Core Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Lanziroti, A.; Newville, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements) are tracers of silicate / metal interactions during planetary processes. Since most core-formation models involve some state of equilibrium between liquid silicate and liquid metal, understanding the partioning of highly siderophile elements (HSE) between silicate and metallic melts is a key issue for models of core / mantle equilibria and for core formation scenarios. However, partitioning models for HSE are still inaccurate due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variable like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. In this abstract, we describe a self-consistent set of experiments aimed at determining the valence of platinum, one of the HSE, in silicate melts. This is a key information required to parameterize the evolution of platinum partitioning with oxygen fugacity.

  20. Near infrared image processing to quantitate and visualize oxygen saturation during vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Jalil, B; Salvetti, O; Potì, L; Hartwig, V; Marinelli, M; L'Abbate, A

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of microcirculation spatial heterogeneity on the hand skin is the main objective of this work. Near-infrared spectroscopy based 2D imaging is a non-invasive technique for the assessment of tissue oxygenation. The haemoglobin oxygen saturation images were acquired by a dedicated camera (Kent Imaging) during baseline, ischaemia (brachial artery cuff occlusion) and reperfusion. Acquired images underwent a preliminary restoration process aimed at removing degradations occurring during signal capturing. Then, wavelet transform based multiscale analysis was applied to identify edges by detecting local maxima and minima across successive scales. Segmentation of test areas during different conditions was obtained by thresholding-based region growing approach. The method identifies the differences in microcirculatory control of blood flow in different regions of the hand skin. The obtained results demonstrate the potential use of NIRS images for the clinical evaluation of skin disease and microcirculatory dysfunction. PMID:26725781

  1. CONTINUOUS PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE FROM URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE AND OXYGEN

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.B.; Bresee, J.C.; Ferris, L.M.

    1961-11-21

    A process for preparing UF/sub 6/ by reacting UF/sub 4/ and oxygen is described. The UF/sub 4/ and oxygen are continuously introduced into a fluidized bed of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ at a temperature of 600 to 900 deg C. The concentration of UF/sub 4/ in the bed is maintained below 25 weight per cent in order to avoid sintering and intermediate compound formation. By-product U0/sub 2/F/sub 2/ is continuously removed from the top of the bed recycled. In an alternative embodiment heat is supplied to the reaction bed by burning carbon monoxide in the bed. The product UF/sub 6/ is filtered to remove entrained particles and is recovered in cold traps and chemical traps. (AEC)

  2. Process design and simulation for optimizing the oxygen concentration in Czochralski-grown single-crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, W. K.; Jung, Jae Hak

    2014-08-01

    The highest-concentration impurity in a single-crystal silicon ingot is oxygen, which infiltrates the ingot during growth stage. This oxygen adversely affects the wafer is quality. This study was aimed at finding an optimal design for the Czochralski (Cz) process to enable high-quality and lowcost (by reducing power consumption) wafer production by controlling the oxygen concentration in the silicon ingots. In the Cz process, the characteristics of silicon ingots during crystallization are greatly influenced by the design and the configuration of the hot zone, and by crystallization rate. In order to identify process conditions for obtaining an optimal oxygen concentration of 11-13 ppma (required for industrial-grade ingots), designed two shield shapes for the hot zone. Furthermore, oxygen concentrations corresponding to these two shapes were compared by evaluating each shape at five different production speeds. In addition, simulations were performed to identify the optimal shield design for industrial applications.

  3. An experimental research on the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zengqiang; Sang, Fengting; Zhang, Yuelong; Hui, Xiaokang; Xu, Mingxiu; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Weili; Fang, Benjie; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi

    2014-12-01

    The O2(1Δ)/I2 mixing process is one of the most important steps in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Based on the chemical fluorescence method (CFM), a diagnostic system was set up to image electronically excited fluorescent I2(B3П0) by means of a high speed camera. An optimized data analysis approach was proposed to analyze the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams, employing a set of qualitative and quantitative parameters and a proper percentage boundary threshold of the fluorescence zone. A slit nozzle bank with supersonic parallel streams and a trip tab set for enhancing the mixing process were designed and fabricated. With the diagnostic system and the data analysis approach, the performance of the trip tab set was examined and is demonstrated in this work. With the mixing enhancement, the fluorescence zone area was enlarged 3.75 times. We have studied the mixing process under different flow conditions and demonstrated the mixing properties with different iodine buffer gases, including N2, Ar, He and CO2. It was found that, among the four tested gases, Ar had the best penetration ability, whilst He showed the best free diffusion ability, and both of them could be well used as the buffer gas in our experiments. These experimental results can be useful for designing and optimizing COIL systems.

  4. Oxygen isotope variation in primitive achondrites: The influence of primordial, asteroidal and terrestrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, R. C.; Franchi, I. A.; Gibson, J. M.; Benedix, G. K.

    2012-10-01

    similar oxygen isotope compositions to the brachinites. It remains unclear whether the brachinites and related olivine-rich achondrites are from a single or multiple parent bodies. The primitive achondrites and related samples represent material from at most only 18 parent bodies, compared to an estimated 65 for the iron meteorites. This suggests that asteroidal mantle material is underrepresented in the meteorite record. Early fragmentation of differentiated asteroids, followed by preferential destruction of their silicate-rich mantles, offers a possible explanation for this discrepancy. On an oxygen three-isotope diagram, primitive chondrule-bearing winonaites (Dho 1222, NWA 725, NWA 1052, NWA 1463, Mt. Morris (Wisconsin)) plot close to the Young & Russell (Y&R) slope 1 line, with more evolved samples extending away from it towards the CCAM line. A similar relationship is shown by the CR chondrites. The acapulcoite-lodranite clan plots between the slope 1 and CCAM lines. However, the precursor material to the clan may have had a composition close to the slope 1 line prior to parent body processing. These relationships support the view that primordial oxygen isotope variation in the early solar system is best represented by the slope 1 (Y&R) line.

  5. Process for selection of oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H{sub 2}

    DOEpatents

    Ghirardi, M.L.; Seibert, M.

    1999-02-16

    A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H{sub 2}-producing algal mutant cells comprises: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas and (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light; (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H{sub 2}-producing mutants. 5 figs.

  6. Coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon interstitial-free steel in a smelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Bao, Yan-ping; Yang, Quan; Zhao, Li-hua; Lin, Lu

    2015-12-01

    Low residual-free-oxygen before final de-oxidation was beneficial to improving the cleanness of ultra-low-carbon steel. For ultra-low-carbon steel production, the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen is a precondition for achieving low residual oxygen during the Ruhrstahl Heraeus (RH) decarburization process. In this work, we studied the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon steel during the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) endpoint and RH process using data statistics, multiple linear regressions, and thermodynamics computations. The results showed that the aluminum yield decreased linearly with increasing residual oxygen in liquid steel. When the mass ratio of free oxygen and carbon ([O]/[C]) in liquid steel before RH decarburization was maintained between 1.5 and 2.0 and the carbon range was from 0.030wt% to 0.040wt%, the residual oxygen after RH natural decarburization was low and easily controlled. To satisfy the requirement for RH decarburization, the carbon and free oxygen at the BOF endpoint should be controlled to be between 297 × 10-6 and 400 × 10-6 and between 574 × 10-6 and 775 × 10-6, respectively, with a temperature of 1695 to 1715°C and a furnace campaign of 1000 to 5000 heats.

  7. Identification of sources and production processes of bottled waters by stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Brencic, Mihael; Vreca, Polona

    2006-01-01

    Bottled water is a food product that considerably depends on the environment from which it originates, not only at the place where it is produced, but predominantly on the conditions in the recharge area of the wells captured for bottling. According to their source and the bottling process, bottled waters can be divided into natural and artificially sparkling waters, still and flavoured waters. These waters originate from various parts of the hydrological cycle and their natural origin is reflected in their hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions (delta(2)H and delta(18)O). A total of 58 domestic and foreign brands and 16 replicates of bottled waters, randomly collected on the Slovene market in September 2004, were analysed for delta(2)H and delta(18)O. The isotopic composition varied between -83 per thousand and -46 per thousand with an average of -66 per thousand for hydrogen, and between -11.9 per thousand and -7.5 per thousand with an average of -9.6 per thousand for oxygen. This investigation helped (1) to determine and test the classification of bottled waters, (2) to determine the natural origin of bottled water, and (3) to indicate differences between the natural and production processes. The production process may influence the isotopic composition of flavoured waters and artificially sparkling waters. No such modification was observed for still and natural sparkling waters. The methods applied, together with hydrological knowledge, can be used for the authentication of bottled waters for regulatory and consumer control applications.

  8. Interaction of Oxygen with TiN(001): N O Exchange and Oxidation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Graciani,J.; Fdez Sanz, J.; Asaki, T.; Nakamura, K.; Rodriguez, J.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the oxidation of TiN(001) using a combination of synchrotron-based photoemission and density functional theory (DFT). Experimentally, the adsorption of O{sub 2} on TiN(001) was investigated at temperatures between 250 and 450 K. At the lowest temperature, there was chemisorption of oxygen (O2,gas{yields}2Oads) without significant surface oxidation. In contrast, at 450 K the amount of O{sub 2} adsorbed increased continuously, there was no evidence for an oxygen saturation coverage, a clear signal in the Ti 2p core level spectra denoted the presence of TiO{sub x} species, and desorption of both N{sub 2} and NO was detected. The DFT calculations show that the adsorption/dissociation of O{sub 2} is highly exothermic on a TiN(001) substrate and is carried out mainly by the Ti centers. A high oxygen coverage (larger than 0.5 ML) may induce some structural reconstructions of the surface. The exchange of a surface N atom by an O adatom is a highly endothermic process ({Delta}E=2.84 eV). However, the overall oxidation of the surface layer is thermodynamically favored due to the energy released by the dissociative adsorption of O{sub 2} and the formation of N{sub 2} or NO. Both experimental and theoretical results lead to conclude that a TiN+mO{sub 2}{yields}TiO{sub x}+NO reaction is an important exit channel for nitrogen in the oxidation process.

  9. Thermal phenomena during operation of the oxygen cycle in VRLAB and processes that cause them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, D.

    The present paper makes a summary of the results of the investigations on the oxygen cycle (OxCy) performed in this laboratory with the aim to elucidate the processes that take place at the two electrodes of VRLA cells during OxCy operation and the thermal phenomena caused by these processes. It has been established that on constant voltage polarization, the cell reaches a certain state after which its temperature (T) and current (I) begin to increase spontaneously and pass through maxima before reaching stationary values. This phenomenon is called thermal runaway (TRA). These maxima are a result of self-accelerating interrelation established between the rates of the reactions involved in the oxygen cycle at the two electrodes. At high polarization voltages and currents, electrochemical reactions proceed at the positive and negative plates leading to changes in the surface properties and the structures of the PbO 2 and Pb plates as well as in the composition of the electrolyte filling the pores of the active masses. The above changes result in passivation of the PbO 2 electrode, decrease of the rate of O 2 evolution at the positive plates and initiate new chemical exothermic reactions of O 2 reduction at the negative plates. The generated heat causes the cell temperature to rise. If the temperature is higher than 60 °C for a long period of time, this may impair the performance characteristics of the cell. This paper proposes a mechanism of the chemical and electrochemical reactions that proceed at the positive and negative plates during operation of the oxygen cycle (OxCy) and their evolution on constant voltage polarization of the cell. It has been established that there are critical values of T and φ above which the OxCy efficiency declines substantially and thermal phenomena proceed causing TRA.

  10. Intrinsic and metal-doped gallium oxide based high-temperature oxygen sensors for combustion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Ernesto Javier

    Currently, there is enormous interest in research, development and optimization of the combustion processes for energy harvesting. Recent statistical and economic analyses estimated that by improving the coal-based firing/combustion processes in the power plants, savings up to $450-500 million yearly can be achieved. Advanced sensors and controls capable of withstanding extreme environments such as high temperatures, highly corrosive atmospheres, and high pressures are critical to such efficiency enhancement and cost savings. For instance, optimization of the combustion processes in power generation systems can be achieved by sensing, monitoring and control of oxygen, which is a measure of the completeness of the process and can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, despite the fact that there exists a very high demand for advanced sensors, the existing technologies suffer from poor 'response and recovery times' and 'long-term stability.' Motivated by the aforementioned technological challenges, the present work was focused on high-temperature (≥700 °C) oxygen sensors for application in power generation systems. The objective of the present work is to investigate nanostructured gallium oxide (2O3) based sensors for oxygen sensing, where we propose to conduct in-depth exploration of the role of refractory metal (tungsten, W, in this case) doping into 2O 3 to enhance the sensitivity, selectivity, stability ("3S" criteria) and reliability of such sensors while keeping cost economical. Tungsten (W) doped gallium oxide (2O3) thin films were deposited via rf-magnetron co-sputtering of W-metal and Ga2O3-ceramic targets. Films were produced by varying the sputtering power applied to the W-target in order to achieve variable W content into 2O3 films while substrate temperature was kept constant at 500 °C. Chemical composition, chemical valence states, microstructure and crystal structure of as-grown and post-annealed W-doped 2O3

  11. Photolysis of atrazine in aqueous solution: role of process variables and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcela Prado; Batista, Ana Paula dos Santos; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Silva, Vanessa Honda Ogihara; Teixeira, Antonio Carlos Silva Costa

    2014-11-01

    Photochemical advanced oxidation processes have been considered for the treatment of water and wastewater containing the herbicide atrazine (ATZ), a possible human carcinogen and endocrine disruptor. In this study, we investigated the effects of the photon emission rate and initial concentration on ATZ photolysis at 254 nm, an issue not usually detailed in literature. Moreover, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed. Photon emission rates in the range 0.87 × 10(18)-3.6 × 10(18) photons L(-1) s(-1) and [ATZ]0 = 5 and 20 mg L(-1) were used. The results showed more than 65 % of ATZ removal after 30 min. ATZ photolysis followed apparent first-order kinetics with k values and percent removals decreasing with increasing herbicide initial concentration. A fivefold linear increase in specific degradation rate constants with photon emission rate was observed. Also, regardless the presence of persistent degradation products, toxicity was efficiently removed after 60-min exposure to UV radiation. Experiments confirmed a noticeable contribution of singlet oxygen and radical species to atrazine degradation during photolysis. These results may help understand the behavior of atrazine in different UV-driven photochemical degradation treatment processes.

  12. Basic investigation into the production of oxygen in a solid electrolyte process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1981-01-01

    Mission analyses indicated that by extracting oxygen from the Martian atmosphere, which consists primarily of carbon dioxide, the launch mass of a spacecraft can be reduced by such an amount that samples from the planet can be returned to earth. The solid electrolyte process for producing O2 from CO2 was investigated. A model of the thermodynamic and electrochemical processes in the electrolyte cell was postulated, thereby establishing the parameters influencing the effectiveness and efficiency of an in situ O2 production system. The major operating parameters were investigated over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Operating limits imposed by the solid electrolyte material, 8% yttria stabilized zirconia, were determined as a function of the operating temperature.

  13. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zayas Pérez, Teresa; Geissler, Gunther; Hernandez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculation and advanced oxidation processes (AOP) had been studied. The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions. For each of these processes, different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater. Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and low total suspended solids. The outcomes of coffee wastewater treatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD, color, and turbidity. It was found that a reduction in COD of 67% could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculation with lime and coagulant T-1. When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H2O2, a COD reduction of 86% was achieved, although only after prolonged UV irradiation. Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered, UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3, we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective, with an efficiency of color, turbidity and further COD removal of 87%, when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater.

  14. Action of oxygen and sodium carbonate in the urea-SNCR process

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Weijuan; Zhou, Junhu; Zhou, Zhijun; Chen, Zhenchao; Liu, Jianzhong; Cen, Kefa

    2009-09-15

    Experimental researches are focused on the effects of O{sub 2} concentration and sodium carbonate on Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) performance in a tube reactor, and plug flow reactor model and perfectly stirred reactor model in CHEMKIN are adopted to simulate the reactions processes. It is found that there is a conversion temperature point (CTP), on the two sides of which oxygen performs different effect. Below CTP, which is 1273 K in our experiments, higher NO reduction efficiency can be gained with higher oxygen concentration because more O{sub 2} results in more radicals to drive the reduction chain reactions by speeding up the reactions O{sub 2} + H = O + OH and H{sub 2}O + O = 2OH. At 1473 K without oxygen, 60% of NO reduction efficiency can be achieved and a 15 ppm Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition improves it to 90%. In this case the reaction H{sub 2}O + H = OH + H{sub 2} becomes fast enough to provide the radical OH without the aid of O{sub 2} to produce NH{sub 2} which reduces NO. And H{sub 2} is the byproduct of this reaction. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition shifts the optimal temperature of SNCR 50 K towards lower temperature and more NO is removed in the temperature window. The reactions NaO + H{sub 2}O = NaOH + OH and NaOH + O{sub 2} = NaO{sub 2} + OH and NaOH + M = Na + M + OH offer new pathways to produce OH radical, which results in more OH and more NH{sub 2} to reduce NO. The promotion effect of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is significant when temperature is lower or O{sub 2} concentration is lower, which means the radicals are insufficient. (author)

  15. Gene regulatory and metabolic adaptation processes of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T during oxygen depletion.

    PubMed

    Laass, Sebastian; Kleist, Sarah; Bill, Nelli; Drüppel, Katharina; Kossmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Klein, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Wittmann, Christoph; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the key to the ecological success of the marine Roseobacter clade bacteria. We investigated the metabolic adaptation and the underlying changes in gene expression of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) to anoxic life by a combination of metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome analyses. Time-resolved studies during continuous oxygen depletion were performed in a chemostat using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Formation of the denitrification machinery was found enhanced on the transcriptional and proteome level, indicating that D. shibae DFL12(T) established nitrate respiration to compensate for the depletion of the electron acceptor oxygen. In parallel, arginine fermentation was induced. During the transition state, growth and ATP concentration were found to be reduced, as reflected by a decrease of A578 values and viable cell counts. In parallel, the central metabolism, including gluconeogenesis, protein biosynthesis, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis was found transiently reduced in agreement with the decreased demand for cellular building blocks. Surprisingly, an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutanoate was observed during prolonged incubation under anoxic conditions. One possible explanation is the storage of accumulated metabolites and the regeneration of NADP(+) from NADPH during poly-3-hydroxybutanoate synthesis (NADPH sink). Although D. shibae DFL12(T) was cultivated in the dark, biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll was increased, possibly to prepare for additional energy generation via aerobic anoxygenic photophosphorylation. Overall, oxygen depletion led to a metabolic crisis with partly blocked pathways and the accumulation of metabolites. In response, major energy-consuming processes were reduced until the alternative respiratory denitrification machinery was operative. PMID:24648520

  16. Extraction processes for the production of aluminum, titanium, iron, magnesium, and oxygen and nonterrestrial sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Choudary, U. V.; Erstfeld, T. E.; Williams, R. J.; Chang, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    The suitability of existing terrestrial extractive metallurgical processes for the production of Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, and O2 from nonterrestrial resources is examined from both thermodynamic and kinetic points of view. Carbochlorination of lunar anorthite concentrate in conjunction with Alcoa electrolysis process for Al; carbochlorination of lunar ilmenite concentrate followed by Ca reduction of TiO2; and subsequent reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 for Ti and Fe, respectively, are suggested. Silicothermic reduction of olivine concentrate was found to be attractive for the extraction of Mg becaue of the technological knowhow of the process. Aluminothermic reduction of olivine is the other possible alternative for the production of magnesium. The large quantities of carbon monoxide generated in the metal extraction processes can be used to recover carbon and oxygen by a combination of the following methods: (1) simple disproportionation of CO,(2) methanation of CO and electrolysis of H2O, and (3) solid-state electrolysis of gas mixtures containing CO, CO2, and H2O. The research needed for the adoption of earth-based extraction processes for lunar and asteroidal minerals is outlined.

  17. The confines of triple oxygen isotope exponents in elemental and complex mass-dependent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in triple isotope relationships, or Δ17O in the case of oxygen, have been increasingly used to study a range of problems including hydrological cycles, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, biogeochemical pathways and fluxes, and the Moon's origin in the geochemical and cosmochemical communities. A Δ17O value depends on the triple isotope exponent θ of involved reaction steps. However, the probabilistic distribution of the intrinsic and apparent θ values has not been examined for elemental processes and for processes that are out of equilibrium or bearing reservoir-transport complexities. A lack of knowledge on the confines of θ may hamper our understanding of the subtle differences among mass-dependent processes and may result in mischaracterization of a set of mass-dependent processes as being in violation of mass-dependent rules. Here we advocate a reductionist approach and explore θ confines starting from kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) within the framework of transition state theory (TST). The advantage of our KIE approach is that any elemental or composite, equilibrium or non-equilibrium process can be reduced to a set of KIEs with corresponding θKIE. We establish that the KIE between a reactant and a transition state (TS) is intrinsic. Given a range of KIEs known for Earth processes involving oxygen, we use a Monte Carlo calculation method and a range of oxygen-bonded molecular masses to obtain a distribution of θKIE values and subsequently that of θeq. Next, complexities are examined by looking into expected effects due to reaction progress, unbalanced fluxes, and reference frame. Finally, compounded reservoir-transport effects are examined using two simple processes - Rayleigh Distillation (RD) and Fractional Distillation (FD). Our results show that the apparent θ values between two species or two states of the same evolving species have much broader confines than the commonly used "canonical" confines of 0.51-0.53, particularly

  18. Decoupling the influence of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    is instructive and essential to decouple the effects of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen condition, in order to understand their contribution to the interannual variability of hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s. A conceptual bottom DO budget model is applied, using the vertical exchange time scale (VET) to quantify the physical condition and net oxygen consumption rate to quantify biological activities. By combining observed DO data and modeled VET values along the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay, the monthly net bottom DO consumption rate was estimated for 1985-2012. The DO budget model results show that the interannual variations of physical conditions accounts for 88.8% of the interannual variations of observed DO. The high similarity between the VET spatial pattern and the observed DO suggests that physical processes play a key role in regulating the DO condition. Model results also show that long-term VET has a slight increase in summer, but no statistically significant trend is found. Correlations among southerly wind strength, North Atlantic Oscillation index, and VET demonstrate that the physical condition in the Chesapeake Bay is highly controlled by the large-scale climate variation. The relationship is most significant during the summer, when the southerly wind dominates throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The seasonal pattern of the averaged net bottom DO consumption rate (B'20) along the main stem coincides with that of the chlorophyll-a concentration. A significant correlation between nutrient loading and B'20 suggests that the biological processes in April-May are most sensitive to the nutrient loading.

  19. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  20. Multi-pollutant treatment of crystalline cellulosic effluent: Function of dissolved oxygen on process control.

    PubMed

    Shanthi Sravan, J; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of crystalline cellulose based wastewater was carried out in periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR). Specific influence of dissolved oxygen on treatment of crystalline cellulosic (CC) wastewater was evaluated in three different microenvironments such as aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic. PDBR-aerobic biosystem documented relatively higher substrate degradation [2.63kgCOD/m(3)-day (92%)] in comparison to PDBR-anoxic [2.12kgCOD/m(3)-day (71%)] and PDBR-anaerobic [1.81kgCOD/m(3)-day (63%)], which is in accordance with the observed DO levels. Similarly, multipollutants viz., phosphates and nitrates removal was observed to be higher in aerobic followed by anoxic and anaerobic operations. Higher nitrate removal in aerobic operation might be attributed to the efficient denitrification carried out by the biocatalyst, which utilizes both nitrates and oxygen as oxidizing agents. Multiscan spectral profiles depicted reduction in color intensity in all three microenvironments that correlated with the substrate degradation observed. Despite the high organic load, PDBR functioned well without exhibiting process inhibition. PMID:27005787

  1. Multi-pollutant treatment of crystalline cellulosic effluent: Function of dissolved oxygen on process control.

    PubMed

    Shanthi Sravan, J; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of crystalline cellulose based wastewater was carried out in periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR). Specific influence of dissolved oxygen on treatment of crystalline cellulosic (CC) wastewater was evaluated in three different microenvironments such as aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic. PDBR-aerobic biosystem documented relatively higher substrate degradation [2.63kgCOD/m(3)-day (92%)] in comparison to PDBR-anoxic [2.12kgCOD/m(3)-day (71%)] and PDBR-anaerobic [1.81kgCOD/m(3)-day (63%)], which is in accordance with the observed DO levels. Similarly, multipollutants viz., phosphates and nitrates removal was observed to be higher in aerobic followed by anoxic and anaerobic operations. Higher nitrate removal in aerobic operation might be attributed to the efficient denitrification carried out by the biocatalyst, which utilizes both nitrates and oxygen as oxidizing agents. Multiscan spectral profiles depicted reduction in color intensity in all three microenvironments that correlated with the substrate degradation observed. Despite the high organic load, PDBR functioned well without exhibiting process inhibition.

  2. The structural features of hemicelluloses dissolved out at different cooking stages of active oxygen cooking process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianbin; Yang, Qiulin; Lin, Lu

    2014-04-15

    This work described the morphologic changes of corn stalk and the structural characterization of its hemicelluloses dissolved in yellow liquor at different cooking stages. The results showed that active oxygen cooking process was an efficient method to depolymerize the corn stalk into cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin as a pretreatment of biomass conversion. This cooking process can also be divided into three phases: bulk delignification, extended delignification, and residual delignification. During the heating-up period 57.67% of hemicelluloses and 62.31% of lignin were removed from the raw material. However, only 15% of hemicelluloses and 23.21% of lignin were removed during at temperature' period. The hemicelluloses from the corn stalk and yellow liquor were composed of (1→4)-β-D-xylopyranose backbones substituted with α-l-arabinofuranosyl, 4-O-methyl-α-D-glucuronic acid, and some methoxyl residues. The backbones of hemicelluloses were gradually cleaved during the cooking process. The acetyl groups substituted with xylopyranosyl residues were completely cleaved during the cooking process.

  3. 2D Model for Diffusion of Oxygen with Biochemical Reaction During Biofilm Formation Process in Static Aqueous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puyate, Y. T.; Rim-Rukeh, A.

    A 2D model that describes diffusion of oxygen with biochemical reaction during biofilm formation process in static aqueous medium is presented. The analysis is based on X60 steel placed at the bottom of a container containing produced water inoculated with Leptothrix discophora (iron-oxidizing bacteria). These bacteria form biofilms on the exposed surfaces of the metal. The biofilm-microorganisms absorb oxygen from the produced water through biochemical reaction, resulting in transfer of oxygen from the bulk liquid phase to the biofilm. Predictions of the model are compared with experimental data and good agreement is obtained.

  4. From graphene to carbon nanotube: The oxygen effect on the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials on nickel foil during CVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Ching; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Hsieh, Chien-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated an oxygen-assisted ultralow-pressure (20 mTorr) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including multilayer graphene (MLG), double-layer graphene (DLG), single-layer graphene (SLG), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a Ni foil substrate. Oxygen is typically considered undesirable to synthesize carbon nanomaterials during the CVD process. However, our study provided evidence demonstrating that the growth of MLG, DLG, SLG, and CNTs can be maintained by adjusting the oxygen concentration during the CVD process; it also provided an easy way in controlling the layer of graphene. It was observed that oxygen played an important role in controlling the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials.

  5. Triple oxygen isotope data characterize oxidation processes that produce sulfate on Earth (and Mars?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J.; Kohl, I.; Coleman, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Tinto, a river in southwest Spain, has a long history of acid, iron and sulfate rich water resulting primarily from the oxidation of pyrite (ferrous iron sulfide). Its geochemistry and extremophile microbiology make it an exciting and ideal mars-analogue research site, as relatively recent discoveries have shown Mars to be rich in sulfates believed to have formed in an acidic environment. Current models for the oxidation pathways of pyrite sulfur to sulfate, and the microbial influences on those pathways are incomplete. Traditionally, studies have only focused on d18O as a tracer for the oxygen sources in sulfate and determination of the oxidation pathways. The d18O method has always been fraught with uncertainty due to isotope fractionation during oxygen incorporation from the two dominant sources, atmospheric oxygen and water. A relatively new method utilizing 17O measures the relationship between d17O/d18O. The average relationship has been defined as the Terrestrial Fractionation Line, with a slope of 0.52. Deviations from this relationship are represented as Cap delta 17O, the difference of delta 17O from the expected value. Cap17O values are useful because they depend only on the relationship between d17O/d18O, which remains constant during mass dependent fractionation. During O2 generation from solid BaSO4, some fractionation can occur due to incomplete oxygen yield. This can produce uncertainties in d17O and d18O, but Cap17O is dependent only on the d17O/d18O ratio and is therefore not affected. The relationship mentioned above between d17O/d18O (slope=0.52) is an average for terrestrial materials and it is becoming increasingly clear that process specific slopes can be defined. This offers an exciting opportunity to characterize potential biomarkers on Mars. If a biologically specific slope could be determined, then its signature will be preserved through subsequent mass dependent fractionation processes. Our approach is to use Río Tinto field and

  6. Nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, Thulwaneng; Waldron, Howard; Vichi, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in some OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations occur below the detection limit in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding dominant nitrogen loss mechanisms through modeling studies in the Benguela OMZ. The coupled physical-biogeochemical model for eastern boundary upwelling systems (BioEBUS) using the Southern Africa experiment (SAfE) nested configuration is applied in the Benguela to study nitrite dynamics. Model results show nitrite maxima associated with the Angola-Benguela front region. The maxima are linked to poleward nutrient rich, oxygen-depleted south Atlantic central water (SACW) from the Angola gyre which favour denitrification on the shelf during summer to autumn. Ventilation of the shelf during winter to spring by the equatorward well-aerated eastern south Atlantic central water (ESACW) results in depleted nitrite concentrations. In addition to local circulation, Hovmuller analyses suggest that both primary and secondary nitrite maxima are driven by shelf biogeochemical processes and offshore advection. Vertical depth profiles show nitrite maxima at 17°S and depletion at 23°S attributed to denitrification and anammox, respectively. Model results suggest nitrogen in the Benguela OMZ is lost to anammox, denitrification and offshore advection, with denitrification as the dominant loss mechanism rather than anammox as previously documented. These results are key to understanding feedback processes from nitrogen loss in the Benguela OMZ and its impact on related biogeochemical cycles.

  7. Effect of oxygenated liquid additives on the urea based SNCR process.

    PubMed

    Tayyeb Javed, M; Nimmo, W; Mahmood, Asif; Irfan, Naseem

    2009-08-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of oxygenated liquid additives, H(2)O(2), C(2)H(5)OH, C(2)H(4)(OH)(2) and C(3)H(5)(OH)(3) on NO(x) removal from flue gases by the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process using urea as a reducing agent. Experiments were performed with a 150kW pilot scale reactor in which a simulated flue gas was generated by the combustion of methane operating with 6% excess oxygen in flue gases. The desired levels of initial NO(x) (500ppm) were achieved by doping the fuel gas with ammonia. Experiments were performed throughout the temperature range of interest, i.e. from 800 to 1200 degrees C for the investigation of the effects of the process additives on the performance of aqueous urea DeNO(x). With H(2)O(2) addition a downward shift of 150 degrees C in the peak reduction temperature from 1130 to 980 degrees C was observed during the experimentation, however, the peak reduction efficiency was reduced from 81 to 63% when no additive was used. The gradual addition of C(2)H(5)OH up to a molar ratio of 2.0 further impairs the peak NO(x) reduction efficiency by reducing it to 50% but this is accompanied by a downward shift of 180 degrees C in the peak reduction temperature. Further exploration using C(2)H(4)(OH)(2) suggested that a 50% reduction could be attained for all the temperatures higher than 940 degrees C. The use of C(3)H(5)(OH)(3) as a secondary additive has a significant effect on the peak reduction efficiency that decreased to 40% the reductions were achievable at a much lower temperature of 800 degrees C showing a downward shift of 330 degrees C.

  8. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  9. Experimental evaluation of the ignition process of carbon monoxide and oxygen in a rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and oxygen ignition boundaries were determined in a spark torch igniter as a function of propellant inlet temperatures. The oxygen temperature was varied from ambient to -258 F, and the carbon monoxide temperature was varied from ambient to -241 F. With the oxygen and carbon monoxide at -253 F and -219 F, respectively, they successfully ignited between mixture ratios of 2.42 and 3.10. Analysis of the results indicated that the lower ignition boundary was more sensitive to oxygen temperature than to carbon monoxide temperature. Another series of tests was performed in a small simulated rocket engine with oxygen at -197 F and carbon monoxide at -193 F. An oxygen/hydrogen flame was used to initiate combustion of the oxygen and carbon monoxide. Tests performed at the optimum operating mixture ratio of 0.55 obtained steady-state combustion in every test.

  10. Nitrogen Loss Processes and Nitrous Oxide Turnover in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and the maintenance of all ecosystems. For many ecosystems, both aquatic and terrestrial, nitrogen is the element most likely to limit the amount and rate of production. But just as ecosystems can suffer from too little nitrogen, they are also sensitive to too much nitrogen, which leads to eutrophication and structural changes in food webs. Thus the processes by which nitrogen is removed are as critical to our understanding of ecosystem function as are those by which it is added. Nitrogen loss processes in the open ocean have been the focus of research and discovery in recent years. Long thought to be dominated by the bacterial respiratory process of denitrification, N loss is now also known to occur by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). We now understand that the ratio of the two processes is controlled by the quality and quantity of organic matter supplied to the anoxic waters of the ocean's major oxygen deficient zones. Coastal environments are also major sites of N loss but excess N loading from land often ameliorates the direct dependence of anammox and denitrification on organic matter composition. The ratio is important partly because of side products: Denitrification is a significant source and sink for nitrous oxide (N2O), while anammox has no significant contribution to N2O biogeochemistry. With the anthropogenic flux of CFCs at least mostly under control, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are the greatest contribution to ozone destruction, and they also contribute to greenhouse warming. Both anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to N2O emissions, and natural sources are sensitive to anthropogenic forcing. Our direct measurements of N2O production and consumption in the ocean agree with modeling results that have implicated multiple microbial processes and complex physical and biological control of N2O fluxes in the ocean.

  11. Mechanism of the cathodic process coupled to the oxidation of iron monosulfide by dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Duinea, Mădălina I; Costas, Andreea; Baibarac, Mihaela; Chiriță, Paul

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the mechanism of iron monosulfide (FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen (O2(aq)). Synthetic FeS was reacted with O2(aq) for 6days and at 25°C. We have characterized the initial and reacted FeS surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that during the aqueous oxidation of FeS new solid phases (disulfide, polysulfide, elemental sulfur, ferric oxyhydroxides and Fe3O4) develop on the mineral surface. The results of potentiodynamic polarization experiments show that after 2days of FeS electrode immersion in oxygen bearing solution (OBS) at initial pH 5.1 and 25°C the modulus of cathodic Tafel slopes dramatically decreases, from 393mV/dec to 86mV/dec. This decrease is ascribed to the change of the mechanism of electron transfer from cathodic sites to O2 (mechanism of cathodic process). The oxidation current densities (jox) indicate that mineral oxidative dissolution is not inhibited by pH increase up to 6.7. Another conclusion, which emerges from the analysis of jox, is that the dissolved Fe(3+) does not intermediate the aqueous oxidation of FeS. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) show that after 2days of contact between electrode and OBS the properties of FeS/water interface change. From the analysis of the EIS, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDX data we can conclude that the change of FeS/water interface properties accompanies the formation of new solid phases on the mineral surface. The new characteristics of the surface layer and FeS/water interface do not cause the inhibition of mineral oxidation.

  12. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  13. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  14. Mus308 Processes Oxygen and Nitrogen Ethylation DNA Damage in Germ Cells of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Comendador, Miguel A.; Sierra, L. María

    2010-01-01

    The D. melanogaster mus308 gene, highly conserved among higher eukaryotes, is implicated in the repair of cross-links and of O-ethylpyrimidine DNA damage, working in a DNA damage tolerance mechanism. However, despite its relevance, its possible role on the processing of different DNA ethylation damages is not clear. To obtain data on mutation frequency and on mutation spectra in mus308 deficient (mus308−) conditions, the ethylating agent diethyl sulfate (DES) was analysed in postmeiotic male germ cells. These data were compared with those corresponding to mus308 efficient conditions. Our results indicate that Mus308 is necessary for the processing of oxygen and N-ethylation damage, for the survival of fertilized eggs depending on the level of induced DNA damage, and for an influence of the DNA damage neighbouring sequence. These results support the role of mus308 in a tolerance mechanism linked to a translesion synthesis pathway and also to the alternative end-joinig system. PMID:20936147

  15. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  16. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed.

  17. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed. PMID:25704155

  18. Oxygen microprofile in the prepared sediments and its implication for the sediment oxygen consuming process in a heavily polluted river of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhai, Wanying; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) microprofiles of prepared sediments from 24 sampling sites in the Fuyang River were measured using a gold amalgam microelectrode in this study. The measured microprofiles can be divided into four types. In type I profiles, DO kept constant in the overlying water and decreased smoothly in the pore water; in type II profile, DO showed fluctuation in the pore water; in type III profiles, DO showed peak in the SWI; in type IV profiles, DO decreased obviously in the overlying water. Type I profiles indicated the absence of benthic organisms and thus the degradation of the sediment habitat. Type II and III profiles indicated the activity of benthic animal and epipelic algae, which is common in the healthy aquatic sediment. Type IV profiles indicated that the excessive accumulation of pollutants in the sediment and thus the serious sediment pollution. There are nine sites showing type I profile, three sites showing type II profile, nine sites showing type III profile, and three sites showing type IV profile in the Fuyang River. The dominance of type I and appearance of type IV indicated that sediment oxygen consumption processes in the Fuyang River were strongly influenced by the sediment pollutants release and the vanish of benthic organisms. The pharmacy, metallurgy, and curriery industries may contribute to the sediment deterioration and thus to the occurrence of type I and type IV oxygen profiles in the Fuyang River.

  19. Cerebral oxygenation and processed EEG response to clamping and shunting during carotid endarterectomy under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Perez, William; Dukatz, Christopher; El-Dalati, Sami; Duncan, James; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Springer, Andrew; Go, Michael R; Dzwonczyk, Roger

    2015-12-01

    Clamping and shunting during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) surgery causes changes in cerebral blood flow. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare, side by side, the cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) and processed electroencephalogram (EEG) response bilaterally to carotid artery clamping and shunting in patients undergoing CEA under general anesthesia. With institutional approval and written informed consent, patients undergoing CEA under general anesthesia and routine carotid artery shunting were recorded bilaterally, simultaneously and continuously with an rSO2 and processed EEG monitor. The response of the monitors during carotid artery clamping and shunting were assessed and compared between monitors and bilaterally within each monitor. Sixty-nine patients were included in the study. At clamping the surgical-side and contralateral-side rSO2 dropped significantly below the baseline incision value (-17.6 and -9.4% respectively). After shunting, the contralateral-side rSO2 returned to baseline while the surgical-side rSO2 remained significantly below baseline (-9.0%) until the shunt was removed following surgery. At clamping the surgical-side and contralateral-side processed EEG also dropped below baseline (-19.9 and -20.6% respectively). However, following shunt activation, the processed EEG returned bilaterally to baseline. During the course of this research, we found the rSO2 monitor to be clinically more robust (4.4% failure rate) than the processed EEG monitor (20.0% failure rate). There was no correlation between the rSO2 or processed EEG changes that occurred immediately after clamping and the degree of surgical side stenosis measured pre-operatively. Both rSO2 and processed EEG respond to clamping and shunting during CEA. Cerebral oximetry discriminates between the surgical and contralateral side during surgery. The rSO2 monitor is more reliable in the real-world clinical setting. Future studies should focus on developing algorithms based on these

  20. Electronic excitation and relaxation processes of oxygen vacancies in YSZ and their involvement in photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Takaaki; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2016-09-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) consists of zirconia and yttria and oxygen vacancies appear in accordance with the ratio of yttria. The oxygen vacancy would sometimes give annoyance, but it would be beneficial on other occasions, depending on its applications. Photoluminescence (PL) due to oxygen vacancies induced by photons with energies around 5.5 eV exhibits two decay time constants. As a possible reason for this, an oxygen vacancy changes its charging state from neutral to positive monovalent by losing an electron when YSZ is irradiated by ultraviolet photons. The PL decays either in a ms range or in a ns range, depending on whether the oxygen vacancies are neutral or positive monovalent.

  1. What processes control the oxygen isotopes of soil bio-available phosphate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Avner; Angert, Alon

    2015-06-01

    The biological availability of phosphorus (P) is considered to be the limiting factor for plant growth in many natural and agricultural soils. Recent studies demonstrated that valuable information on soil P dynamics can be gained from the stable oxygen isotopes of soil phosphate (δ18OP). However, to interpret this information correctly, our understanding of the processes that controls soil phosphate δ18OP values needs to be improved since most of the current data is based primarily on laboratory studies of pure microbial cultures and enzymatic assays and may not be relevant to soils. Here we designed a series of controlled soil incubation experiments to study the actual isotopic effects induced by abiotic reactions, biological uptake, microbial turnover and organic-P mineralization on soil phosphate δ18OP values. We used this data to estimate the role of these processes in mediating soil P availability. Our study was conducted on Mediterranean soils sampled from the same site during winter, spring and summer. The soils were incubated with various mineral and organic-P compounds and their bioavailable phosphate concentrations and δ18OP values were measured. We confirmed that the role of abiotic reactions on phosphate δ18OP values was negligible and that the δ18OP values of the added phosphate were rapidly driven towards isotopic equilibrium with soil water. We suggest this process was mediated by rapid microbial phosphate turnover. Yet, we did not detect the expected isotopic enrichment effect associated with phosphate biological uptake. In another set of incubation experiments we demonstrated that mineralization of phosphate from organic compounds, such as phospho-mono-ester (PME) and phosphor-di-ester (PDE), produced an offset from isotopic equilibrium, as a result of the strong isotopic fractionation associated with the mineralization process. However, the δ18OP values recorded by the mineralized phosphate were gradually driven back towards isotopic

  2. Bioreactor scale-up and oxygen transfer rate in microbial processes: an overview.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ochoa, Felix; Gomez, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    In aerobic bioprocesses, oxygen is a key substrate; due to its low solubility in broths (aqueous solutions), a continuous supply is needed. The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) must be known, and if possible predicted to achieve an optimum design operation and scale-up of bioreactors. Many studies have been conducted to enhance the efficiency of oxygen transfer. The dissolved oxygen concentration in a suspension of aerobic microorganisms depends on the rate of oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the liquid, on the rate at which oxygen is transported into the cells (where it is consumed), and on the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) by the microorganism for growth, maintenance and production. The gas-liquid mass transfer in a bioprocess is strongly influenced by the hydrodynamic conditions in the bioreactors. These conditions are known to be a function of energy dissipation that depends on the operational conditions, the physicochemical properties of the culture, the geometrical parameters of the bioreactor and also on the presence of oxygen consuming cells. Stirred tank and bubble column (of various types) bioreactors are widely used in a large variety of bioprocesses (such as aerobic fermentation and biological wastewater treatments, among others). Stirred tanks bioreactors provide high values of mass and heat transfer rates and excellent mixing. In these systems, a high number of variables affect the mass transfer and mixing, but the most important among them are stirrer speed, type and number of stirrers and gas flow rate used. In bubble columns and airlifts, the low-shear environment compared to the stirred tanks has enabled successful cultivation of shear sensitive and filamentous cells. Oxygen transfer is often the rate-limiting step in the aerobic bioprocess due to the low solubility of oxygen in the medium. The correct measurement and/or prediction of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient, (k(L)a), is a crucial step in the design, operation and scale-up of

  3. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    COPD - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive airways disease - oxygen safety; Emphysema - oxygen safety; Heart failure - oxygen-safety; Palliative care - oxygen safety; ...

  4. Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system for control of airborne microorganisms in meat processing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Serratia marcescens and lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were used to artificiall...

  5. Removing oxygen from a solvent extractant in an uranium recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Fred J.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Posey, Franz A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

  6. Method for oxygen reduction in a uranium-recovery process. [US DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, F.J.; Brown, G.M.; Posey, F.A.

    1981-11-04

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous iron and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

  7. BENTHIC-PELAGIC PROCESSES IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eutrophication caused by excess nutrients can exacerbate hypoxia by increasing bottom water and sediment respiration. However, in shallow sub-tropical estuaries, the euphotic zone often extends below the pycnocline allowing oxygen fluxes in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA. Measurements we...

  8. Numerical simulation of oxygen transport during the CZ silicon crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jyh-Chen; Teng, Ying-Yang; Wun, Wan-Ting; Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Hsueh-I.; Chen, Chi-Yung; Lan, Wen-Chieh

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the effect of the flow motion and heat transfer generated by the crystal and crucible rotation on the oxygen distribution inside the melt during Czochralski silicon crystal growth is investigated. When the crucible rotates in a direction opposite to the crystal rotation, Taylor-Proundman vortices appear in the region below the crystal. The diffusion of oxygen impurity from the crucible wall to the crystal-melt interface is suppressed by these Taylor-Proundman vortices, while heat transport from the crucible wall to the crystal-melt interface is blocked by the Taylor-Proundman vortices. With a higher crucible rotation rate, the size of the Taylor-Proundman vortices increases and the size of the buoyancy-thermocapillary vortices decreases. This causes the temperature at the crucible wall to rise and the evaporation of oxygen impurity on the free surface to decrease. Hence, the amount of oxygen impurity that diffuses into the melt towards the crystal-melt interface increases. The suppression from the Taylor-Proundman vortices is dominant for the smaller crucible rotation rate, while the enhancement from the oxygen impurity diffusion prevails for the higher crucible rotation rate. Therefore, there is an optimum combination of crucible and crystal rotation for obtaining the lowest oxygen concentration.

  9. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Ito, Taka; Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Valett, Jackie; Deutsch, Curtis

    2015-04-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  10. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, A.; Ito, T.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Valett, J.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  11. Tandem oxidative processes catalyzed by polymer-incarcerated multimetallic nanoclusters with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Shū

    2014-04-15

    alcohols and the following Michael reaction catalyzed by trimetallic PI catalysts containing Au-Pd alloy nanoclusters and tetraalkoxyborates as cross-linkers. All of these heterogeneous catalysts could be recovered by simple operations and reused without significant loss of activity or any leaching of metals. We have demonstrated that the polymer incarceration method enables the simultaneous immobilization of several metals, with which we can achieve one-pot tandem oxidative processes using molecular oxygen as an oxidant within the multifunctional heterogeneous catalysts. Suitable choices of metals and bimetallic structures are crucial for the reactivity and the selection of reaction pathways.

  12. Influence of under pressure dissolved oxygen on trichloroethylene degradation by the H2O2/TiO2 process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The widespread use of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its frequent release into the environment has caused many environmental and health problems. In this study the degradation of TCE at different micromolar concentrations was investigated in a stainless steel reactor with various concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 at different oxygen pressures and three different pHs. Methods To examine the synergistic effect of under pressure oxygen on TCE degradation, the concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 as well as pH were first optimized, and then the experiments were performed under optimal conditions. Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (FID) was used to measure TCE concentrations. Results Results showed that the percentage of TCE degradation without pressurized oxygen was low and it increased with increasing pressure of oxygen at all initial concentrations of TCE. The degradation percentages without oxygen pressure were 48.27%, 51.22%, 58.13% and 64.33% for TCE concentrations of 3000, 1500, 300 and 150 μg/L respectively. At an oxygen pressure of 2.5 atmospheres (atm) the percent degradation of TCE reached 84.85%, 89.14%, 93.13% and 94.99% respectively for the aforementioned TCE concentrations. Conclusions The results of this study show that the application of dissolved oxygen under pressure increases the efficiency of the H2O2/TiO2 process on the degradation of TCE and can be used along with other oxidants as an effective method for the removal of this compound from aqueous solutions. PMID:24359702

  13. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation processes during speleothem growth: systematic investigation in novel laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, D.; Hansen, M.; Dreybrodt, W.

    2012-04-01

    The most widely applied climate proxies in speleothems are stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (δ13C and δ18O). The interpretation of the stable isotope signals in terms of past temperature and/or precipitation variability is complex because both δ18O and δ13C depend on a complex interplay of various processes occurring in the atmosphere, the soil and karst above the cave and inside the cave. Quantitative reconstruction of climate parameters such as temperature and precipitation has, thus, remained impossible so far. Here we present several novel laboratory experiments aiming to understand the basic physical and chemical processes affecting the δ18O and δ13C signals during precipitation of calcium carbonate on the stalagmite surface. In particular, we aim to quantify the influence of kinetic isotope fractionation and verify recently published modelling studies (Dreybrodt, 2008; Scholz et al., 2009, Dreybrodt and Scholz, 2011). Several experiments are conducted: Degassing of CO2 from a thin film of water sparged with CO2 flowing down an inclined glass plate. pH and electric conductivity are systematically documented in order to monitor degassing of CO2. The results show that degassing of CO2 is fast, and the pCO2 of the solution is in equilibrium with the atmosphere after a short distance of flow. Carbon isotope exchange between atmospheric CO2 and dissolved bicarbonate. The results show that carbon isotope exchange may have a significant effect on the δ13C value of the dissolved bicarbonate and, thus, speleothem calcite, in particular for slow drip rates. Degassing of CO2 and calcite precipitation from a thin film of water supersaturated with respect to calcite flowing down an inclined calcium carbonate plate. Drip water is sampled after different lengths of flow path and, thus, different residence times on the plate, and pH, electrical conductivity and the stable isotope composition of the water are determined. Decreasing conductivity with increasing distance

  14. Growth of oxygen bubbles during recharge process in zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Chen, Huicui; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang; Xing, Haoqiang

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable zinc-air battery used for energy storage has a serious problem of charging capacity limited by oxygen bubble coalescence. Fast removal of oxygen bubbles adhered to the charging electrode surface is of great importance for improving the charging performance of the battery. Here we show that the law of oxygen bubble growth can be achieved by means of phase-field simulation, revealing two phenomena of bubble detachment and bubble coalescence located in the charging electrode on both sides. Hydrodynamic electrolyte and partial insulation structure of the charging electrode are investigated to solve the problem of oxygen bubble coalescence during charging. Two types of rechargeable zinc-air battery are developed on the basis of different tri-electrode configurations, demonstrating that the charging performance of the battery with electrolyte flow (Ⅰ) is better than that of the battery with the partially insulated electrode (Ⅱ), while the battery Ⅱ is superior to the battery Ⅰ in the discharging performance, cost and portability. The proposed solutions and results would be available for promoting commercial application of rechargeable zinc-air batteries or other metal-air batteries.

  15. Fast Oxidation Processes in a Naturally Reduced Aquifer Zone Caused by Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Jemison, N. E.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Bush, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is quite common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. The naturally reduced zones are heterogeneously dispersed in such aquifers and are characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon and reduced phases, including iron sulfides and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases that are found in association with these natural reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Three field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO wherein groundwater associated with naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in these field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Small concentrations of nitrate were also observed in the previously nitrate-free groundwater, and Fe(II) decreased to the detection limit. These results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS) rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table, and seasonal variations

  16. Human Factors Process Task Analysis: Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure at the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA). HF PFMEA includes the following 10 steps: Describe mission; Define System; Identify human-machine; List human actions; Identify potential errors; Identify factors that effect error; Determine likelihood of error; Determine potential effects of errors; Evaluate risk; Generate solutions (manage error). The presentation also describes how this analysis was applied to a liquid oxygen pump acceptance test.

  17. Development of a Novel Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with an Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-31

    BOC, the world's second largest industrial gas company, has developed a novel high temperature sorption based technology referred to as CAR (Cyclic Autothermal Recovery) for oxygen production and supply to oxy-fuel boilers with flue gas recycle. This technology is based on sorption and storage of oxygen in a fixed bed containing mixed ionic and electronic conductor materials. The objective of the proposed work was to construct a CAR PDU that was capable of producing 10-scfm of oxygen, using steam or recycled flue gas as the sweep gas, and install it in the Combustion Test Facility. The unit was designed and fabricated at BOC/The Linde Group, Murray Hill, New Jersey. The unit was then shipped to WRI where the site had been prepared for the unit by installation of air, carbon dioxide, natural gas, nitrogen, computer, electrical and infrastructure systems. Initial experiments with the PDU consisted of flowing air into both sides of the absorption systems and using the air heaters to ramp up the bed temperatures. The two beds were tested individually to operational temperatures up to 900 C in air. The cycling process was tested where gases are flowed alternatively from the top then bottom of the beds. The PDU unit behaved properly with respect to flow, pressure and heat during tests. The PDU was advanced to the point where oxygen production testing could begin and integration to the combustion test facility could occur.

  18. Influence of dissolved oxygen concentration on the start-up of the anammox-based process: ELAN®.

    PubMed

    Morales, N; Val del Río, A; Vázquez-Padín, J R; Gutiérrez, R; Fernández-González, R; Icaran, P; Rogalla, F; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-01-01

    The anammox-based process ELAN® was started-up in two different sequencing batch reactor (SBR) pilot plant reactors treating municipal anaerobic digester supernatant. The main difference in the operation of both reactors was the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the bulk liquid. SBR-1 was started at a DO value of 0.4 mg O2/L whereas SBR-2 was started at DO values of 3.0 mg O2/L. Despite both reactors working at a nitrogen removal rate of around 0.6 g N/(L d), in SBR-1, granules represented only a small fraction of the total biomass and reached a diameter of 1.1 mm after 7 months of operation, while in SBR-2 the biomass was mainly composed of granules with an average diameter of 3.2 mm after the same operational period. Oxygen microelectrode profiling revealed that granules from SBR-2 where only fully penetrated by oxygen with DO concentrations of 8 mg O2/L while granules from SBR-1 were already oxygen penetrated at DO concentrations of 1 mg O2/L. In this way granules from SBR-2 performed better due to the thick layer of ammonia oxidizing bacteria, which accounted for up to 20% of all the microbial populations, which protected the anammox bacteria from non-suitable liquid media conditions. PMID:26247749

  19. Vertical partitioning of nitrogen-loss processes across the oxic-anoxic interface of an oceanic oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Canfield, Don E; Dalsgaard, Tage; Friederich, Gernot E; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-10-01

    We investigated anammox, denitrification and dissimilatory reduction of nitrite to ammonium (DNRA) activity in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off northern Chile, at high-depth resolution through the oxycline into the anoxic OMZ core. This was accompanied by high-resolution nutrient and oxygen profiles to link changes in nitrogen transformation rates to physicochemical characteristics of the water column. Denitrification was detected at most depths, but anammox was the most active N2 -producing process, while DNRA was not detectable. Anammox and denitrification were mainly active in the anoxic OMZ core while activity was low to not detectable in the oxycline, except in association with an intrusion of OMZ core water. This indicates that continuous exposure to even submicromolar oxygen levels inhibits the processes either directly or through nitrite limitation. Anammox activity did not peak at the oxic-anoxic boundary but 20-50 m below matching the salinity maximum of the Equatorial Subsurface Water. This suggests that water history plays a major role for anammox activity possibly due to slow growth of anammox bacteria. Denitrification peaked deeper than anammox, likely reflecting a shift in the balance between this process and nitrate reduction to nitrite, governed by the relative availability of nitrate and nitrite.

  20. Vertical partitioning of nitrogen-loss processes across the oxic-anoxic interface of an oceanic oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Canfield, Don E; Dalsgaard, Tage; Friederich, Gernot E; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-10-01

    We investigated anammox, denitrification and dissimilatory reduction of nitrite to ammonium (DNRA) activity in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off northern Chile, at high-depth resolution through the oxycline into the anoxic OMZ core. This was accompanied by high-resolution nutrient and oxygen profiles to link changes in nitrogen transformation rates to physicochemical characteristics of the water column. Denitrification was detected at most depths, but anammox was the most active N2 -producing process, while DNRA was not detectable. Anammox and denitrification were mainly active in the anoxic OMZ core while activity was low to not detectable in the oxycline, except in association with an intrusion of OMZ core water. This indicates that continuous exposure to even submicromolar oxygen levels inhibits the processes either directly or through nitrite limitation. Anammox activity did not peak at the oxic-anoxic boundary but 20-50 m below matching the salinity maximum of the Equatorial Subsurface Water. This suggests that water history plays a major role for anammox activity possibly due to slow growth of anammox bacteria. Denitrification peaked deeper than anammox, likely reflecting a shift in the balance between this process and nitrate reduction to nitrite, governed by the relative availability of nitrate and nitrite. PMID:24118779

  1. Process for spinning flame retardant elastomeric compositions. [fabricating synthetic fibers for high oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having halogen containing polyols incorporated into the polymer chain, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives were developed. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and manufactured articles as well as nonelastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, and nylons, for high oxygen environments.

  2. Maximizing biomass concentration in baker's yeast process by using a decoupled geometric controller for substrate and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Rathore, Anurag S; Gomes, James

    2015-11-01

    Biomass production by baker's yeast in a fed-batch reactor depends on the metabolic regime determined by the concentration of glucose and dissolved oxygen in the reactor. Achieving high biomass concentration in turn is dependent on the dynamic interaction between the glucose and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taking this into account, we present in this paper the implementation of a decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) for maximizing biomass in a fed-batch yeast process. The decoupling is based on the inversion of 2×2 input-output matrix resulting from global linearization. The DIOLC was implemented online using a platform created in LabVIEW employing a TCP/IP protocol via the reactor's built-in electronic system. An improvement in biomass yield by 23% was obtained compared to that using a PID controller. The results demonstrate superior capability of the DIOLC and that the cumulative effect of smoother control action contributes to biomass maximization. PMID:26233328

  3. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospísil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  4. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  5. Synthesis, processing and characterization of calcia-stabilized zirconia solid electrolytes for oxygen sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Minghua . E-mail: mzhou@nrcan.gc.ca; Ahmad, Aftab

    2006-04-13

    Precursor powders of calcia-stabilized zirconia (CSZ) solid electrolytes have been synthesized by a sol-gel method. The phase evolution of the precursor powders after thermal treatments at different temperatures were analysized by X-ray diffraction technique. Disc-shaped sensor elements were fabricated via uniaxial pressing of the calcined powders and subsequently sintered at 1650 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the microstructure of the sintered pellets. Platinum electrodes were applied to the sintered elements to produce potentiometric/electrochemical gas sensors. The electrical response of the gas sensors to oxygen and the complex impedance of the sensors in air were measured at various temperatures. Impedance analyses indicate that the sensor cell with 15 mol% CaO has much lower resistance (the sum of bulk and grain-boundary resistance) than the sensor cell with 22 mol% CaO. This is also reflected by the EMF responses of both sensor cells to various oxygen concentrations in the testing gas. The EMF deviation from the theoretical value of the CSZ sensor cell with 22 mol% CaO was larger than that of the CSZ sensor cell with 15 mol% CaO. The corrrelations between material compositions, microstructures of the sintered pellets and the electrical properties of the sensors are discussed.

  6. Singlet oxygen-induced photodegradation of the polymers and dyes in optical sensing materials and the effect of stabilizers on these processes.

    PubMed

    Enko, Barbara; Borisov, Sergey M; Regensburger, Johannes; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Gescheidt, Georg; Klimant, Ingo

    2013-09-12

    A comprehensive study of photodegradation processes in optical sensing materials caused by photosensitized singlet oxygen in different polymers is presented. The stabilities of the polymers are accessed in the oxygen consumption measurements performed with help of optical oxygen sensors. Polystyrene and poly(phenylsilesquioxane) are found to be the most stable among the polymers investigated, whereas poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) and particularly poly(methyl methacrylate) and their derivatives show the fastest oxygen consumption. The effect of the stabilizers (singlet oxygen quenchers) on the oxygen consumption rates, the photostability of the sensitizer, and the total photon emission (TPE) by singlet oxygen is studied. 1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) was found to significantly reduce both the TPE and the oxygen consumption rates, indicating its role as a physical quencher of singlet oxygen. The addition of DABCO also significantly improved the photostability of the sensitizer. The N-alkylated derivative of DABCO and DABCO covalently grafted to the polystyrene backbone are prepared in an attempt to overcome the volatility and water solubility of the quencher. These derivatives as well as other tertiary amines investigated were found to be inefficient as stabilizing agents, and some of them even negatively affected the oxygen consumption rates.

  7. Investigations on the mechanism of oxygen-dependent plant processes: ethylene biosynthesis and cyanide-resistant respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Stegink, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Two oxygen-dependent plant processes were investigated. A cell-free preparation from pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska) was used to study ethylene biosynthesis from 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was investigated in studies with /sup 14/C-butyl gallate and other respiratory effectors. Ethylene biosynthesis was not due to a specific enzyme, or oxygen radicals. Rather, hydrogen peroxide, generated at low levels, coupled with endogenous manganese produced ethylene. /sup 14/C-butyl gallate bound specifically to mitochondria from cyanide-sensitive and -resistant higher plants and Neurospora crassa mitochondria. The amount of gallate bound was similar for all higher plant mitochondria. Rat liver mitochondria bound very little /sup 14/C-butyl gallate. Plant mitochondria in which cyanide-resistance was induced bound as much /sup 14/C-butyl gallate as before induction. However mitochondria from recently harvested white potato tubers did not bind the gallate. The observations suggest that an engaging factor couples with a gallate binding site in the mitochondrial membrane. With skunk cabbage spadix mitochondria the I/sub 5//sup 0/ for antimycin A inhibition of oxygen uptake was decreased by salicylhydroxamic acid pretreatment; this was also true for reverse order additions. No shift was observed with mung bean hypocotyl or Jerusalem artichoke tuber mitochondria.

  8. Modular continuous wavelet processing of biosignals: extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video signal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A novel method of extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video-based biosignal is described. The method comprises a novel modular continuous wavelet transform approach which includes: performing the transform, undertaking running wavelet archetyping to enhance the pulse information, extraction of the pulse ridge time–frequency information [and thus a heart rate (HRvid) signal], creation of a wavelet ratio surface, projection of the pulse ridge onto the ratio surface to determine the ratio of ratios from which a saturation trending signal is derived, and calibrating this signal to provide an absolute saturation signal (SvidO2). The method is illustrated through its application to a video photoplethysmogram acquired during a porcine model of acute desaturation. The modular continuous wavelet transform-based approach is advocated by the author as a powerful methodology to deal with noisy, non-stationary biosignals in general. PMID:27382479

  9. Modular continuous wavelet processing of biosignals: extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video signal.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    A novel method of extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video-based biosignal is described. The method comprises a novel modular continuous wavelet transform approach which includes: performing the transform, undertaking running wavelet archetyping to enhance the pulse information, extraction of the pulse ridge time-frequency information [and thus a heart rate (HRvid) signal], creation of a wavelet ratio surface, projection of the pulse ridge onto the ratio surface to determine the ratio of ratios from which a saturation trending signal is derived, and calibrating this signal to provide an absolute saturation signal (SvidO2). The method is illustrated through its application to a video photoplethysmogram acquired during a porcine model of acute desaturation. The modular continuous wavelet transform-based approach is advocated by the author as a powerful methodology to deal with noisy, non-stationary biosignals in general. PMID:27382479

  10. Oxygen and Metals Processing on the Moon: Will Materials Science Change Our Future in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an In-Situ Resource Utilization infrastructure on the lunar surface, the production of oxygen and metals by various technologies is under development within NASA projects. Such an effort reflects the ambition to change paradigms in space exploration to enable human presence for the long-term. Sustaining such presence involves the acceptance of a new concept in space activities; crews must be able to generate some of their consumables from local resources. The balance between accepting early development risks and reducing long-term mission risks is at the core of the technology development approach. We will present an overview of the technologies involved and present their possible impact on the future of human expansion in the solar system.

  11. Multiple stable oxygen isotopic studies of atmospheric sulfate: A new quantitative way to understand sulfate formation processes in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles Chi-Woo

    2000-11-01

    Sulfate is an important trace species in the Earth's atmosphere because of its roles in numerous atmospheric processes. In addition to its inherent light-scattering properties, sulfate can serve as cloud condensation nucleus (CCN), affecting cloud formation as well as microphysical properties of clouds. Consequently, atmospheric sulfate species influence the global radiative energy balance. Sulfate is known to increase acidity of rainwater with negative consequences in both natural and urban environments. In addition, aerosol sulfate (<=2.5 μm) is respirable and poses a threat to human health as a potential carrier of toxic pollutants through the respiratory tract. Despite intense investigative effort, uncertainty regarding the relative significance of gas and aqueous phase oxidation pathways still remains. Acquisition of such information is important because the lifetime and transport of S(IV) species and sulfate aerosols are influenced by the oxidative pathways. In addition, sulfate formation processes affect the aerosol size distribution, which ultimately influences radiative properties of atmospheric aerosols. Therefore, the budgetary information of the sulfur cycle, as well as the radiative effects of sulfate on global climate variation, can be attained from better quantitative understanding of in situ sulfate formation processes in the atmosphere. Multiple stable oxygen isotopic studies of atmospheric sulfate are presented as a new tool to better comprehend the atmospheric sulfate formation processes. Coupled with isotopic studies, 35S radioactivity measurements have been utilized to assess contribution of sulfate from high altitude air masses. Atmospheric sulfate (aerosols and rainwater) samples have been collected from diverse environments. Laboratory experiments of gas and aqueous phase S(IV) oxidation by various oxidants, as well as biomass burning experiments, have also been conducted. The main isotopic results from these studies are as follows: (1

  12. Oxygen at Nanomolar Levels Reversibly Suppresses Process Rates and Gene Expression in Anammox and Denitrification in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Frank J.; Thamdrup, Bo; De Brabandere, Loreto; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Don E.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O2 and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N2-producing processes of anammox and denitrification determine where this loss occurs. We studied experimentally how O2 at nanomolar levels affects anammox and denitrification rates and the transcription of nitrogen cycle genes in the anoxic OMZ off Chile. Rates of anammox and denitrification were reversibly suppressed, most likely at the enzyme level. Fifty percent inhibition of N2 and N2O production by denitrification was achieved at 205 and 297 nM O2, respectively, whereas anammox was 50% inhibited at 886 nM O2. Coupled metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that transcripts encoding nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), nitrite reductase (nirS), and nitric oxide reductase (norB) decreased in relative abundance above 200 nM O2. This O2 concentration did not suppress the transcription of other dissimilatory nitrogen cycle genes, including nitrate reductase (narG), hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo), and nitrite reductase (nirK). However, taxonomic characterization of transcripts suggested inhibition of narG transcription in gammaproteobacteria, whereas the transcription of anammox narG, whose gene product is likely used to oxidatively replenish electrons for carbon fixation, was not inhibited. The taxonomic composition of transcripts differed among denitrification enzymes, suggesting that distinct groups of microorganisms mediate different steps of denitrification. Sulfide addition (1 µM) did not affect anammox or O2 inhibition kinetics but strongly stimulated N2O production by denitrification. These results identify new O2 thresholds for delimiting marine nitrogen loss and highlight the utility of integrating biogeochemical and metatranscriptomic analyses. PMID:25352619

  13. Oxygen extraction from lunar materials - An experimental test of an ilmenite reduction process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction of ilmenite with hydrogen to produce water has been studied experimentally in order to evaluate the effectiveness of using a cold trap to improve yields in a continuous flow process. Yields were enhanced, but not to the degree observed in batch processing systems. The terrestrial simulant used in these studies contained traces of iron sulfide, which released H2S during processing with a deleterious effect on several components of the test system. More sophisticated testing should be undertaken to obtain kinetic data and attention given to the removal of sulfides in the pre-process beneficiation.

  14. Processes controlling dissolved oxygen and pH in the upper Willamette River basin, Oregon, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pogue, Ted R.; Anderson, Chauncey W.

    1995-01-01

    In July and August of 1994, the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) collected data to document the spatial extent and diel variability of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH levels in selected reaches of streams in the upper Willamette River Basin. These data were also collected to identify primary factors that control DO concentrations downstream from major point sources as well as to provide ODEQ with data to refine calibration of their steady-state DO and nutrient models for the upper Willamette River Basin. All of the reaches studied had diel variations in DO and pH. The magnitude of the diel variations in DO ranged from 0.2 to 3.9 milligrams per liter (7 to 50 percent-saturation units based on ambient water temperature and barometric pressure) and in pH from 0.3 to 1.4 units. However, of the reaches studied, only the Coast Fork Willamette River from river mile (RM) 21.7 to 12.5 and the Willamette River from RM 151 to 141.6 had field measured violations of State standards for DO and pH. DO concentration and pH in water depend on many factors. Data were collected to examine several major factors, including BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), carbonaceous BOD, nitrogenous BOD, and measures of photosynthetic activity. Of the four study reaches, only a short stretch of the Coast Fork Willamette River has potential for important levels of oxygen consumption from BOD or nitrification. Additionally, water-column primary-productivity measurements indicated that respiration and photosynthesis by free-floating algae did not explain the observed diel variations in DO in the study reaches. Results from a simple mathematical model incorporating measures of community respiration and net primary productivities indicated that periphyton are capable of producing a diel variation of the order of magnitude observed during the August study period. In the Willamette River near Peoria, the combined periphyton DO

  15. A high performance biometric signal and image processing method to reveal blood perfusion towards 3D oxygen saturation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imms, Ryan; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Trico, Michaël.; Summers, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) is a recent development in the field of physiological data acquisition, currently undergoing a large amount of research to characterize and define the range of its capabilities. Contact-based PPG techniques have been broadly used in clinical scenarios for a number of years to obtain direct information about the degree of oxygen saturation for patients. With the advent of imaging techniques, there is strong potential to enable access to additional information such as multi-dimensional blood perfusion and saturation mapping. The further development of effective opto-physiological monitoring techniques is dependent upon novel modelling techniques coupled with improved sensor design and effective signal processing methodologies. The biometric signal and imaging processing platform (bSIPP) provides a comprehensive set of features for extraction and analysis of recorded iPPG data, enabling direct comparison with other biomedical diagnostic tools such as ECG and EEG. Additionally, utilizing information about the nature of tissue structure has enabled the generation of an engineering model describing the behaviour of light during its travel through the biological tissue. This enables the estimation of the relative oxygen saturation and blood perfusion in different layers of the tissue to be calculated, which has the potential to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  16. A Technique for Decreasing Reactivity of Coal Material to Suppress the Oxygen Absorption Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, S. S.; Lugovtsova, N. Yu; Gubanova, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper describes the mechanisms of self-ignition formation in coal liable to spontaneous combustion, on the basis of experimental works performed to analyze heat and mass transfer in the coal-air system. A new approach was developed to the coal self-heating suppression and thermodynamic control of the oxidation process. The influence of coal moisture content and thermal behaviour of air in the cooling process was studied during moisture evaporation.

  17. Process for regenerating and stabilizing phosphorus-vanadium-oxygen complex catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.C.

    1989-08-29

    This patent describes a process for regenerating and for stabilizing a phosphorus-vanadium-oxide catalyst having an atomic ratio of phosphorus to vanadium in the range of about 0.5 to about 5. The process comprises: contacting the catalyst at a temperature in the range of from about 300{sup 0}C. to about 550{sup 0}C. with an effective about of a halogen-containing material selected from the group consisting of: molecular chlorine or flourine or mixtures thereof; carbon halides of fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine being in the vapor state above about 250{sup 0}C.; organic halides of fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine being in the vapor state above about 250{sup 0}F.; hydrogen halides singularly or mixtures thereof at regeneration conditions including a temperature in the range of from about 300{sup 0}C. to about 550{sup 0}C.; and contacting the catalyst with an effective amount of an alkyl ester of orthophosphoric acid and water. The amount of the halogen-containing material and the amount of the alkyl ester of orthophosphoric acid effective to regenerate the catalyst.

  18. Cold plasma processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.; Bullard, D.; Ortega, R.

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of a cold or nonequilibrium plasma in chlorination processing is discussed. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was successfully chlorinated at temperatures between 700 and 900 C without the aid of carbon. In addition to these initial experiments, a technique was developed for determining the temperature of a specimen in a plasma. Development of that technique has required evaluating the emissivity of TiO2, ZrO2, and FeOTiO2 and analyzing the specimen temperature in a plasma as a function of both power absorbed by the plasma and the pressure of the plasma. The mass spectrometer was also calibrated with TiCl4 and CCl4 vapor.

  19. Role of DDL processes during electrolytic reduction of Cu(II) in a low oxygen environment.

    PubMed

    Brosky, Rebekah T; Pamukcu, Sibel

    2013-11-15

    Heavy metals typically accumulate in reduced bottom sediments after being discharged into waterways by industrial and municipal processes. A laboratory experiment was conducted in order to determine if abundance of clay in the bottom sediments of a Cu-contaminated aqueous ecosystem could enhance electrolytic reduction of the heavy metal. Cu(NO3)2 · 2.5H2O was added to simulate a moderately contaminated system with 650 μg Cu/ml kaolinite clay-water slurry. A constant electrical potential of 1.0 V/cm was applied across platinum wire electrodes inserted into the continuously stirred system for four days while the system ORP(2) was monitored and periodic sub-samples were taken for analysis. The electrical as well as the chemical results indicate that the quantity of Cu(II) being reduced to Cu(I), especially within the aqueous phase, is increased within the first 48 h of experimentation by the presence of kaolinite clay up to 0.05 mg clay/l slurry.

  20. The mechanisms of catchment flow processes using natural variations in deuterium and oxygen-18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. V.; Macpherson, D. K.; Stokes, R. A.

    1987-10-01

    Stable isotope compositions and chloride concentrations in rainfall, deep and shallow groundwaters and streamflow have been used to investigate the flow processes through a small catchment in southwest Western Australia. In addition to the stable isotope and chloride data, daily rainfall, streamflow rate, streamflow chloride concentrations and shallow and deep groundwater hydrographs were used in an integrated approach to determine the mechanisms of streamflow generation. The range in δ18O and δ2H of rainfall events incident to the catchment during 1985 was 9.0 and 60‰, respectively, and was large enough to be useful in tracing flows generated from them through the catchment. During the season, four separate rainfall events were analysed using stream hydrograph separation methods based on δ18O, δ2H and chloride. Results showed that between 60 and 95% of the streamflow generated from the respective events had originated from pre-event shallow groundwater within the catchment. The seasonal pattern in the streamflow isotopic composition during 1985 was also analysed. Most significant rainfall events during the season generated an almost immediate response in the streamflow isotopic composition. The response to individual rainfall events was strongest early in the season but diminished as the season progressed. This attenuation with time indicated isotopic mixing and dilution of individual rainfall events with the increasing storage of shallow groundwater as the season progressed. Kalman filtering methods were used to investigate the function linking rainfall volume and streamflow and also the average time lag between rain and flow, using δ values in rainfall as time markers. The analysis showed a range of "ages" for the streamflow from about 20 to about 50 days lag after rainfall, tending to decrease after rainfall events and then increase again. The estimated value of the lag was always significantly greater than zero. Deep and shallow groundwaters in the 1985

  1. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb ... in your home. A different kind of oxygen therapy is called hyperbaric oxygen therapy. It uses oxygen ...

  2. The effect of gold nanoparticles on exchange processes in collision complexes of triplet and singlet oxygen molecules with excited eosin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryukhanov, V. V.; Minaev, B. M.; Tsibul'nikova, A. V.; Slezhkin, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied exchange processes in contact complexes of triplet eosin molecules with oxygen molecules in the triplet (3Σ{/g -}) and singlet (1Δ g ) states in thin polyvinylbutyral films in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Upon resonant excitation of surface plasmons in gold nanoparticles into the absorption band of eosin molecules-singlet oxygen sensitizers-we have obtained an increase in the intensity of the delayed fluorescence and an increase in the lifetime of the dye with simultaneous quenching of the luminescence of singlet oxygen. The kinetics of the delayed fluorescence of the dye as a result of singlet-triplet annihilation of triplet eosin molecules with singlet oxygen molecules has been investigated. To compare theoretical and experimental data, we have numerically simulated energy transfer processes. Rate constants of energy transfer and of singlet-triplet annihilation, as well as quenching constants of triplet states of the dye by molecular oxygen, have been calculated. Luminescence quantum yield 1Δ g of polyvinylbutyral has been estimated. We have analyzed quantum-chemically electronic mechanisms of singlet-triplet annihilation of oxygen and eosin.

  3. Effects of halogen doping on nanocarbon catalysts synthesized by a solution plasma process for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Wada, Yuta; Chiba, Satoshi; Kumagai, Sou; Lee, Hoonseung; Serizawa, Ai; Li, Oi Lun; Panomsuwan, Gasidit

    2016-08-01

    Halogen-doped carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were synthesized by a simple one-step solution plasma process at room temperature using a mixture of benzene (C6H6) and organics containing halogen atoms as the precursors (i.e., hexafluorobenzene (C6F6), hexachlorobenzene (C6Cl6), and hexabromobenzene (C6Br6)). The experimental results demonstrated that halogen doping, especially F and Cl, could lead to more efficient removal of residual hydrogen compared to carbon synthesized with pure benzene. This phenomenon was related to the different binding energies between hydrogen and halogens to form hydrogen halides. Their crystallinity and morphology did not change and remained the same as non-doped carbon. The electrochemical evaluation of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in an alkaline solution revealed that halogen doping did not play a significant role in shifting the onset potential for the ORR, while a slight enhancement in diffusion limited current density was observed at high overpotentials. Moreover, the electron transfer number involved in the ORR process determined from the Koutecky-Levich plot at -0.6 V was found to increase for halogen-doped carbons in the following order: F-CNPs > Br-CNPs > Cl-CNPs > CNPs. The improved ORR performance of F-CNPs could reasonably be attributed to the synergistic effects of specific bonding states between the halogen and carbon, structural defects and surface functional groups. Our results confirmed the validity of using halogen doping to improve the ORR catalytic activity of CNPs. PMID:27435811

  4. An Efficient Technology for Smelting Low Grade Bismuth-Lead Concentrate: Oxygen-Rich Side Blow Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Hao, Zhandong; Yang, Tianzu; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Weifeng; Zhang, Duchao; Bin, Shu; Bin, Wanda

    2015-09-01

    An efficient technology for low-grade bismuth-lead concentrate smelting is reported. In the process, two oxygen-rich side blow furnaces (OSBF) are used for oxidative smelting of the concentrate and reductive smelting of the oxidized slag from the upstream furnace, respectively. Slags are collected from the OSBFs by certain intervals during an operation period and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrum, x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Analysis for the oxidized slag revealed that spherical or oval metallic inclusions with sizes range from submicron to 40 μm in diameter are randomly embedded in the glassy matrix. On the one hand, the metal content of the inclusions is close to that of the bottom metal alloy, indicating metal inclusions are physically entrained in the oxidized slag. On the other hand, metal inclusions are not identified in the reduced slag, disclosing the strong metal-slag separation ability of the OSBF. The bismuth content of the reduced slag is about 0.05 wt.%, which is 6-10 times lower than that of the traditional pyrometallurgical processes.

  5. Reactive oxygen species are involved in group I mGluR-mediated facilitation of nociceptive processing in amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guangchen; Neugebauer, Volker

    2010-07-01

    Recent biochemical and behavioral data implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in peripheral and spinal pain mechanisms. However, pain-related functions of ROS in the brain and mechanisms of pain-related ROS activation remain to be determined. Our previous studies showed that the amygdala plays a key role in emotional-affective pain responses and pain modulation. Hyperactivity of amygdala neurons in an animal pain model depends on group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (subtypes mGluR1 and mGluR5), but their signaling pathway remains to be determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that activation of group I mGluRs increases nociceptive processing in amygdala neurons through a mechanism that involves ROS. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made from neurons in the laterocapsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC) in anesthetized adult male rats. Administration of a group I mGluR agonist (DHPG) into the CeLC by microdialysis increased the responses to innocuous and noxious somatosensory (knee joint compression) and visceral (colorectal distention [CRD]) stimuli. A ROS scavenger (PBN) and a superoxide dismutase mimetic (TEMPOL) reversed the facilitatory effects of DHPG. An mGluR5 antagonist (MPEP) also inhibited the effects of DHPG on the responses to innocuous and noxious somatosensory and visceral stimuli, whereas an mGluR1 antagonist (LY367385) decreased only the responses to visceral stimulation. The results show for the first time that ROS mediate group I mGluR-induced facilitation of nociceptive processing in amygdala neurons. The antagonist data may suggest differential contributions of subtypes mGluR1 and mGluR5 to the processing of somatosensory and visceral nociceptive information in the amygdala.

  6. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO2 thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-01

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and capacitance-frequency (C-f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO2 thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C-V anomalous) is observed in the C-V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C-V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO2 interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60-0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti3+ ions. Both the C-V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO2 arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  7. Role of oxygen vacancies on the bias illumination stress stability of solution-processed zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li-Chih; Chen, Jen-Sue E-mail: jsjeng@mail.nutn.edu.tw; Jeng, Jiann-Shing E-mail: jsjeng@mail.nutn.edu.tw

    2014-07-14

    Solution-processed ultra-thin (∼3 nm) zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) with a mobility of 8 cm{sup 2}/Vs are obtained with post spin-coating annealing at only 350 °C. The effect of light illumination (at wavelengths of 405 nm or 532 nm) on the stability of TFT transfer characteristics under various gate bias stress conditions (zero, positive, and negative) is investigated. It is found that the ΔV{sub th} (V{sub th}{sup stress} {sup 3400} {sup s − stress} {sup 0} {sup s}) window is significantly positive when ZTO TFTs are under positive bias stress (PBS, ΔV{sub th} = 9.98 V) and positive bias illumination stress (λ = 405 nm and ΔV{sub th} = 6.96 V), but ΔV{sub th} is slightly negative under only light illumination stress (λ = 405 nm and ΔV{sub th} = −2.02 V) or negative bias stress (ΔV{sub th} = −2.27 V). However, the ΔV{sub th} of ZTO TFT under negative bias illumination stress is substantial, and it will efficiently recover the ΔV{sub th} caused by PBS. The result is attributed to the photo-ionization and subsequent transition of electronic states of oxygen vacancies (i.e., V{sub o}, V{sub o}{sup +}, and V{sub o}{sup ++}) in ZTO. A detailed mechanism is discussed to better understand the bias stress stability of solution processed ZTO TFTs.

  8. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  9. Regulatory Effect of Low-Intensity Optical Radiation on Oxygenation of Blood Irradiated In Vivo and Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    For three series of blood samples, we have studied the effect of therapeutic doses of low-intensity optical radiation (LOR) on oxygenation parameters of blood irradiated in vivo, and also on the levels of some metabolites: lactate, glucose, cholesterol. The quality of blood oxygenation was assessed using three parameters: the partial pressure of oxygen pVO2, the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin SVO2, and the oxygen level in arterial and venous blood, varying under the influence of low-intensity optical radiation due to photodissociation of hemoglobin/ligand complexes. We have established that during photohemotherapy (PHT), including extracorporeal, supravascular, and intravenous blood irradiation, positive changes occur in the oxygenation parameters and the metabolite levels, while after the courses of PHT have been completed, the individual changes in such parameters in individual patients were both positive and negative. The regulatory effect of PHT was apparent in the tendency toward a decrease in high initial values and an increase in low initial values both for the oxygenation parameters and for the metabolites; but at the doses recommended for use, PHT had a regulatory but still not a normalizing effect.

  10. [Startup, stable operation and process failure of EBPR system under the low temperature and low dissolved oxygen condition].

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Li, Lu; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Xue-Fen; Liu, Juan-Li

    2015-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was started up and operated with alternating anaerobic/oxic (An/O) to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) under the condition of 13-16 degrees C. The results showed that under the condition of low temperature, the EBPR system was successfully started up in a short time (<6 d). The reactor achieved a high and stable phosphorus removal performance with an influent phosphate concentration of 20 mg x L(-1) and the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 2 mg x L(-1). The effluent phosphate concentration was lower than 0.5 mg x L(-1). It was found that decreasing DO had an influence on the steady operation of EBPR system. As DO concentration of aerobic phase decreased from 2 mg x L(-1) to 1 mg x L(-1), the system could still perform EBPR and the phosphorus removal efficiency was greater than 97.4%. However, the amount of phosphate released during anaerobic phase was observed to decrease slightly compared with that of 2 mg x L(-1) DO condition. Moreover, the phosphorus removal performance of the system deteriorated immediately and the effluent phosphate concentration couldn't meet the national integrated wastewater discharge standard when DO concentration was further lowered to 0.5 mg x L(-1). The experiments of increasing DO to recover phosphorus removal performance of the EBPR suggested the process failure resulted from low DO was not reversible in the short-term. It was also found that the batch tests of anoxic phosphorus uptake using nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors had an impact on the stable operation of EBPR system, whereas the resulting negative influence could be recovered within 6 cycles. In addition, the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) of the EBPR system remained stable and the sludge volume index (SVI) decreased to a certain extend in a long run, implying long-term low temperature and low DO condition favored the sludge sedimentation. PMID:26031088

  11. Different hydrodynamic processes regulated on water quality (nutrients, dissolved oxygen, and phytoplankton biomass) in three contrasting waters of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Long, Aimin; Huang, Hui; Yue, Weizhong

    2014-03-01

    The subtropical Hong Kong (HK) waters are located at the eastern side of the Pearl River Estuary. Monthly changes of water quality, including nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a) were routinely investigated in 2003 by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in three contrasting waters of HK with different prevailing hydrodynamic processes. The western, eastern, and southern waters were mainly dominated by nutrient-replete Pearl River discharge, the nutrient-poor coastal/shelf oceanic waters, and mixtures of estuarine and coastal seawater and sewage effluent of Hong Kong, respectively. Acting in response, the water quality in these three contrasting areas showed apparently spatial–temporal variation pattern. Nutrients usually decreased along western waters to eastern waters. In the dry season, the water column was strongly mixed by monsoon winds and tidal currents, which resulted in relatively low Chl-a (<5 μg l(−1)) and high bottom DO (>4 mg l(−1)), suggesting that mixing enhanced the buffering capacity of eutrophication in HK waters. However, in the wet season, surface Chl-a was generally >10 μg l(−1) in southern waters in summer due to halocline and thermohaline stratification, adequate nutrients, and light availability. Although summer hypoxia (DO <2 mg l(−1)) was episodically observed near sewage effluent site and in southern waters induced by vertical stratification, the eutrophication impacts in HK waters were not as severe as expected owing to P limitation and short water residence time in the wet season. PMID:24122158

  12. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon: Moessbauer Spectroscopy as a Process Monitor for Oxygen Production. Results from a Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R.V.; Schroder, C.; Graff, T.G.; Sanders, G.B.; Lee, K.A.; Simon, T.M.; Larson, W.E.; Quinn, J.W.; Clark, L.D.; Caruso, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Essential consumables like oxygen must to be produced from materials on the lunar surface to enable a sustained, long-term presence of humans on the Moon. The Outpost Precursor for ISRU and Modular Architecture (OPTIMA) field test on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, facilitated by the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) of the University of Hawaii at Hilo, was designed to test the implementation of three hardware concepts to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith: Precursor ISRU Lunar Oxygen Testbed (PILOT) developed by Lockheed Martin in Littleton, CO; Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) developed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, FL; and ROxygen developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. The three concepts differ in design, but all rely on the same general principle: hydrogen reduction of metal cations (primarily Fe2+) bonded to oxygen to metal (e.g., Fe0) with the production of water. The hydrogen source is residual hydrogen in the fuel tanks of lunar landers. Electrolysis of the water produces oxygen and hydrogen (which is recycled). We used the miniaturized M ssbauer spectrometer MIMOS II to quantify the yield of this process on the basis of the quantity of Fe0 produced. Iron M ssbauer spectroscopy identifies iron-bearing phases, determines iron oxidation states, and quantifies the distribution of iron between mineral phases and oxidation states. The oxygen yield can be calculated by quantitative measurements of the distribution of Fe among oxidation states in the regolith before and after hydrogen reduction. A M ssbauer spectrometer can also be used as a prospecting tool to select the optimum feedstock for the oxygen production plants (e.g., high total Fe content and easily reduced phases). As a demonstration, a MIMOS II backscatter spectrometer (SPESI, Germany) was mounted on the Cratos rover (NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH), which is one of

  13. A study of alternative methods for reclaiming oxygen from carbon dioxide and water by a solid-electrolyte process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Two alternative technical approaches were studied for application of an electrochemical process using a solid oxide electrolyte (zirconia stabilized by yttria or scandia) to oxygen reclamation from carbon dioxide and water, for spacecraft life support systems. Among the topics considered are the advisability of proceeding to engineering prototype development and fabrication of a full scale model for the system concept, the optimum choice of method or approach to be carried into prototype development, and the technical problem areas which exist.

  14. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

    2008-09-30

    In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW

  15. Dependence of fracture toughness of molybdenum laser welds on processing parameters and in-situ oxygen gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, L.E.; Jellison, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Fracture toughness properties have been determined for laser welds in different grades of molybdenum. The fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum was consistently less than the fracture toughness of welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum. These differences cannot be attributed to oxygen content, since the oxygen level was nominally the same for all grades of molybdenum examined in this program. Alloy additions of titanium by means of physically deposited coatings significantly improved the fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum, whereas titanium additions to welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum decreased the fracture toughness slightly. Pulsed laser welds exhibited fine columnar structures and, in the case of sintered molybdenum, superior fracture toughness when compared with continuous wave laser welds. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Digital phosphorimeter with frequency domain signal processing: Application to real-time fiber-optic oxygen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, J. Ricardo; Yu, Clement; Yeh, Gong Jong

    1993-06-01

    An instrument to measure the excited-state lifetimes of phosphorescent materials in real time is described. This apparatus uses pulsed and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG solid-state laser for excitation, sampler for data acquisition, and frequency domain methods for data fitting. The instrument amplifies the ac components of the detector output and band limits the signal to 25 kHz. The fundamental frequency of the excitation is then set to obtain a desired number of harmonics. This band limited signal is sampled and averaged over few thousand cycles in the time domain. The frequency domain representation of the data is obtained by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio of each sampled harmonic is then computed. Ten to a hundred values of the phase and modulations are averaged before computing the sensor lifetime. The instrument is capable of measuring precise and accurate excited-state lifetimes from subpicowatt luminescent signals in 100 μm optical fibers. To monitor oxygen for biomedical applications the response time of the system is decreased by collecting only 8 or 16 harmonics. A least-squares fit yields the lifetimes of single exponentials. A component of zero lifetime is introduced to account for the backscatter excitation. The phosphorescence lifetimes measured reproducibly to three parts in a thousand are used to monitor oxygen. Oxygen concentrations are computed employing empirical polynomials. The system drift is less than 1% over 100 h of continuous operation. This instrument is used to measure oxygen concentrations in vitro and in vivo with 2 s update times and 90 s full response times. Examples of measurements in saline solutions and in dogs are presented.

  17. Final report on the project entitled: Highly Preheated Combustion Air System with/without Oxygen Enrichment for Metal Processing Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Arvind Atreya

    2007-02-16

    This work develops and demonstrates a laboratory-scale high temperature natural gas furnace that can operate with/without oxygen enrichment to significantly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. The laboratory-scale is 5ft in diameter & 8ft tall. This furnace was constructed and tested. This report demonstrates the efficiency and pollutant prevention capabilities of this test furnace. The project also developed optical detection technology to control the furnace output.

  18. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  19. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  20. Enhancing dissolved oxygen control using an on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    An on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system was developed to optimize dissolved oxygen concentration in a bench-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process. In order to improve the performance of the control system, a self-adapted fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm and adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were employed. The proposed control system permits the on-line implementation of every operating strategy of the experimental system. A set of experiments involving variable hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent pH (pH), dissolved oxygen in the aerobic reactor (DO), and mixed-liquid return ratio (r) was carried out. Using the proposed system, the amount of COD in the effluent stabilized at the set-point and below. The improvement was achieved with optimum dissolved oxygen concentration because the performance of the treatment process was optimized using operating rules implemented in real time. The system allows various expert operational approaches to be deployed with the goal of minimizing organic substances in the outlet while using the minimum amount of energy. PMID:24052227

  1. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads.

  2. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads. PMID:25164570

  3. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    PubMed

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues. PMID:23648104

  4. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  5. Electrical Characteristics of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor with High-κ/Metal Gate Using Oxygen Scavenging Process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junil; Kim, Jang Hyun; Kwon, Dae Woong; Park, Euyhwan; Park, Taehyung; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Byung-gook

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely accepted that the mismatch of lattice constants between HfO2 and Si generates interface traps at the HfO2-Si interface, which causes the degradation of device performances. For better interface quality, very thin SiO2 film (< 2 nm) has been inserted as an interlayer (IL) between HfO2 and Si despite of the increase of EOT. In order to obtain both the better interface quality and the reduction of EOT, we used Ti metal on HfO2/IL SiO2 stack as a scavenging layer to absorb oxygens in the SiO2 and various annealing conditions were applied to optimize the thickness of the SiO2. As a result, we can effectively shrink the EOT from 3.55 nm to 1.15 nm while maintaining the same physical thickness of gate stacks. Furthermore, the diffusion of oxygen was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass Spectrometry (SIMS). PMID:27483842

  6. Optical Measurements Reveal Interplay Between Surface and Bottom Processes Involving Phytoplankton, Organic Carbon, Iron, Light, and Oxygen in Two Stratified Mesotrophic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.; Vaidya, A.; Wiles, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Water column distribution of phytoplankton, organic carbon, particulate and dissolved iron are described through detailed vertical optical measurements that include downwelling cosine irradiance, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence by CDOM, Chl-a, phycobilin pigments, and diffuse attenuation for several UV wavebands, plus pH, temperature, and specific conductance. These measurements were completed with a group of profiling instruments during summer in two mid-latitude small lakes. Special calibration allowed for correcting the impact of CDOM and turbidity on the pigment fluorescence signals. These in situ data were combined with laboratory analysis of discrete water column samples for methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a, spectral absorbance of particles, concentration of particulates (dry mass and ash-free mass), total particulate and "dissolved" iron, DOC and CDOM (the "dissolved fraction" passes through a GF/F filter). Surface processes revealed by these measurement include solar heating and photobleaching of CDOM (partly distributed by wind-driven mixing), and nonphotochemical quenching of phytoplankton chlorophyll-a fluorescence. Bottom processes revealed by these measurements include oxygen consumption by net heterotrophic metabolism, release of DOC, CDOM, and iron from anoxic bottom sediments, and the development of a biological community structured by the light and temperature gradients and absence or scarcity of dissolved oxygen near the bottom. The iron associated with CDOM and particles in the deep samples substantially increased the latter's DOC-specific absorption once there was an opportunity for oxidation. A model for mass-specific spectral absorption of particulates accounts for the contribution of organic matter and iron associated with the particles. A detailed hydrologic budget for one of the lakes will allow the water column processes to be explored further by accounting for inputs and outputs of water and organic carbon (via precipitation

  7. Theoretical Investigation of the Process of Steam-Oxygen Gasification of Coke-Ash Particles in a Fluidized Bed Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhman, B. B.

    2015-03-01

    The problem on the evolution of the state of an ensemble of reacting coke-ash particles in a fluidized-bed gas generator is considered. A kinetic equation for the distribution function of particles within small ranges of carbon concentration variation for the stages of surface and bulk reaction has been constructed and integrated. Boundary conditions ("matching" conditions) at the boundaries between these ranges are formulated. The influence of the granulometric composition of the starting coal, height, porosity, and of the bed temperature on the process of steam-oxygen gasification of coke-ash particles of individual sorts of fuel and of a binary coal mixture has been investigated.

  8. Processes of chemoionization in the course of inflammation of a methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current gliding surface discharge in a closed chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Artem’ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kossyi, I. A. Misakyan, M. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2015-05-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the inflammation of a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current multielectrode spark-gap in a closed cylindrical chamber. It is shown that, in both the preflame and well-developed flame stages, the gas medium is characterized by a high degree of ionization (n{sub e} ≈ 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}) due to chemoionization processes and a high electron-neutral collision frequency (ν{sub e0} ≈ 10{sup 12} s{sup −1})

  9. The reconstruction of the first copper-smelting processes in Europe during the 4th and the 3rd millennium BC: where does the oxygen come from?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, E.; Bourgarit, D.; Wattiaux, A.; Fialin, M.

    2010-09-01

    From the end of Chalcolithic times (end of the 4th millennium BC) up to the end of the Bronze Age (1st millenium BC), copper production increases dramatically in Western Europe. However, due to the scarcity of technology-related archaeological data, the technological background sustaining the transition to mass production modes remains poorly understood. The main archaeological clues concerning metal production stem from the metallurgical waste, namely copper slags. Those complex materials may be a genuine chemical footprint of the process. In particular, it may bring new insights on one main issue of the process reconstruction: the origin of the oxygen in the system. A new analytical methodology based on both mass-balance calculation and quantification of Fe3+ contents in copper slags (Mössbauer spectroscopy, electronic microprobe and Synchrotron μ-XANES at the Fe-K-edge) has been set up. This methodology enables us to distinguish between the solid and gaseous sources of oxygen in a broad range of working conditions, thus yielding new features for the understanding of the first smelting processes dealing with copper sulphides in Western Europe 4000 years ago.

  10. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  11. Electroless Pt deposition on Mn3O4 nanoparticles via the galvanic replacement process: electrocatalytic nanocomposite with enhanced performance for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woong; Kim, Soo Min; Choi, Suhee; Kim, Jongwon; Lee, In Su

    2012-06-26

    A novel electroless Pt deposition method was exploited by employing the galvanic replacement process occurring between the Mn(3)O(4) surface and PtCl(4)(2-) complexes. The newly discovered process provides a simple protocol to produce the catalytic nanocomposite, in which a high density of ultrafine Pt nanocrystals is stably immobilized in a homogeneously dispersive state on the surface of Mn(3)O(4) nanoparticles. When the eletrocatalytic activity was tested for the oxygen reduction reaction, which limits the rate of the overall process in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, the resulting Pt/Mn(3)O(4) nanocomposite showed highly enhanced specific activity and durability, compared with those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  12. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  13. Processing of low carbon content interstellar ice analogues by cosmic rays: implications for the chemistry around oxygen-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Pilling, S.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Radiolysis of a homogeneous H2O:H2CO:CH3OH (100:2:0.8) ice mixture by fast heavy ions is performed in the laboratory in an attempt to simulate the interaction of cosmic rays with frozen surfaces at 15 K. Bombarded by 220-MeV 16O7 + ions, the ice layer is thin enough to be traversed by projectiles at approximately constant velocity and with charge states close to the equilibrium one. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) reveals that the molecular species formed are CH4, CO2, CO, HCO, HCOO- and CH3OCHO. The formation and dissociation cross-sections of all observed daughter molecules are determined. As a control procedure, a carbon budget is performed as the beam fluence increases. The observed radiation effects lead to a general observation that the destruction cross-sections of condensed gases by heavy ions are ruled by a power law that is a function of the electronic stopping power: σd ˜ Sn_e, where n is approximately 3/2. This relation is observed for the destruction of precursor H2CO molecules and for the formation of daughter species. The present results help our understanding of the chemical and physicochemical interactions induced by heavy cosmic rays in cold astrophysical environments with low carbon contents, such as those around oxygen-rich stars.

  14. Synthesis of boron and nitrogen co-doped graphene nano-platelets using a two-step solution process and catalytic properties for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jongwoo; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Sungjin

    2014-07-01

    Chemically modified graphenes (CMGs) show great promise for various applications owing to the feasibility of their low-cost mass production and good solution processability. Recently, hetero-atom-doped CMGs have been suggested as good candidate materials for electrochemical catalysts in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we synthesized B, N co-doped graphene nano-platelets (BN-rG-O) using a two-step solution process with sequential reaction of graphene oxide with borane tetrahydrofuran and hydrazine monohydrate. In the ORR measured in a basic medium (0.1 M KOH), BN-rG-O exhibits an onset potential of 0.81 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode), follows near four electron pathway, and shows excellent stability against methanol poisoning and during durability tests.

  15. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had δ18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in δ18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that

  16. Attempts to comprehend Martian surface processes through interpretation of the oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Grady, Monica M.

    1992-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are known to contain trace quantities of a variety of secondary minerals such as carbonates, sulfates, and aluminosilicates. Since these constituents are thought to be mostly preterrestrial in origin, their study has the potential to provide rigorous constraints on the nature of martian weathering processes. However, this line of investigation is potentially complicated by the presence within the meteorite samples of any additional weathering products produced by terrestrial processes. Examination of such terrestrial components is important since weathering processes that affect meteorite samples following their fall to Earth might have some bearing on the nature of analogous processes at the surface of Mars. It is obviously necessary to try and distinguish which secondary components in SNC meteorites are terrestrial in origin from those that are preterrestrial. Herein consideration is made of the stable isotopic compositions of weathering products in two SNC meteorites: EET A79001 (a sample collected from Antarctica) and Nakhla (a fall from Egypt, 1911).

  17. Oxygen "getter" effects on microstructure and carrier transport in low temperature combustion-processed a-InXZnO (X = Ga, Sc, Y, La) transistors.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Smith, Jeremy; Yan, Aiming; Kim, Myung-Gil; Zhao, Wei; Dravid, Vinayak P; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2013-07-24

    In oxide semiconductors, such as those based on indium zinc oxide (IXZO), a strong oxygen binding metal ion ("oxygen getter"), X, functions to control O vacancies and enhance lattice formation, hence tune carrier concentration and transport properties. Here we systematically study, in the IXZO series, the role of X = Ga(3+) versus the progression X = Sc(3+) → Y(3+) → La(3+), having similar chemical characteristics but increasing ionic radii. IXZO films are prepared from solution over broad composition ranges for the first time via low-temperature combustion synthesis. The films are characterized via thermal analysis of the precursor solutions, grazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction (GIAXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging. Excellent thin-film transistor (TFT) performance is achieved for all X, with optimal compositions after 300 °C processing exhibiting electron mobilities of 5.4, 2.6, 2.4, and 1.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for Ga(3+), Sc(3+), Y(3+), and La(3+), respectively, and with I(on)/I(off) = 10(7)-10(8). Analysis of the IXZO TFT positive bias stress response shows X = Ga(3+) to be superior with mobilities (μ) retaining >95% of the prestress values and threshold voltage shifts (ΔV(T)) of <1.6 V, versus <85% μ retention and ΔV(T) ≈ 20 V for the other trivalent ions. Detailed microstructural analysis indicates that Ga(3+) most effectively promotes oxide lattice formation. We conclude that the metal oxide lattice formation enthalpy (ΔH(L)) and metal ionic radius are the best predictors of IXZO oxygen getter efficacy.

  18. Mass independent oxygen and sulfur isotopic compositions of environmental sulfate and nitrate. A new probe of atmospheric, hydrospheric and geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M.; Michalski, G.; Romero, A.; McCabe, J.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol sulfate is well known to exert a significant influence on the Earth’s atmosphere and surface. They mediate climate in its capacity as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and as a visible light scattering agent. These particles are respirable, with severe cardiovascular disease consequences. Removal by wet and dry depositions is well known to cause surficial damage to biota, biodiversity, and structures. Despite decades of high precision global concentration measurements, single isotope ratio measurements (d18O, d34S) and high quality modeling efforts, there remain unresolved issues with respect to resolution of relative oxidative processes (homogenous vs. heterogeneous), transformation mechanisms, and identification of sources, proximal and distal. Mass independent oxygen isotopic compositions have added new insights un attainable by other techniques. These observations ideally complement other measurements in an effort to improve parameters used in modeling aerosols and climate. Recent sulfur mass independent compositions have potentially added a new means to recognize upper atmospheric photolytic processes. Aerosol nitrate is estimated to nearly double in the next half century, with potentially severe consequences which include soil acidification, loss of biodiversity, eutrophication of coastal and freshwaters, and, human cardiovascular disease. Loss of fresh water lake clarity, e.g. Lake Tahoe is also believed to occur due to increased nitrogen levels. As in the case of atmospheric sulfate, mass independent oxygen isotopic signatures have been observed in nitrate. The D17O is one of the largest mass independent isotopic signatures observed in any environmental species with the exception of ozone. These measurements have demonstrated the ability to provide new insight into the nitrogen cycle, including atmospheric, hydrospheric and geologic processes.

  19. Melt processing of the Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub y] superconductor in oxygen and argon atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J. ); Chumbley, L.S. )

    1992-08-01

    Solidification and subsequent annealing of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub y] (2212) in oxygen and argon atmospheres were investigated in order to identify alternative processing routes for controlling microstructures and superconducting properties. In addition to 2212, several other phases formed on cooling in O[sub 2] and did not disappear upon subsequent annealing. Crystallization in Ar resulted in a divorced eutetic structure of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 3-x]Ca[sub x]O[sub y] and Cu[sub 2]O/CuO. The superconductor was formed on subsequent anneals. Samples melted in Ar and then annealed generally possessed a more uniform microstructure compared with samples that were melted in oxygen and annealed. Compositional measurements of the 2212 phase suggest that CaO segregation in the melt may be minimized with an overall composition such as Bi[sub 2.15]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub 0.85]Cu[sub 2]O[sub y].

  20. Melt processing of the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} superconductor in oxygen and argon atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J.; Chumbley, L.S.

    1992-08-01

    Solidification and subsequent annealing of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (2212) in oxygen and argon atmospheres were investigated in order to identify alternative processing routes for controlling microstructures and superconducting properties. In addition to 2212, several other phases formed on cooling in O{sub 2} and did not disappear upon subsequent annealing. Crystallization in Ar resulted in a divorced eutetic structure of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 3-x}Ca{sub x}O{sub y} and Cu{sub 2}O/CuO. The superconductor was formed on subsequent anneals. Samples melted in Ar and then annealed generally possessed a more uniform microstructure compared with samples that were melted in oxygen and annealed. Compositional measurements of the 2212 phase suggest that CaO segregation in the melt may be minimized with an overall composition such as Bi{sub 2.15}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.85}Cu{sub 2}O{sub y}.

  1. Identification and roles of nonstoichiometric oxygen in amorphous Ta2O5 thin films deposited by electron beam and sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannequin, Cedric; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    The morphology and composition of tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) thin films prepared by electron-beam (EB) evaporation and radio-frequency sputtering (SP) were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray reflectometry (XRR), atomic force microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). GIXRD revealed an amorphous nature for both films, and XRR showed that the density of the Ta2O5-EB films was lower than that of the Ta2O5-SP films; both films have lower density than the bulk value. A larger amount of molecular water and peroxo species were detected for the Ta2O5-EB films by FTIR performed in ambient atmosphere. XPS analyses performed in vacuum confirmed the presence of hydroxyl groups, but no trace of chemisorbed molecular water was detected. In addition, a higher oxygen nonstoichiometry (higher O/Ta ratio) was found for the EB films. From these results, we conclude that the oxygen nonstoichiometry of the EB film accounted for its lower density and higher amount of absorbed molecular water. The results also suggest the importance of understanding the dependence of the structural and chemical properties of thin amorphous oxide films on the deposition process.

  2. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  3. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  4. Enhanced neuropeptide Y synthesis during intermittent hypoxia in the rat adrenal medulla: role of reactive oxygen species-dependent alterations in precursor peptide processing.

    PubMed

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Kalari, Apeksha; Dhingra, Rishi; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Kumar, Ganesh K

    2011-04-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with recurrent apneas often leads to cardiovascular abnormalities. Previously, we showed that IH treatment elevates blood pressure and increases plasma catecholamines (CAs) in rats via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent enhanced synthesis and secretion from the adrenal medulla (AM). Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a sympathetic neurotransmitter that colocalizes with CA in the AM, has been implicated in blood pressure regulation during persistent stress. Here, we investigated whether IH facilitates NPY synthesis in the rat AM and assessed the role of ROS signaling. IH increased NPY-like immunoreactivity in many dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing chromaffin cells with a parallel increase in preproNPY mRNA and protein. IH increased the activities of proNPY-processing enzymes, which were due, in part, to elevated protein expression and increased proteolytic processing. IH increased ROS generation, and antioxidants reversed IH-induced increases in ROS, preproNPY, and its processing to bioactive NPY in the AM. IH treatment increased blood pressure and antioxidants and inhibition of NPY amidation prevented this response. These findings suggest that IH-induced elevation in NPY expression in the rat AM is mediated by ROS-dependent augmentation of preproNPY mRNA expression and proNPY-processing enzyme activities and contributes to IH-induced elevation of blood pressure.

  5. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  6. Effects of dissolved oxygen on performance and microbial community structure in a micro-aerobic hydrolysis sludge in situ reduction process.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhao; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Xuelian; Qiao, Weimin; Jiang, Lu-Man; Pan, Wei; Zhou, Jijun

    2016-03-01

    A sludge process reduction activated sludge (SPRAS), with a sludge process reduction module composed of a micro-aerobic tank and a settler positioned before conventional activated sludge process, showed good performance of pollutant removal and sludge reduction. Two SPRAS systems were operated to investigate effects of micro-aeration on sludge reduction performance and microbial community structure. When dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the micro-aerobic tank decreased from 2.5 (SPH) to 0.5 (SPL) mg/L, the sludge reduction efficiency increased from 42.9% to 68.3%. Compared to SPH, activated sludge in SPL showed higher contents of extracellular polymeric substances and dissolved organic matter. Destabilization of floc structure in the settler, and cell lysis in the sludge process reduction module were two major reasons for sludge reduction. Illumina-MiSeq sequencing showed that microbial diversity decreased under high DO concentration. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi were the most abundant phyla in the SPRAS. Specific comparisons down to the class and genus level showed that fermentative, predatory and slow-growing bacteria in SPL community were more abundant than in SPH. The results revealed that micro-aeration in the SPRAS improved hydrolysis efficiency and enriched fermentative and predatory bacteria responsible for sludge reduction. PMID:26766160

  7. Phenol Decomposition Process by Pulsed-discharge Plasma above a Water Surface in Oxygen and Argon Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, Haruki; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    By-products from phenol by the exposure of pulsed-discharge plasma above a phenol aqueous solution are investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and the decomposition process of phenol is deduced. When Ar is used as a background gas, catechol, hydroquinone and 4-hydroxy-2-cyclohexene-1-on are produced, and no O3 is detected; therefore, active species such as OH, O, HO2, H2O2, which are produced from H2O in the discharge, can convert phenol into those by-products. When O2 is used as a background gas, formic acid, maleic acid, succinic acid and 4,6-dihydroxy-2,4-hexadienoic acid are produced in addition to catechol and hydroquinone. O3 is produced in the discharge plasma, so that phenol is probably decomposed into 4,6-dihydroxy-2,4-hexadienoic acid by 1,3-dipolar addition reaction with O3, and then 4,6-dihydroxy-2,4-hexadienoic acid can be decomposed into formic acid, maleic acid and succinic acid by 1,3-dipolar addition reaction with O3.

  8. Processes affecting oxygen isotope ratios of atmospheric and ecosystem sulfate in two contrasting forest catchments in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Novák, Martin; Mitchell, Myron J; Jacková, Iva; Buzek, Frantisek; Schweigstillová, Jana; Erbanová, Lucie; Prikryl, Richard; Fottová, Daniela

    2007-02-01

    Sulfate aerosols are harmful as respirable particles. They also play a role as cloud condensation nuclei and have radiative effects on global climate. A combination of delta18O-SO4 data with catchment sulfur mass balances was used to constrain processes affecting S cycling in the atmosphere and spruce forests of the Czech Republic. Extremely high S fluxes via spruce throughfall and runoff were measured at Jezeri (49 and 80 kg S ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively). The second catchment, Na Lizu, was 10 times less polluted. In both catchments, delta18O-SO4 decreased in the following order: open-area precipitation > throughfall > runoff. The delta18O-SO4 values of throughfall exhibited a seasonal pattern at both sites, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. This seasonal pattern paralleled delta18O-H2O values, which were offset by -18 per thousand. Sulfate in throughfall was predominantly formed by heterogeneous (aqueous) oxidation of SO2. Wet-deposited sulfate in an open area did not show systematic delta18O-SO4 trends, suggesting formation by homogeneous (gaseous) oxidation and/or transport from large distances. The percentage of incoming S that is organically cycled in soil was similar under the high and the low pollution. High-temperature 18O-rich sulfate was not detected, which contrasts with North American industrial sites.

  9. Processes affecting oxygen isotope ratios of atmospheric and ecosystem sulfate in two contrasting forest catchments in Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Novak; Myron J. Mitchell; Iva Jackova; Frantisek Buzek; Jana Schweigstillova; Lucie Erbanova; Richard Prikryl; Daniela Fottova

    2007-02-15

    Sulfate aerosols are harmful as respirable particles. They also play a role as cloud condensation nuclei and have radiative effects on global climate. A combination of {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} data with catchment sulfur mass balances was used to constrain processes affecting S cycling in the atmosphere and spruce forests of the Czech Republic. Extremely high S fluxes via spruce throughfall and runoff were measured at Jezeri (49 and 80 kg S ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively). The second catchment, Na Lizu, was 10 times less polluted. In both catchments, {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} decreased in the following order: open-area precipitation {gt} throughfall {gt} runoff. The 180-SO{sub 4} values of throughfall exhibited a seasonal pattern at both sites, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. This seasonal pattern paralleled {delta}{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O values, which were offset by -18{per_thousand}. Sulfate in throughfall was predominantly formed by heterogeneous (aqueous) oxidation of SO{sub 2}. Wet-deposited sulfate in an open area did not show systematic {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} trends, suggesting formation by homogeneous (gaseous) oxidation and/or transport from large distances. The percentage of incoming S that is organically cycled in soil was similar under the high and the low pollution. High-temperature {sup 18}O-rich sulfate was not detected, which contrasts with North American industrial sites. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Effects of pH, Temperature, Dissolved Oxygen, and Flow Rate on Phosphorus Release Processes at the Sediment and Water Interface in Storm Sewer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan; Li, Mingyi; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and flow rate on the phosphorus (P) release processes at the sediment and water interface in rainwater pipes were investigated. The sampling was conducted in a residential storm sewer of North Li Shi Road in Xi Cheng District of Beijing on August 3, 2011. The release rate of P increased with the increase of pH from 8 to 10. High temperature is favorable for the release of P. The concentration of total phosphorus (TP) in the overlying water increased as the concentration of DO decreased. With the increase of flow rate from 0.7 m s−1 to 1.1 m s−1, the concentration of TP in the overlying water increased and then tends to be stable. Among all the factors examined in the present study, the flow rate is the primary influence factor on P release. The cumulative amount of P release increased with the process of pipeline runoff in the rainfall events with high intensities and shorter durations. Feasible measures such as best management practices and low-impact development can be conducted to control the P release on urban sediments by slowing down the flow rate. PMID:24349823

  11. Partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate using a pilot-scale continuous activated sludge process at low dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, YongYuan; Mirino, Markus W; Yuan, Yanlei

    2016-10-01

    Controlling of low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.1-0.5mg/L), a cost-effective strategy, was applied to a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic-oxic-anoxic process for partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate. High ammonium removal efficiency, stable nitrite accumulation rate and total nitrogen removal efficiency was higher than 95.0%, 90.0% and 66.4%, respectively, implying potential application of this process for nitrogen removal of mature landfill leachate. Efficient nitrite accumulation in the first oxic reactor depended on low DO conditions and sufficient alkalinity. However, operational limit was mainly decided by actual hydraulic retention time (AHRT) of the first oxic reactor and appeared with AHRT less than 13.9h under DO of 0.3-0.5mg/L. High-throughput sequencing analysis demonstrated significant change of bacterial diversity in the first oxic reactor after a long-term operation and dominant bacteria genus Nitrosomonas was shown to be responsible for NH4(+)-N removal and nitrite accumulation under low DO levels. PMID:27403860

  12. Effects of pH, Temperature, Dissolved Oxygen, and Flow Rate on Phosphorus Release Processes at the Sediment and Water Interface in Storm Sewer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Liu, Liang; Li, Mingyi; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and flow rate on the phosphorus (P) release processes at the sediment and water interface in rainwater pipes were investigated. The sampling was conducted in a residential storm sewer of North Li Shi Road in Xi Cheng District of Beijing on August 3, 2011. The release rate of P increased with the increase of pH from 8 to 10. High temperature is favorable for the release of P. The concentration of total phosphorus (TP) in the overlying water increased as the concentration of DO decreased. With the increase of flow rate from 0.7 m s(-1) to 1.1 m s(-1), the concentration of TP in the overlying water increased and then tends to be stable. Among all the factors examined in the present study, the flow rate is the primary influence factor on P release. The cumulative amount of P release increased with the process of pipeline runoff in the rainfall events with high intensities and shorter durations. Feasible measures such as best management practices and low-impact development can be conducted to control the P release on urban sediments by slowing down the flow rate.

  13. Oxygen-Concentrating Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    High-purity oxygen produced from breathing air or from propellantgrade oxygen in oxygen-concentrating cell. Operating economics of concentrator attractive: Energy consumption about 4 Wh per liter of oxygen, slightly lower than conventional electrochemical oxygen extractors.

  14. Determining Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Systematics in Brines at Elevated p/T Conditions to Enhance Monitoring of CO2 Induced Processes in Carbon Storage Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, V.; Myrttinen, A.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) are a powerful tool for inferring carbon sources and mixing ratios of injected and baseline CO2 in storage reservoirs. Furthermore, CO2 releasing and consuming processes can be deduced if the isotopic compositions of end-members are known. At low CO2 pressures (pCO2), oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of CO2 usually assume the δ18O of the water plus a temperature-dependent isotope fractionation factor. However, at very high CO2 pressures as they occur in CO2 storage reservoirs, the δ18O of the injected CO2 may in fact change the δ18O of the reservoir brine. Hence, changing δ18O of brine constitutes an additional tracer for reservoir-internal carbon dynamics and allows the determination of the amount of free phase CO2 present in the reservoir (Johnson et al. 2011). Further systematic research to quantify carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation between the involved inorganic carbon species (CO2, H2CO3, HCO3-, CO32-, carbonate minerals) and kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects during gas-water-rock interactions is necessary because p/T conditions and salinities in CO2 storage reservoirs may exceed the boundary conditions of typical environmental isotope applications, thereby limiting the accuracy of stable isotope monitoring approaches in deep saline formations (Becker et al. 2011). In doing so, it is crucial to compare isotopic patterns observed in laboratory experiments with artificial brines to similar experiments with original fluids from representative field sites to account for reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with minor brine components. In the CO2ISO-LABEL project, funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research, multiple series of laboratory experiments are conducted to determine the influence of pressure, temperature and brine composition on the δ13C of DIC and the δ18O of brines in water-CO2-rock reactions with special focus placed on kinetics and stable oxygen and carbon isotope fractionation

  15. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  16. Piezoelectric and dielectric properties of Sn-doped (Na0.5K0.5)NbO3 ceramics processed under low oxygen partial pressure atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Keisuke; Doshida, Yutaka; Mizuno, Youichi; Randall, Clive A.

    2014-01-01

    Sn-doped (Na0.5K0.5)NbO3 (Sn-NKN) ceramics fired under various oxygen partial pressure (pO2) conditions have been investigated and discussed in terms of bulk piezoelectric and dielectric properties. X-ray diffraction measurements and Rayleigh analysis indicate that the substitution site of the Sn cations depend on the pO2 atmosphere in the firing process. For pO2 higher than 1.0 × 10-10 atm, Sn cations mainly substitute as Sn4+ at the B-site of perovskite NKN, whereas Sn2+ A-site substitution is favored under a low-pO2 atmosphere. Low-pO2 fired Sn-NKN ceramics exhibit higher relative permittivity, Curie temperature, and piezoelectric coefficient (d33). Sn2+ at A-site acts as a donor and reduces the p-type carrier concentrations that result from an electronic compensation of metal vacancies created through the high volatility of Na and K suboxides. The higher piezoelectricity and resistivity in low-pO2 fired Sn-NKN ceramics make this material suitable for base-metal cofired devices such as Ni-inner-electrode multilayer capacitors and actuators.

  17. The observation research of the differences in cell death and reactive oxygen species in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, HuaBin; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Objective: To observe the differences of cell death and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), it will be of great importance to research the role of plant disease resistance and defense response. Methods: Using WT, AtrbohD and AtrbohF mutant as experimental materials, we discuss the impact of cell death and ROS on the leaves of Arabidopsis infected with avirulent Pst DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), observed by spectral analysis and visualized by DAB and trypan blue stain. Results: When infected with avirulent Pst DC3000, both WT and AtrbohF mutant line behaved resistance that exhibited burst of ROS and HR occur, limit senescence and pathogen induced chlorotic cell death. Paradoxically, AtrbohD mutant behaved susceptible characters that exhibited a small quantity of ROS accumulated and enhanced cell death. Conclusion: After infection of Arabidopsis with avirulent Pst DC3000, WT exhibited more ROS accumulation than AtrbohF, and AtrbohD eliminated the majority of total ROS production. Although both WT and AtrbohF mutant exhibited HR occur, enhanced cell death in AtrbohD mutant.

  18. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  19. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-07-28

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270 °C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270 °C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270 °C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  20. The Natural History of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dole, Malcolm

    1965-01-01

    The nuclear reactions occurring in the cores of stars which are believed to produce the element oxygen are first described. Evidence for the absence of free oxygen in the early atmosphere of the earth is reviewed. Mechanisms of creation of atmospheric oxygen by photochemical processes are then discussed in detail. Uncertainty regarding the rate of diffusion of water vapor through the cold trap at 70 km altitude in calculating the rate of the photochemical production of oxygen is avoided by using data for the concentration of hydrogen atoms at 90 km obtained from the Meinel OH absorption bands. It is estimated that the present atmospheric oxygen content could have been produced five to ten times during the earth's history. It is shown that the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen is not that of photosynthetic oxygen. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes by organic respiration and oxidation occurs in a direction to enhance the O18 content of the atmosphere and compensates for the O18 dilution resulting from photosynthetic oxygen. Thus, an oxygen isotope cycle exists in nature. PMID:5859927

  1. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  2. OXYGEN POISONING IN MAMMALS.

    PubMed

    Binger, C A; Faulkner, J M; Moore, R L

    1927-04-30

    1. Oxygen in concentrations of over 70 per cent of an atmosphere is poisonous to dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs and mice. 2. The poisonous effects manifest themselves in drowsiness, anorexia, loss of weight, increasing dyspnea, cyanosis and death from oxygen want. 3. The cause of oxygen want is a destructive lesion of the lungs. 4. The lesion may be characterized grossly as an hemorrhagic edema. Microscopically there is to be seen in varying degrees of intensity (a) capillary engorgement with hemorrhage, (b) the presence of interstitial and intraalveolar serum, (c) hypertrophy and desquamation of alveolar cells, (d) interstitial and alveolar infiltration of mononuclear cells. 5. The type of tissue reaction is not characteristic of an infectious process and no organisms have been recovered at autopsy from the heart's blood or from lung puncture. 6. The poisonous effects of inhalations of oxygen-rich mixtures do not appear to be related to impurities in the oxygen, nor are they related to faulty ventilation, excessive moisture or increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of the chambers in which the experimental animals were confined. PMID:19869294

  3. Monitoring oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  4. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 1 of 6: Optical Sensors and Controls for Improved Basic Oxygen Furnace Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Allendorf; David Ottesen; Donald Hardesty

    2002-01-31

    The development of an optical sensor for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) off-gas composition and temperature in this Advanced Process Control project has been a laboratory spectroscopic method evolve into a pre-commercialization prototype sensor system. The sensor simultaneously detects an infrared tunable diode laser ITDL beam transmitted through the process off-gas directly above the furnace mouth, and the infrared greybody emission from the particulate-laden off-gas stream. Following developmental laboratory and field-testing, the sensor prototype was successfully tested in four long-term field trials at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore, MD> The resulting optical data were analyzed and reveal correlations with four important process variables: (1) bath turndown temperature; (2) carbon monoxide post-combustion control; (2) bath carbon concentration; and (4) furnace slopping behavior. The optical sensor measurement of the off-gas temperature is modestly correlated with bath turndown temperature. A detailed regression analysis of over 200 heats suggests that a dynamic control level of +25 Degree F can be attained with a stand-alone laser-based optical sensor. The ability to track off-gas temperatures to control post-combustion lance practice is also demonstrated, and may be of great use in optimizing post-combustion efficiency in electric furnace steelmaking operations. In addition to the laser-based absorption spectroscopy data collected by this sensor, a concurrent signal generated by greybody emission from the particle-laden off-gas was collected and analyzed. A detailed regression analysis shows an excellent correlation of a single variable with final bath turndown carbon concentration. Extended field trials in 1998 and early 1999 show a response range from below 0.03% to a least 0.15% carbon concentration with a precision of +0.0007%. Finally, a strong correlation between prolonged drops in the off-gas emission signal and furnace slopping events

  5. A prospective, randomized clinical study evaluating the effect of transdermal continuous oxygen therapy on biological processes and foot ulcer healing in persons with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Driver, Vickie R; Yao, Min; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Gu, Guosheng; Park, Nanjin; Hasturk, Hatice

    2013-11-01

    Hypoxia is a major factor in delayed wound healing. The aim of this prospective, randomized, clinical trial was to compare outcomes of treatment in persons with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) randomly assigned to transdermal continuous oxygen therapy (TCOT) for 4 weeks as an adjunct to standard care (debridement, offloading, and moisture). Nine patients (age 58.6±7.1, range 38-73 years) received TCOT (treatment group) and eight patients (age 59.9±12.6, range 35-76 years) received standard care alone (control group). Most patients (12) were male, and all had a Wagner I or II foot ulcer for an average of 14 (control group) or 20 months (treatment group). Weekly wound measurements and wound tissue biopsies were obtained and wound fluid collected. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteases in wound fluid samples were analyzed using Luminex-based multiplex assays. Tissue-resident macrophages were quantified by immunohistochemistry. At week 4, average wound size reduction was 87% (range 55.7% to 100%) in the treatment group compared to 46% (15% to 99%) in the control group (P <0.05). Changes in cytokine levels (IL-6, IL-8) and proteinases (MMP-1,-2,-9, TIMP-1) at weeks 2 to 4 in wound fluid correlated with clinical findings. CD68+ macrophage counts showed statistically significant reduction in response to TCOT compared to the control group (P <0.01). The results of this study show that TCOT may facilitate healing of DFUs by reversing the inflammatory process through reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading proteases. Additional research to elucidate the effects of this treatment on complete healing and increase understanding about the role of wound fluid analysis is needed.

  6. Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1998-01-01

    A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

  7. Oxygenated fraction and mass of organic aerosol from direct emission and atmospheric processing measured on the R/V Ronald Brown during TEXAQS/GoMACCS 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Takahama, S.; Liu, S.; Hawkins, L. N.; Covert, D. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2009-04-01

    masses. Organosulfate groups were found in GAM and SAM, accounting for 1% and 3% of OM, respectively. Two thirds of the OM and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) measured could be attributed to oil and wood combustion sources on the basis of mild or strong correlations to coemitted, nonvolatile trace metals, with the remaining one third being associated with atmospherically processed organic aerosol. The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) fraction (normalized by total condensation nuclei) had weak correlations to the alcohol and amine group fractions and mild correlation with O/C, also varying inversely with alkane group fraction. The chemical components that influenced f(RH) were sulfate, organic, and nitrate fraction, but this contrast is consistent with the size-distribution dependence of CCN counters and nephelometers.

  8. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. The results of the checkout, shakedown, and initial parametric tests are summarized.

  9. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. Technical progress achieved during the first two months of the program is summarized.

  10. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  11. Oxygen detection using evanescent fields

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Cao, Weenqing

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus and method for the detection of oxygen using optical fiber based evanescent light absorption. Methylene blue was immobilized using a sol-gel process on a portion of the exterior surface of an optical fiber for which the cladding has been removed, thereby forming an optical oxygen sensor. When light is directed through the optical fiber, transmitted light intensity varies as a result of changes in the absorption of evanescent light by the methylene blue in response to the oxygen concentration to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor was found to have a linear response to oxygen concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale within the oxygen concentration range between 0.6% and 20.9%, a response time and a recovery time of about 3 s, ant to exhibit good reversibility and repeatability. An increase in temperature from 21.degree. C. to 35.degree. C. does not affect the net absorption of the sensor.

  12. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these "oxygenated" compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing

  13. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.

    2012-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these oxygenated compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing.

  14. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Sulfide Oxidation by Oxygen: A Look at Inorganically Controlled Reactions and Biologically Mediated Processes in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Owings, Shannon M.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Beinart, Roxanne A.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics for the first electron transfer step for sulfide and oxygen indicates that the reaction is unfavorable as unstable superoxide and bisulfide radical ions would need to be produced. However, a two-electron transfer is favorable as stable S(0) and peroxide would be formed, but the partially filled orbitals in oxygen that accept electrons prevent rapid kinetics. Abiotic sulfide oxidation kinetics improve when reduced iron and/or manganese are oxidized by oxygen to form oxidized metals which in turn oxidize sulfide. Biological sulfur oxidation relies on enzymes that have evolved to overcome these kinetic constraints to affect rapid sulfide oxidation. Here we review the available thermodynamic and kinetic data for H2S and HS• as well as O2, reactive oxygen species, nitrate, nitrite, and NOx species. We also present new kinetic data for abiotic sulfide oxidation with oxygen in trace metal clean solutions that constrain abiotic rates of sulfide oxidation in metal free solution and agree with the kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, we present experimental data that give insight on rates of chemolithotrophic and photolithotrophic sulfide oxidation in the environment. We demonstrate that both anaerobic photolithotrophic and aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfide oxidation rates are three or more orders of magnitude higher than abiotic rates suggesting that in most environments biotic sulfide oxidation rates will far exceed abiotic rates due to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints discussed in the first section of the paper. Such data reshape our thinking about the biotic and abiotic contributions to sulfide oxidation in the environment. PMID:21833317

  15. Solid-state source of atomic oxygen for low-temperature oxidation processes: Application to pulsed laser deposition of TiO2:N films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, Daiki; Chiba, Tetsuya; Shima, Kazunari; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Hayashi, Katsuro

    2012-02-01

    An atomic oxygen (AO) source has been redesigned to coordinate with a pulsed laser deposition system and used to grow nitrogen-doped TiO2 films by deposition of TiN and simultaneous irradiation of the substrate with AO. The AO source uses an incandescently heated thin tube of zirconia as an oxygen permeation media to generate pure AO of low kinetic energy. The emission flux is calibrated using a silver-coated quartz crystal microbalance. The thin shape of the probe and transverse emission geometry of this emission device allow the emission area to be positioned close to the substrate surface, enhancing the irradiation flux at the substrate. AO irradiation is crucial for formation of TiO2 phases via oxidation of the deposited TiN laser plume, and is effective for decrease of the substrate temperature for crystallization of anatase phase to as low as around 200 °C.

  16. Living with Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Oxygen Therapy Oxygen therapy helps many people function better and be ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) Although you may need oxygen therapy continuously or for long periods, it doesn' ...

  17. Molecular identification of an ABC transporter complex for manganese: analysis of a cyanobacterial mutant strain impaired in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution process.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsevich, V V; Pakrasi, H B

    1995-01-01

    During photosynthesis, the photosystem II (PSII) pigment-protein complex catalyzes oxygen evolution, a reaction in which a four-manganese ensemble plays a crucial role. Using a newly developed selection scheme, we have isolated BP13, a random photosynthesis-deficient mutant strain of the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803. This mutant grew slowly under photoautotrophic conditions, and had a low oxygen evolution activity. Biochemical analysis revealed that the lesion in this mutant strain had specifically affected the Mn ensemble in PSII. Interestingly, incubation of BP13 cells with micromolar levels of added Mn induced rapid recovery of oxygen evolution activity. The mutant could be complemented with a fragment of wild-type chromosomal DNA containing three closely linked genes, mntA, mntB and mntC. These gene products showed significant sequence similarities with polypeptide components of bacterial permeases that are members of the 'ABC (ATP binding cassette) superfamily' of transporter proteins. We determined that in the BP13 strain, a single nucleotide change had resulted in the replacement of an alanine by an aspartic acid residue in MntA, a soluble protein containing ATP binding motifs. These results suggest that the mntCAB gene cluster encodes polypeptide components of a Mn transporter, the first such protein complex identified in any organism. PMID:7743991

  18. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (<8 solar masses), and 18O coming primarily from high-mass stars (Prantzos et al., 1996). These differences in type of stellar source result in large observable variations in stellar isotopic abundances as functions of age, size, metallicity, and galactic location ( Prantzos

  19. Oxygen in the delivery room.

    PubMed

    Cernada, María; Cubells, Elena; Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Kuligowski, Julia; Escobar, Javier; Aguar, Marta; Escrig, Raquel; Vento, Maximo

    2013-06-01

    Immediately after birth the newly born infant aerates the lungs, diminishes pulmonary vascular resistance, and initiates gas exchange. However, under certain circumstances this process will not be adequately accomplished. Asphyxia is characterized by periods of hypoxia and ischemia leading frequently to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The mainstay of newborn resuscitation resides in the establishment of a functional residual capacity and an adequate oxygenation. Recent guidelines have established guidelines which provide counsel on the use of oxygen in term infants. However, preterm oxygenation in the delivery room (DR) has only been defined very vaguely. Herewith, we will address available information regarding the use of oxygen supplementation in the DR both in term and preterm babies for a satisfactory postnatal adaptation. PMID:23809339

  20. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  1. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Semenza, Gregg L

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology.

  2. [How did the earth's oxygen atmosphere originate?].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, G

    2004-09-01

    The planet earth did not carry an oxygen atmosphere from the beginning. Though oxygen could arise from radiation mediated water splitting, these processes were not efficient enough to create a global gas atmosphere. Oxygen in the latter is a product of the photosynthetic activity of early green organisms. Only after biological mass-formation of oxygen the UV-protective ozone layer could develop, then enabeling life to move from water onto land. This took billions of years. The basics of the processes of biological oxygen liberation and utilization are described in the following as well as the importance of their steady state equilibrium. Also a hint is given to oxygen as a toxic compound though being a chemical prerequisite for aerobic life on earth.

  3. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  4. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  5. The Universal Oxygen Connector.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mark A; Gombkoto, Rebecca L M

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the benefits of using the Universal Oxygen Connector. Until now, an oxygen hose was only able to connect to a 22-mm fitting, such as those found on humidifiers used in the recovery room, and oxygen tubing was only able to connect to a Christmas tree type adapter. The Universal Oxygen Connector, manufactured and sold by International Medical, Inc (Burnsville, Minn), was developed to allow the practitioner to attach either a 22-mm oxygen hose, oxygen tubing, or a 15-mm oxygen adapter to the same connector. Patients benefit from the administration of supplemental oxygen in the perioperative period. Supplemental oxygen has been shown to decrease postoperative hypoxemia, infection, and in some cases, nausea and vomiting. As such, oxygen should be administered during transport from the operating room to the recovery room, in the recovery room, and at times during transport to the patient room and in the patient room. Oxygen also should be administered whenever a patient receiving oxygen is transported. Use of the Universal Oxygen Connector decreases material waste, decreases hospital costs, saves time and effort and, most importantly, promotes patient safety by providing a versatile system for oxygen delivery.

  6. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  7. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  8. Mechanical and photo-fragmentation processes for nanonization of melanin to improve its efficacy in protecting cells from reactive oxygen species stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Sih-Min; Liu, Jhong-Han; Hsu, Hsiang-Wei; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2015-02-01

    It has been well established ex vivo that melanin has the ability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), besides other functions. Therefore, we propose to utilize nanonized melanin as medication against acute oxidative stress. For this purpose, we developed and characterized two techniques based on mechanical stir and photo-fragmentation using femtosecond laser pulses, respectively, for disintegration of suspended melanin powder to produce nanometer-sized and water-dispersible melanin. This resolves a major obstacle in the medical and industrial applications of melanin. The viabilities of cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to exogenous H2O2 stress and treated with various conditions of melanin and irradiation were compared. It was found that melanin could be nanonized very effectively with the techniques, and nanonized melanin exhibited a much stronger effect than unprocessed melanin on raising the viability of cultured RPE cells under acute ROS stress. The effect was even more prominent without simultaneous light irradiation, promising for effective in vivo application to the whole body.

  9. Mechanical and photo-fragmentation processes for nanonization of melanin to improve its efficacy in protecting cells from reactive oxygen species stress

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Sih-Min; Liu, Jhong-Han; Hsu, Hsiang-Wei; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2015-02-14

    It has been well established ex vivo that melanin has the ability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), besides other functions. Therefore, we propose to utilize nanonized melanin as medication against acute oxidative stress. For this purpose, we developed and characterized two techniques based on mechanical stir and photo-fragmentation using femtosecond laser pulses, respectively, for disintegration of suspended melanin powder to produce nanometer-sized and water-dispersible melanin. This resolves a major obstacle in the medical and industrial applications of melanin. The viabilities of cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress and treated with various conditions of melanin and irradiation were compared. It was found that melanin could be nanonized very effectively with the techniques, and nanonized melanin exhibited a much stronger effect than unprocessed melanin on raising the viability of cultured RPE cells under acute ROS stress. The effect was even more prominent without simultaneous light irradiation, promising for effective in vivo application to the whole body.

  10. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-12-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  11. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  12. Workshop on Oxygen in Asteroids and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Constraints on the detection of solar nebula's oxidation state through asteroid observation. Oxidation/Reduction Processes in Primitive Achondrites. Low-Temperature Chemical Processing on Asteroids. On the Formation Location of Asteroids and Meteorites. The Spectral Properties of Angritic Basalts. Correlation Between Chemical and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions in Chondrites. Effect of In-Situ Aqueous Alteration on Thermal Model Heat Budgets. Oxidation-Reduction in Meteorites: The Case of High-Ni Irons. Ureilite Atmospherics: Coming up for Air on a Parent Body. High Temperature Effects Including Oxygen Fugacity, in Pre-Planetary and Planetary Meteorites and Asteroids. Oxygen Isotopic Variation of Asteroidal Materials. High-Temperature Chemical Processing on Asteroids: An Oxygen Isotope Perspective. Oxygen Isotopes and Origin of Opaque Assemblages from the Ningqiang Carbonaceous Chondrite. Water Distribution in the Asteroid Belt. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: V Systematics in Planetary Pyroxenes and fo 2 Estimates for Basalts from Vesta.

  13. Home Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... important advantage of liquid oxygen is you can transfer some of the liquid oxygen into a smaller, ... from gas stoves, candles, lighted fireplaces, or other heat sources. Don't use any flammable products like ...

  14. Biogeochemistry: Oxygen burrowed away

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. Biogeochemical model simulations suggest that as these animals started to rework the seafloor, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced global oxygen.

  15. Pilot Plant Makes Oxygen Difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F.; Lawton, Emil A.

    1989-01-01

    Pilot plant makes oxygen difluoride highly-energetic, space-storable oxidizer not made commercially. Designed to handle reactants, product, and byproduct, most of which highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic. Oxygen difluoride evolves continuously from reactor containing potassium hydroxide in water at 10 degree C. Collection tanks alternated; one filled while other drained to storage cylinder. Excess OF2 and F2 dissipated in combustion of charcoal in burn barrel. Toxic byproduct, potassium fluoride, reacted with calcium hydroxide to form nontoxic calcium fluoride and to regenerate potassium hydroxide. Equipment processes toxic, difficult-to-make substance efficiently and safely.

  16. Timeline: Cellular Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Szewczak, Lara

    2016-09-22

    Since the 1950s, researchers have recognized that red blood cell numbers expand or contract as needed, according to the amount of available oxygen. The later discoveries that erythropoietin and VEGF levels adapt to oxygen levels launched a new field aimed at understanding how cells sense and respond to normal- and low-oxygen environments. The 2016 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award recognizes key discoveries about this global oxygen sensing pathway and its impacts on pathogenesis, including cancer and inflammation. PMID:27662095

  17. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  18. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  19. An oxygen pumping anode for electrowinning aluminium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changqing; Ji, Xiaobo; Zhang, Pingmin; Chen, Qiyuan; Banks, Craig E

    2013-05-01

    The chemical potential of oxygen ions at the novel oxygen pumping anode for electrowinning aluminum was manipulated by the electromotive forces to create thermodynamic stability. It is our anticipation that this newly designed anode can be applied to electrochemical metallurgy of other metals, such as the direct electrochemical reduction of TiO2 in the FFC process. PMID:23519386

  20. Oxygen electrode in molten carbonate fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, B. B.; White, R. E.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A. J.

    1990-12-01

    During this quarter, impedance data were analyzed for an oxygen reduction process in molten carbonate electrolyte and a manuscript, Impedance Analysis for Oxygen Reduction in a Lithium Carbonate Melt: Effects of Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide and Temperature, was prepared to be submitted to Journal of the Electrochemical Society for publication.

  1. The distribution pattern of the red tide and the process of oxygen depletion in the coastal brackish Lake Nakaumi, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, K.; Miyagi, H.; Katsuki, K.; Takata, H.; Dettman, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    Lake Nakaumi is a coastal brackish water lake formed by the Yumigahama peninsula. The water mass of Lake Nakaumi has two-layer structures. The main halocline divided to Nakaumi Surface Water (NSW) of the intermediate saline water (around 15psu) and Nakaumi Bottom Water (NBW) of the high saline water (about 30psu). Recently, the occurrence of red tide bloom is frequently observed in the lake. The main purpose of this study is to understand the influence of the red tide on the lake environment (The especially, dissolved oxygen in NBW). In this study, we investigated the water quality during April to June 2006 when the lake has experienced extensive occurrence of red tide, and we also monitored the chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) distribution by in vivo fluorometric method. ? Red tide blooms were observed almost in the entire area of Lake Nakaumi in spring, 2006. The water surface showed reddish brown color due to the occurrence of red tide. In the composition of the phytoplankton, Prorocentrum minimum was the dominant species during the red tide. The composition of the phytoplankton rapidly changed during May 27 to 30, and it shifts to the community in which Cyanophyceae is dominant. During that time, the Chl-a concentration rapidly decreased. Based on the vertical distribution of the Chl-a concentration, the red tide at our observation period was divided to 3 phases. In Phase I (March 18th to April 22nd), the Chl-a concentration was relatively low, and homogenous distribution in NSW. In Phase II (April 22nd to May 10th), the Chl-a concentration shows high value, and the peak of Chl-a concentration was present at small-scale and main halocline in the whole water column. In Phase III (May 10th to May 27th), the peak concentrations of Chl-a were distributed around small-scale halocline in NSW and main halocline. In NBW, the Chl-a concentration was low. In Phase I, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of NBW shows 5~7mg/l. During Phase II, DO in NBW decreased. The decreasing

  2. Propiconazole increases reactive oxygen species levels in mouse hepatic cells in culture and in mouse liver by a cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated process.

    PubMed

    Nesnow, Stephen; Grindstaff, Rachel D; Lambert, Guy; Padgett, William T; Bruno, Maribel; Ge, Yue; Chen, Pei-Jen; Wood, Charles E; Murphy, Lynea

    2011-10-15

    Propiconazole induces hepatocellular carcinomas and hepatocellular adenomas in mice and promotes liver tumors in rats. Transcriptional, proteomic, metabolomic and biochemical studies of hepatic tissues from mice treated with propiconazole under the conditions of the chronic bioassay indicated that propiconazole induced oxidative stress. Here we sought to identify the source of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by propiconazole using both AML12 immortalized mouse hepatocytes in culture and liver tissues from mice. We also sought to further characterize the nature and effects of ROS formation induced by propiconazole treatment in mouse liver. ROS was induced in AML12 cells by propiconazole as measured by fluorescence detection and its formation was ameliorated by N-acetylcysteine. Propiconazole induced glutathione-S-transferase (GSTα) protein levels and increased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in AML12 cells. The TBARS levels were decreased by diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPIC), a cytochrome P450 (CYP) reductase inhibitor revealing the role of CYPs in ROS generation. It has been previously reported that Cyp2b and Cyp3a proteins were induced in mouse liver by propiconazole and that Cyp2b and Cyp3a proteins undergo uncoupling of their CYP catalytic cycle releasing ROS. Therefore, salicylic acid hydroxylation was used as probe for ROS formation using microsomes from mice treated with propiconazole. These studies showed that levels of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (an ROS derived metabolite) were decreased by ketoconazole, melatonin and DPIC. In vivo, propiconazole increased hepatic malondialdehyde levels and GSTα protein levels and had no effect on hepatic catalase or superoxide dismutase activities. Based on these observations we conclude that propiconazole induces ROS in mouse liver by increasing CYP protein levels leading to increased ROS levels. Our data also suggest that propiconazole induces the hydroxyl radical as a major

  3. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  4. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  5. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  6. Diffusion and solubility of oxygen in silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenauer, W.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion and solubility of oxygen in Ag in the temperature range between 412 and 862 C was determined. The following interpolation formula was found for the solubility: L = 8.19.1/100.exp(-11 860/RT)Mol O2/g.At.Ag.at 1/.5. The process obeys the Sieverts square root law within the limits of error. The dissolution of oxygen in Ag may be accompanied by the dissociation of the oxygen molecules into atoms. The tests on Ag-foils reveal that below a temperature of about 500 C a higher solubility is simulated by the adsorption of oxygen. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in silver obeys the following equation: D = 2.72.1/100.exp(-11 000/RT)sq cm/s. The relatively low activation energy of 11 kcal/g.At suggests that the diffusion of oxygen takes places over interstitial sites.

  7. A Survey of Alternative Oxygen Production Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.; Parrish, Clyde F.; Buttner, William J.; Surma, Jan M.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Utilization of the Martian atmosphere for the production of fuel and oxygen has been extensively studied. The baseline fuel production process is a Sabatier reactor, which produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The oxygen produced from the electrolysis of the water is only half of that needed for methane-based rocket propellant, and additional oxygen is needed for breathing air, fuel cells and other energy sources. Zirconia electrolysis cells for the direct reduction of CO2 are being developed as an alternative means of producing oxygen, but present many challenges for a large-scale oxygen production system. The very high operating temperatures and fragile nature of the cells coupled with fairly high operating voltages leave room for improvement. This paper will survey alternative oxygen production technologies, present data on operating characteristics, materials of construction, and some preliminary laboratory results on attempts to implement each.

  8. The influence of oxygen exchange between sulfite and water on the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, I. A.; Brunner, B.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate does not exchange oxygen with the water under most environmental conditions. Therefore, its oxygen isotope composition serves as an archive of past oxidative sulfur cycling. Studies on the oxygen isotope signature of sulfate produced from reduced sulfur compounds show varying relative contributions of two possible oxygen sources; molecular oxygen and water, and variable isotope fractionations relative to these two compounds. These discrepancies could be due to differences in the production and consumption of sulfuroxy intermediates which exchange oxygen with water. Thereby, the rate of oxygen exchange as well as the rate of oxidation depends on the pH. Studies on the oxygen isotope exchange effects between sulfuroxy intermediates and water and on the oxygen isotope effects during the oxidation of sulfuroxy intermediates are scarce, severely limiting the interpretability of oxygen isotope signatures in sulfate. Sulfite is often considered to be the last/final sulfuroxy intermediate in the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to sulfate and may, therefore, be pivotal in shaping the oxygen isotope signature of sulfate. We determined the oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite and water and used the obtained equilibrium value to determine the oxygen isotope effects in abiotic sulfite oxidation experiments. Our results demonstrate that natural variations in the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate produced by oxidative processes can be explained by differences in the interplay of the sulfite oxidation rate and oxygen isotope exchange rate between sulfite and water which both depend on pH conditions and availability of oxidizing agents (e.g. molecular oxygen or ferric iron). Our findings contribute to a more detailed mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and underline the importance of sulfite as the final sulfuroxy intermediate in oxidative sulfur cycling.

  9. Oxygen defects in phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Ziletti, A; Carvalho, A; Campbell, D K; Coker, D F; Castro Neto, A H

    2015-01-30

    Surface reactions with oxygen are a fundamental cause of the degradation of phosphorene. Using first-principles calculations, we show that for each oxygen atom adsorbed onto phosphorene there is an energy release of about 2 eV. Although the most stable oxygen adsorbed forms are electrically inactive and lead only to minor distortions of the lattice, there are low energy metastable forms which introduce deep donor and/or acceptor levels in the gap. We also propose a mechanism for phosphorene oxidation involving reactive dangling oxygen atoms and we suggest that dangling oxygen atoms increase the hydrophilicity of phosphorene.

  10. Brain Oxygenation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Smith, Martin

    2016-09-01

    A mismatch between cerebral oxygen supply and demand can lead to cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and deleterious outcomes. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring is an important aspect of multimodality neuromonitoring. It is increasingly deployed whenever intracranial pressure monitoring is indicated. Although there is a large body of evidence demonstrating an association between cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and poor outcomes, it remains to be determined whether restoring cerebral oxygenation leads to improved outcomes. Randomized prospective studies are required to address uncertainties about cerebral oxygenation monitoring and management. This article describes the different methods of monitoring cerebral oxygenation, their indications, evidence base, limitations, and future perspectives. PMID:27521197

  11. Oxygen pressure measurement using singlet oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Gamal E.; Chang, Alvin; Gouterman, Martin; Callis, James B.; Dalton, Larry R.; Turro, Nicholas J.; Jockusch, Steffen

    2005-05-15

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) provides a visualization of two-dimensional pressure distributions on airfoil and model automobile surfaces. One type of PSP utilizes platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP) dissolved in a fluoro-polymer film. Since the intense 650 nm triplet emission of PtTFPP is quenched by ground state oxygen, it is possible to measure two-dimensional oxygen concentration from the 650 nm emission intensity using a Stern-Volmer-type relationship. This article reports an alternative luminescence method to measure oxygen concentration based on the porphyrin-sensitized 1270 nm singlet oxygen emission, which can be imaged with an InGaAs near infrared camera. This direct measurement of oxygen emission complements and further validates the oxygen measurement based on PtTFPP phosphorescence quenching. Initial success at obtaining a negative correlation between the 650 nm PtTFPP emission and the 1270 nm O{sub 2} emission in solution led us to additional two-dimensional film studies using surfaces coated with PtTFPP, MgTFPP, and H{sub 2}TFPP in polymers in a pressure and temperature controlled chamber.

  12. Oxygen pressure measurement using singlet oxygen emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Gamal E.; Chang, Alvin; Gouterman, Martin; Callis, James B.; Dalton, Larry R.; Turro, Nicholas J.; Jockusch, Steffen

    2005-05-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) provides a visualization of two-dimensional pressure distributions on airfoil and model automobile surfaces. One type of PSP utilizes platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP) dissolved in a fluoro-polymer film. Since the intense 650nm triplet emission of PtTFPP is quenched by ground state oxygen, it is possible to measure two-dimensional oxygen concentration from the 650nm emission intensity using a Stern-Volmer-type relationship. This article reports an alternative luminescence method to measure oxygen concentration based on the porphyrin-sensitized 1270nm singlet oxygen emission, which can be imaged with an InGaAs near infrared camera. This direct measurement of oxygen emission complements and further validates the oxygen measurement based on PtTFPP phosphorescence quenching. Initial success at obtaining a negative correlation between the 650nm PtTFPP emission and the 1270nm O2 emission in solution led us to additional two-dimensional film studies using surfaces coated with PtTFPP, MgTFPP, and H2TFPP in polymers in a pressure and temperature controlled chamber.

  13. Nitrate-nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios for identification of nitrate sources and dominant nitrogen cycle processes in a tile-drained dryland agricultural field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural systems are a leading source of reactive nitrogen to aquatic and atmospheric ecosystems. Natural d15Nnitrate and d18Onitrate are used to identify the dominant nitrogen cycle processes and sources of NO3- leached from a tile-drained, dryland agricultural field. Tile-drain water discharge...

  14. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  15. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  16. Solar Energy Systems for Lunar Oxygen Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Heller, Richard S.; Wong, Wayne A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2010-01-01

    An evaluation of several solar concentrator-based systems for producing oxygen from lunar regolith was performed. The systems utilize a solar concentrator mirror to provide thermal energy for the oxygen production process. Thermal energy to power a Stirling heat engine and photovoltaics are compared for the production of electricity. The electricity produced is utilized to operate the equipment needed in the oxygen production process. The initial oxygen production method utilized in the analysis is hydrogen reduction of ilmenite. Utilizing this method of oxygen production a baseline system design was produced. This baseline system had an oxygen production rate of 0.6 kg/hr with a concentrator mirror size of 5 m. Variations were performed on the baseline design to show how changes in the system size and process (rate) affected the oxygen production rate. An evaluation of the power requirements for a carbothermal lunar regolith reduction reactor has also been conducted. The reactor had a total power requirement between 8,320 to 9,961 W when producing 1000 kg/year of oxygen. The solar concentrator used to provide the thermal power (over 82 percent of the total energy requirement) would have a diameter of less than 4 m.

  17. Oxygen binding by Helix pomatia alpha-haemocyanin studied by X-ray-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, R; Phillips, J C

    1983-01-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of haemocyanin from Helix pomatia were obtained by using X-rays from synchrotron radiation. Cu K-edges were recorded at four conditions, namely fully oxygenated, 85% oxygenated, 12% oxygenated and fully deoxygenated. The percentage oxygenation calculated from the edge-shift of the partially oxygenated samples did not agree with the percentage oxygenation as determined by u.v. measurements. Two intermediates in the oxygenation process are presented to explain the observed dissimilarities. PMID:6847624

  18. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur J. Ragauskas Lucian A. Lucia Hasan Jameel

    2005-09-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in

  19. Enhanced humification by carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag--II. Process characterization and the role of inorganic components in the formation of humic-like substances.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Fukushima, Masami; Fukuchi, Shigeki; Nishimoto, Ryo; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced humification by abiotic catalysts is a potentially promising supplementary composting method for stabilizing organic carbon from biowastes. In this study, the role of steel slag in the transformation of humic precursors was directly characterized by measuring the variance in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), spectroscopic parameters (E(600)), and the concentration and molecular weight change of humic-like substances (HLS) during the process. In addition, a mechanistic study of the process was explored. The results directly showed that steel slag greatly accelerated the formation of HLS. The findings indicate that Fe(III)-and Mn(IV)-oxides in steel slag act as oxidants and substantially enhance the polycondensation of humic precursors. Moreover, the reaction appears to suppress the release of metals from steel slag to a certain extent under acidic conditions. This can be attributed to the cover of HLS on the external surface of steel slag, which is significant for its environmentally sound reuse.

  20. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... only (gaseous or liquid tanks). (iii) Oxygen generating portable equipment only. (iv) Stationary oxygen... stationary oxygen equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents; or (ii) Rents stationary oxygen equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents after the period...

  1. Hadean Crustal Processes Revealed from Oxygen Isotopes and U-Th-Pb Depth Profiling of Pre-4.0 Ga Detrital Zircons from Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trail, D.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Harrison, T. M.

    2005-01-01

    Because physical and chemical processes of the past are determined from analysis of a preserved geologic record, little is known about terrestrial crustal processes of the first 500 Ma during the so-called Hadean Eon. What is known from direct measurements has been derived almost exclusively from the study of greater than 4.0 Ga detrital zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia. The geochemistry of these zircons has direct application to understanding the origin and evolution of the rocks during the Hadean because: (i) U-Th-Pb age determinations by ion microprobe suggests the presence of crust as early as 4.37 Ga, or shortly after lunar formation; (ii) high-resolution U-Th-Pb zircon depth profiles reported here reveal several episodes of zircon growth in the Hadean previously unrecognized; (iii) core regions of pre-4.0 Ga zircons with igneous compositions are enriched in O-18 and contain metaluminous and peraluminous mineral inclusions, both features indicative of S-type grainitod protoliths. Study of these ancient zircons provides a unique window into the first half billion years that permits assessment of the potential of the Hadean Earth to host an emergent biosphere.

  2. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-03-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  3. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth’s surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850–542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635–542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5–4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth. PMID:24550467

  4. Estimating and controlling the atomic oxygen content in an argon-oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keville, Bernard; Monahan, Derek D.; Turner, Miles M.

    2008-10-01

    Oxygen rich plasmas have been applied in many plasma processing applications for decades. In most such applications, process yield could be improved significantly by applying closed loop control of atomic oxygen radical concentration. The design of effective, real time, closed loop control algorithms is facilitated by simple dynamical models of the relationship between inputs, or actuators in control terminology, and the process quantities to be controlled. In the case of an oxygen rich plasma process, one requires the relationship between the inputs - flow-rate set points, forward power from the RF supply and residence time, for example - and the oxygen radical density. With the aid of an argon-oxygen plasma simulation, this presentation describes how, with the aid of simplified dynamical models of the process, one would design model-based control algorithms for the real-time, closed loop control of oxygen radical density. A sine qua non of real time, closed loop control is an accurate estimate of the process quantities to be controlled. Although actinometry provides a non-invasive method for estimating species densities, atomic oxygen actinometry is complicated by the fact that photon emission can occur through dissociative as well as direct excitation, leading to potential ambiguity between the emission intensity and the actual radical concentration in the plasma. Optimal estimation of process states given indirect measurements corrupted by process and measurement noise is a classical topic in control theory and has yielded some spectacular results, notably the ubiquitous Kalman filter.

  5. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  6. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  7. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  8. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  9. Continuous home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega Ruiz, Francisco; Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Galdiz Iturri, Juan Bautista; García Rio, Francisco; Güell Rous, Rosa; Morante Velez, Fátima; Puente Maestu, Luis; Tàrrega Camarasa, Julia

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen therapy is defined as the therapeutic use of oxygen and consists of administering oxygen at higher concentrations than those found in room air, with the aim of treating or preventing hypoxia. This therapeutic intervention has been shown to increase survival in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and respiratory failure. Although this concept has been extended by analogy to chronic respiratory failure caused by respiratory and non-respiratory diseases, continuous oxygen therapy has not been shown to be effective in other disorders. Oxygen therapy has not been shown to improve survival in patients with COPD and moderate hypoxaemia, nor is there consensus regarding its use during nocturnal desaturations in COPD or desaturations caused by effort. The choice of the oxygen source must be made on the basis of criteria such as technical issues, patient comfort and adaptability and cost. Flow must be adjusted to achieve appropriate transcutaneous oxyhaemoglobin saturation correction.

  10. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  11. Rockets using Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    It is my task to discuss rocket propulsion using liquid oxygen and my treatment must be highly condensed for the ideas and experiments pertaining to this classic type of rocket are so numerous that one could occupy a whole morning with a detailed presentation. First, with regard to oxygen itself as compared with competing oxygen carriers, it is known that the liquid state of oxygen, in spite of the low boiling point, is more advantageous than the gaseous form of oxygen in pressure tanks, therefore only liquid oxygen need be compared with the oxygen carriers. The advantages of liquid oxygen are absolute purity and unlimited availability at relatively small cost in energy. The disadvantages are those arising from the impossibility of absolute isolation from heat; consequently, allowance must always be made for a certain degree of vaporization and only vented vessels can be used for storage and transportation. This necessity alone eliminates many fields of application, for example, at the front lines. In addition, liquid oxygen has a lower specific weight than other oxygen carriers, therefore many accessories become relatively larger and heavier in the case of an oxygen rocket, for example, the supply tanks and the pumps. The advantages thus become effective only in those cases where definitely scheduled operation and a large ground organization are possible and when the flight requires a great concentration of energy relative to weight. With the aim of brevity, a diagram of an oxygen rocket will be presented and the problem of various component parts that receive particularly thorough investigation in this classic case but which are also often applicable to other rocket types will be referred to.

  12. Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets, July 20-23,2004, Santa Fe, New Mexico. The contents include: 1) Experimental Constraints on Oxygen and Other Light Element Partitioning During Planetary Core Formation; 2) In Situ Determination of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe of Spinels by Electron Microprobe: An Evaluation of the Flank Method; 3) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Large-Strain Deformation and Recrystallization of Olivine; 4) Plagioclase-Liquid Trace Element Oxygen Barometry and Oxygen Behaviour in Closed and Open System Magmatic Processes; 5) Core Formation in the Earth: Constraints from Ni and Co; 6) Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of the Terrestrial Planets; 7) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Electrical Conduction of Olivine and Implications for Earth s Mantle; 8) Redox Chemical Diffusion in Silicate Melts: The Impact of the Semiconductor Condition; 9) Ultra-High Temperature Effects in Earth s Magma Ocean: Pt and W Partitioning; 10) Terrestrial Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Variations: Primordial Values, Systematics, Subsolidus Effects, Planetary Comparisons, and the Role of Water; 11) Redox State of the Moon s Interior; 12) How did the Terrestrial Planets Acquire Their Water?; 13) Molecular Oxygen Mixing Ratio and Its Seasonal Variability in the Martian Atmosphere; 14) Exchange Between the Atmosphere and the Regolith of Mars: Discussion of Oxygen and Sulfur Isotope Evidence; 15) Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Systematics of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Meteoric Waters: Evidence from North Texas; 16) Implications of Isotopic and Redox Heterogeneities in Silicate Reservoirs on Mars; 17) Oxygen Isotopic Variation of the Terrestrial Planets; 18) Redox Exchanges in Hydrous Magma; 19) Hydrothermal Systems on Terrestrial Planets: Lessons from Earth; 20) Oxygen in Martian Meteorites: A Review of Results from Mineral Equilibria Oxybarometers; 21) Non-Linear Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes Implanted in

  13. Test Would Quantify Combustion Oxygen From Different Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed isotope-enrichment scheme enables determination of contributions of dual sources of oxygen for combustion. Liquid oxygen or other artificial stream enriched with O(18) to about 1 percent by weight. Combustion products analyzed by mass spectrometer to measure relative abundances of H2O(18) and H2O(16). From relative abundances of water products measured, one computes relative contribution of oxygen extracted from stream compared to other source of oxygen in combustion process. Used to determine contributions of natural oxygen in air and liquid oxygen supplied in separate stream mixed with air or sent directly into combustion chamber.

  14. Measuring Traces Of Oxygen By Resonant Electron Attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Boumsellek, Said; Chutjian, Ara

    1995-01-01

    Method of detecting trace amounts of oxygen based on dissociative attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules followed by measurement of resulting flux of negative oxygen ions in mass spectrometer. High sensitivity achieved in method by exploiting resonance in dissociative attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules: electron-attachment cross section rises to high peak at incident electron kinetic energy of 6.2 eV. Relative concentrations below 1 ppb detected. Devised to increase sensitivity of detection of oxygen in processing chambers in which oxygen regarded as contaminant; for example, chambers used in making semiconductor devices and in growing high-purity crystals.

  15. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  16. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  17. Oxygen Sensing by Protozoans: How They Catch Their Breath

    PubMed Central

    West, Christopher M.; Blader, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Cells must know the local levels of available oxygen and either alter their activities or relocate to more favorable environments. Prolyl 4-hydroxylases are emerging as universal cellular oxygen sensors. In animals, these oxygen sensors respond to decreased oxygen availability by up-regulating hypoxia-inducible transcription factors. In protists, the prolyl 4-hydroxylases appear to activate E3-SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes potentially to turn over their proteomes. Intracellular parasites respond to decreased oxygen by utilizing both types of oxygen-sensing pathways. Since parasites are exposed to diverse oxygen tensions during their life cycle, oxygen sensing is likely a critical process and this review will discuss how these oxygen-sensing mechanisms contribute to the behavior of these unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:25988702

  18. The role of oxygen in lipid oxidation reactions: a review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Decker, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of food oil to quality loss is largely determined by the presence of oxygen. This article reviews the current understanding concerning the effect of oxygen types, location, and concentration on the oxidative stability of foods. It also discusses the major factors that influence the interaction between oxygen and lipids such as antioxidants, prooxidants, reactive oxygen species (ROS), environmental conditions, and oxygen scavengers. Research has shown that the amount of oxygen needed to cause oxidation is generally very small and that by reducing oxygen concentration in containers to less than 2%, oxidative stability can be greatly enhanced. However, very few studies have systematically examined the oxygen levels needed to reduce, or inhibit, lipid oxidation processes. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between oxygen levels and lipid oxidation is necessary for the development of innovative antioxidant solutions and package designs that prolong the quality of foods containing lipids.

  19. Oxygen separation from air using zirconia solid electrolyte membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suitor, J. W.; Marner, W. J.; Schroeder, J. E.; Losey, R. W.; Ferrall, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Air separation using a zirconia solid electrolyte membrane is a possible alternative source of oxygen. The process of zirconia oxygen separation is reviewed, and an oxygen plant concept using such separation is described. Potential cell designs, stack designs, and testing procedures are examined. Fabrication of the materials used in a zirconia module as well as distribution plate design and fabrication are examined.

  20. 1. LOOKING NORTH AT THE BASIC OXYGEN STEELMAKING PLANT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH AT THE BASIC OXYGEN STEELMAKING PLANT. THE FLUX HANDLING BUILDING IS ON THE RIGHT, THE MOULD CONDITIONING BUILDING IS IN THE CENTER, THE BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS (BOP) SHOP IS IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND, AND OPEN HEARTH No. 2 BUILDING IS ON THE LEFT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  1. Oxygen production by pyrolysis of lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, Constance L.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen was identified as the most important product of initial lunar materials processing efforts. A source of oxygen on the Moon provides an alternative to the costly transport of propellant to the Moon or to low earth orbit. Pyrolysis, or vapor-phase reduction, involves heating a feedstock to temperatures sufficient to decompose the constituent metal oxides and release oxygen. The process relies on the vaporization of metal oxides in the form of reduced suboxides or atomic species. The reduced species must then be condensed without re-oxidizing, yielding oxygen in the gas phase. The feasibility of obtaining oxygen from common lunar minerals was demonstrated using solar furnace experiments. These results are discussed together with chemical equilibrium models which were extended to include the multicomponent oxides used in experiments. For the first time, both experiments and theoretical models dealt with the complex oxides that make up potential lunar feedstocks. Two major conclusions are drawn from this preliminary work. First, unbeneficiated regolith is a suitable feedstock for pyrolysis. Second, the process can operate at moderate temperatures, circa 2000 K, which could be supplied by direct solar or electrical energy. In addition to these advantages in choice of feedstock and energy source, the pyrolysis process requires no chemicals or reagents, making it an attractive process for lunar oxygen production.

  2. Oxygen isotopic anomalies in Allende inclusion HAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Mayeda, T. K.; Clayton, R. N.

    1980-07-01

    An oxygen isotopic study which demonstrates the Allende inclusion HAL is a FUN object is discussed; the hibonite core, black inner rim and fine-grained outer rim have beem sampled. The oxygen in HAL is found to be heterogeneous, the rim samples having oxygen compositions similar to that of melilites and alteration products in other Allende inclusions including the FUN inclusion EK1-4-1, while the oxygen in the hibonite core shows the most extreme deviation from the AD line so far observed. The oxygen in HAL hibonite, in ED1-4-1 spinel and in spinels of usual Allende inclusions form an approximate linear array with a slope close to 1/2. With regard to the fractionation process, it is noted that the fractionation per amu for various elements does not correlate inversely with mass and that fractionation is elementally selective, probably according to volatility.

  3. Additively Manufactured Metals in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Metals produced by additive manufacturing methods, such as Powder Bed Fusion Technology, are now mature enough to be considered for qualification in human spaceflight oxygen systems. The mechanical properties of metals produced through AM processes are being systematically studied. However, it is unknown whether AM metals in oxygen applications may present an increased risk of flammability or ignition as compared to wrought metals of the same metallurgical composition due to increased porosity. Per NASA-STD-6001B materials to be used in oxygen system applications shall be based on flammability and combustion test data, followed by a flammability assessment. Without systematic flammability and ignition testing in oxygen there is no credible method for NASA to accurately evaluate the risk of using AM metals in oxygen systems.

  4. Microbial ecology of expanding oxygen minimum zones.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jody J; Konwar, Kishori M; Hallam, Steven J

    2012-06-01

    Dissolved oxygen concentration is a crucial organizing principle in marine ecosystems. As oxygen levels decline, energy is increasingly diverted away from higher trophic levels into microbial metabolism, leading to loss of fixed nitrogen and to production of greenhouse gases, including nitrous oxide and methane. In this Review, we describe current efforts to explore the fundamental factors that control the ecological and microbial biodiversity in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, termed oxygen minimum zones. We also discuss how recent advances in microbial ecology have provided information about the potential interactions in distributed co-occurrence and metabolic networks in oxygen minimum zones, and we provide new insights into coupled biogeochemical processes in the ocean.

  5. Kinetic analysis of the temperature dependence of PbSe colloidal quantum dot photoluminescence: Effects of synthesis process and oxygen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles A.; Abel, Keith A.; van Veggel, Frank C. J. M.; Young, Jeff F.

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic model is derived and used to analyze recently published works and new data on the temperature dependence of the spectrally integrated photoluminescence (PL) from thick-film formulations of PbSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs), with particular attention to the effects of air exposure. The model assumes that the excitons thermalize within a ground-state manifold of states and treats the distribution of radiative and nonradiative decay rates within the distribution as generally as possible, while using a minimal number of free parameters. By adjusting the parameters of the model, good fits are obtained for the wide range of integrated PL behaviors reported in [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 889 (2011), 10.1021/jz2001979; ACS Nano 6, 5498 (2012), 10.1021/nn301405j; Phys. Rev. B 82, 165435 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.165435] and the new data presented in this manuscript. By comparing the extracted parameters we deduce the following: (i) All of the samples in the first two references emit from two distinct clusters of states separated by an energy of 55 to 80 meV regardless of air exposure, while there is only one cluster of emissive states that contributes to the emission reported in the third reference. (ii) In the absence of intentional air exposure, the nonradiative decay from all samples can be described by a single Arrhenius-like process. (iii) Although air-exposure effects are reversible in some samples and irreversible in others, the changes in integrated PL behavior brought about by air-exposure forces the introduction of a common, low-activation-energy nonradiative pathway in all cases. (iv) The low-lying emissive cluster of the two-emissive-cluster samples exhibits behavior similar to the single emissive cluster of the other samples. (v) Many hours of air exposure do not trend either the radiative or nonradiative behavior of the dual-emissive-cluster samples towards the behavior of the single-emissive-cluster samples.

  6. Batteries: Avoiding oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, Laurence J.

    2016-08-01

    In the development of lithium–air batteries, managing the phase change between gaseous oxygen and crystalline lithium peroxide is a key challenge. Now, a high-performing sealed battery with an oxygen anion-redox electrode is presented that does not involve any gas evolution.

  7. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry.

    PubMed

    Lequier, Laurance; Horton, Stephen B; McMullan, D Michael; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit is made of a number of components that have been customized to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery in patients with severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure for a prolonged period of time (days to weeks). A standard extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit consists of a mechanical blood pump, gas-exchange device, and a heat exchanger all connected together with circuit tubing. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits can vary from simple to complex and may include a variety of blood flow and pressure monitors, continuous oxyhemoglobin saturation monitors, circuit access sites, and a bridge connecting the venous access and arterial infusion limbs of the circuit. Significant technical advancements have been made in the equipment available for short- and long-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation applications. Contemporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits have greater biocompatibility and allow for more prolonged cardiopulmonary support time while minimizing the procedure-related complications of bleeding, thrombosis, and other physiologic derangements, which were so common with the early application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Modern era extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry and components are simpler, safer, more compact, and can be used across a wide variety of patient sizes from neonates to adults. PMID:23735989

  8. Oxygen sensitive paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whidby, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Paper is impregnated with mixture of methylene blue and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Methylene blue is photo-reduced to leuco-form. Paper is kept isolated from oxygen until ready for use. Paper can be reused by photo-reduction after oxygen exposure.

  9. Oxygen therapy - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... help breathing than they can get from an oxygen hood or nasal cannula, but do not need a machine to completely ... is not warm enough. Most (but not all) nasal cannulas use cool, dry oxygen. At higher flow rates, this can irritate the ...

  10. Batteries: Avoiding oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, Laurence J.

    2016-08-01

    In the development of lithium-air batteries, managing the phase change between gaseous oxygen and crystalline lithium peroxide is a key challenge. Now, a high-performing sealed battery with an oxygen anion-redox electrode is presented that does not involve any gas evolution.

  11. Metastable Oxygen Production by Electron-Impact of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. D.; Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Kanik, I.

    2014-12-01

    Electron-impact excitation processes involving atomic and molecular oxygen are important in atmospheric interactions. The production of long-lived metastable O(1S) and O(1D) through electron impact of oxygen-containing molecules plays a significant role in the dynamics of planetary atmospheres (Earth, Mars, Europa, Io, Enceladus) and cometary bodies (Hale-Bopp). The electron-impact excitation channels to O(1S) and O(1D) are important for determining energy partitioning and dynamics. To reliably model natural phenomena and interpret observational data, the accurate determination of underlying collision processes (cross sections, dissociation dynamics) through fundamental experimental studies is essential. The detection of metastable species in laboratory experiments requires a novel approach. Typical radiative de-excitation detection techniques cannot be performed due to the long-lived nature of excited species, and conventional particle detectors are insensitive to the low internal energies O(1S) and O(1D). We have recently constructed an apparatus to detect and characterize metastable oxygen production by electron impact using the "rare gas conversion technique." Recent results will be presented, including absolute excitation functions for target gases O2, CO, CO2, and N2O. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Financial support through NASA's OPR, PATM, and MFRP programs, as well as the NASA Postdoctoral Program (NPP) are gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  13. Audit of oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Gravil, J H; O'Neill, V J; Stevenson, R D

    1997-06-01

    We audited the use of oxygen in our hospital. Over three days we found 119 patients using oxygen, 21 wearing their mask incorrectly or not at all. The commonest indication was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Forty patients had no record of arterial gas analysis. Of those who had, 29 did not require oxygen and the average time from last arterial gas analysis was 5.7 days and only eight patients were being monitored with an oximeter. Taking into account the risk of exacerbating carbon dioxide retention and the problems that arise when discharging a patient who has been receiving oxygen therapy for the duration of their admission, we fee oxygen therapy should only be administered with the knowledge of the arterial gases and with frequent reassessment during therapy.

  14. Acute oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Campbell, Ian Allen

    2004-05-01

    Oxygen therapy is a central part of our clinical practice and is widely used in many pulmonary and non-pulmonary conditions worldwide but it is sometimes used unnecessarily and can be harmful. Optimum use is not only important for patient care but is also sound fiscally because of the expense of oxygen and the cost of devices utilised. This article is aimed both at reviewing available research and guidelines for the use of oxygen and providing knowledge of different administering and monitoring devices and equipment. Various hospital based audits have shown oxygen as being poorly prescribed and inappropriately administered and it is important for everyone involved in patient care to understand the basics of oxygen therapy before optimum practice can be implemented and followed. PMID:15225466

  15. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  16. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  17. Oxygen foreshock of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Frahm, R. A.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Holmström, M.; Barabash, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mars Express (MEX) has operated for more than 10 years in the environment of Mars, providing solar wind ion observations from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment's Ion Mass Analyser (IMA). On 21 September 2008, MEX/IMA detected foreshock-like discrete distributions of oxygen ions at around 1 keV in the solar wind attached to the bow shock and this distribution was observed continuously up to more than 2000 km from the bow shock. Foreshock-like protons are also observed but at a shifted location from the oxygen by about 1000 km, at a slightly higher energy, and flowing in a slightly different direction than the oxygen ions. Both protons and oxygen ions are flowing anti-sunward at different angles with respect to the solar wind direction. This is the first time that a substantial amount of planetary oxygen is observed upstream of the bow shock. Although rare, this is not the only IMA observation of foreshock-like oxygen: oxygen ions are sometimes observed for a short period of time (<5 min) inside the foreshock region. These observations suggest a new escape channel for planetary ions through the acceleration in the bow shock-magnetosheath region.

  18. Electrochemical oxygen concentrator as an oxygen compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) oxygen compressor is described which generates pressures of 3000 psi. The SPE is a cation exchange membrane with chemical compatibility, and has the capability of withstanding 5000 psi. Other features of the compressor described include: gasketless sealing, porus plate cell supports, and conductive cooling. Results are presented of a computer program which defines the power of the system as a function of density, temperature, pressure, membrane thickness, and water content.

  19. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O3(υ) formed in O + O2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O3(υ ⩾ 2) + O2(a1Δ) → 2O2 + O is the main O2(a1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O2(a1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2004-04-01

    Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this

  1. Method for producing oxygen from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is related to producing oxygen from lunar or Martian materials, particularly from lunar ilmenite in situ. The process includes producing a slurry of the minerals and hot sulfuric acid, the acid and minerals reacting to form sulfates of the metal. Water is added to the slurry to dissolve the minerals into an aqueous solution, the first aqueous solution is separated from unreacted minerals from the slurry, and the aqueous solution is electrolyzed to produce the metal and oxygen.

  2. Enhanced Glow Discharge Production of Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert; Zhong, Shi

    1998-01-01

    Studies starting in late seventies have shown Mars atmosphere can be used as a feedstock for oxygen production using simple chemical processing systems during early phases of the Mars exploration program. This approach has been recognized as one of the most important in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) concepts for enabling future round trip Mars missions. It was determined a decade ago that separation of oxygen can be accomplished efficiently by permeation through a silver membrane at temperatures well below 1000 K. This process involves adsorption of atomic oxygen on the surface and its subsequent diffusion through a silver lattice via an oxygen concentration gradient. We have determined recently that glow discharge can be used to liberate atomic oxygen from Mars atmosphere and that the oxygen can be collected through a silver permeation membrane. Recently, we demonstrated a substantial increase in energy efficiency of the process by applying a radio frequency discharge in combination with a silver permeation membrane. The experiments were performed using pure carbon dioxide in the pressure range equal to Mars surface conditions. Energy efficiency was defined as the ratio of the energy required to dissociate a unit mass of oxygen from carbon dioxide to the (electrical) energy consumed by the overall system during the dissociation and collection process. The research effort, started at NASA Langley Research Center, continued with this project. Oxygen production apparatus, built and operated under the research grant NAG1-1140 was relocated to the Atomic Beams Laboratory at ODU in July 1996, being since then in fall operation.

  3. Acceleration of the aging process by oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Lunderen, P. R.; Bensch, K. G.

    1975-01-01

    Tissue changes induced by hyperoxia have been compared with those of normal aging. Results of investigations using male flies prompt conclusion that normal aging, radiation syndrome, and hyperoxic injury share at least one common feature--lipid peroxidation damage to all mambranes resulting in accumulation of age pigment.

  4. A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water.

    PubMed

    Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Faschinger, Felix; Chattopadhyay, Samir; Bhakta, Snehadri; Mondal, Biswajit; Elemans, Johannes A A W; Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Koch, Reinhold; Klappenberger, Florian; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Barth, Johannes V; Rauls, Eva; Aldahhak, Hazem; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Dey, Abhishek

    2016-02-12

    Oxygen reduction and water oxidation are two key processes in fuel cell applications. The oxidation of water to dioxygen is a 4 H(+)/4 e(-) process, while oxygen can be fully reduced to water by a 4 e(-)/4 H(+) process or partially reduced by fewer electrons to reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 and O2(-). We demonstrate that a novel manganese corrole complex behaves as a bifunctional catalyst for both the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen as well as the reduction of dioxygen in aqueous media. Furthermore, our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical study of manganese corroles adsorbed on different electrode materials (down to a submolecular level) reveals mechanistic details of the oxygen evolution and reduction processes.

  5. A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water

    PubMed Central

    Faschinger, Felix; Chattopadhyay, Samir; Bhakta, Snehadri; Mondal, Biswajit; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Koch, Reinhold; Klappenberger, Florian; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Barth, Johannes V.; Rauls, Eva; Aldahhak, Hazem; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxygen reduction and water oxidation are two key processes in fuel cell applications. The oxidation of water to dioxygen is a 4 H+/4 e− process, while oxygen can be fully reduced to water by a 4 e−/4 H+ process or partially reduced by fewer electrons to reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 and O2 −. We demonstrate that a novel manganese corrole complex behaves as a bifunctional catalyst for both the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen as well as the reduction of dioxygen in aqueous media. Furthermore, our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical study of manganese corroles adsorbed on different electrode materials (down to a submolecular level) reveals mechanistic details of the oxygen evolution and reduction processes. PMID:27478281

  6. A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water

    PubMed Central

    Faschinger, Felix; Chattopadhyay, Samir; Bhakta, Snehadri; Mondal, Biswajit; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Koch, Reinhold; Klappenberger, Florian; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Barth, Johannes V.; Rauls, Eva; Aldahhak, Hazem; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxygen reduction and water oxidation are two key processes in fuel cell applications. The oxidation of water to dioxygen is a 4 H+/4 e− process, while oxygen can be fully reduced to water by a 4 e−/4 H+ process or partially reduced by fewer electrons to reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 and O2 −. We demonstrate that a novel manganese corrole complex behaves as a bifunctional catalyst for both the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen as well as the reduction of dioxygen in aqueous media. Furthermore, our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical study of manganese corroles adsorbed on different electrode materials (down to a submolecular level) reveals mechanistic details of the oxygen evolution and reduction processes. PMID:26773287

  7. The Presence of Oxygen in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Howard M; Grant, Anthony; Ditata, James

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen must be tightly governed in all phases of wound healing to produce viable granulation tissue. This idea of tight regulation has yet to be disputed; however, the role of oxygen at the cellular and molecular levels still is not fully understood as it pertains to its place in healing wounds. In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of oxygen on living tissue and its potential role as a therapy in wound healing, a substantial literature review of the role of oxygen in wound healing was performed and the following key points were extrapolated: 1) During energy metabolism, oxygen is needed for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase as it produces high-energy phosphates that are needed for many cellular functions, 2) oxygen is also involved in the hydroxylation of proline and lysine into procollagen, which leads to collagen maturation, 3) in angiogenesis, hypoxia is required to start the process of wound healing, but it has been shown that if oxygen is administered it can accelerate and sustain vessel growth, 4) the antimicrobial action of oxygen occurs when nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-linked oxygenase acts as a catalyst for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a superoxide ion which kills bacteria, and 5) the level of evidence is moderate for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for diabetic foot ulcers, crush injuries, and soft-tissue infections. The authors hypothesized that HBOT would be beneficial to arterial insufficiency wounds and other ailments, but at this time further study is needed before HBOT would be indicated. PMID:27560469

  8. The use of medical orders in acute care oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming; Elliott, Malcolm

    The life of every living organism is sustained by the presence of oxygen and the acute deprivation of oxygen will, therefore, result in hypoxia and ultimately death. Although oxygen is normally present in the air, higher concentrations are required to treat many disease processes. Oxygen is therefore considered to be a drug requiring a medical prescription and is subject to any law that covers its use and prescription. Administration is typically authorized by a physician following legal written instructions to a qualified nurse. This standard procedure helps prevent incidence of misuse or oxygen deprivation which could worsen the patients hypoxia and ultimate outcome. Delaying the administration of oxygen until a written medical prescription is obtained could also have the same effect. Clearly, defined protocols should exist to allow for the legal administration of oxygen by nurses without a physicians order because any delay in administering oxygen to patients can very well lead to their death. PMID:19377391

  9. [Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as adjuvant in stump surgical wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pani, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential gas. Oxygen is also a biological medicine. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a treatment which is based on the respiration of pure oxygen in a particular pressurised environment (hyperbaric chamber). The pressure allows the diffusion of oxygen into the blood at a concentration which is ten/fifteen/twenty times the normal level. The increase in oxygen in bodily liquids stimulates the synthesis of a gas, nitric oxide (NO), which has a powerful anti-inflammatory effect and promotes the formation of new blood vessels (also through the employment of stem cells) thus accelerating the healing of wounds. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy reactivates metabolic processes which have stopped and is able to help the recovery and obvious improvement of patients suffering from several serious illnesses. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a medicine, and as such requires careful dosage, monitoring of its results, and prevention of possible side effects.

  10. Southern Ocean biological impacts on global ocean oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, David P.; Kriest, Iris; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Southern Ocean (SO) physical and biological processes are known to have a large impact on global biogeochemistry. However, the role that SO biology plays in determining ocean oxygen concentrations is not completely understood. These dynamics are investigated here by shutting off SO biology in two marine biogeochemical models. The results suggest that SO biological processes reduce the ocean's oxygen content, mainly in the deep ocean, by 14 to 19%. However, since these processes also trap nutrients that would otherwise be transported northward to fuel productivity and subsequent organic matter export, consumption, and the accompanying oxygen consumption in midlatitude to low-latitude waters, SO biology helps to maintain higher oxygen concentrations in these subsurface waters. Thereby, SO biology can influence the size of the tropical oxygen minimum zones. As a result of ocean circulation the link between SO biological processes and remote oxygen changes operates on decadal to centennial time scales.

  11. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

  12. Traveling with Portable Oxygen

    MedlinePlus

    ... is rich in oxygen. At higher altitudes, the atmosphere becomes increasingly thin as a result of decreasing ... breathe a mixture of gases similar to the atmosphere inside a pressurized airplane cabin at cruising altitude. ...

  13. Oxygen and Biological Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the evolution of aerobic organisms from anaerobic organisms and the accompanying biochemistry that developed to motivate and enable this evolution. Uses of oxygen by aerobic organisms are described. (CW)

  14. Medical Oxygen Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... near the oxygen. Post No Smoking and No Open Flames signs in and outside the home to remind people not to smoke. Your Source for SAFETY Information NFPA Public Education Division • 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 Name ...

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... units may be available in outpatient centers. The air pressure inside a hyperbaric oxygen chamber is about two and a half times higher than the normal pressure in the ... Air or gas embolism Bone infections ( osteomyelitis ) that have ...

  16. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... sooner to your house or neighborhood if the power goes out. Keep their phone numbers in a place where you can find them easily. Tell your family, neighbors, and friends that you use oxygen. They can help during an emergency.

  17. Practical procedures: oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Olive, Sandra

    Knowing when to start patients on oxygen therapy can save lives, but ongoing assessment and evaluation must be carried out to ensure the treatment is safe and effective. This article outlines when oxygen therapy should be used and the procedures to follow. It also describes the delivery methods applicable to different patient groups, along with the appropriate target saturation ranges, and details relevant nurse competencies.

  18. Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

    1985-04-16

    A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

  19. Methods for separating oxygen from oxygen-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Mackay, Richard; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    This invention provides mixed conducting metal oxides particularly useful for the manufacture of catalytic membranes for gas-phase oxygen separation processes. The materials of this invention have the general formula: A.sub.x A'.sub.x A".sub.2-(x+x') B.sub.y B'.sub.y B".sub.2-(y+y') O.sub.5+z ; where x and x' are greater than 0; y and y' are greater than 0; x+x' is less than or equal to 2; y+y' is less than or equal to 2; z is a number that makes the metal oxide charge neutral; A is an element selected from the f block lanthanide elements; A' is an element selected from Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; A" is an element selected from the f block lanthanides or Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; B is an element selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; and B' and B" are different elements and are independently selected from the group of elements Mg or the d-block transition elements. The invention also provides methods for oxygen separation and oxygen enrichment of oxygen deficient gases which employ mixed conducting metal oxides of the above formula. Examples of the materials used for the preparation of the membrane include A.sub.x Sr.sub.x' B.sub.y Fe.sub.y' Co.sub.2-(y+y') O.sub.5+z, where x is about 0.3 to about 0.5, x' is about 1.5 to about 1.7, y is 0.6, y' is between about 1.0 and 1.4 and B is Ga or Al.

  20. [Oxygen Leukocyte Larceny].

    PubMed

    Pinto da Costa, Miguel; Pimenta Coelho, Henrique

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, who was admitted to the Emergency Room with dyspnea. The initial evaluation revealed severe anemia (Hgb = 5.0 g/dL) with hyperleukocytosis (800.000/µL), nearly all of the cells being mature lymphocytes, a normal chest X-ray and a low arterial oxygen saturation (89%; pulse oximetry). After red blood cell transfusion, Hgb values rose (9.0 g/dL) and there was a complete reversion of the dyspnea. Yet, subsequent arterial blood gas analysis, without the administration of supplemental oxygen, systematically revealed very low oxygen saturation values (~ 46%), which was inconsistent with the patientâs clinical state and his pulse oximetry values (~ 87%), and these values were not corrected by the administration of oxygen via non-rebreather mask. The investigation performed allowed to establish the diagnosis of oxygen leukocyte larceny, a phenomenon which conceals the true oxygen saturation due to peripheral consumption by leukocytes. PMID:27649020

  1. [Oxygen Leukocyte Larceny].

    PubMed

    Pinto da Costa, Miguel; Pimenta Coelho, Henrique

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, who was admitted to the Emergency Room with dyspnea. The initial evaluation revealed severe anemia (Hgb = 5.0 g/dL) with hyperleukocytosis (800.000/µL), nearly all of the cells being mature lymphocytes, a normal chest X-ray and a low arterial oxygen saturation (89%; pulse oximetry). After red blood cell transfusion, Hgb values rose (9.0 g/dL) and there was a complete reversion of the dyspnea. Yet, subsequent arterial blood gas analysis, without the administration of supplemental oxygen, systematically revealed very low oxygen saturation values (~ 46%), which was inconsistent with the patientâs clinical state and his pulse oximetry values (~ 87%), and these values were not corrected by the administration of oxygen via non-rebreather mask. The investigation performed allowed to establish the diagnosis of oxygen leukocyte larceny, a phenomenon which conceals the true oxygen saturation due to peripheral consumption by leukocytes.

  2. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queste, B. Y.; Fernand, L.; Jickells, T. D.; Heywood, K. J.; Hind, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≈ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of CTD, dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter and fluorescence during a three day deployment. The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small scale events that supply oxygenated water into the bottom layer at a rate of 2±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. Benthic and pelagic oxygen sinks, quantified through glider observations and past studies, indicate more gradual background consumption rates of 2.5±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. This budget revealed that the balance of oxygen supply and demand is in agreement with previous studies of the North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8±0.3 μmol dm-3 day-1 indicating a localised or short-lived increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localised depocentres and rapid remineralisation of resuspensded organic matter. The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date rates to be used in the development of ecosystem models.

  3. Oxygen production System Models for Lunar ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) seeks to make human space exploration feasible; by using available resources from a planet or the moon to produce consumables, parts, and structures that otherwise would be brought from Earth. Producing these in situ reduces the mass of such that must be launched and doing so allows more payload mass' for each mission. The production of oxygen from lunar regolith, for life support and propellant, is one of the tasks being studied under ISRU. NASA is currently funding three processes that have shown technical merit for the production of oxygen from regolith: Molten Salt Electrolysis, Hydrogen Reduction of Ilmenite, and Carbothermal Reduction. The ISRU program is currently developing system models of, the , abovementioned processes to: (1) help NASA in the evaluation process to select the most cost-effective and efficient process for further prototype development, (2) identify key parameters, (3) optimize the oxygen production process, (4) provide estimates on energy and power requirements, mass and volume.of the system, oxygen production rate, mass of regolith required, mass of consumables, and other important parameters, and (5) integrate into the overall end-to-end ISRU system model, which could be integrated with mission architecture models. The oxygen production system model is divided into modules that represent unit operations (e.g., reactor, water electrolyzer, heat exchanger). Each module is modeled theoretically using Excel and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), and will be validated using experimental data from on-going laboratory work. This modularity (plug-n-play) feature of each unit operation allows the use of the same model on different oxygen production systems simulations resulting in comparable results. In this presentation, preliminary results for mass, power, volume will be presented along with brief description of the oxygen production system model.

  4. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  5. Design of a lunar oxygen production plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam

    1990-01-01

    To achieve permanent human presence and activity on the moon, oxygen is required for both life support and propulsion. Lunar oxygen production using resources existing on the moon will reduce or eliminate the need to transport liquid oxygen from earth. In addition, the co-products of oxygen production will provide metals, structural ceramics, and other volatile compounds. This will enable development of even greater self-sufficiency as the lunar outpost evolves. Ilmenite is the most abundant metal-oxide mineral in the lunar regolith. A process involving the reaction of ilmenite with hydrogen at 1000 C to produce water, followed by the electrolysis of this water to provide oxygen and recycle the hydrogen has been explored. The objective of this 1990 Summer Faculty Project was to design a lunar oxygen-production plant to provide 5 metric tons of liquid oxygen per year from lunar soil. The results of this study describe the size and mass of the equipment, the power needs, feedstock quantity and the engineering details of the plant.

  6. Oxygen Mass Transport in Stented Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Eoin A; Dunne, Adrian S; Martin, David M; Boyle, Fergal J

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen deficiency, known as hypoxia, in arterial walls has been linked to increased intimal hyperplasia, which is the main adverse biological process causing in-stent restenosis. Stent implantation has significant effects on the oxygen transport into the arterial wall. Elucidating these effects is critical to optimizing future stent designs. In this study the most advanced oxygen transport model developed to date was assessed in two test cases and used to compare three coronary stent designs. Additionally, the predicted results from four simplified blood oxygen transport models are compared in the two test cases. The advanced model showed good agreement with experimental measurements within the mass-transfer boundary layer and at the luminal surface; however, more work is needed in predicting the oxygen transport within the arterial wall. Simplifying the oxygen transport model within the blood flow produces significant errors in predicting the oxygen transport in arteries. This study can be used as a guide for all future numerical studies in this area and the advanced model could provide a powerful tool in aiding design of stents and other cardiovascular devices.

  7. TRP channels as sensors of oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Numata, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Nozomi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Mori, Yasuo

    2013-08-01

    An ability to adapt to changes in oxygen availability is essential for survival in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Recently, cation channels encoded by the transient receptor potential (trp) gene superfamily have been recognized as multimodal sensors of a wide variety of factors inside the cells and in the extracellular environment and also as transducers of electrical and chemical signals mediated by ions such as Ca(2+). The functional features of TRP channels enable the body to react and adapt to different forms of environmental changes, including oxygen levels. A subclass of TRP channels regulates various cellular processes in response to fluctuations in oxygen. In this article, we describe the physiological and pathological significance of the oxygen-sensitive TRP channels, which are heterogeneous in the cellular responses to acute changes in oxygen, by contrasting their oxygen monitoring function with that of other ion channels, transporters, and enzymes. We also discuss the physiological relevance of oxygen-sensitive TRP channels as a novel class of target proteins for pharmaceutical therapeutics.

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  9. Innovative oxygen separation membrane prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2006-08-15

    Improvements are still needed to gas separation processes to gain industry acceptance of coal gasification systems. The Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) technology, being developed by the US Department of Energy and its partners, offers an opportunity to lower overall plant cost and improve efficiency compared to cryogenic distillation and pressure swing adsorption methods. The technology is based on a novel class of perovskite ceramic oxides which can selectively separate oxygen ions from a stream of air at high temperature and pressure. Those ions are transported across the ITM leaving non-permeate air which can be integrated with a fuel-fired gas system, enabling co-production of power and steam along with the concentrated, high-purity oxygen. The project is at the second phase, to scale up the ITM Oxygen ceramic devices to demonstrate the technology at the 1-5 tpd capability in the Subscale Engineering Prototype. A third phase to demonstrate commercial viability extends to the end of the decade. 2 figs.

  10. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  11. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... contents (stationary and portable). (ii) Portable equipment only (gaseous or liquid tanks). (iii) Oxygen... equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents; or (ii) Rents stationary oxygen equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents after the period of continuous use...

  12. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... contents (stationary and portable). (ii) Portable equipment only (gaseous or liquid tanks). (iii) Oxygen... equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents; or (ii) Rents stationary oxygen equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents after the period of continuous use...

  13. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... contents (stationary and portable). (ii) Portable equipment only (gaseous or liquid tanks). (iii) Oxygen... equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents; or (ii) Rents stationary oxygen equipment that requires delivery of gaseous or liquid oxygen contents after the period of continuous use...

  14. Singlet molecular oxygen generated by biological hydroperoxides.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sayuri; Martinez, Glaucia R; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The chemistry behind the phenomenon of ultra-weak photon emission has been subject of considerable interest for decades. Great progress has been made on the understanding of the chemical generation of electronically excited states that are involved in these processes. Proposed mechanisms implicated the production of excited carbonyl species and singlet molecular oxygen in the mechanism of generation of chemiluminescence in biological system. In particular, attention has been focused on the potential generation of singlet molecular oxygen in the recombination reaction of peroxyl radicals by the Russell mechanism. In the last ten years, our group has demonstrated the generation of singlet molecular oxygen from reactions involving the decomposition of biologically relevant hydroperoxides, especially from lipid hydroperoxides in the presence of metal ions, peroxynitrite, HOCl and cytochrome c. In this review we will discuss details on the chemical aspects related to the mechanism of singlet molecular oxygen generation from different biological hydroperoxides.

  15. Isotopic Composition of Oxygen in Lunar Zircons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2005-01-01

    The recent discovery of heavy oxygen in zircons from the Jack Hills conglomerates Wilde et al. and Mojzsis et al. was interpreted as an indication of presence of liquid water on the surface of Early Earth. The distribution of ages of Jack Hills zircons and lunar zircons appears to be very similar and therefore analysis of oxygen in the lunar grains may provide a reference frame for further study of the early history of the Earth as well as give additional information regarding processes that operated on the Moon. In the present study we have analysed the oxygen isotopic composition of zircon grains from three lunar samples using the Swedish Museum of Natural History CAMECA 1270 ion microprobe. The samples were selected as likely tests for variations in lunar oxygen isotopic composition. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  16. Atomic Oxygen Durability of Aluminized Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Judith C.

    2003-01-01

    The atomic oxygen durability of aluminized polymers will be investigated. Such aluminized polymers are commonly used in space and specifically on the International Space Station. Recent data from in-space results indicates that vapor deposited aluminum coatings are highly defected with many small pin windows. However, electron microscopy to validate the size and aerial density of such defects remains to be demonstrated. The research project is planned to compare electron microscopy analysis of pristine and atomic oxygen exposed aluminized polyimide Kapton with the results of ground laboratory atomic oxygen erosion data, in-space results and computational Monte Carlo modeling to develop a self consistent understanding of the atomic oxygen degradation processes and effects.

  17. Atomic oxygen effects on materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Brady, Joyce A.; Merrow, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Understanding of the basic processes of atomic oxygen interaction is currently at a very elementary level. However, measurement of erosion yields, surface morphology, and optical properties for low fluences have brought about much progress in the past decade. Understanding the mechanisms and those factors that are important for proper simulation of low Earth orbit is at a much lower level of understanding. The ability to use laboratory simulations with confidence to quantifiably address the functional performance and durability of materials in low Earth orbit will be necessary to assure long-term survivability to the natural space environment.

  18. Purified oxygen scavenging cell membrane fragments and use of same

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Adler, H.I.

    1988-10-18

    A process for purifying oxygen scavenging cell membrane fragments (OSCMF) and the use of same are disclosed. The novel purifying process involves salt precipitation and molecular exclusion chromatography. The unique feature of purified OSCMF is its ability to remove oxygen from organic reaction media and organic preparations without contaminating them to any substantial degree. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  19. Metered oxygen supply aids treatment of domestic sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weliky, N.; Hooper, T. J.; Silverman, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Microbiological fixed-bed process was developed in which supplementary oxygen required by microbial species is supplied by electrochemical device. Rate of addition of oxygen to waste treatment process is controlled to maintain aerobic metabolism and prevent anaerobic metabolisms which produce odorous or toxic products.

  20. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, P.

    1997-07-22

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

  1. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  2. Electrochemical cell for obtaining oxygen from carbon dioxide atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, M. W.; Rast, H. E.; Rogers, D. K.

    1989-01-01

    For manned missions to Mars to become a reality, an efficient and reliable means of obtaining oxygen from the carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere will be required. Otherwise, the high cost of transporting the oxygen needed to sustain the astronauts will severely restrict the expedition to the martian surface. Recently, the use of electrochemical devices has been explored as a means of obtaining oxygen from the carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. In these devices, oxygen ions diffuse through solid oxide membranes, thus, separating oxygen from the other gases presented. This phenomenon has only recently been explored as a means of obtaining large quantities of oxygen from toxic atmospheres, although first observed by Walter nernst in 1899. Nernst observed that stabilized zirconia will conduct oxygen ions when an electrical potential is applied across metallic electrodes applied to the ceramic membrane. Diatomic oxygen molecules are dissociated at the positive electrode/electrolyte interface. The oxygen ions enter the ceramic body due to the ion density gradient which is produced by the electrical potential across the electrolytic membrane. Once the ions have diffused through the membrane, they reform diatomic oxygen molecules at the anode. The separation of oxygen from carbon dioxide is achieved by the combination of thermal and electrochemical processes. The thermal decomposition of carbon dioxide (at 1000 C) results in the production of carbon monoxide and oxygen by the reaction.

  3. Metastable Oxygen Production by Electron-Impact of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Jeffrey; Johnson, Paul; Kanik, Isik; Malone, Charles

    2014-05-01

    Electron-impact excitation processes involving atomic and molecular oxygen are important in atmospheric interactions. The production of long-lived metastable O(1S) and O(1D) through electron impact of atomic O and molecular O2 play a significant role in the dynamics of oxygen-containing atmospheres (Earth, Europa, Io). Emissions from metastable O (1S --> 1D) produce the well-recognized green light from terrestrial aurora. Electron-impact excitation to 1S and 1D are sensitive channels for determining energy partitioning and dynamics from space weather. Electron-impact excitation cross sections determined through fundamental experimental studies are necessary for modeling of natural phenomena and observation data. The detection of metastable states in laboratory experiments requires a novel approach, since typical detection techniques (e.g., fluorescence by radiative de-excitation) cannot be performed due to the long-lived nature of the excited species. In this work, metastable O is produced through electron impact, and is incident on a cryogenically cooled rare gas matrix. The excimer production and subsequent rapid radiative de-excitation provides measurable signal that is directly related to the originating electron-impact excitation process.

  4. Monolithic solid electrolyte oxygen pump

    DOEpatents

    Fee, Darrell C.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Easler, Timothy E.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-layer oxygen pump having a one-piece, monolithic ceramic structure affords high oxygen production per unit weight and volume and is thus particularly adapted for use as a portable oxygen supply. The oxygen pump is comprised of a large number of small cells on the order of 1-2 millimeters in diameter which form the walls of the pump and which are comprised of thin, i.e., 25-50 micrometers, ceramic layers of cell components. The cell components include an air electrode, an oxygen electrode, an electrolyte and interconnection materials. The cell walls form the passages for input air and for exhausting the oxygen which is transferred from a relatively dilute gaseous mixture to a higher concentration by applying a DC voltage across the electrodes so as to ionize the oxygen at the air electrode, whereupon the ionized oxygen travels through the electrolyte and is converted to oxygen gas at the oxygen electrode.

  5. Neurological oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Farmery, Scott; Sykes, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    SCUBA diving has several risks associated with it from breathing air under pressure--nitrogen narcosis, barotrauma and decompression sickness (the bends). Trimix SCUBA diving involves regulating mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen and helium in an attempt to overcome the risks of narcosis and decompression sickness during deep dives, but introduces other potential hazards such as hypoxia and oxygen toxicity convulsions. This study reports on a seizure during the ascent phase, its potential causes and management and discusses the hazards posed to the diver and his rescuer by an emergency ascent to the surface.

  6. The Appropriate Use of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Stan

    1988-01-01

    The scientific evidence for the efficacy of oxygen therapy in acute hypoxemia is limited. In chronic hypoxemia continuous oxygen therapy appears to decrease mortality. Current indications for oxygen treatment are PaO2 less than 60 in acute hypoxemia and less than 55 in chronic hypoxemia. Physical and physiological hazards of oxygen are reviewed. Three syndromes of pulmonary oxygen toxicity are described: tracheobronchitis, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID:21253258

  7. Oxidation mechanism of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen species, the spores were treated with an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source and observed in-situ using a fluorescent confocal-laser microscope. The treated spores were stained with two fluorescent dyes, 1,1‧-dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3‧-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP). The intracellular organelles as well as the cell membranes in the spores treated with the oxygen radical source were stained with DiI without a major morphological change of the membranes. DPPP staining revealed that the organelles were oxidized by the oxygen radical treatment. These results suggest that neutral oxygen species, especially atomic oxygen, induce a minor structural change or functional inhibition of cell membranes, which leads to the oxidation of the intracellular organelles through the penetration of reactive oxygen species into the cell.

  8. The mechanisms of oxygen reduction and evolution reactions in nonaqueous lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruiguo; Walter, Eric D; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Bowden, Mark E; Engelhard, Mark H; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in nonaqueous lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries is essential for the further development of these batteries. In this work, we systematically investigate the mechanisms of the ORR/OER reactions in nonaqueous Li-O2 batteries by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, using 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide as a spin trap. The study provides direct verification of the formation of the superoxide radical anion (O2(˙-)) as an intermediate in the ORR during the discharge process, while no O2(˙-) was detected in the OER during the charge process. These findings provide insight into, and an understanding of, the fundamental reaction mechanisms involving oxygen and guide the further development of this field.

  9. Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

  10. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, Paul

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  11. The Oxygen Flask Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses application of Schoniger's method of quantitative organic elemental analysis in teaching of qualitative analysis of the halogens, nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus. Indicates that the oxygen flask method is safe and suitable for both high school and college courses because of simple apparatus requirements. (CC)

  12. Oxygen transport by hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Mairbäurl, Heimo; Weber, Roy E

    2012-04-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) constitutes a vital link between ambient O2 availability and aerobic metabolism by transporting oxygen (O2) from the respiratory surfaces of the lungs or gills to the O2-consuming tissues. The amount of O2 available to tissues depends on the blood-perfusion rate, as well as the arterio-venous difference in blood O2 contents, which is determined by the respective loading and unloading O2 tensions and Hb-O2-affinity. Short-term adjustments in tissue oxygen delivery in response to decreased O2 supply or increased O2 demand (under exercise, hypoxia at high altitude, cardiovascular disease, and ischemia) are mediated by metabolically induced changes in the red cell levels of allosteric effectors such as protons (H(+)), carbon dioxide (CO2), organic phosphates, and chloride (Cl(-)) that modulate Hb-O2 affinity. The long-term, genetically coded adaptations in oxygen transport encountered in animals that permanently are subjected to low environmental O2 tensions commonly result from changes in the molecular structure of Hb, notably amino acid exchanges that alter Hb's intrinsic O2 affinity or its sensitivity to allosteric effectors. Structure-function studies of animal Hbs and human Hb mutants illustrate the different strategies for adjusting Hb-O2 affinity and optimizing tissue oxygen supply.

  13. The Oxygen Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Gary D.

    Produced for primary grades, this booklet provides study of the oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle in nature. Line drawings, a minimum amount of narrative, and a glossary of terms make up its content. The booklet is designed to be used as reading material, a coloring book, or for dramatic arts with students acting out parts of the cycle. This work was…

  14. FUEL OXYGENATES HEALTH ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygenates (e.g., methyl tertiary butyl ether [MTBE], ethanol) are required in certain areas of the United States by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. MTBE and ethanol have also been used to increase octane ratings in U.S. gasoline since the 1970s. In 1996 alone, 10 billion Kg...

  15. Calibration Of Oxygen Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalenski, M. A.; Rowe, E. L.; Mcphee, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Readings corrected for temperature, pressure, and humidity of air. Program for handheld computer developed to ensure accuracy of oxygen monitors in National Transonic Facility, where liquid nitrogen stored. Calibration values, determined daily, based on entries of data on barometric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity. Output provided directly in millivolts.

  16. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  17. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  18. The onsite manufacture of propellant oxygen from lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Sanders D.; Beegle, Robert L., Jr.; Guter, Gerald A.; Miller, Frederick E.; Rothenberg, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The Aerojet carbothermal process for the manufacture of oxygen from lunar materials has three essential steps: the reduction of silicate with methane to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen; the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen to form methane and water; and the electrolysis of water to form hydrogen and oxygen. The reactions and the overall process are shown. It is shown with laboratory experimentation that the carbothermal process is feasible. Natural silicates can be reduced with carbon or methane. The important products are carbon monoxide, metal, and slag. The carbon monoxide can be completely reduced to form methane and water. The water can be electrolyzed to produce hydrogen and oxygen. A preliminary engineering study shows that the operation of plants using this process for the manufacture of propellant oxygen has a large economic advantage when the cost of the plant and its operation is compared to the cost of delivering oxygen from Earth.

  19. A Survey of Alternative Oxygen Production Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.; Parrish, Clyde F.; Buttner, William J.; Surma, Jan M.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Utilization of the Martian atmosphere for the production of fuel and oxygen has been extensively studied. The baseline fuel production process is a Sabatier reactor, which produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The oxygen produced from the electrolysis of the water is only half of that needed for methane-based rocket propellant, and additional oxygen is needed for breathing air, fuel cells and other energy sources. Zirconia electrolysis cells for the direct reduction of CO2 arc being developed as an alternative means of producing oxygen, but present many challenges for a large-scale oxygen production system. The very high operating temperatures and fragile nature of the cells coupled with fairly high operating voltages leave room for improvement. This paper will survey alternative oxygen production technologies, present data on operating characteristics, materials of construction, and some preliminary laboratory results on attempts to implement each. Our goal is to significantly improve upon the characteristics of proposed zirconia cells for oxygen production. To achieve that goal we are looking at electrolytic systems that operate at significantly lower temperatures, preferably below 31C to allow the incorporation of liquid CO2 in the electrolyte. Our preliminary results indicate that such a system will have much higher current densities and have simpler cathode construction than a porous gas feed electrode system. Such a system could be achieved based on nonaqueous electrolytes or ionic liquids. We are focusing our research on the anode reaction that will produce oxygen from a product generated at the cathode using CO2 as the feed. Operation at low temperatures also will open up the full range of polymer and metal materials, allowing a more robust system design to withstand the rigors of flight, landing, and long term unattended operation on the surface of Mars.

  20. The history of extracorporeal oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Lim, M W

    2006-10-01

    Extracorporeal oxygenators are artificial devices that substitute for anatomical lungs by delivering oxygen to, and extracting carbon dioxide from, blood. They were first conceptualised by the English scientist Robert Hooke (1635-1703) and developed into practical extracorporeal oxygenators by French and German experimental physiologists in the 19th century. Indeed, most of the extracorporeal oxygenators used until the late 1970s were derived from von Schroder's 1882 bubble oxygenator and Frey and Gruber's 1885 film oxygenator. As there is no intervening barrier between blood and oxygen, these are called 'direct contact' oxygenators; they contributed significantly to the development and practice of cardiac surgery till the 1980s. Membrane extracorporeal oxygenators introduce a gas-permeable interface between blood and oxygen. This greatly decreased the blood trauma of direct-contact extracorporeal oxygenators, and enabled extracorporeal oxygenators to be used in longer-term applications such as the intensive therapy of respiratory distress syndrome; this was demonstrably beneficial for neonates but less so for older patients. Much work since the 1960s focused on overcoming the gas exchange handicap of the membrane barrier, leading to the development of high-performance microporous hollow-fibre oxygenators that eventually replaced direct-contact oxygenators in cardiac theatres. PMID:16978315

  1. The history of extracorporeal oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Lim, M W

    2006-10-01

    Extracorporeal oxygenators are artificial devices that substitute for anatomical lungs by delivering oxygen to, and extracting carbon dioxide from, blood. They were first conceptualised by the English scientist Robert Hooke (1635-1703) and developed into practical extracorporeal oxygenators by French and German experimental physiologists in the 19th century. Indeed, most of the extracorporeal oxygenators used until the late 1970s were derived from von Schroder's 1882 bubble oxygenator and Frey and Gruber's 1885 film oxygenator. As there is no intervening barrier between blood and oxygen, these are called 'direct contact' oxygenators; they contributed significantly to the development and practice of cardiac surgery till the 1980s. Membrane extracorporeal oxygenators introduce a gas-permeable interface between blood and oxygen. This greatly decreased the blood trauma of direct-contact extracorporeal oxygenators, and enabled extracorporeal oxygenators to be used in longer-term applications such as the intensive therapy of respiratory distress syndrome; this was demonstrably beneficial for neonates but less so for older patients. Much work since the 1960s focused on overcoming the gas exchange handicap of the membrane barrier, leading to the development of high-performance microporous hollow-fibre oxygenators that eventually replaced direct-contact oxygenators in cardiac theatres.

  2. Oxygen levels in the gut lumens of herbivorous insects.

    PubMed

    Johnson; V Barbehenn R

    2000-06-01

    Oxygen levels were measured in the foregut and midgut lumens of ten species of caterpillars and three species of grasshoppers. In most species, the foregut was nearly anoxic, with oxygen levels ranging from 0 to 2.5 mm Hg. However, two caterpillar species with large foreguts (Malacosoma disstria and Lymantria dispar) had elevated oxygen levels (27.9 and 32.1 mm Hg) in this region when they were fed artificial diet. In all of the species surveyed, the anterior and posterior midgut were nearly anoxic, with oxygen levels ranging from 0 to 7.3 mm Hg. Oxygen levels in the midgut lumen of Helicoverpa zea did not differ when caterpillars were fed artificial diet or tomato foliage, suggesting that the insect is capable of reducing the level of ingested oxygen in its gut. An examination of the radial microgradient of oxygen in the gut lumen demonstrated that the midgut epithelium is not a sink for ingested oxygen. However, the midgut contents of larvae fed artificial diet were capable of depleting oxygen. This capacity was reduced by boiling, suggesting that the nearly anoxic state of the midgut lumen in some insects is maintained by endogenous chemical processes. We conclude that low oxygen levels in the gut lumens of most herbivorous insects may greatly reduce the rates of oxidation of ingested plant compounds by oxygen-dependent reactions.

  3. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; DeLong, Edward F; Letelier, Ricardo M; Stewart, Frank J

    2012-10-01

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, contributing to major losses of fixed nitrogen as dinitrogen (N(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) gases. Anaerobic microbial processes, including the two pathways of N(2) production, denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, are oxygen-sensitive, with some occurring only under strictly anoxic conditions. The detection limit of the usual method (Winkler titrations) for measuring dissolved oxygen in seawater, however, is much too high to distinguish low oxygen conditions from true anoxia. However, new analytical technologies are revealing vanishingly low oxygen concentrations in nitrite-rich OMZs, indicating that these OMZs are essentially anoxic marine zones (AMZs). Autonomous monitoring platforms also reveal previously unrecognized episodic intrusions of oxygen into the AMZ core, which could periodically support aerobic metabolisms in a typically anoxic environment. Although nitrogen cycling is considered to dominate the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of AMZs, recent environmental genomics and geochemical studies show the presence of other relevant processes, particularly those associated with the sulfur and carbon cycles. AMZs correspond to an intermediate state between two "end points" represented by fully oxic systems and fully sulfidic systems. Modern and ancient AMZs and sulfidic basins are chemically and functionally related. Global change is affecting the magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes and ocean chemical inventories, leading to shifts in AMZ chemistry and biology that are likely to continue well into the future.

  4. Coating A Bearing With Oxygen-Compatible Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funkhouser, Merle E.; Dalzell, William J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Laser powder-injection process developed to coat contact surfaces of shaft and hydrostatic bearing with alloy protecting against attack by liquid or gaseous oxygen. Protective alloy is INCO MA 754 (or equivalent). Forms coat uniform, dense, and hard. Has low coefficient of friction and wears negligibly. Does not ignite and burn in high-pressure oxygen. With it, underlying shaft and bearing alloy selected for strength and low thermal expansion rather than compatibility with oxygen.

  5. Emergency oxygen: What? Who? When?

    PubMed

    Starr, L M

    1994-01-01

    1. While the need for oxygen to support ill or injured clients is well established, confusion exists about oxygen devices and legal and training requirements. 2. The FDA recognizes both emergency and prescription oxygen. Emergency devices may be used legally by a non-health care workplace first aider who has completed a course in oxygen administration. Training sources for oxygen administration training are identified. 3. Workplace first aiders may assist a client and occupational health nurse by administering emergency oxygen. The appropriate use of these devices for cases of cardiac distress/arrest, shock, COPD, and hyperventilation is reviewed. PMID:8147981

  6. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen; David R. Thompson

    2000-07-01

    . A specific goal is to achieve a material that will sinter to desired density without compromising other variables such as reaction to binder systems or phase purity. Oxygen-enhanced combustion requires a facility which is capable of supplying high purity oxygen (>99.5%) at low costs. This goal can be achieved through the thermal integration of high temperature air separation with ceramic OTM. The objective of the OTM process development program (Task 2.3) is to demonstrate successfully the program objectives on a lab-scale single OTM tube reactor under process conditions comparable to those of an optimum large-scale oxygen facility. This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the first quarter April--June 2000 in the following task areas: Task 1 Oxygen Enhanced Coal Combustion; Task 2 Oxygen Transport Membranes; and Task 4 Program Management.

  7. [Several indicators of tissue oxygen during modeling of extravehicular activity of man].

    PubMed

    Lan'shina, O E; Loginov, V A; Akinfiev, A V; Kovalenko, E A

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of tissue oxygen indices during simulation of extravehicular activity (EVA) of cosmonauts demonstrated that breathing pure oxygen at approximately 280 mmHg elevates oxygen tension in capillary blood, and capillary-tissue gradient during physical work. Physical work alone stimulates tissue oxygenation due to, apparently, intensification of the processes of oxidative phosphorylation. The observed shifts in oxygen status reverse significantly within the first 5 min after completion of the experiment.

  8. Determining the Source of Water Vapor in a Cerium Oxide Electrochemical Oxygen Separator to Achieve Aviator Grade Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John; Taylor, Dale; Martinez, James

    2014-01-01

    ]. Combined with a mechanical compressor, a Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Separator (SEOS) should be capable of producing ABO grade oxygen at pressures >2400 psia, on the space station. Feasibility tests using a SEOS integrated with a mechanical compressor identified an unexpected contaminant in the oxygen: water vapour was found in the oxygen product, sometimes at concentrations higher than 40 ppm (the ABO limit for water vapour is 7 ppm). If solid electrolyte membranes are really "infinitely selective" to oxygen as they are reported to be, where did the water come from? If water is getting into the oxygen, what other contaminants might get into the oxygen? Microscopic analyses of wafers, welds, and oxygen delivery tubes were performed in an attempt to find the source of the water vapour contamination. Hot and cold pressure decay tests were performed. Measurements of water vapour as a function of O2 delivery rate, O2 delivery pressure, and process air humidity levels were the most instructive in finding the source of water contamination (Fig 3). Water contamination was directly affected by oxygen delivery rate (doubling the oxygen production rate cut the water level in half). Water was affected by process air humidity levels and delivery pressure in a way that indicates the water was diffusing into the oxygen delivery system.

  9. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... different for stationary oxygen equipment than for portable oxygen equipment, the flow rate for the stationary equipment is used. (ii) If the prescribed flow rate is different for the patient at rest than for... amounts are separately calculated for the following items: (i) Stationary oxygen equipment and...

  10. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  11. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  13. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  14. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOEpatents

    Shanks, H.R.; Bevolo, A.J.; Danielson, G.C.; Weber, M.F.

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A/sub x/WO/sub 3/ where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt/sub y/WO/sub 3/ where y is at least 0.8.

  15. Transport properties of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, H. M.

    1983-01-01

    Tables of viscosity, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity of oxygen as a function of temperature and pressure from the triple point to 320 K and at pressures to 100 MPa are presented. Auxiliary tables in engineering units are also given. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are calculated from published correlations. Density and specific heat at constant pressure, required to calculate thermal diffusivity, are obtained from an equation of state. The Prandtl number can be obtained quite easily from the values tabulated.

  16. Electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L. L. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    The performance and costs of an electrochemical catalyst as compared to a pure platinum catalyst is evaluated. The catalysts are used to reduce oxygen in low temperature alkaline fuel cells. The electrochemical catalyst is composed of silver and platinum and is dispersed in a resinous inert binder to provide a cell electrode. The results indicate the electrochemical catalyst is superior structurally to the platinum one for high current density operation, and is at least as active as the platinum catalyst in other operations.

  17. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOEpatents

    Shanks, Howard R.; Bevolo, Albert J.; Danielson, Gordon C.; Weber, Michael F.

    1980-11-04

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

  18. Atmospheric Oxygen Photoabsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, Tom G.

    1996-01-01

    The work conducted on this grant was devoted to various aspects of the photophysics and photochemistry of the oxygen molecule. Predissociation linewidths were measured for several vibrational levels in the O2(B3 Sigma(sub u)(sup -)) state, providing good agreement with other groups working on this important problem. Extensive measurements were made on the loss kinetics of vibrationally excited oxygen, where levels between v = 5 and v = 22 were investigated. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to measure oscillator strengths in the oxygen Herzberg bands. The great sensitivity of this technique made it possible to extend the known absorption bands to the dissociation limit as well as providing many new absorption lines that seem to be associated with new O2 transitions. The literature concerning the Herzberg band strengths was evaluated in light of our new measurements, and we made recommendations for the appropriate Herzberg continuum cross sections to be used in stratospheric chemistry. The transition probabilities for all three Herzberg band systems were re-evaluated, and we are recommending a new set of values.

  19. Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2016-06-01

    The origin of oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important metabolic innovation in Earth history. It allowed life to generate energy and reducing power directly from sunlight and water, freeing it from the limited resources of geochemically derived reductants. This greatly increased global primary productivity and restructured ecosystems. The release of O2 as an end product of water oxidation led to the rise of oxygen, which dramatically altered the redox state of Earth's atmosphere and oceans and permanently changed all major biogeochemical cycles. Furthermore, the biological availability of O2 allowed for the evolution of aerobic respiration and novel biosynthetic pathways, facilitating much of the richness we associate with modern biology, including complex multicellularity. Here we critically review and synthesize information from the geological and biological records for the origin and evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Data from both of these archives illustrate that this metabolism first appeared in early Paleoproterozoic time and, despite its biogeochemical prominence, is a relatively late invention in the context of our planet's history.

  20. Onboard oxygen generation systems.

    PubMed

    Manatt, S A

    1981-11-01

    During the 1970s, the development of onboard oxygen generation systems (OBOGS) progressed through ground and flight test phases to the point where a second-generation concept is now production qualified and additional alternatives are being evaluated. This paper reviews the development of OBOGS and assesses the current state of the art of these systems. High-purity fluomine systems, developed for flight demonstration and qualified for production application, are discussed. Development of enriched air molecular sieve systems for laboratory and flight applications is described, along with a recent study of a permeable membrane-based aircraft oxygen enrichment concept. Capabilities and characteristics of the various OBOGS concepts are compared, showing the greater compliance of high-purity fluomine systems with the current oxygen military standards while noting the advantages of the reduced interface complexity of enriched air systems. Recommendations for future OBOGS development are presented, emphasizing the need to coordinate the development of specifications and hardware so the optimum compromises between physiological requirements and engineering feasibilities can result in OBOGS that best satisfy the metabolic needs of aircrew members.

  1. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  2. Ancient Oceans Had Less Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of dissolved oxygen in the oceans in the mid-Proterozoic period has evolutionary implications since essential trace metals are redox sensitive. The findings suggest that there is global lack of oxygen in seawater.

  3. How Does Oxygen Therapy Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does Oxygen Therapy Work? Oxygen therapy provides you with ... pass through your nose or mouth like it does with the other delivery systems. A humidifier adds ...

  4. Atomic Oxygen Used to Restore Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Techniques developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to produce atomic oxygen in order to simulate the low-Earth-orbit environment for spacecraft materials testing can also be applied in the field of art restoration. Defaced or fire-damaged artwork can be treated with atomic oxygen to remove the damage and enable restoration that could not be accomplished with conventional methods. The process has been patented (U.S. Patents 5,560,781 and 5,693,241) and has been used to restore several works of art.

  5. Lunar production of oxygen by electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Rudolf

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches to prepare oxygen from lunar resources by direct electrolysis are discussed. Silicates can be melted or dissolved in a fused salt and electrolyzed with oxygen evolved at the anode. Direct melting and electrolysis is potentially a very simple process, but high temperatures of 1400-1500 C are required, which aggravates materials problems. Operating temperatures can be lowered to about 1000 C by employing a molten salt flux. In this case, however, losses of electrolyte components must be avoided. Experimentation on both approaches is progressing.

  6. [Photosynthesis and oxygenation of the earth's atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A P; Vinogradov, M E; Lappo, S S

    2002-01-01

    Based on the contemporary data concerning photosynthesis as a global biogeochemical mechanism of solar energy utilization and organic matter and oxygen production, the formation of photosynthesis in the Proterozoic is considered, as well as its role in transformation of the pre-Proterozoic oceanic hydrosphere and the Earth's atmosphere from a reduced to an oxidized state. Photosynthesis is considered the longest stage of organic world evolution. The problem of production of "excessive" oxygen is considered, which entered and is entering the atmosphere through the oceanic hydrosphere and determines the process of its organization.

  7. Producing liquid oxygen in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Warden, Nicole; Wharton, Barry

    2016-09-01

    A number of organisations have provided instructions on how to produce small quantities of liquid oxygen in the classroom using liquid nitrogen and a copper condensation coil (Lister 1995 Classic Chemistry Demonstrations (London: Royal Society of Chemistry) pp 61–2, French and Hibbert 2010 Phys. Educ. 45 221–2). The method presented below describes a process which is believed to be safer as it contains the oxygen during production and produces a controllable amount of the liquid. The method also has the advantage that it can be conducted using cheap and easily available materials.

  8. Producing liquid oxygen in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Warden, Nicole; Wharton, Barry

    2016-09-01

    A number of organisations have provided instructions on how to produce small quantities of liquid oxygen in the classroom using liquid nitrogen and a copper condensation coil (Lister 1995 Classic Chemistry Demonstrations (London: Royal Society of Chemistry) pp 61-2, French and Hibbert 2010 Phys. Educ. 45 221-2). The method presented below describes a process which is believed to be safer as it contains the oxygen during production and produces a controllable amount of the liquid. The method also has the advantage that it can be conducted using cheap and easily available materials.

  9. Oxygen in demand: How oxygen has shaped vertebrate physiology.

    PubMed

    Dzal, Yvonne A; Jenkin, Sarah E M; Lague, Sabine L; Reichert, Michelle N; York, Julia M; Pamenter, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    In response to varying environmental and physiological challenges, vertebrates have evolved complex and often overlapping systems. These systems detect changes in environmental oxygen availability and respond by increasing oxygen supply to the tissues and/or by decreasing oxygen demand at the cellular level. This suite of responses is termed the oxygen transport cascade and is comprised of several components. These components include 1) chemosensory detectors that sense changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood, and initiate changes in 2) ventilation and 3) cardiac work, thereby altering the rate of oxygen delivery to, and carbon dioxide clearance from, the tissues. In addition, changes in 4) cellular and systemic metabolism alters tissue-level metabolic demand. Thus the need for oxygen can be managed locally when increasing oxygen supply is not sufficient or possible. Together, these mechanisms provide a spectrum of responses that facilitate the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis in the face of environmental hypoxia or physiological oxygen depletion (i.e. due to exercise or disease). Bill Milsom has dedicated his career to the study of these responses across phylogenies, repeatedly demonstrating the power of applying the comparative approach to physiological questions. The focus of this review is to discuss the anatomy, signalling pathways, and mechanics of each step of the oxygen transport cascade from the perspective of a Milsomite. That is, by taking into account the developmental, physiological, and evolutionary components of questions related to oxygen transport. We also highlight examples of some of the remarkable species that have captured Bill's attention through their unique adaptations in multiple components of the oxygen transport cascade, which allow them to achieve astounding physiological feats. Bill's research examining the oxygen transport cascade has provided important insight and leadership to the study of the diverse suite

  10. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  11. Oxygen isotope geospeedometry by SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamici, C. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Geospeedometry, a discipline closely related and complimentary to thermochronology, exploits the phenomenon of diffusion in order to extract rate and duration information for segments of a rock's thermal history. Geospeedometry data, when anchored in absolute time by geochronologic data, allow for the construction of detailed temperature-time paths for specific terranes and geologic processes. We highlight the developing field of SIMS-based oxygen isotope geospeedometry with an application from granulites of the Adirondack Mountains (New York) and discuss potential future applications based on a recently updated and expanded modeling tool, the Fast Grain Boundary diffusion program (FGB; Eiler et al. 1994). Equilibrium oxygen isotope ratios in minerals are a function of temperature and bulk rock composition. In dynamic systems, intragrain oxygen isotope zoning can develop in response to geologic events that affect the thermal state of a rock and/or induce recrystallization, especially tectonic deformation and fluid infiltration. As an example, titanite grains from late-Grenville shear zones in the northwestern Adirondack Mountains exhibit a range of δ18O zoning patterns that record post-peak metamorphic cooling, episodic fluid infiltration, and deformation-facilitated recrystallization. Many titanite grains preserve smooth, core-to-rim decreasing, diffusional δ18O profiles, which are amenable to diffusion modeling. FGB models that best fit the measured δ18O profiles indicate cooling from ~700-500°C in just 2-5 m.y., a rapid thermal change signaling the final gravitational collapse of the late-Grenville orogen. Titanite can also be utilized as a U-Pb chronometer, and comparison of δ18O and U-Pb age zoning patterns within the Adirondack titanites pins the episode of rapid cooling inferred from the δ18O record to some time between 1054 and 1047 Ma. The expanded capabilities of FGB also allow for evaluation of a range of heating-cooling histories for the

  12. Oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Accepting that oxygen, rather than gigantic gems or gold, is likely to make the Moon's Klondike, the extraction of oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis has chosen to be investigated. Process theory and proposed lunar factory are addressed.

  13. Oxygen generator for medical applications (USIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    The overall Project objective is to develop a portable, non-cryogenic oxygen generator capable of supplying medical grade oxygen at sufficient flow rates to allow the field application of the Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT{reg_sign}) developed by Numotech, Inc. This project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) and is managed by collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Numotech, Inc, and LLC SPE 'Spektr-Conversion.' The project had two phases, with the objective of Phase I being to develop, build and test a laboratory prototype of the membrane-pressure swing adsorber (PSA) system producing at 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum of 98% oxygen purity. Phase II objectives were to further refine and identify the pre-requisites needed for a commercial product and to determine the feasibility of producing 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum oxygen purity of 99%. In Phase I, Spektr built up the necessary infrastructure to perform experimental work and proceeded to build and demonstrate a membrane-PSA laboratory prototype capable of producing 98% purity oxygen at a flow rate of 5 L/min. Spektr offered a plausible path to scale up the process for 15 L/min. Based on the success and experimental results obtained in Phase I, Spektr performed work in three areas for Phase II: construction of a 15 L/min PSA; investigation of compressor requirements for the front end of the membrane/PSA system; and performing modeling and simulation of assess the feasibility of producing oxygen with a purity greater than 99%. Spektr successfully completed all of the tasks under Phase II. A prototype 15 L/min PSA was constructed and operated. Spektr determined that no 'off the shelf' air compressors met all of the specifications required for the membrane-PSA, so a custom compressor will likely need to be built. Modeling and simulation concluded that production of oxygen with purities greater than 99% was possible

  14. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  15. Oxygen Sag and Stream Purification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry; Herwig, Roy

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of water quality related to oxygen sag and stream purification, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) self-purification models; (2) oxygen demand; and (3) reaeration and oxygen transfer. A list of 60 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Watkins, Casey N.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight-saving potential for aerospace applications in propellant and oxidizer tanks. This application for oxygen tanks presents the challenge of being oxygen compatible in addition to complying with the other required material characteristics. This effort reports on the testing procedures and data obtained in examining and selecting potential composite materials for oxygen tank usage. Impact testing of composites has shown that most of these materials initiate a combustion event when impacted at 72 ft-lbf in the presence of liquid oxygen, though testing has also shown substantial variability in reaction sensitivities to impact. Data for screening of 14 potential composites using the Bruceton method is given herein and shows that the 50-percent reaction frequencies range from 17 to 67 ft-lbf. The pressure and temperature rises for several composite materials were recorded to compare the energy releases as functions of the combustion reactions with their respective reaction probabilities. The test data presented are primarily for a test pressure of 300 psia in liquid oxygen. The impact screening process is compared with oxygen index and autogenous ignition test data for both the composite and the basic resin. The usefulness of these supplemental tests in helping select the most oxygen compatible materials is explored. The propensity for mechanical impact ignition of the composite compared with the resin alone is also examined. Since an ignition-free composite material at the peak impact energy of 72 ft-lbf has not been identified, composite reactivity must be characterized over the impact energy level and operating pressure ranges to provide data for hazard analyses in selecting the best potential material for liquid tank usage.

  17. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

  18. Where is the oxygen in protostellar outflows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Oxygen (O) is the third-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and helium. Despite its high elemental abundance, a good picture of where oxygen is located in low-mass protostellar outflows and jets is missing: we cannot account for > 60% of the oxygen budget in these objects. This hole in our picture means that we currently do not have a good understanding of the dominant cooling processes in outflows jets, despite the fact that [O I] emission at 63 micron is one of the dominant cooling lines, nor how cooling processes evolve with protostellar evolution. To shed light on these processes, we propose to observe the [O I] 63 micron line with SOFIA-GREAT toward five low-mass protostars. As a first step, the velocity-resolved line profile will be decomposed into its constituent components to isolate the relative contributions from the jet and the irradiated outflow. Second, the [O I] line profile will be compared to those of H2O, OH and CO to obtain the relative atomic O abundance with respect to CO, H2O, and OH. Third, the effects of evolution will be examined by observing protostars at different evolutionary stages. These three approaches will allow us to quantify: the oxygen chemistry in warm and hot gas, the relative amounts of material in the outflow and the jet, and finally to start tracing the evolutionary sequence of how feedback evolves with time.

  19. Mixed oxygen ion/electron-conducting ceramics for oxygen separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Armstrong, B.L.

    1996-08-01

    Mixed oxygen ion and electron-conducting ceramics are unique materials that can passively separate high purity oxygen from air. Oxygen ions move through a fully dense ceramic in response to an oxygen concentration gradient, charge-compensated by an electron flux in the opposite direction. Compositions in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, perovskites where M=Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N=Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, have been prepared and their electrical, oxygen permeation, oxygen vacancy equilibria, and catalytic properties evaluated. Tubular forms, disks, and asymmetric membrane structures, a thin dense layer on a porous support of the same composition, have been fabricated for testing purposes. In an oxygen partial gradient, the passive oxygen flux through fully dense structures was highly dependent on composition. An increase in oxygen permeation with increased temperature is attributed to both enhanced oxygen vacancy mobility and higher vacancy populations. Highly acceptor-doped compositions resulted in oxygen ion mobilities more than an order of magnitude higher than yttria-stabilized zirconia. The mixed conducting ceramics have been utilized in a membrane reactor configuration to upgrade methane to ethane and ethylene. Conditions were established to balance selectivity and throughput in a catalytic membrane reactor constructed from mixed conducting ceramics.

  20. Oxygen Compatibility Assessment of Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel; Sparks, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Fire hazards are inherent in oxygen systems and a storied history of fires in rocket engine propulsion components exists. To detect and mitigate these fire hazards requires careful, detailed, and thorough analyses applied during the design process. The oxygen compatibility assessment (OCA) process designed by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) can be used to determine the presence of fire hazards in oxygen systems and the likelihood of a fire. This process may be used as both a design guide and during the approval process to ensure proper design features and material selection. The procedure for performing an OCA is a structured step-by-step process to determine the most severe operating conditions; assess the flammability of the system materials at the use conditions; evaluate the presence and efficacy of ignition mechanisms; assess the potential for a fire to breach the system; and determine the reaction effect (the potential loss of life, mission, and system functionality as the result of a fire). This process should be performed for each component in a system. The results of each component assessment, and the overall system assessment, should be recorded in a report that can be used in the short term to communicate hazards and their mitigation and to aid in system/component development and, in the long term, to solve anomalies that occur during engine testing and operation.

  1. Risks and benefits of oxygen in the delivery room.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Rønnaug; Perrone, Serafina; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Oxygen is an essential element of aerobic life, and oxidative metabolism represents a principal source of energy. Nevertheless, oxygen may also be toxic and mutagenic with the potential to cause damage through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS generation can be considered a double-edged sword. Beneficial effects of ROS occur at moderate concentrations and involve physiological roles in cellular responses to noxia, as in defense against infectious agents, in the function of a number of cellular signaling pathways and the induction of a mitogenic response. The overproduction of ROS and the insufficiency of an antioxidant mechanism results in oxidative stress (OS), a deleterious process and important mediator of damage to cell structures and tissues. Newborns, especially if preterm, are particularly susceptible to OS and damage due to increased generation of ROS, the lack of adequate antioxidant protection, and the inability to induce antioxidant defenses during the hyperoxic challenge at birth. Hence the "Oxygen Paradox": higher eukaryotic aerobic organisms cannot exist without oxygen and without OS, yet oxygen and ROS are dangerous to their existence. Originally, the oxygen paradox described that the injury was aggravated by giving oxygen after hypoxia. Today, we know this is caused by production of oxygen radicals. Therefore, it is mandatory in the handling of newborns to use oxygen as a medication when clinical surveillance indicates a need.

  2. First oxygen from lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, M. A.; Knudsen, C. W.; Brueneman, D. J.; Kanamori, H.; Ness, R. O.; Sharp, L. L.; Brekke, D. W.; Allen, C. C.; Morris, R. V.; Keller, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Carbotek/Shimizu process to produce oxygen from lunar soils has been successfully demonstrated on actual lunar samples in laboratory facilities at Carbotek with Shimizu funding and support. Apollo sample 70035 containing approximately 25 percent ilmenite (FeTiO3) was used in seven separate reactions with hydrogen varying temperature and pressure: FeTiO3 + H2 yields Fe + TiO2 + H2O. The experiments gave extremely encouraging results as all ilmenite was reduced in every experiment. The lunar ilmenite was found to be about twice as reactive as terrestrial ilmenite samples. Analytical techniques of the lunar and terrestrial ilmenite experiments performed by NASA Johnson Space Center include iron Mossbauer spectroscopy (FeMS), optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and XRD. The Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota performed three SEM techniques (point count method, morphology determination, elemental mapping), XRD, and optical microscopy.

  3. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  4. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon

    1991-01-01

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  5. Feasibility of electrokinetic oxygen supply for soil bioremediation purposes.

    PubMed

    Mena Ramírez, E; Villaseñor Camacho, J; Rodrigo Rodrigo, M A; Cañizares Cañizares, P

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies the possibility of providing oxygen to a soil by an electrokinetic technique, so that the method could be used in future aerobic polluted soil bioremediation treatments. The oxygen was generated from the anodic reaction of water electrolysis and transported to the soil in a laboratory-scale electrokinetic cell. Two variables were tested: the soil texture and the voltage gradient. The technique was tested in two artificial soils (clay and sand) and later in a real silty soil, and three voltage gradients were used: 0.0 (control), 0.5, and 1.0 V cm(-1). It was observed that these two variables strongly influenced the results. Oxygen transport into the soil was only available in the silty and sandy soils by oxygen diffusion, obtaining high dissolved oxygen concentrations, between 4 and 9 mg L(-1), useful for possible aerobic biodegradation processes, while transport was not possible in fine-grained soils such as clay. Electro-osmotic flow did not contribute to the transport of oxygen, and an increase in voltage gradients produced higher oxygen transfer rates. However, only a minimum fraction of the electrolytically generated oxygen was efficiently used, and the maximum oxygen transport rate observed, approximately 1.4 mgO2 L(-1)d(-1), was rather low, so this technique could be only tested in slow in-situ biostimulation processes for organics removal from polluted soils.

  6. Feasibility of electrokinetic oxygen supply for soil bioremediation purposes.

    PubMed

    Mena Ramírez, E; Villaseñor Camacho, J; Rodrigo Rodrigo, M A; Cañizares Cañizares, P

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies the possibility of providing oxygen to a soil by an electrokinetic technique, so that the method could be used in future aerobic polluted soil bioremediation treatments. The oxygen was generated from the anodic reaction of water electrolysis and transported to the soil in a laboratory-scale electrokinetic cell. Two variables were tested: the soil texture and the voltage gradient. The technique was tested in two artificial soils (clay and sand) and later in a real silty soil, and three voltage gradients were used: 0.0 (control), 0.5, and 1.0 V cm(-1). It was observed that these two variables strongly influenced the results. Oxygen transport into the soil was only available in the silty and sandy soils by oxygen diffusion, obtaining high dissolved oxygen concentrations, between 4 and 9 mg L(-1), useful for possible aerobic biodegradation processes, while transport was not possible in fine-grained soils such as clay. Electro-osmotic flow did not contribute to the transport of oxygen, and an increase in voltage gradients produced higher oxygen transfer rates. However, only a minimum fraction of the electrolytically generated oxygen was efficiently used, and the maximum oxygen transport rate observed, approximately 1.4 mgO2 L(-1)d(-1), was rather low, so this technique could be only tested in slow in-situ biostimulation processes for organics removal from polluted soils. PMID:25173714

  7. Oxygen and the evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    While a considerable amount of evidence has been accumulated about the history of oxygen on this planet, little is known about the relative amounts to which primitive cells might have been exposed. One clue may be found in the metabolic pathways of extant microorganisms. While eucaryotes are principally aerobic organisms, a number are capable of anaerobic growth by fermentation. One such eucaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, will grow in the complete absence of oxygen when supplemented with unsaturated fatty acid and sterol. Oxygen-requiring enzymes are involved in the synthesis of both of these compounds. Studies have demonstrated that the oxidative desaturation of palmitic acid and the conversion of squalene to sterols occur in the range of 10-(3) to 10(-2) PAL. Thus, if the oxygen requirements of these enzymatic processes are an indication, eucaryotes might be more primitive than anticipated from the microfossil record. Results of studies on the oxygen requirements for sterol and unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in a more primitive procaryotic system are also discussed.

  8. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2003-02-01

    This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the eleventh quarter, October-December 2002, in the following task areas: Task 1 - Oxygen Enhanced Combustion, Task 2 - Oxygen Transport Membranes, Task 3 - Economic Evaluation and Task 4 - Program Management. The program is proceeding in accordance with the objectives for the third year. Pilot scale experiments conducted at the University of Utah were aimed at confirming the importance of oxygen injection strategy for different types of burners. CFD modeling at REI was used to better understand the potential for increased corrosion under oxygen enhanced combustion conditions. Data from a full-scale demonstration test in Springfield, MO were analyzed. OTM element development continued with preliminary investigation of an alternative method of fabrication of PSO1d elements. OTM process development continued with long-term testing of a PSO1d element. Economic evaluation has confirmed the advantage of oxygen-enhanced combustion. Proposals have been submitted for two additional beta test sites. A first commercial proposal has been submitted. Economic analysis of a beta site test performance was conducted.

  9. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2003-04-01

    This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the twelfth quarter, January-March 2003, in the following task areas: Task 1--Oxygen Enhanced Combustion, Task 2--Oxygen Transport Membranes, Task 3--Economic Evaluation and Task 4--Program Management. The program is proceeding in accordance with the objectives for the third year. Pilot scale experiments conducted at the University of Utah explored both the effectiveness of oxygen addition and the best way to add oxygen with a scaled version of Riley Power's newest low NOx burner design. CFD modeling was done to compare the REI's modeling results for James River Unit 3 with the NOx and LOI results obtained during the demonstration program at that facility. Investigation of an alternative method of fabrication of PSO1d elements was conducted. OTM process development work has concluded with the completion of a long-term test of a PSO1d element Economic evaluation has confirmed the advantage of oxygen-enhanced combustion. Proposals have been submitted for two additional beta test sites. Commercial proposals have been submitted. Economic analysis of a beta site test performance was conducted.

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lindell K

    2014-01-01

    Despite established exposure limits and safety standards, and the availability of carbon monoxide (CO) alarms, each year 50,000 people in the United States visit emergency departments for CO poisoning. Carbon monoxide poisoning can occur from brief exposures to high levels of CO, or from longer exposures to lower levels. Common symptoms include headaches, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, general malaise, and altered mental status. Some patients may have chest pain, shortness of breath and myocardial ischemia, and may require mechanical ventilation and treatment of shock. Individuals poisoned by CO often go on to develop neurological problems, including cognitive sequelae, anxiety and depression, persistent headaches, dizziness, sleep problems, motor weakness, vestibular and balance problems, gaze abnormalities, peripheral neuropathies, hearing loss, tinnitus and Parkinsonian-like syndrome. While breathing oxygen hastens the removal of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) hastens COHb elimination and favorably modulates inflammatory processes instigated by CO poisoning, an effect not observed with breathing normobaric oxygen. Hyperbaric oxygen improves mitochondrial function, inhibits lipid peroxidation transiently, impairs leukocyte adhesion to injured microvasculature, and reduces brain inflammation caused by the CO-induced adduct formation of myelin basic protein. Based upon three supportive randomized clinical trials in humans and considerable evidence from animal studies, HBO2 should be considered for all cases of acute symptomatic CO poisoning. Hyperbaric oxygen is indicated for CO poisoning complicated by cyanide poisoning, often concomitantly with smoke inhalation.

  11. Oxygen extraction from lunar soil by fluorination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seboldt, W.; Lingner, S.; Hoernes, S.; Grimmeisen, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mining and processing of lunar material could possibly lead to more cost-efficient scenarios for permanent presence of man in space and on the Moon. Production of oxygen for use as propellant seems especially important. Different candidate processes for oxygen-extraction from lunar soil were proposed, of which the reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen was studied most. This process, however, needs the concentration of ilmenite from lunar regolith to a large extent and releases oxygen only with low efficiency. Another possibility - the fluorination method - which works with lunar bulk material as feedstock is discussed. Liberation of oxygen from silicate or oxide materials by fluorination methods has been applied in geoscience since the early sixties. The fact that even at moderate temperatures 98 to 100 percent yields can be attained, suggests that fluorination of lunar regolith could be an effective way of propellant production. Lunar soil contains about 50 percent oxygen by weight which is gained nearly completely through this process as O2 gas. The second-most element Si is liberated as gaseous SiF4. It could be used for production of Si-metal and fluorine-recycling. All other main elements of lunar soil will be converted into solid fluorides which also can be used for metal-production and fluorine-recycling. Preliminary results of small scale experiments with different materials are discussed, giving information on specific oxygen-yields and amounts of by-products as functions of temperature. These experiments were performed with an already existing fluorine extraction and collection device at the University of Bonn, normally used for determination of oxygen-isotopic abundances. Optimum conditions, especially concerning energy consumption, are investigated. Extrapolation of the experimental results to large industrial-type plants on the Moon is tried and seems to be promising at first sight. The recycling of the fluorine is, however, crucial for the process. It

  12. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, Srikanth

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  13. The Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions in Nonaqueous Lithium-Oxygen Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruiguo; Walter, Eric D.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-09-01

    The oxygen reduction/evolution reaction (ORR/OER) mechanisms in nonaqueous Li-O2 batteries have been investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in this work. We identified the superoxide radical anion (O2•-) as an intermediate in the ORR process using 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide as a spin trap, while no O2•- in OER was detected during the charge process. These findings provide insightful understanding on the fundamental oxygen reaction mechanisms in rechargeable nonaqueous Li-O2 batteries.

  14. Solar Forbidden Oxygen, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-10-01

    Recent large reductions in the solar oxygen abundance, based on synthesis of photospheric O I, OH, and CO absorptions with 3D convection models, have provoked consternation in the helioseismology community: the previous excellent agreement between measured p-mode oscillation frequencies and predictions based on the recommended epsilonO of a decade ago (680 parts per million [ppm] relative to hydrogen) unravels at the new low value (460 ppm). In an attempt to reconcile these conflicting results, the formation of pivotal [O I] λ6300, which is blended with a weak Ni I line, has been reconsidered, exploiting an alternative 3D model (albeit only a single temporal snapshot). And while there are several areas of agreement with the earlier [O I] studies of Allende Prieto, Asplund, and others, there is one crucial point of disagreement: the epsilonO derived here is significantly larger, 650 +/- 65 ppm (although at the expense of a ~30% weaker Ni I line than expected from the recommended nickel abundance). One innovation is a more robust treatment of the solar wavelengths: the balance between the components of the [O I] + Ni I blend is sensitive to velocity errors of only a few hundred m s-1. A second improvement is enforcement of a "continuum calibration" to ensure a self-consistent 3D temperature scale. Because of the renewed agreement between the linchpin tracer [O I] and seismic oxygen, the proposed downward slump of the solar metallicity and the perceived "oxygen crisis" now can be said to rest on less secure footings.

  15. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W.; Canfield, Don E.

    2009-09-01

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between ~2.45 and 2.2Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era (~800-542Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean ~580Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In ~1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9‰), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life.

  16. Oxygen supplies in disaster management.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Thomas C; Branson, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Mass casualty events and disasters, both natural and human-generated, occur frequently around the world and can generate scores of injured or ill victims in need of resources. Of the available medical supplies, oxygen remains the critical consumable resource in disaster management. Strategic management of oxygen supplies in disaster scenarios remains a priority. Hospitals have large supplies of liquid oxygen and a supply of compressed gas oxygen cylinders that allow several days of reserve, but a large influx of patients from a disaster can strain these resources. Most backup liquid oxygen supplies are attached to the main liquid system and supply line. In the event of damage to the main system, the reserve supply is rendered useless. The Strategic National Stockpile supplies medications, medical supplies, and equipment to disaster areas, but it does not supply oxygen. Contracted vendors can deliver oxygen to alternate care facilities in disaster areas, in the form of concentrators, compressed gas cylinders, and liquid oxygen. Planning for oxygen needs following a disaster still presents a substantial challenge, but alternate care facilities have proven to be valuable in relieving pressure from the mass influx of patients into hospitals, especially for those on home oxygen who require only an electrical source to power their oxygen concentrator. PMID:23271827

  17. Oxygen supplies in disaster management.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Thomas C; Branson, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Mass casualty events and disasters, both natural and human-generated, occur frequently around the world and can generate scores of injured or ill victims in need of resources. Of the available medical supplies, oxygen remains the critical consumable resource in disaster management. Strategic management of oxygen supplies in disaster scenarios remains a priority. Hospitals have large supplies of liquid oxygen and a supply of compressed gas oxygen cylinders that allow several days of reserve, but a large influx of patients from a disaster can strain these resources. Most backup liquid oxygen supplies are attached to the main liquid system and supply line. In the event of damage to the main system, the reserve supply is rendered useless. The Strategic National Stockpile supplies medications, medical supplies, and equipment to disaster areas, but it does not supply oxygen. Contracted vendors can deliver oxygen to alternate care facilities in disaster areas, in the form of concentrators, compressed gas cylinders, and liquid oxygen. Planning for oxygen needs following a disaster still presents a substantial challenge, but alternate care facilities have proven to be valuable in relieving pressure from the mass influx of patients into hospitals, especially for those on home oxygen who require only an electrical source to power their oxygen concentrator.

  18. Oxygen therapy in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Cherian, S; Morris, I; Evans, J; Kotecha, S

    2014-06-01

    Despite being the most widely used and vital therapy in neonatology, optimal strategies for the use of oxygen in preterm infants remain controversial. Achieving the balance between attaining adequate tissue oxygenation and avoiding oxygen toxicity is challenging. There remains a paucity of clear evidence based guidance for clinicians on safe oxygen saturation targets. What does seem apparent is that these targets vary over time in the life of a preterm infant. This article summarises the evidence behind current practice of oxygen monitoring and administration from the first few minutes after birth, through to the acute neonatal and later convalescent periods. Finally, we review the use of home oxygen for preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia including administration and weaning from domically home oxygen.

  19. Toward a Full Simulation of the Basic Oxygen Furnace: Deformation of the Bath Free Surface and Coupled Transfer Processes Associated with the Post-Combustion in the Gas Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Y.; Chapelle, P.; Jardy, A.; Djambazov, G.; Pericleous, K.; Ghazal, G.; Gardin, P.

    2013-06-01

    The present article treats different phenomena taking place in a steelmaking converter through the development of two separate models. The first model describes the cavity produced at the free surface of the metal bath by the high-speed impinging oxygen jet. The model is based on a zonal approach, where gas compressibility effects are taken into account only in the high velocity jet region, while elsewhere the gas is treated as incompressible. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is employed to follow the deformation of the bath free surface. Calculations are presented for two- and three-phase systems and compared against experimental data obtained in a cold model experiment presented in the literature. The influence on the size and shape of the cavity of various parameters and models (including the jet inlet boundary conditions, the VOF advection scheme, and the turbulence model) is studied. Next, the model is used to simulate the interaction of a supersonic oxygen jet with the surface of a liquid steel bath in a pilot-scale converter. The second model concentrates on fluid flow, heat transfer, and the post-combustion reaction in the gas phase above the metal bath. The model uses the simple chemical reaction scheme approach to describe the transport of the chemical species and takes into account the consumption of oxygen by the bath and thermal radiative transfer. The model predictions are in reasonable agreement with measurements collected in a laboratory experiment and in a pilot-scale furnace.

  20. Timescales of Oxygenation Following the Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Lewis M.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-03-01

    Among the most important bioenergetic innovations in the history of life was the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis—autotrophic growth by splitting water with sunlight—by Cyanobacteria. It is widely accepted that the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis ultimately resulted in the rise of oxygen by ca. 2.35 Gya, but it is debated whether this occurred more or less immediately as a proximal result of the evolution of oxygenic Cyanobacteria or whether they originated several hundred million to more than one billion years earlier in Earth history. The latter hypothesis involves a prolonged period during which oxygen production rates were insufficient to oxidize the atmosphere, potentially due to redox buffering by reduced species such as higher concentrations of ferrous iron in seawater. To examine the characteristic timescales for environmental oxygenation following the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, we applied a simple mathematical approach that captures many of the salient features of the major biogeochemical fluxes and reservoirs present in Archean and early Paleoproterozoic surface environments. Calculations illustrate that oxygenation would have overwhelmed redox buffers within ~100 kyr following the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, a geologically short amount of time unless rates of primary production were far lower than commonly expected. Fundamentally, this result arises because of the multiscale nature of the carbon and oxygen cycles: rates of gross primary production are orders of magnitude too fast for oxygen to be masked by Earth's geological buffers, and can only be effectively matched by respiration at non-negligible O2 concentrations. These results suggest that oxygenic photosynthesis arose shortly before the rise of oxygen, not hundreds of millions of years before it.

  1. Timescales of Oxygenation Following the Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lewis M; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-03-01

    Among the most important bioenergetic innovations in the history of life was the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis-autotrophic growth by splitting water with sunlight-by Cyanobacteria. It is widely accepted that the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis ultimately resulted in the rise of oxygen by ca. 2.35 Gya, but it is debated whether this occurred more or less immediately as a proximal result of the evolution of oxygenic Cyanobacteria or whether they originated several hundred million to more than one billion years earlier in Earth history. The latter hypothesis involves a prolonged period during which oxygen production rates were insufficient to oxidize the atmosphere, potentially due to redox buffering by reduced species such as higher concentrations of ferrous iron in seawater. To examine the characteristic timescales for environmental oxygenation following the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, we applied a simple mathematical approach that captures many of the salient features of the major biogeochemical fluxes and reservoirs present in Archean and early Paleoproterozoic surface environments. Calculations illustrate that oxygenation would have overwhelmed redox buffers within ~100 kyr following the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, a geologically short amount of time unless rates of primary production were far lower than commonly expected. Fundamentally, this result arises because of the multiscale nature of the carbon and oxygen cycles: rates of gross primary production are orders of magnitude too fast for oxygen to be masked by Earth's geological buffers, and can only be effectively matched by respiration at non-negligible O2 concentrations. These results suggest that oxygenic photosynthesis arose shortly before the rise of oxygen, not hundreds of millions of years before it. PMID:26286084

  2. Timescales of Oxygenation Following the Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lewis M; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-03-01

    Among the most important bioenergetic innovations in the history of life was the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis-autotrophic growth by splitting water with sunlight-by Cyanobacteria. It is widely accepted that the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis ultimately resulted in the rise of oxygen by ca. 2.35 Gya, but it is debated whether this occurred more or less immediately as a proximal result of the evolution of oxygenic Cyanobacteria or whether they originated several hundred million to more than one billion years earlier in Earth history. The latter hypothesis involves a prolonged period during which oxygen production rates were insufficient to oxidize the atmosphere, potentially due to redox buffering by reduced species such as higher concentrations of ferrous iron in seawater. To examine the characteristic timescales for environmental oxygenation following the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, we applied a simple mathematical approach that captures many of the salient features of the major biogeochemical fluxes and reservoirs present in Archean and early Paleoproterozoic surface environments. Calculations illustrate that oxygenation would have overwhelmed redox buffers within ~100 kyr following the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, a geologically short amount of time unless rates of primary production were far lower than commonly expected. Fundamentally, this result arises because of the multiscale nature of the carbon and oxygen cycles: rates of gross primary production are orders of magnitude too fast for oxygen to be masked by Earth's geological buffers, and can only be effectively matched by respiration at non-negligible O2 concentrations. These results suggest that oxygenic photosynthesis arose shortly before the rise of oxygen, not hundreds of millions of years before it.

  3. Oxygen variance and meridional oxygen supply in the Tropical North East Atlantic oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J.; Brandt, P.; Greatbatch, R. J.; Krahmann, G.; Körtzinger, A.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of the mean oceanic oxygen concentration results from a balance between ventilation and consumption. In the eastern tropical Pacific and Atlantic, this balance creates extended oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) at intermediate depth. Here, we analyze hydrographic and velocity data from shipboard and moored observations, which were taken along the 23°W meridian cutting through the Tropical North East Atlantic (TNEA) OMZ, to study the distribution and generation of oxygen variability. By applying the extended Osborn-Cox model, the respective role of mesoscale stirring and diapycnal mixing in producing enhanced oxygen variability, found at the southern and upper boundary of the OMZ, is quantified. From the well-ventilated equatorial region toward the OMZ core a northward eddy-driven oxygen flux is observed whose divergence corresponds to an oxygen supply of about 2.4 μmol kg-1 year-1 at the OMZ core depth. Above the OMZ core, mesoscale eddies act to redistribute low- and high-oxygen waters associated with westward and eastward currents, respectively. Here, absolute values of the local oxygen supply >10 μmol kg-1 year-1 are found, likely balanced by mean zonal advection. Combining our results with recent studies, a refined oxygen budget for the TNEA OMZ is derived. Eddy-driven meridional oxygen supply contributes more than 50 % of the supply required to balance the estimated oxygen consumption. The oxygen tendency in the OMZ, as given by the multidecadal oxygen decline, is maximum slightly above the OMZ core and represents a substantial imbalance of the oxygen budget reaching about 20 % of the magnitude of the eddy-driven oxygen supply.

  4. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  5. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  6. Hyperthermal atomic oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Wu, Dongchuan

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the transport properties of oxygen through silver was continued. Specifically, experiments measuring the transport through Ag(111), Ag(110), Ag(100) single crystals and through Ag0.05 Zr alloy were completed. In addition, experiments using glow discharge excitation of oxygen to assist in the transport were completed. It was found that the permeability through the different orientations of single crystal Ag was the same, but significant differences existed in the diffusivity. The experimental ratio of diffusivities, however, was in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates. Since the solubilities of orientations must be the same, this suggests some problems with the assumption K = DS. The glow discharge experiments show that there is a substantial increase in transport (factor of six) when the upstream pressure is dissociated to some fraction of atoms (which have a much higher sticking coefficient). These results indicate that there is a significant surface limitation because of dissociative adsorption of the molecules. Experiments with the Ag0.05 Zr alloy and its high-grain boundary and defect density show a permeability of greater than a factor of two over ordinary polycrystalline Ag, but it is unclear as to whether this is because of enhanced transport through these defects or whether the Zr and defects on the surface increased the sticking coefficient and therefore the transport.

  7. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  8. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2014-08-05

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  9. Triple Oxygen Isotopes: Fundamental Relationships and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2016-06-01

    The element oxygen has three stable isotopes: 16O, 17O, and 18O. For a defined process, a change in 18O/16O scales with the corresponding change in 17O/16O, or the fractionation factors 18α and 17α have a relationship of θ = ln17α/ln18α, in which the triple oxygen isotope exponent θ is relatively fixed but does vary with reaction path, temperature, and species involved. When the small variation is of interest, the distinction of three concepts—θ, S (a slope through data points in δ17O-δ18O space), and C (an arbitrary referencing number for the degree of 17O deviation)—becomes important. Triple oxygen isotope variations can be measured by modern instruments and thus offer an additional line of information on the underlying reaction processes and conditions. Analytical methods and Earth science applications have recently been developed for air oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, silicates, oxides, sulfates, carbonates, and phosphates.

  10. Triple Oxygen Isotopes: Fundamental Relationships and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2016-06-01

    The element oxygen has three stable isotopes: 16O, 17O, and 18O. For a defined process, a change in 18O/16O scales with the corresponding change in 17O/16O, or the fractionation factors 18α and 17α have a relationship of θ = ln17α/ln18α, in which the triple oxygen isotope exponent θ is relatively fixed but does vary with reaction path, temperature, and species involved. When the small variation is of interest, the distinction of three concepts—θ, S (a slope through data points in δ17O–δ18O space), and C (an arbitrary referencing number for the degree of 17O deviation)—becomes important. Triple oxygen isotope variations can be measured by modern instruments and thus offer an additional line of information on the underlying reaction processes and conditions. Analytical methods and Earth science applications have recently been developed for air oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, silicates, oxides, sulfates, carbonates, and phosphates.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-05-01

    been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  12. Medical oxygen and air travel.

    PubMed

    Lyznicki, J M; Williams, M A; Deitchman, S D; Howe, J P

    2000-08-01

    This report responds to a resolution that asked the American Medical Association (AMA) to take action to improve airport and airline accommodations for passengers requiring medical oxygen. Information for the report was derived from a search of the MEDLINE database and references listed in pertinent articles, as well as through communications with experts in aerospace and emergency medicine. Based on this information, the AMA Council on Scientific Affairs determined that commercial air travel exposes passengers to altitude-related hypoxia and gas expansion, which may cause some passengers to experience significant symptoms and medical complications during flight. Medical guidelines are available to help physicians evaluate and counsel potential passengers who are at increased risk of inflight hypoxemia. Supplemental oxygen may be needed for some passengers to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation and prevent hypoxemic complications. For safety and security reasons, federal regulations prohibit travelers from using their own portable oxygen system onboard commercial aircraft. Many U.S. airlines supply medical oxygen for use during flight but policies and procedures vary. Oxygen-dependent passengers must make additional arrangements for the use of supplemental oxygen in airports. Uniform standards are needed to specify procedures and equipment for the use of medical oxygen in airports and aboard commercial aircraft. Revision of federal regulations should be considered to accommodate oxygen-dependent passengers and permit them to have an uninterrupted source of oxygen from departure to destination.

  13. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queste, Bastien Y.; Fernand, Liam; Jickells, Timothy D.; Heywood, Karen J.; Hind, Andrew J.

    2016-02-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≍ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high-resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD), dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter, and fluorescence during a 3-day deployment.The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small-scale events (< 200 m or 6 h) that supply oxygenated water to the bottom layer at a rate of 2 ± 1 µmol dm-3 day-1. Benthic and pelagic oxygen sinks, quantified through glider observations and past studies, indicate more gradual background consumption rates of 2.5 ± 1 µmol dm-3 day-1. This budget revealed that the balance of oxygen supply and demand is in agreement with previous studies of the North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8 ± 0.3 µmol dm-3 day-1, indicating a localized or short-lived (< 200 m or 6 h) increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localized depocentres and rapid remineralization of resuspended organic matter.The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date

  14. Guide for Oxygen Compatibility Assessments on Oxygen Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and preventing fire hazards is necessary when designing, maintaining, and operating oxygen systems. Ignition risks can be minimized by controlling heat sources and using materials that will not ignite or will not support burning in the end-use environment. Because certain materials are more susceptible to ignition in oxygen-enriched environments, a compatibility assessment should be performed before the component is introduced into an oxygen system. This document provides an overview of oxygen fire hazards and procedures that are consistent with the latest versions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards G63 (1999) and G94 (2005) to address fire hazards associated with oxygen systems. This document supersedes the previous edition, NASA Technical Memorandum 104823, Guide for Oxygen Hazards Analyses on Components and Systems (1996). The step-by-step oxygen compatibility assessment method described herein (see Section 4) enables oxygen-system designers, system engineers, and facility managers to determine areas of concern with respect to oxygen compatibility and, ultimately, prevent damage to a system or injury to personnel.

  15. Extraction of oxygen and metals from lunar ores

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrett, N.; Das, S.K.; Haupin, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration of the lunar environment suggests modifications of the Bayer-Hall approach leading to a conceptual process for extracting aluminum and oxygen from lunar soil. The process consists of electrowinning aluminum-silicon-iron-titanium alloy and oxygen from unrefined soil in a bipolar fluoride type cell with inert electrodes. Aluminum and other elements would be recovered from the alloy by vacuum fractional distillation. The silicon produced would be used to produce solar cells for additional electrical power.

  16. Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Zhang, Liping; Benemann, John R.; Forestier, Marc; Ghirardi, Maria; Seibert, Michael

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  17. Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  18. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report

  19. Constraining Oxygen False Positives in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, C. E.; Schottelkotte, J. C.; Kasting, J. F.

    2014-03-01

    Oxygen (O2) and ozone (O3) in the present Earth's atmosphere are byproducts of oxygenic photosynthesis coupled with organic carbon burial. On Earth, no known abiotic surface process would be able to generate such an atmosphere, and by extension, lifeless exoplanets are expected to be devoid of O2. As a result, molecular oxygen and ozone are often seen as convincing signposts for life. Recently, however, a number of authors have demonstrated the abiotic generation of molecular oxygen in a planetary atmosphere, either under oxidizing conditions (Hu et al., 2013) or around an M star (Tian et al., 2013). This èfalse positive', if verified, would remove oxygen and ozone from an already short list of easily detectable biosignatures. We explore oxygen false positives with our 1-D photochemical model, updated from Segura et al. (2007). Preliminary results show that if water vapor photolysis longward of ~200 nm is neglected, substantial amounts of CO and O2 can build up in the lower part of the atmosphere. Additionally, the ultimate fate of CO and O2 produced in such atmospheres is strongly dependent on the imposed lower boundary condition, with low depositional velocities corresponding to higher mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. The deposition velocity of a gas depends on it dissolved concentration, however, and so one needs to consider the chemistry of these gases in solution. Ongoing work seeks to test the conclusions of Tian et al., (2013) by exploring this dependence on ocean chemistry and by including spectra from AD Leo (an active M-dwarf, used by Domagal-Goldman et al., (2011)) to compare with the M-dwarf spectra used by Tian et al.

  20. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  1. Dissolved oxygen sensing based on fluorescence quenching of ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Nader; Meehan, Kathleen; Leber, Donald

    2012-10-01

    The development of oxygen sensors has positively impacted the fields of medical science, bioengineering, environmental monitoring, solar cells, industrial process control, and a number of military applications. Fluorescent quenching sensors have an inherent high sensitivity, chemical selectivity, and stability when compared to other types of sensors. While cerium oxide thin films have been used to monitor oxygen in the gas phase, the potential of cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles as the active material in sensor for oxygen gas has only recently been investigated. Ceria nanoparticles are one of the most unique nanomaterials that are being studied today due to the diffusion and reactivity of its oxygen vacancies, which contributes to its high oxygen storage capability. The reactivity of the oxygen vacancies, which is also related to conversion of cerium ion from the Ce+4 to Ce+3 state, affects the fluorescence properties of the ceria nanoparticles. Our research demonstrates that the ceria nanoparticles (~7 nm in diameter) have application as a fluorescence quenching sensor to measure dissolved oxygen in water. We have found a strong inverse correlation between the amplitude of the fluorescence emission (λexcitation = 430 nm and λpeak = 520 nm) and the dissolved oxygen concentration between 5 - 13 mg/L. The Stern-Volmer constant, which is an indication of the sensitivity of gas sensing is 184 M-1 for the ceria nanoparticles. The results show that ceria nanoparticles can be used in an improved, robust fluorescence sensor for dissolved oxygen in a liquid medium.

  2. Luminescence lifetime determination for oxygen imaging in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochmann, C.; Häupl, T.; Beuthan, J.

    2008-02-01

    Imaging and monitoring of biochemical parameters in vitro and in vivo have become the goal of many investigations in medical physics. The main imaging technique used is laser-induced luminescence due to its cost effectiveness and diversity of applications [1]. One key parameter in medical investigations, for instance to control photodynamic therapy, is the molecular oxygen concentration. The use of optical methods provides possible means of measuring molecular oxygen. The basis of such a method is the measurement of the luminescence lifetime of a dye which is quenched by molecular oxygen. The molecular oxygen concentration can be monitored two-dimensionally by pixel-wise determination of the luminescence lifetime with a CCD-camera. An oxygen imaging system based on this principle was built and tested with a commercially available oxygen sensitive sol gel-layer. The embedded ruthenium complex is quenched by molecular oxygen and because of the oxygen permeability of the layer; it is suitable for oxygen measurements. The characteristics and dependence on the pH-value and temperature of the luminescence lifetime of the layer were examined in preparation for measurements on tissue to exclude cross-correlation of other quenching processes.

  3. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  4. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation. PMID:26650762

  5. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation.

  6. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  7. Microdistribution of oxygen in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgai, A.; Chi, J. Y.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    The microdistribution of oxygen in Czochralskii-grown, p-type silicon crystals was determined by using the SEM in the EBIC mode in conjunction with spreading resistance measurements. When the conductivity remained p-type, bands of contrast were observed in the EBIC image which corresponded to maxima in resistivity. When at the oxygen concentration maxima the oxygen donor concentration exceeded the p-type dopant concentration, an inversion of the conductivity occurred. It resulted in the formation of p-n junctions in a striated configuration and the local inversion of the EBIC image contrast. By heat-treating silicon at 1000 C prior to the activation of oxygen donors, some silicon-oxygen micro-precipitates were observed in the EBIC image within the striated oxygen concentration maxima.

  8. Outgassing of oxygen from polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung In; Monson, L; Extrand, C W

    2009-07-01

    A manometric permeation apparatus was used to study the "outgassing" or desorption of oxygen from polycarbonate (PC). A PC film was placed in the apparatus. Both sides were exposed to oxygen until the film was saturated. To simulate inert gas purging of a closed container or "microenvironment", oxygen was pumped from one side of the apparatus to reduce the concentration on that side to nearly zero. Oxygen concentrations on the freshly purged side rose quickly at first but then slowed. Eventually, a steady state was established and oxygen concentrations increased linearly with time. Mass-transport coefficients (permeation, diffusion, and solubility coefficients) were also estimated and then used to successfully predict the postpurge rise of the oxygen concentration.

  9. Measurement of oxygen transfer from air into organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Hobisch, Mathias; Borisov, Sergey; Klimant, Ingo; Krühne, Ulrich; Woodley, John M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The use of non‐aqueous organic media is becoming increasingly important in many biotechnological applications in order to achieve process intensification. Such media can be used, for example, to directly extract poorly water‐soluble toxic products from fermentations. Likewise many biological reactions require the supply of oxygen, most normally from air. However, reliable online measurements of oxygen concentration in organic solvents (and hence oxygen transfer rates from air to the solvent) has to date proven impossible due to limitations in the current analytical methods. RESULTS For the first time, online oxygen measurements in non‐aqueous media using a novel optical sensor are demonstrated. The sensor was used to measure oxygen concentration in various organic solvents including toluene, THF, isooctane, DMF, heptane and hexane (which have all been shown suitable for several biological applications). Subsequently, the oxygen transfer rates from air into these organic solvents were measured. CONCLUSION The measurement of oxygen transfer rates from air into organic solvents using the dynamic method was established using the solvent resistant optical sensor. The feasibility of online oxygen measurements in organic solvents has also been demonstrated, paving the way for new opportunities in process control. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Mechanisms and meaning of cellular oxygen sensing in the organism.

    PubMed

    Acker, H

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen sensors in the body induce various cell activities to avoid any mismatch between oxygen demand and oxygen supply and to maintain an optimal level of oxygen partial pressure (PO2) in various organs. Oxygen sensing seems to be a well conserved process among procaryontic and eucaryontic cells. The molecular mechanism of oxygen sensing is unknown, but it has been suggested that a hemeprotein is involved that does not participate in the mitochondrial energy production. As examplified on the carotid body and on erythropoietin producing HepG2 cells, a cytochrome b was described for the NAD(P)H oxidase of neutrophiles might be an attractive candidate for this hemeprotein. It is hypothesised that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by this cytochrome b in direct correlation with cellular PO2, serves as a second messenger to regulate potassium channels or gene expression. One might forsee, that this new concept of oxygen sensing could have an impact on all processes in physiology and pathophysiology which are dealing with reactive oxygen intermediates.

  11. Measuring oxygen reduction/evolution reactions on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Ciucci, Francesco; Morozovska, Anna N; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2011-08-14

    The efficiency of fuel cells and metal-air batteries is significantly limited by the activation of oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. Despite the well-recognized role of oxygen reaction kinetics on the viability of energy technologies, the governing mechanisms remain elusive and until now have been addressable only by macroscopic studies. This lack of nanoscale understanding precludes optimization of material architecture. Here, we report direct measurements of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions and oxygen vacancy diffusion on oxygen-ion conductive solid surfaces with sub-10 nm resolution. In electrochemical strain microscopy, the biased scanning probe microscopy tip acts as a moving, electrocatalytically active probe exploring local electrochemical activity. The probe concentrates an electric field in a nanometre-scale volume of material, and bias-induced, picometre-level surface displacements provide information on local electrochemical processes. Systematic mapping of oxygen activity on bare and platinum-functionalized yttria-stabilized zirconia surfaces is demonstrated. This approach allows direct visualization of the oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activation process at the triple-phase boundary, and can be extended to a broad spectrum of oxygen-conductive and electrocatalytic materials.

  12. Low-Flammability PTFE for High-Oxygen Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walle, E.; Fallon, B.; Sheppard, A.

    1986-01-01

    Modified forming process removes volatile combustible materials. Flammability of cable-wrapping tape reduced by altering tape-manufacturing process. In new manufacturing process, tape formed by proprietary process of screw extrusion, followed by washing in solvent and drying. Tape then wrapped as before. Spectrogram taken after extrusion, washing, and drying shows lower hydrocarbon content. PTFE formed by new process suited to oxygen-rich environments. Safe in liquid oxygen of Space Shuttle tank and in medical uses; thin-wall shrinkable tubing in hospital test equipment, surgical instruments, and implants.

  13. Saturn's Stratospheric Oxygen Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Paul N.; Delgado Díaz, Héctor E.; Bjoraker, Gordon; Hesman, Brigette; Achterberg, Richard

    2016-10-01

    There are three known oxygenated species present in Saturn's upper atmosphere: H2O, CO and CO2. The ultimate source of the water must be external to Saturn as Saturn's cold tropopause effectively prevents any internal water from reaching the upper atmosphere. The carbon monoxide and dioxide source(s) could be internal, external, produced by the photochemical interaction of water with Saturn's stratospheric hydrocarbons or some combination of all of these. At this point it is not clear what the external source(s) are.Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O and CO2 (Hesman et al., DPS 2015, 311.16 & Abbas et al. 2013, Ap. J. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/776/2/73) on Saturn. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using CIRS retrieved temperatures, the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level can be retrieved and the CO2 mole fraction at ~1-10 mbar. Coupled with ground based observations of CO (Cavalié et al., 2010, A&A, DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/200912909) these observations provide a complete oxygen compound data set to test photochemical models.Preliminary results will be presented with an emphasis on upper limit analysis to determine the percentage of stratospheric CO and CO2 that can be produced photochemically from CIRS observational constraints on the H2O profile.

  14. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies.

  15. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies. PMID:25898071

  16. Oxygen scrubbing and sensing in plant growth chambers using solid oxide electrolyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; MacElroy, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance of optimal levels of oxygen in the gaseous environment of a plant growth chamber during light and dark periods is an essential criterion for the correct growth of plants. The use of solid oxide electrolyzers to control the oxygen levels by removing the excess gaseous oxygen during periods of illumination and full-scale photosynthesis is described. A part of the oxygen removed can be stored and supplied back to the plants during dark periods. The excess oxygen can be used by the crew. The electrolizer can be additionally used in its open circuit mode, to sense the oxygen concentrations in the plant chamber. The solid oxide electrolysis process is described.

  17. When did oxygenic photosynthesis evolve?

    PubMed

    Buick, Roger

    2008-08-27

    The atmosphere has apparently been oxygenated since the 'Great Oxidation Event' ca 2.4 Ga ago, but when the photosynthetic oxygen production began is debatable. However, geological and geochemical evidence from older sedimentary rocks indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before this oxygenation event. Fluid-inclusion oils in ca 2.45 Ga sandstones contain hydrocarbon biomarkers evidently sourced from similarly ancient kerogen, preserved without subsequent contamination, and derived from organisms producing and requiring molecular oxygen. Mo and Re abundances and sulphur isotope systematics of slightly older (2.5 Ga) kerogenous shales record a transient pulse of atmospheric oxygen. As early as ca 2.7 Ga, stromatolites and biomarkers from evaporative lake sediments deficient in exogenous reducing power strongly imply that oxygen-producing cyanobacteria had already evolved. Even at ca 3.2 Ga, thick and widespread kerogenous shales are consistent with aerobic photoautrophic marine plankton, and U-Pb data from ca 3.8 Ga metasediments suggest that this metabolism could have arisen by the start of the geological record. Hence, the hypothesis that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before the atmosphere became permanently oxygenated seems well supported. PMID:18468984

  18. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Hot oxygen corona of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.H.

    1988-10-01

    Electron dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions in the Venus ionosphere, which may be an important source of suprathermal atomic oxygen, is presently considered as a factor in the Mars exosphere; due to the weaker surface gravitational attraction of Mars, a hot oxygen corona thus formed would be denser than that of Venus at altitudes greater than 2000 km despite Mars' lower ionospheric content. If such an extended oxygen corona does exist on Mars, its collisional interaction with Phobos would lead to the formation of an oxygen gas torus whose average number density is of the order of only 1-2/cu cm along the Phobos orbit. 51 references.

  20. When did oxygenic photosynthesis evolve?

    PubMed

    Buick, Roger

    2008-08-27

    The atmosphere has apparently been oxygenated since the 'Great Oxidation Event' ca 2.4 Ga ago, but when the photosynthetic oxygen production began is debatable. However, geological and geochemical evidence from older sedimentary rocks indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before this oxygenation event. Fluid-inclusion oils in ca 2.45 Ga sandstones contain hydrocarbon biomarkers evidently sourced from similarly ancient kerogen, preserved without subsequent contamination, and derived from organisms producing and requiring molecular oxygen. Mo and Re abundances and sulphur isotope systematics of slightly older (2.5 Ga) kerogenous shales record a transient pulse of atmospheric oxygen. As early as ca 2.7 Ga, stromatolites and biomarkers from evaporative lake sediments deficient in exogenous reducing power strongly imply that oxygen-producing cyanobacteria had already evolved. Even at ca 3.2 Ga, thick and widespread kerogenous shales are consistent with aerobic photoautrophic marine plankton, and U-Pb data from ca 3.8 Ga metasediments suggest that this metabolism could have arisen by the start of the geological record. Hence, the hypothesis that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before the atmosphere became permanently oxygenated seems well supported.

  1. Economical oxygen-delivery system.

    PubMed

    Olson, R M

    1976-04-01

    The conservation of aircraft oxygen supplies is becoming of considerable interest to the Air Force. Onboard oxygen-generating systems are being developed which could support an aircrew if oxygen produced by these systems were used conservatively. These experiments studied the conservation potential of a rebreather bag placed in a vented container near the regulator in an oxygen-delivery system. The bag's volume was close to that of the subject's physiologic dead space. When the subject exhaled, oxygen in the mouth, trachea, and mask dead space went to the rebreather bag, to be rebreathed with the next breath. The CO2-contaminated oxygen from the alveoli was vented to the cabin. The dead-space oxygen could be separated from contaminated oxygen because dead-space air is exhaled first with each breath. When the rebreather-bag volume matched the subject's physiologic dead space so that no CO2 accumulated, a 30% oxygen savings was realized. When the bag was large enough to realize a 50% savings, CO2 accumulation was only 2%.

  2. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: pulsing experiments for cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses for 0.566 ≤ k ≤ 2.3 in oxygenated and deoxygenated sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Doe W; Montague, Fred W; Hudak, Eric M; Mortimer, J Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The application of a train of cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses applied to a platinum electrode resulted in a positive creep of the anodic phase potential that increases with increasing charge injection but reaches a steady-state value before 1000 pulses have been delivered. The increase follows from the fact that charge going into irreversible reactions occurring during the anodic phase must equal the charge going into irreversible reactions during the cathodic phase for charge-balanced pulses. In an oxygenated electrolyte the drift of the measured positive potential moved into the platinum oxidation region of the i(V e) profile when the charge injection level exceeds k = 1.75. Platinum dissolution may occur in this region and k = 1.75 defines a boundary between damaging and non-damaging levels on the Shannon Plot. In a very low oxygen environment, the positive potential remained below the platinum oxidation region for the highest charge injection values studied, k = 2.3. The results support the hypothesis that platinum dissolution is the defining factor for the Shannon limit, k = 1.75. Numerous instrumentation issues were encountered in the course of making measurements. The solutions to these issues are provided. PMID:27464506

  3. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: pulsing experiments for cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses for 0.566 ≤ k ≥ 2.3 in oxygenated and deoxygenated sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumsa, Doe W.; Montague, Fred W.; Hudak, Eric M.; Mortimer, J. Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The application of a train of cathodic-first/charge-balanced/biphasic pulses applied to a platinum electrode resulted in a positive creep of the anodic phase potential that increases with increasing charge injection but reaches a steady-state value before 1000 pulses have been delivered. The increase follows from the fact that charge going into irreversible reactions occurring during the anodic phase must equal the charge going into irreversible reactions during the cathodic phase for charge-balanced pulses. In an oxygenated electrolyte the drift of the measured positive potential moved into the platinum oxidation region of the i(V e) profile when the charge injection level exceeds k = 1.75. Platinum dissolution may occur in this region and k = 1.75 defines a boundary between damaging and non-damaging levels on the Shannon Plot. In a very low oxygen environment, the positive potential remained below the platinum oxidation region for the highest charge injection values studied, k = 2.3. The results support the hypothesis that platinum dissolution is the defining factor for the Shannon limit, k = 1.75. Numerous instrumentation issues were encountered in the course of making measurements. The solutions to these issues are provided.

  4. Reproducibility of liquid oxygen impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Results for 12,000 impacts on a wide range of materials were studied to determine the reproducibility of the liquid oxygen impact test method. Standard deviations representing the overall variability of results were in close agreement with the expected values for a binomial process. This indicates that the major source of variability is due to the go - no go nature of the test method and that variations due to sampling and testing operations were not significant.

  5. Guide for Oxygen Compatibility Assessments on Oxygen Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation evaluating the compatibility of oxygen components and systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Application; 2) Gaining Wide Subscription; 3) Approach; 4) Establish Worst-Case Operating Conditions; 5) Assess Materials Flammability; 6) Evaluate Ignition Mechanisms; 7) Evaluate Kindling Chain; 8) Determine Reaction Affect; 9) Document Results; 10) Example of Documentation; and 11) Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Team.

  6. Energetic Oxygen in the Terestrial Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, B.; Sospedra-Alfonso, R.; Yau, A.

    2012-04-01

    There are numerous processes in the terrestrial atmosphere which involve the production of translationally energetic atoms with energies considerably above thermal energies. These "hot" atoms can play an important role in enhanced reaction rates, nonthermal emissions, and the enhanced nonthermal escape of atmospheric species. Such nonthermal escape mechanisms play an important role in the evolution of the atmosphere of Earth [1]. The dissociative recombination of O2+, that is O2+ + e-→ O* + O*, produces energetic oxygen atoms in the terrestrial exosphere in a range of altitudes where the production of hot atoms is greatest and a substantial coronae of hot oxygen is expected [2, 3]. These energetic oxygen atoms can transfer their energy to H and D and create additional energetic populations of H and D. The existence of extended corona of energetic H and O in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets is now well established both from theoretical models and observations. There is a continued interest in a better understanding of the physics of the processes that produce and maintain these steady state nonequilibrium distributions. In the rarefied atmosphere of the high altitude portions of these planetary atmospheres, collisional relaxation of nonthermal distributions is slow. The extent of the departure from equilibrium distributions depends on the strengths of the processes that perturb the distributions from equilibrium and the collisional relaxation processes that restore the distributions to Maxwellians. If there is a significant population of energetic atoms with speeds in excess of the escape speed of the planet, these extended coronae can have an important effect on the rate of loss of atmospheric species, both directly and indirectly. This paper examines the altitude dependence of the nonequilibrium energetic oxygen distribution function with a Boltzmann equation driven by the energetic oxygen source term owing to dissociative recombination. The solution

  7. Extraction of Oxygen from the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanical process was designed for direct extraction of molecular oxygen from the martian atmosphere based on liquefaction of the majority component, CO2, followed by separation of the lower-boiling components. The atmospheric gases are compressed from about 0.007 bar to 13 bar and then cooled to liquefy most of the CO2. The uncondensed gases are further compressed to 30 bar or more, and then cooled again to recover water as ice and to remove much of the remaining CO2. The final gaseous products consisting mostly of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon monoxide are liquefied and purified by cryogenic distillation. The liquefied CO2 is expanded back to the low-pressure atmosphere with the addition of heat to recover a majority of the compression energy and to produce the needed mechanical work. Energy for the process is needed primarily as heat to drive the CO2-based expansion power system. When properly configured, the extraction process can be a net producer of electricity. The conceptual design, termed 'MARRS' for Mars Atmosphere Resource Recovery System, was based on the NASA/JSC Mars Reference Mission (MRM) requirement for oxygen. This mission requires both liquid oxygen for propellant, and gaseous oxygen as a component of air for the mission crew. With single redundancy both for propellant and crew air, the oxygen requirement for the MRM is estimated at 5.8 kg/hr. The process thermal power needed is about 120 kW, which can be provided at 300-500 C. A lower-cost nuclear reactor made largely of stainless steel could serve as the heat source. The chief development needed for MARRS is an efficient atmospheric compression technology, all other steps being derived from conventional chemical engineering separations. The conceptual design describes an exceptionally low-mass compression system that can be made from ultra-lightweight and deployable structures. This system adapts to the rapidly changing martian environment to supply the atmospheric resource to MARRS at

  8. Evolving Oxygen Landscape of the Early Atmosphere and Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, T. W.; Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable advances in our understanding of oxygen on the early Earth, and a new framework, the topic of this presentation, is now in place to address the controls on spatiotemporal distributions of oxygen and their potential relationships to deep-Earth processes. Recent challenges to the Archean biomarker record have put an added burden on inorganic geochemistry to fingerprint and quantify the early production, accumulation, and variation of biospheric oxygen. Fortunately, a wide variety of techniques now point convincingly to photosynthetic oxygen production and dynamic accumulation well before the canonical Great Oxidation Event (GOE). Recent modeling of sulfur recycling over this interval allows for transient oxygen accumulation in the atmosphere without the disappearance of non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulfur isotope anomalies from the stratigraphic record and further allows for persistent accumulation in the atmosphere well before the permanent disappearance of NMD signals. This recent work suggests that the initial rise of oxygen may have occurred in fits and starts rather than a single step, and that once permanently present in the atmosphere, oxygen likely rose to high levels and then plummeted, in phase with the Paleoproterozoic Lomagundi positive carbon isotope excursion. More than a billion years of oxygen-free conditions in the deep ocean followed and set a challenging course for life, including limited abundances and diversity of eukaryotic organisms. Despite this widespread anoxia, sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were likely limited to productive ocean margins. Nevertheless, euxinia was sufficiently widespread to impact redox-dependent nutrient relationships, particularly the availability of bioessential trace metals critical in the nitrogen cycle, which spawned feedbacks that likely maintained oxygen at very low levels in the ocean and atmosphere and delayed the arrival of animals. Then, in the mid, pre-glacial Neoproterozoic

  9. Sources of dissolved oxygen in monitoring and pumping wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, Matthijs; Wols, Bas; Maas, Kees; Stuyfzand, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Groundwater monitoring and pumping wells set in anoxic aquifers require attention to keep the groundwater free of dissolved oxygen (DO). In properly constructed monitoring or pumping wells, two processes can however still introduce oxygen to anoxic groundwater: (1) permeation of oxygen through polymer materials such as silicone, PVC, HDPE or Teflon, and (2) thermally driven convection, which can occur in all types of piezometers or wells, regardless of construction material, when the water table or pressure head is close (<10 m) to the land surface. Here, field measurements (temperature and DO well loggings) from a monitoring well in Bilthoven, the Netherlands, are combined with analytical and numerical modelling to investigate the role of both processes on oxygenation of anoxic groundwater in wells. The results of numerical and analytical modeling show that both permeation and convection can introduce oxygen into anoxic wells to near saturation concentrations. In the field data gathered, convection is primarily responsible for oxygen intrusion up to a depth of around 12 m. Oxygen intrusion through convection and permeation in monitoring and pumping wells may influence groundwater sampling and analyses, and may contribute to well clogging, depending on site conditions. The combination of field and modelling provides new insights into these processes, which can be used for both groundwater sampling and pumping well design.

  10. Nitrogen and Oxygen Photochemistry following SL9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Allen, Mark; Gladstone, G. Randall

    1995-01-01

    The collision of Shoemaker Levy 9 (SL9) with Jupiter caused many new molecular species to be deposited in the Jovian stratosphere. We use a photochemical model to follow the evolution of the impact derived species. Our results regarding the nitrogen and oxygen compounds are presented here. NH3 photolysis initiates the nitrogen photochemistry. Much of the nitrogen ends up in N2, nitrogen-sulfur compounds, and HCN, but NH3 and nitriles such as C2H3CN may also exist in observable quantities for a year or so after the impacts. Oxygen species survive for a long time in the Jovian stratosphere. The only major oxygen containing compounds that exhibit dramatic changes in the lower stratosphere in the first year following the impacts are SO, SO2, and OCS - H2O, CO2, and CO are comparatively stable. We discuss the important photochemical processes operating on the nitrogen and oxygen species in the Jovian stratosphere, make prediction concerning the temporal variation of the major species, and identify molecules that might act as good tracers for atmospheric dynamics.

  11. Freezing of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochkovitch, R.

    1983-06-01

    Assuming a C-12 and O-16 mixture phase diagram exhibiting an oxygen-poor eutectic, the cooling and solidification of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf is considered. Freezing is in the present case an efficient chemical differentiation mechanism, and an almost pure oxygen snow which is denser than the liquid crystallizes and settles at the center as the carbon is mixed throughout the rest of the star by convective motions due to an unstable concentration gradient. Although solid carbon begins to form when the fluid at the oxygen core boundary has reached the eutectic composition, the high gravity may ensure further differentiation because the carbon snow, which is less dense than the liquid, will rise to lower density regions and melt. White dwarf evolution is compared to the coexistence of carbon and oxygen in an alloy. Cooling time is increased by the combined effects of lower luminosity and binding energy release radiation due to the differentiation process.

  12. S-nitrosylation: integrator of cardiovascular performance and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Saptarsi M; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of oxygen to tissues is the primary function of the cardiovascular system. NO, a gasotransmitter that signals predominantly through protein S-nitrosylation to form S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in target proteins, operates coordinately with oxygen in mammalian cellular systems. From this perspective, SNO-based signaling may have evolved as a major transducer of the cellular oxygen-sensing machinery that underlies global cardiovascular function. Here we review mechanisms that regulate S-nitrosylation in the context of its essential role in "systems-level" control of oxygen sensing, delivery, and utilization in the cardiovascular system, and we highlight examples of aberrant S-nitrosylation that may lead to altered oxygen homeostasis in cardiovascular diseases. Thus, through a bird's-eye view of S-nitrosylation in the cardiovascular system, we provide a conceptual framework that may be broadly applicable to the functioning of other cellular systems and physiological processes and that illuminates new therapeutic promise in cardiovascular medicine.

  13. Cycle time control of an onboard oxygen generation system.

    PubMed

    Beaman, J J; Wang, S Y; Masada, G Y

    1987-12-01

    The outlet oxygen concentration of an onboard oxygen generation system (OBOGS) is controlled in this study by varying the cycle time of a pressure swing adsorption process. The control of the oxygen concentration is highly desirable since both high and low concentrations of oxygen can cause physiological problems. This cycle time control method can be easily implemented using a DC motor and a simple electronic controller. The physiological requirements recommended for high-performance tactical aircraft can be met by this method with either an open-loop or closed-loop configuration. The open-loop configuration requires the measurement of crew breathing flowrate and cabin pressure. The closed-loop configuration requires an additional measurement of oxygen concentration, but it has the advantage of being more adaptive to system variability during setup and operation. The method in either configuration requires very little adjustment and setup time in order to meet the specifications.

  14. Oxygen Compatibility of Brass-Filled PTFE Compared to Commonly Used Fluorinated Polymers for Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herald, Stephen D.; Frisby, Paul M.; Davis, Samuel Eddie

    2009-01-01

    Safe and reliable seal materials for high-pressure oxygen systems sometimes appear to be extinct species when sought out by oxygen systems designers. Materials that seal well are easy to find, but these materials are typically incompatible with oxygen, especially in cryogenic liquid form. This incompatibility can result in seals that leak, or much worse, seals that easily ignite and burn during use. Materials that are compatible with oxygen are easy to find, such as the long list of compatible metals, but these metallic materials are limiting as seal materials. A material that seals well and is oxygen compatible has been the big game in the designer's safari. Scientists at the Materials Combustion Research Facility (MCRF), part of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are constantly searching for better materials and processes to improve the safety of oxygen systems. One focus of this effort is improving the characteristics of polymers used in the presence of an oxygen enriched environment. Very few systems can be built which contain no polymeric materials; therefore, materials which have good impact resistance, low heat of combustion, high auto-ignition temperature and that maintain good mechanical properties are essential. The scientists and engineers at the Materials Combustion Research Facility, in cooperation with seal suppliers, are currently testing a new formulation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Brass filler. This Brass-filled PTFE is showing great promise as a seal and seat material for high pressure oxygen systems. Early research has demonstrated very encouraging results, which could rank this material as one of the best fluorinated polymers ever tested. This paper will compare the data obtained for Brass-filled PTFE with other fluorinated polymers, such as TFE-Teflon (PTFE) , Kel-F 81, Viton A, Viton A-500, Fluorel , and Algoflon . A similar metal filled fluorinated polymer, Salox-M , was tested in comparison to Brass-filled PTFE to

  15. Manifestation of oxygen desorption in photoluminescence spectra of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopyan, I. Kh.; Labzovskaya, M. E.; Lisachenko, A. A.; Novikov, B. V.; Serov, A. Yu.; Titov, V. V.; Filosofov, N. G.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of oxygen desorption on the photoluminescence of zinc oxide has been investigated. Photodesorption and thermal desorption of oxygen have been controlled using mass spectrometry. It has been found that the removal of oxygen from the ZnO surface leads to a manifold increase in the exciton photoluminescence intensity. The process has a reversible character. The mechanism of increase in the exciton luminescence intensity of ZnO during the oxygen desorption has been discussed.

  16. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR FUEL OXYGENATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE (and potentially any other oxygenate) may be present at any petroleum UST site, whether the release is new or old, virtually anywhere in the United States. Consequently, it is prudent to analyze samples for the entire suite of oxygenates as identified in this protocol (i.e....

  17. Mars oxygen production system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Charles E.; Pillow, Linda K.; Perkinson, Robert C.; Brownlie, R. P.; Chwalowski, P.; Carmona, M. F.; Coopersmith, J. P.; Goff, J. C.; Harvey, L. L.; Kovacs, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and construction phase is summarized of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere was assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer compatible data acquisition and control instrumentation is ongoing.

  18. Mars oxygen production system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the design and construction of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere has been assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer data acquisition and control instrumentation is continuing.

  19. Work, heat, and oxygen cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, P.

    1973-01-01

    Human energy is discussed in terms of the whole man. The physical work a man does, the heat he produces, and the quantity of oxygen he takes from the air to combine with food, the fuel source of his energy, are described. The daily energy exchange, work and heat dissipation, oxygen costs of specific activities, anaerobic work, and working in space suits are summarized.

  20. Oxygen in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen within the heliosphere, whether neutral or ionized, comes from both the external source in the local interstellar medium (LISM) and internal sources. If transient cometary sources are neglected, Jupiter is the strongest of the internal sources by virtue of its corotation and charge exchange driven neutral wind. O(+) pickup ions are born where the penetrating neutrals lose an electron as a result of photoionization, charge exchange with solar wind protons, or solar wind electron impact ionization. The region of the heliosphere from which these pickup ions arise depends on the phase of the solar cycle as well as on the velocities of the neutrals. The present model of neutral O populations and their ionization suggests that Jovian pickup ions can dominate the inner heliospheric O(+) population if the LISM neutrals are strongly filtered at the heliopause, or are excluded by strong ionizing fluxes from the Sun. Other heliospheric species such as sulfur and nitrogen may have similar origins. These planetary sources need to be taken into account in the interpretation of interplanetary gas and ion composition observations.