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Sample records for monitor intervention effectiveness

  1. Effects of a Self-Monitoring Intervention on Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Susan C.; Jones, Kevin M.; Rafoth, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a self-monitoring intervention on teachers' direct behavior ratings of 3 students with traumatic brain injury. The authors used a multiple-baseline-across-participants design to evaluate the effect of the strategy on each child's classwork and classroom behavior. The self-monitoring strategy…

  2. Effects of a Self-Monitoring Intervention on Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Susan C.; Jones, Kevin M.; Rafoth, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a self-monitoring intervention on teachers' direct behavior ratings of 3 students with traumatic brain injury. The authors used a multiple-baseline-across-participants design to evaluate the effect of the strategy on each child's classwork and classroom behavior. The self-monitoring strategy…

  3. Cost Effectiveness of Potential ART Adherence Monitoring Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Sow, Papa Salif; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Ford, Deborah; Mugurungi, Owen; Apollo, Tsitsi; Murungu, Joseph; Bangsberg, David R.; Revill, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions based around objective measurement of adherence to antiretroviral drugs for HIV have potential to improve adherence and to enable differentiation of care such that clinical visits are reduced in those with high adherence. It would be useful to understand the approximate upper limit of cost that could be considered for such interventions of a given effectiveness in order to be cost effective. Such information can guide whether to implement an intervention in the light of a trial showing a certain effectiveness and cost. Methods An individual-based model, calibrated to Zimbabwe, which incorporates effects of adherence and resistance to antiretroviral therapy, was used to model the potential impact of adherence monitoring-based interventions on viral suppression, death rates, disability adjusted life years and costs. Potential component effects of the intervention were: enhanced average adherence when on ART, reduced risk of ART discontinuation, and reduced risk of resistance acquisition. We considered a situation in which viral load monitoring is not available and one in which it is. In the former case, it was assumed that care would be differentiated based on the adherence level, with fewer clinic visits in those demonstrated to have high adherence. In the latter case, care was assumed to be primarily differentiated according to viral load level. The maximum intervention cost required to be cost effective was calculated based on a cost effectiveness threshold of $500 per DALY averted. Findings In the absence of viral load monitoring, an adherence monitoring-based intervention which results in a durable 6% increase in the proportion of ART experienced people with viral load < 1000 cps/mL was cost effective if it cost up to $50 per person-year on ART, mainly driven by the cost savings of differentiation of care. In the presence of viral load monitoring availability, an intervention with a similar effect on viral load suppression was cost-effective

  4. Environmental monitoring in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sol, S.; Garcia, R.; Sánchez, D.; Ramirez, G.; Chavarin, E. U.; Rivera, T.

    2017-01-01

    The procedures in Interventional Radiology involve long times of exposure and high number of radiographic images that bring higher radiation doses to patients, staff and environmental than those received in conventional Radiology. Currently for monitoring the dose, the thermoluminescent dosimetry use is recommended. The aim of this work was to carry out the monitoring of the environmental scattered radiation inside the IR room using two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD-100 (reference dosimeter), CaSO4:Dy (synthesized in our laboratory). The results indicate that the TLD-100 is not effective for the environmental monitoring of low-energy Rx rooms. The CaSO4:Dy presented good behaviour over the 6 months of study. The results will be specific to each room so it is recommended such studies as part of the program of quality control of each Rx room.

  5. A pilot lifestyle intervention study: effects of an intervention using an activity monitor and Twitter on physical activity and body composition.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Masato; Nakashima, Nana; Ikegami, Yumi; Kawakami, Ryoko; Kurobe, Kazumichi; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2017-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to examine the effects of a lifestyle intervention comprising an activity monitor and the concurrent use of Twitter, on physical activity (PA) and body composition. Seventeen healthy volunteers (36±3 years) were randomly assigned to normal (N, N.=8) or Twitter (T, N.=9) intervention groups for six weeks. Participants in both groups wore an activity monitor but those in the T group also tweeted daily about their PA. An observer read the tweets from each participant and provided feedback. Body composition was determined using bioelectrical impedance analysis before and after the intervention. Significantly more daily steps and PA at an intensity of ≥3 metabolic equivalents (METs) were recorded by the T than the N during six weeks. The number of steps and PA did not significantly change over time in the N, but significantly increased in the T from weeks one to six (8170±1130 to 12,934±1400 steps/day and 2.6±0.5 to 5.0±0.8 METs·h/day). In addition, significantly more body fat was lost in the T, than in the N (-1.1±0.2 vs. -0.1±0.3 kg), and the changes in PA significantly correlated with the changes in body fat (r=-0.713). Lifestyle intervention can increase daily PA and reduce body fat more effectively when using an activity monitor and Twitter than an activity monitor alone.

  6. Monitoring Malaria Vector Control Interventions: Effectiveness of Five Different Adult Mosquito Sampling Methods

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, Shirley A.; Kitron, Uriel; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M.; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; King, Charles H.; Mutuku, Francis M.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods—light traps associated with a person sleeping under a net, pyrethrum spray catches, Prokopack aspirator, clay pots, and urine-baited traps—in four villages representing three ecological settings along the south coast of Kenya. Of the five methods, light traps were the most efficient for collecting female Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Anopheles funestus (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes, whereas the Prokopack aspirator was most efficient in collecting Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) and other culicines. With the low vector densities here, and across much of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever malaria interventions, long-lasting insecticidal nets, and/or indoor residual spraying are in place, the use of a single mosquito collection method will not be sufficient to achieve a representative sample of mosquito population structure. Light traps will remain a relevant tool for host-seeking mosquitoes, especially in the absence of human landing catches. For a fair representation of the indoor mosquito population, light traps will have to be supplemented with aspirator use, which has potential for routine monitoring of indoor resting mosquitoes, and can substitute the more labor-intensive and intrusive pyrethrum spray catches. There are still no sufficiently efficient mosquito collection methods for sampling outdoor mosquitoes, particularly those that are bloodfed. PMID:24180120

  7. Monitoring malaria vector control interventions: effectiveness of five different adult mosquito sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Shirley A; Kitron, Uriel; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; King, Charles H; Mutuku, Francis M

    2013-09-01

    Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods--light traps associated with a person sleeping under a net, pyrethrum spray catches, Prokopack aspirator, clay pots, and urine-baited traps--in four villages representing three ecological settings along the south coast of Kenya. Of the five methods, light traps were the most efficient for collecting female Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Anopheles funestus (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes, whereas the Prokopack aspirator was most efficient in collecting Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) and other culicines. With the low vector densities here, and across much of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever malaria interventions, long-lasting insecticidal nets, and/or indoor residual spraying are in place, the use of a single mosquito collection method will not be sufficient to achieve a representative sample of mosquito population structure. Light traps will remain a relevant tool for host-seeking mosquitoes, especially in the absence of human landing catches. For a fair representation of the indoor mosquito population, light traps will have to be supplemented with aspirator use, which has potential for routine monitoring of indoor resting mosquitoes, and can substitute the more labor-intensive and intrusive pyrethrum spray catches. There are still no sufficiently efficient mosquito collection methods for sampling outdoor mosquitoes, particularly those that are bloodfed.

  8. A pilot crossover study: effects of an intervention using an activity monitor with computerized game functions on physical activity and body composition.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Masato; Kuriyama, Akinori; Ikegami, Yumi; Nakashima, Nana; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2014-12-02

    Wearing an activity monitor as a motivational tool and incorporating a behavior-based reward system or a computerized game element might have a synergistic effect on an increase in daily physical activity, thereby inducing body fat reduction. This pilot crossover study aimed to examine the effects of a short-term lifestyle intervention using an activity monitor with computerized game functions on physical activity and body composition. Twenty healthy volunteers (31 ± 3 years) participated in a 12-week crossover study. The participants were randomly assigned to either Group A (a 6-week game intervention followed by a 6-week normal intervention) or Group B (a 6-week normal intervention followed by a 6-week game intervention). The participants wore both a normal activity monitor (Lifecorder EX) and an activity monitor with computerized game functions (Yuuhokei) during the game intervention, whereas they only wore a normal activity monitor during the normal intervention. Before, during, and after the intervention, body composition was assessed. Significantly more daily steps were recorded for the game intervention than for the normal intervention (10,520 ± 562 versus 8,711 ± 523 steps/day, P < 0.01). The participants performed significantly more physical activity at an intensity of ≥ 3 metabolic equivalents (METs) in the game intervention than in the normal intervention (3.1 ± 0.2 versus 2.4 ± 0.2 METs · hour/day, P < 0.01). Although body mass and fat were significantly reduced in both periods (P < 0.01), the difference in body fat reduction was significantly greater in the game intervention than in the normal intervention (P < 0.05). A short-term intervention using an activity monitor with computerized game functions increases physical activity and reduces body fat more effectively than an intervention using a standard activity monitor.

  9. The Effect of Realtime Monitoring on Dose Exposure to Staff Within an Interventional Radiology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Frederic Katzen, Barry T.; Carelsen, Bart; Diehm, Nicolas; Benenati, James F.; Peña, Constantino S.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate a new device providing real-time monitoring on radiation exposure during fluoroscopy procedures intending to reduce radiation in an interventional radiology setting.Materials and MethodsIn one interventional suite, a new system providing a real-time radiation dose display and five individual wireless dosimeters were installed. The five dosimeters were worn by the attending, fellow, nurse, technician, and anesthesiologist for every procedure taking place in that suite. During the first 6-week interval the dose display was off (closed phase) and activated thereafter, for a 6-week learning phase (learning phase) and a 10-week open phase (open phase). During these phases, the staff dose and the individual dose for each procedure were recorded from the wireless dosimeter and correlated with the fluoroscopy time. Further subanalysis for dose exposure included diagnostic versus interventional as well as short (<10 min) versus long (>10 min) procedures.ResultsA total of 252 procedures were performed (n = 88 closed phase, n = 50 learning phase, n = 114 open phase). The overall mean staff dose per fluoroscopic minute was 42.79 versus 19.81 µSv/min (p < 0.05) comparing the closed and open phase. Thereby, anesthesiologists were the only individuals attaining a significant dose reduction during open phase 16.9 versus 8.86 µSv/min (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a significant reduction of total staff dose was observed for short 51 % and interventional procedures 45 % (p < 0.05, for both).ConclusionA real-time qualitative display of radiation exposure may reduce team radiation dose. The process may take a few weeks during the learning phase but appears sustained, thereafter.

  10. Effects of interventions promoting monitoring of medication use and brief messaging on medication adherence for people with Type 2 diabetes: a systematic review of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Farmer, A J; McSharry, J; Rowbotham, S; McGowan, L; Ricci-Cabello, I; French, D P

    2016-05-01

    To assess the impact of interventions promoting the monitoring of medication use and brief messaging to support medication adherence in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to investigate the extent of theory use to guide intervention development. We systematically searched for controlled trials, published from 1990 onwards in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane library, that evaluated interventions based on monitoring and brief messaging to support medication adherence in patients with Type 2 diabetes, to examine the effectiveness of such interventions. A total of 11 trials, comparing 15 interventions, were identified. Only a small minority presented a low risk of bias. Three interventions were based on delivering brief messages, six were based on monitoring medication adherence, and six used both strategies. Messaging interventions included the use of short message service text messages, web-based feedback, and messages delivered through monitoring devices. Monitoring interventions included remote self-reporting of medication and telephone calls with healthcare staff. Improvements in medication adherence were observed in six interventions, although effect sizes were generally moderate. Only two interventions improved both adherence and clinical outcomes. A meta-analysis of five trials (eight interventions) combining monitoring and messaging strategies showed that the pooled difference in medication adherence between intervention and control was moderate and not statistically significant [standardized mean difference = 0.22 (95% CI -0.05; 0.49)]. Only four trials were based on explicit theoretical frameworks. Although interventions based on messaging and monitoring have the potential to improve medication adherence in patients with Type 2 diabetes, evidence of their efficacy is limited and additional high-quality, theory-based research is needed. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  11. Introducing a new monitoring manual for home fortification and strengthening capacity to monitor nutrition interventions

    PubMed Central

    Jefferds, Maria Elena D.; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Lack of monitoring capacity is a key barrier for nutrition interventions and limits programme management, decision making and programme effectiveness in many low-income and middle-income countries. A 2011 global assessment reported lack of monitoring capacity was the top barrier for home fortification interventions, such as micronutrient powders or lipid-based nutrient supplements. A Manual for Developing and Implementing Monitoring Systems for Home Fortification Interventions was recently disseminated. It is comprehensive and describes monitoring concepts and frameworks and includes monitoring tools and worksheets. The monitoring manual describes the steps of developing and implementing a monitoring system for home fortification interventions, including identifying and engaging stakeholders; developing a programme description including logic model and logical framework; refining the purpose of the monitoring system, identifying users and their monitoring needs; describing the design of the monitoring system; developing indicators; describing the core components of a comprehensive monitoring plan; and considering factors related to stage of programme development, sustainability and scale up. A fictional home fortification example is used throughout the monitoring manual to illustrate these steps. The monitoring manual is a useful tool to support the development and implementation of home fortification intervention monitoring systems. In the context of systematic capacity gaps to design, implement and monitor nutrition interventions in many low-income and middle-income countries, the dissemination of new tools, such as monitoring manuals may have limited impact without additional attention to strengthening other individual, organisational and systems levels capacities. PMID:24784541

  12. Introducing a new monitoring manual for home fortification and strengthening capacity to monitor nutrition interventions.

    PubMed

    Jefferds, Maria Elena D; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Lack of monitoring capacity is a key barrier for nutrition interventions and limits programme management, decision making and programme effectiveness in many low-income and middle-income countries. A 2011 global assessment reported lack of monitoring capacity was the top barrier for home fortification interventions, such as micronutrient powders or lipid-based nutrient supplements. A Manual for Developing and Implementing Monitoring Systems for Home Fortification Interventions was recently disseminated. It is comprehensive and describes monitoring concepts and frameworks and includes monitoring tools and worksheets. The monitoring manual describes the steps of developing and implementing a monitoring system for home fortification interventions, including identifying and engaging stakeholders; developing a programme description including logic model and logical framework; refining the purpose of the monitoring system, identifying users and their monitoring needs; describing the design of the monitoring system; developing indicators; describing the core components of a comprehensive monitoring plan; and considering factors related to stage of programme development, sustainability and scale up. A fictional home fortification example is used throughout the monitoring manual to illustrate these steps. The monitoring manual is a useful tool to support the development and implementation of home fortification intervention monitoring systems. In the context of systematic capacity gaps to design, implement and monitor nutrition interventions in many low-income and middle-income countries, the dissemination of new tools, such as monitoring manuals may have limited impact without additional attention to strengthening other individual, organisational and systems levels capacities.

  13. The Effect of Prospective Monitoring and Early Physiotherapy Intervention on Arm Morbidity Following Surgery for Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chiara; De Vera, Mary

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Significant arm morbidity is reported following surgery for breast cancer, yet physiotherapy is not commonly part of usual care. This study compared the effect on arm morbidity after surgery for breast cancer of a clinical care pathway including preoperative education, prospective monitoring, and early physiotherapy (experimental group) to that of preoperative education alone (comparison group). Methods: A prospective quasi-experimental pretest–posttest, non-equivalent group design compared two clinical sites; Site A (n=41) received the experimental intervention, and Site B (n=31) received the comparison intervention. At baseline (preoperative) and 7 months postoperative, shoulder range of motion (ROM), upper-extremity (UE) strength, UE circumference, pain, UE function, and quality of life were assessed. Results: The experimental group maintained shoulder flexion ROM at 7 months, whereas the comparison group saw a decrease (mean 1° [SD 9°] vs. −6° [SD 15°], p=0.03). A lower incidence of arm morbidity and better quality of life were observed in the experimental group, but these findings were not statistically significant. Baseline characteristics and surgical approaches differed between the two sites, which may have had an impact on the findings. Conclusion: Initial results are promising and support the feasibility of integrating a surveillance approach into follow-up care. This pilot study provides the foundation for a larger, more definitive trial. PMID:24403683

  14. Routine real-time cost-effectiveness monitoring of a web-based depression intervention: a risk-sharing proposal.

    PubMed

    Naveršnik, Klemen; Mrhar, Aleš

    2014-02-27

    A new health care technology must be cost-effective in order to be adopted. If evidence regarding cost-effectiveness is uncertain, then the decision maker faces two choices: (1) adopt the technology and run the risk that it is less effective in actual practice, or (2) reject the technology and risk that potential health is forgone. A new depression eHealth service was found to be cost-effective in a previously published study. The results, however, were unreliable because it was based on a pilot clinical trial. A conservative decision maker would normally require stronger evidence for the intervention to be implemented. Our objective was to evaluate how to facilitate service implementation by shifting the burden of risk due to uncertainty to the service provider and ensure that the intervention remains cost-effective during routine use. We propose a risk-sharing scheme, where the service cost depends on the actual effectiveness of the service in real-life setting. Routine efficacy data can be used as the input to the cost-effectiveness model, which employs a mapping function to translate a depression specific score into quality-adjusted life-years. The latter is the denominator in the cost-effectiveness ratio calculation, required by the health care decision maker. The output of the model is a "value graph", showing intervention value as a function of its observed (future) efficacy, using the €30,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) threshold. We found that the eHealth service should improve the patient's outcome by at least 11.9 points on the Beck Depression Inventory scale in order for the cost-effectiveness ratio to remain below the €30,000/QALY threshold. The value of a single point improvement was found to be between €200 and €700, depending on depression severity at treatment start. Value of the eHealth service, based on the current efficacy estimates, is €1900, which is significantly above its estimated cost (€200). The eHealth depression

  15. Monitoring the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic and assessing effectiveness of interventions in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

    PubMed Central

    Chau, P; Yip, P

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the infection curve of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) using the back projection method and to assess the effectiveness of interventions. Design: Statistical method. Data: The daily reported number of SARS and interventions taken by Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) up to 24 June 2003 are used. Method: To use a back projection technique to construct the infection curve of SARS in Hong Kong. The estimated epidemic curve is studied to identify the major events and to assess the effectiveness of interventions over the course of the epidemic. Results: The SARS infection curve in Hong Kong is constructed for the period 1 March 2003 to 24 June 2003. Some interventions seem to be effective while others apparently have little or no effect. The infections among the medical and health workers are high. Conclusions: Quarantine of the close contacts of confirmed and suspected SARS cases seems to be the most effective intervention against spread of SARS in the community. Thorough disinfection of the infected area against environmental hazards is helpful. Infections within hospitals can be reduced by better isolation measures and protective equipments. PMID:14573569

  16. Wildlife feeding in parks: methods for monitoring the effectiveness of educational interventions and wildlife food attraction behaviors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Dvorak, Robert G.; Manning, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Opportunities to view and interact with wildlife are often an important part of high quality recreational experiences. Such interactions frequently include wildlife feeding, resulting in food-conditioned behaviors that may cause harm to both wildlife and visitors. This study developed and applied efficient protocols for simultaneously evaluating wildlife feeding-related behaviors of visitors and related foraging behaviors of chipmunks along a trail in Zion National Park. Unobtrusive observation protocols permitted an evaluation of educational messages delivered, and documentation of wildlife success in obtaining human food and the strength of their food attraction behavior. Significant improvements were documented for some targeted visitor behaviors and human food available to chipmunks, with minor differences between treatments. Replication of these protocols as part of a long-term monitoring program can help protected area managers evaluate and improve the efficacy of their interventions and monitor the strength of food attraction behavior in wildlife.

  17. The effects of self-monitoring on the procedural integrity of a behavioral intervention for young children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Plavnick, Joshua B; Ferreri, Summer J; Maupin, Angela N

    2010-01-01

    The effects of self-monitoring on the procedural integrity of token economy implementation by 3 staff in a special education classroom were evaluated. The subsequent changes in academic readiness behaviors of 2 students with low-incidence disabilities were measured. Multiple baselines across staff and students showed that procedural integrity increased when staff used monitoring checklists, and students' academic readiness behavior also increased. Results are discussed with respect to the use of self-monitoring and the importance of procedural integrity in public school settings.

  18. The Effects of Self-Monitoring on the Procedural Integrity of a Behavioral Intervention for Young Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plavnick, Joshua B.; Ferreri, Summer J.; Maupin, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of self-monitoring on procedural integrity of token economy implementation by 3 staff in a special education classroom were evaluated. The subsequent changes in academic readiness behaviors of 2 students with low-incidence disabilities were measured. Multiple baselines across staff and students showed that procedural integrity…

  19. The Patient Remote Intervention and Symptom Management System (PRISMS) - a Telehealth- mediated intervention enabling real-time monitoring of chemotherapy side-effects in patients with haematological malignancies: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Breen, Sibilah; Ritchie, David; Schofield, Penelope; Hsueh, Ya-Seng; Gough, Karla; Santamaria, Nick; Kamateros, Rose; Maguire, Roma; Kearney, Nora; Aranda, Sanchia

    2015-10-19

    Outpatient chemotherapy is a core treatment for haematological malignancies; however, its toxicities frequently lead to distressing/potentially life-threatening side-effects (neutropenia/infection, nausea/vomiting, mucositis, constipation/diarrhoea, fatigue). Early detection/management of side-effects is vital to improve patient outcomes, decrease morbidity and limit lengthy/costly hospital admissions. The ability to capture patient-reported health data in real-time, is regarded as the 'gold-standard' to allow rapid clinical decision-making/intervention. This paper presents the protocol for a Phase 3 multi-site randomised controlled trial evaluating a novel nurse-led Telehealth intervention for remote monitoring/management of chemotherapy side-effects in Australian haematological cancer patients. Two hundred and twenty-two patients will be recruited from two hospitals. Eligibility criteria include: diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia/Hodgkin's/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; aged ≥ 18 years; receiving ≥ 2 cycles chemotherapy. Patients will be randomised 1:1 to either the control or intervention arm with stratification by diagnosis, chemotherapy toxicity (high versus low), receipt of previous chemotherapy and hospital. Patients allocated to the control arm will receive 'Usual Care' whilst those allocated to the intervention will receive the intervention in addition to 'Usual Care'. Intervention patients will be provided with a computer tablet and software prompting twice-daily completion of physical/emotional scales for up to four chemotherapy cycles. Should patient data exceed pre-determined limits an Email alert is delivered to the treatment team, prompting nurses to view patient data, and contact the patient to provide clinical intervention. In addition, six scheduled nursing interventions will be completed to educate/support patients in use of the software. Patient outcomes will be measured cyclically (midpoint and end of cycles) via pen

  20. Mathematical models and lymphatic filariasis control: monitoring and evaluating interventions.

    PubMed

    Michael, Edwin; Malecela-Lazaro, Mwele N; Maegga, Bertha T A; Fischer, Peter; Kazura, James W

    2006-11-01

    Monitoring and evaluation are crucially important to the scientific management of any mass parasite control programme. Monitoring enables the effectiveness of implemented actions to be assessed and necessary adaptations to be identified; it also determines when management objectives are achieved. Parasite transmission models can provide a scientific template for informing the optimal design of such monitoring programmes. Here, we illustrate the usefulness of using a model-based approach for monitoring and evaluating anti-parasite interventions and discuss issues that need addressing. We focus on the use of such an approach for the control and/or elimination of the vector-borne parasitic disease, lymphatic filariasis.

  1. Radiation monitoring in interventional cardiology: a requirement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T.; Uruchurtu, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing of procedures using fluoroscopy in interventional cardiology procedures may increase medical and patients to levels of radiation that manifest in unintended outcomes. Such outcomes may include skin injury and cancer. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and they receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Mexico does not have a formal policy for monitoring and recording the radiation dose delivered in hemodynamic establishments. Deterministic risk management can be improved by monitoring the radiation delivered from X-ray devices. The objective of this paper is to provide cardiologist, techniques, nurses, and all medical staff an information on DR levels, about X-ray risks and a simple a reliable method to control cumulative dose.

  2. Social Studies Progress Monitoring and Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Sarah J.; Lembke, Erica S.; Curs, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technical adequacy of vocabulary-matching curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to identify and monitor the progress of 148 middle school students in social studies. In addition, the effectiveness of a reading comprehension intervention, Collaborative Strategic Reading (Klingner, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm, & Bryant, 2001),…

  3. Social Studies Progress Monitoring and Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Sarah J.; Lembke, Erica S.; Curs, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technical adequacy of vocabulary-matching curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to identify and monitor the progress of 148 middle school students in social studies. In addition, the effectiveness of a reading comprehension intervention, Collaborative Strategic Reading (Klingner, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm, & Bryant, 2001),…

  4. Program Monitoring Practices for Teachers of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Anne E.; Marvin, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Program monitoring is an important and necessary assessment practice within the field of early childhood deaf education. Effective program monitoring requires a focus on both the consistent implementation of intervention strategies (fidelity) and the assessment of children's ongoing progress in response to interventions (progress monitoring).…

  5. The Effects of a Self-Monitoring and Video Self-Modeling Intervention to Increase On-Task Behavior for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Rachel Calkins Oxnard

    2009-01-01

    Children are diagnosed with AD/HD more often than any other disorder and interventions are needed in schools to increase on-task behavior. Most studies examining on-task behavior are conducted in special education classrooms or clinical laboratories. Previous studies have not combined video self-modeling and self-monitoring as an intervention to…

  6. The Effects of a Self-Monitoring and Video Self-Modeling Intervention to Increase On-Task Behavior for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Rachel Calkins Oxnard

    2009-01-01

    Children are diagnosed with AD/HD more often than any other disorder and interventions are needed in schools to increase on-task behavior. Most studies examining on-task behavior are conducted in special education classrooms or clinical laboratories. Previous studies have not combined video self-modeling and self-monitoring as an intervention to…

  7. Using Parents and Teachers to Monitor Progress among Children with ASD: A Review of Intervention Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witmer, Sara E.; Nasamran, Amy; Parikh, Purvi J.; Schmitt, Heather A.; Clinton, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing knowledge of the effectiveness of various interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), it is never clear whether a particular intervention will be effective for a specific child with ASD. Careful monitoring of an individual child's progress is necessary to know whether an intervention is effective. In this…

  8. Using Parents and Teachers to Monitor Progress among Children with ASD: A Review of Intervention Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witmer, Sara E.; Nasamran, Amy; Parikh, Purvi J.; Schmitt, Heather A.; Clinton, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing knowledge of the effectiveness of various interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), it is never clear whether a particular intervention will be effective for a specific child with ASD. Careful monitoring of an individual child's progress is necessary to know whether an intervention is effective. In this…

  9. Sarcopenia: monitoring, molecular mechanisms, and physical intervention.

    PubMed

    Zembroń-Łacny, A; Dziubek, W; Rogowski, Ł; Skorupka, E; Dąbrowska, G

    2014-01-01

    According to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) sarcopenia includes both a loss of muscle strength and a decline in functional quality in addition to the loss of muscle protein mass. In order to develop strategies to prevent and treat sarcopenia, the risk factors and causes of sarcopenia must be identified. Age-related muscle loss is characterized by the contribution of multiple factors, and there is growing evidence for a prominent role of low-grade chronic inflammation in sarcopenia. The elderly who are less physically active are more likely to have lower skeletal muscle mass and strength and are at increased risk of developing sarcopenia. Resistance training added to aerobic exercise or high-intensity interval training promote numerous changes in skeletal muscle, many of which may help to prevent or reverse sarcopenia. In this review, we provided current information on definition and monitoring, molecular mechanisms, and physical intervention to counteract sarcopenia.

  10. The Effects of Self-Monitoring and Performance Feedback on the Treatment Integrity of Behavior Intervention Plan Implementation and Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouzakitis, Angela; Codding, Robin S.; Tryon, Georgiana

    2015-01-01

    Accurate implementation of individualized behavior intervention plans (BIPs) is a critical aspect of evidence-based practice. Research demonstrates that neither training nor consultation is sufficient to improve and maintain high rates of treatment integrity (TI). Therefore, evaluation of ongoing support strategies is needed. The purpose of this…

  11. The Effects of Self-Monitoring and Performance Feedback on the Treatment Integrity of Behavior Intervention Plan Implementation and Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouzakitis, Angela; Codding, Robin S.; Tryon, Georgiana

    2015-01-01

    Accurate implementation of individualized behavior intervention plans (BIPs) is a critical aspect of evidence-based practice. Research demonstrates that neither training nor consultation is sufficient to improve and maintain high rates of treatment integrity (TI). Therefore, evaluation of ongoing support strategies is needed. The purpose of this…

  12. Safety Intervention Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    ZIMMERMAN, R.O.

    2001-10-16

    Judging safety intervention effectiveness is often left up to the eye of the beholder. Safety and Health Professionals must increase skills and increase their body of knowledge, based on scientific evidence, that can be applied confidently in the workplace. Evidence must be collected and analyzed to separate the interventions of the month with those that stand the test of time. The book Guide to Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Work injuries DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-119, April 2001, serves as a primary reference. An example study related to biorhythms, popular in the late 1970s, is used to illustrate the separating of scientific evidence and pseudo-science hype. The cited biorhythm study focuses on the relationship of the accident dates and the three biorhythmic cycles (physical, emotional, and intelligence).

  13. But I Trust My Teen: Parents' Attitudes and Response to a Parental Monitoring Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Aaron; Ice, Christa; Cottrell, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Parental knowledge gained from monitoring activities protects against adolescent risk involvement. Parental monitoring approaches are varied and may be modified with successful interventions but not all parents or adolescents respond to monitoring programs the same way. 339 parent-adolescent dyads randomized to receive a parental monitoring intervention and 169 parent-adolescent dyads in the control group were followed for one year over four measurement periods. Parent attitudes about the usefulness of monitoring, the importance of trust and respecting their teens' privacy, and the appropriateness of adolescent risk-taking behavior and experimentation were examined as predictors of longitudinal change in parental monitoring and open communication. Similar effects were found in both the intervention and control group models regarding open communication. Parental attitudes impacted longitudinal patterns of teen-reported parent monitoring, and these patterns differed across experimental groups. In the intervention group, parents' beliefs about the importance of trust and privacy were associated with a steeper decline in monitoring across time. Finally, parents' attitudes about the normative nature of teen experimentation were associated with a quadratic parental monitoring time trend in the intervention but not the control group. These findings suggest that parental attitudes may impact how families respond to an adolescent risk intervention. PMID:22720144

  14. The Effectiveness of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J., Ed.

    This book reviews research on the effectiveness of early intervention for children with disabilities or who are at risk. Program factors for children at risk and with disabilities, the effects of early intervention on different types of disabilities, and the outcomes of early intervention are explored. Chapters include: "Second-Generation Research…

  15. The Effectiveness of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J., Ed.

    This book reviews research on the effectiveness of early intervention for children with disabilities or who are at risk. Program factors for children at risk and with disabilities, the effects of early intervention on different types of disabilities, and the outcomes of early intervention are explored. Chapters include: "Second-Generation Research…

  16. Cascading Effects Following Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Gerald R.; Forgatch, Marion S.; DeGarmo, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Four different sources for cascade effects were examined using 9-year process and outcome data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a preventive intervention using Parent Management Training – Oregon Model (PMTO™). The social interaction learning (SIL) model of child antisocial behavior serves as one basis for predicting change. A second source addresses the issue of comorbid relationships among clinical diagnoses. The third source, collateral changes, describes events in which changes in one family member correlate with changes in another. The fourth component is based on the long-term effects of reducing coercion and increasing positive interpersonal processes within the family. New findings from the 9-year follow-up show that mothers experienced benefits as measured by standard of living (i.e., income, occupation, education, and financial stress) and frequency of police arrests. It is assumed that PMTO reduces the level of coercion, which sets the stage for a massive increase in positive social interaction. In effect, PMTO alters the family environment and thereby opens doors to healthy new social environments. PMID:20883592

  17. [Interventional neuroradiology. Drug treatment, monitoring and function tests].

    PubMed

    Laurent, A; Gobin, Y P; Launay, F; Aymard, A; Casasco, A; Merland, J J

    1994-04-23

    Specialized monitoring as well as function tests and drug therapy play an ever growing role in neuroradiological procedures. The particular route of administration and the territories involved in neuroradiology require special precautions. Anaesthesia must enable the operators to monitor the central nervous system since the patients must remain totally immobilized for several hours. Catheterization is made safe by careful asepsia and antibiotic prophylaxis and by preventing embolic events, particularly in neuro-cervico-facial interventions where an anticoagulant protocol is important. Arterial spasms can be prevented or cured with calcium inhibitors. The safety of the procedure itself is guaranteed by various function tests including sensitivity to ischaemia using anaesthetic barbiturates, controlled clampings or the lidocaine test. Undesirable effects of both emboli (e.g. toxicity of cyanoacrylate glue) and embolization (e.g. subsequent venous thrombosis) can be prevented by adapted anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein, we describe the routine monitoring conditions, drugs prescribed and function tests performed at the Therapeutic Angiography Department of the Lariboisière Hospital, Paris.

  18. Self-Monitoring Interventions for At-Risk Middle School Students: The Importance of Considering Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briere, Donald E., III; Simonsen, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    Self-monitoring is a popular, efficient, and effective intervention that is associated with improved academic and social behavior for students across age and ability levels. To date, this is the first study to directly compare the outcomes of self-monitoring functionally relevant and non-relevant replacement behaviors. Specifically, we used an…

  19. Is Early Intervention Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1974-01-01

    Synthesizes the results of current follow-up studies on the efficacy of preschool programs, and lays down the basis for a major reorientation in the design of intervention programs and in the training of personnel. (CS)

  20. Monitoring device safety in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Michael E; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Resnic, Frederic S

    2006-01-01

    A variety of postmarketing surveillance strategies to monitor the safety of medical devices have been supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but there are few systems to automate surveillance. Our objective was to develop a system to perform real-time monitoring of safety data using a variety of process control techniques. The Web-based Data Extraction and Longitudinal Time Analysis (DELTA) system imports clinical data in real-time from an electronic database and generates alerts for potentially unsafe devices or procedures. The statistical techniques used are statistical process control (SPC), logistic regression (LR), and Bayesian updating statistics (BUS). We selected in-patient mortality following implantation of the Cypher drug-eluting coronary stent to evaluate our system. Data from the University of Michigan Consortium Bare-Metal Stent Study was used to calculate the event rate alerting boundaries. Data analysis was performed on local catheterization data from Brigham and Women's Hospital from July 1, 2003, shortly after the Cypher release, to December 31, 2004, including 2,270 cases with 27 observed deaths. The single-stratum SPC had alerts in months 4 and 10. The multistrata SPC had alerts in months 5, 10, and 18 in the moderate-risk stratum, and months 1, 4, 7, and 10 in the high-risk stratum. The only cumulative alerts were in the first month for the high-risk stratum of the multistrata SPC. The LR method showed no monthly or cumulative alerts. The BUS method showed an alert in the first month for the high-risk stratum. The system performed adequately within the Brigham and Women's Hospital Intranet environment based on the design goals. All three cumulative methods agreed that the overall observed event rates were not significantly higher for the new medical device than for a closely related medical device and were consistent with the observation that the initial concerns about this device dissipated as more data accumulated.

  1. Monitoring Intervention Coverage in the Context of Universal Health Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Ties; AbouZahr, Carla; Evans, David; Evans, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring universal health coverage (UHC) focuses on information on health intervention coverage and financial protection. This paper addresses monitoring intervention coverage, related to the full spectrum of UHC, including health promotion and disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation. A comprehensive core set of indicators most relevant to the country situation should be monitored on a regular basis as part of health progress and systems performance assessment for all countries. UHC monitoring should be embedded in a broad results framework for the country health system, but focus on indicators related to the coverage of interventions that most directly reflect the results of UHC investments and strategies in each country. A set of tracer coverage indicators can be selected, divided into two groups—promotion/prevention, and treatment/care—as illustrated in this paper. Disaggregation of the indicators by the main equity stratifiers is critical to monitor progress in all population groups. Targets need to be set in accordance with baselines, historical rate of progress, and measurement considerations. Critical measurement gaps also exist, especially for treatment indicators, covering issues such as mental health, injuries, chronic conditions, surgical interventions, rehabilitation, and palliation. Consequently, further research and proxy indicators need to be used in the interim. Ideally, indicators should include a quality of intervention dimension. For some interventions, use of a single indicator is feasible, such as management of hypertension; but in many areas additional indicators are needed to capture quality of service provision. The monitoring of UHC has significant implications for health information systems. Major data gaps will need to be filled. At a minimum, countries will need to administer regular household health surveys with biological and clinical data collection. Countries will also need to improve the production of

  2. Monitoring intervention coverage in the context of universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Ties; AbouZahr, Carla; Evans, David; Evans, Tim

    2014-09-01

    Monitoring universal health coverage (UHC) focuses on information on health intervention coverage and financial protection. This paper addresses monitoring intervention coverage, related to the full spectrum of UHC, including health promotion and disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation. A comprehensive core set of indicators most relevant to the country situation should be monitored on a regular basis as part of health progress and systems performance assessment for all countries. UHC monitoring should be embedded in a broad results framework for the country health system, but focus on indicators related to the coverage of interventions that most directly reflect the results of UHC investments and strategies in each country. A set of tracer coverage indicators can be selected, divided into two groups-promotion/prevention, and treatment/care-as illustrated in this paper. Disaggregation of the indicators by the main equity stratifiers is critical to monitor progress in all population groups. Targets need to be set in accordance with baselines, historical rate of progress, and measurement considerations. Critical measurement gaps also exist, especially for treatment indicators, covering issues such as mental health, injuries, chronic conditions, surgical interventions, rehabilitation, and palliation. Consequently, further research and proxy indicators need to be used in the interim. Ideally, indicators should include a quality of intervention dimension. For some interventions, use of a single indicator is feasible, such as management of hypertension; but in many areas additional indicators are needed to capture quality of service provision. The monitoring of UHC has significant implications for health information systems. Major data gaps will need to be filled. At a minimum, countries will need to administer regular household health surveys with biological and clinical data collection. Countries will also need to improve the production of

  3. Monitoring Device Safety in Interventional Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Resnic, Frederic S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: A variety of postmarketing surveillance strategies to monitor the safety of medical devices have been supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but there are few systems to automate surveillance. Our objective was to develop a system to perform real-time monitoring of safety data using a variety of process control techniques. Design: The Web-based Data Extraction and Longitudinal Time Analysis (DELTA) system imports clinical data in real-time from an electronic database and generates alerts for potentially unsafe devices or procedures. The statistical techniques used are statistical process control (SPC), logistic regression (LR), and Bayesian updating statistics (BUS). Measurements: We selected in-patient mortality following implantation of the Cypher drug-eluting coronary stent to evaluate our system. Data from the University of Michigan Consortium Bare-Metal Stent Study was used to calculate the event rate alerting boundaries. Data analysis was performed on local catheterization data from Brigham and Women's Hospital from July 1, 2003, shortly after the Cypher release, to December 31, 2004, including 2,270 cases with 27 observed deaths. Results: The single-stratum SPC had alerts in months 4 and 10. The multistrata SPC had alerts in months 5, 10, and 18 in the moderate-risk stratum, and months 1, 4, 7, and 10 in the high-risk stratum. The only cumulative alerts were in the first month for the high-risk stratum of the multistrata SPC. The LR method showed no monthly or cumulative alerts. The BUS method showed an alert in the first month for the high-risk stratum. Conclusion: The system performed adequately within the Brigham and Women's Hospital Intranet environment based on the design goals. All three cumulative methods agreed that the overall observed event rates were not significantly higher for the new medical device than for a closely related medical device and were consistent with the observation that the initial concerns about this

  4. Patient dose monitoring in Dubai in radiography and interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    AlSuwaidi, J S; AlMazrouei, N K; Pottybindu, S; Siraj, M; Mathew, D; Al Blooshi, A A; Kuriakose, V P

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents ongoing actions in Dubai on patient dose monitoring in digital radiographic examinations, mammography, interventional procedures, and dental radiological procedures. The aim of Dubai Health Authority (DHA) is to move towards the establishment of local diagnostic reference levels. DHA has participated in national and regional projects under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The need for local radiation protection educational programmes and wider patient dosimetry monitoring and recording emerged from this work.

  5. Statistical process control (SPC)--a simple objective method for monitoring seizure frequency and evaluating effectiveness of drug interventions in refractory childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pujar, Suresh; Calvert, Sophie; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Chin, Richard F M; Smith, Ralph A; Cross, J Helen; Das, Krishna; Pitt, Matthew; Scott, Rod C

    2010-10-01

    Objective assessment of seizure fluctuation in patients with refractory epilepsy in the clinical setting is difficult and subjective assessment may lead to inappropriate changes in medication. We therefore evaluated the utility of Statistical Process Control (SPC) charts as a simple objective clinical tool to demonstrate variability in seizure frequency and to assess the efficacy of drug interventions. Total weekly seizure frequencies over 1 year were collected for 38 young people with refractory epilepsy. SPC I-charts were generated and Nelson's tests for "special" causes of variability applied. In a separate analysis, run charts were reviewed by two epileptologists blinded to clinical data who were asked to identify if and when drug interventions took place. The SPC charts showed that only seven out of 38 (18%) patients had stable seizure frequencies. In the others, they identified significant but short-lived increases in seizure frequency, which were followed by rapid return towards baseline independently of drug changes. A substantial reduction in seizure frequency was associated with a drug increase in only 5 (6.5%) instances. Inter-rater agreement on whether there were drug interventions and their timing was poor (κ=0.15, p=0.4). SPC I-charts have the potential to be used as a clinical tool to monitor seizure frequency and to evaluate efficacy of drug interventions in patients with refractory epilepsy. Epilepsy is commonly an unstable condition with fluctuations in seizure frequencies which are unpredictable and usually do not require a change in treatment. Positive responses to treatment changes are uncommon. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-Monitoring during Whole Group Reading Instruction: Effects among Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities during Summer School Intervention Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects that a self-monitoring strategy, plus a tactile prompting device, had upon the on-task and oral reading fluency behaviors of students with emotional and/or behavioral disabilities in the general education setting when used during whole group reading instruction. A multiple-baseline across pairs…

  7. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  8. How countries link REDD+ interventions to drivers in their readiness plans: implications for monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, G.; Herold, M.; De Sy, V.; Kissinger, G.; Brockhaus, M.; Skutsch, M.

    2014-07-01

    Countries participating in the REDD+ scheme are in the readiness phase, designing policy interventions to address drivers of deforestation and forest degradation (DD). In order for REDD+ interventions to be effective, it is essential that they take into account the specific drivers that they aim to address. Moreover it is crucial to design systems that monitor the effectiveness of the planned interventions. In this article we provide a comprehensive and comparative assessment of interventions proposed by 43 REDD+ countries in 98 readiness documents. We summarize the types of interventions and assess if they are formulated referring to the drivers of DD that they are aiming to address. Based on this assessment we consider the implications for systems for monitoring effectiveness of proposed interventions. Most countries reviewed link proposed interventions to specific drivers of DD. The majority of the countries making this link have better driver data quality, in particularly those that present their data in ratio or ordinal terms. Proposed interventions focus not only on activities to reduce deforestation, but also on other forest related REDD+ activities such as sustainable forest management, which reduce forest degradation and enhance forest stocks. Moreover, driver-specific interventions often relate to drivers not only inside but also outside the forest sector. Hence we suggest that monitoring systems need to assess not only deforestation rates through remote sensing, but also degradation and other carbon stock changes within the forest, using more detailed ground level surveys and measurements. In addition, the performance of interventions outside the forest need to be monitored, even if the impacts of these cannot be linked to specific changes in forest carbon stock in specific locations.

  9. Self-monitoring bypass grafts enable early intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Richard F.; Gupta, Samit K.; Kuraguntla, David J.

    2016-09-01

    Prosthetic grafts used for lower extremity revascularization and dialysis access fail due to hyperplastic stenosis and thrombosis. Graft surveillance is advocated to monitor function, however, graft failure can occur between episodic examinations. An innovative self-monitoring graft system allows automated surveillance with assessment of graft function using a cloud-based algorithm. We performed proof of concept experiments with in vitro and in vivo models to assess the feasibility such a real-time graft surveillance system. Initial in-vitro and in-vivo experiments demonstrate the ability for a self-monitoring graft system to remotely monitor hemodynamic parameters reflecting graft function using wireless data transmission. This automated system shows promise to deliver real-time data that can be analyzed by cloud-based algorithms alerting the clinician of a change in graft function or development of stenosis for further diagnostic study or intervention prior to graft failure.

  10. Monitoring Student Response to Mathematics Intervention: Using Data to Inform Tier 3 Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciullo, Stephen; SoRelle, Danielle; Kim, Sun A.; Seo, You-jin; Bryant, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes types of progress-monitoring techniques that mathematics interventionists and special education teachers can implement in classrooms to make informed, data-driven decisions about early mathematics intervention. Although educators may be using some of these assessment types already to inform instruction, this article…

  11. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P < .001), and this result was consistent with changes found in the rigorous evidence-based interventions. Evidence-based interventions can be successfully adapted into primary care settings that serve impoverished, high-risk populations, reducing the morbidity of asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Social network diagnostics: a tool for monitoring group interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many behavioral interventions designed to improve health outcomes are delivered in group settings. To date, however, group interventions have not been evaluated to determine if the groups generate interaction among members and how changes in group interaction may affect program outcomes at the individual or group level. Methods This article presents a model and practical tool for monitoring how social ties and social structure are changing within the group during program implementation. The approach is based on social network analysis and has two phases: collecting network measurements at strategic intervention points to determine if group dynamics are evolving in ways anticipated by the intervention, and providing the results back to the group leader to guide implementation next steps. This process aims to initially increase network connectivity and ultimately accelerate the diffusion of desirable behaviors through the new network. This article presents the Social Network Diagnostic Tool and, as proof of concept, pilot data collected during the formative phase of a childhood obesity intervention. Results The number of reported advice partners and discussion partners increased during program implementation. Density, the number of ties among people in the network expressed as a percentage of all possible ties, increased from 0.082 to 0.182 (p < 0.05) in the advice network, and from 0.027 to 0.055 (p > 0.05) in the discussion network. Conclusions The observed two-fold increase in network density represents a significant shift in advice partners over the intervention period. Using the Social Network Tool to empirically guide program activities of an obesity intervention was feasible. PMID:24083343

  13. Social network diagnostics: a tool for monitoring group interventions.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Sabina B; Barkin, Shari L; Valente, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    Many behavioral interventions designed to improve health outcomes are delivered in group settings. To date, however, group interventions have not been evaluated to determine if the groups generate interaction among members and how changes in group interaction may affect program outcomes at the individual or group level. This article presents a model and practical tool for monitoring how social ties and social structure are changing within the group during program implementation. The approach is based on social network analysis and has two phases: collecting network measurements at strategic intervention points to determine if group dynamics are evolving in ways anticipated by the intervention, and providing the results back to the group leader to guide implementation next steps. This process aims to initially increase network connectivity and ultimately accelerate the diffusion of desirable behaviors through the new network. This article presents the Social Network Diagnostic Tool and, as proof of concept, pilot data collected during the formative phase of a childhood obesity intervention. The number of reported advice partners and discussion partners increased during program implementation. Density, the number of ties among people in the network expressed as a percentage of all possible ties, increased from 0.082 to 0.182 (p < 0.05) in the advice network, and from 0.027 to 0.055 (p > 0.05) in the discussion network. The observed two-fold increase in network density represents a significant shift in advice partners over the intervention period. Using the Social Network Tool to empirically guide program activities of an obesity intervention was feasible.

  14. Facilitating Intimacy: Intervention and Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandeneau, Michel L.; Johnson, Susan M.

    1994-01-01

    Investigated effects of interventions from Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) and Cognitive Marital Therapy (CMT) on levels of marital intimacy, dyadic trust, and dyadic adjustment. Thirty-six couples free of marital distress and seeking to enhance their intimate relationship were randomly assigned to EFT, CMT, or control group. Both treatment…

  15. Facilitating Intimacy: Intervention and Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandeneau, Michel L.; Johnson, Susan M.

    1994-01-01

    Investigated effects of interventions from Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) and Cognitive Marital Therapy (CMT) on levels of marital intimacy, dyadic trust, and dyadic adjustment. Thirty-six couples free of marital distress and seeking to enhance their intimate relationship were randomly assigned to EFT, CMT, or control group. Both treatment…

  16. [Nutritional dynamic monitoring during pregnancy: a personalized intervention of prevention].

    PubMed

    De Cristofaro, Paolo; Pompilii, Sonia; Di Bonifacio, M Teresa; Malatesta, Guido; Pantoni, Natascia; Xhebraj, Elona; Dragani, Beatrice

    2008-06-01

    Obesity is an increasing condition spreading out in all of the world, independently by race, sex and age. Obesity in pregnancy represent a risk condition for both mother and her offspring. All of the studies are observational and show intervention strategies on weight gain improvement during gestational period, a current topic, but still controversial. Our study is based on nutritional dynamic monitoring during pregnancy in order to improve health and wellbeing status of both mother and her offspring, through an early and efficacy prevention.

  17. Monitoring Process Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of municipal sludges to produce biosolids which meet federal and/or state requirements for land application requires process monitoring. The goal of process monitoring is to produce biosolids of consistent and reliable quality. In its simplest form, for Class B treatme...

  18. Monitoring Process Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of municipal sludges to produce biosolids which meet federal and/or state requirements for land application requires process monitoring. The goal of process monitoring is to produce biosolids of consistent and reliable quality. In its simplest form, for Class B treatme...

  19. Systematic review of physiologic monitor alarm characteristics and pragmatic interventions to reduce alarm frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Christine Weirich; Goel, Veena V.; Ely, Elizabeth; Stave, Christopher D.; Stemler, Shannon; Zander, Miriam; Bonafide, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alarm fatigue from frequent nonactionable physiologic monitor alarms is frequently named as a threat to patient safety. Purpose To critically examine the available literature relevant to alarm fatigue. Data Sources Articles published in English, Spanish, or French between January 1980 and April 2015 indexed in PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Study Selection Articles focused on hospital physiologic monitor alarms addressing any of the following: 1) the proportion of alarms that are actionable, 2) the relationship between alarm exposure and nurse response time, and 3) the effectiveness of interventions in reducing alarm frequency. Data Extraction We extracted data on setting, collection methods, proportion of alarms determined to be actionable, nurse response time, and associations between interventions and alarm rates. Data Synthesis Our search produced 24 observational studies focused on alarm characteristics and response time and 8 studies evaluating interventions. Actionable alarm proportion ranged from <1% to 36% across a range of hospital settings. Two studies showed relationships between high alarm exposure and longer nurse response time. Most intervention studies included multiple components implemented simultaneously. While studies varied widely, and many had high risk of bias, promising but still unproven interventions include widening alarm parameters, instituting alarm delays, and using disposable electrocardiographic wires or frequently changed electrocardiographic electrodes. Conclusions Physiologic monitor alarms are commonly nonactionable, and evidence supporting the concept of alarm fatigue is emerging. Several interventions have the potential to reduce alarms safely, but more rigorously designed studies with attention to possible unintended consequences are needed. PMID:26663904

  20. Systematic Review of Physiologic Monitor Alarm Characteristics and Pragmatic Interventions to Reduce Alarm Frequency.

    PubMed

    Paine, Christine Weirich; Goel, Veena V; Ely, Elizabeth; Stave, Christopher D; Stemler, Shannon; Zander, Miriam; Bonafide, Christopher P

    2016-02-01

    Alarm fatigue from frequent nonactionable physiologic monitor alarms is frequently named as a threat to patient safety. To critically examine the available literature relevant to alarm fatigue. Articles published in English, Spanish, or French between January 1980 and April 2015 indexed in PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Articles focused on hospital physiologic monitor alarms addressing any of the following: (1) the proportion of alarms that are actionable, (2) the relationship between alarm exposure and nurse response time, and (3) the effectiveness of interventions in reducing alarm frequency. We extracted data on setting, collection methods, proportion of alarms determined to be actionable, nurse response time, and associations between interventions and alarm rates. Our search produced 24 observational studies focused on alarm characteristics and response time and 8 studies evaluating interventions. Actionable alarm proportion ranged from <1% to 36% across a range of hospital settings. Two studies showed relationships between high alarm exposure and longer nurse response time. Most intervention studies included multiple components implemented simultaneously. Although studies varied widely, and many had high risk of bias, promising but still unproven interventions include widening alarm parameters, instituting alarm delays, and using disposable electrocardiographic wires or frequently changed electrocardiographic electrodes. Physiologic monitor alarms are commonly nonactionable, and evidence supporting the concept of alarm fatigue is emerging. Several interventions have the potential to reduce alarms safely, but more rigorously designed studies with attention to possible unintended consequences are needed. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Monitoring unwanted effects of antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are licensed as treatment for schizophrenia and other mental health disorders but can cause a range of unwanted effects that require close monitoring by, and close collaboration between, healthcare professionals across a range of settings. This applies to both first-generation and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs; sometimes known as conventional and atypical antipsychotics, respectively). Here we discuss monitoring for unwanted effects of antipsychotics in adults, with a particular focus on SGAs.

  2. Monitoring and Evaluating Psychosocial Intervention Outcomes in Humanitarian Aid

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Kaz; Ariti, Cono; van der Kam, Saskia; Mooren, Trudy; Shanks, Leslie; Pintaldi, Giovanni; Kleber, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Existing tools for evaluating psychosocial interventions (un-validated self-reporting questionnaires) are not ideal for use in non-Western conflict settings. We implement a generic method of treatment evaluation, using client and counsellor feedback, in 18 projects in non-Western humanitarian settings. We discuss our findings from the perspective of validity and suggestions for future research. A retrospective analysis is executed using data gathered from psychosocial projects. Clients (n = 7,058) complete two (complaints and functioning) rating scales each session and counsellors rate the client’s status at exit. The client-completed pre- and post-intervention rating scales show substantial changes. Counsellor evaluation of the clients’ status shows a similar trend in improvement. All three multivariable models for each separate scale have similar associations between the scales and the investigated variables despite different cultural settings. The validity is good. Limitations are: ratings give only a general impression and clinical risk factors are not measured. Potential ceiling effects may influence change of scales. The intra and inter-rater reliability of the counsellors’ rating is not assessed. The focus on client and counsellor perspectives to evaluate treatment outcome seems a strong alternative for evaluation instruments frequently used in psychosocial programming. The session client rated scales helps client and counsellor to set mutual treatment objectives and reduce drop-out risk. Further research should test the scales against a cross-cultural valid gold standard to obtain insight into their clinical relevance. PMID:27315263

  3. Bifunctional nanoparticles for SERS monitoring and magnetic intervention of assembly and enzyme cutting of DNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liqin; Crew, Elizabeth; Yan, Hong; Shan, Shiyao; Skeete, Zakiya; Mott, Derrick; Krentsel, Tatiana; Yin, Jun; Chernova, Natasha A.; Luo, Jin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Li, Qingbiao; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-07-27

    The ability to detect and intervene in DNA assembly, disassembly, and enzyme cutting processes in a solution phase requires effective signal transduction and stimulus response. This report demonstrates a novel bifunctional strategy for the creation of this ability using gold- and silver-coated MnZn ferrite nanoparticles (MZF@Au or MZF@Ag) that impart magnetic and surfaceenhanced Raman scattering (SERS) functionalities to these processes. The double-stranded DNA linkage of labeled gold nanoparticles with MZF@Au (or MZF@Ag) produces interparticle "hot-spots" for real-time SERS monitoring of the DNA assembly, disassembly, or enzyme cutting processes, during which the magnetic component provides an effective means for intervention in the solution. The unique combination of the nanoprobes functionalities serves a new paradigm for the design of functional nanoprobes in biomolecular recognition and intervention.

  4. Impact of newer self-monitoring technology and brief phone-based intervention on weight loss: a randomized pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kathryn M.; Wing, Rena R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite the proliferation of newer self-monitoring technology (e.g., activity monitors and smartphone apps), their impact on weight loss outside of structured in-person behavioral intervention is unknown. Methods A randomized, controlled pilot study was conducted to examine efficacy of self-monitoring technology, with and without phone-based intervention, on 6-month weight loss in adults with overweight and obesity. Eighty participants were randomized to receive standard self-monitoring tools (ST, n=26), technology-based self-monitoring tools (TECH, n=27), or technology-based tools combined with phone-based intervention (TECH+PHONE, n=27). All participants attended one introductory weight loss session and completed assessments at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Results Weight loss from baseline to 6 months differed significantly between groups p=.042; there was a trend for TECH+PHONE (−6.4±1.2kg) to lose more weight than ST (−1.3±1.2kg); weight loss in TECH (−4.1±1.4kg) was between ST and TECH+PHONE. Fewer ST (15%) achieved ≥5% weight losses compared to TECH and TECH+PHONE (44%), p=.039. Adherence to self-monitoring caloric intake was higher in TECH+PHONE than TECH or ST, ps<.05. Conclusion These results suggest use of newer self-monitoring technology plus brief phone-based intervention improves adherence and weight loss compared to traditional self-monitoring tools. Further research should determine cost-effectiveness of adding phone-based intervention when providing self-monitoring technology. PMID:27367614

  5. Impact of newer self-monitoring technology and brief phone-based intervention on weight loss: A randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kathryn M; Wing, Rena R

    2016-08-01

    Despite the proliferation of newer self-monitoring technology (e.g., activity monitors and smartphone apps), their impact on weight loss outside of structured in-person behavioral intervention is unknown. A randomized, controlled pilot study was conducted to examine efficacy of self-monitoring technology, with and without phone-based intervention, on 6-month weight loss in adults with overweight and obesity. Eighty participants were randomized to receive standard self-monitoring tools (ST, n = 26), technology-based self-monitoring tools (TECH, n = 27), or technology-based tools combined with phone-based intervention (TECH + PHONE, n = 27). All participants attended one introductory weight loss session and completed assessments at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Weight loss from baseline to 6 months differed significantly between groups P = 0.042; there was a trend for TECH + PHONE (-6.4 ± 1.2 kg) to lose more weight than ST (-1.3 ± 1.2 kg); weight loss in TECH (-4.1 ± 1.4 kg) was between ST and TECH + PHONE. Fewer ST (15%) achieved ≥5% weight losses compared with TECH and TECH + PHONE (44%), P = 0.039. Adherence to self-monitoring caloric intake was higher in TECH + PHONE than TECH or ST, Ps < 0.05. These results suggest use of newer self-monitoring technology plus brief phone-based intervention improves adherence and weight loss compared with traditional self-monitoring tools. Further research should determine cost-effectiveness of adding phone-based intervention when providing self-monitoring technology. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  6. Using an electronic activity monitor system as an intervention modality: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Zakkoyya H; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Jarvis, Jessica M; Baillargeon, Jacques

    2015-06-24

    Obesity is a growing global health concern that may lead to cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and cancer. Several systematic reviews have shown that technology is successful in combating obesity through increased physical activity, but there is no known review on interventions that use an electronic activity monitor system (EAMS). EAMSs are defined as a wearable device that objectively measures lifestyle physical activity and can provide feedback, beyond the display of basic activity count information, via the monitor display or through a partnering application to elicit continual self-monitoring of activity behavior. These devices improve upon standard pedometers because they have the ability to provide visual feedback on activity progression, verbal encouragement, and social comparison. This systematic review aimed to synthesize the efficacy and feasibility results of EAMSs within published physical activity interventions. Electronic databases and journal references were searched for relevant articles. Data sources included CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, Medline Ovid, PsycINFO, and clinicaltrials.gov. Out of the 1,574 retrieved, 11 articles met the inclusion criteria. These articles were reviewed for quality and content based on a risk of bias tool and intervention components. Most articles were determined to be of medium quality while two were of low quality, and one of high quality. Significant pre-post improvements in the EAMS group were found in five of nine studies for physical activity and in four of five studies for weight. One found a significant increase in physical activity and two studies found significant weight loss in the intervention group compared with the comparator group. The EAMS interventions appear to be feasible with most studies reporting continual wear of the device during waking hours and a higher retention rate of participants in the EAMS groups. These studies provide preliminary evidence suggesting that EAMS can increase physical

  7. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Lönnroth, Nadja; Hirvonen-Kari, Mirja; Timonen, Marjut; Savolainen, Sauli; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2012-08-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are <10 µSv y(-1) and the highest value was 0.3 mSv (single interventional radiologist). A revised categorisation of radiation workers based on the working profile of the radiologist and observed accumulated doses is justified. Occupational monitoring can be implemented mostly with group dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential.

  8. Evaluating the Effects of On-Task in a Box as a Class-Wide Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battaglia, Allison A.; Radley, Keith C.; Ness, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of the On-Task in a Box intervention on student on-task behavior when used as a class-wide intervention. The intervention package includes self-monitoring, video modeling, and reinforcement contingency components. A multiple baseline design across three elementary classrooms was used to determine the effects…

  9. Examining the Effects of Linking Student Performance and Progression in a Tier 2 Kindergarten Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Deborah C.; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-man; Coyne, Michael D.; Simmons, Leslie E.; Oslund, Eric; Fogarty, Melissa; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Little, Mary E.; Rawlinson, D'Ann

    2015-01-01

    Despite the emerging evidence base on response to intervention, there is limited research regarding how to effectively use progress-monitoring data to adjust instruction for students in Tier 2 intervention. In this study, we analyzed extant data from a series of randomized experimental studies of a kindergarten supplemental reading intervention to…

  10. Evaluating the Effects of On-Task in a Box as a Class-Wide Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battaglia, Allison A.; Radley, Keith C.; Ness, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of the On-Task in a Box intervention on student on-task behavior when used as a class-wide intervention. The intervention package includes self-monitoring, video modeling, and reinforcement contingency components. A multiple baseline design across three elementary classrooms was used to determine the effects…

  11. Cost-effectiveness of a Primary Care Depression Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Jeffrey M; Rost, Kathryn M; Zhang, Mingliang; Williams, D Keith; Smith, Jeffrey; Fortney, John

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of a quality improvement depression intervention (enhanced care) in primary care settings relative to usual care. DESIGN Following stratification, we randomized 12 primary care practices to enhanced or usual care conditions and followed patients for 12 months. SETTING Primary care practices located in 10 states across the United States. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS Two hundred eleven patients beginning a new treatment episode for major depression. INTERVENTIONS Training the primary care team to assess, educate, and monitor depressed patients during the acute and continuation stages of their depression treatment episode over 1 year. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Cost-effectiveness was measured by calculating incremental (enhanced minus usual care) costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) derived from SF-36 data. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in the main analysis was $15,463 per QALY. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the sensitivity analyses ranged from $11,341 (using geographic block variables to control for pre-intervention service utilization) to $19,976 (increasing the cost estimates by 50%) per QALY. CONCLUSIONS This quality improvement depression intervention was cost-effective relative to usual care compared to cost-effectiveness ratios for common primary care interventions and commonly cited cost-effectiveness ratio thresholds for intervention implementation. PMID:12823650

  12. Real-time human collaboration monitoring and intervention

    DOEpatents

    Merkle, Peter B.; Johnson, Curtis M.; Jones, Wendell B.; Yonas, Gerold; Doser, Adele B.; Warner, David J.

    2010-07-13

    A method of and apparatus for monitoring and intervening in, in real time, a collaboration between a plurality of subjects comprising measuring indicia of physiological and cognitive states of each of the plurality of subjects, communicating the indicia to a monitoring computer system, with the monitoring computer system, comparing the indicia with one or more models of previous collaborative performance of one or more of the plurality of subjects, and with the monitoring computer system, employing the results of the comparison to communicate commands or suggestions to one or more of the plurality of subjects.

  13. Interventional Device Visualization with Toroidal Transceiver and Optically-Coupled Current Sensor for RF Safety Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Etezadi-Amoli, Maryam; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John; Scott, Greig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The development of catheters and guidewires that are safe from radiofrequency (RF)-induced heating and clearly visible against background tissue is a major challenge in interventional MRI. An interventional imaging approach using a toroidal transmit-receive (transceive) coil is presented. This toroidal transceiver allows controlled, low levels of RF current to flow in the catheter/guidewire for visualization, and can be used with conductive interventional devices that have a localized low-impedance tip contact. Methods Toroidal transceivers were built, and phantom experiments were performed to quantify transmit power levels required for device visibility and to detect heating hazards. Imaging experiments in a pig cadaver tested the extendibility to higher field strength and non-phantom settings. A photonically-powered optically-coupled toroidal current sensor for monitoring induced RF currents was built, calibrated, and tested using an independent image-based current estimation method. Results Results indicate that high-SNR visualization is achievable using milliwatts of transmit power—power levels orders of magnitude lower than levels that induce measurable heating in phantom tests. Agreement between image-based current estimates and RF current sensor measurements validates sensor accuracy. Conclusion The toroidal transceiver, integrated with power and current sensing, could offer a promising platform for safe and effective interventional device visualization. PMID:24691876

  14. Preliminary effects of parent-implemented behavioural interventions for stereotypy.

    PubMed

    Lanovaz, Marc J; Rapp, John T; Maciw, Isabella; Dorion, Catherine; Prégent-Pelletier, Émilie

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to replicate and extend previous research on using multicomponent behavioural interventions designed to reduce engagement in stereotypy by examining their effects when implemented by parents over several months. We used an alternating treatment design to examine the effects of the parent-implemented interventions on engagement in stereotypy and appropriate behaviour in three children with autism and other developmental disabilities. The parent-implemented multicomponent treatments reduced vocal stereotypy in all three participants and increased engagement in appropriate behaviour in two participants. These effects persisted up to 24 weeks following the parent training sessions. Altogether, our preliminary results support (a) the involvement of parents as behaviour change agents to reduce engagement in stereotypy and (b) the scheduling of regular, but infrequent (i.e. weekly to monthly), follow-up meetings to monitor the effects of behavioural interventions in outpatient and home-based service delivery models.

  15. ADHD in the Classroom: Effective Intervention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Janusis, Grace M.

    2011-01-01

    School-related difficulties are commonly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This article describes effective school-based intervention strategies including behavioral interventions, modifications to academic instruction, and home-school communication programs. One overlooked aspect of treatment of children with ADHD…

  16. ADHD in the Classroom: Effective Intervention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Janusis, Grace M.

    2011-01-01

    School-related difficulties are commonly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This article describes effective school-based intervention strategies including behavioral interventions, modifications to academic instruction, and home-school communication programs. One overlooked aspect of treatment of children with ADHD…

  17. Monitoring Children with Reading Disabilities' Response to Phonics Intervention: Are There Differences between Intervention Aligned and General Skill Progress Monitoring Assessments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Lambert, Warren; Compton, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether 2 different progress monitoring assessments differentially predicted growth in reading skills associated with systematic phonics instruction. Oral reading fluency (ORE) was compared with an intervention aligned word list (IAWL) as predictors of growth in untimed and timed decoding and word identification and text…

  18. Monitoring Children with Reading Disabilities' Response to Phonics Intervention: Are There Differences between Intervention Aligned and General Skill Progress Monitoring Assessments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Lambert, Warren; Compton, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether 2 different progress monitoring assessments differentially predicted growth in reading skills associated with systematic phonics instruction. Oral reading fluency (ORE) was compared with an intervention aligned word list (IAWL) as predictors of growth in untimed and timed decoding and word identification and text…

  19. Monitoring and interpreting bioremediation effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, J.R.; Prince, R.C.; Harner, J.; Atlas, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, extensive research was conducted by the US Environments Protection Agency and Exxon to develop and implement bioremediation techniques for oil spill cleanup. A key challenge of this program was to develop effective methods for monitoring and interpreting bioremediation effectiveness on extremely heterogenous intertidal shorelines. Fertilizers were applied to shorelines at concentrations known to be safe, and effectiveness achieved in acceleration biodegradation of oil residues was measure using several techniques. This paper describes the most definitive method identified, which monitors biodegradation loss by measuring changes in ratios of hydrocarbons to hopane, a cycloalkane present in the oil that showed no measurable degradation. Rates of loss measured by the hopane ratio method have high levels of statistical confidence, and show that the fertilizer addition stimulated biodegradation rates as much a fivefold. Multiple regression analyses of data show that fertilizer addition of nitrogen in interstitial pore water per unit of oil load was the most important parameter affecting biodegradation rate, and results suggest that monitoring nitrogen concentrations in the subsurface pore water is preferred technique for determining fertilizer dosage and reapplication frequency.

  20. Using Data to Individualize a Multicomponent, Technology-Based Self-Monitoring Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, Allison Leigh; Vogelgesang, Kari; Fernando, Josephine; Lugo, Wilbeth

    2016-01-01

    Technology in schools is abundant as is the call for evidence-based interventions for students who need additional support to be successful. One promising use of technology is for self-monitoring interventions aimed at improving classroom behavior. In this study, two middle school students with disabilities used a multicomponent, self-monitoring…

  1. Monitoring Progress: Response to Intervention's Promise and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Response to intervention began as a way to identify and teach struggling readers and special education students. It's fast becoming a way to change schooling for everyone. This special report examines the many forms the approach is now taking, its research base, its influence on the educational marketplace, and the federal regulations that both…

  2. Monitoring Progress: Response to Intervention's Promise and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Response to intervention began as a way to identify and teach struggling readers and special education students. It's fast becoming a way to change schooling for everyone. This special report examines the many forms the approach is now taking, its research base, its influence on the educational marketplace, and the federal regulations that both…

  3. Breath acetone to monitor life style interventions in field conditions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, Devasena; Lammers, Gerwen; Mandon, Julien; Blanchet, Lionel; Schreuder, Tim H A; Hopman, Maria T; Harren, Frans J M; Tappy, Luc; Cristescu, Simona M

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether breath acetone concentration can be used to monitor the effects of a prolonged physical activity on whole body lipolysis and hepatic ketogenesis in field conditions. Twenty-three non-diabetic, 11 type 1 diabetic, and 17 type 2 diabetic subjects provided breath and blood samples for this study. Samples were collected during the International Four Days Marches, in the Netherlands. For each participant, breath acetone concentration was measured using proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometry, before and after a 30-50 km walk on four consecutive days. Blood non-esterified free fatty acid (NEFA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB), and glucose concentrations were measured after walking. Breath acetone concentration was significantly higher after than before walking, and was positively correlated with blood NEFA and BOHB concentrations. The effect of walking on breath acetone concentration was repeatedly observed on all four consecutive days. Breath acetone concentrations were higher in type 1 diabetic subjects and lower in type 2 diabetic subjects than in control subjects. Breath acetone can be used to monitor hepatic ketogenesis during walking under field conditions. It may, therefore, provide real-time information on fat burning, which may be of use for monitoring the lifestyle interventions. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  4. [Surface Cleaning and Disinfection in the Hospital. Improvement by Objective Monitoring and Intervention].

    PubMed

    Woltering, R; Hoffmann, G; Isermann, J; Heudorf, U

    2016-11-01

    Background and Objective: An assessment of cleaning and disinfection in hospitals by the use of objective surveillance and review of mandatory corrective measures was undertaken. Methods: A prospective examination of the cleaning and disinfection of surfaces scheduled for daily cleaning in 5 general care hospitals by use of an ultraviolet fluorescence targeting method (UVM) was performed, followed by structured educational and procedural interventions. The survey was conducted in hospital wards, operating theatres and intensive care units. Cleaning performance was measured by complete removal of UVM. Training courses and reinforced self-monitoring were implemented after the first evaluation. 6 months later, we repeated the assessment for confirmation of success. Results: The average cleaning performance was 34% (31/90) at base-line with significant differences between the 5 hospitals (11-67%). The best results were achieved in intensive care units (61%) and operating theatres (58%), the worst results in hospital wards (22%). The intervention significantly improved cleaning performance up to an average of 69% (65/94; +34.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 21.2-48.3; p<0.05), with differences between the hospitals (20-95%). The largest increase was achieved in hospital wards (+45%; CI 29.2-60.8; p<0.05). Improvements in operating theatres (+22.9%; CI 10.9-56.7) and intensive care units (+5.6%; CI 25.8-36.9) were statistically not significant. Conclusions: The monitoring of cleaning and disinfection of surfaces by fluorescence targeting is appropriate for evaluating hygiene regulations. An intervention can lead to a significant improvement of cleaning performance. As part of a strategy to improve infection control in hospitals, fluorescence targeting enables a simple inexpensive and effective surveillance of the cleaning performance and corrective measures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phanthunane, Pudtan; Vos, Theo; Whiteford, Harvey; Bertram, Melanie

    2011-05-13

    Information on cost-effectiveness of interventions to treat schizophrenia can assist health policy decision making, particularly given the lack of health resources in developing countries like Thailand. This study aims to determine the optimal treatment package, including drug and non-drug interventions, for schizophrenia in Thailand. A Markov model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of typical antipsychotics, generic risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine and family interventions. Health outcomes were measured in disability adjusted life years. We evaluated intervention benefit by estimating a change in disease severity, taking into account potential side effects. Intervention costs included outpatient treatment costs, hospitalization costs as well as time and travel costs of patients and families. Uncertainty was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation. A sensitivity analysis of the expected range cost of generic risperidone was undertaken. Generic risperidone is more cost-effective than typicals if it can be produced for less than 10 baht per 2 mg tablet. Risperidone was the cheapest treatment with higher drug costs offset by lower hospital costs in comparison to typicals. The most cost-effective combination of treatments was a combination of risperidone (dominant intervention). Adding family intervention has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 1,900 baht/DALY with a 100% probability of a result less than a threshold for very cost-effective interventions of one times GDP or 110,000 baht per DALY. Treating the most severe one third of patients with clozapine instead of risperidone had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 320,000 baht/DALY with just over 50% probability of a result below three times GDP per capita. There are good economic arguments to recommend generic risperidone as first line treatment in combination with family intervention. As the uncertainty interval indicates the addition of clozapine may be dominated and there are serious

  6. Reactive Effects of Self-Monitoring Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Bryan; Fox, E.E.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the use of Wolpe's notion of subjective units of disturbance (SUDS) to monitor anxiety. Two studies were conducted to test for reactive effects of the self-monitoring. Results indicated that self-monitoring can have a positive effect on perceived anxiety level. (Author/RC)

  7. Practical Effects of Classwide Mathematics Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDerHeyden, Amanda M.; Codding, Robin S.

    2015-01-01

    The current article presents additional analyses of a classwide mathematics intervention, from a previously reported randomized controlled trial, to offer new information about the treatment and to demonstrate the utility of different types of effect sizes. Multilevel modeling was used to examine treatment effects by race, sex, socioeconomic…

  8. Cost-effective Ambulatory Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Pantelis; Psymarnou, Markela

    2005-01-01

    The Mobinet service concept emerged, as points of care move closer to the patient and the citizen/patient undertakes a more active role in healthcare monitoring and prevention. Today's advances in monitoring devices and telecommunication networks have made possible a viable solution regarding the provision of continuous health monitoring services, seamlessly from the patients' point of view. The Mobinet concept has been tested under various clinical, technical and business pilots throughout Europe and is currently set for commercial launch in Greece.

  9. Performance monitoring in interventional cardiology: application of statistical process control to a single-site database.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ian R; Rivers, John T; Mengersen, Kerrie L; Cameron, James

    2011-03-01

    Graphical Statistical Process Control (SPC) tools have been shown to promptly identify significant variations in clinical outcomes in a range of health care settings, but as yet have not been widely applied to performance monitoring in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We explored the application of these techniques to a prospective PCI registry at a single site. Baseline clinical and procedural data along with one and twelve month major adverse cardiac event (MACE) details were prospectively collected in relation to 2,697 consecutive PCI procedures (2,417 patients) performed between the 1st January 2003 and the 31st December 2007. We investigated outcome measures which were both clinically relevant and occurred at a sufficient frequency (>1%) to allow valid application of SPC techniques, and found procedural and lesion failure, major postprocedural complications, and one and 12 month MACE to be suitable endpoints. Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) charts, Variable Life-Adjusted Display (VLAD) charts and Funnel Plots were employed in combination to evaluate both group and individual performance on a near "real time" basis. We found that the use of these charts provided complimentary prospective audit of clinical performance to identify variations in group and individual operator performance and to clarify these as either systemic or individual operator-related. We propose a system of integrating SPC tools as a component of the audit function of a PCI unit. SPC tools have the potential to provide near "real-time" performance monitoring and may allow early detection and intervention in altered performance for both the group and the individual operator. A clinically-integrated system of SPC tools may thus complement and enhance effectiveness of the traditional case-based morbidity and mortality audit.

  10. Intervention Effectiveness in Reducing Prejudice against Transsexuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Kim A.; Stewart, Briana

    2013-01-01

    The transgender community encounters pervasive prejudice, discrimination, and violence, yet social science literature lacks research that focuses on reduction of antitransgender prejudice. This experimental study examined the effectiveness of three interventions aimed at decreasing negative attitudes toward transsexuals, correcting participants'…

  11. Impact of Treatment Integrity on Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryling, Mitch J.; Wallace, Michele D.; Yassine, Jordan N.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity has cogent implications for intervention effectiveness. Understanding these implications is an important, but often neglected, undertaking in behavior analysis. This paper reviews current research on treatment integrity in applied behavior analysis. Specifically, we review research evaluating the relation between integrity…

  12. Impact of Treatment Integrity on Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryling, Mitch J.; Wallace, Michele D.; Yassine, Jordan N.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity has cogent implications for intervention effectiveness. Understanding these implications is an important, but often neglected, undertaking in behavior analysis. This paper reviews current research on treatment integrity in applied behavior analysis. Specifically, we review research evaluating the relation between integrity…

  13. Intervention Effectiveness in Reducing Prejudice against Transsexuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Kim A.; Stewart, Briana

    2013-01-01

    The transgender community encounters pervasive prejudice, discrimination, and violence, yet social science literature lacks research that focuses on reduction of antitransgender prejudice. This experimental study examined the effectiveness of three interventions aimed at decreasing negative attitudes toward transsexuals, correcting participants'…

  14. Classwide Interventions: Effective Instruction Makes a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Snyder, Angela L.; Marsh, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Classrooms are dynamic environments in which teachers and students engage in ongoing reciprocal interactions throughout the school day. Classes that include classwide effective intervention practices are likely to have positive teacher-student interactions and to promote student learning and engagement while minimizing problem behaviors. However,…

  15. Classwide Interventions: Effective Instruction Makes a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Snyder, Angela L.; Marsh, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Classrooms are dynamic environments in which teachers and students engage in ongoing reciprocal interactions throughout the school day. Classes that include classwide effective intervention practices are likely to have positive teacher-student interactions and to promote student learning and engagement while minimizing problem behaviors. However,…

  16. The Effectiveness and Precision of Intervention Fidelity Measures in Preschool Intervention Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Catherine L.

    2013-01-01

    A quantifiable measure of teachers' intervention fidelity when delivering curriculum-based interventions allows researchers to interpret the effectiveness of the curricula under scrutiny. Fidelity measures, however, must accurately represent the critical components of an intervention to confirm that the intervention was delivered as intended and…

  17. Effectiveness of total worker health interventions.

    PubMed

    Anger, W Kent; Elliot, Diane L; Bodner, Todd; Olson, Ryan; Rohlman, Diane S; Truxillo, Donald M; Kuehl, Kerry S; Hammer, Leslie B; Montgomery, Dede

    2015-04-01

    Total Worker Health (TWH) was introduced and the term was trademarked in 2011 by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to formally signal the expansion of traditional occupational safety and health (OSH) to include wellness and well-being. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, and other databases using keywords TWH, health promotion, health protection, and variants for articles meeting the criteria of (a) employing both occupational safety and/or health (OSH, or health protection) and wellness and/or well-being (health promotion, or HP) in the same intervention study, and (b) reporting both OSH and HP outcomes. Only 17 published studies met these criteria. All but 1 of the 17 TWH interventions improved risk factors for injuries and/or chronic illnesses, and 4 improved 10 or more risk factors. Several TWH interventions reported sustained improvements for over a year, although only 1 is readily available for dissemination. These results suggest that TWH interventions that address both injuries and chronic diseases can improve workforce health effectively and more rapidly than the alternative of separately employing more narrowly focused programs to change the same outcomes in serial fashion. These 17 articles provide useful examples of how TWH interventions can be structured. The promise of simultaneous improvements in safety, health, and well-being leads to the call to pursue TWH research to identify and disseminate best practices.

  18. Implementing and Monitoring the Response to Intervention Process: The Special Educator Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Leigh K.; Fischetti, John C.; Moody, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the varied implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) and uneven occurrence of professional development, special education teachers struggle to adapt to new roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the role of special education teachers in implementing and monitoring RTI, the role…

  19. An Application of School-Based Intervention Implementation Adherence Monitoring and Performance Feedback Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Julia Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the application of implementation adherence monitoring and group feedback procedures with teachers implementing the Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI; Fountas & Pinnell, 2008a). Using a repeated measures design across time, changes in implementation adherence levels were examined as teachers participated in…

  20. Interventions Linked to Decreased Heart Failure Hospitalizations During Ambulatory Pulmonary Artery Pressure Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Maria R; Stevenson, Lynne W; Adamson, Philip B; Desai, Akshay S; Heywood, J Thomas; Bourge, Robert C; Bauman, Jordan; Abraham, William T

    2016-05-01

    This study sought to analyze medical therapy data from the CHAMPION (CardioMEMS Heart Sensor Allows Monitoring of Pressure to Improve Outcomes in Class III Heart Failure) trial to determine which interventions were linked to decreases in heart failure (HF) hospitalizations during ambulatory pulmonary artery (PA) pressure-guided management. Elevated cardiac filling pressures, which increase the risk of hospitalizations and mortality, can be detected using an ambulatory PA pressure monitoring system before onset of symptomatic congestion allowing earlier intervention to prevent HF hospitalizations. The CHAMPION trial was a randomized, controlled, single-blind study of 550 patients with New York Heart Association functional class III HF with a HF hospitalization in the prior year. All patients undergoing implantation of the ambulatory PA pressure monitoring system were randomized to the active monitoring group (PA pressure-guided HF management plus standard of care) or to the blind therapy group (HF management by standard clinical assessment), and followed for a minimum of 6 months. Medical therapy data were compared between groups to understand what interventions produced the significant reduction in HF hospitalizations in the active monitoring group. Both groups had similar baseline medical therapy. After 6 months, the active monitoring group experienced a higher frequency of medications adjustments; significant increases in the doses of diuretics, vasodilators, and neurohormonal antagonists; targeted intensification of diuretics and vasodilators in patients with higher PA pressures; and preservation of renal function despite diuretic intensification. Incorporation of a PA pressure-guided treatment algorithm to decrease filling pressures led to targeted changes, particularly in diuretics and vasodilators, and was more effective in reducing HF hospitalizations than management of patient clinical signs or symptoms alone. Copyright © 2016 American College of

  1. A Review of the Literature on Remote Monitoring Technology in Incentive-Based Interventions for Health-Related Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Kurti, Allison N.; Davis, Danielle R.; Redner, Ryan; Jarvis, Brantley P.; Zvorsky, Ivori; Keith, Diana R.; Bolivar, Hypatia A.; White, Thomas J.; Rippberger, Peter; Markesich, Catherine; Atwood, Gary; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Use of technology (e.g., Internet, cell phones) to allow remote implementation of incentives interventions for health-related behavior change is growing. To our knowledge, there has yet to be a systematic review of this literature reported. The present report provides a systematic review of the controlled studies where technology was used to remotely implement financial incentive interventions targeting substance use and other health behaviors published between 2004 and 2015. For inclusion in the review, studies had to use technology to remotely accomplish one of the following two aims alone or in combination: (a) monitor the target behavior, or (b) deliver incentives for achieving the target goal. Studies also had to examine financial incentives (e.g., cash, vouchers) for health-related behavior change, be published in peer-reviewed journals, and include a research design that allowed evaluation of the efficacy of the incentive intervention relative to another condition (e.g., non-contingent incentives, treatment as usual). Of the 39 reports that met inclusion criteria, 18 targeted substance use, 10 targeted medication adherence or home-based health monitoring, and 11 targeted diet, exercise, or weight loss. All 39 (100%) studies used technology to facilitate remote monitoring of the target behavior, and 26 (66.7%) studies also incorporated technology in the remote delivery of incentives. Statistically significant intervention effects were reported in 71% of studies reviewed. Overall, the results offer substantial support for the efficacy of remotely implemented incentive interventions for health-related behavior change, which have the potential to increase the cost-effectiveness and reach of this treatment approach. PMID:27777964

  2. FIREMON: Fire effects monitoring and inventory system

    Treesearch

    Duncan C. Lutes; Robert E. Keane; John F. Caratti; Carl H. Key; Nathan C. Benson; Steve Sutherland; Larry J. Gangi

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring and inventory to assess the effects of wildland fire is critical for 1) documenting fire effects, 2) assessing ecosystem damage and benefit, 3) evaluating the success or failure of a burn, and 4) appraising the potential for future treatments. However, monitoring fire effects is often difficult because data collection requires abundant funds, resources, and...

  3. Reading Intervention: The Effectiveness of Leveled Literacy Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton-Archie, Sonya H.

    2014-01-01

    Reading challenges are still evident for more than 90 million adults in the United States who are functioning at the lowest levels of literacy (United States Department of Education, 2004). Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) is one program designed to address these educational needs. The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the…

  4. The effect of workers' visibility on effectiveness of intervention programs: supervisory-based safety interventions.

    PubMed

    Luria, Gil; Zohar, Dov; Erev, Ido

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses an organizational change intervention program targeting safety behaviors and addresses important considerations concerning the planning of organizational change. Using layout of the plant as a proxy for ease of daily leader-member interaction, the effect of workers' visibility on the effectiveness of supervisory-based safety (SBS) interventions is examined. Through a reinforcement-learning framework, it is suggested that visibility can affect supervisors' incentive to interact with subordinates regarding safety-related issues. Data were collected during SBS intervention studies in five manufacturing companies. Results suggest a reinforcement cycle model whereby increased visibility generates more frequent exchanges between supervisors and employees, resulting in improved safety behavior among employees. In turn, employees' safer behavior reinforces continued supervisory safety-related interaction. CONCLUSION AND IMPACT ON INDUSTRY: Visibility is an important moderator in supervisory based safety interventions, and can serve to increase workplace safety. Implications of these findings for safety are discussed.

  5. Refugee children: mental health and effective interventions.

    PubMed

    Pacione, Laura; Measham, Toby; Rousseau, Cécile

    2013-02-01

    The mental health consequences of war and other forms of organized violence for children represent a serious global public health issue. Much of the research on the mental health of war-affected civilians has focused on refugees who have sought asylum in high-income countries and face the dual stress of a traumatic past and resettlement. This review will focus on the mental health of refugee children who have fled war as well as interventions to both prevent and treat adverse mental health outcomes. While war can have devastating mental health consequences, children raised in the midst of armed conflict also display resilience. Effective interventions for refugee children will be discussed both in terms of prevention and treatment of psychopathology, with a focus on recent developments in the field.

  6. Effectiveness of interventions to improve antidepressant medication adherence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chong, W W; Aslani, P; Chen, T F

    2011-09-01

    Non-adherence to antidepressant medications is a significant barrier to the successful treatment of depression in clinical practice. This review aims to systematically assess the effectiveness of interventions for improving antidepressant medication adherence among patients with unipolar depression, and to evaluate the effect of these interventions on depression clinical outcomes. MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE databases were searched for English-language randomised controlled trials published between January 1990 and December 2010 on interventions to improve antidepressant adherence. The impact of interventions on antidepressant medication adherence (compliance and persistence) and depression clinical outcomes was evaluated. Data concerning the quality of the included studies were also extracted. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Interventions were classified as educational, behavioural and multifaceted interventions. A total of 28 interventions were tested, as two studies investigated two interventions each. Sixteen (57%) of the 28 interventions showed significant effects on antidepressant adherence outcomes, whereas 12 (43%) interventions demonstrated significant effects on both antidepressant adherence and depression outcomes. The interventions which showed significant improvement in outcomes were primarily multifaceted and complex, with proactive care management and involvement of mental health specialists. The most commonly used elements of multifaceted interventions included patient educational strategies, telephone follow-up to monitor patients' progress, as well as providing medication support and feedback to primary care providers. Overall, educational interventions alone were ineffective in improving antidepressant medication adherence. In conclusion, improving adherence to antidepressants requires a complex behavioural change and there is some evidence to support behavioural and multifaceted interventions as the most effective in improving

  7. Unobtrusive monitoring of divided attention in a cognitive health coaching intervention for the elderly.

    PubMed

    McKanna, James A; Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly

    2010-11-13

    Assessment of cognitive functionality is an important aspect of care for elders. Unfortunately, few tools exist to measure divided attention, the ability to allocate attention to different aspects of tasks. An accurate determination of divided attention would allow inference of generalized cognitive decline, as well as providing a quantifiable indicator of an important component of driving skill. We propose a new method for determining relative divided attention ability through unobtrusive monitoring of computer use. Specifically, we measure performance on a dual-task cognitive computer exercise as part of a health coaching intervention. This metric indicates whether the user has the ability to pay attention to both tasks at once, or is primarily attending to one task at a time (sacrificing optimal performance). The monitoring of divided attention in a home environment is a key component of both the early detection of cognitive problems and for assessing the efficacy of coaching interventions.

  8. A remote monitoring and telephone nurse coaching intervention to reduce readmissions among patients with heart failure: study protocol for the Better Effectiveness After Transition - Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Black, Jeanne T; Romano, Patrick S; Sadeghi, Banafsheh; Auerbach, Andrew D; Ganiats, Theodore G; Greenfield, Sheldon; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Ong, Michael K

    2014-04-13

    Heart failure is a prevalent health problem associated with costly hospital readmissions. Transitional care programs have been shown to reduce readmissions but are costly to implement. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of telemonitoring in managing the care of this chronic condition is mixed. The objective of this randomized controlled comparative effectiveness study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a care transition intervention that includes pre-discharge education about heart failure and post-discharge telephone nurse coaching combined with home telemonitoring of weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and symptoms in reducing all-cause 180-day hospital readmissions for older adults hospitalized with heart failure. A multi-center, randomized controlled trial is being conducted at six academic health systems in California. A total of 1,500 patients aged 50 years and older will be enrolled during a hospitalization for treatment of heart failure. Patients in the intervention group will receive intensive patient education using the 'teach-back' method and receive instruction in using the telemonitoring equipment. Following hospital discharge, they will receive a series of nine scheduled health coaching telephone calls over 6 months from nurses located in a centralized call center. The nurses also will call patients and patients' physicians in response to alerts generated by the telemonitoring system, based on predetermined parameters. The primary outcome is readmission for any cause within 180 days. Secondary outcomes include 30-day readmission, mortality, hospital days, emergency department (ED) visits, hospital cost, and health-related quality of life. BEAT-HF is one of the largest randomized controlled trials of telemonitoring in patients with heart failure, and the first explicitly to adapt the care transition approach and combine it with remote telemonitoring. The study population also includes patients with a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic

  9. A remote monitoring and telephone nurse coaching intervention to reduce readmissions among patients with heart failure: study protocol for the Better Effectiveness After Transition - Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a prevalent health problem associated with costly hospital readmissions. Transitional care programs have been shown to reduce readmissions but are costly to implement. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of telemonitoring in managing the care of this chronic condition is mixed. The objective of this randomized controlled comparative effectiveness study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a care transition intervention that includes pre-discharge education about heart failure and post-discharge telephone nurse coaching combined with home telemonitoring of weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and symptoms in reducing all-cause 180-day hospital readmissions for older adults hospitalized with heart failure. Methods/Design A multi-center, randomized controlled trial is being conducted at six academic health systems in California. A total of 1,500 patients aged 50 years and older will be enrolled during a hospitalization for treatment of heart failure. Patients in the intervention group will receive intensive patient education using the ‘teach-back’ method and receive instruction in using the telemonitoring equipment. Following hospital discharge, they will receive a series of nine scheduled health coaching telephone calls over 6 months from nurses located in a centralized call center. The nurses also will call patients and patients’ physicians in response to alerts generated by the telemonitoring system, based on predetermined parameters. The primary outcome is readmission for any cause within 180 days. Secondary outcomes include 30-day readmission, mortality, hospital days, emergency department (ED) visits, hospital cost, and health-related quality of life. Discussion BEAT-HF is one of the largest randomized controlled trials of telemonitoring in patients with heart failure, and the first explicitly to adapt the care transition approach and combine it with remote telemonitoring. The study population also includes patients with a

  10. Text messaging data collection for monitoring an infant feeding intervention program in rural China: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Wang, Wei; van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Chen, Li; Car, Josip; Rudan, Igor; Zhang, Yanfeng; Wu, Qiong; Du, Xiaozhen; Scherpbier, Robert W

    2013-12-04

    An effective data collection method is crucial for high quality monitoring of health interventions. The traditional face-to-face data collection method is labor intensive, expensive, and time consuming. With the rapid increase of mobile phone subscribers, text messaging has the potential to be used for evaluation of population health interventions in rural China. The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of using text messaging as a data collection tool to monitor an infant feeding intervention program. Participants were caregivers of children aged 0 to 23 months in rural China who participated in an infant feeding health education program. We used the test-retest method. First, we collected data with a text messaging survey and then with a face-to-face survey for 2 periods of 3 days. We compared the response rate, data agreement, costs, and participants' acceptability of the two methods. Also, we interviewed participants to explore their reasons for not responding to the text messages and the reasons for disagreement in the two methods. In addition, we evaluated the most appropriate time during the day for sending text messages. We included 258 participants; 99 (38.4%) participated in the text messaging survey and 177 (68.6%) in the face-to-face survey. Compared with the face-to-face survey, the text messaging survey had much lower response rates to at least one question (38.4% vs 68.6%) and to all 7 questions (27.9% vs 67.4%) with moderate data agreement (most kappa values between .5 and .75, the intraclass correlation coefficients between .53 to .72). Participants who took part in both surveys gave the same acceptability rating for both methods (median 4.0 for both on a 5-point scale, 1=disliked very much and 5=liked very much). The costs per questionnaire for the text messaging method were much lower than the costs for the face-to-face method: ¥19.7 (US $3.13) versus ¥33.9 (US $5.39) for all questionnaires, and ¥27.1 (US $4.31) versus ¥34

  11. Text Messaging Data Collection for Monitoring an Infant Feeding Intervention Program in Rural China: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Chen, Li; Car, Josip; Rudan, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Du, Xiaozhen; Scherpbier, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Background An effective data collection method is crucial for high quality monitoring of health interventions. The traditional face-to-face data collection method is labor intensive, expensive, and time consuming. With the rapid increase of mobile phone subscribers, text messaging has the potential to be used for evaluation of population health interventions in rural China. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of using text messaging as a data collection tool to monitor an infant feeding intervention program. Methods Participants were caregivers of children aged 0 to 23 months in rural China who participated in an infant feeding health education program. We used the test-retest method. First, we collected data with a text messaging survey and then with a face-to-face survey for 2 periods of 3 days. We compared the response rate, data agreement, costs, and participants’ acceptability of the two methods. Also, we interviewed participants to explore their reasons for not responding to the text messages and the reasons for disagreement in the two methods. In addition, we evaluated the most appropriate time during the day for sending text messages. Results We included 258 participants; 99 (38.4%) participated in the text messaging survey and 177 (68.6%) in the face-to-face survey. Compared with the face-to-face survey, the text messaging survey had much lower response rates to at least one question (38.4% vs 68.6%) and to all 7 questions (27.9% vs 67.4%) with moderate data agreement (most kappa values between .5 and .75, the intraclass correlation coefficients between .53 to .72). Participants who took part in both surveys gave the same acceptability rating for both methods (median 4.0 for both on a 5-point scale, 1=disliked very much and 5=liked very much). The costs per questionnaire for the text messaging method were much lower than the costs for the face-to-face method: ¥19.7 (US $3.13) versus ¥33.9 (US $5.39) for all

  12. Effects of Intervention and Team Culture on Operating Room Traffic.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Ricardo W; Kester, Benjamin; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    How changes in the surgical team's culture can potentially reduce operating room (OR) traffic. Excessive OR traffic during surgical procedures can present a risk to the patient's safety and recovery. Data suggest that limiting the number of OR personnel during the intraoperative period can reduce excessive OR traffic. However, it is unclear whether the surgeon's verbal intervention can also successfully reduce intraoperative OR traffic. This study compares traffic rates in hip and knee arthroplasty cases against traffic rates during nonarthroplasty cases to examine the effects of verbal interventions implemented by the surgeon to reduce intraoperative traffic. The study consisted of 16 orthopedic surgeons in a noninterventional group and 1 orthopedic surgeon in the interventional group. The surgeon in the interventional group implemented verbal protocols to OR staff to limit excessive intraoperative traffic. Operating room traffic was monitored for 3 consecutive months (January-March 2015) with the use of infrared automated door counters that tracked door openings when someone entered or left the OR. A total of 50 hip and knee arthroplasties cases and 157 nonarthroplasty cases were tracked during the study period. A total of 134 hours and 4482 movements were collected for the hip and knee arthroplasty cases. A total of 498 hours and 22 902 movements were collected for the nonarthroplasty cases. Comparing the 2 groups, the interventional group averaged 33 movements per hour while the noninterventional group averaged 46 movements per hour (P < .001). These results suggest that operative room traffic can be reduced through simple verbal protocols established by the surgical team.

  13. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of a collaborative patient education hypertension intervention in Utah.

    PubMed

    Trogdon, Justin G; Larsen, Barbara; Larsen, David; Salas, Wendy; Snell, Matt

    2012-11-01

    This study analyzed the cost-effectiveness of a patient hypertension education intervention that provided patient education through interactive voice response technology and distribution of automated blood pressure monitors to high-risk plan members with uncontrolled hypertension. A total of 17,318 members were identified with hypertension in an administrative database. The study sample consisted of all 534 high-risk hypertensive plan members who received blood pressure monitors. Using data on activity-based program costs and changes in hypertension control, this study modeled the intervention's cost-effectiveness relative to no intervention. The intervention was estimated to have brought hypertension under control in 151 patients during the study year. Across all 534 participants in 1 year, 0.3 events (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and renal failure) were avoided and 2.77 life-years were gained (LYG). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the intervention compared with no intervention was $767 per person brought under control or $41,927 per LYG. If the gains in hypertension control from 1 year's investment were assumed to last 10 years, the 10-year ICER relative to no intervention was $1857 per LYG. The intervention is a cost-effective strategy to address hypertension and can serve as a model for future innovations.

  14. Differential Effects of Reinforcement on the Self-Monitoring of On-Task Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, Tiffany L.; Haut, Jillian M.

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, the differential effects of reinforcement on a self-monitoring intervention were evaluated. Three students nominated by their teachers for having a marked difficultly maintaining on-task behaviors participated in the study. Using an alternating treatments single-case design to assess self-monitoring with and without…

  15. Differential Effects of Reinforcement on the Self-Monitoring of On-Task Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, Tiffany L.; Haut, Jillian M.

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, the differential effects of reinforcement on a self-monitoring intervention were evaluated. Three students nominated by their teachers for having a marked difficultly maintaining on-task behaviors participated in the study. Using an alternating treatments single-case design to assess self-monitoring with and without…

  16. Behavioral Reactivity Associated With Electronic Monitoring of Environmental Health Interventions--A Cluster Randomized Trial with Water Filters and Cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Evan A; Tellez-Sanchez, Sarita; Wick, Carson; Kirby, Miles; Zambrano, Laura; Abadie Rosa, Ghislaine; Clasen, Thomas F; Nagel, Corey

    2016-04-05

    Subject reactivity--when research participants change their behavior in response to being observed--has been documented showing the effect of human observers. Electronics sensors are increasingly used to monitor environmental health interventions, but the effect of sensors on behavior has not been assessed. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Rwanda among 170 households (70 blinded to the presence of the sensor, 100 open) testing whether awareness of an electronic monitor would result in a difference in weekly use of household water filters and improved cookstoves over a four-week surveillance period. A 63% increase in number of uses of the water filter per week between the groups was observed in week 1, an average of 4.4 times in the open group and 2.83 times in the blind group, declining in week 4 to an insignificant 55% difference of 2.82 uses in the open, and 1.93 in the blind. There were no significant differences in the number of stove uses per week between the two groups. For both filters and stoves, use decreased in both groups over four-week installation periods. This study suggests behavioral monitoring should attempt to account for reactivity to awareness of electronic monitors that persists for weeks or more.

  17. Heliospheric modulation strength: effective neutron monitor energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanko, K.; Usoskin, I. G.; Mursula, K.; Kovaltsov, G. A.

    2003-08-01

    The widely used concept of the neutron monitor energy range is not well defined. Also, the median energy of a neutron monitor varies in the course of the solar cycle. Here we present a new concept of the effective energy of cosmic rays as measured by neutron monitors. Using a spherically-symmetric model of the heliospheric transport of cosmic rays and the specific yield function of a neutron monitor, we show that there is such an effective energy that the count rate of a given neutron monitor is directly proportional to the flux of cosmic rays with energy above this effective energy, irrespectively of the phase of the solar cycle. The new concept of the effective energy allows to regard the neutron monitor count rate as a direct measurement of the galactic cosmic ray flux with energy above this value. The effective energy varies from about 6 GeV for polar up to about 50 GeV for equatorial stations (e.g., it is about 6.5 GeV for high-latitude Oulu, 8 GeV for mid-latitude Climax and 40 GeV for equatorial Huancayo NM).

  18. Monitoring Guidance for Determining the Effectiveness of Nonpoint Source Controls

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A nonpoint source monitoring and evaluation guide written for use by those who monitor and those who evaluate monitoring proposals. It focuses on monitoring to determine the effectiveness of nonpoint source controls at the watershed and practice levels

  19. The effect of Transtheoretical Model based interventions on smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Aveyard, Paul; Massey, Louise; Parsons, Amanda; Manaseki, Semira; Griffin, Carl

    2009-02-01

    The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) proposes that stage matching improves the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions, such as for smoking cessation. It also proposes that standard smoking cessation interventions are matched to the relatively few smokers in the preparation stage and will not assist the majority of smokers, who are in the precontemplation or contemplation stages. This study tested the hypothesis that stage-matched interventions increase movement through the stages relative to interventions not stage-matched. It also tested the hypothesis that the relative effectiveness of stage-matched interventions is greater for people in precontemplation or contemplation (stage-matched for TTM but not for control) than for people in preparation (where both intervention and control were stage-matched). A total of 2471 UK adult smokers were randomised to either control or TTM-based self-help intervention and followed up 12 months after beginning the programme. Content analysis of the intervention and control self-help interventions examined whether control interventions were action-oriented, meaning they emphasised the processes of change relevant for preparation and action. Participants in the TTM arm were slightly more likely to make a positive move in stage, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that the TTM-based intervention was more effective for participants in precontemplation or contemplation than for participants in preparation. There was no evidence that TTM-based interventions were effective in this trial. The control intervention advocated process use appropriate for all stages and was not action-orientated. Stage matching does not explain the modest effects of TTM-based interventions over control interventions observed in some trials. These effects may instead have occurred because TTM-based interventions were more intensive than control interventions.

  20. Effective coverage: a metric for monitoring Universal Health Coverage.

    PubMed

    Ng, Marie; Fullman, Nancy; Dieleman, Joseph L; Flaxman, Abraham D; Murray, Christopher J L; Lim, Stephen S

    2014-09-01

    A major challenge in monitoring universal health coverage (UHC) is identifying an indicator that can adequately capture the multiple components underlying the UHC initiative. Effective coverage, which unites individual and intervention characteristics into a single metric, offers a direct and flexible means to measure health system performance at different levels. We view effective coverage as a relevant and actionable metric for tracking progress towards achieving UHC. In this paper, we review the concept of effective coverage and delineate the three components of the metric - need, use, and quality - using several examples. Further, we explain how the metric can be used for monitoring interventions at both local and global levels. We also discuss the ways that current health information systems can support generating estimates of effective coverage. We conclude by recognizing some of the challenges associated with producing estimates of effective coverage. Despite these challenges, effective coverage is a powerful metric that can provide a more nuanced understanding of whether, and how well, a health system is delivering services to its populations.

  1. Using smartphone video "selfies" to monitor change in toothbrushing behavior after a brief intervention: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Madan Kumar, Parangimalai Diwakar; Mohandoss, Anusa Arunachalam; Walls, Theodore; Rooban, Thavarajah; Vernon, Lance T

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to refine toothbrushing (TB) technique, an ingrained habit in adults, can meet with some challenges. Recently, the role of proactive interference as a barrier to improving the learning of proper brushing has been proposed. This pilot feasibility study was designed to investigate TB behavior and to see how it changes after training. Smartphone video "selfies" (SPVSs) are increasingly being used in the medical field to assess, monitor, and determine the progression of diseases. We used SPVS to study TB skills in a small sample of volunteers. Over a period of 14 days, after a one-time group training session, we observed TB behavior of volunteers using self-captured SPVS. Following the brief intervention, we observed an 8% of improvement in TB skills. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using SPVS to study TB behavior. We demonstrated initial feasibility of using SPVS in the dental setting. We observed modest improvements in toothbrushing accuracy and quality, and we generated important experiences about the use of Selfies for TB monitoring and intervention, and some interesting insights about where in the toothbrushing is more or less effective. Further investigation using a larger sample size is needed to thoroughly assess the effectiveness of this approach to improve TB skills and better understand the role of proactive interference.

  2. Masked Intervention Effects: Analytic Methods for Addressing Low Dosage of Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochman, John E.; Boxmeyer, Caroline; Powell, Nicole; Roth, David L.; Windle, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This chapter examines how a particular strategy for analyzing evaluation data, intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses, may underestimate the true effects of interventions. Such underestimation of intervention effects can profoundly influence policies for prevention and treatment of children's mental health problems, which can in turn lead to negative…

  3. Masked Intervention Effects: Analytic Methods for Addressing Low Dosage of Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochman, John E.; Boxmeyer, Caroline; Powell, Nicole; Roth, David L.; Windle, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This chapter examines how a particular strategy for analyzing evaluation data, intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses, may underestimate the true effects of interventions. Such underestimation of intervention effects can profoundly influence policies for prevention and treatment of children's mental health problems, which can in turn lead to negative…

  4. The Use of Individual Growth and Developmental Indicators for Progress Monitoring and Intervention Decision Making in Early Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Dale; Carta, Judith J.; Greenwood, Charles R.; Buzhardt, Joseph F.

    2008-01-01

    Progress monitoring tools have been shown to be essential elements in current approaches to intervention problem-solving models. Such tools have been valuable not only in marking individual children's level of performance relative to peers but also in measuring change in skill level in a way that can be attributed to intervention and development.…

  5. Remote Health Monitoring Outcome Success Prediction Using Baseline and First Month Intervention Data.

    PubMed

    Alshurafa, Nabil; Sideris, Costas; Pourhomayoun, Mohammad; Kalantarian, Haik; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Eastwood, Jo-Ann

    2017-03-01

    Remote health monitoring (RHM) systems are becoming more widely adopted by clinicians and hospitals to remotely monitor and communicate with patients while optimizing clinician time, decreasing hospital costs, and improving quality of care. In the Women's heart health study (WHHS), we developed Wanda-cardiovascular disease (CVD), where participants received healthy lifestyle education followed by six months of technology support and reinforcement. Wanda-CVD is a smartphone-based RHM system designed to assist participants in reducing identified CVD risk factors through wireless coaching using feedback and prompts as social support. Many participants benefitted from this RHM system. In response to the variance in participants' success, we developed a framework to identify classification schemes that predicted successful and unsuccessful participants. We analyzed both contextual baseline features and data from the first month of intervention such as activity, blood pressure, and questionnaire responses transmitted through the smartphone. A prediction tool can aid clinicians and scientists in identifying participants who may optimally benefit from the RHM system. Targeting therapies could potentially save healthcare costs, clinician, and participant time and resources. Our classification scheme yields RHM outcome success predictions with an F-measure of 91.9%, and identifies behaviors during the first month of intervention that help determine outcome success. We also show an improvement in prediction by using intervention-based smartphone data. Results from the WHHS study demonstrates that factors such as the variation in first month intervention response to the consumption of nuts, beans, and seeds in the diet help predict patient RHM protocol outcome success in a group of young Black women ages 25-45.

  6. Empty rituals? A qualitative study of users' experience of monitoring & evaluation systems in HIV interventions in western India.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anuprita; Teedon, Paul; Cornish, Flora

    2016-11-01

    In global health initiatives, particularly in the context of private philanthropy and its 'business minded' approach, detailed programme data plays an increasing role in informing assessments, improvements, evaluations, and ultimately continuation or discontinuation of funds for individual programmes. The HIV/AIDS literature predominantly treats monitoring as unproblematic. However, the social science of audit and indicators emphasises the constitutive power of indicators, noting that their effects at a grassroots level are often at odds with the goals specified in policy. This paper investigates users' experiences of Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) systems in the context of HIV interventions in western India. Six focus groups (totalling 51 participants) were held with employees of 6 different NGOs working for government or philanthropy-funded HIV interventions for sex workers in western India. Ten donor employees were interviewed. Thematic analysis was conducted. NGO employees described a major gap between what they considered their "real work" and the indicators used to monitor it. They could explain the official purposes of M&E systems in terms of programme improvement and financial accountability. More cynically, they valued M&E experience on their CVs and the rhetorical role of data in demonstrating their achievements. They believed that inappropriate and unethical means were being used to meet targets, including incentives and coercion, and criticised indicators for being misleading and inflexible. Donor employees valued the role of M&E in programme improvement, financial accountability, and professionalising NGO-donor relationships. However, they were suspicious that NGOs might be falsifying data, criticised the insensitivity of indicators, and complained that data were under-used. For its users, M& E appears an 'empty ritual', enacted because donors require it, but not put to local use. In this context, monitoring is constituted as an instrument of

  7. Patient perceptions of a remote monitoring intervention for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Holman, John E; Ray, Annette; Scherubel, Melody

    2011-04-01

    Use of telecommunications technology to provide remote monitoring for people with chronic disease is becoming increasingly accepted as a means to improve patient outcomes and reduce resource use. The purpose of this project was to evaluate patient perceptions of a nurse-managed remote monitoring intervention to improve outcomes in veterans with comorbid diabetes and hypertension. Postintervention evaluation data were collected using a 12-item questionnaire and an open-ended question. Participants rated the program as generally positive on the questionnaire, but responses to the open-ended question revealed criticisms and suggestions for improvement not captured on the questionnaire. Interviewing participants in these programs may offer richer data for identifying areas for program improvement.

  8. Development of temporal context-based feature abstractions for enabling monitoring and managing of interventions.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Pei-Yun Sabrina; Ramakrishnan, Sreeram; Yu, Ke; Akushevich, Marina; Sharma, Shweta; Mooiweer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Disease self-management programs and intervention/care plan monitoring are often unable to systematically leverage patient-generated information, especially those requiring interpretation of the temporal contexts of the measurement. While existing techniques help in capturing and storing the relevant data, their ability to determine appropriate metrics most sensitive to that individual is limited or non-existent. This is attributable to the lack of unifying models for enabling such interpretations and the non-trivial process required to generate meaningful feature abstractions to support individualized prognosis. To address these issues, a data-driven approach designed to identify the right abstractions for key features relevant to personalization and monitoring of care is discussed.

  9. The effect of continuous nursing intervention guided by chronotherapeutics on ambulatory blood pressure of older hypertensive patients in the community.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mei; Cheng, Shu-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Jiang, He; Cong, Ji-Yan; Zang, Xiao-Ying; Zhao, Yue

    2014-08-01

    To explore the effect of continuous nursing intervention guided by chronotherapeutics so as to provide the easy, noninvasive, effective and acceptable intervention for older hypertensive patients in the community. Many researchers studied the effect of administration at different times on blood pressure control and circadian rhythm. However, the individual administrative time was set ambiguously in previous studies. A semi-experimental study. In the study, 90 eligible patients were recruited and separated into three groups randomly, which were the control group, intervention group A (behaviour and chronotherapy intervention) and intervention group B (behaviour intervention). At 6 and 12 months after the study, the intervention groups were measured 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. There were significant differences in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring parameters of the two intervention groups at different measurement times, and there were interaction between measurement time and different groups. The number of patients with dipper increased and reverse dipper decreased in group A as the intervention applied. There were statistical differences between two groups. The number of patients with morning surge in group A decreased more, and there were statistical differences between two groups at six months after the intervention. The behaviour and chronotherapy intervention based on the patients' ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can control casual blood pressure much better and last longer, which can also improve patients' indexes of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring better than behaviour intervention only. The behaviour and chronotherapy intervention can increase patients' nocturnal blood pressure drop, increase the number of patients with dipper and decrease reverse dipper, and improve blood pressure surge in the morning. Nurses can use continuous nursing intervention guided by chronotherapeutics to help improve hypertension of older patients

  10. Clinical monitoring of smooth surface enamel lesions using CP-OCT during nonsurgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kenneth H; Tom, Henry; Lee, Robert C; Kang, Hobin; Simon, Jacob C; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L; Pelzner, Roger B; Fried, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Studies have shown that cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) can be used to image the internal structure of carious lesions in vivo. The objective of this study was to show that CP-OCT can be used to monitor changes in the internal structure of early active carious lesions on smooth surfaces during non-surgical intervention with fluoride. Lesions on the smooth surfaces of teeth were imaged using CP-OCT on 17 test subjects. Lesion structural changes were monitored during fluoride varnish application at 6-week intervals for 30 weeks. The lesion depth (Ld ), integrated reflectivity (ΔR), and surface zone thickness (Sz ) were monitored. A distinct transparent surface zone that may be indicative of lesion arrestment was visible in CP-OCT images on 62/63 lesions before application of fluoride varnish. The lesion depth and internal structure were resolved for all the lesions. The overall change in the mean values for Ld , ΔR, and Sz for all the lesions was minimal and was not significant during the study (P > 0.05). Only 5/63 lesions manifested a significant increase in Sz during intervention. Even though it appears that most of the lesions manifested little change with fluoride varnish application in the 30 weeks of the study, CP-OCT was able to measure the depth and internal structure of all the lesions including the thickness of the important transparent surface zone located at the surface of the lesions, indicating that CP-OCT is ideally suited for monitoring lesion severity in vivo. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:915-923, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of air quality interventions.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Annemoon M M; O'Keefe, Robert; Cohen, Aaron J; Warren, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Evaluating the extent to which air quality regulations improve public health--sometimes referred to as accountability--is part of an emerging effort to assess the effectiveness of environmental regulatory policies. Air quality has improved substantially in the United States and Western Europe in recent decades, with far less visible pollution and decreasing concentrations of several major pollutants. In large part, these gains were achieved through increasingly stringent air quality regulations. The costs associated with compliance and, importantly, the need to ensure that the regulations are achieving the intended public health benefits underscore the importance of accountability research. To date, accountability research has emphasized measuring the effects of actions already taken to improve air quality. Such research may also contribute to estimating the burden of disease that might be avoided in the future if certain actions are taken. The Health Effects Institute (HEI) currently funds eight ongoing studies on accountability, which cover near-term interventions to improve air quality including (1) a ban on the sale of coal, (2) replacing old wood stoves with cleaner ones, (3) decreasing sulfur content in fuel, (4) measures to reduce traffic, and (5) longer term, wide-ranging actions or events (such as complex changes associated with the reunification of Germany). HEI is also funding the development of methods and research to assess regulations that are implemented incrementally over extended periods of time, such as Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, which reduces sulfur dioxide emissions from power plants in the eastern United States.

  12. Computer-Assisted Dieting: Effects of a Randomized Nutrition Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroder, Kerstin E. E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of a computer-assisted dieting intervention (CAD) with and without self-management training on dieting among 55 overweight and obese adults. Methods: Random assignment to a single-session nutrition intervention (CAD-only) or a combined CAD plus self-management group intervention (CADG). Dependent variables were…

  13. A Blueprint for Effectively Using RTI Intervention Block Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins Averill, Orla; Baker, Diana; Rinaldi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Many schools have adopted schoolwide intervention blocks as a component of response-to-intervention (RTI) implementation to ensure that students who need intervention are receiving it. However, virtually no peer-reviewed guidance exists for helping teachers manage this time effectively. This article presents a blueprint for organizing intervention…

  14. Computer-Assisted Dieting: Effects of a Randomized Nutrition Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroder, Kerstin E. E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of a computer-assisted dieting intervention (CAD) with and without self-management training on dieting among 55 overweight and obese adults. Methods: Random assignment to a single-session nutrition intervention (CAD-only) or a combined CAD plus self-management group intervention (CADG). Dependent variables were…

  15. The Effects of Educational Intervention on Perceptions of Sexual Harassment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonate, Diana L.; Jessell, John C.

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the effects of educational intervention upon perceptions of sexual harassment. Results from 96 subjects reveal that educational intervention impacted perception of sexual harassment, with literature interventions showing superiority over video. Gender differences in sensitivity to sexual harassment in favor of females prior to…

  16. The Effects of Educational Intervention on Perceptions of Sexual Harassment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonate, Diana L.; Jessell, John C.

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the effects of educational intervention upon perceptions of sexual harassment. Results from 96 subjects reveal that educational intervention impacted perception of sexual harassment, with literature interventions showing superiority over video. Gender differences in sensitivity to sexual harassment in favor of females prior to…

  17. A Blueprint for Effectively Using RTI Intervention Block Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins Averill, Orla; Baker, Diana; Rinaldi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Many schools have adopted schoolwide intervention blocks as a component of response-to-intervention (RTI) implementation to ensure that students who need intervention are receiving it. However, virtually no peer-reviewed guidance exists for helping teachers manage this time effectively. This article presents a blueprint for organizing intervention…

  18. Effects of a Forgiveness Intervention for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allemand, Mathias; Steiner, Marianne; Hill, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors' aim in the present study was to examine the effects of a brief forgiveness intervention for older adults. The psychoeducational group intervention consists of (a) established core components of previous forgiveness interventions and (b) additional components considering specific needs of older adults. Seventy-eight older adults (mean…

  19. Teaching Strategies for Effective Fifth Grade Math Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zank, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine what effects explicit and systematic math intervention instruction will have on student's performance on math assessments. The study will focus on a small group of fifth grade students that have been identified as needing targeted intervention (tier 2) and intensive interventions (tier 1) through the…

  20. Advancing Intervention Science through Effectiveness Research: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Adamson, Lena; Kumpfer, Karol L.; Eichas, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effectiveness research is maturing as a field within intervention and prevention science. Effectiveness research involves the implementation and evaluation of the effectiveness of the dissemination of evidence-based interventions in everyday circumstances (i.e., type 2 translational research). Effectiveness research is characterized by…

  1. Facilitators and barriers for the adoption, implementation and monitoring of child safety interventions: a multinational qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholtes, Beatrice; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; MacKay, J Morag; Vincenten, Joanne; Förster, Katharina; Brand, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    The efficiency and effectiveness of child safety interventions are determined by the quality of the implementation process. This multinational European study aimed to identify facilitators and barriers for the three phases of implementation: adoption, implementation and monitoring (AIM process). Twenty-seven participants from across the WHO European Region were invited to provide case studies of child safety interventions from their country. Cases were selected by the authors to ensure broad coverage of injury issues, age groups and governance level of implementation (eg, national, regional or local). Each participant presented their case and provided a written account according to a standardised template. Presentations and question and answer sessions were recorded. The presentation slides, written accounts and the notes taken during the workshops were analysed using thematic content analysis to elicit facilitators and barriers. Twenty-six cases (from 26 different countries) were presented and analysed. Facilitators and barriers were identified within eight general themes, applicable across the AIM process: management and collaboration; resources; leadership; nature of the intervention; political, social and cultural environment; visibility; nature of the injury problem and analysis and interpretation. The importance of the quality of the implementation process for intervention effectiveness, coupled with limited resources for child safety makes it more difficult to achieve successful actions. The findings of this study, divided by phase of the AIM process, provide practitioners with practical suggestions, where proactive planning might help increase the likelihood of effective implementation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Differential effects of reinforcement on the self-monitoring of on-task behavior.

    PubMed

    Otero, Tiffany L; Haut, Jillian M

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, the differential effects of reinforcement on a self-monitoring intervention were evaluated. Three students nominated by their teachers for having a marked difficultly maintaining on-task behaviors participated in the study. Using an alternating treatments single-case design to assess self-monitoring with and without reinforcement, students self-monitored their on-task behavior while being prompted by a vibrating timer at 1-min intervals for 20-min sessions. The investigators collected data regarding the students' percentage of intervals on-task and the accuracy of their recordings. Accuracy was measured by calculating the percent of agreement between the observer and student. For half of the self-monitoring sessions, students were provided reinforcement for matching at least 80% of their self-monitored ratings with those of the observer. Results indicated that self-monitoring alone was effective for 2 students in increasing their on-task behaviors in a general education classroom and self-monitoring with reinforcement was effective for all 3. Two students demonstrated an increase in on-task behavior when self-monitoring was paired with the opportunity to receive reinforcement compared to self-monitoring alone. Percentage of nonoverlapping data for self-monitoring without reinforcement ranged from 16.6% to 100%, and self-monitoring with reinforcement ranged from 83% to 100%. Additionally, the opportunity to receive reinforcement impacted students' accuracy in self-monitoring resulting in more accurate self-recording of on-task behavior. Including reinforcement as a component of a self-monitoring intervention package is an important consideration as it may impact the effectiveness of the intervention for students with significant difficulties maintaining attention to tasks. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. When drugs don't work: economic assessment of enhancing compliance with interventions supported by electronic monitoring devices.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Dyfrig

    2007-01-01

    Non-compliance with prescribed regimens poses a significant problem in clinical therapeutics - patients who do not take their medications according to the labelling instructions are at higher risk of treatment failure, and this may have adverse effects on health outcome and healthcare costs. There is increasing evidence on strategies aimed at improving compliance, but most studies do not implement an unbiased technique for measuring compliance. Patients and clinicians alike are notoriously unreliable in assessing compliance; the use of electronic compliance-monitoring devices (ECMDs) is one of the most robust ways to identify non-compliance and assess the effectiveness of interventions aimed at promoting compliance. ECMDs may also form a part of the intervention, by allowing the health professional to provide feedback to the patient on his/her dosing history. This approach has been referred to as a 'measurement-guided medication management (MGMM) programme'.This article reviews the evidence on the effectiveness of MGMM programmes based on ECMDs, and sets out a framework for assessing their economic value. Existing studies focus primarily on the impact of MGMM programmes on compliance. However, to generalise to other settings, including routine practice, further evidence is required on their clinical and cost effectiveness. Specifically, more studies are required to assess whether the observed improvements in compliance translate to improvements in health outcomes, and whether these may be achieved in a cost-effective manner.

  4. Effective Intervention for School Refusal Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Clare; Woods, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of successful professional intervention for two case studies of female adolescents' school refusal behaviour is presented. Data gathered from the young person, professionals, and parents in each case are synthesised to propose a multi-level, ecologically situated model of intervention for school refusal behaviour. The proposed model…

  5. Effective Intervention for School Refusal Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Clare; Woods, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of successful professional intervention for two case studies of female adolescents' school refusal behaviour is presented. Data gathered from the young person, professionals, and parents in each case are synthesised to propose a multi-level, ecologically situated model of intervention for school refusal behaviour. The proposed model…

  6. Systematic Review of School-based Interventions to Modify Dietary Behavior: Does Intervention Intensity Impact Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racey, Megan; O'Brien, Charlene; Douglas, Sabrina; Marquez, Olivia; Hendrie, Gilly; Newton, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Owing to the associations between diet and health, it is important that effective health promotion strategies establish healthful eating behaviors from an early age. We reviewed the intensity of school-based interventions aimed to modify dietary behavior in preadolescent and adolescents and related intervention characteristics to…

  7. Effects of Intensive Reading Intervention for Eighth-Grade Students with Persistently Inadequate Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Wexler, Jade; Leroux, Audrey; Roberts, Greg; Denton, Carolyn; Barth, Amy; Fletcher, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the effects of a yearlong, very small-group, intensive reading intervention for eighth-grade students with serious reading difficulties who had demonstrated low response to intervention (RTI) in both Grades 6 and 7. At the beginning of Grade 6, a cohort of students identified as having reading difficulties were randomized to…

  8. The Life Interventions for Family Effectiveness (LIFE) Project: Preliminary Findings on Alternative School Intervention for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Donnie W.; Mouttapa, Michele; Reiber, Chris; McCuller, William Jason; Arancibia, Ruben; Kavich, Julia A.; Nieves, Elena; Novgrod, Judith; Mai, Noemi; Bisesi, Lorrie; Sim, Tiffanie

    2007-01-01

    A non-randomized control trial was conducted to assess the feasibility and efficacy of the Life Interventions for Family Effectiveness (LIFE) project: a family-based, evidence-based comprehensive substance abuse intervention for at-risk adolescents and their families. The Matrix Adolescent Treatment Model of program delivery was utilized in the…

  9. Effects of Intensive Reading Intervention for Eighth-Grade Students with Persistently Inadequate Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Wexler, Jade; Leroux, Audrey; Roberts, Greg; Denton, Carolyn; Barth, Amy; Fletcher, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the effects of a yearlong, very small-group, intensive reading intervention for eighth-grade students with serious reading difficulties who had demonstrated low response to intervention (RTI) in both Grades 6 and 7. At the beginning of Grade 6, a cohort of students identified as having reading difficulties were randomized to…

  10. The Utility of Brief Experimental Analysis and Extended Intervention Analysis in Selecting Effective Mathematics Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mong, Michael D.; Mong, Kristi W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the utility of brief experimental analysis (BEA) in predicting effective interventions for increasing the math fluency of 3 elementary students identified as having math skill deficits. Baseline data were collected followed by implementation of a BEA consisting of the following interventions: cover, copy, and compare,…

  11. Feasibility of a semiconductor dosimeter to monitor skin dose in interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; Regal, R; Jung, M; Siffert, P; Mertz, L; Constantinesco, A

    2001-10-01

    The design and preliminary test results of a semiconductor silicon dosimeter are presented in this article. Use of this dosimeter is foreseen for real-time skin dose control in interventional radiology. The strong energy dependence of this kind of radiation detector is well overcome by filtering the silicon diode. Here, the optimal filter features have been calculated by numerical Monte Carlo simulations. A prototype has been built and tested in a radiological facility. The first experimental results show a good match between the filtered semiconductor diode response and an ionization chamber response, within 2% fluctuation in a 2.2 to 4.1 mm Al half-value layer (HVL) energy range. Moreover, the semiconductor sensor response is linear from 0.02 Gy/min to at least 6.5 Gy/min, covering the whole dose rate range found in interventional radiology. The results show that a semiconductor dosimeter could be used to monitor skin dose during the majority of procedures using x-rays below 150 keV. The use of this device may assist in avoiding radiation-induced skin injuries and lower radiation levels during interventional procedures.

  12. Improving Patient Safety: Implementing Dose Monitoring Software in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventions.

    PubMed

    Heilmaier, Christina; Niklaus, Zuber; Berthold, Christian; Kara, Levent; Weishaupt, Dominik

    2015-11-01

    To assess whether dose monitoring software can be successfully implemented in fluoroscopically guided interventions and to provide dose data based on levels of complexity. After launching the software (DoseWatch; GE Healthcare Systems, Buc, France), data were collected for 6 months and analyzed by means of kerma-area product (KAP; Gy/cm(2)), cumulative air kerma (KA,R; Gy), and fluoroscopic time (minutes). Data analysis was executed by level of complexity as graded by the operators. Complexity grading was based on factors such as tortuosity and calcification of vessel, variant anatomy, and patient cooperation. The software successfully transferred dose data of 357 fluoroscopically guided procedures. KAP was 0.238-400 Gy/cm(2) with mean, median, and 75th percentile values of 46.0 Gy/cm(2), 163.2 Gy/cm(2), and 541.1 Gy/cm(2) (KA,R, 0.013-4.1 Gy; mean, median, 75th percentile, 0.48 Gy, 0.97 Gy, 3.98 Gy). Highest dose values were seen in transarterial chemoembolization (KAP mean, median, 75th percentile, 229.5 Gy/cm(2), 216.4 Gy/cm(2), 299.9 Gy/cm(2); KA,R mean, median, 75th percentile, 1.9 Gy, 1.2 Gy, 1.7 Gy). Analysis revealed that the level of complexity strongly correlated with KAP (r = 0.88; P < .001) whereas there was no direct correlation of KAP and fluoroscopy time. During the same intervention, KA,R and fluoroscopy time increased with level of complexity, but the correlation was not statistically significant. Implementation of dose monitoring software in fluoroscopically guided interventions can be successfully accomplished, and it facilitates data comparison. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy of Internet-Based Self-Monitoring Interventions on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Perinatal Diabetic Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Tha Pyai; Wong, Suei Nee; Tam, Wai San Wilson; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring using the Internet offers new opportunities to engage perinatal diabetic women in self-management to reduce maternal and neonatal complications. Objective This review aims to synthesize the best available evidence to evaluate the efficacy of Internet-based self-monitoring interventions in improving maternal and neonatal outcomes among perinatal diabetic women. Methods The review was conducted using Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsyINFO, Scopus, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses to search for English-language research studies without any year limitation. A risk of bias table was used to assess methodological quality. Meta-analysis was performed with RevMan software. Cochran Q and I2 tests were used to assess heterogeneity. The overall effect was assessed using z tests at P<.05. Of the 438 studies identified through electronic searches and reference lists, nine experimental studies from 10 publications were selected. Results Half of the selected studies showed low risk of bias and comprised 852 perinatal diabetic women in six countries. The meta-analysis revealed that Internet-based self-monitoring interventions significantly decreased the level of maternal glycated hemoglobin A1c (z=2.23, P=.03) compared to usual care among perinatal diabetic women at postintervention. Moreover, Internet-based self-monitoring interventions significantly decreased the cesarean delivery rate (z=2.23, P=.03) compared to usual care among the mixed group at postintervention. Conclusions This review shows neonatal or other maternal outcomes are similar between Internet-based self-monitoring interventions and usual diabetes care among perinatal diabetic women. The long-term effects of the intervention must be confirmed in future studies using randomized controlled trials and follow-up data. PMID:27526637

  14. Efficacy of Internet-Based Self-Monitoring Interventions on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Perinatal Diabetic Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ying; Htun, Tha Pyai; Wong, Suei Nee; Tam, Wai San Wilson; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee

    2016-08-15

    Self-monitoring using the Internet offers new opportunities to engage perinatal diabetic women in self-management to reduce maternal and neonatal complications. This review aims to synthesize the best available evidence to evaluate the efficacy of Internet-based self-monitoring interventions in improving maternal and neonatal outcomes among perinatal diabetic women. The review was conducted using Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsyINFO, Scopus, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses to search for English-language research studies without any year limitation. A risk of bias table was used to assess methodological quality. Meta-analysis was performed with RevMan software. Cochran Q and I(2) tests were used to assess heterogeneity. The overall effect was assessed using z tests at P<.05. Of the 438 studies identified through electronic searches and reference lists, nine experimental studies from 10 publications were selected. Half of the selected studies showed low risk of bias and comprised 852 perinatal diabetic women in six countries. The meta-analysis revealed that Internet-based self-monitoring interventions significantly decreased the level of maternal glycated hemoglobin A1c (z=2.23, P=.03) compared to usual care among perinatal diabetic women at postintervention. Moreover, Internet-based self-monitoring interventions significantly decreased the cesarean delivery rate (z=2.23, P=.03) compared to usual care among the mixed group at postintervention. This review shows neonatal or other maternal outcomes are similar between Internet-based self-monitoring interventions and usual diabetes care among perinatal diabetic women. The long-term effects of the intervention must be confirmed in future studies using randomized controlled trials and follow-up data.

  15. Research considerations for more effective groundwater monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since numerous pathogens can occur in feces, water has traditionally been monitored for fecal contamination by detecting fecal indicator organisms rather than the pathogens themselves. Although this approach is backed up by health effects data in recreational waters, it has been...

  16. Research considerations for more effective groundwater monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since numerous pathogens can occur in feces, water has traditionally been monitored for fecal contamination by detecting fecal indicator organisms rather than the pathogens themselves. Although this approach is backed up by health effects data in recreational waters, it has been...

  17. Validity Estimates and Functionality of Materials and Procedures Used to Monitor the Implementation Integrity of a Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeny, John; Upright, James; Easton, Julia; Ehrenbock, Cassia; Tunstall, Kali

    2013-01-01

    Observing for, documenting, and improving implementation integrity are critical components of effective intervention services in schools. Without them, students may not receive effective intervention, and systems-level models of intervention service-delivery may never be properly evaluated or realize its potential. The purpose of this study was to…

  18. Validity Estimates and Functionality of Materials and Procedures Used to Monitor the Implementation Integrity of a Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeny, John; Upright, James; Easton, Julia; Ehrenbock, Cassia; Tunstall, Kali

    2013-01-01

    Observing for, documenting, and improving implementation integrity are critical components of effective intervention services in schools. Without them, students may not receive effective intervention, and systems-level models of intervention service-delivery may never be properly evaluated or realize its potential. The purpose of this study was to…

  19. Adherence to Self-Monitoring via Interactive Voice Response Technology in an eHealth Intervention Targeting Weight Gain Prevention Among Black Women: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background eHealth interventions are effective for weight control and have the potential for broad reach. Little is known about the use of interactive voice response (IVR) technology for self-monitoring in weight control interventions, particularly among populations disproportionately affected by obesity. Objective This analysis sought to examine patterns and predictors of IVR self-monitoring adherence and the association between adherence and weight change among low-income black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Methods The Shape Program was a randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-month eHealth behavioral weight gain prevention intervention to usual care among overweight and obese black women in the primary care setting. Intervention participants (n=91) used IVR technology to self-monitor behavior change goals (eg, no sugary drinks, 10,000 steps per day) via weekly IVR calls. Weight data were collected in clinic at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Self-monitoring data was stored in a study database and adherence was operationalized as the percent of weeks with a successful IVR call. Results Over 12 months, the average IVR completion rate was 71.6% (SD 28.1) and 52% (47/91) had an IVR completion rate ≥80%. At 12 months, IVR call completion was significantly correlated with weight loss (r =−.22; P=.04) and participants with an IVR completion rate ≥80% had significantly greater weight loss compared to those with an IVR completion rate <80% (−1.97 kg, SE 0.67 vs 0.48 kg, SE 0.69; P=.01). Similar outcomes were found for change in body mass index (BMI; mean difference −0.94 kg, 95% CI −1.64 to −0.24; P=.009). Older, more educated participants were more likely to achieve high IVR call completion. Participants reported positive attitudes toward IVR self-monitoring. Conclusions Adherence to IVR self-monitoring was high among socioeconomically disadvantaged black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Higher adherence

  20. Adherence to self-monitoring via interactive voice response technology in an eHealth intervention targeting weight gain prevention among Black women: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Dori M; Levine, Erica L; Lane, Ilana; Askew, Sandy; Foley, Perry B; Puleo, Elaine; Bennett, Gary G

    2014-04-29

    eHealth interventions are effective for weight control and have the potential for broad reach. Little is known about the use of interactive voice response (IVR) technology for self-monitoring in weight control interventions, particularly among populations disproportionately affected by obesity. This analysis sought to examine patterns and predictors of IVR self-monitoring adherence and the association between adherence and weight change among low-income black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. The Shape Program was a randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-month eHealth behavioral weight gain prevention intervention to usual care among overweight and obese black women in the primary care setting. Intervention participants (n=91) used IVR technology to self-monitor behavior change goals (eg, no sugary drinks, 10,000 steps per day) via weekly IVR calls. Weight data were collected in clinic at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Self-monitoring data was stored in a study database and adherence was operationalized as the percent of weeks with a successful IVR call. Over 12 months, the average IVR completion rate was 71.6% (SD 28.1) and 52% (47/91) had an IVR completion rate ≥80%. At 12 months, IVR call completion was significantly correlated with weight loss (r =-.22; P=.04) and participants with an IVR completion rate ≥80% had significantly greater weight loss compared to those with an IVR completion rate <80% (-1.97 kg, SE 0.67 vs 0.48 kg, SE 0.69; P=.01). Similar outcomes were found for change in body mass index (BMI; mean difference -0.94 kg, 95% CI -1.64 to -0.24; P=.009). Older, more educated participants were more likely to achieve high IVR call completion. Participants reported positive attitudes toward IVR self-monitoring. Adherence to IVR self-monitoring was high among socioeconomically disadvantaged black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Higher adherence to IVR self-monitoring was also associated with greater

  1. The Multiphase Optimization Strategy for Engineering Effective Tobacco Use Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Linda M.; Baker, Timothy B.; Mermelstein, Robin J.; Piper, Megan E.; Jorenby, Douglas E.; Smith, Stevens S.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Schlam, Tanya R.; Cook, Jessica W.; Fiore, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) is a new methodological approach for building, optimizing, and evaluating multicomponent interventions. Conceptually rooted in engineering, MOST emphasizes efficiency and careful management of resources to move intervention science forward steadily and incrementally. MOST can be used to guide the evaluation of research evidence, develop an optimal intervention (the best set of intervention components), and enhance the translation of research findings, particularly Type II translation. This article uses an ongoing study to illustrate the application of MOST in the evaluation of diverse intervention components derived from the phase-based framework reviewed in the companion article by Baker et al. (1). The article also discusses considerations, challenges, and potential benefits associated with using MOST and similar principled approaches to improving intervention efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The applicability of this methodology may extend beyond smoking cessation to the development of behavioral interventions for other chronic health challenges. PMID:21132416

  2. Fast Track intervention effects on youth arrests and delinquency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of the Fast Track preventive intervention on youth arrests and self-reported delinquent behavior through age 19. High-risk youth randomly assigned to receive a long-term, comprehensive preventive intervention from 1st grade through 10th grade at four sites were compared to high-risk control youth. Findings indicated that random assignment to Fast Track reduced court-recorded juvenile arrest activity based on a severity weighted sum of juvenile arrests. Supplementary analyses revealed an intervention effect on the reduction in the number of court-recorded moderate-severity juvenile arrests, relative to control children. In addition, among youth with higher initial behavioral risk, the intervention reduced the number of high-severity adult arrests relative to the control youth. Survival analyses examining the onset of arrests and delinquent behavior revealed a similar pattern of findings. Intervention decreased the probability of any juvenile arrest among intervention youth not previously arrested. In addition, intervention decreased the probability of a self-reported high-severity offense among youth with no previous self-reported high-severity offense. Intervention effects were also evident on the onset of high-severity court-recorded adult arrests among participants, but these effects varied by site. The current findings suggest that comprehensive preventive intervention can prevent juvenile arrest rates, although the presence and nature of intervention effects differs by outcome. PMID:20577576

  3. A pragmatic approach to measuring, monitoring and evaluating interventions for improved tuberculosis case detection

    PubMed Central

    Blok, Lucie; Creswell, Jacob; Stevens, Robert; Brouwer, Miranda; Ramis, Oriol; Weil, Olivier; Klatser, Paul; Sahu, Suvanand; Bakker, Mirjam I.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to detect all individuals with active tuberculosis has led to a growing interest in new approaches to improve case detection. Policy makers and program staff face important challenges measuring effectiveness of newly introduced interventions and reviewing feasibility of scaling-up successful approaches. While robust research will continue to be needed to document impact and influence policy, it may not always be feasible for all interventions and programmatic evidence is also critical to understand what can be expected in routine settings. The effects of interventions on early and improved tuberculosis detection can be documented through well-designed program evaluations. We present a pragmatic framework for evaluating and measuring the effect of improved case detection strategies using systematically collected intervention data in combination with routine tuberculosis notification data applying historical and contemporary controls. Standardized process evaluation and systematic documentation of program implementation design, cost and context will contribute to explaining observed levels of success and may help to identify conditions needed for success. Findings can then guide decisions on scale-up and replication in different target populations and settings. PMID:25100402

  4. A pragmatic approach to measuring, monitoring and evaluating interventions for improved tuberculosis case detection.

    PubMed

    Blok, Lucie; Creswell, Jacob; Stevens, Robert; Brouwer, Miranda; Ramis, Oriol; Weil, Olivier; Klatser, Paul; Sahu, Suvanand; Bakker, Mirjam I

    2014-09-01

    The inability to detect all individuals with active tuberculosis has led to a growing interest in new approaches to improve case detection. Policy makers and program staff face important challenges measuring effectiveness of newly introduced interventions and reviewing feasibility of scaling-up successful approaches. While robust research will continue to be needed to document impact and influence policy, it may not always be feasible for all interventions and programmatic evidence is also critical to understand what can be expected in routine settings. The effects of interventions on early and improved tuberculosis detection can be documented through well-designed program evaluations. We present a pragmatic framework for evaluating and measuring the effect of improved case detection strategies using systematically collected intervention data in combination with routine tuberculosis notification data applying historical and contemporary controls. Standardized process evaluation and systematic documentation of program implementation design, cost and context will contribute to explaining observed levels of success and may help to identify conditions needed for success. Findings can then guide decisions on scale-up and replication in different target populations and settings.

  5. Effects of a forgiveness intervention for older adults.

    PubMed

    Allemand, Mathias; Steiner, Marianne; Hill, Patrick L

    2013-04-01

    The authors' aim in the present study was to examine the effects of a brief forgiveness intervention for older adults. The psychoeducational group intervention consists of (a) established core components of previous forgiveness interventions and (b) additional components considering specific needs of older adults. Seventy-eight older adults (mean age 70.1 years) were randomized to a treatment condition or a waiting-list control condition. The intervention reduced the levels of perceived actual transgression painfulness, transgression-related emotions and cognitions, and negative affect. These findings suggest the promise of forgiveness interventions for older adults that help participants clarify and deal with past, present, and future interpersonal transgressions.

  6. Effects of web-based interventions on cancer patients' symptoms: review of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Fridriksdottir, N; Gunnarsdottir, S; Zoëga, S; Ingadottir, B; Hafsteinsdottir, E J G

    2017-09-18

    Symptom management is of high priority in cancer care. Information and communication technology allows interventions to be provided through the internet to enhance the delivery of care. This study aimed to review the effects of web-based interventions on cancer patients' symptoms. MEDLINE, PSychINFO, PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched. Included were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), pilot RCTs, or quasi-experimental (QE) studies focusing on web-based interventions in adult cancer patients with at least one outcome primary or secondary, in terms of symptoms, treatment side effects, or distress. Data were analyzed study by study. Twenty studies were identified. All web interventions included information, 16 included self-management support, 14 included self-monitoring, 13 included feedback/tailored information, 12 used communication with health-care professionals, and eight used communication with other patients. Overall, 13 studies reported positive symptom outcomes. Psychological distress was reported in eight studies with positive intervention effects in three. Symptoms of anxiety/depression were reported in ten studies with positive intervention effects in five. Somatic symptom severity was reported in ten studies with intervention effects found in six, and symptom distress was reported in six studies with intervention effects found in all. This review shows the promising potential of web-based interventions for cancer symptom management, although it was limited by considerable heterogeneity in the interventions tested and targeted outcomes. The multidimensional nature of symptoms was partly addressed; only one study was guided by a comprehensive theoretical model of cancer symptom management. It can only be speculated which web elements are important for effective symptom outcomes. Further testing is needed for web-based cancer symptom management.

  7. Effectiveness of a Pregnancy Smoking Intervention: The Tennessee Intervention for Pregnant Smokers Program.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Beth A

    2015-12-01

    Despite the known dangers of pregnancy smoking, rates remain high, especially in the rural, Southern United States. Interventions are effective, but few have been developed and tested in regions with high rates of pregnancy smoking, a culture that normalizes smoking, and a hard-to-reach prenatal population. The goals were to describe a smoking cessation intervention, the Tennessee Intervention for Pregnant Smokers program, and examine the impact on quit rates compared to usual care. Additionally we sought to examine reduction in smoking levels and number of quit attempts related to the intervention and finally to examine the impact of the intervention on birth outcomes. Intervention and historical control group participants, all smokers at entry to prenatal care, were recruited from five medical practices providing prenatal care in rural, South-Central Appalachia. The intervention, an expanded 5A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, Arrange) model, was delivered by trained health educators. Over 28% of intervention group women quit smoking, compared to 9.8% in the control group. Two thirds of intervention group women significantly reduced smoking by delivery, with 40%+ attempting to quit at least once. Compared to controls, intervention group women saw significantly better birth outcomes, including newborns weighing 270g more and 50% less likely to have a neonatal intensive care unit admission. Among intervention group participants, those who quit smoking had significantly better birth outcomes than those who did not quit smoking. Findings point to the potential for appropriately tailored pregnancy smoking interventions to produce substantial improvements in birth outcomes within populations with health disparities.

  8. Effects of an obesity intervention program on cognitive function in children: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Larsen, Kristian Traberg; Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Møller, Niels Christian; Thorsen, Anne Kaer; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2015-10-01

    Adiposity may be associated with poorer cognitive function in children. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of an obesity intervention on cognitive function in children. One hundred and fifteen children were randomly allocated to either the Day Camp Intervention Arm (DCIA) or the Standard Intervention Arm (SIA). Children in the DCIA participated in a 6-week day camp intervention and a subsequent 46-week family-based intervention. The camp intervention mainly consisted of physical exercise and health classes. The SIA was offered one weekly physical exercise session for 6 weeks and one educational meeting. Anthropometrics and cognitive function were measured at baseline, 6 weeks, and 52 weeks. At 6 weeks, the improvement in visuospatial construction skills was larger in the DCIA than the SIA (standardized mean difference, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.86, P = 0.02). At 52 weeks, the improvements in emotional control (standardized mean difference, -0.42, 95% CI, -0.68 to -0.16, P = 0.002) and monitoring (standardized mean difference, -0.32, 95% CI, -0.63 to -0.02, P = 0.04) were larger in the DCIA than the SIA. No group differences were observed in changes in other cognitive outcomes. The obesity intervention may benefit emotional control, monitoring, and visuospatial construction skills in children. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  9. Can a Costly Intervention Be Cost-effective?

    PubMed Central

    Foster, E. Michael; Jones, Damon

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine the cost-effectiveness of the Fast Track intervention, a multi-year, multi-component intervention designed to reduce violence among at-risk children. A previous report documented the favorable effect of intervention on the highest-risk group of ninth-graders diagnosed with conduct disorder, as well as self-reported delinquency. The current report addressed the cost-effectiveness of the intervention for these measures of program impact. Design Costs of the intervention were estimated using program budgets. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were computed to determine the cost per unit of improvement in the 3 outcomes measured in the 10th year of the study. Results Examination of the total sample showed that the intervention was not cost-effective at likely levels of policymakers' willingness to pay for the key outcomes. Subsequent analysis of those most at risk, however, showed that the intervention likely was cost-effective given specified willingness-to-pay criteria. Conclusions Results indicate that the intervention is cost-effective for the children at highest risk. From a policy standpoint, this finding is encouraging because such children are likely to generate higher costs for society over their lifetimes. However, substantial barriers to cost-effectiveness remain, such as the ability to effectively identify and recruit such higher-risk children in future implementations. PMID:17088509

  10. A review of the nature and effectiveness of nutrition interventions in adult males – a guide for intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy excess, low fruit and vegetable intake and other suboptimal dietary habits contribute to an increased poor health and the burden of disease in males. However the best way to engage males into nutrition programs remains unclear. This review provides a critical evaluation of the nature and effectiveness of nutrition interventions that target the adult male population. Methods A search for full-text publications was conducted using The Cochrane Library; Web of Science; SCOPUS; MEDLINE and CINAHL. Studies were included if 1) published from January 1990 to August 2011 and 2) male only studies (≥18 years) or 3) where males contributed to >90% of the active cohort. A study must have described, (i) a significant change (p<0.05) over time in an objective measure of body weight, expressed in kilograms (kg) OR Body Mass Index (BMI) OR (ii) at least one significant change (p<0.05) in a dietary intake measure to qualify as effective. To identify emerging patterns within the research a descriptive process was used. Results Nine studies were included. Sample sizes ranged from 53 to 5042 male participants, with study durations ranging from 12 weeks to 24 months. Overlap was seen with eight of the nine studies including a weight management component whilst six studies focused on achieving changes in dietary intake patterns relating to modifications of fruit, vegetable, dairy and total fat intakes and three studies primarily focused on achieving weight loss through caloric restriction. Intervention effectiveness was identified for seven of the nine studies. Five studies reported significant positive changes in weight (kg) and/or BMI (kg/m2) changes (p≤0.05). Four studies had effective interventions (p<0.05) targeting determinants of dietary intake and dietary behaviours and/or nutritional intake. Intervention features, which appeared to be associated with better outcomes, include the delivery of quantitative information on diet and the use of self-monitoring

  11. In vivo language intervention: unanticipated general effects.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, B; Risley, T R

    1980-01-01

    After observing the lack of generalization of language trained in highly structured training sessions using established behavior modification techniques, "incidental teaching" procedures were developed to change the use of specified language behaviors in the natural environment. This paper reports an analysis of the general changes in the language, other than that specifically targeted by the incidental teaching procedures, used by disadvantaged preschool children. The daily language samples of disadvantaged children involved in a previously reported experiment to increase compound sentence usage were reexamined and compared to comparable records of other disadvantaged children and of middle-class children of college parents in order to assess possible general effects of the intervention program. Whereas the language that both groups of comparison children used changed little across the preschool year, the amount of talking by the children in the experimental program increased markedly. Their use of more elaborate vocabulary and more elaborate sentences also increased in direct proportion to the increases in overall language use, such that both language use and language elaboration in the experimental group of children changed from a pattern simlar to the comparison group of disadvantaged children to a pattern similar to the comparison group of middleclass children. It is argued that some general features of the incidental teaching procedure--differentially attending to child overtures and responding relative to the child's selected topic (reinforcer)--contributed to the increase in overall language use beyond the specific language behavior targeted, and that this increase in the probability of children's talking itself resulted in the substantial increases in elaboration seen in the children's spontaneous language. Because, at least in children with fairly well-developed language repertoires, language use is contextually controlled, talking more involves talking

  12. Choosing among Techniques for Quantifying Single-Case Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manolov, Rumen; Solanas, Antonio; Sierra, Vicenta; Evans, Jonathan J.

    2011-01-01

    If single-case experimental designs are to be used to establish guidelines for evidence-based interventions in clinical and educational settings, numerical values that reflect treatment effect sizes are required. The present study compares four recently developed procedures for quantifying the magnitude of intervention effect using data with known…

  13. Exploration of a bayesian updating methodology to monitor the safety of interventional cardiovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Resnic, Frederic S; Zou, Kelly H; Do, Daihung V; Apostolakis, George; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate methods for monitoring of the safety of medical devices introduced into clinical practice have been elusive to develop and implement. A novel approach is the application of Bayesian updating, which incorporates existing knowledge regarding event rates into the estimation of risk. This framework has been shown in other domains to be data efficient and to address some of the limitations of conventional statistical methods. In this article, the authors propose a methodologic framework for developing initial prior probability distributions in risk-stratified patient groups and a mechanism for incorporating accumulating procedure safety experience. In addition, they use this methodology to retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of 309 patients undergoing an infrequent interventional cardiology procedure, rotational atherectomy. These exploratory analyses demonstrate the feasibility of Bayesian updating applied to medical device safety evaluation and indicate that the methodology is capable of generating stable estimates of risk in a variety of patient risk groups.

  14. The novel application of Benford's second order analysis for monitoring radiation output in interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Cournane, S; Sheehy, N; Cooke, J

    2014-06-01

    Benford's law is an empirical observation which predicts the expected frequency of digits in naturally occurring datasets spanning multiple orders of magnitude, with the law having been most successfully applied as an audit tool in accountancy. This study investigated the sensitivity of the technique in identifying system output changes using simulated changes in interventional radiology Dose-Area-Product (DAP) data, with any deviations from Benford's distribution identified using z-statistics. The radiation output for interventional radiology X-ray equipment is monitored annually during quality control testing; however, for a considerable portion of the year an increased output of the system, potentially caused by engineering adjustments or spontaneous system faults may go unnoticed, leading to a potential increase in the radiation dose to patients. In normal operation recorded examination radiation outputs vary over multiple orders of magnitude rendering the application of normal statistics ineffective for detecting systematic changes in the output. In this work, the annual DAP datasets complied with Benford's first order law for first, second and combinations of the first and second digits. Further, a continuous 'rolling' second order technique was devised for trending simulated changes over shorter timescales. This distribution analysis, the first employment of the method for radiation output trending, detected significant changes simulated on the original data, proving the technique useful in this case. The potential is demonstrated for implementation of this novel analysis for monitoring and identifying change in suitable datasets for the purpose of system process control. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Principles and Strategies for Monitoring Data Collection Integrity in a Multi-site Randomized Clinical Trial of a Behavioral Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Salimi, Celeste R.; Stickler, Molly A. Donovan; Stegenga, Kristin; Lee, Melissa; Haase, Joan E.

    2011-01-01

    Although treatment fidelity strategies for enhancing the integrity of behavioral interventions have been well described, little has been written about monitoring data collection integrity. This article describes the principles and strategies developed to monitor data collection integrity of the “Stories and Music for Adolescent/Young Adult Resilience During Transplant” study (R01NR008583; U10CA098543; U10CA095861) — a multi-site Children’s Oncology Group randomized clinical trial of a music therapy intervention for adolescents and young adults undergoing stem cell transplant. The principles and strategies outlined in this article provide one model for development and evaluation of a data collection integrity monitoring plan for behavioral interventions that may be adapted by investigators and may be useful to funding agencies and grant application reviewers in evaluating proposals. PMID:21567433

  16. Northern Manhattan Hispanic Caregiver Intervention Effectiveness Study: protocol of a pragmatic randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of two established interventions for informal caregivers of persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, José A; Burgio, Louis; Mittelman, Mary; Dunner, Ilana; Levine, Jed A; Kong, Jian; Silver, Stephanie; Ramirez, Mildred; Teresi, Jeanne A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of dementia is increasing without a known cure, resulting in an increasing number of informal caregivers. Caring for a person with dementia results in increased stress and depressive symptoms. There are several behavioural interventions designed to alleviate stress and depressive symptoms in caregivers of persons with dementia with evidence of efficacy. Two of the best-known interventions are the New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI) and the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH). The effectiveness of the NYUCI and REACH has never been compared. There is also a paucity of data on which interventions are more effective in Hispanics in New York City. Thus, we proposed the Northern Manhattan Hispanic Caregiver intervention Effectiveness Study (NHiCE), a pragmatic clinical trial designed to compare the effectiveness of adaptations of the NYUCI and the REACH in informal Hispanic caregivers of persons with dementia in New York City. Methods and analysis NHiCE is a 6-month randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of adaptations of the NYUCI and REACH among 200 Hispanic informal adult caregivers of persons with dementia. The planned number of sessions of the NYUCI and REACH are similar. The primary outcome measures are changes from baseline to 6 months in the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale and Geriatric Depression Scale. Our primary approach to analyses will be intent-to-treat. The primary analyses will use mixed random effects models, and a full information maximum likelihood approach, with sensitivity analyses using generalised estimating equation. Ethics and dissemination NHiCE is approved by the Institutional Review Board of Columbia University Medical Center (protocol AAAM5150). A Data Safety Monitoring Board monitors the progress of the study. Dissemination will include reports of the characteristics of the study participants, as well as a report of the results of the clinical trial. Trial

  17. Effects of a Flexibility/Support Intervention on Work Performance.

    PubMed

    Bray, Jeremy W; Hinde, Jesse M; Kaiser, David J; Mills, Michael J; Karuntzos, Georgia T; Genadek, Katie R; Kelly, Erin L; Kossek, Ellen E; Hurtado, David A

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the effects of a workplace initiative to reduce work-family conflict on employee performance. A group-randomized multisite controlled experimental study with longitudinal follow-up. An information technology firm. Employees randomized to the intervention (n = 348) and control condition (n = 345). An intervention, "Start. Transform. Achieve. Results." to enhance employees' control over their work time, to increase supervisors' support for this change, and to increase employees' and supervisors' focus on results. We estimated the effect of the intervention on 9 self-reported employee performance measures using a difference-in-differences approach with generalized linear mixed models. Performance measures included actual and expected hours worked, absenteeism, and presenteeism. This study found little evidence that an intervention targeting work-family conflict affected employee performance. The only significant effect of the intervention was an approximately 1-hour reduction in expected work hours. After Bonferroni correction, the intervention effect is marginally insignificant at 6 months and marginally significant at 12 and 18 months. The intervention reduced expected working time by 1 hour per week; effects on most other employee self-reported performance measures were statistically insignificant. When coupled with the other positive wellness and firm outcomes, this intervention may be useful for improving employee perceptions of increased access to personal time or personal wellness without sacrificing performance. The null effects on performance provide countervailing evidence to recent negative press on work-family and flex work initiatives.

  18. Effective Bullying-Trauma Intervention Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable interest in many sectors of society in trauma intervention. School yard bullying has been getting a lot of attention as of late. It is widely reported and analyzed repeatedly in the media. As a clinical psychologist and adjunct psychology professor for over 30 years, the author has had occasion to see bullying in many forms…

  19. Effective Bullying-Trauma Intervention Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable interest in many sectors of society in trauma intervention. School yard bullying has been getting a lot of attention as of late. It is widely reported and analyzed repeatedly in the media. As a clinical psychologist and adjunct psychology professor for over 30 years, the author has had occasion to see bullying in many forms…

  20. Minimizing risks and monitoring safety of an antenatal care intervention to mitigate domestic violence among young Indian women: The Dil Mil trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Domestic violence - physical, psychological, or sexual abuse perpetrated against women by one or more family members – is highly prevalent in India. However, relatively little research has been conducted on interventions with the potential to mitigate domestic violence and its adverse health consequences, and few resources exist to guide safety planning and monitoring in the context of intervention research. Dil Mil is a promising women’s empowerment-based intervention developed in India that engages with young women (daughters-in-law) and their mothers-in-law to mitigate domestic violence and related adverse health outcomes. This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial of Dil Mil in Bengaluru, India, with a focus on strategies used to minimize study-related risks and monitor safety. Methods/design A phase 2 randomized controlled trial using a parallel comparison of the Dil Mil intervention versus standard care will be implemented in three public primary health centers in Bengaluru. Young pregnant women in the first or second trimester of pregnancy will be recruited from antenatal services at study health centers and through community outreach. If eligible and willing, their mother-in-law will also be recruited. Once enrolled, dyads will participate in a baseline interview and then randomized either to the control arm and receive standard care or to the intervention arm and receive standard care plus the Dil Mil intervention. Additional evaluations will be conducted at 3 months and 6 months postpartum. Data will be analyzed to examine the feasibility and safety of the intervention and the effect of the intervention on intermediary outcomes (the empowerment of daughters-in-law and mothers-in-law), incidence of domestic violence among daughters-in-law, and health outcomes including perceived quality of life, psychosocial status and maternal and infant health outcomes. Discussion This study offers approaches that may help guide

  1. Minimizing risks and monitoring safety of an antenatal care intervention to mitigate domestic violence among young Indian women: The Dil Mil trial.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Suneeta; Subbiah, Kalyani; Chandra, Prabha; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2012-11-01

    Domestic violence - physical, psychological, or sexual abuse perpetrated against women by one or more family members - is highly prevalent in India. However, relatively little research has been conducted on interventions with the potential to mitigate domestic violence and its adverse health consequences, and few resources exist to guide safety planning and monitoring in the context of intervention research. Dil Mil is a promising women's empowerment-based intervention developed in India that engages with young women (daughters-in-law) and their mothers-in-law to mitigate domestic violence and related adverse health outcomes. This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial of Dil Mil in Bengaluru, India, with a focus on strategies used to minimize study-related risks and monitor safety. A phase 2 randomized controlled trial using a parallel comparison of the Dil Mil intervention versus standard care will be implemented in three public primary health centers in Bengaluru. Young pregnant women in the first or second trimester of pregnancy will be recruited from antenatal services at study health centers and through community outreach. If eligible and willing, their mother-in-law will also be recruited. Once enrolled, dyads will participate in a baseline interview and then randomized either to the control arm and receive standard care or to the intervention arm and receive standard care plus the Dil Mil intervention. Additional evaluations will be conducted at 3 months and 6 months postpartum. Data will be analyzed to examine the feasibility and safety of the intervention and the effect of the intervention on intermediary outcomes (the empowerment of daughters-in-law and mothers-in-law), incidence of domestic violence among daughters-in-law, and health outcomes including perceived quality of life, psychosocial status and maternal and infant health outcomes. This study offers approaches that may help guide safety planning and monitoring in other

  2. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry.

    PubMed

    Ertürk, M Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M; Bottomley, Paul A

    2015-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel's thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A "H-factor" relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna's sensitive region. The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15-0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or the extra space needed to accommodate alternative

  3. Is Stacking Intervention Components Cost-Effective? An Analysis of the Incredible Years Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, E. Michael; Olchowski, Allison E.; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn H.

    2007-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of delivering stacked multiple intervention components for children is compared to implementing single intervention by analyzing the Incredible Years Series program. The result suggests multiple intervention components are more cost-effective than single intervention components.

  4. Effectiveness of job search interventions: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songqi; Huang, Jason L; Wang, Mo

    2014-07-01

    The current meta-analytic review examined the effectiveness of job search interventions in facilitating job search success (i.e., obtaining employment). Major theoretical perspectives on job search interventions, including behavioral learning theory, theory of planned behavior, social cognitive theory, and coping theory, were reviewed and integrated to derive a taxonomy of critical job search intervention components. Summarizing the data from 47 experimentally or quasi-experimentally evaluated job search interventions, we found that the odds of obtaining employment were 2.67 times higher for job seekers participating in job search interventions compared to job seekers in the control group, who did not participate in such intervention programs. Our moderator analysis also suggested that job search interventions that contained certain components, including teaching job search skills, improving self-presentation, boosting self-efficacy, encouraging proactivity, promoting goal setting, and enlisting social support, were more effective than interventions that did not include such components. More important, job search interventions effectively promoted employment only when both skill development and motivation enhancement were included. In addition, we found that job search interventions were more effective in helping younger and older (vs. middle-aged) job seekers, short-term (vs. long-term) unemployed job seekers, and job seekers with special needs and conditions (vs. job seekers in general) to find employment. Furthermore, meta-analytic path analysis revealed that increased job search skills, job search self-efficacy, and job search behaviors partially mediated the positive effect of job search interventions on obtaining employment. Theoretical and practical implications and future research directions are discussed.

  5. Effect of daily noise exposure monitoring on annual rates of hearing loss in industrial workers

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Galusha, Deron; Kirsche, Sharon R; Cullen, Mark R; Slade, Martin D; Dixon-Ernst, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Occupational noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is prevalent, yet evidence on the effectiveness of preventive interventions is lacking. The effectiveness of a new technology allowing workers to monitor daily at-ear noise exposure was analysed. Methods Workers in the hearing conservation program of an aluminium smelter were recruited because of accelerated rates of hearing loss. The intervention consisted of daily monitoring of at-ear noise exposure and regular feedback on exposures from supervisors. The annual rate of change in high frequency hearing average at 2, 3 and 4 KHz before intervention (2000–2004) and 4 years after intervention (2006–2009) was determined. Annual rates of loss were compared between 78 intervention subjects and 234 controls in other company smelters matched for age, gender and high frequency hearing threshold level in 2005. Results Individuals monitoring daily noise exposure experienced on average no further worsening of high frequency hearing (average rate of hearing change at 2, 3 and 4 KHz=–0.5 dB/year). Matched controls also showed decelerating hearing loss, the difference in rates between the two groups being significant (p<0.0001). Analysis of a subset of intervention subjects matched to controls for initial rate of hearing loss showed a similar trend but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.06). Conclusion Monitoring daily occupational noise exposure inside hearing protection with ongoing administrative feedback apparently reduces the risk of occupational NIHL in industrial workers. Longer follow-up of these workers will help determine the significance of the intervention effect. Intervention studies for the prevention of NIHL need to include appropriate control groups. PMID:21193566

  6. Helping working Equidae and their owners in developing countries: monitoring and evaluation of evidence-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Upjohn, Melissa M; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Verheyen, Kristien L P

    2014-02-01

    There are an estimated 112 million Equidae (horses, donkeys, mules) in the developing world, providing essential resources for their owners' livelihoods and well-being. The impoverished situation of their owners and the often harsh conditions in which they work mean that the animals' welfare is a cause for concern. A number of equine non-governmental organisations (NGOs) operate within working equid communities providing veterinary care, education and training programmes aimed at improving equine welfare. However, there is little published information available that describes monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of such interventions using objective outcome-based indicators and where baseline data are available. The aim of this paper is to summarise the peer-reviewed reports of M&E in this sector and identify the key issues which need to be addressed in ensuring that such evaluations provide useful information on the work of these organisations. A rigorous evidence base for designing future interventions will provide an opportunity for enhancing the effectiveness of working equid NGO operations. Increased availability of M&E reports in the peer-reviewed literature will enable NGOs to learn from one another and disseminate to a wider audience information on the role of working Equidae and the issues they face. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Stage-specific effects of an action control intervention on dental flossing.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Benjamin; Sniehotta, Falko F; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2007-06-01

    Health behavior interventions may have different effects when targeting individuals at different stages of change. A 'motivation' stage, during which intentions are formed, has been distinguished from a 'volition' stage, implying that the latter requires self-regulatory effort in implementing and maintaining behavior. To test this stage assumption, an action control intervention (self-monitoring tool for dental flossing) matched to the volition stage and mismatched to the motivation stage was provided to 151 university students, with follow-up measures of action control and flossing after 2 and 6 weeks. Separate regression analyses for motivational and volitional participants indicated that only volitional participants benefited from the volitional intervention. This supports the usefulness of stage assumptions and the advantage of tailoring interventions to participants who reside either in the motivational or in the volitional stage.

  8. Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Druten-Frietman, Loes; Strating, Heleen; Denessen, Eddie; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    A dialogic storybook-based intervention integrating dialogic storybook reading with early literacy activities is studied with a longitudinal quasi-experimental study design. The effects of this intervention, in addition to a regular early childhood education (ECE) program, on kindergartners' vocabulary and phonological awareness development are…

  9. HRD Interventions, Employee Competencies and Organizational Effectiveness: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potnuru, Rama Krishna Gupta; Sahoo, Chandan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine the impact of human resource development (HRD) interventions on organizational effectiveness by means of employee competencies which are built by some of the selected HRD interventions. Design/methodology/approach: An integrated research model has been developed by combining the principal factors…

  10. The Effectiveness of an Emergent Literacy Intervention for Teenage Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Amy; van Bysterveldt, Anne; McNeill, Brigid

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of an experimental emergent literacy intervention, targeting teenage mothers attending an educational facility. Using a pretest/posttest research design, 27 participants completed a 7­-week intervention based in the classroom, targeting a range of emergent literacy skills that they could utilize when reading…

  11. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  12. Effects of Critical Thinking Intervention for Early Childhood Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Heejeong Sophia; Brown, E. Todd

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on an intervention designed to enhance early childhood teacher candidates' critical thinking abilities. The concept, elements, standards, and traits of critical thinking were integrated into the main course contents, and the effects of the intervention were examined. The results indicated that early childhood teacher…

  13. Effects of Critical Thinking Intervention for Early Childhood Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Heejeong Sophia; Brown, E. Todd

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on an intervention designed to enhance early childhood teacher candidates' critical thinking abilities. The concept, elements, standards, and traits of critical thinking were integrated into the main course contents, and the effects of the intervention were examined. The results indicated that early childhood teacher…

  14. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  15. Using Functional Assessments To Develop Effective Behavioral Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Soung

    2002-01-01

    All too often, one behavioral intervention is used universally to handle a variety of problem behaviors, regardless of the function of the misbehavior. This article describes how a functional assessment of behavior can be used to identify the purpose of misbehaviors and plan effective behavioral interventions. (Author)

  16. Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Druten-Frietman, Loes; Strating, Heleen; Denessen, Eddie; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    A dialogic storybook-based intervention integrating dialogic storybook reading with early literacy activities is studied with a longitudinal quasi-experimental study design. The effects of this intervention, in addition to a regular early childhood education (ECE) program, on kindergartners' vocabulary and phonological awareness development are…

  17. The Effectiveness of an Emergent Literacy Intervention for Teenage Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Amy; van Bysterveldt, Anne; McNeill, Brigid

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of an experimental emergent literacy intervention, targeting teenage mothers attending an educational facility. Using a pretest/posttest research design, 27 participants completed a 7­-week intervention based in the classroom, targeting a range of emergent literacy skills that they could utilize when reading…

  18. HRD Interventions, Employee Competencies and Organizational Effectiveness: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potnuru, Rama Krishna Gupta; Sahoo, Chandan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine the impact of human resource development (HRD) interventions on organizational effectiveness by means of employee competencies which are built by some of the selected HRD interventions. Design/methodology/approach: An integrated research model has been developed by combining the principal factors…

  19. Adherence to dietary regimens. 2: Components of effective interventions.

    PubMed

    Brownell, K D; Cohen, L R

    1995-01-01

    Diet has an important impact not only on health but also on daily functioning, cognitive performance, and, perhaps, psychological well-being. Much is known about the specific dietary changes necessary to improve these factors, yet it becomes ever more clear that information about proper diet is rarely sufficient to change dietary behavior. Interventions aimed at changing diet must consider the typical dietary practices of the population in question and, as a corollary, must deal with the cultural obstacles to eating the "proper" foods. Psychological factors are paramount in setting the stage for dietary change. These include the individual's perception of being at risk, perceived benefits of a change in diet, confidence that the necessary change can be made, and the symbolic and real role food plays in a person's life. Nutrition education has traditionally focused on what changes should be made, and behavioral psychology has emphasized how to make the changes. These two fields must come together, and there must be recognition that nutrition education can provide necessary information, and behavioral change strategies can provide the necessary skills. There is now a considerable amount of information on strategies for nutrition education and on principles and techniques for behavioral change. Many intervention programs to alter dietary behavior have been undertaken. These have varied from programs aimed at an entire country, such as the National Cholesterol Education Program in the United States, to programs aimed at individuals. Although these vary considerably in size, strategy, and effects, collectively they yield valuable information on effective methods for changing behavior and for maintaining behavioral change. Programs that integrate behavioral procedures such as self-monitoring, stimulus control, coping skills, and relapse prevention appear to hold the most promise. Policy is an area that has received little attention as a means of changing dietary behavior

  20. Diabetes and Technology for Increased Activity (DaTA) Study: Results of a Remote Monitoring Intervention for Prevention of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Melanie; Russell-Minda, Elizabeth; Read, Emily; Munoz, Claudio; Shoemaker, Kevin; Kleinstiver, Peter; Petrella, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: An increasingly aged, overweight, and sedentary population has resulted in elevated risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The escalating incidence of diabetes and other chronic illnesses, deficits in health care budgets, and physician shortages, especially in rural communities, have prompted investigations of feasible solutions. The Diabetes and Technology for Increased Activity (DaTA) study was designed to test the effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention driven by self-monitoring of blood glucose (BG), blood pressure (BP), physical activity (PA), and weight to positively impact CVD risk factors in a medically underserviced rural population with a high incidence of metabolic syndrome (MS). Research Design and Methods: Conducted in a community-based research setting, this single-center open feasibility study used smart phones to transmit BP, BG, pedometer, weight, heart rate, and activity measurements to a database. Technology allowed participants to interface with the clinical team and self-monitor their personal health indicators. Results Twenty-four participants aged 30 to 71 years completed the 8-week intervention. Participants had significant improvement in clinic (p = .046) and self-monitored diastolic BP (p = .001), body mass index (p = .002), and total cholesterol (p = .009), and steps per day. Daily PA increased as well as participants' interest in and willingness to make lifestyle changes that impact health outcomes. Conclusions The DaTA study demonstrated that self-monitoring of the risk factors for MS and increased PA improved the participant's CVD risk profile. Considering the 8-week time period of this intervention, results are encouraging. This lifestyle intervention, which uses education and technology as tools, confirms the utility of remote health monitoring. PMID:21880236

  1. Adverse effects of public health interventions: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Theo; Oliver, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Public health interventions may have a range of adverse effects. However, there is limited guidance as to how evaluations should address the possibility of adverse effects. This discussion paper briefly presents a framework for thinking about the potential harms of public health interventions, focusing on the following categories: direct harms; psychological harms; equity harms; group and social harms; and opportunity harms. We conclude that the possibility of adverse effects needs to be taken into account by those implementing and evaluating interventions, and requires a broad perspective on the potential impacts of public health strategies.

  2. Improved effectiveness of performance monitoring in amateur instrumental musicians.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Ines; Mkrtchian, Anahit; Kansal, Nayantara

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a cross-sectional study investigating the influence of instrumental music practice on the ability to monitor for and respond to processing conflicts and performance errors. Behavioural and electrophysiological indicators of response monitoring in amateur musicians with various skill levels were collected using simple conflict tasks. The results show that instrumental musicians are better able than non-musicians to detect conflicts and errors as indicated by systematic increases in the amplitude of the error-related negativity and the N200 with increasing levels of instrumental practice. Also, high levels of musical training were associated with more efficient and less reactive responses after experience of conflicts and errors as indicated by reduced post-error interference and post-conflict processing adjustments. Together, the present findings suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed. As these processes are amongst the first to be affected by cognitive aging, our evidence could promote musical activity as a realistic intervention to slow or even prevent age-related decline in frontal cortex mediated executive functioning. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Improved effectiveness of performance monitoring in amateur instrumental musicians☆

    PubMed Central

    Jentzsch, Ines; Mkrtchian, Anahit; Kansal, Nayantara

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a cross-sectional study investigating the influence of instrumental music practice on the ability to monitor for and respond to processing conflicts and performance errors. Behavioural and electrophysiological indicators of response monitoring in amateur musicians with various skill levels were collected using simple conflict tasks. The results show that instrumental musicians are better able than non-musicians to detect conflicts and errors as indicated by systematic increases in the amplitude of the error-related negativity and the N200 with increasing levels of instrumental practice. Also, high levels of musical training were associated with more efficient and less reactive responses after experience of conflicts and errors as indicated by reduced post-error interference and post-conflict processing adjustments. Together, the present findings suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed. As these processes are amongst the first to be affected by cognitive aging, our evidence could promote musical activity as a realistic intervention to slow or even prevent age-related decline in frontal cortex mediated executive functioning. PMID:24056298

  4. Insights into workplace bullying: psychosocial drivers and effective interventions

    PubMed Central

    Escartín, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Research on effectiveness of workplace bullying interventions has lagged behind descriptive studies on this topic. The literature on bullying intervention research has only recently expanded to a point that allows for synthesis of findings across empirical studies. This study addresses the question of whether workplace bullying can be reduced in prevalence and consequences, if so to what extent and by which strategies and interventions. It opens with a brief overview of the nature of bullying at work and discussion of some precursors and existing interventions. However, its principal focus is on the findings obtained from selected (quasi-) experimental longitudinal studies on antibullying interventions, drawing together the results of studies conducted in Europe, USA, and Australia, including several economic sectors, and concerned about primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention programs and strategies. Additional emphasis is considered from the psychosocial drivers highlighted both from prescriptive and cross-sectional studies and factual empirical studies. One randomized control study and seven quasiexperimental longitudinal studies were identified by searching electronic databases and bibliographies and via contact with experts. The majority of outcomes evidenced some level of change, mostly positive, suggesting that workplace bullying interventions are more likely to affect knowledge, attitudes, and self-perceptions, but actual bullying behaviors showed much more mixed results. In general, growing effectiveness was stated as the level of intervention increased from primary to tertiary prevention. However, methodological problems relating to the evaluation designs in most studies do not allow direct attribution of these findings to the interventions. Overall, the evaluation of antibullying interventions must flourish and be improved, requiring close cooperation between practitioners and academics to design, implement, and evaluate effective interventions based

  5. Examining the effects of linking student performance and progression in a tier 2 kindergarten reading intervention.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Deborah C; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-Man; Coyne, Michael D; Simmons, Leslie E; Oslund, Eric; Fogarty, Melissa; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Little, Mary E; Rawlinson, D'Ann

    2015-01-01

    Despite the emerging evidence base on response to intervention, there is limited research regarding how to effectively use progress-monitoring data to adjust instruction for students in Tier 2 intervention. In this study, we analyzed extant data from a series of randomized experimental studies of a kindergarten supplemental reading intervention to determine whether linking performance on formative assessments to curriculum progression improved kindergarten reading outcomes over standard implementation. We were interested in whether specific progression adjustments would enhance the effects of supplemental reading intervention. Growth-mixture modeling using data from kindergarteners (n = 136) whose intervention progression (e.g. repeat lessons, skip lessons) was adjusted every 4 weeks based on mastery data identified four latent classes characterized by unique profiles of curriculum progression adjustments. Multilevel analyses comparing the performance of students in the four classes with that of propensity matched groups whose intervention was not adjusted (n = 101) indicated positive effects of curriculum progression for (a) students whose formative assessment performance exceeded 90% and received early and sustained lesson acceleration and (b) students who initially performed below 70% on assessments and who repeated early lessons and progressed to conventional implementation. Effects of curriculum adjustments for the two smallest groups were less clear.

  6. The Reliability and User-Feasibility of Materials and Procedures for Monitoring the Implementation Integrity of a Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeny, John C.; Easton, Julia E.; Upright, James J.; Tunstall, Kali R.; Ehrenbock, Cassia A.

    2014-01-01

    Within the realm of school-based interventions, implementation integrity is important for practical, legal, and ethical purposes. Unfortunately, evidence suggests that proper monitoring of implementation integrity is often absent from both research and practice. School psychology practitioners and researchers have reported that a major barrier to…

  7. The Reliability and User-Feasibility of Materials and Procedures for Monitoring the Implementation Integrity of a Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeny, John C.; Easton, Julia E.; Upright, James J.; Tunstall, Kali R.; Ehrenbock, Cassia A.

    2014-01-01

    Within the realm of school-based interventions, implementation integrity is important for practical, legal, and ethical purposes. Unfortunately, evidence suggests that proper monitoring of implementation integrity is often absent from both research and practice. School psychology practitioners and researchers have reported that a major barrier to…

  8. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Ertürk, M. Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  9. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ertürk, M. Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  10. Effect assessment in work environment interventions: a methodological reflection.

    PubMed

    Neumann, W P; Eklund, J; Hansson, B; Lindbeck, L

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses a number of issues for work environment intervention (WEI) researchers in light of the mixed results reported in the literature. If researchers emphasise study quality over intervention quality, reviews that exclude case studies with high quality and multifactorial interventions may be vulnerable to 'quality criteria selection bias'. Learning from 'failed' interventions is inhibited by both publication bias and reporting lengths that limit information on relevant contextual and implementation factors. The authors argue for the need to develop evaluation approaches consistent with the complexity of multifactorial WEIs that: a) are owned by and aimed at the whole organisation; and b) include intervention in early design stages where potential impact is highest. Context variety, complexity and instability in and around organisations suggest that attention might usefully shift from generalisable 'proof of effectiveness' to a more nuanced identification of intervention elements and the situations in which they are more likely to work as intended. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This paper considers ergonomics interventions from perspectives of what constitutes quality and 'proof". It points to limitations of traditional experimental intervention designs and argues that the complexity of organisational change, and the need for multifactorial interventions that reach deep into work processes for greater impact, should be recognised.

  11. Relative Effectiveness of DRO and Self-Monitoring in a General Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Michael J.; Gresham, Frank M.; Dart, Evan H.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript describes a research project designed to examine the relative effectiveness of a two non-function-based interventions (differential reinforcement of other behavior and self- monitoring) for decreasing problem behavior in a general education classroom for three students whose problem behaviors were hypothesized to be functionally…

  12. Effects of Social Development Intervention in Childhood Fifteen Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, J. David; Kosterman, Rick; Catalano, Richard F.; Hill, Karl G.; Abbott, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine long-term effects of a universal intervention in elementary schools in promoting positive functioning in school, work, and community, and preventing mental health problems, risky sexual behavior, substance misuse, and crime at ages 24 and 27. Design Nonrandomized controlled trial followed participants to age 27, 15 years after the intervention ended. Three intervention conditions were compared: a full intervention group, assigned to intervention in grades 1 through 6; a late intervention group, assigned to intervention in grades 5 and 6 only; and a no-treatment control group. Setting Fifteen public elementary schools serving diverse neighborhoods including high-crime neighborhoods of Seattle. Participants A gender-balanced and multiethnic sample of 598 participants at ages 24 and 27 (93% of original sample in these conditions). Interventions Teacher training in classroom instruction and management, child social and emotional skill development, and parent workshops. Outcome Measures Self-reports of functioning in school, work and community, mental health, sexual behavior, substance use, and crime, and court records. Results A significant multivariate intervention effect across all 16 primary outcome indices was found. Specific effects included significantly better educational and economic attainment, mental health, and sexual health by age 27 (all p < .05). Hypothesized effects on substance use and crime were not found at ages 24 or 27. Conclusions A universal intervention for urban elementary school children, focused on classroom management and instruction, children’s social competence, and parenting practices, positively affected educational and economic attainment, mental health, and sexual health 15 years following the intervention’s end. PMID:19047540

  13. Thresholds for the cost-effectiveness of interventions: alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Marseille, Elliot; Larson, Bruce; Kazi, Dhruv S; Kahn, James G; Rosen, Sydney

    2015-02-01

    Many countries use the cost-effectiveness thresholds recommended by the World Health Organization's Choosing Interventions that are Cost-Effective project (WHO-CHOICE) when evaluating health interventions. This project sets the threshold for cost-effectiveness as the cost of the intervention per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted less than three times the country's annual gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. Highly cost-effective interventions are defined as meeting a threshold per DALY averted of once the annual GDP per capita. We argue that reliance on these thresholds reduces the value of cost-effectiveness analyses and makes such analyses too blunt to be useful for most decision-making in the field of public health. Use of these thresholds has little theoretical justification, skirts the difficult but necessary ranking of the relative values of locally-applicable interventions and omits any consideration of what is truly affordable. The WHO-CHOICE thresholds set such a low bar for cost-effectiveness that very few interventions with evidence of efficacy can be ruled out. The thresholds have little value in assessing the trade-offs that decision-makers must confront. We present alternative approaches for applying cost-effectiveness criteria to choices in the allocation of health-care resources.

  14. The Effects of Peer Monitoring Training on the Emergence of the Capability to Learn from Observing Instruction Received by Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Jo Ann Pereira; Greer, R. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    We tested the effects of teaching peer monitoring on the emergence of an observational learning (OL) capability in 2 experiments using delayed multiple probe designs with children diagnosed with developmental disabilities. In probes for the OL capability before and after each stage of the peer monitoring intervention, participants received…

  15. The Effects of Peer Monitoring Training on the Emergence of the Capability to Learn from Observing Instruction Received by Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Jo Ann Pereira; Greer, R. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    We tested the effects of teaching peer monitoring on the emergence of an observational learning (OL) capability in 2 experiments using delayed multiple probe designs with children diagnosed with developmental disabilities. In probes for the OL capability before and after each stage of the peer monitoring intervention, participants received…

  16. Immediate and Delayed Effects of Invented Writing Intervention in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofslundsengen, Hilde; Hagtvet, Bente Eriksen; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 10 week invented writing program with five-year-old preschoolers (mean age 5.7 years) on their immediate post intervention literacy skills and also the facilitative effects of the intervention on the subsequent learning to read during the first 6 months of schooling. The study included 105 children (54 girls)…

  17. Persistence of metabolic monitoring for psychiatry inpatients treated with second-generation antipsychotics utilizing a computer-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Dalack, G W; Casher, M I; Eappen, S A; Bostwick, J R

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring and intervention for metabolic abnormalities secondary to second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) remain weak areas of performance in mental health care. This study evaluated the sustained impact of a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) pop-up alert designed to improve rates of laboratory metabolic monitoring of patients treated with SGAs in an inpatient psychiatry unit. Interventions carried out by the psychiatry team to manage metabolic abnormalities found on screening were also identified. A retrospective chart review of patients treated with scheduled SGAs at a large Midwestern academic medical centre's inpatient adult psychiatry unit was conducted nearly 4 years after the initial implementation of a pop-up alert. Rates of laboratory monitoring (blood glucose level, haemoglobin A1C [HbA1c], lipid panel) were compared to those following the initial implementation. Medical charts of patients with abnormal laboratory results were also reviewed to summarize interventions made by the psychiatry team to manage identified abnormalities. Patient demographics in the current study population (n = 129) were similar to those in the initial test cohort (n = 157). There was no significant decrease in monitoring of glucose levels and lipid panels (fasting or random). Nine patients with abnormally elevated laboratories were identified. Interventions by the psychiatry team included referrals to appropriate healthcare professionals and initiation of medication. The rate of metabolic monitoring for inpatients on SGA therapy did not significantly change over time with the continued use of the CPOE pop-up alert. Optimal monitoring utilizing a CPOE pop-up alert may allow the psychiatry team, including psychiatric pharmacists, to better manage metabolic conditions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Near infrared fluorescence imaging for early detection, monitoring and improved intervention of diseases involving the joint.

    PubMed

    Slooter, M D; Bierau, K; Chan, A B; Löwik, C W G M

    2015-04-01

    Joints consist of different tissues, such as bone, cartilage and synovium, which are at risk for multiple diseases. The current imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, Doppler ultrasound, X-ray, computed tomography and arthroscopy, lack the ability to detect disease activity before the onset of anatomical and significant irreversible damage. Optical in vivo imaging has recently been introduced as a novel imaging tool to study the joint and has the potential to image all kinds of biological processes. This tool is already exploited in (pre)clinical studies of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and cancer. The technique uses fluorescent dyes conjugated to targeting moieties that recognize biomarkers of the disease. This review will focus on these new imaging techniques and especially where Near Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has been used to visualize diseases of the joint. NIR fluorescent imaging is a promising technique which will soon complement established radiological, ultrasound and MRI imaging in the clinical management of patients with respect to early disease detection, monitoring and improved intervention.

  19. Incredible Years parenting interventions: current effectiveness research and future directions.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Frances; Leijten, Patty

    2017-06-01

    The Incredible Years parenting intervention is a social learning theory-based programme for reducing children's conduct problems. Dozens of randomized trials, many by independent investigators, find consistent effects of Incredible Years on children's conduct problems across multiple countries and settings. However, in common with other interventions, these average effects hide much variability in the responses of individual children and families. Innovative moderator research is needed to enhance scientific understanding of why individual children and parents respond differently to intervention. Additionally, research is needed to test whether there are ways to make Incredible Years more effective and accessible for families and service providers, especially in low resource settings, by developing innovative delivery systems using new media, and by systematically testing for essential components of parenting interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Which helper behaviors and intervention styles are related to better short-term outcomes in telephone crisis intervention? Results from a Silent Monitoring Study of Calls to the U.S. 1-800-SUICIDE Network.

    PubMed

    Mishara, Brian L; Chagnon, François; Daigle, Marc; Balan, Bogdan; Raymond, Sylvaine; Marcoux, Isabelle; Bardon, Cécile; Campbell, Julie K; Berman, Alan

    2007-06-01

    A total of 2,611 calls to 14 helplines were monitored to observe helper behaviors and caller characteristics and changes during the calls. The relationship between intervention characteristics and call outcomes are reported for 1,431 crisis calls. Empathy and respect, as well as factor-analytically derived scales of supportive approach and good contact and collaborative problem solving were significantly related to positive outcomes, but not active listening. We recommend recruitment of helpers with these characteristics, development of standardized training in those methods that are empirically shown to be effective, and the need for research relating short-term outcomes to long-term effects.

  1. Effect of reactive pharmacy intervention on quality of hospital prescribing.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, C J; Hodgson, S; Norman, A; Daneshmend, T K; Garner, S T

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the medical impact of reactive pharmacy intervention. DESIGN--Analysis of all interventions during 28 days by all 35 pharmacists in hospitals in Nottingham. SETTING--All (six) hospitals in the Nottingham health authority (a teaching district), representing 2530 mainly acute beds, 781 mental illness beds, and 633 mainly health care of the elderly beds. PATIENTS--Hospital inpatients and outpatients. INTERVENTIONS--Recording of every important intervention made by pharmacists to prescriptions for both inpatients and outpatients when they perceived inadequacies of drug prescription or administration, including characterisation of the problem, coding of outcome, recording of time taken to initiate and resolve intervention, and grade of prescribing doctor. The problems were independently assessed for their potential to cause medical harm. RESULTS--769 Interventions (about 2.9% of prescriptions) were made, of which 60 concerned prescriptions rated as having a major potential for medical harm. The commonest problems concerned dosage, which was wrong in 280 prescriptions (102 for antibiotics) and not stated in 50 (one for antibiotics), especially those associated with a major potential for medical harm (32 prescriptions). These concerned sedatives; analgesics; cardiovascular drugs or diuretics; and iron, vitamin, or mineral preparations. Also common were overprolonged prescription of antibiotics (48 prescriptions), confusion of drug names (nine), and inadvertent coprescription of excessive quantities of aspirin or paracetamol in plain and compound preparations (seven). The pharmacist's recommendation was accepted in 639 instances (86%), and the prescription was altered in 575, leading to an appreciable (246 cases) or minor (231 cases) improvement. Interventions had little effect on costs; 427/646 had no effect and 130 produced savings less than 50p. Pharmacy intervention (730/769 interventions) occupied on average 41 minutes per pharmacist per week

  2. Self-monitoring and other non-pharmacological interventions to improve the management of hypertension in primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Liam G; Murphy, Andrew W; Smith, Susan M; Schroeder, Knut; Fahey, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with high blood pressure (hypertension) in the community frequently fail to meet treatment goals: a condition labelled as ‘uncontrolled’ hypertension. The optimal way to organise and deliver care to hypertensive patients has not been clearly identified. Aim To determine the effectiveness of interventions to improve control of blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Design of study Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Setting Primary and ambulatory care. Method Interventions were categorised as following: self-monitoring; educational interventions directed to the patient; educational interventions directed to the health professional; health professional- (nurse or pharmacist) led care; organisational interventions that aimed to improve the delivery of care; and appointment reminder systems. Outcomes assessed were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, control of blood pressure and proportion of patients followed up at clinic. Results Seventy-two RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The trials showed a wide variety of methodological quality. Self-monitoring was associated with net reductions in systolic blood pressure (weighted mean difference [WMD] −2.5mmHg, 95%CI = −3.7 to −1.3 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (WMD −1.8mmHg, 95%CI = −2.4 to −1.2 mmHg). An organised system of regular review allied to vigorous antihypertensive drug therapy was shown to reduce blood pressure and all-cause mortality in a single large randomised controlled trial. Conclusion Antihypertensive drug therapy should be implemented by means of a vigorous stepped care approach when patients do not reach target blood pressure levels. Self-monitoring is a useful adjunct to care while reminder systems and nurse/pharmacist -led care require further evaluation. PMID:21144192

  3. When workplace interventions lead to negative effects: learning from failures.

    PubMed

    Aust, Birgit; Rugulies, Reiner; Finken, Annett; Jensen, Chris

    2010-02-01

    To investigate if workplace interventions resulted in changes in the psychosocial work environment. Process evaluation was conducted to study the implementation process and to use this knowledge to understand the results. Seven intervention units (n = 128) and seven non-randomized reference units (n = 103) of a large hospital in Denmark participated in an intervention project with the goal of improving the psychosocial working conditions. The intervention consisted of discussion days for all staff, employee working groups, leader coaching, and activities to improve communication and cooperation. Measures of the psychosocial work environment were conducted before the start of the intervention and again after 16 months using 13 scales from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, version I (COPSOQ I). In the intervention units there was a statistically significant worsening in six out of 13 work environment scales. The decrease was most pronounced for three scales that measure aspects of interpersonal relations and leadership. In addition, all three scales that measure aspects of work organization and job content decreased. In comparison, the reference group showed statistically significant changes in only two scales. Process evaluation revealed that a large part of the implementation failed and that different implicit theories were at play. Without the insights gained from process data the negative effects of this intervention could not be understood. Sometimes--as it seems happened in this study--more harm can be done by disappointing expectations than by not conducting an intervention.

  4. Intervention fidelity and effectiveness of a UK worksite physical activity intervention funded by the BUPA Foundation, UK.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Rebecca; Mceachan, Rosie; Jackson, Cath; West, Robert; Conner, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The main aim of this study was to test whether the effectiveness of a worksite physical activity intervention delivered in five work organizations varied as a function of intervention fidelity. We conducted a fidelity analysis as part of a large matched-pair cluster randomized controlled trial of a worksite physical activity intervention (AME for Activity). Participants (N = 1260) were employees from five organizations in the UK. The primary trial outcome was physical activity at 9 months post intervention. Adherence, exposure, quality of delivery and participant responsiveness/engagement were measured to assess fidelity. Qualitative data about the context in which the intervention was delivered were collected via focus groups, interviews and field notes. Multi-level modelling was used to provide a comparison of the effect of the intervention on increases in physical activity for worksites where intervention fidelity was good, compared with those where intervention fidelity was poor or moderate. Intervention fidelity was poor in two organizations, moderate in two organizations and good in one organization (local council). Re-analysis of the trial data comparing employees in the local council (N = 443) with employees in all other worksites (N = 611) revealed a significant effect of the intervention on physical activity levels among council employees only. These findings suggest that the measurement of fidelity and the testing of the effects of intervention fidelity on outcomes, as part of the evaluation of complex interventions, are essential to understand the context and conditions in which interventions are most effective.

  5. Effective home programme intervention for adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Novak, Iona

    2011-12-01

    To summarize evidence on effective home programme intervention for adults and describe characteristics of successful home programmes. A search was conducted of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, DARE, The Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, OTSeeker and Google Scholar and references in manuscripts retrieved. Two independent reviewers determined whether retrieved study abstracts met inclusion criteria: human subjects; adults; home programme intervention; systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials or controlled trials. Included papers were appraised for study design, participants, type and intensity of intervention, and outcomes. Methodological quality of trials was rated using the PEDro scale (1-10 highest). Thirty-two papers were retrieved (6 systematic reviews, 26 trials). The 23 randomized controlled trials and 3 controlled trials were appraised. All the retrieved papers were level 1a, 1b or 2b evidence. Major findings were: (a) home programme intervention was more effective than no intervention at all; (b) home programme intervention was equally effective to expert-provided therapy, except when therapeutic modalities were used; and (c) different instruction formats produced similar outcomes. Home programmes with favourable outcomes were more likely to: involve the patients in establishing the programme; intervene on the person, task and environment; and provide feedback about progress. Dose did not appear to be related to outcome. There is grade 1A evidence supporting the effectiveness of home programmes for adults. Home programmes are as effective as expert-provided therapy.

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate Outcomes of a Workplace Self-Management Intervention and an Intensive Monitoring Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schopp, Laura H.; Clark, Mary J.; Lamberson, William R.; Uhr, David J.; Minor, Marian A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare outcomes of two voluntary workplace health management methods: an adapted worksite self-management (WSM) approach and an intensive health monitoring (IM) approach. Research participants were randomly assigned to either the WSM group or the IM group by a computer-generated list (n = 180; 92 WSM…

  7. Effectiveness of a Pregnancy Smoking Intervention: The Tennessee Intervention for Pregnant Smokers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known dangers of pregnancy smoking, rates remain high, especially in the rural, Southern United States. Interventions are effective, but few have been developed and tested in regions with high rates of pregnancy smoking, a culture that normalizes smoking, and a hard-to-reach prenatal population. The goals were to describe a smoking…

  8. Effectiveness of a Pregnancy Smoking Intervention: The Tennessee Intervention for Pregnant Smokers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known dangers of pregnancy smoking, rates remain high, especially in the rural, Southern United States. Interventions are effective, but few have been developed and tested in regions with high rates of pregnancy smoking, a culture that normalizes smoking, and a hard-to-reach prenatal population. The goals were to describe a smoking…

  9. The impact of parent involvement in an effective adolescent risk reduction intervention on sexual risk communication and adolescent outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Stanton, Bonita; Deveaux, Lynette; Li, Xiaoming; Koci, Veronica; Lunn, Sonja

    2014-12-01

    Parent involvement in prevention efforts targeting adolescents increases the impact of such programs. However, the majority of risk-reduction intervention programs that are implemented through schools do not include parents, in part because most existing parental interventions require significant time commitment by parents. We designed a brief parent-adolescent sexual risk communication intervention to be delivered with an effective HIV prevention intervention as part of a randomized, controlled trial among 2,564 grade 10 students and their parents in the Bahamas. Mixed effects modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of the brief parent-adolescent communication intervention using four waves of longitudinal data. Results indicate that a brief parent-adolescent communication intervention is effective in improving parent-adolescent communication on sex-related issues and perceived parental monitoring as well as the youth's condom use skills and self-efficacy. There is a marginal effect on consistent condom use. In addition, there is an apparent dose effect of the brief parent intervention on perceived parent-adolescent sexual risk communication and adolescent outcomes. These findings suggest that adolescent risk reduction interventions should include a brief parent-adolescent communication intervention that should be reinforced by periodic boosters in order to enhance the impact of adolescent HIV prevention programs.

  10. The impact of parent involvement in an effective adolescent risk reduction intervention on sexual risk communication and adolescent outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Stanton, Bonita; Deveaux, Lynette; Li, Xiaoming; Koci, Veronica; Lunn, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Parent involvement in prevention efforts targeting adolescents increases the impact of such programs. However, the majority of risk-reduction intervention programs that are implemented through schools do not include parents, in part because most existing parental interventions require significant time commitment by parents. We designed a brief parent-adolescent sexual risk communication intervention to be delivered with an effective HIV prevention intervention as part of a randomized, controlled trial among 2564 grade 10 students and their parents in The Bahamas. Mixed effects modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of the brief parent-adolescent communication intervention using four waves of longitudinal data. Results indicate that a brief parent-adolescent communication intervention is effective in improving parent-adolescent communication on sex-related issues and perceived parental monitoring as well as the youth's condom use skills and self-efficacy. There is a marginal effect on consistent condom use. In addition, there is an apparent dose effect of the brief parent intervention on perceived parent-adolescent sexual risk communication and adolescent outcomes. These findings suggest that adolescent risk reduction interventions should include a brief parent-adolescent communication intervention which should be reinforced by periodic boosters in order to enhance the impact of adolescent HIV prevention programs. PMID:25490732

  11. Effect of Disinfectants on Glucose Monitors

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, John J; Lim, Christine G

    2012-01-01

    Background Monitoring blood glucose levels is an integral part of routine diabetes management. To minimize the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens during monitoring, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that glucose meters be disinfected after each use whenever they are used to test multiple patients. The objective of this study is to assess the compatibility of some common disinfectants with certain blood glucose meter systems. Methods We tested six disinfectants for adverse impact on meter performance or the exterior meter surfaces. The disinfectants tested were 0.525% sodium hypochlorite, 20% 2-propanol and 10% ethanol, 17.2% isopropanol, 55% isopropanol, 70% isopropanol, and hydrogen peroxide. To assess meter performance, we tested OneTouch® Ultra® blood glucose monitoring systems with control solution before and after application of either water or disinfectant. To assess the effect on exterior meter surfaces, we performed a soaking test to simulate long-term exposure to disinfectant. Results Paired t-test results showed that the control solution data associated with disinfectant and with water application were not significantly different for each meter type. However, most of the meter types were adversely affected by hydrogen peroxide and/or by the higher concentrations of alcohol-based disinfectants. Conclusions Although none of the six disinfectants affected meter performance, hydrogen peroxide and isopropanol >20% adversely affected the exterior surfaces of the tested meters. When complying with CDC instructions for meter disinfection, users should use caution and choose disinfectants that have been validated by the meter manufacturer. PMID:22401326

  12. Effect of disinfectants on glucose monitors.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, John J; Lim, Christine G

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring blood glucose levels is an integral part of routine diabetes management. To minimize the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens during monitoring, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that glucose meters be disinfected after each use whenever they are used to test multiple patients. The objective of this study is to assess the compatibility of some common disinfectants with certain blood glucose meter systems. We tested six disinfectants for adverse impact on meter performance or the exterior meter surfaces. The disinfectants tested were 0.525% sodium hypochlorite, 20% 2-propanol and 10% ethanol, 17.2% isopropanol, 55% isopropanol, 70% isopropanol, and hydrogen peroxide. To assess meter performance, we tested OneTouch® Ultra® blood glucose monitoring systems with control solution before and after application of either water or disinfectant. To assess the effect on exterior meter surfaces, we performed a soaking test to simulate long-term exposure to disinfectant. Paired t-test results showed that the control solution data associated with disinfectant and with water application were not significantly different for each meter type. However, most of the meter types were adversely affected by hydrogen peroxide and/or by the higher concentrations of alcohol-based disinfectants. Although none of the six disinfectants affected meter performance, hydrogen peroxide and isopropanol >20% adversely affected the exterior surfaces of the tested meters. When complying with CDC instructions for meter disinfection, users should use caution and choose disinfectants that have been validated by the meter manufacturer. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Effectiveness of percutaneous coronary interventions in nonagenarians.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Raúl; Salazar, Abel; Bañuelos, Camino; Hernández, Rosana; Alfonso, Fernando; Sabaté, Manel; Escaned, Javier; Pérez, Maria J; Azcona, Luis; Macaya, Carlos

    2004-10-15

    Data on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in nonagenarians are very scarce. The investigators present a series of 26 nonagenarians who underwent PCI (29 lesions, 1.1 +/- 0.3 per patient). Most (96%) had acute coronary syndrome at presentation, 27% underwent primary PCI for acute myocardial infarctions, and 54% had multivessel disease. Angiographically successful results were obtained in 24 patients (92%), and coronary stents were used in 81%. Five patients (19%) died during hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was significantly greater in patients with Killip class III or IV at presentation (100% vs 9%, p = 0.001), in those in whom the procedure was a primary PCI for acute myocardial infarction (57% vs 5%, p = 0.010), and in the presence of angiographic failure (100% vs 13%, p = 0.031). In-hospital mortality was 0% after excluding patients in cardiogenic shock and those with primary PCI. Thus, most nonagenarians who undergo PCI have a high-risk profile. However, PCI achieves a successful angiographic result in most patients. Mortality is high but concentrated in patients in cardiogenic shock and with primary angioplasty as PCI.

  14. Treatment Fidelity: Special Educators' Perceptions of Measures Used to Monitor the Implementation of Behavior Intervention Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 requires empirically based interventions to be used when treating chronic problem behaviors. The fundamental part of behavior modification is the ability to demonstrate that behavior change occurred due to the intervention. This can only be accomplished when the intervention is…

  15. Treatment Fidelity: Special Educators' Perceptions of Measures Used to Monitor the Implementation of Behavior Intervention Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 requires empirically based interventions to be used when treating chronic problem behaviors. The fundamental part of behavior modification is the ability to demonstrate that behavior change occurred due to the intervention. This can only be accomplished when the intervention is…

  16. Effects of a Workplace Intervention on Parent-Child Relationships.

    PubMed

    McHale, Susan M; Davis, Kelly D; Green, Kaylin; Casper, Lynne; Kan, Marni L; Kelly, Erin L; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Okechukwu, Cassandra

    2016-02-01

    This study tested whether effects of a workplace intervention, aimed at promoting employees' schedule control and supervisor support for personal and family life, had implications for parent-adolescent relationships; we also tested whether parent-child relationships differed as a function of how many intervention program sessions participants attended. Data came from a group randomized trial of a workplace intervention, delivered in the information technology division of a Fortune 500 company. Analyses focused on 125 parent-adolescent dyads that completed baseline and 12-month follow-up home interviews. Results revealed no main effects of the intervention, but children of employees who attended 75% or more program sessions reported more time with their parent and more parent education involvement compared to adolescents whose parents attended less than 75% of sessions, and they tended to report more time with parent and more parental solicitation of information about their experiences compared to adolescents whose parents were randomly assigned to the usual practice condition.

  17. Low-income groups and behaviour change interventions: a review of intervention content, effectiveness and theoretical frameworks.

    PubMed

    Michie, S; Jochelson, K; Markham, W A; Bridle, C

    2009-08-01

    Interventions to change health-related behaviours have potential to increase health inequalities. This review investigated the effectiveness of interventions targeting low-income groups to reduce smoking or increase physical activity and/or healthy eating. Of 9766 papers identified by the search strategy, 13 met the inclusion criteria. Intervention content was coded into component technique and theoretical basis, and examined as a potential source of effect heterogeneity. Interventions were heterogeneous, comprising 4-19 techniques. Nine interventions had positive effects, seven resulted in no change and one had an adverse effect. Effective interventions had a tendency to have fewer techniques than ineffective interventions, with no evidence for any technique being generally effective or ineffective. Only six studies cited theory relative to intervention development, with little information about how theory was used and no obvious association with intervention content or effect. This review shows that behaviour change interventions, particularly those with fewer techniques, can be effective in low-income groups, but highlights the lack of evidence to draw on in informing the design of interventions for disadvantaged groups.

  18. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Intervention Program for Restraint Prevention in an Acute Spanish Psychiatric Ward.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Aguilera Serrano, Carlos; García-Sánchez, Juan A; Pino-Benítez, Isabel; Alba-Vallejo, Mercedes; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2016-05-01

    International recommendations have called to implement strategies to reduce the use of coercion in psychiatric settings. However, in Spain there is a lack of research about intervention programs to reduce mechanical restraint in acute psychiatric units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multimodal intervention program based on the principles of six core strategies to reduce the frequency of use of mechanical restraint in an acute psychiatric ward. The design was a retrospective analysis of the frequency and duration of episodes of mechanical restraint prior to the intervention program (2012) and during the intervention program (2013) in one acute psychiatric ward. The intervention was governed by four strategies: (1) leadership and organizational changes, (2) registration and monitoring of risk patients, (3) staff training, and (4) involving patients in the treatment program. There was a significant difference between the mean number of monthly episodes of mechanical restraint per 1,000 patient days, pre-intervention (18.54 ± 8.78) compared with postintervention (8.53 ± 7.00; p = .005). We found the probability that mechanical restraint would occur in a hospital admission decreased after performing the intervention (odds ratio = .587; confidence interval = 0.411-0.838; p = .003) after adjusting for confounding variables. The total percentage of restrained patients fell from 15.07% to 9.74%. The main implication of the study is to support the effectiveness of specific intervention programs based on different measures to reduce mechanical restraint and without contemplating all the strategies that are considered effective. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Barriers to physical activity as moderators of intervention effects.

    PubMed

    Schoeny, Michael E; Fogg, Louis; Buchholz, Susan W; Miller, Arlene; Wilbur, JoEllen

    2017-03-01

    The impact of interventions to increase physical activity (PA) may vary as a function of participants' barriers to PA. The aim of this paper is to determine whether individual barriers (demographic, physical health, psychological health, neighborhood factors, perceived barriers to PA, social support for PA) moderate treatment effects on increases in PA. Three treatment conditions tested the relative efficacy of a group-based PA intervention alone or supplemented by either personal or automated phone calls made between group meetings. From 2010 to 2012, 284 African American women (ages 40-65) living in the Chicago, IL, area were randomized to one of the three treatment conditions. Data collection occurred at baseline as well as 24 and 48 weeks after baseline. Moderation of intervention effects by barriers to PA were tested across four outcome measures (self-reported moderate-vigorous PA, self-reported walking, accelerometer steps, and aerobic fitness) using multilevel mixed-effects analyses. Significant condition by barrier interaction effects for the accelerometer steps outcome were found for material hardships, general health, depressive symptoms, neighborhood crime rate, and perceived barriers to PA. For aerobic fitness, intervention effects were moderated by material hardships and perceived pain. Increases in the outcome variables were greater for the conditions in which group sessions were supplemented with personal and/or automated calls. Among participants with greater barriers to PA, supplementing the intervention group meetings with between-session personal and/or automated phone calls may be an effective way to strengthen intervention effects. These results may inform the use of treatment supplements in the context of adaptive interventions.

  20. Effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions to improve cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta G; Olivo, Susan Armijo; Biondo, Patricia D; Stiles, Carla R; Yurtseven, Ozden; Fainsinger, Robin L; Hagen, Neil A

    2011-05-01

    Cancer pain is prevalent, yet patients do not receive best care despite widely available evidence. Although national cancer control policies call for education, effectiveness of such programs is unclear and best practices are not well defined. To examine existing evidence on whether knowledge translation (KT) interventions targeting health care providers, patients, and caregivers improve cancer pain outcomes. A systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken to evaluate primary studies that examined effects of KT interventions on providers and patients. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Five studies reported interventions targeting health care providers, four focused on patients or their families, one study examined patients and their significant others, and 16 studies examined patients only. Seven quantitative comparisons measured the statistical effects of interventions. A significant difference favoring the treatment group in least pain intensity (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44, 1.42) and in usual pain/average pain (95% CI: 0.13, 0.74) was observed. No other statistical differences were observed. However, most studies were assessed as having high risk of bias and failed to report sufficient information about the intervention dose, quality of educational material, fidelity, and other key factors required to evaluate effectiveness of intervention design. Trials that used a higher dose of KT intervention (characterized by extensive follow-up, comprehensive educational program, and higher resource allocation) were significantly more likely to have positive results than trials that did not use this approach. Further attention to methodological issues to improve educational interventions and research to clarify factors that lead to better pain control are urgently needed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Organizational Process Intervention for Effective Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotowala, Martin C.

    The involvement of process consultants can ease the development of strategies for increasing school effectiveness. The process consultant does not function as an expert in education, but facilitates development of an effective planning team consisting of the principal and four or five faculty members. The consultant first determines whether the…

  2. An Organizational Process Intervention for Effective Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotowala, Martin C.

    The involvement of process consultants can ease the development of strategies for increasing school effectiveness. The process consultant does not function as an expert in education, but facilitates development of an effective planning team consisting of the principal and four or five faculty members. The consultant first determines whether the…

  3. Understanding and Promoting Effective Engagement With Digital Behavior Change Interventions.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Lucy; Spring, Bonnie J; Riper, Heleen; Morrison, Leanne G; Crane, David H; Curtis, Kristina; Merchant, Gina C; Naughton, Felix; Blandford, Ann

    2016-11-01

    This paper is one in a series developed through a process of expert consensus to provide an overview of questions of current importance in research into engagement with digital behavior change interventions, identifying guidance based on research to date and priority topics for future research. The first part of this paper critically reflects on current approaches to conceptualizing and measuring engagement. Next, issues relevant to promoting effective engagement are discussed, including how best to tailor to individual needs and combine digital and human support. A key conclusion with regard to conceptualizing engagement is that it is important to understand the relationship between engagement with the digital intervention and the desired behavior change. This paper argues that it may be more valuable to establish and promote "effective engagement," rather than simply more engagement, with "effective engagement" defined empirically as sufficient engagement with the intervention to achieve intended outcomes. Appraisal of the value and limitations of methods of assessing different aspects of engagement highlights the need to identify valid and efficient combinations of measures to develop and test multidimensional models of engagement. The final section of the paper reflects on how interventions can be designed to fit the user and their specific needs and context. Despite many unresolved questions posed by novel and rapidly changing technologies, there is widespread consensus that successful intervention design demands a user-centered and iterative approach to development, using mixed methods and in-depth qualitative research to progressively refine the intervention to meet user requirements.

  4. The effect of interventions targeting screen time reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Sun, Samio; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have evaluated the effectiveness of interventions aimed at screen time reduction, but the results have been inconsistent. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to summarize the accumulating evidence of the impact of interventions targeting screen time reduction on body mass index (BMI) reduction and screen time reduction. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases were searched for RCTs on the effect of interventions targeting screen time reduction. The primary and secondary outcomes were the mean difference between the treatment and control groups in the changes in BMI and changes in screen viewing time. A random effects model was used to calculate the pooled mean differences. Fourteen trials including 2238 participants were assessed. The pooled analysis suggested that interventions targeting screen time reduction had a significant effect on BMI reduction (−0.15 kg/m2, P < 0.001, I2 = 0) and on screen time reduction (−4.63 h/w, P = 0.003, I2 = 94.6%). Subgroup analysis showed that a significant effect of screen time reduction was observed in studies in which the duration of intervention was <7 months and that the types of interventions in those studies were health promotion curricula or counseling. Interventions for screen time reduction might be effective in reducing screen time and preventing excess weight. Further rigorous investigations with larger samples and longer follow-up periods are still needed to evaluate the efficacy of screen time reduction both in children and in adults. PMID:27399085

  5. Monitoring acute effects on athletic performance with mixed linear modeling.

    PubMed

    Vandenbogaerde, Tom J; Hopkins, Will G

    2010-07-01

    There is a need for a sophisticated approach to track athletic performance and to quantify factors affecting it in practical settings. To demonstrate the application of mixed linear modeling for monitoring athletic performance. Elite sprint and middle-distance swimmers (three females and six males; aged 21-26 yr) performed 6-13 time trials in training and competition in the 9 wk before and including Olympic-qualifying trials, all in their specialty event. We included a double-blind, randomized, diet-controlled crossover intervention, in which the swimmers consumed caffeine (5 mg x kg(-1) body mass) or placebo. The swimmers also knowingly consumed varying doses of caffeine in some time trials. We used mixed linear modeling of log-transformed swim time to quantify effects on performance in training versus competition, in morning versus evening swims, and with use of caffeine. Predictor variables were coded as 0 or 1 to represent absence or presence, respectively, of each condition and were included as fixed effects. The date of each performance test was included as a continuous linear fixed effect and interacted with the random effect for the athlete to represent individual differences in linear trends in performance. Most effects were clear, owing to the high reliability of performance times in training and competition (typical errors of 0.9% and 0.8%, respectively). Performance time improved linearly by 0.8% per 4 wk. The swimmers performed substantially better in evenings versus mornings and in competition versus training. A 100-mg dose of caffeine enhanced performance in training and competition by approximately 1.3%. There were substantial but unclear individual responses to training and caffeine (SD of 0.3% and 0.8%, respectively). Mixed linear modeling can be applied successfully to monitor factors affecting performance in a squad of elite athletes.

  6. A simulation of affordability and effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sai; Frick, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to project at what level of effectiveness and cost a population-based or targeted intervention would yield a positive net economic benefit. Data sources include prevalence of obesity at all ages from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the persistence of obesity from childhood to adulthood from a literature review, and a cost estimate from the 2006 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey. Econometric analysis was used to estimate medical cost related to obesity. Lifetime medical cost related to obesity is calculated by race, gender, and smoking status. Simulations were conducted to estimate the break-even point for interventions that take place between ages 0 and 6 years, ages 7 and 12 years, and ages 13 to 18 years, with a range of effectiveness. Results of simulations reveal that, from a pure medical cost perspective, spending approximately $1.4 to $1.7 billion at present value for each birth cohort will break even if 1 percentage point reduction in obesity among children is achieved. Population-based interventions can spend up to between $280 and $339 per child at present value if 1 percentage point reduction in obesity rate could be achieved; in contrast, should we invest in interventions that only target obese children, we can spend up to $1648 to $2735 per obese child for every 1 percentage point reduction in obesity rate. This study has several important policy implications; early interventions make economic sense. Targeted interventions could yield higher cost savings than population-based interventions for young children (aged 0-6 years), whereas a population-based approach could yield greater economic net benefits for adolescents (aged 13-18 years). Our simulation shows that childhood obesity interventions, even with moderate effectiveness, would make economic sense, which should motivate policy makers to take action. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Economics of mycotoxins: evaluating costs to society and cost-effectiveness of interventions.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The economic impacts of mycotoxins to human society can be thought of in two ways: (i) the direct market costs associated with lost trade or reduced revenues due to contaminated food or feed, and (ii) the human health losses from adverse effects associated with mycotoxin consumption. Losses related to markets occur within systems in which mycotoxins are being monitored in the food and feed supply. Food that has mycotoxin levels above a particular maximum allowable level is either rejected outright for sale or sold at a lower price for a different use. Such transactions can take place at local levels or at the level of trade among countries. Sometimes this can result in heavy economic losses for food producers, but the benefit of such monitoring systems is a lower risk of mycotoxins in the food supply. Losses related to health occur when mycotoxins are present in food at levels that can cause illness. In developed countries, such losses are often measured in terms of cost of illness; around the world, such losses are more frequently measured in terms of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). It is also useful to assess the economics of interventions to reduce mycotoxins and their attendant health effects; the relative effectiveness of public health interventions can be assessed by estimating quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) associated with each intervention. Cost-effectiveness assessment can be conducted to compare the cost of implementing the intervention with the resulting benefits, in terms of either improved markets or improved human health. Aside from cost-effectiveness, however, it is also important to assess the technical feasibility of interventions, particularly in low-income countries, where funds and infrastructures are limited.

  8. The Effectiveness of Interventions for Non-Communicable Diseases in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Alexander; Knight, Abigail; Perel, Pablo; Blanchet, Karl; Roberts, Bayard

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) affected humanitarian crises. Humanitarian agencies and governments are increasingly challenged with how to effectively tackle NCDs. Reviewing the evidence of interventions for NCDs in humanitarian crises can help guide future policies and research by identifying effective interventions and evidence gaps. The aim of this paper is to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of interventions targeting NCDs during humanitarian crises in LMICs. A systematic review methodology was followed using PRISMA standards. Studies were selected on NCD interventions with civilian populations affected by humanitarian crises in low- and middle-income countries. Five bibliographic databases and a range of grey literature sources were searched. Descriptive analysis was applied and a quality assessment conducted using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for observational studies and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool for experimental studies. The search yielded 4919 references of which 8 studies met inclusion criteria. Seven of the 8 studies were observational, and one study was a non-blinded randomised-controlled trial. Diseases examined included hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, thalassaemia, and arthritis. Study settings included locations in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and South Asia. Interventions featuring disease-management protocols and/or cohort monitoring demonstrated the strongest evidence of effectiveness. No studies examined intervention costs. The quality of studies was limited, with a reliance on observational study designs, limited use of control groups, biases associated with missing data and inadequate patient-follow-up, and confounding was poorly addressed. The review highlights the extremely limited quantity and quality of evidence on this topic. Interventions that incorporate standardisation and

  9. Effectiveness of Four Supplemental Reading Comprehension Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James-Burdumy, Susanne; Deke, John; Gersten, Russell; Lugo-Gil, Julieta; Newman-Gonchar, Rebecca; Dimino, Joseph; Haymond, Kelly; Liu, Albert Yung-Hsu

    2012-01-01

    This article presents evidence from a large-scale randomized controlled trial of the effects of four supplemental reading comprehension curricula (Project CRISS, ReadAbout, Read for Real, and Reading for Knowledge) on students' understanding of informational text. Across 2 school years, the study included 10 school districts, more than 200…

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood: Developmental Effects and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara; Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the unique effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on development in early childhood and offers suggestions for interventions in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Urges more intensive, long-term studies on the immediate and long-term effects of TBI. (Author/DB)

  11. Pediatric HIV Infection: Effects on Development, Learning, and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Briefly reviews modes of HIV transmission and course of the disease, then focuses on its effects on children's development and learning. Describes treatments, therapies, and possible educational interventions. Challenges educators to learn more effective methods of helping these children improve their learning potential and quality of life. (EV)

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood: Developmental Effects and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara; Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the unique effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on development in early childhood and offers suggestions for interventions in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Urges more intensive, long-term studies on the immediate and long-term effects of TBI. (Author/DB)

  13. Self-Monitoring as an Intervention to Decrease Swimmers Stroke Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polaha, Jodi; Allen, Keith; Studley, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Self-monitoring of stroke count by swimmers is a common coaching strategy, it is but one that has little data to support it. Although research has demonstrated that self-monitoring can motivate behavior change, little research has focused on whether self-monitoring can enhance skill development. The purpose of the present set of studies was to…

  14. Self-Monitoring as an Intervention to Decrease Swimmers Stroke Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polaha, Jodi; Allen, Keith; Studley, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Self-monitoring of stroke count by swimmers is a common coaching strategy, it is but one that has little data to support it. Although research has demonstrated that self-monitoring can motivate behavior change, little research has focused on whether self-monitoring can enhance skill development. The purpose of the present set of studies was to…

  15. Northern Manhattan Hispanic Caregiver Intervention Effectiveness Study: protocol of a pragmatic randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of two established interventions for informal caregivers of persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, José A; Burgio, Louis; Mittelman, Mary; Dunner, Ilana; Levine, Jed A; Kong, Jian; Silver, Stephanie; Ramirez, Mildred; Teresi, Jeanne A

    2016-11-25

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing without a known cure, resulting in an increasing number of informal caregivers. Caring for a person with dementia results in increased stress and depressive symptoms. There are several behavioural interventions designed to alleviate stress and depressive symptoms in caregivers of persons with dementia with evidence of efficacy. Two of the best-known interventions are the New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI) and the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH). The effectiveness of the NYUCI and REACH has never been compared. There is also a paucity of data on which interventions are more effective in Hispanics in New York City. Thus, we proposed the Northern Manhattan Hispanic Caregiver intervention Effectiveness Study (NHiCE), a pragmatic clinical trial designed to compare the effectiveness of adaptations of the NYUCI and the REACH in informal Hispanic caregivers of persons with dementia in New York City. NHiCE is a 6-month randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of adaptations of the NYUCI and REACH among 200 Hispanic informal adult caregivers of persons with dementia. The planned number of sessions of the NYUCI and REACH are similar. The primary outcome measures are changes from baseline to 6 months in the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale and Geriatric Depression Scale. Our primary approach to analyses will be intent-to-treat. The primary analyses will use mixed random effects models, and a full information maximum likelihood approach, with sensitivity analyses using generalised estimating equation. NHiCE is approved by the Institutional Review Board of Columbia University Medical Center (protocol AAAM5150). A Data Safety Monitoring Board monitors the progress of the study. Dissemination will include reports of the characteristics of the study participants, as well as a report of the results of the clinical trial. NCT02092987, Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  16. Effectiveness of a Barber-Based Intervention for Improving Hypertension Control in Black Men

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Ronald G.; Ravenell, Joseph E.; Freeman, Anne; Leonard, David; Bhat, Deepa G.; Shafiq, Moiz; Knowles, Patricia; Storm, Joy S.; Adhikari, Emily; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Coxson, Pamela G.; Pletcher, Mark J.; Hannan, Peter; Haley, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Context Barbershop-based hypertension (HTN) outreach programs for black men are becoming increasingly common, but whether they are an effective approach for improving HTN control remains uncertain. Objective To evaluate whether a continuous high blood pressure (BP) monitoring and referral program conducted by barbers will motivate male patrons with elevated BP to pursue physician follow-up, leading to improved HTN control. Design, Setting, and Participants Cluster randomized trial (Barber-Assisted Reduction in Blood Pressure in Ethnic Residents [BARBER-1]) of HTN control among black male patrons of 17 black-owned barbershops in Dallas County, Texas (March 2006-December 2008). Intervention Black male patrons of participating barbershops underwent 10-week baseline BP screening. Study sites were then randomized to a comparison group (8 shops, 77 hypertensives/shop) that received standard BP pamphlets or an intervention group (9 shops, 75 hypertensives/shop) in which barbers continually offered BP checks with haircuts and promoted physician follow-up with gender-specific peer-based health messaging. After 10 months, follow-up data were obtained. Primary Outcome Measure Change in HTN control rate for each barbershop. Results The HTN control rate increased more in intervention-arm barbershops than in comparison-arm barbershops (absolute group difference, 8.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8 to 16.9%; P=0.036); the intervention effect persisted after adjustment for covariates (P=0.031). A marginal intervention effect was found for systolic BP change (absolute group difference: −2.5 mmHg; 95% CI, −5.3 to 0.3 mmHg; P=0.08). Conclusion The effect of BP screening on HTN control among black male barbershop patrons was improved when barbers were enabled to become health educators, monitor BP, and promote physician referral. Further research is warranted. Trial registration clinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00325533 PMID:20975012

  17. Behavioral interventions--rationale, measurement, and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2005-06-01

    Effective STD and HIV prevention requires synergism of individual-based prevention behaviors and societal/structural supports that will promote and maintain these behaviors. We should also expect the unexpected. STD rates in gay men have risen after effective prevention of HIV/STD in gay men and effective antiretroviral therapy. New drugs of abuse, such as methamphetamine ("crystal meth"), have induced risky sexual behaviors in gay and heterosexual communities. Economic dislocation in Eastern Europe has resulted in trafficking of commercial sex workers to Europe, the Mideast, and Asia, all with the potential for STD and HIV spread. James Curran, formerly director of the HIV epidemiology and prevention effort at the CDC, has written: It is ironic that the two clearest examples of large-scale success in HIV prevention-reduction in HIV transmission in gay men in the United States and national declines in HIV incidence in Thailand-arise in societies/communities known in their own way for sexual openness....the openness in both communities provided the environment to make the powerful revolutionary changes needed. In Africa, the powerful voice of President Museveni of Uganda has also encouraged candor about sexual risk-taking and facilitated that nation's encouraging early success in reducing HIV prevalence...Unfortunately, most of the world remains unable or unwilling to deal frankly and consistently with sexuality despite the considerable risks of HIV infection in many communities. There is a worldwide sexual hangup hampering HIV prevention efforts.

  18. Checking In: A Pilot of a Physician-Delivered Intervention to Increase Parent-Adolescent Communication About Blood Glucose Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Maureen; Clary, Lauren; Mehta, Priya; Stern, Alexa; Sharkey, Christina; Cogen, Fran R; Vaidyanathan, Priya; Streisand, Randi

    2015-12-01

    Low-cost, translatable interventions to promote adherence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes are needed. This study evaluated a brief physician-delivered intervention designed to increase parent-adolescent communication about blood glucose monitoring. Thirty adolescent-parent dyads completed baseline questionnaires and received the physician-delivered intervention. Participants completed follow-up questionnaires at 12 weeks; HbA1c and glucometer data were abstracted from medical charts. Parent-reported conflict surrounding diabetes management decreased from pre- to postintervention. Participants who reported adhering to the intervention plan (n = 15) demonstrated an increase in blood glucose monitoring frequency and trends in improved HbA1c and parental diabetes collaboration from pre- to postintervention. Participants and physicians reported overall satisfaction with the program. Results demonstrate initial feasibility as well as a trend toward improvement in diabetes-specific health indicators for parent-adolescent dyads who adhered to program components. Frequent joint review of glucometer data can be a useful strategy to improve type 1 diabetes-related health outcomes and parent-adolescent communication. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Effectiveness of individual and group interventions for people with type 2 diabetes1

    PubMed Central

    Imazu, Maria Fernanda Manoel; Faria, Barbara Nascimento; de Arruda, Guilherme Oliveira; Sales, Catarina Aparecida; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the effectiveness of two educational interventions used by a healthcare provider in the monitoring of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), regarding knowledge of the disease, impact on quality of life and adoption of self-care actions. METHODS: comparative, longitudinal, prospective study performed with 150 subjects with type 2 diabetes, analyzed according to the type of participation in the program (individual and/or group). Participants of the individual intervention (II) received nursing consultations every six months and those of the group intervention (GI) took part in weekly meetings for three months. Data were collected through four questionnaires: Identification questionnaire, Problem Areas in Diabetes Questionnaire (PAID), Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire (SDSCA) and the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A). Data were analyzed using the Friedman and Mann Whitney tests, considering a statistical significance of p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS: there was an increase in knowledge about the disease in the II (p<0.003) and GI (p<0.007), with reduction of the impact on the quality of life in the II (p<0.007) and improvement in self-care actions in the GI (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: in both intervention models improvements were observed in the indicators, over the six month monitoring period. PMID:26039289

  20. The effect of a trail use intervention on urban trail use in Southern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sheila; Bungum, Tim; Shan, Guogen; Meacham, Mindy; Coker, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    Communities are building or improving trail networks for biking and walking to encourage physical activity, but the relationship between trail environments and physical activity is not well understood. We examined the effect of a trail use intervention in Southern Nevada. We monitored the usage of urban trails (n=10) in Southern Nevada before, during, and after an intervention which included a marketing campaign promoting trail use and the addition of way-finding and incremental distance signage to selected trails (October 2011-October 2012). Data were collected with infrared monitors placed on the trails for three periods of 7days. We compared pre-, mid-, and post-intervention usage rates on the 6 trails where signage was added to usage rates on the 4 control trails. The groups of trails experienced different patterns of increases and decreases over the 1-year study period. Mean users per hour increased 31% for the study trails and 35% for the control trails (p<0.001), but the total increase did not vary between the groups. Trail use increased about 33% during the 1-year study period for the intervention. Adding wayfinding and incremental distance signage appeared to support the increase in usage which followed the marketing campaign. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of individual-focused interventions to prevent chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Sara; Golfam, Mohammad; Beall, Reed F; Ashbury, Fredrick D; Palmer, Lyle J; Little, Julian

    2014-09-01

    The burden of chronic disease is projected to assume crisis proportions in most parts of the world by the middle of the century, focusing attention on the need for preventive interventions. We identify and review published research on primary prevention individual-level interventions in current practice and describe and discuss the limitations of the current evidence. The report facilitates prioritizing a research agenda for potential interventions that might be investigated within cohort studies. This study is a rapid review. Computerized database searches (PubMed and EMBASE) were performed in October 2012 to identify articles on primary prevention interventions that are directed at the individual level. Potentially, relevant International Agency of Research on Cancer handbooks and monographs were also reviewed. The review includes articles reported in English on the efficacy or effectiveness of a preventive intervention in an adult population. It excludes articles on alcohol or tobacco smoking. Many chronic disease interventions directed at individuals report a protective effect in the short term and some evidence for the efficacy of chemoprevention in chronic disease prevention exists. Evidence these effects persist in the longer term is inconsistent. There are currently only limited evidence-based preventions for most chronic diseases, for which a summary is available in Table A1 (see Appendix B). Most individual-level intervention research studies have been conducted using case-control designs and some small, randomized studies. There are fewer impediments to lifestyle modifications when compared to prevention using chemoprevention and vaccination or other methods of prevention of persistent infection. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  2. Effect of lifestyle intervention on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese obese children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Lin; Liang, Li; Fu, Jun-Fen; Zou, Chao-Chun; Hong, Fang; Xue, Jin-Zheng; Lu, Jin-Rui; Wu, Xiang-Min

    2008-03-14

    To investigate the effect of lifestyle intervention on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Chinese obese children. Seventy-six obese children aged from 10 to 17 years with NAFLD were enrolled for a one-month intervention and divided randomly into three groups. Group1, consisting of 38 obese children, was an untreated control group without any intervention. Group 2, consisting of 19 obese children in summer camp, was strictly controlled only by life style intervention. Group 3, consisting of 19 obese children, received oral vitamin E therapy at a dose of 100 mg/d. The height, weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TCHO) and homeostasis model assent-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured at baseline and after one month. All patients were underwent to an ultrasonographic study of the liver performed by one operator who was blinded to the groups. The monitor indices of BMI, ALT, AST, TG, TCHO and HOMA-IR were successfully improved except in group 1. BMI and ALT in group 2 were reduced more significantly than in group 3 (2.44 +/- 0.82 vs 1.45 +/- 0.80, P = 0.001; 88.58 +/- 39.99 vs 63.69 +/- 27.05, P = 0.040, respectively). Both a short-term lifestyle intervention and vitamin E therapy have an effect on NAFLD in obese children. Compared with vitamin E, lifestyle intervention is more effective. Therefore, lifestyle intervention should represent the first step in the management of children with NAFLD.

  3. Cardiovascular effects of intensive lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wing, Rena R; Bolin, Paula; Brancati, Frederick L; Bray, George A; Clark, Jeanne M; Coday, Mace; Crow, Richard S; Curtis, Jeffrey M; Egan, Caitlin M; Espeland, Mark A; Evans, Mary; Foreyt, John P; Ghazarian, Siran; Gregg, Edward W; Harrison, Barbara; Hazuda, Helen P; Hill, James O; Horton, Edward S; Hubbard, Van S; Jakicic, John M; Jeffery, Robert W; Johnson, Karen C; Kahn, Steven E; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Knowler, William C; Lewis, Cora E; Maschak-Carey, Barbara J; Montez, Maria G; Murillo, Anne; Nathan, David M; Patricio, Jennifer; Peters, Anne; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Pownall, Henry; Reboussin, David; Regensteiner, Judith G; Rickman, Amy D; Ryan, Donna H; Safford, Monika; Wadden, Thomas A; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; West, Delia S; Williamson, David F; Yanovski, Susan Z

    2013-07-11

    Weight loss is recommended for overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of short-term studies, but long-term effects on cardiovascular disease remain unknown. We examined whether an intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss would decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among such patients. In 16 study centers in the United States, we randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes to participate in an intensive lifestyle intervention that promoted weight loss through decreased caloric intake and increased physical activity (intervention group) or to receive diabetes support and education (control group). The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or hospitalization for angina during a maximum follow-up of 13.5 years. The trial was stopped early on the basis of a futility analysis when the median follow-up was 9.6 years. Weight loss was greater in the intervention group than in the control group throughout the study (8.6% vs. 0.7% at 1 year; 6.0% vs. 3.5% at study end). The intensive lifestyle intervention also produced greater reductions in glycated hemoglobin and greater initial improvements in fitness and all cardiovascular risk factors, except for low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The primary outcome occurred in 403 patients in the intervention group and in 418 in the control group (1.83 and 1.92 events per 100 person-years, respectively; hazard ratio in the intervention group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.09; P=0.51). An intensive lifestyle intervention focusing on weight loss did not reduce the rate of cardiovascular events in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; Look AHEAD ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00017953.).

  4. Modeling the effect of comprehensive interventions on Ebola virus transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin

    2015-10-01

    Since the re-emergence of Ebola in West Africa in 2014, comprehensive and stringent interventions have been implemented to decelerate the spread of the disease. The effectiveness of interventions still remains unclear. In this paper, we develop an epidemiological model that includes various controlling measures to systematically evaluate their effects on the disease transmission dynamics. By fitting the model to reported cumulative cases and deaths in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia until March 22, 2015, we estimate the basic reproduction number in these countries as 1.2552, 1.6093 and 1.7994, respectively. Model analysis shows that there exists a threshold of the effectiveness of isolation, below which increasing the fraction of latent individuals diagnosed prior to symptoms onset or shortening the duration between symptoms onset and isolation may lead to more Ebola infection. This challenges an existing view. Media coverage plays a substantial role in reducing the final epidemic size. The response to reported cumulative infected cases and deaths may have a different effect on the epidemic spread in different countries. Among all the interventions, we find that shortening the duration between death and burial and improving the effectiveness of isolation are two effective interventions for controlling the outbreak of Ebola virus infection.

  5. Effect of depressive symptoms on asthma intervention in urban teens.

    PubMed

    Guglani, Lokesh; Havstad, Suzanne L; Johnson, Christine Cole; Ownby, Dennis R; Joseph, Christine L M

    2012-10-01

    The literature suggests that depression is an important comorbidity in asthma that can significantly influence disease management and quality of life (QOL). To study the effect of coexisting depressive symptoms on the effectiveness of self-management interventions in urban teens with asthma. We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial of Puff City, a web-based, tailored asthma management intervention for urban teens, to determine whether depression modulated intervention effectiveness for asthma control and QOL outcomes. Teens and caregivers were classified as depressed based on responses collected from baseline questionnaires. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that a lower percentage of treatment students had indicators of uncontrolled asthma compared with controls (adjusted odds ratios <1). However, for teens depressed at baseline, QOL scores at follow-up were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with the control group for the emotions domain (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.63; P = .01; interpreted as emotional QOL for treatment students increased by a factor of 2.08 above controls). Estimates for overall QOL and symptoms QOL were borderline significant (adjusted relative risk, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-2.63; P = .09; and adjusted relative risk, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-3.15; P = .08; respectively). Among teens not depressed at baseline, no significant differences were observed between treatment and control groups in QOL domains at follow-up. Our results suggest that depression modified the relationship between the effectiveness of an asthma intervention and emotional QOL in urban teens. Further assessment of self-management behavioral interventions for asthma should explore the mechanism by which depression may alter the intervention effect. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of depressive symptoms on asthma intervention in urban teens

    PubMed Central

    Guglani, Lokesh; Havstad, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Christine Cole; Ownby, Dennis R.; Joseph, Christine L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The literature suggests that depression is an important comorbidity in asthma that can significantly influence disease management and quality of life (QOL). Objective To study the effect of coexisting depressive symptoms on the effectiveness of self-management interventions in urban teens with asthma. Methods We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial of Puff City, a web-based, tailored asthma management intervention for urban teens, to determine whether depression modulated intervention effectiveness for asthma control and QOL outcomes. Teens and caregivers were classified as depressed based on responses collected from baseline questionnaires. Result Using logistic regression analysis, we found that a lower percentage of treatment students had indicators of uncontrolled asthma compared with controls (adjusted odds ratios <1). However, for teens depressed at baseline, QOL scores at follow-up were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with the control group for the emotions domain (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.2–3.63; P = .01; interpreted as emotional QOL for treatment students increased by a factor of 2.08 above controls). Estimates for overall QOL and symptoms QOL were borderline significant (adjusted relative risk, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.93–2.63; P = .09; and adjusted relative risk, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.94–3.15; P = .08; respectively). Among teens not depressed at baseline, no significant differences were observed between treatment and control groups in QOL domains at follow-up. Conclusion Our results suggest that depression modified the relationship between the effectiveness of an asthma intervention and emotional QOL in urban teens. Further assessment of self-management behavioral interventions for asthma should explore the mechanism by which depression may alter the intervention effect. PMID:23010228

  7. Improving temperature monitoring in the vaccine cold chain at the periphery: an intervention study using a 30-day electronic refrigerator temperature logger (Fridge-tag).

    PubMed

    Kartoğlu, Umit; Nelaj, Erida; Maire, Denis

    2010-05-28

    This intervention study was conducted in Albania to establish the superiority of the Fridge-tag (30-day electronic refrigerator temperature logger) against thermometers. Intervention sites used Fridge-tag and a modified temperature control record sheet, while control sites continued with their routine operation with thermometers. All refrigerators in both groups were equipped with downloadable electronic data loggers to record temperatures for reference. Focus group sessions were conducted with involved staff to discuss temperature monitoring, Fridge-tag use and its user-friendliness. Significant discrepancies were observed between thermometer readings and the electronic data loggers in control sites, while all alarms from Fridge-tag were confirmed in the intervention group. Thermometers are not sufficient to monitor temperatures in refrigerators since they miss the great majority of low and high alarms. Fridge-tag has proven to be an effective tool in providing health workers with the information they need to take the necessary actions when there are refrigerator temperature variations. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a continuing care intervention for cocaine-dependent adults

    PubMed Central

    McCollister, Kathryn; Yang, Xuan; McKay, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The study conducts a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a continuing care Telephone Monitoring and Counseling (TMC) intervention for adults diagnosed with cocaine dependence. Participants were randomly assigned to a control condition of intensive outpatient treatment only (treatment-as-usual, or TAU; N = 108), or to one of two treatment conditions featuring TMC (N = 106) and TMC plus incentives (TMC-plus; N = 107). Follow-up assessments were conducted over a 2-year period. Methods Intervention and client costs were collected with the program and client versions of the Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program (DATCAP). Effectiveness was measured as the number of days abstinent during follow-up. Secondary analyses consider alternative measures of effectiveness and the reduced societal costs of physical and mental health problems and criminal justice involvement. Results From the societal perspective, TMC dominates both TAU and TMC-plus as a cost-effective and cost-saving intervention. Results varied by substance-using status, however, with the subgroup of participants in TMC-plus that were using drugs at intake and early in treatment having the greatest number of days of abstinence and generating similar savings during follow-up than the TMC subgroup using drugs at intake. Conclusions Telephone monitoring and counseling appears to be a cost-effective and potentially cost-saving strategy for reducing substance use among chronic substance users. Providing client incentives added to total intervention costs but did not improve overall effectiveness. Clinical trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Number: NCT00685659. PMID:26621551

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a continuing care intervention for cocaine-dependent adults.

    PubMed

    McCollister, Kathryn; Yang, Xuan; McKay, James R

    2016-01-01

    The study conducts a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a continuing care Telephone Monitoring and Counseling (TMC) intervention for adults diagnosed with cocaine dependence. Participants were randomly assigned to a control condition of intensive outpatient treatment only (treatment-as-usual, or TAU; N=108), or to one of two treatment conditions featuring TMC (N=106) and TMC plus incentives (TMC-plus; N=107). Follow-up assessments were conducted over a 2-year period. Intervention and client costs were collected with the program and client versions of the Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program (DATCAP). Effectiveness was measured as the number of days abstinent during follow-up. Secondary analyses consider alternative measures of effectiveness and the reduced societal costs of physical and mental health problems and criminal justice involvement. From the societal perspective, TMC dominates both TAU and TMC-plus as a cost-effective and cost-saving intervention. Results varied by substance-using status, however, with the subgroup of participants in TMC-plus that were using drugs at intake and early in treatment having the greatest number of days of abstinence and generating similar savings during follow-up than the TMC subgroup using drugs at intake. Telephone monitoring and counseling appears to be a cost-effective and potentially cost-saving strategy for reducing substance use among chronic substance users. Providing client incentives added to total intervention costs but did not improve overall effectiveness. Clinical Trials.gov Number: NCT00685659. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prenatal Depression Risk Factors, Developmental Effects and Interventions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review based on a literature search in PubMed and PsycInfo on the two terms prenatal and antenatal depression includes empirical studies, reviews and meta-analyses that have been published during the last 5 years on risk factors, developmental effects and interventions for prenatal depression. Risk factor studies that met criteria feature demographic measures (lower socioeconomic status, less education, non-marital status, non-employment, less social support and health locus of control, unintended pregnancy, partner violence and history of child abuse) and physiological variables (cortisol, amylase, and pro-inflammatory cytokines and intrauterine artery resistance). The negative effects include postpartum depression, paternal depression, and prematurity and low birth weight. Negative effects on infants include greater right frontal EEG, amygdala connectivity, cortical thinning and more difficult temperament. In childhood, externalizing and internalizing problems have been reported. The data on prenatal antidepressants (specifically SSRIs) reveal negative effects including internalizing problems as well as a greater risk for autism spectrum disorder. Prenatal interventions that have been effective include interpersonal psychotherapy, peer support, massage therapy, yoga, tai chi, and aerobic exercise. Potential underlying mechanisms are discussed as well as methodological limitations including homogeneity of samples and lack of randomization to intervention groups. Despite these limitations, the literature highlights the need for prenatal depression screening and intervention. PMID:28702506

  11. Prenatal Depression Risk Factors, Developmental Effects and Interventions: A Review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2017-02-01

    This narrative review based on a literature search in PubMed and PsycInfo on the two terms prenatal and antenatal depression includes empirical studies, reviews and meta-analyses that have been published during the last 5 years on risk factors, developmental effects and interventions for prenatal depression. Risk factor studies that met criteria feature demographic measures (lower socioeconomic status, less education, non-marital status, non-employment, less social support and health locus of control, unintended pregnancy, partner violence and history of child abuse) and physiological variables (cortisol, amylase, and pro-inflammatory cytokines and intrauterine artery resistance). The negative effects include postpartum depression, paternal depression, and prematurity and low birth weight. Negative effects on infants include greater right frontal EEG, amygdala connectivity, cortical thinning and more difficult temperament. In childhood, externalizing and internalizing problems have been reported. The data on prenatal antidepressants (specifically SSRIs) reveal negative effects including internalizing problems as well as a greater risk for autism spectrum disorder. Prenatal interventions that have been effective include interpersonal psychotherapy, peer support, massage therapy, yoga, tai chi, and aerobic exercise. Potential underlying mechanisms are discussed as well as methodological limitations including homogeneity of samples and lack of randomization to intervention groups. Despite these limitations, the literature highlights the need for prenatal depression screening and intervention.

  12. Effectiveness of Weight Loss Interventions for Obese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Holly C.; West, Delia S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The consequences of obesity among older adults are significant, yet few obesity interventions target this group. Unfamiliarity with weight loss intervention effectiveness and concerns that weight loss negatively affects older adults may be inhibiting targeting this group. This paper reviews the evidence on intentional weight loss and effective weight loss interventions for obese older adults to help dispel concerns and guide health promotion practice. Data Source PubMed articles. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria Randomized controlled trials examining behavioral and pharmaceutical weight loss strategies with 1-year follow-up targeting obese (body mass index ≥30) older adults (mean age ≥60 years), and studies with quasi-experimental designs examining surgical weight loss strategies targeting older adults were examined. Data Extraction Abstracts were reviewed for study objective relevancy, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Data Synthesis Data were inserted into an analysis matrix. Results Evidence indicates behavioral strategies are effective in producing significant (all p < .05) weight loss without significant risk to obese older adults, but effectiveness evidence for surgical and pharmaceutical strategies for obese older adults is lacking, primarily because this group has not been targeted in trials or analyses did not isolate this group. Conclusion These findings support the promotion of intentional weight loss among obese older adults and provide guidance to health promotion practitioners on effective weight loss interventions to use with this group. PMID:23286596

  13. Effectiveness of weight loss interventions for obese older adults.

    PubMed

    Felix, Holly C; West, Delia S

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of obesity among older adults are significant, yet few obesity interventions target this group. Unfamiliarity with weight loss intervention effectiveness and concerns that weight loss negatively affects older adults may be inhibiting targeting this group. This paper reviews the evidence on intentional weight loss and effective weight loss interventions for obese older adults to help dispel concerns and guide health promotion practice. PubMed articles. Randomized controlled trials examining behavioral and pharmaceutical weight loss strategies with 1-year follow-up targeting obese (body mass index ≥ 30) older adults (mean age ≥ 60 years), and studies with quasi-experimental designs examining surgical weight loss strategies targeting older adults were examined. Abstracts were reviewed for study objective relevancy, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Data were inserted into an analysis matrix. Evidence indicates behavioral strategies are effective in producing significant (all p < .05) weight loss without significant risk to obese older adults, but effectiveness evidence for surgical and pharmaceutical strategies for obese older adults is lacking, primarily because this group has not been targeted in trials or analyses did not isolate this group. These findings support the promotion of intentional weight loss among obese older adults and provide guidance to health promotion practitioners on effective weight loss interventions to use with this group.

  14. Curriculum-based assessment of oral language and listening comprehension: a tool for intervention and progress monitoring in the Common Core State Standards.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Wendy

    2012-05-01

    The Common Core State Standards and a Response to Intervention framework are movements sweeping the nation. Speech-language pathologists are uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in supporting successful implementation of these movements. This article explores the assessment tools speech-language pathologists SLPs will need to identify and progress monitor critical language/literacy skills such as listening comprehension and oral narratives skills. Foundational research demonstrates that communication units, total words spoken, and major story components are measures that will discriminate between students with adequate language skills and language disorders and are curriculum-based, sensitive to change, and useful to determine the effectiveness of language/literacy interventions. Speech-language pathologist can broaden the impact of their knowledge and skills to improve outcomes for all students. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Effectiveness of Workplace Weight Management Interventions: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Yasoma Kumari; Roberts, Susan B; Kahn, Mira A; LaVertu, Amy E; Hoffman, Ben; Das, Sai Krupa

    2016-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted of randomized trials of workplace weight management interventions, including trials with dietary, physical activity, environmental, behavioral, and incentive-based components. Main outcomes were defined as change in weight-related measures. Keywords related to weight management and workplace interventions were used to search relevant databases, and 23 eligible studies were reviewed in detail using a data extraction form and quality assessment checklist. The trials were conducted mainly in the USA and Europe, with four additional countries represented. Interventions were mostly multicomponent and were implemented in both sexes and in a range of employment categories. Intervention effectiveness appeared unrelated to region of the world and was highest in 6-12-month trials. The results ranged widely from clinically significant 8.8-kg weight loss in one trial to less effective than the control treatment in others. Some workplace interventions achieve clinically significant benefits, and further studies are needed to replicate those results in wider sociocultural and geographical contexts.

  16. Selecting the Right Tool for the Job: A Review of Behavior Monitoring Tools Used to Assess Student Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Kalberer, Stephen M.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2005-01-01

    The educational accountability movement has demanded that educators implement and also monitor students' responses to positive behavioral accommodations in schools as well as communicate this information to others. This new responsibility has left many educators struggling with ways to monitor students effectively. This article provides a brief…

  17. Worksite intervention effects on physical health: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Chow, Chin-Moi; Kirby, Adrienne; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2006-09-01

    Overweight and physical inactivity are risk factors for increased disease burden and health care expenditure. Well-designed studies are still needed to determine the treatment efficacy of worksite interventions targeting such risk factors. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at one of Australia's casinos in 2002-2003, to investigate the effects of a comprehensive exercise and lifestyle intervention on physical fitness. Only 6.4% of the workforce expressed interest in being study participants. Seventy-three employees (aged 32 +/- 8 years, 51% overweight/obese, 73% shift workers and 52% women) were recruited and randomized to treatment or wait-list control groups for 24 weeks, 44 of whom completed the intervention. Components of the intervention include supervised moderate-to-high intensity exercise including combined aerobic (at least 20 min duration 3 days/week) and weight-training (for an estimated 30 min completed 2-3 days/week), and dietary/health education (delivered via group seminars, one-on-one counselling and literature through the provision of a worksite manual). ANCOVA, by intention-to-treat and of study completers, found significant between-group differences in the mean waist circumference and predicted maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), favouring the intervention, but effects were concentrated in one subject. For study completers, between-group differences in the mean waist circumference (82.3 +/- 9.2 versus 90.5 +/- 17.8 cm, p = 0.01) and predicted VO2max (47 versus 41 ml/kg/min, p < 0.001) remained significant without the outlier, favouring the intervention. Higher intervention compliance predicted greater improvements in physical fitness. No significant effects on body mass or body mass index were found. This worksite intervention significantly improved waist circumference and aerobic fitness in healthy but sedentary employees, most of whom were shift workers. Worksite interventions have the potential to counter the increasing burden of

  18. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, L. M.; Diette, G. B.; Scott, M.; McCormack, M. C.; Matsui, E. C.; Curtin-Brosnan, J.; Williams, D. L.; Kidd-Taylor, A.; Shea, M.; Breysse, P. N.; Hansel, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placement of air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and carbon filters. Home inspection and NO2 monitoring were conducted at 1 week pre-intervention and at 1 week and 3 months post-intervention. Stove replacement resulted in a 51% and 42% decrease in median NO2 concentration at 3 months of follow-up in the kitchen and bedroom, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.01); air purifier placement resulted in an immediate decrease in median NO2 concentration in the kitchen (27%, P < 0.01) and bedroom (22%, P = 0.02), but at 3 months, a significant reduction was seen only in the kitchen (20%, P = 0.05). NO2 concentrations in the kitchen and bedroom did not significantly change following ventilation hood installation. Replacing unvented gas stoves with electric stoves or placement of air purifiers with HEPA and carbon filters can decrease indoor NO2 concentrations in urban homes. PMID:24329966

  19. Using an eHealth Intervention to Stimulate Health Behavior for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline in Dutch Adults: A Study Protocol for the Brain Aging Monitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Internet-delivered intervention programs are an effective way of changing health behavior in an aging population. The same population has an increasing number of people with cognitive decline or cognitive impairments. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors such as physical activity, nutrition, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep, and stress all influence the probability of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. Objective This study aims to answer two questions: (1) Is the use of a self-motivated, complex eHealth intervention effective in changing multiple health behaviors related to cognitive aging in Dutch adults in the work force, especially those aged 40 and over? and (2) Does this health behavior change result in healthier cognitive aging patterns and contribute to preventing or delaying future onset of neurodegenerative syndromes? Methods The Brain Aging Monitor study uses a quasi-experimental 2-year pre-posttest design. The Brain Aging Monitor is an online, self-motivated lifestyle intervention program. Recruitment is done both in medium to large organizations and in the Dutch general population over the age of 40. The main outcome measure is the relationship between lifestyle change and cognitive aging. The program uses different strategies and modalities such as Web content, email, online newsletters, and online games to aid its users in behavior change. To build self-regulatory skills, the Brain Aging Monitor offers its users goal-setting activities, skill-building activities, and self-monitoring. Results Study results are expected to be published in early 2016. Conclusions This study will add to the body of evidence on the effectiveness of eHealth intervention programs with the combined use of state-of-the-art applied games and established behavior change techniques. This will lead to new insights on how to use behavior change techniques and theory in multidimensional lifestyle eHealth research, and how these techniques

  20. Using an eHealth Intervention to Stimulate Health Behavior for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline in Dutch Adults: A Study Protocol for the Brain Aging Monitor.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, Teun; Baars, Maria Ae; Qin, Li; de Lange, Annet; Kessels, Roy Pc; Olde Rikkert, Marcel Gm

    2015-11-10

    Internet-delivered intervention programs are an effective way of changing health behavior in an aging population. The same population has an increasing number of people with cognitive decline or cognitive impairments. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors such as physical activity, nutrition, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep, and stress all influence the probability of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study aims to answer two questions: (1) Is the use of a self-motivated, complex eHealth intervention effective in changing multiple health behaviors related to cognitive aging in Dutch adults in the work force, especially those aged 40 and over? and (2) Does this health behavior change result in healthier cognitive aging patterns and contribute to preventing or delaying future onset of neurodegenerative syndromes? The Brain Aging Monitor study uses a quasi-experimental 2-year pre-posttest design. The Brain Aging Monitor is an online, self-motivated lifestyle intervention program. Recruitment is done both in medium to large organizations and in the Dutch general population over the age of 40. The main outcome measure is the relationship between lifestyle change and cognitive aging. The program uses different strategies and modalities such as Web content, email, online newsletters, and online games to aid its users in behavior change. To build self-regulatory skills, the Brain Aging Monitor offers its users goal-setting activities, skill-building activities, and self-monitoring. Study results are expected to be published in early 2016. This study will add to the body of evidence on the effectiveness of eHealth intervention programs with the combined use of state-of-the-art applied games and established behavior change techniques. This will lead to new insights on how to use behavior change techniques and theory in multidimensional lifestyle eHealth research, and how these techniques and theories apply when they are used in a setting

  1. A retrospective exploration of patient-ventilator monitoring intensity, therapeutic intervention intensity, and compliance with lung protective guidelines in a cohort of patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Terry L

    2011-03-01

     The current approach to mechanical ventilation for adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) involves maintaining key patient-ventilator parameters within established lung protective targets. Monitoring is part of the processes of nursing care believed to guide therapeutic intervention and facilitate compliance with these targets. Empirical relationships between monitoring, therapeutic intervention, and compliance with these practice guidelines have not been adequately explored.  A retrospective observational design was used to explore relationships between monitoring intensity, therapeutic intervention intensity, and compliance with a lung protective philosophy of mechanical ventilation in a cohort of patients with ARDS or ALI. Compliance with lung protective targets was measured as the proportion of time oxygen saturation, alveolar distending pressure, and tidal volume were maintained within recommended guidelines as evidenced by medical record documentation. Monitoring intensity and therapeutic intervention intensity were based on the frequency of recorded assessments and interventions in the medical record.  Monitoring intensity correlated positively with both severity of illness (r = 0.39) and with therapeutic intervention intensity (r = 0.30), and was inversely related to compliance with lung protective guidelines (CLPG) (r = -0.34). A regression model including monitoring intensity, severity of illness, risk for abdominal hypertension, and CLPG was statistically significant (p = 0.02) but explained little of the variance in compliance with lung protective parameters (R2 = 0.13).  Compliance with recommended lung protective parameters in the absence of standardized monitoring and intervention protocols is suboptimal. Preliminary evidence of positive relationships between monitoring and both severity of illness and therapeutic intervention was established. Control for nursing and physician practice variation is

  2. An effectiveness monitoring program for the northwest forest plan: new approaches to common monitoring problems

    Treesearch

    Craig Palmer; Barry Mulder; Barry Noon

    2000-01-01

    The Northwest Forest Plan is a large-scale ecosystem management plan for federal lands in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. An effectiveness monitoring program has been developed to determine the extent to which the goals and objectives of this Plan are being achieved. Priority resources identified for ecological monitoring include late-successional and old-...

  3. The Effects of Child Maltreatment on Learning Disabilities and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the increase in the rate and intensity of child maltreatment, defines the types of maltreatment (physical, sexual, psychological and neglect), their possible effects on learning, and school interventions that can assist the children with learning disabilities. The need for a structured classroom environment is emphasized.…

  4. Measuring the Effects of Administrative Intervention: A Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hechenberger, Nan B.; Bausell, R. Barker

    1982-01-01

    An organizational blockage instrument was administered to measure the effects of administrative interventions by a new nursing dean prior to and following certain organizational changes. A significant reduction in perceived blockages and moderate prediction of the magnitude of specific changes prior to the second data gathering could be found.…

  5. HIV Infection: Transmission, Effects on Early Development, and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Describes the modes of transmission of HIV and the course of the disease in infants and toddlers. Information is provided on its effects on early development, medical screening and treatments, therapies, psychosocial assistance, and interventions, including nutritional therapy, occupational and physical therapies, and speech and language therapy.…

  6. Effects of Individualized Word Retrieval in Kindergarten Vocabulary Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damhuis, Carmen M. P.; Segers, Eliane; Scheltinga, Femke; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of adaptive word retrieval intervention on a classroom vocabulary program on children's vocabulary acquisition in kindergarten. In the experimental condition, word retrieval was provided in a classroom vocabulary program, combining implicit and explicit vocabulary instructions. Children performed extra word retrieval…

  7. Cognitive Counselling Intervention: Treatment Effectiveness in an Italian University Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strepparava, Maria Grazia; Bani, Marco; Zorzi, Federico; Corrias, Deborah; Dolce, Rossella; Rezzonico, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Offering counselling to students is increasingly considered as a key academic service. However, the reduction of resources allocated to Italian universities emphasises the need to assess the quality of interventions. This paper presents data reporting the effectiveness of a university counselling service. A sample of 45 undergraduate students…

  8. Repeated Reading Intervention Effects in Kindergartners with Partial Letter Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gorp, Karly; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    The direct, transfer and retention effects of a repeated reading intervention study of single CVC (consonant in the onset and a vowel and consonant in the rime) words in kindergartners with partial letter knowledge were examined. A total of 26 second-year kindergartners participated in this study. Participants were divided over two feedback…

  9. Power to Detect Intervention Effects on Ensembles of Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Tracy M.; Junker, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    The hierarchical network model (HNM) is a framework introduced by Sweet, Thomas, and Junker for modeling interventions and other covariate effects on ensembles of social networks, such as what would be found in randomized controlled trials in education research. In this article, we develop calculations for the power to detect an intervention…

  10. Secondary/Transition Intervention Effectiveness: Third Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusch, Frank R.; DeStefano, Lizanne

    The Secondary Transition Intervention Effectiveness Institute studies issues related to secondary education and transitional services for individuals with special needs. This third annual report offers an overview of secondary transitional services in the United States by Jane Dowling. Papers describing preliminary findings of the Institute's…

  11. Long-Term Effects of First-Grade Multitier Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Kim, Young-Suk; Wanzek, Jeanne; Petscher, Yaacov; Wagner, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term effects of 2 first-grade Response to Intervention (RTI) models (Dynamic and Typical RTI) on the reading performance of students in second and third grade. Participants included 419 first-grade students (352 in second grade and 278 in third grade after attrition). Students were classified based…

  12. Enhancement of Thinking Skills: Effects of Two Intervention Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga, Maria Luisa; Sanz de Acedo Baquedano, Maria Teresa; Goicoa Mangado, Tomas; Cardelle-Elawar, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Three studies were carried out with Compulsory Secondary Education students to verify the effectiveness of two intervention methods--the infusion method (IM) and the instrumental enrichment program (IEP)--to enhance thinking skills, creativity, behavioral self-regulation, and academic achievement. Study 1 (N = 118) was conducted in order to create…

  13. Long-Term Effects of First-Grade Multitier Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Kim, Young-Suk; Wanzek, Jeanne; Petscher, Yaacov; Wagner, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term effects of 2 first-grade Response to Intervention (RTI) models (Dynamic and Typical RTI) on the reading performance of students in second and third grade. Participants included 419 first-grade students (352 in second grade and 278 in third grade after attrition). Students were classified based…

  14. Power to Detect Intervention Effects on Ensembles of Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Tracy M.; Junker, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    The hierarchical network model (HNM) is a framework introduced by Sweet, Thomas, and Junker for modeling interventions and other covariate effects on ensembles of social networks, such as what would be found in randomized controlled trials in education research. In this article, we develop calculations for the power to detect an intervention…

  15. HIV Infection: Transmission, Effects on Early Development, and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Describes the modes of transmission of HIV and the course of the disease in infants and toddlers. Information is provided on its effects on early development, medical screening and treatments, therapies, psychosocial assistance, and interventions, including nutritional therapy, occupational and physical therapies, and speech and language therapy.…

  16. Effects of Individualized Word Retrieval in Kindergarten Vocabulary Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damhuis, Carmen M. P.; Segers, Eliane; Scheltinga, Femke; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of adaptive word retrieval intervention on a classroom vocabulary program on children's vocabulary acquisition in kindergarten. In the experimental condition, word retrieval was provided in a classroom vocabulary program, combining implicit and explicit vocabulary instructions. Children performed extra word retrieval…

  17. Measuring Effects of a Skills Training Intervention for Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, J. David; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A test was conducted of a supplemental skills training and social-network-development aftercare program with 130 drug abusers from four residential therapeutic communities. The intervention produced positive effects on subjects' performance at the conclusion of treatment. Performance improved in situations involving avoidance of drug use, coping…

  18. Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injuries: Effects on Development and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the variety of possible effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) on early childhood development in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Suggests interventions which can assist young survivors and their families. Suggests that more long-term, intensive studies be conducted on the short- and long-term…

  19. Early Intervention Services: Effectively Supporting Maori Children and their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Mere; Woller, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines Early Intervention (EI) service provision from within one Ministry of Education region in New Zealand. It does this in order to better understand what works well and what needs to change if children from Maori families, of Early Childhood age, are to be provided with the most effective EI services. By engaging with Maori…

  20. Cognitive Counselling Intervention: Treatment Effectiveness in an Italian University Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strepparava, Maria Grazia; Bani, Marco; Zorzi, Federico; Corrias, Deborah; Dolce, Rossella; Rezzonico, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Offering counselling to students is increasingly considered as a key academic service. However, the reduction of resources allocated to Italian universities emphasises the need to assess the quality of interventions. This paper presents data reporting the effectiveness of a university counselling service. A sample of 45 undergraduate students…

  1. Effects of Preschool Intervention Strategies on School Readiness in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Nelson, Regena F.; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.

    2015-01-01

    Using hierarchical linear modeling, the present study aimed to examine whether targeted intervention strategies implemented individually during a preschool program exhibited any short-term and long-term effects on children's school readiness in kindergarten, utilizing data gathered through the Supporting Partnerships to Assure Ready Kids (SPARK)…

  2. Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injuries: Effects on Development and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the variety of possible effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) on early childhood development in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Suggests interventions which can assist young survivors and their families. Suggests that more long-term, intensive studies be conducted on the short- and long-term…

  3. Effectiveness of Abstinence-Only Intervention in Middle School Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borawski, Elaine A.; Trapl, Erika S.; Lovegreen, Loren D.; Colabianchi, Natalie; Block, Tonya

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine effectiveness of abstinence-until-marriage curriculum on knowledge, beliefs, efficacy, intentions, and behavior. Methods: Nonrandomized control trial involving 2069 middle school students with a 5-month follow-up. Results: Intervention students reported increases in knowledge and abstinence beliefs, but decreases in…

  4. Repeated Reading Intervention Effects in Kindergartners with Partial Letter Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gorp, Karly; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    The direct, transfer and retention effects of a repeated reading intervention study of single CVC (consonant in the onset and a vowel and consonant in the rime) words in kindergartners with partial letter knowledge were examined. A total of 26 second-year kindergartners participated in this study. Participants were divided over two feedback…

  5. Effects of Preschool Intervention Strategies on School Readiness in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Nelson, Regena F.; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.

    2015-01-01

    Using hierarchical linear modeling, the present study aimed to examine whether targeted intervention strategies implemented individually during a preschool program exhibited any short-term and long-term effects on children's school readiness in kindergarten, utilizing data gathered through the Supporting Partnerships to Assure Ready Kids (SPARK)…

  6. Public education regarding resuscitation: effects of a multimedia intervention.

    PubMed

    Marco, Catherine A; Larkin, Gregory L

    2003-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated inaccuracies in knowledge and perceptions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among the general public. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of a multimedia educational intervention on knowledge base and resuscitation preferences among the lay public. In this prospective interventional study with preintervention and postintervention measurements, a validated multisite survey was administered to 310 volunteer lay participants in community-based settings during 2001 and 2002. The survey was piloted and validated (percentage of agreement index 98.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9810 to 0.9900). An original 8-minute multimedia educational video was written and produced by physicians to provide educational information about cardiac resuscitation to the lay public. Among 310 participants, the mean age was 40 years (range 17 to 92 years), 67% were female, and 57% reported household incomes of more than 30,000 US dollars. Participants' median estimates of predicted postcardiac arrest survival rate before and after the educational intervention were 50% and 16%, respectively (median change 30%; 95% CI 25% to 35%). Median estimated durations of resuscitative efforts in the emergency department before and after the educational intervention were 30 minutes and 19 minutes, respectively (median change 10 minutes; 95% CI 5 to 15 minutes). For a series of hypothetical scenarios, significantly more participants indicated that they would refuse resuscitative efforts in scenarios involving terminally ill patients after the educational intervention. Inaccurate perceptions regarding cardiac resuscitation and postarrest survival exist among the lay public. A novel educational intervention demonstrated effective improvements in knowledge base regarding resuscitation, resulting in significant effects on resuscitation preferences among the lay public. Improved public education regarding resuscitation is needed to improve knowledge

  7. Effective monitoring of small river basins.

    PubMed

    Symader, W; Bierl, R; Gasparini, F; Krein, A

    2002-04-13

    As the transport of many pollutants occurs during high floods monitoring programs must focus on these intermittent events. In small rivers the pollutants start their travel as short pulses often associated with fine particles, but disperse on their way downstreams. Therefore the chemical data of a flood event are only representative of a small part of the basin adjacent to the monitoring station. This is usually not taken into account by evaluating water quality data.

  8. Effects of yoga interventions on fatigue: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Katja; Ostermann, Thomas; Milazzo, Stefania; Büssing, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    Background. Researchers aimed at systematically reviewing and meta-analyzing the effectiveness of yoga interventions for fatigue. Methods. PubMed/Medline was searched until January 2012 for controlled clinical studies. Two reviewers independently extracted the data. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed. A meta-analysis was performed. Results. Nineteen clinical studies (total n = 948) were included in this review. Investigated yoga styles included Hatha, Iyengar, Asanas, Patanjali, Sahaja, and Tibetan yoga. Participants were suffering from cancer, multiple sclerosis, dialysis, chronic pancreatitis, fibromyalgia, asthma, or were healthy. Yoga had a small positive effect on fatigue (SMD = 0.27, 59% CI = 0.23-0.31). Seven studies received 4 points on the Jadad score. There were baseline differences in at least 5 studies. Conclusion. Overall, the effects of yoga interventions on fatigue were only small, particularly in cancer patients. Although yoga is generally a safe therapeutic intervention and effective to attenuate other health-related symptoms, this meta-analysis was not able to define the powerful effect of yoga on patients suffering from fatigue. Treatment effects of yoga could be improved in well-designed future studies. According to the GRADE recommendations assessing the overall quality of evidence, there is a moderate effect of the confidence placed in the estimates of the effects discussed here.

  9. Equitable service provision for inclusive education and effective early intervention.

    PubMed

    Wicks, K M

    1998-01-01

    This paper illustrates one model of providing an integrated paediatric speech and language therapy service which attempts to meet the demands of both inclusive education and effective early intervention. A move has been made from location-oriented therapy provision to offering children and their families equal opportunities to have appropriate intervention according to need. The model incorporates the philosophy of inclusive education and supports the development of current specialist educational establishments into resource bases of expertise for children with special needs in mainstream schools.

  10. Mediation of a preventive intervention's 6-year effects on health risk behaviors.

    PubMed

    Soper, Ana C; Wolchik, Sharlene A; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N

    2010-06-01

    Using data from a 6-year longitudinal follow-up sample of 240 youth who participated in a randomized experimental trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families with children ages 9 to 12, the current study tested mechanisms by which the intervention reduced substance use and risky sexual behavior in mid to late adolescence (15-19 years old). Mechanisms tested included parental monitoring, adaptive coping, and negative errors. Parental monitoring at 6-year follow-up mediated program effects to reduce alcohol and marijuana use, polydrug use, and other drug use for those with high pretest risk for maladjustment. In the condition that included a program for mothers only, increases in youth adaptive coping at 6-year follow-up mediated program effects on risky sexual behavior for those with high pretest risk for maladjustment. Contrary to expectation, program participation increased negative errors and decreased adaptive coping among low-risk youth in some of the analyses. Ways in which this study furthers our understanding of pathways through which evidence-based preventive interventions affect health risk behaviors are discussed.

  11. Monitoring the outcomes of interventions against Taenia solium: options and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, M W; Garcia, H H; Gauci, C G; Donadeu, M; Abela-Ridder, B

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in reducing the incidence of human neurocysticercosis, caused by infection with the larval stage of Taenia solium. Several intervention trials are currently assessing various options for control of T. solium transmission. A critical aspect of these trials will be the evaluation of whether the interventions have been successful. However, there is no consensus about the most appropriate or valuable methods that should be used. Here, we undertake a critical assessment of the diagnostic tests which are currently available for human T. solium taeniasis and human and porcine cysticercosis, as well as their suitability for evaluation of intervention trial outcomes. Suggestions are made about which of the measures that are available for evaluation of T. solium interventions would be most suitable, and which methodologies are the most appropriate given currently available technologies. Suggestions are also made in relation to the most urgent research needs in order to address deficiencies in current diagnostic methods.

  12. The effectiveness of management interventions used to control ragwort species.

    PubMed

    Roberts, P D; Pullin, A S

    2007-05-01

    Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea and S. aquaticus) causes major losses to agricultural revenue and induces livestock morbidity throughout parts of Europe, North America, and Australasia. The introduction of legislation in the U.K. and Australia has meant that landowners can be prosecuted if the plant spreads to adjacent land, which has led to an increase in activities attempting to control these species. Commonly used interventions include natural enemies, herbicide applications, manual and mechanical removal. Through the use of explicit systematic methodology involving comprehensive searches and detailed inclusion criteria, data from primary research are collated for each type of intervention. Meta-analyses show that 2,4-D, Asulam, Clopyralid, and MCPA are effective at reducing ragwort densities. However, when the datasets were analysed for their effectiveness against individual species, 2,4-D and MCPA were only effective against S. jacobaea, while Asulam was only effective against S. aquaticus. Natural enemies Longitarsus jacobaeae and a combination of L. jacobaeae and Tyria jacobaeae appear to have the potential to reduce S. jacobaea densities. Only applying T. jacobaeae does not appear to significantly reduce S. jacobaea densities, but does reduce the number of capitula per plant, seeds per capitula, viability of seeds, and dry weight of the plants. There is insufficient experimental evidence available to assess other interventions such as manual or mechanical removal. Further research into these types of interventions is recommended, as well as more detailed reporting of site characteristics and experimental design to allow full investigation of each intervention to explain possible reasons for variations in their effectiveness.

  13. The effects of group intervention for battered women in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Kim, J

    2001-12-01

    This study developed a group intervention model appropriate for battered women in Korea and tested its effectiveness. The sessions in the group intervention were formatted to stress the following topics: assess trauma, identify major problems, deal with feelings, understand self, identify batterer's characteristics, improve stress management strategies, develop action plans, and promote empowerment. The major finding was that the trait anxiety scores of the 16 battered women in the experimental group significantly decreased after the intervention. The change in levels of state anxiety, self-esteem, and depression in the experimental group were not significantly different from those of the 17 the subjects in the control group. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  14. Effectiveness of INROADS into pain management, a nursing educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Gregory D; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2011-07-01

    Nurses play a critical role in managing a patient's pain, from initial evaluation to ongoing patient education. However, little information exists on current gaps in nurses' knowledge and their pain-related decision making. To this end, an educational intervention-the INROADS initiative-was designed to improve the knowledge of nurses involved in patient management as well as to guide them toward practices that are consistent with currently available evidence. The results from an evaluation of this intervention show that nurses participating in the INROADS program were 52% more likely to make evidence-based care choices for their patients, compared with a control group of demographically similar nurses. The effect of this program may reinforce it as a model for the design of future interventions for pain management. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. The Differential Effects of Chaplain Interventions on Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vanshdeep; Marin, Deborah B; Sosunov, Eugene; Ozbay, Fatih; Goldstein, Rafael; Handzo, George F

    2016-01-01

    There is an acute need to define the specific skills that make chaplains integral to the healthcare team. This prospective study attempts to identify those skills that may be specific to chaplains, for whom no other member of the health care team has similar training, and to examine if these skills have a differential effect on patient satisfaction. A total of 59 interventions were identified and grouped into 10 categories by focus groups comprised of chaplains. Subsequently, Principal Component Analysis yielded two independent variables; Component 1 representing the "Religious/Spiritual" dimension, and Component 2 representing the "Psychosocial" dimension of chaplains' work. The two components were used in an OLS regression model to measure patient satisfaction. Interventions that comprise the "Religious/Spiritual" dimension may be considered to be specific skills that chaplains contribute to patient care and these have a slightly stronger correlation with patient satisfaction than the interventions of the "Psychosocial" dimension.

  16. Effects of Integrated Health Management Intervention on Overweight and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yiting; Ma, Chung Wah; Yang, Yide; Wang, Xiaoling; Lin, Xiaoliang; Fu, Lianguo; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Zhongping; Wang, Zhenghe; Meng, Xiangkun; Ma, Dongmei; Ma, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Overweight or obese adults aged 20~55 years and living in Beijing more than one year were randomly divided into different management groups. A one-year integrated health management intervention was applied in the health management groups. The physical indicators and metabolic indicators changed after one-year intervention on the overweight and obese adults. The annual reduction of the physical indicators was significant in all groups (p < 0.05) except the weight loss in the placebo + general management group. The health management and the dietary supplement have statistically significant (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) effects on the annual reduction of these indicators and interactive effect between them was found on some of these indicators such as bodyweight, body mass index (BMI), body fat ratio (BFR), and hipline (p < 0.05). The dietary supplement + health management group had the best annual reduction effects for the indicators among the groups. Integrated health management interventions including both dietary supplements intervention and health management could improve metabolic indicators in overweight and obese adults together with the physical indicators, suggesting the intermediated role of metabolic indictors in controlling obesity. PMID:28115972

  17. Effects of music interventions on emotional States and running performance.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew M; Davis, Paul A; Devonport, Tracey J

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two different music interventions on changes in emotional states before and during running, and also explored effects of music interventions upon performance outcome. Volunteer participants (n = 65) who regularly listened to music when running registered online to participate in a three-stage study. Participants attempted to attain a personally important running goal to establish baseline performance. Thereafter, participants were randomly assigned to either a self-selected music group or an Audiofuel music group. Audiofuel produce pieces of music designed to assist synchronous running. The self-selected music group followed guidelines for selecting motivating playlists. In both experimental groups, participants used the Brunel Music Rating Inventory-2 (BMRI-2) to facilitate selection of motivational music. Participants again completed the BMRI-2 post- intervention to assess the motivational qualities of Audiofuel music or the music they selected for use during the study. Results revealed no significant differences between self-selected music and Audiofuel music on all variables analyzed. Participants in both music groups reported increased pleasant emotions and decreased unpleasant emotions following intervention. Significant performance improvements were demonstrated post-intervention with participants reporting a belief that emotional states related to performance. Further analysis indicated that enhanced performance was significantly greater among participants reporting music to be motivational as indicated by high scores on the BMRI-2. Findings suggest that both individual athletes and practitioners should consider using the BMRI-2 when selecting music for running. Key pointsListening to music with a high motivational quotient as indicated by scores on the BMRI-2 was associated with enhanced running performance and meta-emotional beliefs that emotions experienced during running helped performance.Beliefs on the

  18. Effects of Music Interventions on Emotional States and Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew M.; Davis, Paul A.; Devonport, Tracey J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two different music interventions on changes in emotional states before and during running, and also explored effects of music interventions upon performance outcome. Volunteer participants (n = 65) who regularly listened to music when running registered online to participate in a three-stage study. Participants attempted to attain a personally important running goal to establish baseline performance. Thereafter, participants were randomly assigned to either a self-selected music group or an Audiofuel music group. Audiofuel produce pieces of music designed to assist synchronous running. The self-selected music group followed guidelines for selecting motivating playlists. In both experimental groups, participants used the Brunel Music Rating Inventory-2 (BMRI-2) to facilitate selection of motivational music. Participants again completed the BMRI-2 post- intervention to assess the motivational qualities of Audiofuel music or the music they selected for use during the study. Results revealed no significant differences between self-selected music and Audiofuel music on all variables analyzed. Participants in both music groups reported increased pleasant emotions and decreased unpleasant emotions following intervention. Significant performance improvements were demonstrated post-intervention with participants reporting a belief that emotional states related to performance. Further analysis indicated that enhanced performance was significantly greater among participants reporting music to be motivational as indicated by high scores on the BMRI-2. Findings suggest that both individual athletes and practitioners should consider using the BMRI-2 when selecting music for running. Key points Listening to music with a high motivational quotient as indicated by scores on the BMRI-2 was associated with enhanced running performance and meta-emotional beliefs that emotions experienced during running helped performance. Beliefs on the

  19. Intervention-engagement and its role in the effectiveness of stage-matched interventions promoting physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Richert, Jana; Lippke, Sonia; Ziegelmann, Jochen P

    2011-01-01

    Intervention-engagement has received little attention in sports medicine as well as research and promotion of physical exercise. The construct is important, however, in the understanding of why interventions work. This study aimed at shedding more light on the interplay of engagement and the subsequent effectiveness of physical exercise interventions. A three-stage model differentiating among nonintenders, intenders, and actors informed the intervention design in this study. In an Internet-based randomized controlled trial (RCT) with two measurement points, N = 326 participants received a stage-matched, stage-mismatched, or control treatment. Assessed variables were goal setting, planning, behavior, and intervention-engagement. It was found that regarding goal setting, nonintenders in the stage-matched intervention and those who engaged highly in the stage-matched intervention improved significantly over time. Regarding planning, intenders in the matched condition as well as all actors increased their levels over time. Regarding behavior, nonintenders and intenders having engaged highly in the intervention improved more than those having engaged little. In order to help nonintenders progress on their way toward goal behavior, it is necessary that they engage highly in a stage-matched intervention. Implications for exercise promotion are that interventions should also aim at increasing participants' intervention-engagement.

  20. Is There a Lexical Bias Effect in Comprehension Monitoring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severens, Els; Hartsuiker, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Event-related potentials were used to investigate if there is a lexical bias effect in comprehension monitoring. The lexical bias effect in language production (the tendency of phonological errors to result in existing words rather than nonwords) has been attributed to an internal self-monitoring system, which uses the comprehension system, and…

  1. Interventions that involve parents to improve children's weight-related nutrition intake and activity patterns - what nutrition and activity targets and behaviour change techniques are associated with intervention effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Golley, R K; Hendrie, G A; Slater, A; Corsini, N

    2011-02-01

    Parent involvement is an important component of obesity prevention interventions. However, the best way to support parents remains unclear. This review identifies interventions targeting parents to improve children's weight status, dietary and/or activity patterns, examines whether intervention content and behaviour change techniques employed are associated with effectiveness. Seventeen studies, in English, 1998-2008, were included. Studies were evaluated by two reviewers for study quality, nutrition/activity content and behaviour change techniques using a validated quality assessment tool and behaviour change technique taxonomy. Study findings favoured intervention effectiveness in 11 of 17 studies. Interventions that were considered effective had similar features: better study quality, parents responsible for participation and implementation, greater parental involvement and inclusion of prompt barrier identification, restructure the home environment, prompt self-monitoring, prompt specific goal setting behaviour change techniques. Energy intake/density and food choices were more likely to be targeted in effective interventions. The number of lifestyle behaviours targeted did not appear to be associated with effectiveness. Intervention effectiveness was favoured when behaviour change techniques spanned the spectrum of behaviour change process. The review provides guidance for researchers to make informed decisions on how best to utilize resources in interventions to support and engage parents, and highlights a need for improvement in intervention content reporting practices. © 2010 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2010 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  2. Robin Hood effects on motivation in math: Family interest moderates the effects of relevance interventions.

    PubMed

    Häfner, Isabelle; Flunger, Barbara; Dicke, Anna-Lena; Gaspard, Hanna; Brisson, Brigitte M; Nagengast, Benjamin; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2017-08-01

    Using a cluster randomized field trial, the present study tested whether 2 relevance interventions affected students' value beliefs, self-concept, and effort in math differently depending on family background (socioeconomic status, family interest (FI), and parental utility value). Eighty-two classrooms were randomly assigned to either 1 of 2 intervention conditions or a control group. Data from 1,916 students (Mage = 14.62, SDage = 0.47) and their predominantly Caucasian middle-class parents were obtained via separate questionnaires. Multilevel regression analyses with cross-level interactions were used to investigate differential intervention effects on students' motivational beliefs 6 weeks and 5 months after the intervention. Socioeconomic status, FI, and parental utility values were investigated as moderators of the intervention effects. The intervention conditions were especially effective in promoting students' utility, attainment, intrinsic value beliefs, and effort 5 months after the intervention for students whose parents reported lower levels of math interest. Furthermore, students whose parents reported low math utility values especially profited in terms of their utility and attainment math values 5 months after the intervention. No systematic differential intervention effects were found for socioeconomic status. These results highlight the effectiveness of relevance interventions in decreasing motivational gaps between students from families with fewer or more motivational resources. Findings point to the substantial importance of motivational family resources, which have been neglected in previous research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Intervention Effectiveness of The Incredible Years: New Insights Into Sociodemographic and Intervention-Based Moderators.

    PubMed

    Weeland, Joyce; Chhangur, Rabia R; van der Giessen, Danielle; Matthys, Walter; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Overbeek, Geertjan

    2017-01-01

    We tested the effectiveness of the preventive behavioral parent training (BPT) program, The Incredible Years (IY), and the independent effects of previously suggested sociodemographic and intervention-based moderator variables (i.e., initial severity of externalizing problem behavior, child gender, social economic status, family composition, and number of sessions parents attended), in a large-scale randomized controlled trial. Questionnaire and observation data from 387 parents and children ages 4-8 years (Mage= 6.21, SD = 1.33, 55.30% boys) across pretest, posttest, and 4-month follow-up were analyzed, using full intention-to-treat analyses and correcting for multiple testing. IY was successful in decreasing parent-reported child externalizing behavior (Cohen's d = 0.20 at posttest, d = 0.08 at follow-up), increasing parent-reported (d = 0.49, d = 0.45) and observed (d = 0.06, d = 0.02) positive parenting behavior, and decreasing parent-reported negative parenting behavior (d = 0.29, d = 0.25). No intervention effects were found for reported and observed child prosocial behavior, observed child externalizing behavior, and observed negative parenting behavior. Out of 40 tested moderation effects (i.e., 8 Outcomes × 5 Moderators), only three significant moderation effects appeared. Thus, no systematic evidence emerged for moderation of IY effects. The present multi-informant trial demonstrated that many previously suggested moderators might not be as potent in differentiating BPT effects as once thought. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce coronary heart disease risk.

    PubMed

    Adedeji, O O; Oyakhire, G K; Saeed, A K; Ghamdi, A I

    2011-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, and its incidence is increasing in the developing world. The effectiveness of interventions in developing countries has been questioned in view of the overwhelming burden of other health problems in such environments. To determine the effectiveness of coronary heart disease risk reduction interventions. The effects of lipid lowering interventions as well as dietary and lifestyle modifications on some risk factors of CHD were studied retrospectively in 47 males and 53 female patients [aged 33 to 61 years; mean age 47.20 ±14.17 years] attending a lipid clinic in Saudi Arabia. The main outcome measures were reductions in the values of the body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, blood glucose and lipid levels, as well as absolute reductions of risk category. The interventions were associated with reduced BMI by 2.75 percent (p<0.05), systolic pressure by 3.05% (p=0.12), diastolic pressure by 5.13% (p<0.05), blood glucose by 6.51% (p<0.05), total cholesterol by 16.35% (p<0.05), LDL-cholesterol by 4.81% (p<0.05) and triglyceride by 35.01% (p<0.05). HDL-cholesterol remained within the normal range before and after the interventions in all patients. Following the interventions, the absolute risk reductions in category 1 were 45.51% and 53.35%, for males and females, respectively. In category 2, the absolute risk reductions were 30.05% and 45.67%, for males and females, respectively. In category 3, the absolute risk reductions were 100% for both sexes. For the entire study population, the absolute risk reductions were 48.65% in category 1 and 38.10% in category 2, while the percentage of patients with one or no risk factor (category 3) increased by 62%. Lipid-lowering interventions appear to be as effective in reducing CHD risk in Bisha patients as in other populations. Appreciable absolute risk reductions can be achieved within a short period of time in all patients

  5. Network Effects of Risk Behavior Change Following Prophylactic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Rajaraman, Rajmohan; Sun, Zhifeng; Sundaram, Ravi; Vullikanti, Anil Kumar S.

    2013-01-01

    We formulated a network-based model to understand how risk behavior change in conjunction with failure of prophylactic interventions can lead to unintended outcomes where “less (intervention) is more (effective).” Our model captures the distinction between one- and two-sided risk behavior change. In one-sided situations (e.g. influenza/H1N1) it is sufficient for either individual in an interaction to exhibit risk behavior change whereas in two-sided situations (e.g. AIDS/HIV) it is necessary for both individuals in the interaction to exhibit risk behavior change, for a potential transmission of the disease. A central discovery is that this phenomenon occurs at differing levels of intervention coverage depending upon the “sidedness” of the interaction. We find that for one-sided interactions, sufficiently high vaccination coverage is necessary for mitigating the effects of risk behavior; for two-sided interactions, it is essential to combine prophylactic treatments with programs aimed at reducing risky behavior. Furthermore, again dependent on the “sidedness,” targeting highly connected nodes can be strictly worse than uniformly random interventions at the same level of coverage. PMID:23936290

  6. [Effective interventions to reduce absenteeism among hospital nurses].

    PubMed

    Blanca-Gutiérrez, Joaquín Jesús; Jiménez-Díaz, María del Carmen; Escalera-Franco, Luis Felipe

    2013-01-01

    To select and summarize the interventions that have proved effective in reducing absenteeism among hospital nurses. A scoping review was conducted through a literature search using Medline, Web of Science, Cinahl, Embase, Lilacs, Cuiden and Cochrane Library Plus databases. Of a total of 361 articles extracted, 15 were finally selected for this review. The implementation of multifaceted support or physical training programs can produce positive results in terms of reducing absenteeism among hospital nurses. Cognitive-behavioral type interventions require studies with larger samples to provide conclusive results. Establishing more flexible working shifts may also reduce absenteeism rates, although again studies with larger samples are needed. Programs aimed at managing change developed by nurses themselves, participatory management of professional relations, the support provided by supervisors who are opposed to hierarchical leadership styles, and wage supplements that reward the lack of absence can also reduce these types of indicators. Absenteeism can be considered as a final result and a consequence of the level of job satisfaction. The effectiveness of interventions to reduce absenteeism among hospital nurses will no doubt largely depend on the ability of these interventions to increase the job satisfaction of these workers. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effectiveness of a multicomponent smoking cessation intervention in primary care].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Pérez, Fernando; Alonso-Cardeñoso, Carmen; García-González, Jesús Vicente; Fraile-Cobos, José Miguel; Lobo-Llorente, Natalia; Secades-Villa, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a multicomponent program applied by nurses in primary care. A non-experimental pre-post study was carried out in 145 smokers from Area V of Asturias (Spain). The intervention consisted of a multicomponent group treatment program, applied for 7 weeks by primary care nurses. The mean age was 52 years. Men accounted for 39.73% of the study population. The abstinence rate at post-treatment was 51.1% (95% CI: 42.4 to 59.6). At 12 months, the abstinence rate was 41.1% (95% CI: 32.6 to 49.6). The change between the end of the intervention and follow-up at 6 and 12 months was statistically significant at both time points (p = 0.035 and p = 0.013, respectively). Among participants who had stopped smoking, there was a statistically significant decline in daily cigarette consumption. Factors that were statistically significantly associated with continued smoking at 12 months were heavier smoking before the intervention, higher scores on the Fagerström test, and a lower number of sessions attended. The multicomponent treatment program was highly effective. The results suggest the desirability of specific training for health professionals to implement this type of intervention in primary care as an alternative to medical advice for smokers who need it. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of a Workplace Intervention on Parent-Child Relationships

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Susan M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Green, Kaylin; Casper, Lynne; Kan, Marni L.; Kelly, Erin L.; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Okechukwu, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    This study tested whether effects of a workplace intervention, aimed at promoting employees’ schedule control and supervisor support for personal and family life, had implications for parent-adolescent relationships; we also tested whether parent-child relationships differed as a function of how many intervention program sessions participants attended. Data came from a group randomized trial of a workplace intervention, delivered in the information technology division of a Fortune 500 company. Analyses focused on 125 parent-adolescent dyads that completed baseline and 12-month follow-up home interviews. Results revealed no main effects of the intervention, but children of employees who attended 75% or more program sessions reported more time with their parent and more parent education involvement compared to adolescents whose parents attended less than 75% of sessions, and they tended to report more time with parent and more parental solicitation of information about their experiences compared to adolescents whose parents were randomly assigned to the usual practice condition. PMID:26957897

  9. Nursing interventions in monitoring the adolescent with Cystic Fibrosis: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Reisinho, Maria da Conceição Marinho Sousa Ribeiro Oliveira; Gomes, Bárbara Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to search for nursing interventions focused on the improvement of quality of life and promotion of self-care of adolescents suffering from the Cystic Fibrosis. Method: literature review. The inclusion criteria were: primary studies and studies with interventions developed by nurses in the adolescent population with Cystic Fibrosis, using Portuguese, Spanish, French and English with no time limit, and supported by the databases Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL. The search expressions were: nursing AND care AND adolescent AND "Cystic Fibrosis" AND ("quality of life" OR "self-care"). Results: a total of 59 articles was retrieved; 8 matched the criteria chosen. Nursing interventions targeted at adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis and their family members were identified. These interventions were organized according to the nurses' role, namely caregiver, coordinator, counsellor, researcher, trainer and care partner. Conclusions: nursing interventions targeted at following up the adolescent during the entire therapeutic process, involving the presence of parents/significant others, since both the adolescent and family have to be responsible for self-care. Healthcare professionals should be capable of identifying the specific needs of patients with chronic disease and their family, permitting a better understanding and adaptation to the health-disease transition process. PMID:27982311

  10. Effective intervention or child's play? A review of video games for diabetes education.

    PubMed

    DeShazo, Jonathan; Harris, Lynne; Pratt, Wanda

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to identify diabetes education video games and pilot studies in the literature, (2) to review themes in diabetes video game design and evaluation, and (3) to evaluate the potential role of educational video games in diabetes self-management education. Studies were systematically identified for inclusion from Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psychinfo, IEEE Xplore, and ACM Digital Library. Features of each video game intervention were reviewed and coded based on an existing taxonomy of diabetes interventions framework. Nine studies featuring 11 video games for diabetes care were identified. Video games for diabetes have typically targeted children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and used situation problem-solving methods to teach diet, exercise, self-monitored blood glucose, and medication adherence. Evaluations have shown positive outcomes in knowledge, disease management adherence, and clinical outcomes. Video games for diabetes education show potential as effective educational interventions. Yet we found that improvements are needed in expanding the target audience, tailoring the intervention, and using theoretical frameworks. In the future, the reach and effectiveness of educational video games for diabetes education could be improved by expanding the target audience beyond juvenile type 1 diabetes mellitus, the use of tailoring, and increased use of theoretical frameworks.

  11. Effects of alternative interventions among hospitalized, cognitively impaired older adults

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Mary D; Hirschman, Karen B; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Bowles, Kathryn H; Bradway, Christine; McCauley, Kathleen M; Pauly, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Compare within site effects of three interventions designed to enhance outcomes of hospitalized cognitively impaired elders. Methods: Prospective, nonrandomized, confirmatory phased study. In Phase I, 183 patients received one of three interventions: augmented standard care (ASC), resource nurse care (RNC) or Transitional Care Model (TCM). In Phase II, 205 patients received the TCM. Results: Time to first rehospitalization or death was longer for the TCM versus ASC group (p = 0.017). Rates for total all-cause rehospitalizations and days were significantly reduced in the TCM versus ASC group (p < 0.001, both). No differences were observed between RNC versus TCM. Conclusion: Findings suggest the TCM is more effective than ASC. However, potential effects of the RNC relative to the TCM warrant further study. PMID:27146416

  12. Effects of a brief psychoanalytic intervention for perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Nanzer, Nathalie; Sancho Rossignol, Ana; Righetti-Veltema, Marion; Knauer, Dora; Manzano, Juan; Palacio Espasa, Francisco

    2012-08-01

    This pilot study explores the effects of a brief individual psychoanalytic therapy on perinatal depressive symptoms. This intervention is based on the Geneva's mother-infant intervention model. A sample of 129 pregnant women was recruited in Geneva (Switzerland) and screened for depressive symptoms with two instruments: the 'Edinburgh postnatal depression scale' (EPDS) and the 'Dépistage anténatal de la dépression postnatale'. A group of 40 women presenting depressive symptoms (treatment group) participated in a four-session intervention called 'Psychotherapy centred on parenthood (PCP)'. It consists in two antenatal and two postnatal sessions and is focussed on changing problematic representations of parenthood. This treatment group was compared to a control group of 88 women without depressive symptoms and following the usual obstetrical care. The main outcome measure was EPDS at 3 and 6 months after delivery. The 'Global assessment functioning scale' was administered at the end of each therapeutic session. The 'Parent-infant relationship global assessment scale' was administered at the two postnatal sessions in order to explore if PCP was also effective in preventing the potential negative effects of depression on mother-infant relationship. Results show that in the treatment group (N = 31), EPDS scores dropped from 12.8 to 4.8; none of these women met the EPDS cut-off score of 12 at 3 and 6 months postpartum. Mother-infant relationship was well adapted for all 31 dyads at the end of the intervention. These results suggest that PCP is a promising intervention for treating perinatal depression and helping mothers engaging in parenting.

  13. Use of a Mobile Application for Self-Monitoring Dietary Intake: Feasibility Test and an Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Song, Sihan; Ahn, Jeong Sun; Kim, Yoonhee; Lee, Jung Eun

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing social and economic burden of chronic disease and the need for efficient approaches to prevent and treat chronic disease, emphasis on the use of information and communication technology (ICT)-based health care has emerged. We aimed to test the feasibility of a mobile application, Diet-A, and examine whether Diet-A could be used to monitor dietary intake among adolescents. In a three-month pre–post intervention study, 9 male and 24 female high school students aged 16–18 years consented and participated in this study. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages consumed using voice or text mode input. Nutrient intake was measured using 24-h recalls pre- and post-intervention. We compared nutrient intake data assessed by Diet-A application with those assessed by 24-h recalls. Participants tended to underreport intakes of nutrients compared to those assessed by two 24-h recalls. There were significant decreases in sodium (p = 0.04) and calcium (p = 0.03) intake between pre- and post-intervention. Of participants who completed questionnaires of feasibility (n = 24), 61.9% reported that they were satisfied using the application to monitor their food intake, and 47.7% liked getting personal information about their dietary intake from the application. However, more than 70% of participants answered that it was burdensome to use the application or that they had trouble remembering to record their food intake. The mobile application Diet-A offers the opportunity to monitor dietary intake through real-time feedback. However, use of Diet-A may not provide accurate information on the food intake of adolescents, partly because of the recording burden. PMID:28703758

  14. Use of a Mobile Application for Self-Monitoring Dietary Intake: Feasibility Test and an Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Song, Sihan; Ahn, Jeong Sun; Kim, Yoonhee; Lee, Jung Eun

    2017-07-13

    Given the increasing social and economic burden of chronic disease and the need for efficient approaches to prevent and treat chronic disease, emphasis on the use of information and communication technology (ICT)-based health care has emerged. We aimed to test the feasibility of a mobile application, Diet-A, and examine whether Diet-A could be used to monitor dietary intake among adolescents. In a three-month pre-post intervention study, 9 male and 24 female high school students aged 16-18 years consented and participated in this study. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages consumed using voice or text mode input. Nutrient intake was measured using 24-h recalls pre- and post-intervention. We compared nutrient intake data assessed by Diet-A application with those assessed by 24-h recalls. Participants tended to underreport intakes of nutrients compared to those assessed by two 24-h recalls. There were significant decreases in sodium (p = 0.04) and calcium (p = 0.03) intake between pre- and post-intervention. Of participants who completed questionnaires of feasibility (n = 24), 61.9% reported that they were satisfied using the application to monitor their food intake, and 47.7% liked getting personal information about their dietary intake from the application. However, more than 70% of participants answered that it was burdensome to use the application or that they had trouble remembering to record their food intake. The mobile application Diet-A offers the opportunity to monitor dietary intake through real-time feedback. However, use of Diet-A may not provide accurate information on the food intake of adolescents, partly because of the recording burden.

  15. Positive peer pressure: the effects of peer monitoring on children's disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Carden Smith, L K; Fowler, S A

    1984-01-01

    Classroom peers can serve as powerful sources of reinforcement in increasing or maintaining both the positive and negative behaviors of their classmates. In two experiments, we examined the effectiveness of a peer-monitored token system on reducing disruption and nonparticipation during a transition period of a kindergarten class for behaviorally impaired children. Additionally, the effect of providing and subsequently withholding corrective feedback to peer mediators on the accuracy of their point awards was evaluated. Results in Experiment 1 suggest that both teacher- and peer-monitored interventions were successful in decreasing disruption and increasing participation of monitored peers. Experiment 2 further demonstrated that peer monitors could successfully initiate the token system without prior adult implementation. Analysis of the point awards in both experiments indicates that peer monitors consistently awarded points that were earned. However, when corrective feedback was withdrawn the peer monitors frequently awarded points that were not earned, i.e., they rarely withheld points for undesirable behavior. Even so, the monitored peers' disruptive behavior was maintained at low rates.

  16. Comparing Models of Helper Behavior to Actual Practice in Telephone Crisis Intervention: A Silent Monitoring Study of Calls to the U.S. 1-800-SUICIDE Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishara, Brian L.; Chagnon, Francois; Daigle, Marc; Balan, Bogdan; Raymond, Sylvaine; Marcoux, Isabelle; Bardon, Cecile; Campbell, Julie K.; Berman, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Models of telephone crisis intervention in suicide prevention and best practices were developed from a literature review and surveys of crisis centers. We monitored 2,611 calls to 14 centers using reliable behavioral ratings to compare actual interventions with the models. Active listening and collaborative problem-solving models describe help…

  17. The impact of a brief mindfulness meditation intervention on cognitive control and error-related performance monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Michael J.; Steffen, Patrick R.; Primosch, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Meditation is associated with positive health behaviors and improved cognitive control. One mechanism for the relationship between meditation and cognitive control is changes in activity of the anterior cingulate cortex-mediated neural pathways. The error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) components of the scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) represent cingulate-mediated functions of performance monitoring that may be modulated by mindfulness meditation. We utilized a flanker task, an experimental design, and a brief mindfulness intervention in a sample of 55 healthy non-meditators (n = 28 randomly assigned to the mindfulness group and n = 27 randomly assigned to the control group) to examine autonomic nervous system functions as measured by blood pressure and indices of cognitive control as measured by response times, error rates, post-error slowing, and the ERN and Pe components of the ERP. Systolic blood pressure significantly differentiated groups following the mindfulness intervention and following the flanker task. There were non-significant differences between the mindfulness and control groups for response times, post-error slowing, and error rates on the flanker task. Amplitude and latency of the ERN did not differ between groups; however, amplitude of the Pe was significantly smaller in individuals in the mindfulness group than in the control group. Findings suggest that a brief mindfulness intervention is associated with reduced autonomic arousal and decreased amplitude of the Pe, an ERP associated with error awareness, attention, and motivational salience, but does not alter amplitude of the ERN or behavioral performance. Implications for brief mindfulness interventions and state vs. trait affect theories of the ERN are discussed. Future research examining graded levels of mindfulness and tracking error awareness will clarify relationship between mindfulness and performance monitoring. PMID:23847491

  18. The impact of a brief mindfulness meditation intervention on cognitive control and error-related performance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Larson, Michael J; Steffen, Patrick R; Primosch, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Meditation is associated with positive health behaviors and improved cognitive control. One mechanism for the relationship between meditation and cognitive control is changes in activity of the anterior cingulate cortex-mediated neural pathways. The error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) components of the scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) represent cingulate-mediated functions of performance monitoring that may be modulated by mindfulness meditation. We utilized a flanker task, an experimental design, and a brief mindfulness intervention in a sample of 55 healthy non-meditators (n = 28 randomly assigned to the mindfulness group and n = 27 randomly assigned to the control group) to examine autonomic nervous system functions as measured by blood pressure and indices of cognitive control as measured by response times, error rates, post-error slowing, and the ERN and Pe components of the ERP. Systolic blood pressure significantly differentiated groups following the mindfulness intervention and following the flanker task. There were non-significant differences between the mindfulness and control groups for response times, post-error slowing, and error rates on the flanker task. Amplitude and latency of the ERN did not differ between groups; however, amplitude of the Pe was significantly smaller in individuals in the mindfulness group than in the control group. Findings suggest that a brief mindfulness intervention is associated with reduced autonomic arousal and decreased amplitude of the Pe, an ERP associated with error awareness, attention, and motivational salience, but does not alter amplitude of the ERN or behavioral performance. Implications for brief mindfulness interventions and state vs. trait affect theories of the ERN are discussed. Future research examining graded levels of mindfulness and tracking error awareness will clarify relationship between mindfulness and performance monitoring.

  19. Monitoring the effectiveness of antiplatelet therapy: opportunities and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Sambu, Nalyaka; Curzen, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Previous clinical studies have shown heterogeneity in individual patient responses to antiplatelet therapy and high residual platelet reactivity is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical events. Monitoring response to antiplatelet therapy and tailoring treatment accordingly is currently not recommended in routine clinical practice largely due to the lack of a standardized definition of antiplatelet therapy hyporesponse and the need for a widely accepted point-of-care platelet function test that can be reliably utilized in frontline clinical practice. Recent data have shown that titrating the dose of clopidogrel in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention significantly reduces the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events and large-scale clinical trials are currently underway to investigate whether individually tailored treatment based on results of platelet function testing leads to improved clinical outcome. Furthermore, genetic testing has demonstrated a link between CYP2C19 genetic polymorphisms, altered clopidogrel metabolite concentrations and adverse clinical events. Clinical studies are currently underway to investigate the potential clinical benefit associated with genotype-guided tailoring of antiplatelet therapy. With the advent of newer, more potent antiplatelet agents and their associated increased bleeding risks, it will become imperative in the future to select the most appropriate, safe and effective drug. PMID:21366666

  20. An Examination of Treatment Intensity with an Oral Reading Fluency Intervention: Do Intervention Duration and Student-Teacher Instructional Ratios Impact Intervention Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sarah G.; Begeny, John C.

    2014-01-01

    With an increasing percentage of schools moving toward approaches to data-based instructional problem-solving and early remediation of learning difficulties, the development and execution of intervention plans often warrants the pragmatic question: How intensive should an intervention be so that it is effective, while also feasible and time…

  1. An Examination of Treatment Intensity with an Oral Reading Fluency Intervention: Do Intervention Duration and Student-Teacher Instructional Ratios Impact Intervention Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sarah G.; Begeny, John C.

    2014-01-01

    With an increasing percentage of schools moving toward approaches to data-based instructional problem-solving and early remediation of learning difficulties, the development and execution of intervention plans often warrants the pragmatic question: How intensive should an intervention be so that it is effective, while also feasible and time…

  2. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational intervention for reducing burden in Latin American families of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra

    2007-06-01

    To explore the effectiveness of a psycho-educational family intervention program for reducing burden in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia in a developing country. Forty-five caregivers participated, 22 in a psycho-educational family intervention group and 23 in a control group. The family program was held once a week for 5 months. In the control group the caregivers received standard intervention, comprising periodical meetings with the staff to monitor the effects of the medication. Burden was measured before and after the intervention: relatives in the psycho-educational group were evaluated at inclusion and at the end of the program; controls were evaluated at inclusion and 5 months later. Burden decreased significantly in the psycho-educational group; mean scores on the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale fell from 85.06 pre-intervention to 52.44 post-intervention, while scores fell only slightly in the control group, from 87.65 to 87.22. Treatment was especially effective in mothers and caregivers with lower educational levels. This intervention program for reducing caregiver burden in developing Latin American countries was effective. Future investigations should focus on obtaining more precise estimates of the contributions of specific components of these programs to reducing burden.

  3. Development and feasibility of an automated call monitoring intervention for older wheelchair users: the MOvIT project.

    PubMed

    Auger, Claudine; Miller, William C; Jutai, Jeffrey W; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2015-09-16

    Recent advances in wheeled mobility technology are multiplying opportunities for community integration and improved quality of life. The mobility needs of older wheelchair users are particularly complex due to a constellation of chronic conditions and comorbidities that may compromise optimal use of the device. The purpose of the Mobility Outcomes via Information Technologies (MOvIT) project is to examine the feasibility of automated calls for the systematic monitoring for adverse outcomes associated with wheelchair use. A two-phase mixed methods approach was used. Phase I involved user-centered development and face validation of a monitoring questionnaire with end-users (seven wheelchair users and five healthcare providers). Phase II tested the feasibility of monitoring outcomes using automated calls to administer the MOvIT questionnaire 1 and 3 months after wheelchair delivery with a prospective cohort of older adults (50-84 years of age). When problems were identified, the computer monitoring system notified a clinical coordinator who followed up with respondents requiring interventions. Feasibility data were extracted from the web database and from individual interviews covering perceived ease of use, usefulness and intention to use the MOvIT questionnaire in the future. The MOvIT monitoring questionnaire developed in phase I tracks nine potential wheelchair-related adverse outcomes considered important for end-users: 1) non-use of wheelchair, 2) pain, 3) skin condition, 4) positioning, 5) wheelchair incidents, 6) psychosocial issues, 7) restricted wheelchair participation, 8) limited wheelchair skills and knowledge, and 9) technical problems. In phase II, 92 individuals who received a wheelchair were eligible, 71 out of 92 accepted (77%) and 65 out of 71 (92%) completed the 3-month follow-up. In the sample of 65 participants, a wheelchair-related adverse outcome was confirmed by a rehabilitation professional for 58.5%, and at least one recommendation was given

  4. Monitoring source and domestic water quality in parallel with sanitary risk identification in northern Mozambique to prioritise protection interventions.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Aidan A; Breslin, Ned; Gibson, James; Pedley, Steve

    2006-09-01

    Microbiological water quality monitoring in Niassa province, Northern Mozambique, shows groundwater is not, in general, grossly contaminated though contamination levels are strongly linked to season and to risks observable at the wellhead, especially risks dealing with wellhead hygiene and maintenance. Diarrhea incidence, in general, is greatest in the rainy season suggesting poor wellhead protection as a potential mechanism for well contamination. Comparison of source water and stored water in the home shows that significant deterioration in source water quality can occur once transport and storage in the home is undertaken but that this deterioration is also related to the quality of the source water. This study shows that a structured approach to water quality monitoring, with targeted observations and an examination of the relationships between risk and water quality, is important to identify the priority interventions to be undertaken.

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Weight-Loss Interventions in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Lawrence J.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Coughlin, Janelle W.; Daumit, Gail; Miller, Edgar R.; Dalcin, Arlene; Jerome, Gerald J.; Geller, Steven; Noronha, Gary; Pozefsky, Thomas; Charleston, Jeanne; Reynolds, Jeffrey B.; Durkin, Nowella; Rubin, Richard R.; Louis, Thomas A.; Brancati, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity and its cardiovascular complications are extremely common medical problems, but evidence on how to accomplish weight loss in clinical practice is sparse. Methods We conducted a randomized, controlled trial to examine the effects of two behavioral weight-loss interventions in 415 obese patients with at least one cardiovascular risk factor. Participants were recruited from six primary care practices; 63.6% were women, 41.0% were black, and the mean age was 54.0 years. One intervention provided patients with weight-loss support remotely — through the telephone, a study-specific Web site, and e-mail. The other intervention provided in-person support during group and individual sessions, along with the three remote means of support. There was also a control group in which weight loss was self-directed. Outcomes were compared between each intervention group and the control group and between the two intervention groups. For both interventions, primary care providers reinforced participation at routinely scheduled visits. The trial duration was 24 months. Results At baseline, the mean body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) for all participants was 36.6, and the mean weight was 103.8 kg. At 24 months, the mean change in weight from baseline was −0.8 kg in the control group, −4.6 kg in the group receiving remote support only (P<0.001 for the comparison with the control group), and −5.1 kg in the group receiving in-person support (P<0.001 for the comparison with the control group). The percentage of participants who lost 5% or more of their initial weight was 18.8% in the control group, 38.2% in the group receiving remote support only, and 41.4% in the group receiving in-person support. The change in weight from baseline did not differ significantly between the two intervention groups. Conclusions In two behavioral interventions, one delivered with in-person support and the other delivered remotely

  6. Effects of Cognitive Training Interventions With Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Karlene; Berch, Daniel B.; Helmers, Karin F.; Jobe, Jared B.; Leveck, Mary D.; Marsiske, Michael; Morris, John N.; Rebok, George W.; Smith, David M.; Tennstedt, Sharon L.; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2010-01-01

    Context Cognitive function in older adults is related to independent living and need for care. However, few studies have addressed whether improving cognitive functions might have short- or long-term effects on activities related to living independently. Objective To evaluate whether 3 cognitive training interventions improve mental abilities and daily functioning in older, independent-living adults. Design Randomized, controlled, single-blind trial with recruitment conducted from March 1998 to October 1999 and 2-year follow-up through December 2001. Setting and Participants Volunteer sample of 2832 persons aged 65 to 94 years recruited from senior housing, community centers, and hospital/clinics in 6 metropolitan areas in the United States. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: 10-session group training for memory (verbal episodic memory; n=711), or reasoning (ability to solve problems that follow a serial pattern; n=705), or speed of processing (visual search and identification; n=712); or a no-contact control group (n=704). For the 3 treatment groups, 4-session booster training was offered to a 60% random sample 11 months later. Main Outcome Measures Cognitive function and cognitively demanding everyday functioning. Results Thirty participants were incorrectly randomized and were excluded from the analysis. Each intervention improved the targeted cognitive ability compared with baseline, durable to 2 years (P<.001 for all). Eighty-seven percent of speed-, 74% of reasoning-, and 26% of memory-trained participants demonstrated reliable cognitive improvement immediately after the intervention period. Booster training enhanced training gains in speed (P<.001) and reasoning (P<.001) interventions (speed booster, 92%; no booster, 68%; reasoning booster, 72%; no booster, 49%), which were maintained at 2-year follow-up (P<.001 for both). No training effects on everyday functioning were detected at 2 years. Conclusions Results support the

  7. Interventions to improve safe and effective medicines use by consumers: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Rebecca; Santesso, Nancy; Lowe, Dianne; Hill, Sophie; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Prictor, Megan; Kaufman, Caroline; Cowie, Genevieve; Taylor, Michael

    2014-04-29

    identified, while those associated with the interventions themselves, or costs, were rarely reported.Looking across reviews, for most outcomes, medicines self-monitoring and self-management programmes appear generally effective to improve medicines use, adherence, adverse events and clinical outcomes; and to reduce mortality in people self-managing antithrombotic therapy. However, some participants were unable to complete these interventions, suggesting they may not be suitable for everyone.Other promising interventions to improve adherence and other key medicines-use outcomes, which require further investigation to be more certain of their effects, include:· simplified dosing regimens: with positive effects on adherence;· interventions involving pharmacists in medicines management, such as medicines reviews (with positive effects on adherence and use, medicines problems and clinical outcomes) and pharmaceutical care services (consultation between pharmacist and patient to resolve medicines problems, develop a care plan and provide follow-up; with positive effects on adherence and knowledge).Several other strategies showed some positive effects, particularly relating to adherence, and other outcomes, but their effects were less consistent overall and so need further study. These included:· delayed antibiotic prescriptions: effective to decrease antibiotic use but with mixed effects on clinical outcomes, adverse effects and satisfaction;· practical strategies like reminders, cues and/or organisers, reminder packaging and material incentives: with positive, although somewhat mixed effects on adherence;· education delivered with self-management skills training, counselling, support, training or enhanced follow-up; information and counselling delivered together; or education/information as part of pharmacist-delivered packages of care: with positive effects on adherence, medicines use, clinical outcomes and knowledge, but with mixed effects in some studies;· financial

  8. Effectiveness of Intensive Primary Care Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Samuel T; Peterson, Kim; Chan, Brian; Anderson, Johanna; Helfand, Mark

    2017-09-18

    Multicomponent, interdisciplinary intensive primary care programs target complex patients with the goal of preventing hospitalizations, but programs vary, and their effectiveness is not clear. In this study, we systematically reviewed the impact of intensive primary care programs on all-cause mortality, hospitalization, and emergency department use. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Reviews of Effects from inception to March 2017. Additional studies were identified from reference lists, hand searching, and consultation with content experts. We included systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies of multicomponent, interdisciplinary intensive primary care programs targeting complex patients at high risk of hospitalization or death, with a comparison to usual primary care. Two investigators identified studies and abstracted data using a predefined protocol. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. A total of 18 studies (379,745 participants) were included. Three major intensive primary care program types were identified: primary care replacement (home-based; three RCTs, one observational study, N = 367,681), primary care replacement (clinic-based; three RCTs, two observational studies, N = 9561), and primary care augmentation, in which an interdisciplinary team was added to existing primary care (five RCTs, three observational studies, N = 2503). Most studies showed no impact of intensive primary care on mortality or emergency department use, and the effectiveness in reducing hospitalizations varied. There were no adverse effects reported. Intensive primary care interventions demonstrated varying effectiveness in reducing hospitalizations, and there was limited evidence that these interventions were associated with changes in mortality. While interventions could be grouped into categories, there was still substantial overlap

  9. Dosemeter readings and effective dose to the cardiologist with protective clothing in a simulated interventional procedure.

    PubMed

    Schultz, F W; Zoetelief, J

    2008-01-01

    A personal dosemeter issued for individual monitoring is calibrated in terms of personal dose equivalent, usually H(P)(10). In general it yields a reasonable estimate of effective dose (E) when the exposed person does not wear protective clothing. In interventional cardiology, however, a lead equivalent apron is worn and often a thyroid collar. A correction factor will then be necessary to convert a dosemeter reading to E. To explore this factor an interventional cardiology procedure is simulated based on exposure conditions typical for a modern hospital in the BENELUX area. The dose to the cardiologist is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport. It is concluded that a personal dosemeter may best be worn outside the apron at a central position high on the chest for least dependence on the beam direction. It will overestimate E by roughly a factor of 20 (apron and thyroid collar of 0.25 mm Pb).

  10. Improving Behavior by Using Multicomponent Self-Monitoring within a Targeted Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, Allison; Watt, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have documented the interrelatedness of reading and behavior (McIntosh, Sadler, & Brown, 2012). Thus, research examining the best way to intervene with students who exhibit problems in both skill sets is merited. Recently, taking an integrated approach to reading and behavioral intervention has been suggested (Mooney, Ryan, Uhing,…

  11. Physical Interventions for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Survey of Use, Policy, Training and Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deveau, Roy; McGill, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background: Perceived problems around the use of physical intervention (PI) to manage challenging behaviour have led to UK initiatives to encourage policy development and accredited training. However, information on PI use and the impact of these initiatives remains limited. Method: Adult residential services within an English region were sent a…

  12. Proactive Routine Monitoring and Intervention to Reduce the Psychosocial Impact of Cancer Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girgis, Afaf; Boyes, Allison

    2005-01-01

    Much of the psychosocial morbidity experienced by cancer patients goes undetected and therefore untreated. This paper describes infrastructure to routinely screen patients for psychosocial problems and provide targeted intervention in the cancer care setting. Cancer patients will complete a psychosocial screening survey via touchscreen computer at…

  13. Improving Behavior by Using Multicomponent Self-Monitoring within a Targeted Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, Allison; Watt, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have documented the interrelatedness of reading and behavior (McIntosh, Sadler, & Brown, 2012). Thus, research examining the best way to intervene with students who exhibit problems in both skill sets is merited. Recently, taking an integrated approach to reading and behavioral intervention has been suggested (Mooney, Ryan, Uhing,…

  14. Indoor air pollution and childhood asthma: effective environmental interventions.

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, R A

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to indoor air pollutants such as tobacco smoke and dust mites may exacerbate childhood asthma. Environmental interventions to reduce exposures to these pollutants can help prevent exacerbations of the disease. Among the most important interventions is the elimination of environmental tobacco smoke from the environments of children with asthma. However, the effectiveness of reducing asthmatic children's exposure to environmental tobacco smoke on the severity of their symptoms has not yet been systematically evaluated. Dust mite reduction is another helpful environmental intervention. This can be achieved by enclosing the child's mattresses, blankets, and pillows in zippered polyurethane-coated casings. Primary prevention of asthma is not as well understood. It is anticipated that efforts to reduce smoking during pregnancy could reduce the incidence of asthma in children. European studies have suggested that reducing exposure to food and house dust mite antigens during lactation and for the first 12 months of life diminishes the development of allergic disorders in infants with high total IgE in the cord blood and a family history of atopy. Many children with asthma and their families are not receiving adequate counseling about environmental interventions from health care providers or other sources. PMID:8549490

  15. [Effects of a mindfulness intervention in Chilean high schoolers].

    PubMed

    Langer, Álvaro I; Schmidt, Carlos; Aguilar-Parra, José Manuel; Cid, Cristian; Magni, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    Mindfulness has been conceptualized as paying attention to present moment experience in a non-judgmental manner, and the practice of developing that skill. To determine the impact of a mindfulness-based intervention on negative emotional states of anxiety, stress, and depression in Chilean high schoolers. Eighty-eight teenagers aged 13 ± 0.6 years (46 females) were randomly assigned to a mindfulness group or a control (41 and 47, respectively). The mindfulness intervention consisted in eight weekly 45-minute sessions. A depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS-21) was applied at baseline, after the intervention, and at three and six-month follow-up. There was a significant reduction in anxiety, depression, and general symptomatology in the experimental group compared to the control group. However, these changes were not sustained at follow-up. These preliminary results suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of a mindfulness intervention in Chilean schools as a strategy to reduce negative emotional states and prevent risk factors in adolescent population groups.

  16. The effectiveness of workplace dietary modification interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Geaney, F; Kelly, C; Greiner, B A; Harrington, J M; Perry, I J; Beirne, P

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of workplace dietary modification interventions alone or in combination with nutrition education on employees' dietary behaviour, health status, self-efficacy, perceived health, determinants of food choice, nutrition knowledge, co-worker support, job satisfaction, economic cost and food-purchasing patterns. Data sources included PubMed, Medline, Embase, Psych Info., Web of Knowledge and Cochrane Library (November 2011). This review was guided by the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Studies were randomised controlled trials and controlled studies. Interventions were implemented for at least three months. Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool measured potential biases. Heterogeneity precluded meta-analysis. Results were presented in a narrative summary. Six studies conducted in Brazil, the USA, Netherlands and Belgium met the inclusion criteria. Four studies reported small increases in fruit and vegetable consumption (≤half serving/day). These studies involved workplace dietary modifications and three incorporated nutrition education. Other outcomes reported included health status, co-worker support, job satisfaction, perceived health, self-efficacy and food-purchasing patterns. All studies had methodological limitations that weakened confidence in the results. Limited evidence suggests that workplace dietary modification interventions alone and in combination with nutrition education increase fruit and vegetable intakes. These interventions should be developed with recommended guidelines, workplace characteristics, long-term follow-up and objective outcomes for diet, health and cost. © 2013.

  17. The drug resistance strategies intervention: program effects on substance use.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Michael L; Graham, John W; Elek, Elvira

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the Drug Resistance Strategies (DRS) project, a culturally grounded, communication-based substance use prevention program implemented in 35 middle schools in Phoenix, Arizona. The intervention consisted of 10 lessons taught by the classroom teacher that imparted the knowledge, motivation, and skills needed to resist drug offers. The evaluation used growth modeling to analyze significant differences in average postintervention substance use (alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana) and growth of use over the course of the study. The study involved 6,298 seventh graders (65% Mexican/Mexican American) who responded to at least 1 of 4 questionnaires (1 pretest and 3 follow-up measures). When compared to a control group, the DRS intervention appeared to significantly limit the increase in the number of students reporting recent substance use, especially alcohol and marijuana use. The multicultural version of the curriculum proved most broadly effective, followed by the version targeting Mexican American youth. The development of a culturally grounded prevention curriculum for Mexican American youth expands the population being served by interventions. Moreover, the success of the multicultural curriculum version, which has the broadest application, provides particular promise, and the article demonstrates how a growth modeling approach can be used to evaluate a communication-based intervention by analyzing changes over time rather than differences between the pretest and posttest scores.

  18. Effectiveness of a neck stretching intervention on nurses' primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ying; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the effects of a neck stretching exercise intervention on nurses' primary headaches. Using a pretest and posttest two-group design, a total of 60 female staff nurses employed by a medical center in Taiwan were selected by convenience sampling. Participants in the experimental group (N=30) practiced neck stretching exercises while experiencing headaches. The participants in the control group (N=30) managed their headaches as usual. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on headache intensity at baseline, and at 30 minutes and 1 hour after intervention. Decrease in headache intensity of the experimental group was significantly larger than that of the control group. Neck stretching exercises is an effective method for treating primary headaches.

  19. Assessing the effectiveness of integrated interventions: terminology and approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme; Clarke, David

    2006-07-01

    Integrated care is a term that embraces several concepts, all of which imply that the target patients have complex or chronic illness. There is an assumption that such patients require integrated care and benefit from it. Attempts to test this hypothesis have produced evidence of only modest benefit, and much of the evidence is conflicting. Demonstration of effectiveness of integrated interventions in the clinical setting has been less convincing. Often, interventions are introduced uncritically and without adequate follow-up of their effectiveness. More rigorous research is required on definitions, theoretic constructs,outcome measures, the science of data synthesis, and translation to the clinical setting. Recent developments in theoretic constructs in these areas give promise of better answers to the question, "What works for whom in what context?". Qualitative methodology should form part of this research.

  20. Improving the effectiveness of interventions and investment in Andean watersheds through a participatory network of research basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Tocachi, B. F.; Buytaert, W.; De Bièvre, B.

    2016-12-01

    Many watershed interventions in remote data-scarce areas respond to information gaps by extrapolating conventional approaches based on very limited local evidence. However, most interventions, including conservation strategies and adaptation measures, have not been evaluated properly for their hydrological benefits. This is particularly the case for the Andean region, where the complex climatic and hydrological characteristics combined with a very dynamic anthropogenic disturbance, require better monitoring. Here, we present the experience of a partnership of academic and non-governmental institutions who pioneered participatory hydrological monitoring in the Andes. Established in 2009, the Regional Initiative for Hydrological Monitoring of Andean Ecosystems (iMHEA), is a bottom-up initiative that complements the national monitoring networks and more conventional scientific observatories. Using a design based on a trading-space-for-time approach, over 30 paired catchments with a variety of watershed interventions are currently being monitored by 18 local stakeholders in 15 sites in the tropical Andes. Pooling these data into a hydrological impact model allowed the consortium to make more robust predictions about the effectiveness of catchment interventions to improve water resources management and to reduce risks. The collaborative nature of iMHEA has several strengths. We identify as most important of those the ability to: (i) standardize monitoring practices; (ii) ensure quality and technical support; (iii) share responsibility of monitoring activities; (iv) obtain project co-funding and complementarity; and, (v) promote decision maker-scientist engagement. As a result, this network has started to deliver useful information to multi-scale and multi-stakeholder decision making arenas. For example, in the context of growing investment in hydrological ecosystem services in Peru, the sites provide a new generation of hydrological information that allows for evidence

  1. Response to Intervention for Middle School Students with Reading Difficulties: Effects of a Primary and Secondary Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Cirino, Paul T.; Wanzek, Jeanne; Wexler, Jade; Fletcher, Jack M.; Denton, Carolyn D.; Barth, Amy; Romain, Melissa; Francis, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a yearlong, researcher-provided, Tier 2 (secondary) intervention with a group of sixth-graders. The intervention emphasized word recognition, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension. Participants scored below a proficiency level on their state accountability test and were compared to a similar group of…

  2. Preliminary Investigation of the Effects of Reading Fluency Interventions on Comprehension: Using Brief Experimental Analysis to Select Reading Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Gary L.; Thomason, Kelly; Havey, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Brief experimental analyses were conducted using two dependent variables to evaluate the effectiveness of reading interventions. Specifically reading rate (words read correctly per minute) and mean reading comprehension levels for six students with reading difficulties were obtained using six different reading intervention/intervention…

  3. Effects of In-Service Training on Early Intervention Practitioners' Use of Family-Systems Intervention Practices in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Deal, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of three types of in-service training designed to improve early intervention practitioners' abilities to use family-systems intervention practices was evaluated in the study of 473 participants. Participants attended either conference presentations or one of two types of workshops (half day/full day or multi-day), or received one…

  4. An effective office ergonomic assessment and intervention program.

    PubMed

    Childre, Frances; Koehl, Bradley

    2009-12-01

    A significant portion of U.S. employees are office based and their work is sedentary. Office ergonomics is relevant to this population of employees to minimize the deleterious effects of static or sustained postures. Occupational health nurses currently conduct ergonomic assessments and provide interventions to decrease physical stressors. This article describes a straightforward process occupational health nurses can use to augment their ergonomic assessment and evaluation activities.

  5. The effectiveness of brief intervention among injured patients with alcohol dependence: who benefits from brief interventions?

    PubMed

    Field, Craig A; Caetano, Raul

    2010-09-01

    Research investigating the differential effectiveness of Brief Motivational Interventions (BMIs) among alcohol-dependent and non-dependent patients in the medical setting is limited. Clinical guidelines suggest that BMI is most appropriate for patients with less severe alcohol problems. As a result, most studies evaluating the effectiveness of BMI have excluded patients with an indication of alcohol dependence. A randomized controlled trial of brief intervention in the trauma care setting comparing BMI to treatment as usual plus assessment (TAU+) was conducted. Alcohol dependence status was determined for 1336 patients using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. The differential effectiveness of BMI among alcohol-dependent and non-dependent patients was determined with regard to volume per week, maximum amount consumed, percent days abstinent, alcohol problems at 6 and 12 months follow-up. In addition, the effect of BMI on dependence status at 6 and 12 months was determined. There was a consistent interaction between BMI and alcohol dependence status, which indicated significantly higher reductions in volume per week at 6 and 12 months follow-up (beta=-.56, p=.03, beta=-.63, p=.02, respectively), maximum amount at 6 months (beta=-.31, p=.04), and significant decreases in percent days abstinent at 12 months (beta=.11, p=.007) and alcohol problems at 12 months (beta=-2.7, p(12)=.04) among patients with alcohol dependence receiving BMI. In addition, patients with alcohol dependence at baseline that received BMI were .59 (95% CI=.39-.91) times less likely to meet criteria for alcohol dependence at six months. These findings suggest that BMI is more beneficial among patients with alcohol dependence who screen positive for an alcohol-related injury. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effectiveness of Brief Intervention among Injured Patients with Alcohol Dependence: Who Benefits from Brief Interventions?

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Raul

    2009-01-01

    Background Research investigating the differential effectiveness of Brief Motivational Interventions (BMI) among alcohol dependent and non-dependent patients in the medical setting is limited. Clinical guidelines suggest that BMI is most appropriate for patients with less severe alcohol problems. As a result, most studies evaluating the effectiveness of BMI have excluded patients with an indication of alcohol dependence. Methods A randomized controlled trial of brief intervention in the trauma care setting comparing BMI to treatment as usual plus assessment (TAU+) was conducted. Alcohol dependence status was determined for 1336 patients using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. The differential effectiveness of BMI among alcohol dependent and non-dependent patients was determined with regard to volume per week, maximum amount consumed, percent days abstinent, alcohol problems at six and 12 month follow up. In addition, the effect of BMI on dependence status at six and 12 months was determined. Results There was a consistent interaction between BMI and alcohol dependence status, which indicated significantly higher reductions in volume per week at six and twelve month follow up (β=−.56, p=.03, β=−.63, p=.02, respectively), maximum amount at six months (β=−.31, p=.04), and significant decreases in percent days abstinent at twelve months (β=.11, p=.007) and alcohol problems at twelve months (β=−2.7, p12=.04) among patients with alcohol dependence receiving BMI. In addition, patients with alcohol dependence at baseline that received BMI were .59 (95% CI=.39–.91) times less likely to meet criteria for alcohol dependence at six months. Conclusions These findings suggest that BMI is more beneficial among patients with alcohol dependence who screen positive for an alcohol related injury. PMID:20493644

  7. Effects of medical interventions on suicidal behavior. Summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Baldessarini, R J; Jamison, K R

    1999-01-01

    An international symposium evaluated current knowledge of the epidemiology, psychobiology, and effects of medical treatment on suicidal behavior. Moderators summarized the main findings and conclusions of the participants on the basis of presentations and consensus statements at the meeting. Despite striking advances in the medical treatment of mood disorders in the past half-century, rates of suicidal acts have changed little in the general population. Evidence of reduction of long-term rates of suicidal acts in specific at-risk populations remains very limited, particularly persons with major affective illnesses and other common, primary or comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders. It is plausible that reduction of psychiatric morbidity should limit suicidal risk, but very little is known about specific effects of most psychiatric treatments or other interventions aimed at suicide prevention. An exception is substantial evidence of lower suicidal risk during long-term lithium treatment that was not equaled with carbamazepine. However, diagnosis and timely therapeutic interventions reach only a minority of psychiatrically ill persons at risk for suicide. Renewed efforts are strongly urged to: (1) improve public and professional awareness of risk factors for suicide, (2) enhance earlier access to appropriate clinical assessment and increasingly safe and effective treatments for affective and psychotic disorders, and (3) encourage and support research to clarify specific benefits and risks of medical treatments and social interventions aimed at preventing suicide.

  8. Web-Based Positive Psychology Interventions: A Reexamination of Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Rosalind J; O'Brien-Malone, Angela; Diamond, Mark R; Schüz, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    Seligman, Steen, Park, and Peterson (2005) suggested that positive psychology interventions (PPIs) contain specific, powerful, therapeutic ingredients that effect greater increases in happiness and reductions in depression than a placebo control. This study reexamined the three PPIs that Seligman et al. found to be most effective when delivered over the internet. Three PPIs and a placebo control, identical with the interventions used by Seligman et al., were examined in a web-based, randomized assignment design. Mixed-design analysis of variance and multilevel modeling showed that all interventions, including the placebo, led to significant increases in happiness and reductions in depression. The effects of PPIs were indistinguishable from those of the placebo control. Using web-based delivery, both PPIs and theoretically neutral placebos can increase happiness and reduce depression in self-selected populations. Possible explanations include that non-specific factors common to most therapeutic treatments are responsible for the observed changes, or that cultural or other context-related variables operate to account for the divergent findings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Modeling and monitoring the hydrological effects of the Sand Engine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaars, Frans; Hoogmoed, Merel; van Vliet, Frank; Stuyfzand, Pieter; Groen, Michel; van der Made, Kees-Jan; Caljé, Ruben; Auken, Esben; Bergsted Pedersen, Jesper

    2013-04-01

    Since 1887, Dunea Water Company produces high quality drinking water using the dune area at Monster (Province of South Holland, the Netherlands). Annually, 8 billion liters of water is produced here using artificial recharge and recovery with shallow wells and infiltration lakes. The dunes are an important step in producing drinking water serving as an underground buffer, leveling fluctuating in temperature and quality and removing bacteria and viruses from the infiltrated water in a natural way. Since space is limited in the Netherlands, the drinking water production of Dunea is closely matched with surrounding land uses and natural constraints. This prevents groundwater nuisance, upconing and intrusion of salt water and, in this case, movement of a nearby groundwater pollution. This is especially true in the Monster area where the dunes are fairly low and small; the coast is less than 350 meters from the recovery wells. The coast of Monster was identified as a weak link in the coastal defense of The Netherlands. Because of this, two coastal defense projects were carried out between 2009 and 2011. The first project involved creating an extra dune ridge in front of existing dunes which leads to intrusion of a large volume of seawater. Directly after completion, the Sand Engine was constructed. This hook shaped sand peninsula will supply the coast with sand for the coming decades due to erosion and deposition along the coast. These two large coastal defense projects would obviously influence the tightly balanced hydrological system of Monster. Without hydrological intervention, the drinking water production would no longer be sustainable in this area. To study the effects of these projects and to find a solution to combine coastal defense and drinking water supply, field research and effect (geochemical) modeling were used interactively. To prevent negative effects it was decided to construct interception wells on top of the new dune ridge (28 in total). A

  10. Guide to effective monitoring of aquatic and riparian resources

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey L. Kershner; Eric K. Archer; Marc Coles-Ritchie; Ervin R. Cowley; Richard C. Henderson; Kim Kratz; Charles M. Quimby; David L. Turner; Linda C. Ulmer; Mark R. Vinson

    2004-01-01

    This monitoring plan for aquatic and riparian resources was developed in response to monitoring needs addressed in the Biological Opinions for bull trout (U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service 1998) and steelhead (U.S. Department of Commerce, National Marine Fisheries Service). It provides a consistent framework for implementing the effectiveness...

  11. Effectiveness Monitoring Report, MWMF Tritium Phytoremediation Interim Measures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Dan; Blake, John, I.

    2003-02-10

    This report describes and presents the results of monitoring activities during irrigation operations for the calendar year 2001 of the MWMF Interim Measures Tritium Phytoremediation Project. The purpose of this effectiveness monitoring report is to provide the information on instrument performance, analysis of CY2001 measurements, and critical relationships needed to manage irrigation operations, estimate efficiency and validate the water and tritium balance model.

  12. Issues in Monitoring Medication Effects in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Laura; Walcott, Christy M.; Reck, Sarah G.; Landau, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The task of medication monitoring in the schools has increased for school psychologists, yet there is little research specific to pediatric psychoactive medication. The current article reviews issues pertinent to school-based medication monitoring. Feasibility, acceptability, and perception of effectiveness are reviewed as fundamental…

  13. Issues in Monitoring Medication Effects in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Laura; Walcott, Christy M.; Reck, Sarah G.; Landau, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The task of medication monitoring in the schools has increased for school psychologists, yet there is little research specific to pediatric psychoactive medication. The current article reviews issues pertinent to school-based medication monitoring. Feasibility, acceptability, and perception of effectiveness are reviewed as fundamental…

  14. Using Fish Tissue Data to Monitor Remedy Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chapter 8 of the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Guidance for Hazardous Waste Sites (OSWER Directive 9355.0-85, December 2005), presents an approach for developing an effective monitoring plan. As stated in the Guidance, one of the goals of monitoring is to “evaluate long-term ...

  15. Using Fish Tissue Data to Monitor Remedy Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chapter 8 of the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Guidance for Hazardous Waste Sites (OSWER Directive 9355.0-85, December 2005), presents an approach for developing an effective monitoring plan. As stated in the Guidance, one of the goals of monitoring is to “evaluate long-term ...

  16. Antipsychotic Cardiometabolic Side Effect Monitoring in a State Community Mental Health System.

    PubMed

    Cotes, Robert O; de Nesnera, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Orsini, Karen; Xie, Haiyi; McHugo, Greg; Bartels, Stephen; Brunette, Mary F

    2015-08-01

    Antipsychotic medications can cause serious cardiometabolic side effects. No recent research has broadly evaluated monitoring and strategies to improve monitoring in U.S. public mental health systems. To address this knowledge gap, we evaluated education with audit and feedback to leaders to improve cardiometabolic monitoring in a state mental health system. We used Chi square statistics and logistic regressions to explore changes in monitoring recorded in randomly sampled records over 2 years. In 2009, assessment of patients on antipsychotics was 29.6 % for cholesterol, 40.4 % for glucose, 29.1 % for triglycerides, 54.3 % for weight, 33.6 % for blood pressure, and 5.7 % for abdominal girth. In 2010, four of ten mental health centers improved their rate of adult laboratory monitoring. Overall monitoring in the state did not increase. Education for prescribers with audit and feedback to leaders can improve monitoring in some settings, but more intensive and/or prolonged interventions may be required.

  17. Effects of exercise interventions during different treatments in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2017-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that exercise is a safe and efficacious means of improving physiological and psychosocial outcomes in female breast cancer survivors. To date, most research has focused on post-treatment interventions. However, given that the type and severity of treatment-related adverse effects may be dependent on the type of treatment, and that the effects are substantially more pronounced during treatment, an assessment of the safety and efficacy of exercise during treatment is warranted. In this review, we present and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted during breast cancer treatment. We conducted literature searches to identify studies examining exercise interventions in breast cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. Data were extracted on physiological and psychosocial outcomes. Cohen’s d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 17 studies involving 1,175 participants undergoing active cancer therapy met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, exercise interventions resulted in moderate to large improvements in muscular strength: resistance exercise (RE, d = 0.86), aerobic exercise (AE, d = 0.55), small to moderate improvements in cardiovascular functioning (RE, d = 0.45; AE, d = 0.17, combination exercise (COMB, d = 0.31) and quality of life (QoL; RE, d = 0.30; AE, d = 0.50; COMB, d = 0.63). The results of this review suggest that exercise is a safe, feasible, and efficacious intervention in breast cancer patients who are undergoing different types of treatment. Additional research addressing the different modes of exercise during each type of treatment is warranted to assess the comparable efficacy of the various exercise modes during established breast cancer treatments. PMID:27258052

  18. Effects of exercise interventions during different treatments in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2016-05-01

    Previous findings suggest that exercise is a safe and efficacious means of improving physiological and psychosocial outcomes in female breast cancer survivors. To date, most research has focused on post-treatment interventions. However, given that the type and severity of treatment-related adverse effects may be dependent on the type of treatment, and that the effects are substantially more pronounced during treatment, an assessment of the safety and efficacy of exercise during treatment is warranted. In this review, we present and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted during breast cancer treatment. We conducted literature searches to identify studies examining exercise interventions in breast cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. Data were extracted on physiological and psychosocial outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 17 studies involving 1,175 participants undergoing active cancer therapy met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, exercise interventions resulted in moderate to large improvements in muscular strength: resistance exercise (RE, = 0.86), aerobic exercise (AE, = 0.55), small to moderate improvements in cardiovascular functioning (RE, = 0.45; AE, = 0.17, combination exercise (COMB, = 0.31) and quality of life (QoL; RE, = 0.30; AE, = 0.50; COMB, = 0.63). The results of this review suggest that exercise is a safe, feasible, and efficacious intervention in breast cancer patients who are undergoing different types of treatment. Additional research addressing the different modes of exercise during each type of treatment is warranted to assess the comparable efficacy of the various exercise modes during established breast cancer treatments. ©2016 Frontline Medical Communications.

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Intervention Components for Producing Long-Term Abstinence from Smoking: A Factorial Screening Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Schlam, Tanya R.; Fiore, Michael C.; Smith, Stevens S.; Fraser, David; Bolt, Daniel M.; Collins, Linda M.; Mermelstein, Robin; Piper, Megan E.; Cook, Jessica W.; Jorenby, Douglas E.; Loh, Wei-Yin; Baker, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To identify promising intervention components that help smokers attain and maintain abstinence during a quit attempt. Design A 2×2×2×2×2 randomized factorial experiment. Setting Eleven primary care clinics in Wisconsin, USA. Participants 544 smokers (59% women, 86% White) recruited during primary care visits and motivated to quit. Interventions Five intervention components designed to help smokers attain and maintain abstinence: 1) extended medication (26 vs. 8 weeks of nicotine patch + nicotine gum); 2) maintenance (phone) counseling versus none; 3) medication adherence counseling versus none; 4) automated (medication) adherence calls versus none; and 5) electronic medication monitoring with feedback and counseling versus electronic medication monitoring alone. Measurements The primary outcome was 7-day self-reported point-prevalence abstinence 1 year after the target quit day. Findings Only extended medication produced a main effect. Twenty-six versus eight weeks of medication improved point-prevalence abstinence rates (43% vs. 34% at 6 months; 34% versus 27% at 1 year; p =.01 for both). There were four interaction effects at 1 year, showing that an intervention component’s effectiveness depended upon the components with which it was combined. Conclusions Twenty-six weeks of nicotine patch + nicotine gum (versus 8 weeks) and maintenance counseling provided by phone are promising intervention components for the cessation and maintenance phases of smoking treatment. PMID:26581819

  20. Predicting Kindergarteners' Response to Early Reading Intervention: An Examination of Progress-Monitoring Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oslund, Eric L.; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Taylor, Aaron B.; Simmons, Deborah C.; Simmons, Leslie; Kwok, Oi-Man; Johnson, Caitlin; Coyne, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the predictive validity of combinations of progress-monitoring measures: (a) curriculum-embedded phonemic awareness and alphabetic/decoding measures, and (b) Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS; Good & Kaminski, 2002) nonsense word fluency and phoneme segmentation fluency on reading outcomes of…

  1. A national programme for patient and staff dose monitoring in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Sotil, J; Carrera, F; Armas, J; Rosales, F; Pifarre, X; Escaned, J; Angel, J; Diaz, J F; Bosa, F; Saez, J R; Goicolea, J

    2011-09-01

    A national programme on patient and staff dose evaluation in interventional cardiology made in cooperation with the haemodynamic section of the Spanish Society of Cardiology has recently been launched. Its aim is to propose a set of national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for patients as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and to initiate several optimisation actions to improve radiological protection of both patients and staff. Six hospitals have joined the programme and accepted to submit their data to a central database. First to be acquired were the quality control data of the X-ray systems and radiation doses of patients and professionals. The results from 9 X-ray systems, 1467 procedures and staff doses from 43 professionals were gathered. Provisional DRLs resulted in 44 Gy cm(2) for coronary angiography and 78 Gy cm(2) for interventions. The X-ray systems varied up to a factor of 5 for dose rates in reference conditions. Staff doses showed that 50 % of interventional cardiologists do not use their personal dosemeters correctly.

  2. Effect of Telehealth Interventions on Hospitalization Indicators: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kalankesh, Leila R.; Pourasghar, Faramarz; Nicholson, Lorraine; Ahmadi, Shamim; Hosseini, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Telehealth has been defined as the remote delivery of healthcare services using information and communication technology. Where resource-limited health systems face challenges caused by the increasing burden of chronic diseases and an aging global population, telehealth has been advocated as a solution for changing and improving the paradigm of healthcare delivery to cope with these issues. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the effect of telehealth interventions on two indicators: hospitalization rate and length of stay. Materials and Methods The reviewers searched the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Springer electronic databases from January 2005 to November 2013. A search strategy was developed using a combination of the following search keywords: impact, effect, telehealth, telemedicine, telecare, hospitalization, length of stay, and resource utilization. Both randomized controlled trials and observational studies were included in the review. To be included in the review, articles had to be written in English. The results of study were compiled, reviewed, and analyzed on the basis of the review aims. Results This systematic review examined 22 existing studies with a total population of 19,086 patients. The effect of telehealth on all-cause hospitalization was statistically significant in 40 percent of the related studies, whereas it was not statistically significant in 60 percent. Similarly, the effect of telehealth on the all-cause length of stay was statistically significant in 36 percent of the studies and nonsignificant in 64 percent. Conclusion Considering the fact that hospitalization rate and length of stay can be confounded by factors other than telehealth intervention, studies examining the effect of the intervention on these indicators must take into account all other factors influencing them. Otherwise any judgment on the effect of telehealth on these indicators cannot be valid. PMID:27843425

  3. Evaluation of effectiveness of integrated intervention in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sayantani; Rupani, Karishma; Dave, Malay; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal; Kamath, Ravindra

    2014-04-01

    To assess the effectiveness of integrated therapy over the past 3 y on the recipient autistic children and its correlation with the following variables - age at admission, duration of therapy given and initial severity of symptoms. The index study was a retrospective study with 18 autistic children as subjects; the maximum duration of intervention was 3 y. The integrated approach consisted of special education using principles of applied behavior analysis, occupational and speech therapy. The progress records, the occupational therapy and the speech therapy progress reports were tabulated as data. The Childhood Autism Rating Scale (Schopler, Reichler and Renner, 1986) was used for evaluation of severity of symptoms at admission and in present day. The data was then compared and analyzed. The present study showed significant positive results. Only few domains requiring very high integrated cognitive and sensorimotor functioning showed non-significant results. Age at intervention correlated negatively and, duration of therapy given and initial severity of symptoms correlated positively with effectiveness of therapy. Continuous feedback and modification of the therapy is required to maintain performance and develop target interventions for problematic areas identified. Longitudinal as well as comparative studies are required to better understand the benefits of integrated approach.

  4. Environmental charging effects monitors for operational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1981-04-01

    A set of three instruments has been developed that can provide early detection of potentially dangerous geomagnetic substorm conditions, and monitor the spacecraft response. The set consists of three instruments: (1) a 'surface voltage sensor' that measures the characteristic energy of collected electrons or ions from +100 to -20,000 volts; (2) a 'nanoammeter' or logarithmic current density sensor that measures local electron flux by measuring currents from 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -5th A; and (3) a 'transient events counter' that counts the spurious pulses from electrostatic discharges that are coupled into the spacecraft wiring harness. Performance characteristics, specifications, and application of these instruments are discussed.

  5. Malaria in pregnancy: access to effective interventions in Africa.

    PubMed

    Yartey, J E

    2006-09-01

    Malaria infection during pregnancy (MIP) poses substantial risks to the mother, her fetus and the newborn. Consequences of MIP include severe anemia, placental parasitemia and intrauterine growth retardation, which contribute to low birth weight, a principal cause of infant mortality in the African region. Effective interventions for the prevention and control of MIP include Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT), Insecticide treated nets (ITNs), and case management, and are being deployed by countries. The global political and fiscal environment is favorable with increasing resources to support the scale-up of interventions. What is needed at country level is strong collaboration among malaria and reproductive health programs and partners, to maximize the use of available resources for scaling-up to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Equally important is the need for continuous advocacy at all levels to keep malaria high on the global agenda and maintain the current global commitment and momentum.

  6. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  7. Comparing models of helper behavior to actual practice in telephone crisis intervention: a Silent Monitoring Study of Calls to the U.S. 1-800-SUICIDE Network.

    PubMed

    Mishara, Brian L; Chagnon, François; Daigle, Marc; Balan, Bogdan; Raymond, Sylvaine; Marcoux, Isabelle; Bardon, Cécile; Campbell, Julie K; Berman, Alan

    2007-06-01

    Models of telephone crisis intervention in suicide prevention and best practices were developed from a literature review and surveys of crisis centers. We monitored 2,611 calls to 14 centers using reliable behavioral ratings to compare actual interventions with the models. Active listening and collaborative problem-solving models describe help provided. Centers vary greatly in the nature of interventions and their quality according to predetermined criteria. Helpers do not systematically assess suicide risk. Some lives may have been saved but occasionally unacceptable responses occur. Recommendations include the need for quality assurance, development of standardized practices and research relating intervention processes to outcomes.

  8. The Effects of Automated Prompting and Self-Monitoring on Homework Completion for a Student with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blicha, Amy; Belfiore, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention consisting of automated prompting and self-monitoring on the level of independent homework task completion for an elementary-age student with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Instituting a single subject, within series ABAB design, the results showed a consistent increase and…

  9. Effects of Class-Wide Self-Monitoring on On-Task Behaviors of Preschoolers with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartal, Mine Sonmez; Ozkan, Serife Yucesoy

    2015-01-01

    The effects of class-wide self-monitoring on the on-task behaviors of preschoolers with developmental disabilities were determined. Also examined were whether the on-task behaviors of preschoolers with developmental disabilities had approximated the level of typically developing peers at the end of intervention, and classroom teachers and…

  10. An uphill struggle: effects of a point-of-choice stair climbing intervention in a non-English speaking population.

    PubMed

    Eves, Frank F; Masters, Rich S W

    2006-10-01

    Increases in lifestyle physical activity are a current public health target. Interventions that encourage pedestrians to choose the stairs rather than the escalator are uniformly successful in English speaking populations. Here we report the first test of a similar intervention in a non-English speaking sample, namely the Hong Kong Chinese. Travellers on the Mid-Levels escalator system in Hong Kong were encouraged to take the stairs for their health by a point-of-choice prompt with text in Chinese positioned at the junction between the stairs and the travelator. Gender, age, ethnic origin, and walking on the travelator were coded by observers. A 2 week intervention period followed 2 weeks of baseline monitoring with 57 801 choices coded. Specificity of the intervention was determined by contrasting effects in Asian and non-Asian travellers. There was no effect of the intervention on stair climbing and baseline rates (0.4%) were much lower than previous studies in Western populations (5.4%). Nonetheless, a modest increase in walking up the travelator, confined to the Asian population (OR = 1.12), confirmed that the intervention materials could change behaviour. It would be unwise to assume that lifestyle physical activity interventions have universal application. The contexts in which the behaviours occur, e.g. climate, may act as a barrier to successful behaviour change.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Practice: Interventions to Improve High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, Fiona; Bowden, A. Brooks; Belfield, Clive; Levin, Henry M.; Cheng, Henan; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Hanisch-Cerda, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we perform cost-effectiveness analysis on interventions that improve the rate of high school completion. Using the What Works Clearinghouse to select effective interventions, we calculate cost-effectiveness ratios for five youth interventions. We document wide variation in cost-effectiveness ratios between programs and between…

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Practice: Interventions to Improve High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, Fiona; Bowden, A. Brooks; Belfield, Clive; Levin, Henry M.; Cheng, Henan; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Hanisch-Cerda, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we perform cost-effectiveness analysis on interventions that improve the rate of high school completion. Using the What Works Clearinghouse to select effective interventions, we calculate cost-effectiveness ratios for five youth interventions. We document wide variation in cost-effectiveness ratios between programs and between…

  13. Longitudinal Intervention Effects on Parenting of the Aventuras para Niños Study

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Elder, John P.; Campbell, Nadia R.; Arredondo, Elva; Baquero, Barbara; Crespo, Noe C.; Slymen, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Parenting interventions have achieved changes in factors associated with childhood obesity but few have tested the effects on multiple parental influences. Purpose This study examined the efficacy of an intervention aimed at improving several dimensions of parenting related to childhood obesity. Design 2×2 factorial study design Setting/Participants In 2003, thirteen Southern California schools were randomized to one of four conditions: micro-environment only, macro-environment only, micro-plus-macro–environment, and no treatment control condition. Participants included 811 predominantly Mexican immigrant/Mexican-American mothers with children in grades kindergarten through second grade. Intervention In both micro conditions, participants received monthly home visits by a promotora over a 7-month period plus monthly mailed newsletters. Main outcome measures In 2008, intervention effects were examined on: (1) parenting strategies including limit setting, monitoring, discipline, control, and reinforcement related to children’s diet and physical activity; (2) parental support for physical activity; (3) parent-mediated family behaviors such as family meals eaten together and TV watching during family dinners; and (4) perceived barriers and other parent cognitions related to children’s eating and activity. Results At the 2-year follow-up, significant improvements were observed in three of five parenting strategies, parental support, and two of four parent-mediated family behaviors among parents receiving the micro intervention (i.e., those who received promotora visits and monthly newsletters), as compared with those in the macro-only and control conditions. Conclusions Aspects of parenting related to children’s risk for obesity and related health outcomes are modifiable with the support of a promotora and print media. PMID:20117571

  14. Design for Vibration Monitoring: A Methodology for Reliable and Cost-Effective Vibration Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of health monitoring systems is to detect failures or defects for increased safety and performance and to provide on-condition maintenance with reduced costs. The problems associated with health monitoring systems include high rates of false alarms and missed failures, which make monitoring an unreliable and costly task. The reason for this is that unaccounted variations invalidate signal modeling assumptions. Our approach was to focus on vibration monitoring of rotating components. We analyzed baseline signals to determine statistical variations, identify and model factors that influence vibrations (pre-production vs. post-production variations), determine hit and false alarm rates with baseline flight data, model and predict effects of defects and variations on vibrations, and develop algorithms and metrics for failure and anomaly detection in the presence of variations.

  15. The Semiosis of "Side Effects" in Genetic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Affifi, Ramsey

    2016-01-01

    Genetic interventions, which include transgenic engineering, gene editing, and other forms of genome modification aimed at altering the information "in" the genetic code, are rapidly increasing in power and scale. Biosemiotics offers unique tools for understanding the nature, risks, scope, and prospects of such technologies, though few in the community have turned their attention specifically in this direction. Bruni (2003, 2008) is an important exception. In this paper, I examine how we frame the concept of "side effects" that result from genetic interventions and how the concept stands up to current perspectives of the role of organism activity in development. I propose that once the role of living systems in constructing and modifying the informational value of their various developmental resources is taken into account, the concept of a "side effect" will need to be significantly revised. Far from merely a disturbance brought about in a senseless albeit complex system, a biosemiotic view would take "side effects" as at least sometimes the organism's active re-organization in order to accommodate or make use of novelty. This insight is nascent in the work of developmental plasticity and niche construction theory (West-Eberhard 2003; Odling-Smee et al. 2003), but it is brought into sharper focus by the explicitly interpretive perspective offered by biosemiotics. Understanding the "side effects" of genetic interventions depends in part on being able to articulate when and where unexpected consequences are a result of semiotic activity at various levels within the system. While a semiotic interpretation of "side effects" puts into question the naive attitude that would see all unintended side effects as indications of disturbance in system functionality, it certainly does not imply that such side effects are of no concern for the viability of the organisms in the system. As we shall see, the fact that such interventions do not respect the translation of information

  16. Nutritional Intervention Using Nutrition Care Process in a Malnourished Patient with Chemotherapy Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, the process of nutritional diagnosis and intervention conducted at a hospital on a malnourished patient who underwent treatment for a chronic illness (chemotherapy for cancer treatment) was recorded. The patient received his first round of chemotherapy for colorectal cancer, and then a second round after the cancer metastasized to the liver. The patient was malnourished and had experienced weight loss (17% loss in the most recent 3 months) due to side effects of chemotherapy including stomatitis, nausea, and vomiting. Nutritional diagnosis and intervention via the nutrition care process were implemented through two screening rounds, and the quantity of oral intake increased from 28% to 62% of the recommended daily intake. The patient required continuous monitoring and outpatient care after hospital discharge. It is speculated that if a more active patient education and dietary regimen with respect to chemotherapy side effects had been offered after the patient's first chemotherapy cycle, it might have been possible to treat ingestion problems due to stomatitis during the second cycle of chemotherapy and prevent the weight loss. Henceforth, patients receiving chemotherapy should be educated about nutrition management methods and monitored continuously to prevent malnutrition. PMID:25713794

  17. Long-term pressure monitoring with arterial applanation tonometry: a non-invasive alternative during clinical intervention?

    PubMed

    Matthys, Koen S; Kalmar, Alain F; Struys, Michel M R F; Mortier, Eric P; Avolio, Alberto P; Segers, Patrick; Verdonck, Pascal R

    2008-01-01

    Arterial tonometry is a non-invasive technique for continuous registration of arterial pressure waveforms. This study aims to assess tonometric blood pressure recording (TBP) as an alternative for invasive long-term bedside monitoring. A prospective study was set up where patients undergoing neurosurgical intervention were subjected to both invasive (IBP) and non-invasive (TBP) blood pressure monitoring during the entire procedure. A single-element tonometric pressure transducer was used to better investigate different inherent error sources of TBP measurement. A total of 5.7 hours of combined IBP and TBP were recorded from three patients. Although TBP performed fairly well as an alternative for IBP in steady state scenarios and some short-term variations, it could not detect relevant long-term pressure variations at all times. These findings are discussed in comparison to existing work. Physiological alterations at the site of TBP measurement are highlighted as a potentially important source of artifacts. It is concluded that at this point arterial tonometry remains not enough understood for long-term use during a delicate operative procedure. Physiological changes at the TBP measurement site deserve further investigation before tonometry technology is to be considered as an non-invasive alternative for long-term clinical monitoring.

  18. Monitoring and evaluation of soil bioengineering interventions for watershed management, disaster mitigation and environmental restoration in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Alessandro; Preti, Federico

    2013-04-01

    In recent decades the institutions responsible for land management and civil protection have showed a great interest in relation to the use of more environmentally friendly techniques to mitigate the risk of landslides and floods. Soil bioengineering has responded to this need and several research groups are carrying out experimentations using the techniques of this discipline in the countries in the developing world. The Deistaf from University of Florence has concentrated its activities in this area over the past decade promoting the use of the techniques of Soil bioengineering in Latin America through the implementation of training and experimentation programmes. Numerous works have been completed both in riverbanks and on slopes in Nicaragua, Guatemala, Ecuador and Colombia. It was decided to make a census of interventions in Latin America from different institutions that may be related to Soil bioengineering in order to obtain an overview of the state of the art in the specific context taking into account also environmental and socio-economic issues. Taking advantage of its network of contacts, DEISTAF has collected dozens of sheets that describe interventions. These sheets describe, among other fields focused on the environment in which the work has been carried out, the materials and techniques used, and the impact of the intervention. In the sheets we present also the monitoring that has been realized for some of these works in the months of October and November 2012; we include the identification of the current condition and functionality of the intervention and, in the case of the presence of some damages, the formulation of instructions to fix them as well as the economic quantification of the repairs to be carried out.

  19. The effects of a swimming intervention for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeng-Shing; Hung, Wen-Ping

    2009-08-01

    Asthma is a common paediatric airway disease with increasing prevalence. Studies comparing swimming with other sports have found that swimming is unlikely to provoke unstable asthma but possible benefits are not defined. This study investigated the benefits of a 6 week swimming intervention on pulmonary function tests (PFT), PEF and severity of asthma in children. Young asthmatics were randomly assigned to the experimental or the control group, with 15 subjects in each group. In addition to regular treatment for asthma, the experimental group received swimming training for 6 weeks. PFT, PEF and severity of asthma were measured. There was a significant improvement (P < 0.01) in PEF in the experimental group compared with the control group (330 L/min, 95% CI: 309-351 vs. 252 L/min, 95% CI: 235-269) after the swimming intervention. There was also a significant improvement (P < 0.05) in the severity of asthma in the experimental group compared with the control group. These data suggest that a swimming programme for asthmatic children can improve some disease parameters (PEF and the severity of asthma). Swimming may be an effective non-pharmacological intervention for the child or adolescent with asthma.

  20. Effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rotavirus infection has been reported to be responsible for the majority of severe diarrhea in children under-5-years-old in Indonesia. Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection. Increasing breastfeeding promotion programs could be an alternative target to reduce the incidence of rotavirus diarrhea. This study aims to investigate the effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia, focusing on breastfeeding education and support interventions. Methods An age-structured cohort model was developed for the 2011 Indonesia birth cohort. We compared four interventions in scenarios: (i) base-case ( I 0 ) reflecting the current situation for the population of under-5-years-old, (ii) with an additional breastfeeding education intervention ( I 1 ), (iii) with a support intervention on initiation and duration ( I 2 ) and (iv) with both of these two interventions combined ( I 3 ). The model applied a 5-years time horizon, with 1 month analytical cycles for children less than 1 year of age and annually thereafter. Monte Carlo simulations were used to examine the economic acceptability and affordability of rotavirus vaccination. Results Rotavirus immunization would effectively reduce severe cases of rotavirus during the first 5 years of a child's life even assuming various breastfeeding promotion interventions. The total yearly vaccine cost would amount to US$ 64 million under the market vaccine price. Cost-effectiveness would increase to US$ 153 per quality-adjusted-life-year (societal perspective) with an optimal breastfeeding promotion intervention. Obviously, this is much lower than the 2011 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita of US$ 3,495. Affordability results showed that at the market vaccine price, rotavirus vaccination could be affordable for the Indonesian health system. Conclusions Rotavirus immunization would be a highly cost-effective public health

  1. Effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suwantika, Auliya A; Postma, Maarten J

    2013-12-01

    Rotavirus infection has been reported to be responsible for the majority of severe diarrhea in children under-5-years-old in Indonesia. Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection. Increasing breastfeeding promotion programs could be an alternative target to reduce the incidence of rotavirus diarrhea. This study aims to investigate the effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia, focusing on breastfeeding education and support interventions. An age-structured cohort model was developed for the 2011 Indonesia birth cohort. We compared four interventions in scenarios: (i) base-case (I₀) reflecting the current situation for the population of under-5-years-old, (ii) with an additional breastfeeding education intervention (I₁), (iii) with a support intervention on initiation and duration (I₂) and (iv) with both of these two interventions combined (I₃). The model applied a 5-years time horizon, with 1 month analytical cycles for children less than 1 year of age and annually thereafter. Monte Carlo simulations were used to examine the economic acceptability and affordability of rotavirus vaccination. Rotavirus immunization would effectively reduce severe cases of rotavirus during the first 5 years of a child's life even assuming various breastfeeding promotion interventions. The total yearly vaccine cost would amount to US$ 64 million under the market vaccine price. Cost-effectiveness would increase to US$ 153 per quality-adjusted-life-year (societal perspective) with an optimal breastfeeding promotion intervention. Obviously, this is much lower than the 2011 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita of US$ 3,495. Affordability results showed that at the market vaccine price, rotavirus vaccination could be affordable for the Indonesian health system. Rotavirus immunization would be a highly cost-effective public health intervention for Indonesia even under various

  2. Effect of a mobile app intervention on vegetable consumption in overweight adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mummah, Sarah; Robinson, Thomas N; Mathur, Maya; Farzinkhou, Sarah; Sutton, Stephen; Gardner, Christopher D

    2017-09-15

    Mobile applications (apps) have been heralded as transformative tools to deliver behavioral health interventions at scale, but few have been tested in rigorous randomized controlled trials. We tested the effect of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults attempting weight loss maintenance. Overweight adults (n=135) aged 18-50 years with BMI=28-40 kg/m(2) near Stanford, CA were recruited from an ongoing 12-month weight loss trial (parent trial) and randomly assigned to either the stand-alone, theory-based Vegethon mobile app (enabling goal setting, self-monitoring, and feedback and using "process motivators" including fun, surprise, choice, control, social comparison, and competition) or a wait-listed control condition. The primary outcome was daily vegetables servings, measured by an adapted Harvard food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) 8 weeks post-randomization. Daily vegetable servings from 24-hour dietary recalls, administered by trained, certified, and blinded interviewers 5 weeks post-randomization, was included as a secondary outcome. All analyses were conducted according to principles of intention-to-treat. Daily vegetable consumption was significantly greater in the intervention versus control condition for both measures (adjusted mean difference: 2.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.1, 3.8, p=0.04 for FFQ; and 1.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.9; p=0.02 for 24-hour recalls). Baseline vegetable consumption was a significant moderator of intervention effects (p=0.002) in which effects increased as baseline consumption increased. These results demonstrate the efficacy of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults. Theory-based mobile interventions may present a low-cost, scalable, and effective approach to improving dietary behaviors and preventing associated chronic diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01826591. Registered 27 March 2013.

  3. Effects of an 8-month yoga intervention on arterial compliance and muscle strength in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojung; Bemben, Michael G; Bemben, Debra A

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that Yoga exercise has a positive effect on reducing blood pressure and heart rate. However, no randomized controlled studies to date have investigated its effects on arterial compliance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-month Yoga intervention on arterial compliance and muscle strength in normal premenopausal women 35-50 years of age. Thirty-four women were randomly assigned either to a Yoga exercise group (YE, n = 16) or a control group (CON, n = 18). Participants in YE group performed 60 minutes of an Ashtanga Yoga series 2 times/week with one day between sessions for 8 months. Each Yoga session consisted of 15 minutes of warm-up exercises, 35 minutes of Ashtanga Yoga postures and 10 minutes of cool-down with relaxation; and the session intensity was progressively increased during the 8 months. Participants in CON were encouraged to maintain their normal daily lifestyles monitored by the bone-specific physical activity questionnaire at 2 month intervals for 8 months. Arterial compliance (pulse contour analysis) and muscle strength (1 Repetition Maximum) were assessed at baseline and after the intervention. Arterial compliance of the large and small arteries was not affected by the 8 month Yoga training (p > 0.05). Also, there were no significant (p > 0.05) group, time, or group × time interaction effects for cardiovascular variables. YE group significantly (p < 0.01) improved leg press muscle strength compared to CON (11.4% vs. -6.5%). Eight months of Ashtanga Yoga training was beneficial for improving leg press strength, but not arterial compliance in premenopausal women. Key pointsThe 8 month Yoga training did not affect arterial compliance of the large and small arteries.None of the cardiovascular variables were changed by the Yoga intervention.Isotonic muscle strength was not altered by the Yoga intervention, with the exception of leg press.

  4. Effects of an 8-Month Yoga Intervention on Arterial Compliance and Muscle Strength In Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SoJung; Bemben, Michael G.; Bemben, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that Yoga exercise has a positive effect on reducing blood pressure and heart rate. However, no randomized controlled studies to date have investigated its effects on arterial compliance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-month Yoga intervention on arterial compliance and muscle strength in normal premenopausal women 35-50 years of age. Thirty-four women were randomly assigned either to a Yoga exercise group (YE, n = 16) or a control group (CON, n = 18). Participants in YE group performed 60 minutes of an Ashtanga Yoga series 2 times/week with one day between sessions for 8 months. Each Yoga session consisted of 15 minutes of warm-up exercises, 35 minutes of Ashtanga Yoga postures and 10 minutes of cool-down with relaxation; and the session intensity was progressively increased during the 8 months. Participants in CON were encouraged to maintain their normal daily lifestyles monitored by the bone-specific physical activity questionnaire at 2 month intervals for 8 months. Arterial compliance (pulse contour analysis) and muscle strength (1 Repetition Maximum) were assessed at baseline and after the intervention. Arterial compliance of the large and small arteries was not affected by the 8 month Yoga training (p > 0.05). Also, there were no significant (p > 0.05) group, time, or group × time interaction effects for cardiovascular variables. YE group significantly (p < 0.01) improved leg press muscle strength compared to CON (11.4% vs. -6.5%). Eight months of Ashtanga Yoga training was beneficial for improving leg press strength, but not arterial compliance in premenopausal women. Key pointsThe 8 month Yoga training did not affect arterial compliance of the large and small arteries.None of the cardiovascular variables were changed by the Yoga intervention.Isotonic muscle strength was not altered by the Yoga intervention, with the exception of leg press. PMID:24149206

  5. Response to Intervention for Middle School Students With Reading Difficulties: Effects of a Primary and Secondary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Sharon; Cirino, Paul T.; Wanzek, Jeanne; Wexler, Jade; Fletcher, Jack M.; Denton, Carolyn D.; Barth, Amy; Romain, Melissa; Francis, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a yearlong, researcher-provided, Tier 2 (secondary) intervention with a group of sixth-graders. The intervention emphasized word recognition, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension, Participants scored below a proficiency level on their slate accountability test and were compared to a similar group of struggling readers receiving school-provided instruction. All students received the benefits of content area teachers who participated in researcher-provided professional development designed to integrate vocabulary and comprehension practices throughout the school day (Tier 1). Students who participated in the Tier 2 intervention showed gains on measures of decoding, fluency, and comprehension, but differences relative to students in the comparison group were small (median d = +0.16). Students who received the re searcher-provided intervention scored significantly higher than students who received comparison intervention on measures of word attack, spelling, the state accountability measure, passage comprehension, and phonemic decoding efficiency, although most often in particular subgroups. PMID:21479079

  6. Aptitude-treatment interaction effects in psychooncological interventions.

    PubMed

    Stulz, Niklaus; Künzler, Alfred; Barth, Jürgen; Hepp, Urs

    2014-01-01

    To examine aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) effects in cancer patients receiving psychooncological interventions (POIs). N=36 cancer patients were treated with POI. Hierarchical linear regression was used to test two interaction effects between patient baseline characteristics (aptitudes) and process analyses of therapy sessions (treatment) on change in mental health during POI. Patients with high emotional distress did best when their therapy reduced arousal, and patients with lower emotional distress benefited most if therapists emphasized arousal induction. The interaction between the coping style of the patient (internalizing vs. externalizing) and the focus of the treatment (emotion vs. behavior) did not predict POI outcomes. The ATI effect of patient's distress and therapist's arousal induction/reduction may help therapists to make differential treatment decisions in POI. Tailoring treatments to cancer patients based on their personal characteristics may enhance the effectiveness of POI. © 2014.

  7. A comparison of timed artificial insemination and automated activity monitoring with hormone intervention in 3 commercial dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Dolecheck, K A; Silvia, W J; Heersche, G; Wood, C L; McQuerry, K J; Bewley, J M

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the reproductive performance of cows inseminated based on automated activity monitoring with hormone intervention (AAM) to cows from the same herds inseminated using only an intensive timed artificial insemination (TAI) program. Cows (n=523) from 3 commercial dairy herds participated in this study. To be considered eligible for participation, cows must have been classified with a body condition score of at least 2.50, but no more than 3.50, passed a reproductive tract examination, and experienced no incidences of clinical, recorded metabolic diseases in the current lactation. Within each herd, cows were balanced for parity and predicted milk yield, then randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: TAI or AAM. Cows assigned to the TAI group were subjected to an ovulation synchronization protocol consisting of presynchronization, Ovsynch, and Resynch for up to 3 inseminations. Cows assigned to the AAM treatment were fitted with a leg-mounted accelerometer (AfiAct Pedometer Plus, Afimilk, Kibbutz Afikim, Israel) at least 10 d before the end of the herd voluntary waiting period (VWP). Cows in the AAM treatment were inseminated at times indicated by the automated alert system for up to 90 d after the VWP. If an open cow experienced no AAM alert for a 39±7-d period (beginning at the end of the VWP), hormone intervention in the form of a single injection of either PGF2α or GnRH (no TAI) was permitted as directed by the herd veterinarian. Subsequent to hormone intervention, cows were inseminated when alerted in estrus by the AAM system. Pregnancy was diagnosed by ultrasound 33 to 46 d after insemination. Pregnancy loss was determined via a second ultrasound after 60 d pregnant. Timed artificial insemination cows experienced a median 11.0 d shorter time to first service. Automated activity-monitored cows experienced a median 17.5-d shorter service interval. No treatment difference in probability of pregnancy to first AI, probability

  8. Sex effects in cocaine using methadone patients randomized to contingency management interventions

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Ashley E.; Rash, Carla J.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) is an effective treatment for promoting cocaine abstinence in patients receiving methadone maintenance. However, few studies have examined the effect of sex on treatment outcomes in this population. This study evaluated the impact of sex on longest duration of abstinence (LDA) and percent negative urine samples in 323 cocaine-using methadone patients from four randomized clinical trials comparing CM to standard methadone care. Overall, women had better treatment outcomes compared to men, demonstrated by an increase in both LDA and percentages of negative samples. Patients receiving CM also had significantly higher LDA and percentages of negative samples compared to patients receiving standard care, but sex by treatment condition effects were not significant. These data suggest that cocaine using methadone patients who are women have better substance use outcomes than men in interventions that regularly monitor cocaine use, and CM is equally efficacious regardless of sex. PMID:26237326

  9. The Effect of Outpatient Interventional Audiology on Inpatient Audiology Services.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, Lori; Palmer, Catherine V

    2017-05-01

    Although older adults are likely to experience some degree of hearing loss that if untreated will interfere with treatment for other disorders and result in less-than-optimal health care outcomes, health care providers do not have a reliable and cost-effective way to identify these individuals when admitted to a hospital for inpatient care. This article addresses the impact of untreated hearing loss on health care in a hospital setting and shares how the implementation of interventional audiology in an outpatient clinic has impacted the inpatient audiology services provided at a large tertiary care hospital. A discussion of how these services can be further expanded is provided.

  10. Is early intervention for psychosis feasible and effective?

    PubMed Central

    Srihari, Vinod H.; Shah, Jai; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Services that provide comprehensive, early intervention (EI) have shown promise in improving long-term outcomes in schizophrenia. This paper reviews the rationale and salient concepts relevant to understanding the growing EI literature. A selective review of studies evaluating the effectiveness of integrated EI is followed by a discussion of feasibility, especially in the U.S. context. Finally, the authors present a framework that seeks to integrate activities traditionally categorized and separated as discovery and implementation. This framework is offered as one way to advance both goals. PMID:22929869

  11. Biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk in obese/overweight children: effect of lifestyle intervention.

    PubMed

    Vrablík, M; Dobiášová, M; Zlatohlávek, L; Urbanová, Z; Češka, R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a strong cardiometabolic (CM) risk factor in children. We tested potential CM risk in obese/overweight children and the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention using newer CM markers: atherogenic index of plasma AIP [Log(TG/HDL-C)], apoB/apoAI ratio and a marker of insulin resistance HOMA-IR. The participants (194 girls, 115 boys, average age 13) were enrolled in an intensive, one-month, inpatient weight reduction program. The program consisted of individualised dietary changes and the exercise program comprised aerobic and resistance training. Anthropometrical and biochemical parameters in plasma and CM risk biomarkers - (AIP, apoB/apoAI ratio and HOMA-IR) were examined before and after the intervention. AIP and HOMA-IR significantly correlated with BMI while apoB/apoAI ratio did not. Only AIP and HOMA-IR showed systematic increases according to the level of obesity by BMI quartiles. Lifestyle intervention significantly improved anthropometrical and biochemical values and the biomarkers too. The response of lipid parameters to the intervention was considerably higher in boys than in girls. The children were stratified into three risk categories according to AIP, where 13.8 % of boys and 5.3 % of girls fell into high risk category. The monitored biomarkers may complement each other in the prognosis of CM risk. AIP was strongly related to obesity and to lipid and glycid metabolism, while the relationship of the apoB/apoAI ratio to obesity and glycid metabolism was not significant. The obese children benefited from the intensive lifestyle intervention which improved the anthropometrical and biochemical parameters and CM risk biomarkers.

  12. Serological markers suggest heterogeneity of effectiveness of malaria control interventions on Bioko Island, equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jackie; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Schwabe, Christopher; Nseng, Gloria; Bousema, Teun; Corran, Patrick H; Riley, Eleanor M; Drakeley, Chris J

    2011-01-01

    In order to control and eliminate malaria, areas of on-going transmission need to be identified and targeted for malaria control interventions. Immediately following intense interventions, malaria transmission can become more heterogeneous if interventions are more successful in some areas than others. Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, has been subject to comprehensive malaria control interventions since 2004. This has resulted in substantial reductions in the parasite burden, although this drop has not been uniform across the island. In 2008, filter paper blood samples were collected from 7387 people in a cross-sectional study incorporating 18 sentinel sites across Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Antibodies were measured to P. falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1) by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Age-specific seropositivity rates were used to estimate seroconversion rates (SCR). Analysis indicated there had been at least a 60% decline in SCR in four out of five regions on the island. Changes in SCR showed a high degree of congruence with changes in parasite rate (PR) and with regional reductions in all cause child mortality. The mean age adjusted concentration of anti-AMA-1 antibodies was mapped to identify areas where individual antibody responses were higher than expected. This approach confirmed the North West of the island as a major focus of continuing infection and an area where control interventions need to be concentrated or re-evaluated. Both SCR and PR revealed heterogeneity in malaria transmission and demonstrated the variable effectiveness of malaria control measures. This work confirms the utility of serological analysis as an adjunct measure for monitoring transmission. Age-specific seroprevalence based evidence of changes in transmission over time will be of particular value when no baseline data are available. Importantly, SCR data provide additional evidence to link malaria control activities to contemporaneous reductions in all

  13. Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Safe Firearm Storage.

    PubMed

    Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Simonetti, Joseph A; Rivara, Frederick P

    2016-01-01

    Despite supportive evidence for an association between safe firearm storage and lower risk of firearm injury, the effectiveness of interventions that promote such practices remains unclear. Guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist, we conducted a systematic review of randomized and quasi-experimental controlled studies of safe firearm storage interventions using a prespecified search of 9 electronic databases with no restrictions on language, year, or location from inception through May 27, 2015. Study selection and data extraction were independently performed by 2 investigators. The Cochrane Collaboration's domain-specific tool for assessing risk of bias was used to evaluate the quality of included studies. Seven clinic- and community-based studies published in 2000-2012 using counseling with or without safety device provision met the inclusion criteria. All 3 studies that provided a safety device significantly improved firearm storage practices, while 3 of 4 studies that provided no safety device failed to show an effect. Heterogeneity of studies precluded conducting a meta-analysis. We discuss methodological considerations, gaps in the literature, and recommendations for conducting future studies. Although additional studies are needed, the totality of evidence suggests that counseling augmented by device provision can effectively encourage individuals to store their firearms safely. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Environmental charging effects monitors for operational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    A set of three instruments was developed that can provide early detection of potentially dangerous geomagnetic substorm conditions, and monitor the spacecraft response. The set consists of three instruments: A Surface Voltage Sensor that measures the characteristic energy of collected electrons or ions from +100 to -20,000 volts; a logarithmic current density sensor or Nanoammeter that measures local electron flux by measuring currents from 10 to the minus 9th power to 10 to the minus 5th power A; and a Transient Events Counter that counts the spurious pulses from electrostatic discharges that are coupled into the spacecraft wiring harness. An amplitude threshold can be set to count only pulses that are large enough to cause circuit malfunction. Performance characteristics, specifications, and application of these instruments are discussed. Size, weight, and power requirements were minimized. The Surface Voltage Sensor and Nanoammeter are packaged together in a box that is 10.1 by 11.3 by 9.5 cm and weighs 0.82 kg. The transient Events Counter measures 10.1 by 11.3 by 5.4 cm and weighs 0.55 kg. Both operate from a nominal 28 V dc input and require a total of 3/4 watt for both. Although designed for flight use, these instruments are also suitable for laboratory use.

  15. The timing of nutritional status determination: implications for interventions and growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huttly, S R; Victora, C G; Barros, F C; Teixeira, A M; Vaughan, J P

    1991-02-01

    A population-based birth cohort of 1226 urban Brazilian children underwent anthropometric examinations at, on average, ages 11, 23 and 47 months. Multiple regression analyses showed that while birth weight was the single most important factor in predicting nutritional status at age 11 months, a wide range of other social, biological and morbidity factors also appeared to play a significant role. Environmental and dietary factors, however, showed no significant association. Nutritional status at age 11 months was a very strong predictor of nutritional status at ages 23 and 47 months and the other explanatory factors made a minimal additional contribution to the regression models. These results suggest that, in this population, childhood nutritional status is primarily determined before the end of the first year of life. These findings have implications for the timing and nature of nutritional interventions and for mechanisms for identifying those children who will suffer from poor nutritional status later in childhood.

  16. The Effectiveness of a Technologically Facilitated Classroom-Based Early Reading Intervention: The Targeted Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amendum, Steven J.; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Ginsberg, Marnie C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a classroom-teacher-delivered reading intervention for struggling readers called the Targeted Reading Intervention (TRI), designed particularly for kindergarten and first-grade teachers and their struggling students in rural, low-wealth communities. The TRI was delivered via an innovative…

  17. A School-Based Mindfulness Intervention for Urban Youth: Exploring Moderators of Intervention Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Laura Feagans; Dariotis, Jacinda K.; Mendelson, Tamar; Greenberg, Mark. T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines gender, grade-level, and baseline depressive symptoms as potential moderators of a school-based mindfulness intervention's impact on the self-regulatory outcomes of urban youth. Ninety-seven participants from four urban public schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or wait-list control condition. Fourth and fifth…

  18. A School-Based Mindfulness Intervention for Urban Youth: Exploring Moderators of Intervention Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Laura Feagans; Dariotis, Jacinda K.; Mendelson, Tamar; Greenberg, Mark. T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines gender, grade-level, and baseline depressive symptoms as potential moderators of a school-based mindfulness intervention's impact on the self-regulatory outcomes of urban youth. Ninety-seven participants from four urban public schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or wait-list control condition. Fourth and fifth…

  19. Does a pre-intervention functional assessment increase intervention effectiveness? A meta-analysis of within-subject interrupted time-series studies.

    PubMed

    Hurl, Kylee; Wightman, Jade; Haynes, Stephen N; Virues-Ortega, Javier

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the relative effectiveness of interventions based on a pre-intervention functional behavioral assessment (FBA), compared to interventions not based on a pre-intervention FBA. We examined 19 studies that included a direct comparison between the effects of FBA- and non-FBA-based interventions with the same participants. A random effects meta-analysis of effect sizes indicated that FBA-based interventions were associated with large reductions in problem behaviors when using non-FBA-based interventions as a reference intervention (Effect size=0.85, 95% CI [0.42, 1.27], p<0.001). In addition, non-FBA based interventions had no effect on problem behavior when compared to no intervention (0.06, 95% CI [-0.21, 0.33], p=0.664). Interestingly, both FBA-based and non-FBA-based interventions had significant effects on appropriate behavior relative to no intervention, albeit the overall effect size was much larger for FBA-based interventions (FBA-based: 1.27, 95% CI [0.89, 1.66], p<0.001 vs. non-FBA-based: 0.35, 95% CI [0.14, 0.56], p=0.001). In spite of the evidence in favor of FBA-based interventions, the limited number of comparative studies with high methodological standards underlines the need for further comparisons of FBA-based versus non-FBA-based interventions.

  20. Relative effectiveness of additive pain interventions during vaccination in infants.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Ipp, Moshe; Moss, Steven; Baker, Stephen; Tolkin, Jonathan; Malini, Dave; Feerasta, Sharmeen; Govan, Preeya; Fletcher, Emma; Wong, Horace; McNair, Caitlin; Mithal, Priyanjali; Stephens, Derek

    2017-02-13

    Vaccine injections can cause acute pain and distress in infants, which can contribute to dissatisfaction with the vaccination experience and vaccine hesitancy. We sought to compare the effectiveness of additive pain interventions administered consistently during vaccine injections in the first year of life. We conducted a multicentre, longitudinal, double-blind, add-on, randomized controlled trial. Healthy infants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 levels of pain management for all vaccine injections at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months: (i) placebo control; (ii) parent-directed video education about infant soothing; (iii) the video plus sucrose administered orally or (iv) the video plus sucrose plus liposomal lidocaine applied topically. All infants benefit from injection techniques that minimize pain. We used a double-dummy design; hence all parents watched a video (active psychological intervention or placebo) and all infants received oral solution (sucrose or placebo) and topical cream (lidocaine or placebo). We assessed infant distress during 3 phases - preinjection (baseline), vaccine injection (needle), and 1 minute postinjection (recovery) - using the Modified Behavioural Pain Scale (range 0-10). We compared scores between groups and across infant ages using a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis. A total of 352 infants participated in the study, from Jan. 17, 2012, to Feb. 2, 2016. Demographics did not differ among intervention groups (p > 0.05). Baseline pain scores did not differ among intervention groups (p = 0.4), but did differ across ages (p < 0.001). Needle pain scores differed among groups (p = 0.003) and across ages (p < 0.001). The mean (± standard deviation) needle score was 6.3 (± 0.8) in the video-sucrose-lidocaine group compared with 6.7 (± 0.8) in each of the other groups. There were no other between-group differences. Recovery scores did not differ among groups (p = 0.98), but did differ across ages (p < 0.001). Only liposomal lidocaine provided

  1. Relative effectiveness of additive pain interventions during vaccination in infants

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Ipp, Moshe; Moss, Steven; Baker, Stephen; Tolkin, Jonathan; Malini, Dave; Feerasta, Sharmeen; Govan, Preeya; Fletcher, Emma; Wong, Horace; McNair, Caitlin; Mithal, Priyanjali; Stephens, Derek

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccine injections can cause acute pain and distress in infants, which can contribute to dissatisfaction with the vaccination experience and vaccine hesitancy. We sought to compare the effectiveness of additive pain interventions administered consistently during vaccine injections in the first year of life. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre, longitudinal, double-blind, add-on, randomized controlled trial. Healthy infants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 levels of pain management for all vaccine injections at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months: (i) placebo control; (ii) parent-directed video education about infant soothing; (iii) the video plus sucrose administered orally or (iv) the video plus sucrose plus liposomal lidocaine applied topically. All infants benefit from injection techniques that minimize pain. We used a double-dummy design; hence all parents watched a video (active psychological intervention or placebo) and all infants received oral solution (sucrose or placebo) and topical cream (lidocaine or placebo). We assessed infant distress during 3 phases — preinjection (baseline), vaccine injection (needle), and 1 minute postinjection (recovery) — using the Modified Behavioural Pain Scale (range 0–10). We compared scores between groups and across infant ages using a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis. RESULTS: A total of 352 infants participated in the study, from Jan. 17, 2012, to Feb. 2, 2016. Demographics did not differ among intervention groups (p > 0.05). Baseline pain scores did not differ among intervention groups (p = 0.4), but did differ across ages (p < 0.001). Needle pain scores differed among groups (p = 0.003) and across ages (p < 0.001). The mean (± standard deviation) needle score was 6.3 (± 0.8) in the video–sucrose–lidocaine group compared with 6.7 (± 0.8) in each of the other groups. There were no other between-group differences. Recovery scores did not differ among groups (p = 0.98), but did differ across ages (p < 0

  2. The effectiveness of early intervention: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Parry, T S

    1992-10-01

    The following principles are now clearly defined in the management of children with developmental delay: (1) Multidisciplinary teams are more effective than individual therapeutic approaches. (2) The whole development of the child needs to be considered rather than a single deficient area alone. (3) Home-based programmes are more effective in the young preschool child than centre-based programmes alone. (4) Parent involvement in partnership with professionals is essential for sustained progress. (5) Maximum effectiveness is achieved when parental skills are increased. (6) Programmes commencing earlier in preschool years are more effective than those that commence late. This concept has been recently challenged and evidence supports benefits for the disadvantaged rather than the disabled. White also contends that there is 'simply not enough information to be confident about the long-term impact of early intervention with handicapped children and evidence in support of many of the commonly held positions about mediating variables (e.g. parental involvement, age at start) is either non-existent or contradictory. Early intervention is clearly effective in offering parental support, fostering parent/child relationships and diminishing anxiety even for those programmes that have not at present been proven in altering the developmental disability. Programmes that involve high cost, disrupt total family functioning, deflect scarce resources away from more proven areas of effectiveness should be discouraged, and they should never cause guilt in either parent or professional when they seem ineffective. Future research should include investigation of outcomes other than cognitive and physical functioning alone. We should be warned from the somewhat crisp statement of Mark Twain: 'There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment in fact'.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Effects of Music Intervention on State Anxiety and Physiological Indices in Patients Undergoing Mechanical Ventilation in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiu-Hsiang; Lee, Chien-Ying; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Lai, Chiung-Ling; Sung, Yi-Hui; Lin, Chung-Ying; Lin, Long-Yau

    2017-03-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) often experience stress and anxiety. Although stress and anxiety can be pharmacologically attenuated, some drugs cause adverse side effects such as bradycardia, immobility, and delirium. There is thus a need for an alternative treatment with no substantial adverse effects. Music intervention is a potential alternative. In the present study, we used cortisol levels, subjective questionnaires, and physiological parameters to explore the anxiety-reducing effects of music intervention in a sample of ICU patients on mechanical ventilation. Patients admitted to the ICU for ≥ 24 hr were randomly assigned to the music intervention ( n = 41) or control group ( n = 44). Music group patients individually listened to music from 4:00 to 4:30 p.m.; control group patients wore headphones but heard no music for the same 30 min. Anxiety was measured using serum cortisol levels, the Chinese Version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. After adjusting for demographics, analysis of covariance showed that the music group had significantly better scores for all posttest measures ( p < .02) and pre-post differences ( p < .03) except for diastolic blood pressure. Because of music intervention's low cost and easy administration, clinical nurses may want to use music to reduce stress and anxiety for ICU patients. A single 30-min session might work immediately without any adverse effects. However, the duration of the effect is unclear; thus, each patient's mood should be monitored after the music intervention.

  4. Evaluation of a computer-based intervention to enhance metabolic monitoring in psychiatry inpatients treated with second-generation antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    DelMonte, M T; Bostwick, J R; Bess, J D; Dalack, G W

    2012-12-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) play an important role in the pharmacologic management of various psychiatric conditions. Use of these medications has been associated with metabolic complications. Adherence to guideline-recommended monitoring is suboptimal. We evaluated the effect of a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) pop-up alert designed to improve rates of laboratory metabolic monitoring of patients treated with SGAs on a University Hospital inpatient psychiatry unit. A single-centre, retrospective chart review was performed in which patient demographics and SGA drug and laboratory data were extracted from the CPOE database. We assessed the number of orders for appropriate metabolic monitoring data for patients admitted within a 6-month period before or after the alert implementation. Pre-alert (n = 171) and post-alert (n = 157) groups were similar with respect to age, length of stay, sex, race and comorbidities. Following alert implementation, significant increases in monitoring both random (92.4% vs. 100%) and fasting (46.8% vs. 70%) glucose levels as well as random (28.7% vs. 74.5%) and fasting (18.7% vs. 59.9%) lipid panels (all P ≤ 0.001) were observed. The number of patients with both a fasting glucose level and fasting lipid panel available for monitoring increased from 12.9% to 47.8% (P < 0.0001). Significantly more post-alert laboratory orders were submitted at the same time as the SGA drug order (P < 0.0001), suggesting that the alert itself had a direct influence on the ordering of metabolic monitoring labs. Implementation and use of an electronic pop-up alert in an inpatient psychiatric unit significantly improved rates of ordering fasting blood glucose and lipid levels for inpatients treated with SGAs. Overall rates remain suboptimal, suggesting a need for additional strategies to further improve metabolic monitoring. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Intervention Study to Assess the Effect of a Contact Intervention in Reducing Leprosy-Related Stigma in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ruth M H; Dadun; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B M; Bunders, Joske F G; Irwanto; van Brakel, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Can deliberate interaction between the public and persons affected by leprosy reduce stigmatization? The study described in this paper hypothesises that it can and assesses the effectiveness of a 'contact intervention'. This cluster-randomized controlled intervention study is part of the Stigma Assessment and Reduction of Impact (SARI) project conducted in Cirebon District, Indonesia. Testimonies, participatory videos and comics given or made by people affected by leprosy were used as methods to facilitate a dialogue during so-called 'contact events'. A mix of seven quantitative and qualitative methods, including two scales to assess aspects of stigma named the SDS and EMIC-CSS, were used to establish a baseline regarding stigma and knowledge of leprosy, monitor the implementation and assess the impact of the contact events. The study sample were community members selected using different sampling methods. The baseline shows a lack of knowledge about leprosy, a high level of stigma and contrasting examples of support. In total, 91 contact events were organised in 62 villages, directly reaching 4,443 community members (mean 49 per event). The interview data showed that knowledge about leprosy increased and that negative attitudes reduced. The adjusted mean total score of the EMIC-CSS reduced by 4.95 points among respondents who had attended a contact event (n = 58; p < 0.001, effect size = 0.75) compared to the score at baseline (n = 213); for the SDS this was 3.56 (p < 0.001, effect size = 0.81). About 75% of those attending a contact event said they shared the information with others (median 10 persons). The contact intervention was effective in increasing knowledge and improving public attitudes regarding leprosy. It is relatively easy to replicate elsewhere and does not require expensive technology. More research is needed to improve scalability. The effectiveness of a contact intervention to reduce stigma against other neglected tropical diseases and conditions

  6. Nursing interventions in monitoring the adolescent with Cystic Fibrosis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Reisinho, Maria da Conceição Marinho Sousa Ribeiro Oliveira; Gomes, Bárbara Pereira

    2016-12-08

    to search for nursing interventions focused on the improvement of quality of life and promotion of self-care of adolescents suffering from the Cystic Fibrosis. literature review. The inclusion criteria were: primary studies and studies with interventions developed by nurses in the adolescent population with Cystic Fibrosis, using Portuguese, Spanish, French and English with no time limit, and supported by the databases Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL. The search expressions were: nursing AND care AND adolescent AND "Cystic Fibrosis" AND ("quality of life" OR "self-care"). a total of 59 articles was retrieved; 8 matched the criteria chosen. Nursing interventions targeted at adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis and their family members were identified. These interventions were organized according to the nurses' role, namely caregiver, coordinator, counsellor, researcher, trainer and care partner. nursing interventions targeted at following up the adolescent during the entire therapeutic process, involving the presence of parents/significant others, since both the adolescent and family have to be responsible for self-care. Healthcare professionals should be capable of identifying the specific needs of patients with chronic disease and their family, permitting a better understanding and adaptation to the health-disease transition process. buscar intervenções de enfermagem que enfoquem a melhoria da qualidade de vida e a promoção do autocuidado em adolescentes que sofrem de fibrose cística. revisão de literatura. Os critérios de inclusão foram: estudos primários e estudos com intervenções desenvolvidas por enfermeiros na população adolescente com fibrose cística, em português, espanhol, francês e inglês, sem delimitação temporal, nas bases de dados Scopus, Web of Science e CINAHL. Os termos utilizados na busca foram: enfermagem AND cuidado AND adolescente AND "Fibrose Cística" AND ("qualidade de vida" OR "autocuidado"). ao total, 59 artigos foram

  7. [Follow-up interventions after suicide attempt. What tools, what effects and how to assess them?

    PubMed

    Castaigne, E; Hardy, P; Mouaffak, F

    2017-02-01

    After attempting suicide, 60 to 70% of patients are discharged from emergency departments and referred to outpatient treatment which entails psychosocial strategies, pharmacological strategies or a combination. The main objective of outpatient care consists in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. Yet suicide attempters have been found to be very difficult to engage in treatment. Between 11% and 50% of attempters refuse outpatient treatment or drop out of outpatient therapy very quickly. In order to address this extremely serious issue, for the past 20 years monitoring or follow up interventions has been presented as a promising approach. Follow-up intervention is defined as a service that aims at both increased access to and engagement in care as well as to prevent suicide and related behaviors. This approach consists in "stay in contact" or "connectedness" protocols using phone calls or tele-assistance, sending letters, email or mobile phone messages and medical visits or nursing at home. From one study to another these tools have been used separately, associated to one another or reinforced by motivational interviewing or brief psychotherapy. To our knowledge, since 1993 16 controlled and randomized controlled studies assessed the effectiveness of diverse follow-up. Four studies assessing telephone follow up reported a significant decrease in suicide reattempt while one study evaluating a sending letters strategy reported positive results. Among five studies assessing engagement in healthcare, only two (one using phone follow up and the other sending letters reported significantly positive results. The refusal rate of monitoring strategies has not exceeded 11% attesting to the high applicability of these methods. Despite several positive results, we cannot draw firm conclusions on replicability of these results. This is largely due to methodological issues: lack of standardization of interventions, lack of consensus on definition of the main measured variables

  8. Supportive monitoring and disease management through the internet: an internet-delivered intervention strategy for recurrent depression.

    PubMed

    Kordy, Hans; Backenstrass, Matthias; Hüsing, Johannes; Wolf, Markus; Aulich, Kai; Bürgy, Martin; Puschner, Bernd; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Vedder, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Major depression is a highly prevalent, disabling disorder associated with loss of quality of life and large economic burden for the society. Depressive disorders often follow a chronic or recurrent course. The risk of relapses increases with each additional episode. The internet-deliverable intervention strategy SUMMIT (SUpportive Monitoring and Disease Management over the InTernet) for patients with recurrent depression has been developed with the main objectives to prolong symptom-free phases and to shorten symptom-loaden phases. This paper describes the study design of a six-sites, three-arm, randomized clinical trial intended to evaluate the efficacy of this novel strategy compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Two hundred thirty six patients who had been treated for their (at least) third depressive episode in one of the six participating psychiatric centers were randomized into one of three groups: 1) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation with personal support or 2) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation without personal support, or 3) TAU alone. Primary outcome of this study is defined as the number of "well weeks" over 24months after index treatment assessed by blind evaluators based on the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation. If efficacious, the low monetary and nonmonetary expenditures of this automated, yet individualized intervention may open new avenues for providing an acceptable, convenient, and affordable long-term disease management strategy to people with a chronic mental condition such as recurrent depression. © 2013.

  9. Self-Monitoring with a Twist: Using Cell Phones to CellF-Monitor On-Task Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedesem, Peña L.; Dieker, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Self-monitoring is regarded throughout the literature as an effective classroom intervention. Researchers have used self-monitoring interventions to improve school-related behavior of students with varying disabilities across a variety of settings. Although research supports the use of self-monitoring, traditional self-monitoring techniques may be…

  10. Self-Monitoring with a Twist: Using Cell Phones to CellF-Monitor On-Task Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedesem, Peña L.; Dieker, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Self-monitoring is regarded throughout the literature as an effective classroom intervention. Researchers have used self-monitoring interventions to improve school-related behavior of students with varying disabilities across a variety of settings. Although research supports the use of self-monitoring, traditional self-monitoring techniques may be…

  11. Alternative approaches to assessing intervention effectiveness in randomized trials: application in a colorectal cancer screening study.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Annette E; Crespi, Catherine M; Danao, Leda L; Antonio, Cynthia; Garcia, Gabriel M; Bastani, Roshan

    2011-09-01

    Previous analysis of a randomized community-based trial of a multi-component intervention to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among Filipino Americans (n = 548) found significantly higher screening rates in the two intervention groups compared to the control group, when using intent-to-treat analysis and self-reported screening as the outcome. This report describes more nuanced findings obtained from alternative approaches to assessing intervention effectiveness to inform future intervention implementation. The effect of the intervention on CRC screening receipt during follow-up was estimated using methods that adjusted for biases due to missing data and self-report and for different combinations of intervention components. Adjustment for self-report used data from a validation substudy. Effectiveness within demographic subgroups was also examined. Analyses accounting for self-report bias and missing data supported the effectiveness of the intervention. The intervention was also broadly effective across the demographic characteristics of the sample. Estimates of the intervention effect were highest among participants whose providers received a letter as part of the intervention. The findings increase confidence that the intervention could be broadly effective at increasing CRC screening in this population. Subgroup analyses and attempts to deconstruct multi-component interventions can provide important information for future intervention development, implementation, and dissemination.

  12. Social Network Analysis and Mining to Monitor and Identify Problems with Large-Scale Information and Communication Technology Interventions.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Aleksandra do Socorro; de Brito, Silvana Rossy; Vijaykumar, Nandamudi Lankalapalli; da Rocha, Cláudio Alex Jorge; Monteiro, Maurílio de Abreu; Costa, João Crisóstomo Weyl Albuquerque; Francês, Carlos Renato Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    The published literature reveals several arguments concerning the strategic importance of information and communication technology (ICT) interventions for developing countries where the digital divide is a challenge. Large-scale ICT interventions can be an option for countries whose regions, both urban and rural, present a high number of digitally excluded people. Our goal was to monitor and identify problems in interventions aimed at certification for a large number of participants in different geographical regions. Our case study is the training at the Telecentros.BR, a program created in Brazil to install telecenters and certify individuals to use ICT resources. We propose an approach that applies social network analysis and mining techniques to data collected from Telecentros.BR dataset and from the socioeconomics and telecommunications infrastructure indicators of the participants' municipalities. We found that (i) the analysis of interactions in different time periods reflects the objectives of each phase of training, highlighting the increased density in the phase in which participants develop and disseminate their projects; (ii) analysis according to the roles of participants (i.e., tutors or community members) reveals that the interactions were influenced by the center (or region) to which the participant belongs (that is, a community contained mainly members of the same region and always with the presence of tutors, contradicting expectations of the training project, which aimed for intense collaboration of the participants, regardless of the geographic region); (iii) the social network of participants influences the success of the training: that is, given evidence that the degree of the community member is in the highest range, the probability of this individual concluding the training is 0.689; (iv) the North region presented the lowest probability of participant certification, whereas the Northeast, which served municipalities with similar

  13. Social Network Analysis and Mining to Monitor and Identify Problems with Large-Scale Information and Communication Technology Interventions

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Aleksandra do Socorro; de Brito, Silvana Rossy; Vijaykumar, Nandamudi Lankalapalli; da Rocha, Cláudio Alex Jorge; Monteiro, Maurílio de Abreu; Costa, João Crisóstomo Weyl Albuquerque; Francês, Carlos Renato Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    The published literature reveals several arguments concerning the strategic importance of information and communication technology (ICT) interventions for developing countries where the digital divide is a challenge. Large-scale ICT interventions can be an option for countries whose regions, both urban and rural, present a high number of digitally excluded people. Our goal was to monitor and identify problems in interventions aimed at certification for a large number of participants in different geographical regions. Our case study is the training at the Telecentros.BR, a program created in Brazil to install telecenters and certify individuals to use ICT resources. We propose an approach that applies social network analysis and mining techniques to data collected from Telecentros.BR dataset and from the socioeconomics and telecommunications infrastructure indicators of the participants’ municipalities. We found that (i) the analysis of interactions in different time periods reflects the objectives of each phase of training, highlighting the increased density in the phase in which participants develop and disseminate their projects; (ii) analysis according to the roles of participants (i.e., tutors or community members) reveals that the interactions were influenced by the center (or region) to which the participant belongs (that is, a community contained mainly members of the same region and always with the presence of tutors, contradicting expectations of the training project, which aimed for intense collaboration of the participants, regardless of the geographic region); (iii) the social network of participants influences the success of the training: that is, given evidence that the degree of the community member is in the highest range, the probability of this individual concluding the training is 0.689; (iv) the North region presented the lowest probability of participant certification, whereas the Northeast, which served municipalities with similar

  14. Effects of a physical activity intervention for women.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jane Anthony; Yates, Bernice C; Atwood, Jan R; Hertzog, Melody

    2005-02-01

    Physical activity is associated with health and reduced mortality risk, yet only 15% of U.S. adults achieve adequate activity. This study is an experimental repeated measures nested design randomizing two similar rural communities to investigate the effectiveness of the Heart and Soul Physical Activity Program (HSPAP) (Peterson, 2002) in promoting physical activity in midlife women (n=42) aged 35 to 65 years. The HSPAP, an innovative church-based health promotion intervention, is conceptualized in social support and designed to increase physical activity, energy expenditure (EE), and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 max), measured over time. A significant interaction (p<.001) was found for EE in one HSPAP group increasing their EE by 1,010 kcals/week. HSPAP participants increased their VO2 max level by 75% (p<.001) and 10%; comparison groups stayed the same or declined 16%. Study results provide preliminary support for the HSPAP intervention as an effective treatment to improve physical activity levels in sedentary, rural, midlife women.

  15. Compliance with hygiene guidelines: the effect of a multimodal hygiene intervention and validation of direct observations.

    PubMed

    Mernelius, Sara; Svensson, Per-Olof; Rensfeldt, Gunhild; Davidsson, Ewa; Isaksson, Barbro; Löfgren, Sture; Matussek, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    Good compliance with hygiene guidelines is essential to prevent bacterial transmission and health care-associated infections. However, the compliance is usually <50%. A multimodal and multidisciplinary hygiene intervention was launched once the baseline compliance was determined through direct observations in 4 departments of obstetrics and gynecology. Detailed evaluations of the compliance rates were performed at point of stability (at 80%) and follow-up (3 years after hygiene intervention). Validation of direct observations was performed using blinded double appraisal and multiappraisal. At baseline, the compliance with barrier precautions and the dress code at the 4 departments were 39% to 47% and 79% to 98%, respectively. Point of stability was reached approximately 1 year after the hygiene intervention was launched. The compliance with barrier precautions was significantly higher at follow-up compared with baseline in 3 departments. In the validation by double appraisal, 471 of 483 components were judged identical between observers. In the multiappraisal, 95% to 100% of the observers correctly judged the 7 components. It is possible to improve compliance with hygiene guidelines, but, to ensure a long-lasting effect, a continuous focus on barrier precautions is required. Observation is a valid method to monitor compliance. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring impact and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2011-08-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in children <5 years of age globally. Since 2009, the WHO has recommended inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization programs of all countries. Data regarding rotavirus vaccine impact and effectiveness under conditions of routine use are important for encouraging countries to implement vaccination programs. In the absence of a national rotavirus vaccination program in France, the IVANHOE study was initiated to determine the real-world impact and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine following introduction in a limited geographic area. This study found a twofold reduction in rotavirus hospitalizations among children <2 years of age who were age-eligible to receive rotavirus vaccine and a 98% vaccine effectiveness, highlighting the health benefits of a vaccination program.

  17. Longitudinal intervention effects on parenting of the Aventuras para Niños study.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Guadalupe X; Elder, John P; Campbell, Nadia R; Arredondo, Elva; Baquero, Barbara; Crespo, Noe C; Slymen, Donald J

    2010-02-01

    Parenting interventions have achieved changes in factors associated with childhood obesity but few have tested the effects on multiple parental influences. This study examined the efficacy of an intervention aimed at improving several dimensions of parenting related to childhood obesity. The study used a 2 x 2 factorial design. In 2003, a sample of 13 Southern California schools was randomized to one of four conditions: micro-environment only, macro-environment only, micro-plus-macro-environment, and no treatment control condition. Participants included 811 predominantly Mexican immigrant/Mexican-American mothers with children in kindergarten through second grade. In both micro conditions, participants received monthly home visits by a promotora over a 7-month period plus monthly mailed newsletters. In 2008, intervention effects were examined on (1) parenting strategies, including limit setting, monitoring, discipline, control, and reinforcement related to children's diet and physical activity; (2) parental support for physical activity; (3) parent-mediated family behaviors such as family meals eaten together and TV watching during family dinners; and (4) perceived barriers and other parent cognitions related to children's eating and activity. At the 2-year follow-up, significant improvements were observed in three of five parenting strategies, parental support, and two of four parent-mediated family behaviors among parents receiving the micro intervention (i.e., those who received promotora visits and monthly newsletters), as compared with those in the macro-only and control conditions. Aspects of parenting related to children's risk for obesity and related health outcomes are modifiable with the support of a promotora and print media. Copyright 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Are interventions for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement effective?

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    left and right sides of the same participant (split mouth design), and measured the AMD.The method for measuring AMD was reliable in three studies, relatively reliable in one study and unreliable in four studies. The authors only performed pooled AMD mean meta-analysis for the LLL studies. The meta-analysis showed pooled mean AMD of 0.32 (95% confidence interval (CI), 20.04, 0.68), 0.76 (95% CI, 20.14, 1.65), and 0.73 (95% CI, 20.68, 2.14) for one month, two months and three months, respectively. Two LLL studies showed no differences regarding periodontal health and two LLL studies showed no differences in root resorption between LLL intervention and control groups. Compared to control group, one study reported that CS had significantly higher MR and another study showed that CS exhibited larger AMD for one month, two months, three months and four months. Two studies revealed that CS did not show any difference in the periodontal health status. One study reported the EC showed significantly larger AMD for one month, whereas another study reported that PEF induced larger AMD for five + 0.6 months. DAD showed faster MR and less anchorage loss compared to PDD. Teeth remained vital in both DAD and PDD interventions and one out of six cases presented root resorption in the PDD group. Among the five interventions corticotomy is effective and safe to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement, low-level laser therapy was unable to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement. The level of evidence does not support whether electrical current and pulsed electromagnetic fields are effective in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement and dentoalveolar or periodontal distraction is promising in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement.

  19. Translating HIV Interventions into Practice: Community-based Organizations’ Experiences with the Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBIs)

    PubMed Central

    Dolcini, M. Margaret; Gandelman, Alice; Vogan, Stacy A.; Kong, Carol; Leak, Tia-Nicole; King, A. J.; DeSantis, Linda; O’Leary, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Efficacious behavioral interventions developed to address the spread of HIV/STIs are currently being disseminated in the USA through a national diffusion program (DEBI) spearheaded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Understanding how interventions are translated to real world settings is necessary to further scientific knowledge of this process and to facilitate future translation efforts in public health. Prior studies have begun to elucidate how agencies translate behavioral interventions into practice, but further work is needed. Guided by the ADAPT framework, we examined agencies’ assessment, preparation, and implementation of interventions. Our qualitative interview-based study focused on six community-based agencies in California (United States) funded to implement three group-level HIV interventions. Findings showed considerable variation in the extent to which agencies engaged in assessment and broad-based preparation and in the ease with which agencies implemented the interventions. The findings provide insight into the process that agencies undergo in the translation of effective behavioural interventions and illustrate how agencies can inform logic models that guide translation. We also identify relevant dimensions of existing models, including the ADAPT framework and Roger’s (1995 and Roger’s (2005) diffusion of innovations in organizations, that have value for agencies that are translating research to practice. PMID:20926169

  20. Framing effects on metacognitive monitoring and control

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Bridgid

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments explored the contribution of framing effects on metamemory judgments. In Experiment 1, participants studied word pairs. After each presentation, they made an immediate judgment of learning (JOL), framed in terms of either remembering or forgetting. In the remember frame, participants made judgments about how likely it was that they would remember each pair on the upcoming test. In the forget frame, participants made judgments about how likely it was that they would forget each pair. Confidence differed as a result of the frame. Forget frame JOLs, equated to the remember frame JOL scale by a 1-judgment conversion, were lower and demonstrated a smaller overconfidence bias than did remember frame JOLs. When judgments were made at a delay, framing effects did not occur. In Experiment 2, people chose to restudy more items when choices were made within a forget frame. In Experiment 3, people studied Spanish–English vocabulary pairs ranging in difficulty. The framing effect was replicated with judgments and choices. Moreover, forget frame participants included more easy and medium items to restudy. These results demonstrated the important consequences of framing effects on assessment and control of study. PMID:18604963

  1. A Faraday effect position sensor for interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bock, M; Umathum, R; Sikora, J; Brenner, S; Aguor, E N; Semmler, W

    2006-02-21

    An optical sensor is presented which determines the position and one degree of orientation within a magnetic resonance tomograph. The sensor utilizes the Faraday effect to measure the local magnetic field, which is modulated by switching additional linear magnetic fields, the gradients. Existing methods for instrument localization during an interventional MR procedure often use electrically conducting structures at the instruments that can heat up excessively during MRI and are thus a significant danger for the patient. The proposed optical Faraday effect position sensor consists of non-magnetic and electrically non-conducting components only so that heating is avoided and the sensor could be applied safely even within the human body. With a non-magnetic prototype set-up, experiments were performed to demonstrate the possibility of measuring both the localization and the orientation in a magnetic resonance tomograph. In a 30 mT m(-1) gradient field, a localization uncertainty of 1.5 cm could be achieved.

  2. Worksite intervention effects on sleep quality: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Chow, Chin-Moi; Kirby, Adrienne; Singh, Maria A Fiatarone

    2006-10-01

    Employees with sleep disturbance are at increased risk of disease. Exercise is believed to be effective for improving sleep quality, but few studies have been conducted. This study investigated the effects of a 24-week worksite exercise/behavioral intervention on self-rated sleep quality, via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), in 73 employees. Greater post-test improvements in the PSQI (-2.0 +/- 2.6 vs. -1.3 +/- 2.7 points, p = .006, and -16 +/- 61 vs. -1 +/- 76%, p = .02) were found in treatment versus controls, and in women versus men (by -2.7 points [-5.0 to -0.3 points, p = .03], and by -72% [-142 to -2%, p = .04]). Similar results were found in the shift worker subgroup. Changes in sleep scores were not significantly related to baseline characteristics, changes in psychological health or quality-of-life scores, or level of exercise compliance.

  3. Effect of Wearable Technology Combined With a Lifestyle Intervention on Long-term Weight Loss: The IDEA Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Jakicic, John M; Davis, Kelliann K; Rogers, Renee J; King, Wendy C; Marcus, Marsha D; Helsel, Diane; Rickman, Amy D; Wahed, Abdus S; Belle, Steven H

    2016-09-20

    Effective long-term treatments are needed to address the obesity epidemic. Numerous wearable technologies specific to physical activity and diet are available, but it is unclear if these are effective at improving weight loss. To test the hypothesis that, compared with a standard behavioral weight loss intervention (standard intervention), a technology-enhanced weight loss intervention (enhanced intervention) would result in greater weight loss. Randomized clinical trial conducted at the University of Pittsburgh and enrolling 471 adult participants between October 2010 and October 2012, with data collection completed by December 2014. Participants were placed on a low-calorie diet, prescribed increases in physical activity, and had group counseling sessions. At 6 months, the interventions added telephone counseling sessions, text message prompts, and access to study materials on a website. At 6 months, participants randomized to the standard intervention group initiated self-monitoring of diet and physical activity using a website, and those randomized to the enhanced intervention group were provided with a wearable device and accompanying web interface to monitor diet and physical activity. The primary outcome of weight was measured over 24 months at 6-month intervals, and the primary hypothesis tested the change in weight between 2 groups at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included body composition, fitness, physical activity, and dietary intake. Among the 471 participants randomized (body mass index [BMI], 25 to <40; age range, 18-35 years; 28.9% nonwhite, 77.2% women), 470 (233 in the standard intervention group, 237 in the enhanced intervention group) initiated the interventions as randomized, and 74.5% completed the study. For the enhanced intervention group, mean base line weight was 96.3 kg (95% CI, 94.2-98.5) and 24-month weight 92.8 kg (95% CI, 90.6- 95.0) [corrected]. For the standard intervention group, mean baseline weight was 95.2kg (95%CI,93.0-97.3)and

  4. Pubertal timing and substance use: the effects of gender, parental monitoring and deviant peers.

    PubMed

    Westling, Erika; Andrews, Judy A; Hampson, Sarah E; Peterson, Missy

    2008-06-01

    Early pubertal timing is associated with early initiation of cigarettes and alcohol; we evaluated parental monitoring and affiliation with deviant peers in a moderated, mediational model of this relationship for both genders. We tested a prospective model explaining the process through which pubertal timing is related to early use of cigarettes and alcohol for 360 fourth and fifth graders, following them for 4 years. We found a relation between early pubertal maturation and trying cigarettes and alcohol without parents' knowledge for both boys and girls. In addition, for both genders, parental monitoring moderated the association between pubertal timing and trying alcohol, but not trying cigarettes. Affiliation with deviant peers mediated the effect of pubertal timing on both alcohol and cigarette initiation for girls only. Although pathways to substance use differ by gender, both early maturing girls and boys should be regarded as high-risk populations for initiation of substances, and intervention programs may be more effective if they are targeted accordingly.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions to Improve Moderate Physical Activity: A Study in Nine UK Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Andy; Cooke, Carlton; Gilson, Nicholas; Marsh, Kevin; McKenna, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Objective: With growing concerns to establish the value for returns on public health investment, there is a need to identify cost-effective physical activity interventions. This study measured change in moderate physical activity (MPA) in seven community-based intervention types, costs and cost-effectiveness of the interventions, and possible…

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions to Improve Moderate Physical Activity: A Study in Nine UK Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Andy; Cooke, Carlton; Gilson, Nicholas; Marsh, Kevin; McKenna, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Objective: With growing concerns to establish the value for returns on public health investment, there is a need to identify cost-effective physical activity interventions. This study measured change in moderate physical activity (MPA) in seven community-based intervention types, costs and cost-effectiveness of the interventions, and possible…

  7. Assessment effects in educational and psychosocial intervention trials: an important but often-overlooked problem.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Ward, Sandra E

    2015-06-01

    Baseline assessments and repeated measures are an essential part of educational and psychosocial intervention trials, but merely measuring an outcome of interest can modify that outcome, either by the measurement process alone or by interacting with the intervention to strengthen or weaken the intervention effects. Assessment effects can result in biased estimates of intervention effects and may not be controlled by the usual two-group randomized controlled trial design. In this paper, we review the concept of assessment effects and other related phenomena, briefly describe study designs that estimate assessment effects separately from intervention effects and discuss their strengths and limitations, review evidence regarding the strength of assessment effects in intervention trials targeting behavior change, and discuss implications for intervention research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Automatic monitoring of localized skin dose with fluoroscopic and interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Khodadadegan, Yasaman; Zhang, Muhong; Pavlicek, William; Paden, Robert G; Chong, Brian; Schueler, Beth A; Fetterly, Kenneth A; Langer, Steve G; Wu, Teresa

    2011-08-01

    This software tool locates and computes the intensity of radiation skin dose resulting from fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. It is comprised of multiple modules. Using standardized body specific geometric values, a software module defines a set of male and female patients arbitarily positioned on a fluoroscopy table. Simulated X-ray angiographic (XA) equipment includes XRII and digital detectors with or without bi-plane configurations and left and right facing tables. Skin dose estimates are localized by computing the exposure to each 0.01 × 0.01 m(2) on the surface of a patient irradiated by the X-ray beam. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Structured Report Dose data sent to a modular dosimetry database automatically extracts the 11 XA tags necessary for peak skin dose computation. Skin dose calculation software uses these tags (gantry angles, air kerma at the patient entrance reference point, etc.) and applies appropriate corrections of exposure and beam location based on each irradiation event (fluoroscopy and acquistions). A physicist screen records the initial validation of the accuracy, patient and equipment geometry, DICOM compliance, exposure output calibration, backscatter factor, and table and pad attenuation once per system. A technologist screen specifies patient positioning, patient height and weight, and physician user. Peak skin dose is computed and localized; additionally, fluoroscopy duration and kerma area product values are electronically recorded and sent to the XA database. This approach fully addresses current limitations in meeting accreditation criteria, eliminates the need for paper logs at a XA console, and provides a method where automated ALARA montoring is possible including email and pager alerts.

  9. Providing Effective Early Intervention Vocational Rehabilitation at the Community Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn J.; Niu, Jingbo; Zhu, Yanyan; Brett, Belle

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the translation of positive research findings about a job retention intervention for persons with chronic illnesses to rehabilitation practice. A program to provide the intervention was developed and marketed in the community. Fifty-seven consumers with chronic illnesses received the intervention provided…

  10. Effective Family Intervention after Traumatic Brain Injury: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Mitchell; Young, Terry

    1988-01-01

    A framework is presented for intervention with families of traumatic brain injured patients. Described are family assessment strategies; levels of intervention (permission, limited information, specific suggestions, and intensive therapy); and intervention techniques in the areas of family education, counseling, marital/sexual counseling, family…

  11. Providing Effective Early Intervention Vocational Rehabilitation at the Community Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn J.; Niu, Jingbo; Zhu, Yanyan; Brett, Belle

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the translation of positive research findings about a job retention intervention for persons with chronic illnesses to rehabilitation practice. A program to provide the intervention was developed and marketed in the community. Fifty-seven consumers with chronic illnesses received the intervention provided…

  12. Using Multilevel Modeling to Examine the Effects of Multitiered Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Melissa A.; Bolt, Daniel; Hoyt, William; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    Data collected in school settings are inherently hierarchical. At the same time, it is becoming increasingly common for interventions to be implemented within the context of a similar multitiered intervention framework where different interventions are provided at different levels of the hierarchy, often simultaneously. This prevalence of…

  13. Preparing Therapists as Effective Practitioners in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Philippa H.; Chiarello, Lisa; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Milbourne, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Occupational and physical therapists and speech language pathologists provide services for almost half of the children enrolled in early intervention programs nationally. Each professional association has adopted documents defining practice in early intervention that advocate for family-centered practices and interventions embedded in family…

  14. Family History of Alcohol Abuse Moderates Effectiveness of a Group Motivational Enhancement Intervention in College Women

    PubMed Central

    LaBrie, Joseph W.; Feres, Nashla; Kenney, Shannon R.; Lac, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether a self-reported family history of alcohol abuse (FH+) moderated the effects of a female-specific group motivational enhancement intervention with first-year college women. First-year college women (N= 287) completed an initial questionnaire and attended an intervention (n=161) or control (n=126) group session, of which 118 reported FH+. Repeated measures ANCOVA models were estimated to investigate whether the effectiveness of the intervention varied as a function of one’s reported family history of alcohol abuse. Results revealed that family history of alcohol abuse moderated intervention efficacy. Although the intervention was effective in producing less risky drinking relative to controls, among those participants who received the intervention, FH+ women drank less across five weeks of follow-up than FH− women. The current findings provide preliminary support for the differential effectiveness of motivational enhancement interventions with FH+ women. Keywords: college women, intervention, alcohol abuse, family history, motivational interviewing PMID:19162406

  15. Effects of Cognitive Intervention on Latent Ability Measured from Analogy Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitely, Susan E.; Dawis, Rene V.

    1974-01-01

    Results indicate that although latent ability estimates may be significantly increased by a short intervention, modifiability depends on the type of intervention. Futhermore, it was found that general types of relationships may effectively mediate analogy item solving. (Author/BJG)

  16. Use of Self-Monitoring to Maintain Program Fidelity of Multi-Tiered Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, J. Ron; Oliver, Regina M.; Hebert, Michael A.; Bohaty, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Multi-tiered system of supports represents one of the most significant advancements in improving the outcomes of students for whom typical instruction is not effective. While many practices need to be in place to make multi-tiered systems of support effective, accurate implementation of evidence-based practices by individuals at all tiers is…

  17. Effect of the Goals of Care Intervention for Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Laura C.; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Song, Mi-Kyung; Lin, Feng-Chang; Rosemond, Cherie; Carey, Timothy S.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    preferences, symptom management, and quality of care did not differ. Residents in the intervention group had more palliative care content in treatment plans (5.6 vs 4.7, P = .02), MOST order sets (35% vs 16%, P = .05), and half as many hospital transfers (0.078 vs 0.163 per 90 person-days; RR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26–0.88). Survival at 9 months was unaffected (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.76; 95% CI, 0.54–1.08; P = .13). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The GOC decision aid intervention is effective to improve end-of-life communication for nursing home residents with advanced dementia and enhance palliative care plans while reducing hospital transfers. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01565642 PMID:27893884

  18. Effect of interventions on children's blood lead levels.

    PubMed Central

    Hilts, S R; Bock, S E; Oke, T L; Yates, C L; Copes, R A

    1998-01-01

    Trail, Canada, has been the site of an active lead/zinc smelter for nearly a century. Since 1991, the Trail Community Lead Task Force has carried out blood lead screening, case management, education programs targeted at early childhood groups and the general community, community dust abatement, exposure pathways studies, and remedial trials. From 1989 through 1996, average blood lead levels of children tested for the first time declined at an average rate of 0.6 microg/dl/year, while blood lead levels in Canadian children not living near point sources appeared to be leveling off following the phase-out of leaded gasoline. Since there was no concurrent improvement in local environmental conditions during this time, it is possible that the continuing decline in Trail blood lead levels has been at least partly due to community-wide intervention programs. One year follow-up of children whose families received in-home educational visits, as well as assistance with home-based dust control measures, found that these specific interventions produced average blood lead changes of +0.5- -4.0 microg/dl, with statistically significant declines in 3 years out of 5. Education and dust control, particularly actions targeted toward higher risk children, appear to have served as effective and appropriate interim remedial measures while major source control measures have been implemented at the smelter site. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9435149

  19. Effect of Primary Care Intervention on Breastfeeding Duration and Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Stuebe, Alison; Barnett, Josephine; Labbok, Miriam H.; Fletcher, Jason; Bernstein, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the effectiveness of primary care–based, and pre- and postnatal interventions to increase breastfeeding. Methods. We conducted 2 trials at obstetrics and gynecology practices in the Bronx, New York, from 2008 to 2011. The Provider Approaches to Improved Rates of Infant Nutrition & Growth Study (PAIRINGS) had 2 arms: usual care versus pre- and postnatal visits with a lactation consultant (LC) and electronically prompted guidance from prenatal care providers (EP). The Best Infant Nutrition for Good Outcomes (BINGO) study had 4 arms: usual care, LC alone, EP alone, or LC+EP. Results. In BINGO at 3 months, high intensity was greater for the LC+EP (odds ratio [OR] = 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 6.84) and LC (OR = 3.22; 95% CI = 1.14, 9.09) groups versus usual care, but not for the EP group alone. In PAIRINGS at 3 months, intervention rates exceeded usual care (OR = 2.86; 95% CI = 1.21, 6.76); the number needed to treat to prevent 1 dyad from nonexclusive breastfeeding at 3 months was 10.3 (95% CI = 5.6, 50.7). Conclusions. LCs integrated into routine care alone and combined with EP guidance from prenatal care providers increased breastfeeding intensity at 3 months postpartum. PMID:24354834

  20. Stochastic Control Problems where Small Intervention Costs Have Big Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Oksendal, B.

    1999-11-15

    We study an impulse control problem where the cost of interfering in a stochastic system with an impulse of size {zeta} element of R is given by c+{lambda} vertical bar {zeta} vertical bar , where c and {lambda} are positive constants. We call {lambda} the proportional cost coefficient and c the intervention cost . We find the value/cost function V{sub c} for this problem for each c>0 and we show that lim{sub c{sup yields}{sub 0}+}V{sub c}=W , where W is the value function for the corresponding singular stochastic control problem. Our main result is that dV{sub c}/dc = {infinity} at c=0. This illustrates that the introduction of an intervention cost c>0 , however small, into a system can have a big effect on the value function: the increase in the value function is in no proportion to the increase in c (from c=0 )

  1. Effectiveness of a parent-implemented intervention program for young children with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a parent-implemented intervention on children's speech-language development and parents' interaction styles. Seventeen children with cleft palate (CP) and their mothers participated in all sessions of a parent-implemented intervention program. Nine children with CP and their mothers who did not receive the intervention were included to examine the full effectiveness of the program. The intervention program consisted of four phases, pre-intervention test, parent training, parent-implemented intervention at children's home for 3 months, and post-intervention test. Children's language and speech measures and maternal measures from pre- and post-intervention tests were compared between groups (intervention vs. no intervention). Children who received a parent-implemented intervention exhibited significant improvement in language measures based on standardized tests and quantitative language and speech measures from spontaneous utterances. The children in the intervention group showed a significantly greater extent of change in expressive vocabulary size, number of total words, and mean length of utterance than did those who did not receive the intervention. Mothers who received the training showed a significantly decreased number of different words, increased responsiveness, and decreased non-contingent utterances for children's communication acts compared to those who did not receive the training. The results of the study support the effectiveness of parent-implemented early intervention on positive changes in children's speech-language development and mothers' use of communication strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Immediate and delayed effects of invented writing intervention in preschool.

    PubMed

    Hofslundsengen, Hilde; Hagtvet, Bente Eriksen; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    This study examined the effects of a 10 week invented writing program with five-year-old preschoolers (mean age 5.7 years) on their immediate post intervention literacy skills and also the facilitative effects of the intervention on the subsequent learning to read during the first 6 months of schooling. The study included 105 children (54 girls) from 12 preschools in Norway. The preschools were randomly assigned to the experimental group with the invented writing program, or the control group with the ordinary program offered to preschoolers. The classroom-based programs (40 sessions) were conducted by the children's regular teachers. The children's emergent literacy skills were evaluated using a pre-test, a post-test and a follow-up test 6 months later, and the data were analyzed using latent autoregressive models. The results showed that the invented writing group performed significantly better than the control group on the post-test for the measures of phoneme awareness (d = .54), spelling (d = .65) and word reading (d = .36). Additionally, indirect effects were observed on the delayed follow-up tests on phoneme awareness (d = .45), spelling (d = .48) and word reading (d = .26). In conclusion, we argue that invented writing appeared to smooth the progress of emergent literacy skills in preschool, including the subsequent reading development in school. Contextualized in a semi-consistent orthography and a preschool tradition that does not encourage the learning of written language skills, the findings add to our knowledge of how children learn to write and read.

  3. Monitoring of mass distribution interventions for trachoma in Plateau State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Elizabeth A; King, Jonathan D; McPherson, Scott; Jip, Falam N; Patterson, Amy E; Mosher, Aryc W; Evans, Darin S; Emerson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) with antibiotics is a key component of the SAFE strategy for trachoma control. Guidelines recommend that where MDA is warranted the whole population be targeted with 80% considered the minimum acceptable coverage. In other countries, MDA is usually conducted by salaried Ministry of Health personnel (MOH). In Plateau State, Nigeria, the existing network of volunteer Community Directed Distributors (CDD) was used for the first trachoma MDA. We conducted a population-based cluster random survey (CRS) of MDA participation to determine the true coverage and compared this to coverage reported from CDD registers. We surveyed 1,791 people from 352 randomly selected households in 24 clusters in three districts in Plateau State in January 2011, following the implementation of MDA. Households were enumerated and all individuals present were asked about MDA participation. Household heads were questioned about household-level characteristics and predictors of participation. Individual responses were compared with the CDD registers. MDA coverage was estimated as 60.3% (95% CI 47.9-73.8%) by the survey compared with 75.8% from administrative program reports. CDD registration books for comparison with responses were available in 19 of the 24 clusters; there was a match for 658/682 (96%) of verifiable responses. CDD registers did not list 481 (41.3%) of the individuals surveyed. Gender and age were not associated with individual participation. Overall MDA coverage was lower than the minimum 80% target. The observed discrepancy between the administrative coverage estimate from program reports and the CRS was largely due to identification of communities missed by the MDA and not reported in the registers. CRS for evaluation of MDA provides a useful additional monitoring tool to CDD registers. These data support modification of distributor training and MDA delivery to increase coverage in subsequent rounds of MDA.

  4. Biomolecules and Biomarkers Used in Diagnosis of Alcohol Drinking and in Monitoring Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Nanau, Radu M.; Neuman, Manuela G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The quantitative, measurable detection of drinking is important for the successful treatment of alcohol misuse in transplantation of patients with alcohol disorders, people living with human immunodeficiency virus that need to adhere to medication, and special occupational hazard offenders, many of whom continually deny drinking. Their initial misconduct usually leads to medical problems associated with drinking, impulsive social behavior, and drunk driving. The accurate identification of alcohol consumption via biochemical tests contributes significantly to the monitoring of drinking behavior. Methods: A systematic review of the current methods used to measure biomarkers of alcohol consumption was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar databases (2010–2015). The names of the tests have been identified. The methods and publications that correlate between the social instruments and the biochemical tests were further investigated. There is a clear need for assays standardization to ensure the use of these biochemical tests as routine biomarkers. Findings: Alcohol ingestion can be measured using a breath test. Because alcohol is rapidly eliminated from the circulation, the time for detection by this analysis is in the range of hours. Alcohol consumption can alternatively be detected by direct measurement of ethanol concentration in blood or urine. Several markers have been proposed to extend the interval and sensitivities of detection, including ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in urine, phosphatidylethanol in blood, and ethyl glucuronide and fatty acid ethyl esters in hair, among others. Moreover, there is a need to correlate the indirect biomarker carbohydrate deficient transferrin, which reflects longer lasting consumption of higher amounts of alcohol, with serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, another long term indirect biomarker that is routinely used and standardized in laboratory medicine. PMID:26131978

  5. Biomolecules and Biomarkers Used in Diagnosis of Alcohol Drinking and in Monitoring Therapeutic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Nanau, Radu M; Neuman, Manuela G

    2015-06-29

    The quantitative, measurable detection of drinking is important for the successful treatment of alcohol misuse in transplantation of patients with alcohol disorders, people living with human immunodeficiency virus that need to adhere to medication, and special occupational hazard offenders, many of whom continually deny drinking. Their initial misconduct usually leads to medical problems associated with drinking, impulsive social behavior, and drunk driving. The accurate identification of alcohol consumption via biochemical tests contributes significantly to the monitoring of drinking behavior. A systematic review of the current methods used to measure biomarkers of alcohol consumption was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar databases (2010-2015). The names of the tests have been identified. The methods and publications that correlate between the social instruments and the biochemical tests were further investigated. There is a clear need for assays standardization to ensure the use of these biochemical tests as routine biomarkers. Alcohol ingestion can be measured using a breath test. Because alcohol is rapidly eliminated from the circulation, the time for detection by this analysis is in the range of hours. Alcohol consumption can alternatively be detected by direct measurement of ethanol concentration in blood or urine. Several markers have been proposed to extend the interval and sensitivities of detection, including ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in urine, phosphatidylethanol in blood, and ethyl glucuronide and fatty acid ethyl esters in hair, among others. Moreover, there is a need to correlate the indirect biomarker carbohydrate deficient transferrin, which reflects longer lasting consumption of higher amounts of alcohol, with serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, another long term indirect biomarker that is routinely used and standardized in laboratory medicine.

  6. The effectiveness of housing interventions and housing and service interventions on ending family homelessness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, Ellen L; DeCandia, Carmela J; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Richard, Molly K

    2014-09-01

    Family homelessness has become a growing public health problem over the last 3 decades. Despite this trend, few studies have explored the effectiveness of housing interventions and housing and service interventions. The purpose of this systematic review is to appraise and synthesize evidence on effective interventions addressing family homelessness. We searched 10 major electronic databases from 2007 to 2013. Empirical studies investigating effectiveness of housing interventions and housing and service interventions for American homeless families regardless of publication status were eligible for inclusion. Outcomes included housing status, employment, parental trauma and mental health and substance use, children's behavioral and academic status, and family reunification. Study quality was appraised using the Effective Public Health Practice Project tool. Six studies were included in this review. Overall, there was some postintervention improvement in housing and employment, but ongoing residential and work stability were not achieved. Methodological limitations, poor reporting quality, and inconsistent definitions across outcomes hindered between-study comparisons. Substantial limitations in research underscore the insufficiency of our current knowledge base for ending homelessness. Although many families were no longer literally homeless, long-term residential stability and employment at a livable wage were not ensured. Developing and implementing evidence-based approaches for addressing homelessness are long overdue.

  7. [Obesity and overweight. An assessment of the effectiveness of a public health intervention].

    PubMed

    Txakartegi Etxebarria, X; López Mateo, M; Aurrekoetxea, J J

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of excess weight (obesity and overweight) is increasing in developed countries, with preventive measures not shown to be sufficiently effective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the sustained prevention and treatment by Primary Care Paediatrics of overweight from early childhood. The BMI of 1669 patients from two Paediatric Teams, were compared using four different age intervals between 4 and 14 years during 2007-2009. One of the teams had spent 15 years carrying out a systematic strategy aimed at the prevention and monitoring of overweight. The BMI means in this study were higher than those shown in the 1988 Orbegozo tables, particularly in older ages and in males. The prevalence of overweight was lower in the population with the systematic intervention team, and this was significant at the end of the paediatric age, 14 years (P=.043). The overweight problem is so great that the measures aimed at their prevention are clearly beyond the scope of health professionals. However, interventions by health professionals can be effective in maintaining a healthy weight, if they are carried out on an ongoing basis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. A continuous glucose monitoring and problem-solving intervention to change physical activity behavior in women with type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Nancy; Whittemore, Robin; Melkus, Gail

    2011-11-01

    Diabetes technology has the potential to provide useful data for theory-based behavioral counseling. The aims of this study are to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a continuous glucose monitoring and problem-solving counseling intervention to change physical activity (PA) behavior in women with type 2 diabetes. Women (n=29) with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions: continuous glucose counseling and problem-solving skills or continuous glucose monitoring counseling and general diabetes education. Feasibility data were obtained on intervention dose, implementation, and satisfaction. Preliminary efficacy data were collected at baseline and 12 weeks on the following measures: PA amount and intensity, diet, problem-solving skills, self-efficacy for PA, depression, hemogoloin A1c, weight, and blood pressure. Demographic and implementation variables were described using frequency distributions and summary statistics. Satisfaction data were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank. Differences between groups were analyzed using linear mixed-modeling. Women were mostly white/non-Latina with a mean age of 53 years, a 6.5-year history of diabetes, and suboptimal glycemic control. Continuous glucose monitoring plus problem-solving group participants had significantly greater problem-solving skills and had greater, although not statistically significant, dietary adherence, moderate activity minutes, weight loss, and higher intervention satisfaction pre- to post-intervention than did participants in the continuous glucose monitoring plus education group. A continuous glucose monitoring plus problem-solving intervention was feasible and acceptable, and participants had greater problem-solving skills than continuous glucose monitoring plus education group participants.

  9. Effectiveness of physician-targeted interventions to improve antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Alike W; Pijpers, Eefje J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M; Tonkin-Crine, Sarah KG; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo JM

    2012-01-01

    Background Antibiotic use and concomitant resistance are increasing. Literature reviews do not unambiguously indicate which interventions are most effective in improving antibiotic prescribing practice. Aim To assess the effectiveness of physician-targeted interventions aiming to improve antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care, and to identify intervention features mostly contributing to intervention success. Design and setting Analysis of a set of physician-targeted interventions in primary care. Method A literature search (1990–2009) for studies describing the effectiveness of interventions aiming to optimise antibiotic prescription for RTIs by primary care physicians. Intervention features were extracted and effectiveness sizes were calculated. Association between intervention features and intervention success was analysed in multivariate regression analysis. Results This study included 58 studies, describing 87 interventions of which 60% significantly improved antibiotic prescribing; interventions aiming to decrease overall antibiotic prescription were more frequently effective than interventions aiming to increase first choice prescription. On average, antibiotic prescription was reduced by 11.6%, and first choice prescription increased by 9.6%. Multiple interventions containing at least ‘educational material for the physician’ were most often effective. No significant added value was found for interventions containing patient-directed elements. Communication skills training and near-patient testing sorted the largest intervention effects. Conclusion This review emphasises the importance of physician education in optimising antibiotic use. Further research should focus on how to provide physicians with the relevant knowledge and tools, and when to supplement education with additional intervention elements. Feasibility should be included in this process. PMID:23211259

  10. Distributed strain monitoring for bridges: temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Ryan; Hoult, Neil A.

    2014-03-01

    To better manage infrastructure assets as they reach the end of their service lives, quantitative data is required to better assess structural behavior and allow for more informed decision making. Distributed fiber optic strain sensors are one sensing technology that could provide comprehensive data for use in structural assessments as these systems potentially allow for strain to be measured with the same accuracy and gage lengths as conventional strain sensors. However, as with many sensor technologies, temperature can play an important role in terms of both the structure's and sensor's performance. To investigate this issue a fiber optic distributed strain sensor system was installed on a section of a two span reinforced concrete bridge on the TransCanada Highway. Strain data was acquired several times a day as well as over the course of several months to explore the effects of changing temperature on the data. The results show that the strain measurements are affected by the bridge behavior as a whole. The strain measurements due to temperature are compared to strain measurements that were taken during a load test on the bridge. The results show that even a small change in temperature can produce crack width and strain changes similar to those due to a fully loaded transport truck. Future directions for research in this area are outlined.

  11. Effects of language intervention on syntactic skill levels in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Waterfall, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    Questions concerning the role of input in the growth of syntactic skills have generated substantial debate within psychology and linguistics. The authors address these questions by investigating the effects of experimentally manipulated input on children's skill with the passive voice. The study involved 72 four-year-olds who listened to stories containing either a high proportion of passive voice sentences or a high proportion of active voice sentences. Following 10 story sessions, children's production and comprehension of passives were assessed. Intervention type affected performance--children who heard stories with passive sentences produced more passive constructions (and with fewer mistakes) and showed higher comprehension scores than children who heard stories with active sentences. Theoretical implications of these results for the understanding of the nature of syntactic skills and practical implications for the development of preschool materials are discussed. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Improving meat cutters' work: changes and effects following an intervention.

    PubMed

    Vogel, K; Karltun, J; Eklund, J; Engkvist, I-L

    2013-11-01

    Meat cutters face higher risks of injury and musculoskeletal problems than most other occupational groups. The aims of this paper were to describe ergonomics changes implemented in three meat cutting plants and to evaluate effects related to ergonomics on the individual meat cutters and their work. Data was collected by interviews, observations, document studies and a questionnaire (n = 247), as a post intervention study. The changes implemented consisted of reducing knife work to a maximum of 6 h per day and introducing a job rotation scheme with work periods of equal length. Tasks other than traditional meat cutting were added. A competence development plan for each meat cutter and easy adjustment of workplace height were introduced. The questionnaire showed a reduction in perceived physical work load. In general, the changes were perceived positively. Figures from the company showed a positive trend for injuries and sick leave. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of the photomask on multiphase shift test monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Gregory; Neureuther, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    A series of chromeless multiple-phase shift lithographic test monitors have been previously introduced. This paper investigates various effects that impact the performance of these monitors, focusing primarily on PSM Polarimetry, a technique to monitor illumination polarization. The measurement sensitivities from a variety of scalar and rigorous electromagnetic simulations are compared to experimental results from three industrial quality multi-phase test reticles. This analysis enables the relative importance of the various effects to be identified and offers the industry unique insight into various issues associated with the photomask. First, the unavoidable electromagnetic interaction as light propagates through the multiple phase steps of the mask topography appears to account for about 10 to 20% of the lost sensitivity, when experimental results are compared to an ideal simulated case. The polarization dependence of this effect is analyzed, concluding that the 4-phase topography is more effective at manipulating TM polarization. Second, various difficulties in the fabrication of these complicated mask patterns are described and likely account for an additional 60-80% loss in sensitivity. Smaller effects are also described, associated with the photoresist, mask design and subtle differences in the proximity effect of TE and TM polarization of off-axis light at high numerical aperture. Finally, the question: "How practical is PSM polarimetry?" is considered. It is concluded that, despite many severe limiting factors, an accurately calibrated test reticle promises to monitor polarization in state-of-the-art lithography scanners to within about 2%.

  14. Ice Detector and Deicing Fluid Effectiveness Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ice detector and deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring system for an aircraft is disclosed. The ice detection portion is particularly suited for use in flight to notify the flight crew of an accumulation of ice on an aircraft lifting and control surfaces, or helicopter rotors, whereas the deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring portion is particularly suited for use on the ground to notify the flight crew of the possible loss of the effectiveness of the deicing fluid. The ice detection portion comprises a temperature sensor and a parallel arrangement of electrodes whose coefficient of coupling is indicative of the formation of the ice, as well as the thickness of the formed ice. The fluid effectiveness monitoring portion comprises a temperature sensor and an ionic-conduction cell array that measures the conductivity of the deicing fluid which is indicative of its concentration and, thus, its freezing point. By measuring the temperature and having knowledge of the freezing point of the deicing fluid, the fluid effectiveness monitoring portion predicts when the deicing fluid may lose its effectiveness because its freezing point may correspond to the temperature of the ambient.

  15. Examining the effect of three low-intensity pediatric obesity interventions: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Looney, Shannon M; Raynor, Hollie A

    2014-12-01

    Primary care is an ideal setting to treat pediatric obesity. Effective, low-intensity (≤25 contact hours over 6 months) interventions that reduce standardized body mass index (z-BMI) and can be delivered by primary care providers are needed. This pilot randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of 3 low-intensity (≤25 contact hours over 6 months) pediatric obesity treatments on z-BMI. Twenty-two families (children 8.0 ± 1.8 years, z-BMI of 2.34 ± 0.48) were randomized into 1 of 3, 6-month, low-intensity conditions: newsletter (N), newsletter and growth monitoring (N + GM), or newsletter and growth monitoring plus family-based behavioral counseling (N + GM + BC). Anthropometrics and child eating and leisure-time behaviors were measured. Mixed-factor analyses of variance found a significant (P < .05) main effect of time for z-BMI and servings per day of sugar sweetened beverages, with both decreasing over time. Low-intensity obesity treatments can reduce z-BMI and may be more feasible in primary care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Peer Tutoring, Individualized Intervention, and Progress Monitoring with At-Risk Second- Grade Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Susan K.; Alderman, Gary; Liechty, Adam

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effect on at-risk second graders of twice weekly peer-tutoring: sessions with repeated readings combined with once per week tutoring by a college student. The college student addressed onsets and rimes appearing in errors made by the second graders during peer tutoring and noted by the peer tutors. The authors monitored…

  17. Effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring of automated systems.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, R; Mouloua, M; Molloy, R

    1996-12-01

    The effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring for automation failure during multitask flight simulation were examined. Participants monitored an automated engine status task while simultaneously performing tracking and fuel management tasks over three 30-min sessions. Two methods of adaptive task allocation, both involving temporary return of the automated engine status task to the human operator ("human control"), were examined as a possible countermeasure to monitoring inefficiency. For the model-based adaptive group, the engine status task was allocated to all participants in the middle of the second session for 10 min, following which it was again returned to automation control. The same occurred for the performance-based adaptive group, but only if an individual participant's monitoring performance up to that point did not meet a specified criterion. For the nonadaptive control groups, the engine status task remained automated throughout the experiment. All groups had low probabilities of detection of automation failures for the first 40 min spent with automation. However, following the 10-min intervening period of human control, both adaptive groups detected significantly more automation failures during the subsequent blocks under automation control. The results show that adaptive task allocation can enhance monitoring of automated systems. Both model-based and performance-based allocation improved monitoring of automation. Implications for the design of automated systems are discussed.

  18. Changing the home nutrition environment: effects of a nutrition and media literacy pilot intervention.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alexandra E; Dave, Jayna; Tanner, Andrea; Duhe, Sonya; Condrasky, Margaret; Wilson, Dawn; Griffin, Sarah; Palmer, Meredith; Evans, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The specific aim for this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nutrition and media literacy intervention targeting elementary students and their parents. The purpose of the intervention was to increase child fruit and vegetables (FV) consumption and change the home nutrition environment (measured with FV availability and accessibility and parental social support). During the intervention, students learned about nutrition, the role media plays in shaping values concerning nutrition, and developed a media campaign for their parents. A quasi-experimental research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The media intervention was effective in changing the home environment.

  19. Physical habitat monitoring strategy (PHAMS) for reach-scale restoration effectiveness monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; O'Daniel, Scott J.; Beechie, Tim J.; Zakrajsek, John; Webster, John G.

    2015-04-14

    Habitat restoration efforts by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) have shifted from the site scale (1-10 meters) to the reach scale (100-1,000 meters). This shift was in response to the growing scientific emphasis on process-based restoration and to support from the 2007 Accords Agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration. With the increased size of restoration projects, the CTUIR and other agencies are in need of applicable monitoring methods for assessing large-scale changes in river and floodplain habitats following restoration. The goal of the Physical Habitat Monitoring Strategy is to outline methods that are useful for capturing reach-scale changes in surface and groundwater hydrology, geomorphology, hydrologic connectivity, and riparian vegetation at restoration projects. The Physical Habitat Monitoring Strategy aims to avoid duplication with existing regional effectiveness monitoring protocols by identifying complimentary reach-scale metrics and methods that may improve the ability of CTUIR and others to detect instream and riparian changes at large restoration projects.

  20. Motivation and Its Relationship to Adherence to Self-Monitoring and Weight Loss in a 16-Week Internet Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Kelly H.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Bowling, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine changes in motivation and the relationship of motivation to adherence to self-monitoring and weight loss in a 16-week Internet behavioral weight-loss intervention. Design: Two-group randomized design. Setting: This study was conducted over the Internet. Participants: Sixty-six women, ages 22-65, with a body mass index (BMI)…

  1. Non-surgical interventions for pelvic organ prolapse in rural Nepal: a prospective monitoring and evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Bhatta, Surya; Sherpa, Tenzing Y; Malla, Bishwo S; A Fitchett, Elizabeth J; Samen, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major cause of morbidity in Nepal, particularly affecting women in the rural communities. Women with POP in Nepal may suffer from symptoms for decades. At present, the Government of Nepal advocates surgical intervention but access to surgical care is inadequate. This report evaluated the feasibility of a non-surgical public health programme in rural Nepal, and describes risk factors associated with POP in this setting. Design Prospective monitoring and evaluation study of a new public health programme. Setting Baglung district, rural Nepal. Participants Women with gynaecological symptoms of POP. Main outcome measures Risk factors for disease progression were assessed using Fisher’s exact test, Pearson’s χ2-test and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 74 women included in this analysis, 70.8% were diagnosed with stage 2 POP or greater. The majority of women did not have any further children following the onset of POP symptoms (63.5%). Duration of symptoms ranged from 2 months to 60 years, with 73.4% of women suffering for over 5 years and 28.4% suffering for over 20 years. Univariate analyses identified age at screening, age at onset of symptoms, the duration of symptoms and an associated rectocele as factors associated with increasing POP severity (p < 0.05). Kegel exercises were taught to 25 (33.8%) women with POP and ring pessaries were offered to 47 (63.5%) women with POP. Conclusions Non-surgical interventions may provide an opportunity to address the significant burden of POP in rural Nepal. PMID:26664731

  2. Monitoring maternal, newborn, and child health interventions using lot quality assurance sampling in Sokoto State of northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa; Shoretire, Kamil; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Mohammed, Zainab; Abdulazeez, Jumare; Gwamzhi, Ringpon; Ganiyu, Akeem

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality ratio and infant mortality rate are as high as 1,576 per 100,000 live births and 78 per 1,000 live births, respectively, in Nigeria's northwestern region, where Sokoto State is located. Using applicable monitoring indicators for tracking progress in the UN/WHO framework on continuum of maternal, newborn, and child health care, this study evaluated the progress of Sokoto toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 by December 2015. The changes in outcomes in 2012–2013 associated with maternal and child health interventions were assessed. Design We used baseline and follow-up lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) data obtained in 2012 and 2013, respectively. In each of the surveys, data were obtained from 437 households sampled from 19 LQAS locations in each of the 23 local government areas (LGAs). The composite state-level coverage estimates of the respective indicators were aggregated from estimated LGA coverage estimates. Results None of the nine indicators associated with the continuum of maternal, neonatal, and child care satisfied the recommended 90% coverage target for achieving MDGs 4 and 5. Similarly, the average state coverage estimates were lower than national coverage estimates. Marginal improvements in coverage were obtained in the demand for family planning satisfied, antenatal care visits, postnatal care for mothers, and exclusive breast-feeding. Antibiotic treatment for acute pneumonia increased significantly by 12.8 percentage points. The majority of the LGAs were classifiable as low-performing, high-priority areas for intensified program intervention. Conclusions Despite the limited time left in the countdown to December 2015, Sokoto State, Nigeria, is not on track to achieving the MDG 90% coverage of indicators tied to the continuum of maternal and child care, to reduce maternal and childhood mortality by a third by 2015. Targeted health system investments at the primary care level remain a

  3. Monitoring of Geoengineering Effects and their Natural and Anthropogenic Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duren, R. M.; Robock, A.; Stephens, G. L.; MacMynowski, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    A number of climate intervention concepts, referred to as "geoengineering," are being considered as an alternative approach to managing climate change. However, before we go down the path of deliberate climate intervention including precursor field-experiments, it is essential that we take the necessary steps to validate our understanding that underpins any of the proposed intervention concepts in order to understand all likely consequences and put in place the necessary strategies for monitoring the expected and unintended consequences of such intervention. The Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) is undertaking a project to identify specific priorities for improved scientific understanding and focused efforts to address selected priorities. The KISS project does not advocate the deployment of geoengineering or monitoring systems for potential field experiments but is rather a precautionary study with the following goals: 1) enumeration of where major gaps in our understanding exist in solar radiation management (SRM) approaches, 2) identification of the research that would be required to improve understanding of such impacts including modeling and observation of natural and anthropogenic analogues to geoengineering, and 3) a preliminary assessment of where gaps exist in observations of relevance to SRMs and what is needed to fill such gaps. This study focuses primarily on SRM rather than other proposed geoengineering techniques such as carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere because there exist a number of analogues to the SRMs that currently operate on Earth that provide a unique opportunity to assess our understanding of the response of the climate system to associated changes in solar radiation. Additionally, the processes related to these analogues are also fundamental to understanding climate change itself being of central relevance to how climate is forced by aerosol and respond through clouds, among other influences (e.g., such research has potential

  4. Mediation and moderation effects of an in-home family intervention: the "in control: no alcohol!" pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen-Smit, Evelien; Mares, Suzanne H W; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E E; Van der Vorst, Haske; Schulten, Ingrid G H; Engels, Rutger C M E; Vollebergh, Wilma A M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a theory-based in-home family intervention (In control: No alcohol!) on adolescent alcohol cognitions via its putative mediators using a randomized controlled design. In the South Holland region of the Netherlands, a total of 213 children (11-12 years) and their mothers were randomly assigned to the prevention program (108 dyads) and the control condition (105 dyads). Mediation effects were analyzed using pretest and two follow-up measurements (5 and 12 months after baseline). A path model was estimated (using Mplus) to examine the effect of the intervention on the putative mediators (frequency- and quality of mother-child communication, rules about alcohol, establishing a nondrinking agreement, and parental monitoring of the child's whereabouts). Outcomes were adolescents' perceived harmfulness of drinking and intention to drink. Multigroup analyses were performed to examine potential differences across gender. The program led to an increase in frequency of alcohol-specific communication, nondrinking agreements, and parental monitoring. Moreover, adolescents in the experimental condition perceived drinking to be more harmful and had less intention to drink compared to adolescents in the control condition. The effect of the program on adolescent alcohol cognitions was significantly mediated through having more frequent conversations about alcohol, yet only among boys. Although results on actual drinking need to be added, findings indicate that this relatively inexpensive, easy-to-administer home intervention is promising.

  5. Optimizing bulk milk dioxin monitoring based on costs and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lascano-Alcoser, V H; Velthuis, A G J; van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Hoogenboom, L A P; Oude Lansink, A G J M

    2013-07-01

    Dioxins are environmental pollutants, potentially present in milk products, which have negative consequences for human health and for the firms and farms involved in the dairy chain. Dioxin monitoring in feed and food has been implemented to detect their presence and estimate their levels in food chains. However, the costs and effectiveness of such programs have not been evaluated. In this study, the costs and effectiveness of bulk milk dioxin monitoring in milk trucks were estimated to optimize the sampling and pooling monitoring strategies aimed at detecting at least 1 contaminated dairy farm out of 20,000 at a target dioxin concentration level. Incidents of different proportions, in terms of the number of contaminated farms, and concentrations were simulated. A combined testing strategy, consisting of screening and confirmatory methods, was assumed as well as testing of pooled samples. Two optimization models were built using linear programming. The first model aimed to minimize monitoring costs subject to a minimum required effectiveness of finding an incident, whereas the second model aimed to maximize the effectiveness for a given monitoring budget. Our results show that a high level of effectiveness is possible, but at high costs. Given specific assumptions, monitoring with 95% effectiveness to detect an incident of 1 contaminated farm at a dioxin concentration of 2 pg of toxic equivalents/g of fat [European Commission's (EC) action level] costs €2.6 million per month. At the same level of effectiveness, a 73% cost reduction is possible when aiming to detect an incident where 2 farms are contaminated at a dioxin concentration of 3 pg of toxic equivalents/g of fat (EC maximum level). With a fixed budget of €40,000 per month, the probability of detecting an incident with a single contaminated farm at a dioxin concentration equal to the EC action level is 4.4%. This probability almost doubled (8.0%) when aiming to detect the same incident but with a dioxin

  6. [Meta-analysis of intervention effects on obesity in Chinese pupils].

    PubMed

    Yang, Gan-ping; Wang, Yi-ren; Zuo, Shuang-yan; Zeng, Xiao-min

    2011-10-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the effect of interventions on obesity in Chinese pupils. A literature research was carried out in China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, PubMed and the Excerpts Medica Database (EMBASE) databases to collect articles published between 1979 and 2010 concerning the effect of interventions for preventing obesity in Chinese pupils. Rate difference (RD) of the rate of obesity as the evaluation indicator was selected to Meta-analyze the effect of interventions on obesity. There are total 215 articles, in which 211 articles were written in Chinese and other articles were written in English. 17 literatures were used for Meta-analysis by the uniform inclusion and exclusion criteria. The results showed that the RD of obesity rate for the students in the intervention group was 3% (95%CI: 1% - 5%) after the intervention. However, the RD of obesity rate for the students in the control group was -2% (95%CI: -4% - -1%) after the intervention. Results of stratified analysis for the RD of obesity rate showed that the obesity rate for the students in the intervention group were decreased significantly after the intervention of combined programs with health education, physical exercise and nutrition interventions with moderate intervention time (1 to 2 years), the RD (95%CI) of obesity rate were 5% (2% - 8%), 3% (1% - 4%), respectively. For the studies whose baseline obesity rates was insignificant difference between the intervention group and the control group, the obesity rate for the students in the intervention group was 4% (95%CI: -7% - -1%) lower than the obesity rate for the students in the control group after the intervention. Health-education-based comprehensive intervention is effective on obesity prevention in Chinese pupils; combined intervention programs with moderate intervention time (1 to 2 years) were effective in improving efficiency of obesity prevention in pupils.

  7. Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  8. A MIXED-METHODS APPROACH TO SYNTHESIZING EVIDENCE ON MEDIATORS OF INTERVENTION EFFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Jennifer; Chang, YunKyung; Voils, Corrine I.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    Greater understanding of the mechanisms (mediators) by which behavioral change interventions work is critical to developing theory and refining interventions. Although systematic reviews have been advocated as a method for exploring mediators, this is rarely done. One challenge is that intervention researchers typically test only two paths of the mediational model: the effect of the intervention on mediators and on outcomes. We addressed this challenge by drawing information not only from intervention studies but also from observational studies, which provide data on associations between potential mediators and outcomes. We also reviewed qualitative studies of participants’ perceptions of why and how interventions worked. Using data from intervention (n= 37) and quantitative observational studies (n=55), we conducted a meta-analysis of the mediation effects of eight variables. Qualitative findings (n=6) contributed to more in-depth explanations for findings. The methods used have potential to contribute to understanding of core mechanisms of behavioral change interventions. PMID:21415244

  9. The Differential Effect of Three Naturalistic Language Interventions on Language Use in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Naturalistic interventions show promise for improving language in children with autism. Specific interventions differ in direct elicitation of child language and indirect language stimulation, and thus may produce different language outcomes. This study compared the effects of responsive interaction, milieu teaching, and a combined intervention on…

  10. Influence of behavioral theory on fruit and vegetable intervention effectiveness among children: A meta-analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that interventions clearly based on theory, multiple theories, or a formal intervention planning process will be more effective in changing fruit and vegetable consumption among children than interventions with no behavioral theoretical foundati...

  11. The Effects of Interventions to Prevent Substance Use among Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karki, Suyen; Pietila, Anna-Maija; Lansimies-Antikainen, Helena; Varjoranta, Pirjo; Pirskanen, Marjatta; Laukkanen, Eila

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the effects of interventions used for preventing or reducing substance use among adolescents under 18 years of age. Studies (N = 27) available in CINAHL and PubMed from 2007 to 2010 were included. Results showed that family-based interventions and combined interventions have significant…

  12. Effects of a Tier 3 Phonological Awareness Intervention on Preschoolers' Emergent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Sean; Spencer, Trina D.; Kruse, Lydia; Goldstein, Howard

    2014-01-01

    This multiple baseline design study examined the effects of a Tier 3 early literacy intervention on low-income preschool children's phonological awareness (PA). Seven preschool children who did not make progress on identifying first sounds in words during a previous Tier 2 intervention participated in a more intensive Tier 3 intervention. Children…

  13. The Effects of a Class-Wide Behavior Intervention for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeden, Marc; Wills, Howard P.; Kottwitz, Esther; Kamps, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Class-wide interventions have strong empirical support for improving behavior in general education classes but are rarely tested in special education classes. The present study examined the effects of the Class-wide Function-related Intervention Team (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention, on the on-task behavior of six elementary…

  14. Effects of Two Interventions on Solving Basic Fact Problems by Second Graders with Mathematics Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Minyi Shih; Sorrells, Audrey McCray; Falcomata, Terry S.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a multiple probe across participants design, replicated across two interventions and counterbalanced across participant groups to examine the effects of number sense intervention and extensive practice intervention on strategy transformation when students with mathematics learning disabilities (MLD) solved basic fact problems. In…

  15. Effects of a Tier 3 Self-Management Intervention Implemented with and without Treatment Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Ashley; Young, K. Richard; Christensen, Lynnette; Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Wills, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a Tier 3 peer-matching self-management intervention on two elementary school students who had previously been less responsive to Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions. The Tier 3 self-management intervention, which was implemented in the general education classrooms, included daily electronic communication between…

  16. Relative Effectiveness of Continued, Lapsed, and Delayed Smoking Prevention Intervention in Senior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhardt, Laura; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Reports findings from the final year of a tobacco use prevention project for junior and senior high school students. After three years of intervention with junior high students, researchers assessed the relative effectiveness of continued, lapsed, and delayed interventions in high school. In grade 11, continued intervention students had the lowest…

  17. The Effects of Interventions to Prevent Substance Use among Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karki, Suyen; Pietila, Anna-Maija; Lansimies-Antikainen, Helena; Varjoranta, Pirjo; Pirskanen, Marjatta; Laukkanen, Eila

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the effects of interventions used for preventing or reducing substance use among adolescents under 18 years of age. Studies (N = 27) available in CINAHL and PubMed from 2007 to 2010 were included. Results showed that family-based interventions and combined interventions have significant…

  18. Effects of Two Interventions on Solving Basic Fact Problems by Second Graders with Mathematics Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Minyi Shih; Sorrells, Audrey McCray; Falcomata, Terry S.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a multiple probe across participants design, replicated across two interventions and counterbalanced across participant groups to examine the effects of number sense intervention and extensive practice intervention on strategy transformation when students with mathematics learning disabilities (MLD) solved basic fact problems. In…

  19. Enhancing Student Motivation and Engagement: The Effects of a Multidimensional Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the effects of a multidimensional educational intervention on high school students' motivation and engagement. The intervention incorporated: (a) multidimensional targets of motivation and engagement, (b) empirically derived intervention methodology, (c) research-based risk and protective factors, (d)…

  20. The Effect of a "Mindful Restaurant Eating" Intervention on Weight Management in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, Gayle M.; Brown, Adama

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a "Mindful Restaurant Eating" intervention on weight management. Design: Randomized control trial. Setting: Greater metropolitan area of Austin, Texas. Participants: Women (n = 35) 40-59 years old who eat out at least 3 times per week. Intervention: The intervention, using 6 weekly 2-hour, small group…