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Sample records for monitored porcine model

  1. Noninvasive carbon dioxide monitoring in a porcine model of acute lung injury due to smoke inhalation and burns.

    PubMed

    Belenkiy, Slava; Ivey, Katherine M; Batchinsky, Andriy I; Langer, Thomas; Necsoiu, Corina; Baker, William; Salinas, José; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2013-06-01

    In critically ill intubated patients, assessment of adequacy of ventilation relies on measuring partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2), which requires invasive arterial blood gas analysis. Alternative noninvasive technologies include transcutaneous CO2 (tPCO2) and end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) monitoring. We evaluated accuracy of tPCO2 and EtCO2 monitoring in a porcine model of acute lung injury (ALI) due to smoke inhalation and burns. Eight anesthetized Yorkshire pigs underwent mechanical ventilation, wood-bark smoke inhalation injury, and 40% total body surface area thermal injury. tPCO2 was measured with a SenTec system (SenTec AG, Therwil, Switzerland) and EtCO2 with a Capnostream-20 (Oridion Medical, Jerusalem, Israel). These values were compared with PaCO2 measurements from an arterial blood gas analyzer. Paired measurements of EtCO2-PaCO2 (n = 276) and tPCO2-PaCO2 (n = 250) were recorded in the PaCO2 range of 25 to 85 mmHg. Overlapping data sets were analyzed based on respiratory and hemodynamic status of animals. Acute lung injury was defined as PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 300 mmHg; hemodynamic instability was defined as mean arterial pressure ≤ 60 mmHg. Before ALI, EtCO2 demonstrated moderate correlation with PaCO2 (R = 0.45; P < 0.0001), which deteriorated after onset of ALI (R = 0.12; P < 0.0001). Before ALI, tPCO2 demonstrated moderate correlation (R = 0.51, P < 0.0001), which was sustained after onset of ALI (R = 0.78; P < 0.0001). During hemodynamic stability, EtCO2 demonstrated moderate correlation with PaCO2 (R = 0.44; P < 0.0001). During hemodynamic instability, EtCO2 did not correlate with PaCO2 (R = 0.03; P = 0.29). tPCO2 monitoring demonstrated strong correlation with PaCO2 during hemodynamic stability (R = 0.80, P < 0.0001), which deteriorated under hemodynamically unstable conditions (R = 0.39; P < 0.0001). Noninvasive carbon dioxide monitors are acceptable for monitoring trends in PaCO2 under conditions of hemodynamic and pulmonary stability. Under

  2. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  3. A porcine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, A; Janssen, K-P; Ravon, M; Flisikowski, K; Eser, S; Steiger, K; Flisikowska, T; Müller-Fliedner, P; Schulze, É; Brönner, C; Gnann, A; Kappe, E; Böhm, B; Schade, B; Certa, U; Saur, D; Esposito, I; Kind, A; Schnieke, A

    2016-01-01

    We previously produced pigs with a latent oncogenic TP53 mutation. Humans with TP53 germline mutations are predisposed to a wide spectrum of early-onset cancers, predominantly breast, brain, adrenal gland cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas. Loss of p53 function has been observed in >50% of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) convert to a transformed phenotype after activation of latent oncogenic TP53R167H and KRASG12D, and overexpression of MYC promotes tumorigenesis. The process mimics key molecular aspects of human sarcomagenesis. Transformed porcine MSCs exhibit genomic instability, with complex karyotypes, and develop into sarcomas on transplantation into immune-deficient mice. In pigs, heterozygous knockout of TP53 was sufficient for spontaneous osteosarcoma development in older animals, whereas homozygous TP53 knockout resulted in multiple large osteosarcomas in 7–8-month-old animals. This is the first report that engineered mutation of an endogenous tumour-suppressor gene leads to invasive cancer in pigs. Unlike in Trp53 mutant mice, osteosarcoma developed in the long bones and skull, closely recapitulating the human disease. These animals thus promise a model for juvenile osteosarcoma, a relatively uncommon but devastating disease. PMID:26974205

  4. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Yuji; Mimuro, Jun; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Madoiwa, Seiji; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Akira; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yazaki, Satoko; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8). Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  5. Measuring Hemodynamic Changes in the Ophthalmic Artery During Applied Force for Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Monitoring: Test Results in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Twedt, Max; Pfeifer, Chase; Thorell, William; Bashford, Greg

    2017-03-01

    Possible traumatic brain injury victims would greatly benefit from a handheld, noninvasive intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring tool, which a medic could operate in a remote area. Such a device would also benefit the transport of injured soldiers during en route medical care and critical care air transport. This study demonstrates the use of noninvasive blood flow measurements in the eye by ultrasound as a proxy for ICP. ICP was artificially raised in a porcine model and resultant blood flow change in the ophthalmic artery was measured. In addition, the ultrasound transducer itself was used to compress the eye further altering ophthalmic hemodynamics. Blood flow velocities at a range of applied forces and ICP were compared. It was found that 3.25 N of force applied to the cornea was sufficient to produce significant changes in ophthalmic artery blood dynamics regardless of the ICP value. Specifically, the change in resistivity index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) as force was applied to the cornea correlated with ICP levels. In multiple animal experiments, the magnitude of PI/RI percent change was inversely related to differences in ICP. Force applied to the cornea at baseline ICP resulted in a 15% increase in PI/RI. Results indicate that as ICP increases, the percent change in PI/RI while force is applied decreases. The consistency of data collected indicates that a trend line developed with this data and from similar experiments could be used as a predictive measurement of ICP.

  6. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results.

  7. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  8. A Genetic Porcine Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Collares, Tiago V.; Hu, Wenping; Liang, Ying; Rodrigues, Fernanda M.; Rund, Laurie A.; Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Singh, Kuldeep; Wells, Kevin D.; Walters, Eric M.; Prather, Randall S.; Counter, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The large size of the pig and its similarity in anatomy, physiology, metabolism, and genetics to humans make it an ideal platform to develop a genetically defined, large animal model of cancer. To this end, we created a transgenic “oncopig” line encoding Cre recombinase inducible porcine transgenes encoding KRASG12D and TP53R167H, which represent a commonly mutated oncogene and tumor suppressor in human cancers, respectively. Treatment of cells derived from these oncopigs with the adenovirus encoding Cre (AdCre) led to KRASG12D and TP53R167H expression, which rendered the cells transformed in culture and tumorigenic when engrafted into immunocompromised mice. Finally, injection of AdCre directly into these oncopigs led to the rapid and reproducible tumor development of mesenchymal origin. Transgenic animals receiving AdGFP (green fluorescent protein) did not have any tumor mass formation or altered histopathology. This oncopig line could thus serve as a genetically malleable model for potentially a wide spectrum of cancers, while controlling for temporal or spatial genesis, which should prove invaluable to studies previously hampered by the lack of a large animal model of cancer. PMID:26132737

  9. Modeling the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Basu, Reshmi; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2002-06-01

    Cartilage laser thermoforming, also known as laser reshaping, is a new surgical procedure that allows in-situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. During laser irradiation, cartilage becomes sufficiently subtle or deformable for stretching and shaping into new stable configurations. This study describes the experimental and theoretical characterization of the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation (Nd:YAG). The surface temperature history of cartilage specimens was monitored during heating and thermal relaxation; using laser exposure times ranging between 1 and 15 s and laser powers of 1 to 10 W. The experimental results were then used to validate a finite element model, which accounts for heat diffusion, light propagation in tissue, and heat loss due to water evaporation. The simultaneous solution of the energy and mass diffusion equations resulted in predictions of temperature distribution in cartilage that were in good agreement with experiments. The model simulations will provide insights to the relationship between the laser treatment parameters (exposure time, laser beam diameter, and power) and the onset of new molecular arrangements and cell thermal injury in the material, thus conceiving basic guidelines of laser thermoforming.

  10. Experimental porcine model of complex fistula-in-ano

    PubMed Central

    A Ba-Bai-Ke-Re, Ma-Mu-Ti-Jiang; Chen, Hui; Liu, Xue; Wang, Yun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    AIM To establish and evaluate an experimental porcine model of fistula-in-ano. METHODS Twelve healthy pigs were randomly divided into two groups. Under general anesthesia, the experimental group underwent rubber band ligation surgery, and the control group underwent an artificial damage technique. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological evaluation were performed on the 38th d and 48th d after surgery in both groups, respectively. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in general characteristics such as body weight, gender, and the number of fistula (P > 0.05). In the experimental group, 15 fistulas were confirmed clinically, 13 complex fistulas were confirmed by MRI, and 11 complex fistulas were confirmed by histopathology. The success rate in the porcine complex fistula model establishment was 83.33%. Among the 18 fistulas in the control group, 5 fistulas were confirmed clinically, 4 complex fistulas were confirmed by MRI, and 3 fistulas were confirmed by histopathology. The success rate in the porcine fistula model establishment was 27.78%. Thus, the success rate of the rubber band ligation group was significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Rubber band ligation is a stable and reliable method to establish complex fistula-in-ano models. Large animal models of complex anal fistulas can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of anal fistulas. PMID:28348488

  11. Signal averaging and waveform analysis of laser Doppler flowmetry monitoring of porcine myocutaneous flaps: I. Acute assessment of flap viability.

    PubMed

    Stack, B C; Futran, N D; Ridley, M B; Schultz, S; Sillman, J S

    1995-11-01

    Postoperative monitoring of microvascular free-tissue transfer is essential to the early identification and correction of vascular compromise. Laser Doppler flowmetry is a noninvasive monitor of capillary bed perfusion. Its current clinical use requires continuous monitoring and trend analysis to detect changes in capillary perfusion. This study investigated the hypothesis that signal averaging of laser Doppler flowmetry output triggered by a fixed point in the cardiac cycle would provide accurate information about the microvascular flow patterns not dependent on trend analysis. These results indicate that averaged waveform analysis allowed for a rapid, objective, and statistically significant distinction between a viable myocutaneous flap and one with vascular compromise in a porcine model. Moreover, this technique allows for distinction between venous and arterial insufficiency.

  12. Laser tissue interaction in the porcine otic capsule tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brian J.; Lee, Jon P.; Berns, Michael W.; White, Joel M.; Neev, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The absence of a hard tissue model reflecting the properties of the inner and middle ear has made it difficult to draw consistent conclusions on the many experimental laser studies in ear surgery. Porcine otic capsule tissue has been studied by our group extensively in a wide variety of laser-tissue interaction studies and is an economically attractive and simple to use hard tissue source. Porcine otic capsule was harvested from the temporal bone of freshly sacrificed domestic pigs via a craniotomy approach. The technique when performed with power instruments takes less than 5 minutes and the entire otic capsule bone is removed intact as the suture line is not fused to the remaining petrous apex. The tissue specimen contains a vestibule, cochlea, oval and round windows, and internal auditory canals which can be used as an intact middle ear/inner ear system. The tissue can also be micromachined into thin slabs of bone varying for 100 - 1000 micrometers in thickness. In order to quantify more precisely the laser-tissue interactions in otic capsule, optical properties (absorption and scattering) and physical properties were determined (acoustic impedance). The tissue has been used in a wide variety of basic studies investigating the laser-tissue interactions with argon, KTP, (Nd:YAG), carbon dioxide, Ho:YAG, Er:YAG, and XeCl lasers. Porcine otic capsule is an ideal tissue on which standardized test can be performed to compare the relative effects of various laser in otosurgical models.

  13. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training.

  14. Development of a Consistent and Reproducible Porcine Scald Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are very few porcine burn models that replicate scald injuries similar to those encountered by children. We have developed a robust porcine burn model capable of creating reproducible scald burns for a wide range of burn conditions. The study was conducted with juvenile Large White pigs, creating replicates of burn combinations; 50°C for 1, 2, 5 and 10 minutes and 60°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C for 5 seconds. Visual wound examination, biopsies and Laser Doppler Imaging were performed at 1, 24 hours and at 3 and 7 days post-burn. A consistent water temperature was maintained within the scald device for long durations (49.8 ± 0.1°C when set at 50°C). The macroscopic and histologic appearance was consistent between replicates of burn conditions. For 50°C water, 10 minute duration burns showed significantly deeper tissue injury than all shorter durations at 24 hours post-burn (p ≤ 0.0001), with damage seen to increase until day 3 post-burn. For 5 second duration burns, by day 7 post-burn the 80°C and 90°C scalds had damage detected significantly deeper in the tissue than the 70°C scalds (p ≤ 0.001). A reliable and safe model of porcine scald burn injury has been successfully developed. The novel apparatus with continually refreshed water improves consistency of scald creation for long exposure times. This model allows the pathophysiology of scald burn wound creation and progression to be examined. PMID:27612153

  15. Hybrid Transureteral Nephrectomy in a Survival Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kirk M.; Alsyouf, Muhannad; Richards, Gideon; Agarwal, Gautum; Heldt, Jonathan P.; Schlaifer, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Natural-orifice approaches for nephrectomy have included access via the stomach, vagina, bladder, and rectum. Recently, the feasibility of using the ureter as a natural orifice for natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery nephrectomy has been demonstrated in a nonsurvival porcine model. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes of transureteral laparoscopic natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery nephrectomy in a survival porcine model. Methods: Three pigs underwent hybrid transureteral natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery nephrectomy. An experimental balloon/dilating sheath was inserted over a wire to dilate the urethra, ureteral orifice, and ureter. Through a bariatric 12-mm laparoscopic port, the ureter was opened medially and the hilar dissection was performed. Next, 2 needlescopic ports were placed transabdominally to facilitate hilar transection. The kidney was morcellated using a bipolar sealing device and extracted via the ureter using the housing of a bariatric stapling device. The ureteral orifice was closed with a laparoscopic suturing device. The bladder was drained by a catheter for 10 to 14 days postoperatively. Pigs were euthanized on postoperative day 21. Results: All surgical procedures were successfully completed, with no intraoperative complications. One pig had an episode of postoperative clot retention that resolved with catheter irrigation. Each pig was healthy and eating a normal diet prior to euthanasia. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid transureteral approach to nephrectomy in a survival porcine model. This technique avoids the intentional violation of a second organ system and the risk for peritoneal contamination. Improved instrumentation is needed prior to implementation in the human population. PMID:25489210

  16. Anatomy and bronchoscopy of the porcine lung. A model for translational respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Judge, Eoin P; Hughes, J M Lynne; Egan, Jim J; Maguire, Michael; Molloy, Emer L; O'Dea, Shirley

    2014-09-01

    The porcine model has contributed significantly to biomedical research over many decades. The similar size and anatomy of pig and human organs make this model particularly beneficial for translational research in areas such as medical device development, therapeutics and xenotransplantation. In recent years, a major limitation with the porcine model was overcome with the successful generation of gene-targeted pigs and the publication of the pig genome. As a result, the role of this model is likely to become even more important. For the respiratory medicine field, the similarities between pig and human lungs give the porcine model particular potential for advancing translational medicine. An increasing number of lung conditions are being studied and modeled in the pig. Genetically modified porcine models of cystic fibrosis have been generated that, unlike mouse models, develop lung disease similar to human cystic fibrosis. However, the scientific literature relating specifically to porcine lung anatomy and airway histology is limited and is largely restricted to veterinary literature and textbooks. Furthermore, methods for in vivo lung procedures in the pig are rarely described. The aims of this review are to collate the disparate literature on porcine lung anatomy, histology, and microbiology; to provide a comparison with the human lung; and to describe appropriate bronchoscopy procedures for the pig lungs to aid clinical researchers working in the area of translational respiratory medicine using the porcine model.

  17. Laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy: feasibility study in a chronic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Kaouk, Jihad H; Gill, Inderbir S; Desai, Mihir M; Banks, Kevin L W; Raja, Shanker S; Skacel, Marek; Sung, Gyung Tak

    2003-02-01

    PURPOSE Anatrophic nephrolithotomy performed via open surgery involves incising the renal parenchyma along an avascular plane to remove a large, complex renal stone. We determined the feasibility of performing laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy in a survival porcine model. Furthermore, we present a novel technique of creating a staghorn calculus in the porcine model. MATERIALS AND METHODS After developing the technique in 3 pigs the survival study was performed in 10 consecutive animals. The procedure comprised 2 aspects. 1) We developed an animal model for staghorn calculi by retrograde injection of polyurethane (Fomo Products, Inc., Norton, Ohio) into the renal pelvis through a ureteral catheter. For a 2-week period the staghorn calculus was allowed to create hydronephrosis. 2) Laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy was done, involving control of the renal artery and vein, in situ renal hypothermia with ice slush in 1 animal, lateral renal parenchymal incision, stone extraction and suture repair of the incised collecting system and renal parenchyma. RESULTS Synthetic stone formation and laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy were successful in all 10 animals, including 1 that underwent staged bilateral anatrophic nephrolithotomy. Mean operative time for anatrophic nephrolithotomy was 125 minutes. Mean blood loss was 68 cc and mean warm ischemia time was 30 minutes (range 23 to 39). A residual small pelvicaliceal calculus was noted postoperatively in the initial 3 cases only. Thereafter, routine intraoperative ultrasonography and flexible endoscopy were done for stone localization, resulting in a stone-free rate of 100% in all 7 remaining animals. Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid renal scans documented improvement in the glomerular filtration rate from a mean of 26.4 ml. per minute after stone creation and hydronephrosis to 54.8 ml. per minute 4 to 5 weeks after laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy. CONCLUSIONS Laparoscopic techniques can be applied

  18. Characterization of porcine skin as a model for human skin studies using infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rong; Bhargava, Rohit

    2011-06-07

    Porcine skin is often considered a substitute for human skin based on morphological and functional data, for example, for transdermal drug diffusion studies. A chemical, structural and temporal characterization of porcine skin in comparison to human skin is not available but will likely improve our understanding of this porcine skin model. Here, we employ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to holistically measure chemical species as well as spatial structure as a function of time to characterize porcine skin as a model for human skin. Porcine skin was found to resemble human skin spectroscopically and differences are elucidated. Cryo-prepared fresh porcine skin samples for spectroscopic imaging were found to be stable over time and small variations are observed. Hence, we extended characterization to the use of this model for dynamic processes. In particular, the capacity and stability of this model in transdermal diffusion is examined. The results indicate that porcine skin is likely to be an attractive tool for studying diffusion dynamics of materials in human skin.

  19. Vacuum-assisted abdominal wall lift for minimal-access surgery: a porcine model study.

    PubMed

    Udwadia, T E; Kathrani, B K; Bernie, W; Gadgil, U S; Chariar, V M

    2005-08-01

    Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum, although used universally in laparoscopy, has several well-documented complications and disadvantages. The authors describe a simple method of creating vacuum between a rigid shell and the abdominal wall in a porcine model to create adequate operative space for minimal-access surgery, which does not requires carbon dioxide, does not raise intraabdominal pressure, and is safe, cost effective, and feasible. The proposed device and method could be useful wherever basic laparoscopic equipment and a vacuum pump are available, including many parts of the developing world. The study was carried out with three groups using individual porcine models for each study. Group 1 was studied for feasibility of abdominal wall lift, adequacy of intraabdominal space, optimal vacuum levels, and safety and efficacy of the procedure. Group 2 was subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and salpingectomy. Group 3 was studied for 2 days and 8 days after the animals were subjected to prolonged, high-level vacuum and monitored every 24 h to establish long-term effects. In all three groups the safety and efficacy of the proposed method were established, as well as the absence of physiological or histological alterations.

  20. Cardiac Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Pediatric Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Fabiansen, Christian; Lykke, Mikkel; Hother, Anne-Louise; Koch, Jørgen; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard; Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P.; Friis, Henrik; Thymann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition. Objective To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model. Methods and Results Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire) were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12) or a reference diet (AGE-REF, n = 12) for 7 weeks. Outcomes were compared to a weight-matched reference group (WEIGHT-REF, n = 8). Pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T were measured weekly. Plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide decreased in both MAIZE and AGE-REF during the first 3 weeks but increased markedly in MAIZE relative to AGE-REF during week 5–7 (p≤0.001). There was overall no difference in plasma cardiac troponin-T between groups. However, further analysis revealed that release of cardiac troponin-T in plasma was more frequent in AGE-REF compared with MAIZE (OR: 4.8; 95%CI: 1.2–19.7; p = 0.03). However, when release occurred, cardiac troponin-T concentration was 6.9-fold higher (95%CI: 3.0–15.9; p<0.001) in MAIZE compared to AGE-REF. At week 7, the mean body weight in MAIZE was lower than AGE-REF (8.3 vs 32.4 kg, p<0.001), whereas heart-weight relative to body-weight was similar across the three groups. The myocardial performance index was 86% higher in MAIZE vs AGE-REF (p<0.001) and 27% higher in MAIZE vs WEIGHT-REF (p = 0.025). Conclusions Malnutrition associates with cardiac dysfunction in a pediatric porcine model by increased myocardial performance index and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and it associates with cardiac injury by elevated cardiac troponin-T. Clinical studies are needed to see if the same applies for children suffering from

  1. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure—PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  2. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin.

    PubMed

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2015-03-21

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure-PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  3. Thermal epiphysiodesis performed with radio frequency in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Shiguetomi-Medina, Juan M; Rahbek, Ole; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Current techniques for epiphysiodesis involve opening of cortical windows; use of staples, screws, and tension devices; and fusion with curettes or drills. Complications may have serious consequences. There is a need for a more reliable, precise, and less traumatic procedure that overcomes the known complications from existing techniques. We analyzed a new epiphysiodesis technique using radio-frequency ablation (RFA) in a porcine model. Methods Six 35-kg and two 25-kg immature pigs were used. 1 hind leg of each animal was randomly selected and the proximal tibia growth plate was ablated laterally and medially. The contralateral leg was used as a control. MR images were obtained immediately after the ablation and 12 weeks later for 6 animals, and 24 weeks later for the other 2 animals. CT was done for the 2 animals that were followed for 24 weeks for proof of bone bridges. Results Both tibias were equal in length initially. At the 12-week follow-up, there was an average leg length discrepancy of 3.9 mm (95% CI: 3.0–4.8), and at 24 weeks the difference was 8.4 mm and 7.5 mm. No damage to the adjacent tissue was found. Bone bridges and physeal closure were found after 24 weeks. The pigs showed no discomfort after the intervention. Interpretation We found RFA to be feasible for epiphysiodesis in a pig model. The method is minimally invasive and recovery may be quick compared to conventional methods. We recommend that the method should be tested in larger-scale safety studies before clinical application. PMID:25036720

  4. Dynamic and Volumetric Variables Reliably Predict Fluid Responsiveness in a Porcine Model with Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Broch, Ole; Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Heß, Katharina; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability of stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) for prediction of fluid responsiveness in presence of pleural effusion is unknown. The aim of the present study was to challenge the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusions. Methods Pigs were studied at baseline and after fluid loading with 8 ml kg−1 6% hydroxyethyl starch. After withdrawal of 8 ml kg−1 blood and induction of pleural effusion up to 50 ml kg−1 on either side, measurements at baseline and after fluid loading were repeated. Cardiac output, stroke volume, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary occlusion pressure (PAOP) were obtained by pulmonary thermodilution, whereas GEDV was determined by transpulmonary thermodilution. SVV and PPV were monitored continuously by pulse contour analysis. Results Pleural effusion was associated with significant changes in lung compliance, peak airway pressure and stroke volume in both responders and non-responders. At baseline, SVV, PPV and GEDV reliably predicted fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.85 (p<0.001), 0.88 (p<0.001), 0.77 (p = 0.007). After induction of pleural effusion the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness was well preserved and also PAOP was predictive. Threshold values for SVV and PPV increased in presence of pleural effusion. Conclusions In this porcine model, bilateral pleural effusion did not affect the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness. PMID:23418546

  5. Remote effects of acute kidney injury in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Gardner, David S; De Brot, Simone; Dunford, Louise J; Grau-Roma, Llorenc; Welham, Simon J M; Fallman, Rebecca; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E; Oh, Weng; Devonald, Mark A J

    2016-02-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition with no specific treatment. An episode of AKI may affect organs distant from the kidney, further increasing the morbidity associated with AKI. The mechanism of organ cross talk after AKI is unclear. The renal and immune systems of pigs and humans are alike. Using a preclinical animal (porcine) model, we tested the hypothesis that early effects of AKI on distant organs is by immune cell infiltration, leading to inflammatory cytokine production, extravasation, and edema. In 29 pigs exposed to either sham surgery or renal ischemia-reperfusion (control, n = 12; AKI, n = 17), we assessed remote organ (liver, lung, brain) effects in the short (from 2- to 48-h reperfusion) and longer term (5 wk later) using immunofluorescence (for leukocyte infiltration, apoptosis), a cytokine array, tissue elemental analysis (e.g., electrolytes), blood hematology and chemistry (e.g., liver enzymes), and PCR (for inflammatory markers). AKI elicited significant, short-term (∼24 h) increments in enzymes indicative of acute liver damage (e.g. , AST: ALT ratio; P = 0.02) and influenced tissue biochemistry in some remote organs (e.g., lung tissue [Ca(2+)] increased; P = 0.04). These effects largely resolved after 48 h, and no further histopathology, edema, apoptosis, or immune cell infiltration was noted in the liver, lung, or hippocampus in the short and longer term. AKI has subtle biochemical effects on remote organs in the short term, including a transient increment in markers of acute liver damage. These effects resolved by 48 h, and no further remote organ histopathology, apoptosis, edema, or immune cell infiltration was noted.

  6. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic cryoablation at the duodenal papilla: Porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; Reinhard, Mary K; Wagh, Mihir S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and safety of liquid nitrogen spray cryoablation at the duodenal papilla in a porcine model. METHODS: This prospective study protocol was approved by the University of Florida Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Six pigs underwent liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy at the duodenal papilla. Freeze time of 20-s was applied per cycle (4 cycles/session). Survival animals (n = 4) were monitored for adverse events. Hemoglobin, white blood count, liver tests, and lipase were obtained at baseline and post-treatment. EGD was performed on day#7 to evaluate the papilla and for histology. All animals were euthanized and necropsy was performed at the end of the one-week survival period. Feasibility was defined as successful placement of the decompression tube in the duodenum, followed by delivery of spray cryotherapy to the duodenal papilla. Safety was determined by monitoring post-treatment blood tests and clinical course. Treatment effect was defined as endoscopic and histologic changes after cryotherapy. This was established by comparing endoscopic and histologic findings from mucosal biopsies prior to cryotherapy and on post-operative day (POD)#7. Full-thickness specimen was obtained post-mortem to assess depth of injury. RESULTS: Spray cryotherapy was feasible and successfully performed in all 6/6 (100%) animals. Cryospray with liquid nitrogen (four 20-s freeze-thaw cycles) at the duodenal papilla resulted in white frost formation at and around the target region. The mean procedural time was 54.5 min (range 50-58 min). All six animals studied had stable blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse oximetry measurements during the procedure. There were no significant intra-procedural adverse events. There were no significant differences in hemoglobin, white cell count, liver tests or lipase from baseline to post-cryotherapy. Survival animals were monitored daily post-operatively without any clinical ill effects from the cryotherapy. There was

  7. Measuring transdermal glucose levels in neonates by passive diffusion: an in vitro porcine skin model.

    PubMed

    Tiangco, Cristina; Andar, Abhay; Quarterman, Juliana; Ge, Xudong; Sevilla, Fortunato; Rao, Govind; Stinchcomb, Audra; Bunge, Annette; Tolosa, Leah

    2017-03-10

    Current glucose monitoring techniques for neonates rely heavily on blood glucose monitors which require intermittent blood collection through skin-penetrating pricks on the heel or fingers. This procedure is painful and often not clinically conducive, which presents a need for a noninvasive method for monitoring glucose in neonates. Our motivation for this study was to develop an in vitro method for measuring passive diffusion of glucose in premature neonatal skin using a porcine skin model. Such a model will allow us to initially test new devices for noninvasive glucose monitoring without having to do in vivo testing of newborns. The in vitro model is demonstrated by comparing uncompromised and tape-stripped skin in an in-line flow-through diffusion apparatus with glucose concentrations that mimic the hypo-, normo-, and hyper-glycemic conditions in the neonate (2.0, 5.0, and 20 mM, respectively). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) of the tape-stripped skin was approximately 20 g m(-2) h(-1), which closely mimics TEWL for neonatal skin at about 190 days post-conceptional age. The tape-stripped skin showed a >15-fold increase in glucose diffusion compared to the uncompromised skin. The very small concentrations of collected glucose were measured with a highly selective and highly sensitive fluorescent glucose biosensor based on the glucose binding protein (GBP). The demonstrated method of glucose determination is noninvasive and painless, which makes it especially desirable for glucose testing in neonates and children. This study is an important step towards an in vitro model for noninvasive real-time glucose monitoring that may be easily transferred to the clinic for glucose monitoring in neonates. Graphical Abstract Glucose diffusion through model skin was measured using an in-line flow-through diffusion apparatus with glucose solutions mimicking hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemia in the neonate. Phosphate buffered saline was added to the top chamber and the

  8. Multiple models of porcine teschovirus pathogenesis in endemically infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Chih-Lin; Chen, Ya-Mei; Hu, Shu-Chia; Chiu, Kuo-Chao; Lin, Yi-Chien; Chang, Chia-Yi; Wang, Fun-In

    2014-01-10

    Porcine teschoviruses (PTVs) belong to the genus Teschovirus within the family Picornaviridae. PTVs are universal contaminants in pig herds in endemic and multi-infection status. To further the understanding of PTV pathogenesis in endemically infected pigs, a set of samples was studied by real time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) to quantitate viral loads in tissues and by in situ hybridization (ISH) to locate PTV signals in target cells, both targeting the 5'-NTR. cRNA of PTV-1 and PTV-7, in vitro transcribed from cloned fragments of 5'-NTR of 2 viruses, was used to construct standard curves and to run parallel in qRT-PCR, which had detection limits of 10(1) copies/per reaction, with a linearity in between 10(1) and 10(7) copies/per reaction and correlation coefficients of 0.997-0.9988. The qRT-PCR specifically amplified RNA from PTV-1 to -11, while excluding those of Sapelovirus, PEV-9 and PEV-10. Inguinal lymph node (LN) had the highest viral load of all (assuming 100%), followed by ileac LN (89-91%), tonsil (66-68%), ileum (59-60%), spleen (38-40%), and kidney (30-31%), with the least in brain (22.9%) of the inguinal LN. The 22.9% load in brain was higher than that anticipated from a simple fecal-oral-viremia operative model. The results suggested in addition that intranasal infection and retrograding axonal infection from the tonsils were equally operative and significant. ISH revealed PTV signals in a wider variety of tissue cell types than before. PTV signals were noted most impressively in neurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and in the dark zone of the germinal center and adjacent paracortex of regional LN. Multiple operative models indicated that PTVs seemed to have no difficulty invading the brain. The key to whether encephalitis would ensue resided in the animal's immune status and topographic differences of neurons' susceptibilities to PTVs. When common co-infected agents are present, as is typical in the field, PTVs may synergize in

  9. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  10. Met-myoglobin formation, accumulation, degradation, and myoglobin oxygenation monitoring based on multiwavelength attenuance measurement in porcine meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thien; Phan, Kien Nguyen; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple, rapid, and nondestructive method to investigate formation, accumulation, and degradation of met-myoglobin (met-Mb) and myoglobin oxygenation from the interior of porcine meat. For the experiment, color photos and attenuance spectra of porcine meat (well-bled muscle, fat, and mixed) were collected daily to perform colorimetric analysis and to obtain the differences of attenuance between 578 and 567 nm (A578-A567) and between 615 and 630 nm (A630-A615), respectively. Oxy-, deoxy-, and met-myoglobin concentration changes over storage time were also calculated using Beer-Lamberts' law with reflectance intensities at 557, 582, and 630 nm. The change of A578-A567 was well matched with the change of myoglobin oxygenation, and the change of A630-A615 corresponded well with the formation and degradation of met-Mb. In addition, attenuation differences, A578-A567 and A630-A615, were able to show the formation of met-Mb earlier than colorimetric analysis. Therefore, the attenuance differences between wavelengths can be indicators for estimating myoglobin oxygenation and met-Mb formation, accumulation, and degradation, which enable us to design a simple device to monitor myoglobin activities in porcine meat.

  11. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  12. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Saseem; Kurashima, Yo; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kitashiro, Shuji; Kanehira, Eiji; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. RESULTS: All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. CONCLUSION: The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures. PMID:27279391

  13. Noninvasive, optical detection of diabetes: model studies with porcine skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, E. L.; Ediger, M. N.; Unione, A. H. T.; Deemer, E. K.; Stroman, M. L.; Baynes, J. W.

    2004-09-01

    An in vitro study was performed to evaluate noninvasive spectroscopic measurement of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in skin collagen. A porcine dermis preparation was incubated in solutions simulating normal and hyperglycemic conditions. The AGEs kinetics of increase were determined by HPLC and GC/MS assays, and compared to near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet/visible fluorescence skin spectra. Multivariate analysis indicated that, although NIR did not discriminate between collagen samples exposed to different glucose concentrations, fluorescence changes were readily detected and correlated strongly with skin concentration of AGEs. These results suggest that measurement of skin AGEs by fluorescence spectroscopy may be useful for detection and diagnosis of type II diabetes.

  14. Clinically compatible flexible wide-field multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a porcine colon model

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gyugnseok; Park, Youngrong; Yoo, Su Woong; Hwang, Soonjoo; Chin-Yu, Alexey V. Dan; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Do, Eun-Ju; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Sungjee; Myung, Seung-Jae; Chung, Euiheon

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of structural or molecular changes in dysplastic epithelial tissues is crucial for cancer screening and surveillance. Multi-targeting molecular endoscopic fluorescence imaging may improve noninvasive detection of precancerous lesions in the colon. Here, we report the first clinically compatible, wide-field-of-view, multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a leached fiber bundle scope using a porcine model. A porcine colon model that resembles the human colon is used for the detection of surrogate tumors composed of multiple biocompatible fluorophores (FITC, ICG, and heavy metal-free quantum dots (hfQDs)). With an ex vivo porcine colon tumor model, molecular imaging with hfQDs conjugated with MMP14 antibody was achieved by spraying molecular probes on a mucosa layer that contains xenograft tumors. With an in vivo porcine colon embedded with surrogate tumors, target-to-background ratios of 3.36 ± 0.43, 2.70 ± 0.72, and 2.10 ± 0.13 were achieved for FITC, ICG, and hfQD probes, respectively. This promising endoscopic technology with molecular contrast shows the capacity to reveal hidden tumors and guide treatment strategy decisions. PMID:28270983

  15. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Liara M; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing interest in nonrodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine and mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine.

  16. Effects of Pharmacologic Intervention on Oxygenation, Lung Water and Protein Leak in the Pseudomonas ARDS Porcine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    swine U6 i!D 19, ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) A porcine model of Pseudorronas induced acute lung injury...and the clinical picture seen in ARDS unfolds. Pseudomonas- induced ARDS in the porcine model has been used as an effective and reproducible model of...sepsis- induced ARDS in this laboratory. Because ARDS is mediated by numerous inflammatory mediators, it is likely that treatment will require several

  17. Effect of porcine circovirus type 2a or 2b on infection kinetics and pathogenicity of two genetically divergent strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in the conventional pig model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize the infection dynamics and pathogenicity of two heterologous type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates in a conventional pig model under the influence of concurrent porcine circovirus (PCV) subtype 2a or 2b infection. ...

  18. A Zebrafish Larval Model to Assess Virulence of Porcine Streptococcus suis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M.; van Baarlen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, and virulent strains appear to cause disease in both humans and pigs. There is a need for a convenient, reliable and standardized animal model to assess S. suis virulence. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infection model has several advantages, including transparency of larvae, low cost, ease of use and exemption from ethical legislation up to 6 days post fertilization, but has not been previously established as a model for S. suis. Microinjection of different porcine strains of S. suis in zebrafish larvae resulted in highly reproducible dose- and strain-dependent larval death, strongly correlating with presence of the S. suis capsule and to the original virulence of the strain in pigs. Additionally we compared the virulence of the two-component system mutant of ciaRH, which is attenuated for virulence in both mice and pigs in vivo. Infection of larvae with the ΔciaRH strain resulted in significantly higher survival rate compared to infection with the S10 wild-type strain. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a rapid and reliable model to assess the virulence of clinical porcine S. suis isolates. PMID:26999052

  19. Cell Sheet Transplantation for Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Pidial, Laetitia; Camilleri, Sophie; Bellucci, Alexandre; Casanova, Amaury; Viel, Thomas; Tavitian, Bertrand; Cellier, Christophe; Clement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Extended esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is highly responsible for esophageal stricture. We conducted a comparative study in a porcine model to evaluate the effectiveness of adipose tissue-derived stromal cell (ADSC) double cell sheet transplantation. Methods Twelve female pigs were treated with 5 cm long hemi-circumferential ESD and randomized in two groups. ADSC group (n = 6) received 4 double cell sheets of allogenic ADSC on a paper support membrane and control group (n = 6) received 4 paper support membranes. ADSC were labelled with PKH-67 fluorophore to allow probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopie (pCLE) monitoring. After 28 days follow-up, animals were sacrificed. At days 3, 14 and 28, endoscopic evaluation with pCLE and esophagography were performed. Results One animal from the control group was excluded (anesthetic complication). Animals from ADSC group showed less frequent alimentary trouble (17% vs 80%; P = 0.08) and higher gain weight on day 28. pCLE demonstrated a compatible cell signal in 4 animals of the ADSC group at day 3. In ADSC group, endoscopy showed that 1 out of 6(17%) animals developed a severe esophageal stricture comparatively to 100% (5/5) in the control group; P = 0.015. Esophagography demonstrated a decreased degree of stricture in the ADSC group on day 14 (44% vs 81%; P = 0.017) and day 28 (46% vs 90%; P = 0.035). Histological analysis showed a decreased fibrosis development in the ADSC group, in terms of surface (9.7 vs 26.1 mm²; P = 0.017) and maximal depth (1.6 vs 3.2 mm; P = 0.052). Conclusion In this model, transplantation of allogenic ADSC organized in double cell sheets after extended esophegeal ESD is strongly associated with a lower esophageal stricture’s rate. PMID:26930409

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Mitigates Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model of Vascularized Composite Autotransplantation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide Mitigates Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model of Vascularized Composite Autotransplantation Carole Y. Villamaria, MD,*Þ C. Anton...interim perfusion of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) mitigates the effects of reperfusion injury in the setting of delayed resto- ration of blood flow. Methods: A...for reconstructing previ- ously unreconstructable injuries. Key Words: hydrogen sulfide , gracilis myocutaneous flap, vascularized composite tissue

  1. Porcine gonadogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five images submitted for teaching purposes related to porcine gonadogenesis (2), porcine fetal testicular development (2), and porcine fetal ovarian development. Key words include: Egg cell nests, Embryo, GATA4, Genital ridge, Gonad, Leydig cell, Mesonephros, MIS, Ovary, P450c17, Porcine, Sertoli ...

  2. A novel coculture model of porcine central neuroretina explants and retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Lauro, Salvatore; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Gayoso, Manuel J.; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T.; Pastor, J. Carlos; Srivastava, Girish K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and standardize a novel organ culture model using porcine central neuroretina explants and RPE cells separated by a cell culture membrane. Methods RPE cells were isolated from porcine eyes, expanded, and seeded on the bottom of cell culture inserts. Neuroretina explants were obtained from the area centralis and cultured alone (controls) on cell culture membranes or supplemented with RPE cells in the same wells but physically separated by the culture membrane. Finally, cellular and tissue specimens were processed for phase contrast, cyto-/histological, and immunochemical evaluation. Neuroretina thickness was also determined. Results Compared to the neuroretinas cultured alone, the neuroretinas cocultured with RPE cells maintained better tissue structure and cellular organization, displayed better preservation of photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, lower levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoexpression, and preservation of cellular retinaldehyde binding protein both markers of reactive gliosis. Neuroretina thickness was significantly greater in the cocultures. Conclusions A coculture model of central porcine neuroretina and RPE cells was successfully developed and standardized. This model mimics a subretinal space and will be useful in studying interactions between the RPE and the neuroretina and to preclinically test potential therapies. PMID:27081295

  3. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  4. A differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cell culture model for studying human adenovirus tropism and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Ramke, M; Groos, S; Warnecke, G; Heim, A

    2011-12-01

    The species specificity of human adenoviruses (HAdV) almost precludes studying virulence and tropism in animal models, e.g. rodent models, or derived tissue and cell culture models. However, replication of HAdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) has been shown after intravenous injection in swine. In order to study adenovirus replication in airway tissue propagation of bronchial epithelial cells from porcine lungs was established. These primary cells proved to be fully permissive for HAdV-C5 infection in submerged culture, demonstrating efficient HAdV genome replication, infectious viral particle release (1.07×10(8) TCID(50)/ml±6.63×10(7)) and development of cytopathic effect (CPE). Differentiation of porcine bronchial epithelial cells was achieved at the air-liquid interface on collagen I coated 0.4μm polyester membranes. Morphology, expression of tubulin and occludin, the development of tight-junctions and cilia were similar to human bronchial epithelial cells. Infection with HAdV-C5 from the basolateral side resulted in release of infectious virus progeny (2.05×10(7) TCID(50)/ml±2.39×10(7)) to the apical surface as described recently in human bronchial epithelial cells, although complete CPE was not observed. Differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cells hold promise as a novel method for studying the virulence and pathophysiology of pneumonia associated HAdV types.

  5. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models.

    PubMed

    Gibly, Romie F; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L; Hering, Bernhard J; Kaufman, Dixon B; Lowe, William L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-12-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to revascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment.

  6. A model of security monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-01-01

    A model of security monitoring is presented that distinguishes between two types of logging and auditing. Implications for the design and use of security monitoring mechanisms are drawn from this model. The usefulness of the model is then demonstrated by analyzing several different monitoring mechanisms.

  7. A model of security monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1989-01-01

    A model of security monitoring is presented that distinguishes between two types of logging and auditing. Implications for the design and use of security monitoring mechanisms are drawn from this model. The usefulness of the model is then demonstrated by analyzing several different monitoring mechanisms.

  8. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Veluraja, K.; Vennila, K.N.; Umamakeshvari, K.; Jasmine, A.; Velmurugan, D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.

  9. Modelling the porcine oviduct epithelium: a polarized in vitro system suitable for long-term cultivation.

    PubMed

    Miessen, K; Sharbati, S; Einspanier, R; Schoen, J

    2011-09-15

    For exploring the processes leading to successful reproduction, differentiated long-term in vitro systems modelling the mammalian oviduct are needed. Therefore, in the present study culture conditions for primary porcine oviductal epithelial cells were optimized with regard to morphological differentiation and usability for extended cultivation periods. To evaluate different growth media for the primary cells, we used morphological criteria as well as real-time impedance measurement. After an initial media testing, the cells were grown on hanging membranes and the culture settings (conventionally cultured, serum gradient over the membrane and air-liquid interface) were assessed by histology and electron microscopy. We proved long-term expression of an oviduct specific marker (oviductal glycoprotein 1) and showed a hormone responsiveness of the culture system by means of quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Differentiated epithelial cells could reproducibly be cultured up to 6 weeks in an air-liquid interface. After 3 weeks of culturing, the cells were clearly polarized and exhibited cilia. The model maintains physiological properties such as morphological features (mixed cell population of ciliated and secretory cells, apical cell-cell contacts typical for columnar epithelial cells) and oviduct-specific markers showing hormone responsiveness. We established a polarized long-term in vitro-system of the porcine oviductal epithelium preserving detailed features of the porcine oviduct. Therefore, we provide a useful tool to elucidate unsolved scientific questions concerning reproductive physiology.

  10. Porcine model characterizing various parameters assessing the outcome after acetaminophen intoxication induced acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Karolin; Klingert, Wilfried; Klingert, Kathrin; Morgalla, Matthias H; Schuhmann, Martin U; Leckie, Pamela; Sharifi, Yalda; Davies, Nathan A; Jalan, Rajiv; Peter, Andreas; Grasshoff, Christian; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schenk, Martin; Thiel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the changes of hemodynamic and laboratory parameters during the course of acute liver failure following acetaminophen overdose. METHODS Eight pigs underwent a midline laparotomy following jejunal catheter placement for further acetaminophen intoxication and positioning of a portal vein Doppler flow-probe. Acute liver failure was realized by intrajejunal acetaminophen administration in six animals, two animals were sham operated. All animals were invasively monitored and received standardized intensive care support throughout the study. Portal blood flow, hemodynamic and ventilation parameters were continuously recorded. Laboratory parameters were analysed every eight hours. Liver biopsies were sampled every 24 h following intoxication and upon autopsy. RESULTS Acute liver failure (ALF) occurred after 28 ± 5 h resulted in multiple organ failure and death despite maximal support after further 21 ± 1 h (study end). Portal blood flow (baseline 1100 ± 156 mL/min) increased to a maximum flow of 1873 ± 175 mL/min at manifestation of ALF, which was significantly elevated (P < 0.01). Immediately after peaking, portal flow declined rapidly to 283 ± 135 mL/min at study end. Thrombocyte values (baseline 307 × 103/µL ± 34 × 103/µL) of intoxicated animals declined slowly to values of 145 × 103/µL ± 46 × 103/µL when liver failure occurred. Subsequent appearance of severe thrombocytopenia in liver failure resulted in values of 11 × 103/µL ± 3 × 103/µL preceding fatality within few hours which was significant (P > 0.01). CONCLUSION Declining portal blood flow and subsequent severe thrombocytopenia after acetaminophen intoxication precede fatality in a porcine acute liver failure model. PMID:28321158

  11. Small-Incision Laparoscopy-Assisted Surgery Under Abdominal Cavity Irrigation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takuro; Aoe, Tomohiko; Yu, Wen-Wei; Ebihara, Yuma; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Isono, Shiro; Naya, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgeries are performed under carbon dioxide insufflation. Switching from gas to an isotonic irrigant introduces several benefits and avoids some adverse effects of gas insufflation. We developed an irrigating device and apparatus designed for single-incision laparoscopic surgery and tested its advantages and drawbacks during surgery in a porcine model. Materials and Methods: Six pigs underwent surgical procedures under general anesthesia. A 30-cm extracorporeal cistern was placed over a 5–6-cm abdominal incision. The abdomen was irrigated with warm saline that was drained via a suction tube placed near the surgical field and continuously recirculated through a closed circuit equipped with a hemodialyzer as a filter. Irrigant samples from two pigs were cultured to check for bacterial and fungal contamination. Body weight was measured before and after surgery in four pigs that had not received treatments affecting hemodynamics or causing diuresis. Results: One-way flow of irrigant ensured laparoscopic vision by rinsing blood from the surgical field. Through a retroperitoneal approach, cystoprostatectomy was successfully performed in three pigs, nephrectomy in two, renal excision in two, and partial nephrectomy in one, under simultaneous ultrasonographic monitoring. Through a transperitoneal approach, liver excision and hemostasis with a bipolar sealing device were performed in three pigs, and bladder pedicle excision was performed in one pig. Bacterial and fungal contamination of the irrigant was observed on the draining side of the circuit, but the filter captured the contaminants. Body weight increased by a median of 2.1% (range, 1.2–4.4%) of initial weight after 3–5 hours of irrigation. Conclusions: Surgery under irrigation is feasible and practical when performed via a cistern through a small abdominal incision. This method is advantageous, especially in the enabling of continuous and free

  12. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Colon in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiannan; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Wenlong; Chai, Wei; Wu, Jiuping; Guo, Shuai; Fang, Gang; Zhou, Xulong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Kecheng; Zeng, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a method of targeted cell ablation which has been suggested as a potential cancer therapy as it leaves structures such as blood vessels and the extracellular matrix intact, thereby allowing the rapid recovery of healthy tissue. Here, we investigated the effects of IRE on the colon in vivo in a porcine model. Methods IRE ablation was performed on the colon walls of 12 female Tibet mini-pigs, creating a total of 24 lesions. Lesions were monitored periodically by endoscopy. The pigs were euthanized 7, 14, 21 or 28 days after IRE ablation and the colons harvested for gross and histological analysis. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson’s trichrome (MT) stain and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results All pigs tolerated the ablation procedure without serious clinical symptoms or complications. There was no evidence of perforation by endoscopy or gross postmortem examination. All lesions were characterized by necrotic cell death with mild inflammation and hyperemia, with a sharp demarcation between ablated and adjacent normal tissue. A fibrous scar was observed in the ablated colon tissue. Histological analysis revealed damage to each layer of the colon. Histopathology findings also showed the preservation of extracellular structures and the recovery of the ablated colon. Conclusions The complete ablation of the target area, its rapid recovery and the lack of posttreatment symptoms suggest that IRE ablation may be a promising therapy for tumors located adjacent to or violating the colon wall. PMID:27907057

  13. The immunology of the porcine skin and its value as a model for human skin.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur; Meurens, François; Ricklin, Meret E

    2015-07-01

    The porcine skin has striking similarities to the human skin in terms of general structure, thickness, hair follicle content, pigmentation, collagen and lipid composition. This has been the basis for numerous studies using the pig as a model for wound healing, transdermal delivery, dermal toxicology, radiation and UVB effects. Considering that the skin also represents an immune organ of utmost importance for health, immune cells present in the skin of the pig will be reviewed. The focus of this review is on dendritic cells, which play a central role in the skin immune system as they serve as sentinels in the skin, which offers a large surface area exposed to the environment. Based on a literature review and original data we propose a classification of porcine dendritic cell subsets in the skin corresponding to the subsets described in the human skin. The equivalent of the human CD141(+) DC subset is CD1a(-)CD4(-)CD172a(-)CADM1(high), that of the CD1c(+) subset is CD1a(+)CD4(-)CD172a(+)CADM1(+/low), and porcine plasmacytoid dendritic cells are CD1a(-)CD4(+)CD172a(+)CADM1(-). CD209 and CD14 could represent markers of inflammatory monocyte-derived cells, either dendritic cells or macrophages. Future studies for example using transriptomic analysis of sorted populations are required to confirm the identity of these cells.

  14. Creating a model of diseased artery damage and failure from healthy porcine aorta.

    PubMed

    Noble, Christopher; Smulders, Nicole; Green, Nicola H; Lewis, Roger; Carré, Matt J; Franklin, Steve E; MacNeil, Sheila; Taylor, Zeike A

    2016-07-01

    Large quantities of diseased tissue are required in the research and development of new generations of medical devices, for example for use in physical testing. However, these are difficult to obtain. In contrast, porcine arteries are readily available as they are regarded as waste. Therefore, reliable means of creating from porcine tissue physical models of diseased human tissue that emulate well the associated mechanical changes would be valuable. To this end, we studied the effect on mechanical response of treating porcine thoracic aorta with collagenase, elastase and glutaraldehyde. The alterations in mechanical and failure properties were assessed via uniaxial tension testing. A constitutive model composed of the Gasser-Ogden-Holzapfel model, for elastic response, and a continuum damage model, for the failure, was also employed to provide a further basis for comparison (Calvo and Peña, 2006; Gasser et al., 2006). For the concentrations used here it was found that: collagenase treated samples showed decreased fracture stress in the axial direction only; elastase treated samples showed increased fracture stress in the circumferential direction only; and glutaraldehyde samples showed no change in either direction. With respect to the proposed constitutive model, both collagenase and elastase had a strong effect on the fibre-related terms. The model more closely captured the tissue response in the circumferential direction, due to the smoother and sharper transition from damage initiation to complete failure in this direction. Finally, comparison of the results with those of tensile tests on diseased tissues suggests that these treatments indeed provide a basis for creation of physical models of diseased arteries.

  15. Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging for Monitoring Microwave-Induced Thermal Lesion in Ex Vivo Porcine Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Han, Yuqiang; Zhu, Xingguang; Shang, Shaoqiang; Huang, Guojing; Zhang, Lei; Niu, Gang; Wang, Supin; He, Xijing; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-02-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic Nakagami imaging to evaluate thermal lesions induced by microwave ablation (MWA) in ex vivo porcine liver was explored. Dynamic changes in echo amplitudes and Nakagami parameters in the region of the MWA-induced thermal lesion, as well as the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the MWA-induced thermal lesion and the surrounding normal tissue, were calculated simultaneously during the MWA procedure. After MWA exposure, a bright hyper-echoic region appeared in ultrasonic B-mode and Nakagami parameter images as an indicator of the thermal lesion. Mean values of the Nakagami parameter in the thermal lesion region increased to 0.58, 0.71 and 0.91 after 1, 3 and 5 min of MVA. There were no significant differences in envelope amplitudes in the thermal lesion region among ultrasonic B-mode images obtained after different durations of MWA. Unlike ultrasonic B-mode images, Nakagami images were less affected by the shadow effect in monitoring of MWA exposure, and a fairly complete hyper-echoic region was observed in the Nakagami image. The mean value of the Nakagami parameter increased from approximately 0.47 to 0.82 during MWA exposure. At the end of the postablation stage, the mean value of the Nakagami parameter decreased to 0.55 and was higher than that before MWA exposure. CNR values calculated for Nakagami parameter images increased from 0.13 to approximately 0.61 during MWA and then decreased to 0.26 at the end of the post-ablation stage. The corresponding CNR values calculated for ultrasonic B-mode images were 0.24, 0.42 and 0.17. This preliminary study on ex vivo porcine liver suggested that Nakagami imaging have potential use in evaluating the formation of MWA-induced thermal lesions. Further in vivo studies are needed to evaluate the potential application.

  16. Operator Independent Focused High Frequency ISM Band for Fat Reduction: Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robert; Weiss, Margaret; Beasley, Karen; Vrba, Jan; Bernardy, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Selective fat reduction has been clearly shown for various methods and energy modalities including cryolipolysis and high intensity focused thermal ultrasound. Mathematical modeling of focused high frequency of the EM spectrum has indicated that selective heating of fat is possible using wavelengths not previous explored. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate in the porcine model that selective heating of fat is possible with a non-contact, operator independent device. Methods High frequencies of the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) RF band were utilized to reduce abdominal fat in a porcine model. Practical application of mathematical modeling allowed an auto-feedback loop to be developed to allow operator independent adjustment of energy to maintain subcutaneous fat at 45–46°C while overlying skin remained at 40–41°C. Results Treatments of three Vietnamese pigs were performed under anesthesia in a certified veterinary facility. Gross and microscopic histologic results demonstrated a marked reduction in adipocytes of the treated area after 4 treatments of a total of 30 minutes each, with incremental fat diminution after each treatment. A final 70% reduction of the abdominal fat layer was seen in the treated areas. Duplex ultrasound revealed a reduction of fat layer from 7.6 to 2.9 mm. Histologic evaluation revealed that epidermis, dermis, and adnexal structures such as hair follicles were unaffected by the treatment, while adipocytes were significantly affected. Conclusion A new model of fat reduction using high frequency RF has been successfully achieved in a porcine model. This has very positive implications in the development of an operator independent, contact free device for reduction of fat in clinical practice. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23619902

  17. Porcine models for the metabolic syndrome, digestive and bone disorders: a general overview.

    PubMed

    Litten-Brown, J C; Corson, A M; Clarke, L

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this review article is to provide an overview of the role of pigs as a biomedical model for humans. The usefulness and limitations of porcine models have been discussed in terms of metabolic, cardiovascular, digestive and bone diseases in humans. Domestic pigs and minipigs are the main categories of pigs used as biomedical models. One drawback of minipigs is that they are in short supply and expensive compared with domestic pigs, which in contrast cost more to house, feed and medicate. Different porcine breeds show different responses to the induction of specific diseases. For example, ossabaw minipigs provide a better model than Yucatan for the metabolic syndrome as they exhibit obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension, all of which are absent in the Yucatan. Similar metabolic/physiological differences exist between domestic breeds (e.g. Meishan v. Pietrain). The modern commercial (e.g. Large White) domestic pig has been the preferred model for developmental programming due to the 2- to 3-fold variation in body weight among littermates providing a natural form of foetal growth retardation not observed in ancient (e.g. Meishan) domestic breeds. Pigs have been increasingly used to study chronic ischaemia, therapeutic angiogenesis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abdominal aortic aneurysm as their coronary anatomy and physiology are similar to humans. Type 1 and II diabetes can be induced in swine using dietary regimes and/or administration of streptozotocin. Pigs are a good and extensively used model for specific nutritional studies as their protein and lipid metabolism is comparable with humans, although pigs are not as sensitive to protein restriction as rodents. Neonatal and weanling pigs have been used to examine the pathophysiology and prevention/treatment of microbial-associated diseases and immune system disorders. A porcine model mimicking various degrees of prematurity in infants receiving total parenteral nutrition has been established to

  18. A 3-dimensional model for teaching local flaps using porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zahid; Hogg, Fiona; Graham, Ken

    2014-10-01

    The European Working Time Directive and streamlined training has led to reduced training time. Surgery, as an experience-dependent craft specialty is affected more than other medical specialties. Trainees want to maximize all training opportunities in the clinical setting, and having predeveloped basic skills acquired on a simulated model can facilitate this.Here we describe the use of a novel model to design and raise local flaps in the face and scalp regions. The model consists of mannequin heads draped with porcine skin which is skewered with pins at strategic points to give a 3-dimensional model which closely resembles a cadaveric head.The advantages of this model are that it is life size and incorporates all the relevant anatomical features, which can be drawn on if required.This model was used on a recent course, Intermediate Skills in Plastic Surgery: Flaps Around the Face, at the Royal College of Surgeons England. The trainees found that practicing on the porcine skin gave them an opportunity to master the basics of flap design and implementation.In summary, this innovative 3-dimensional training model has received high levels of satisfaction and is currently as close as we can get to cadaveric dissection without the constraints and cost of using human tissue.

  19. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S.; Kovács, Attila D.; Meyerholz, David K.; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Weber, Krystal L.; White, Katherine A.M.; Rheeden, Richard V.; Kruer, Michael C.; Dacken, Brian A.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T.; Rohret, Judy A.; Struzynski, Jason T.; Rohret, Frank A.; Weimer, Jill M.; Pearce, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions. PMID:26374845

  20. A combined trauma model of chest and abdominal trauma with hemorrhagic shock--description of a new porcine model.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Frank; Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Mohr, Juliane; Fröhlich, Matthias; Witte, Ingo; Keibl, Claudia; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Seekamp, Andreas; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Flohe, Sascha; van Griensven, Martijn

    2012-12-01

    Despite the high incidence and prognostic relevance of hemorrhagic shock and abdominal and blunt chest trauma in multiply injured patients, there are no animal models combining these injuries. Therefore, we established a new porcine multiple trauma model consisting of blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma (two incisions in the right upper liver lobe using a four-edged scalpel and subsequent liver packing), and pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock with a mean arterial pressure of 30 ± 5 mmHg (a maximum of 45% of the total blood volume). The combined traumatic insult led to severe signs of hemorrhagic shock and impaired pulmonary function. In conclusion, a consistent, reproducible, and clinically relevant porcine model of multisystem injury with controlled (pressure-controlled blood withdrawal) and uncontrolled components of hemorrhage (liver laceration) with the potential for rebleeding was established.

  1. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Moeser, Adam J.; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in non-rodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia/ reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine as well as to mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine. PMID:25655839

  2. Feasibility and Technique for Transvaginal Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery Liver Resection: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Toshio; Horgan, Santiago; Sandler, Bryan J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.; Coker, Alisa M.; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Maeda, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a challenging minimally invasive procedure. Although laparoscopic techniques for liver resection are gaining acceptance worldwide, few studies have investigated NOTES liver resection. We used a porcine model to assess the feasibility and safety of transvaginal NOTES liver resection (TV NOTES LR). Materials and Methods: Nine female pigs underwent TV NOTES LR. A nonsurvival acute porcine model with general anesthesia was used in all cases. Using hybrid NOTES technique, we placed only 1 umbilical 12-mm umbilical trocar in the abdominal wall, which was used to create pneumoperitoneum. A laparoscope was then advanced to obtain intra-abdominal visualization. A 15-mm vaginal trocar was inserted under direct laparoscopic vision, and a flexible endoscope was introduced through the vaginal trocar. A long, flexible grasper and endocavity retractor were used to stably retract the liver. The liver edge was partially transected using energy devices inserted through the umbilical trocar. To transect the left lateral lobe, a flexible linear stapler was inserted alongside the vaginal trocar. A specimen extraction bag was deployed and extracted transvaginally. Blood loss, bile leakage, operative time, and specimen size were evaluated. Necropsy studies were performed after the procedures. Results: Eighteen transvaginal NOTES partial liver resections and 4 transvaginal NOTES left lateral lobectomies were successfully performed on 9 pigs. Mean operative time was 165.8 minutes, and mean estimated blood loss was 76.6 mL. All TV NOTES LRs were performed without complications or deaths. Necropsy showed no bile leakage from remnant liver. Conclusions: Our porcine model suggests that TV NOTES LR is technically feasible and safe and has the potential for clinical use as a minimally invasive alternative to conventional laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:28030435

  3. A Porcine Anterior Segment Perfusion and Transduction Model With Direct Visualization of the Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Ralitsa T.; Roy, Pritha; Park, Daniel B.; Jensen, Adrianna; Scott, Gordon; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Fautsch, Michael P.; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish a consistent and affordable, high quality porcine anterior segment perfusion and transduction model that allows direct visualization of the trabecular meshwork. Methods Porcine anterior segments were cultured within 2 hours of death by removing lens and uvea and securing in a specially designed petri dish with a thin bottom to allow direct visualization of the trabecular meshwork with minimal distortion. Twenty-two control eyes (CO) with a constant flow rate were compared to eight gravity perfused eyes (COgr, 15 mm Hg). We established gene delivery to the TM using eGFP expressing feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vector GINSIN at 108 transducing units (TU) per eye (GINSIN_8, n = 8) and 107 TU (GINSIN_7, n = 8). Expression was assessed for 14 days before histology was obtained. Results Pig eyes were a reliable source for consistent and high quality anterior segment cultures with a low failure rate of 12%. Control eyes had an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 15.8 ± 1.9 mm Hg at fixed pump perfusion with 3 μL/min compared to gravity perfused COgr with imputed 3.7 ± 1.6 μL/min. Vector GINSIN_8 eyes experienced a transient posttransduction IOP increase of 44% that resolved at 48 hours; this was not observed in GINSIN_7 eyes. Expression was higher in GINSIN_8 than in GINSIN_7 eyes. Trabecular meshwork architecture was well preserved. Conclusions Compared with previously used human donor eyes, this inexpensive porcine anterior segment perfusion model is of sufficient, repeatable high quality to develop strategies of TM bioengineering. Trabecular meshwork could be observed directly. Despite significant anatomic differences, effects of transduction replicate the main aspects of previously explored human, feline and rodent models. PMID:27002293

  4. Porcine sclera as a model of human sclera for in vitro transport experiments: histology, SEM, and comparative permeability

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, G.; Quarta, M.; Macaluso, C.; Govoni, P.; Dallatana, D.; Santi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate porcine sclera as a model of human sclera for in vitro studies of transscleral drug delivery of both low and high molecular weight compounds. Methods Human and porcine scleras were characterized for thickness and water content. The tissue surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the histology was studied with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Comparative permeation experiments were performed using three model molecules, acetaminophen as the model compound for small molecules; a linear dextran with a molecular weight of 120 kDa as the model compound for high molecular weight drugs; and insulin, which was chosen as the model protein. Permeation parameters such as flux, lag time, and permeability coefficient were determined and compared. Results Human and porcine scleras have a similar histology and collagen bundle organization. The water content is approx 70% for both tissues while a statistically significant difference was found for the thickness, porcine sclera being approximately twofold thicker than human sclera. Differences in thickness produced differences in the permeability coefficient. In fact, human sclera was found to be two to threefold more permeable toward the three molecules studied than porcine sclera. Conclusions The results obtained in the present paper prove that porcine sclera can be considered a good model for human sclera for in vitro permeation experiments of both low and high molecular weight compounds. In fact, if the different tissue thickness is taken into account, comparable permeability was demonstrated. This suggests a possible use of this model in the evaluation of the transscleral permeation of new biotech compounds, which currently represent the most innovative and efficient therapeutic options for the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:19190734

  5. Porcine cadaver iris model for iris heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Jiang; Yan, Ying; Juhasz, Tibor; Kurtz, Ron

    2015-03-01

    Multiple femtosecond lasers have now been cleared for use for ophthalmic surgery, including for creation of corneal flaps in LASIK surgery. Preliminary study indicated that during typical surgical use, laser energy may pass beyond the cornea with potential effects on the iris. As a model for laser exposure of the iris during femtosecond corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature rise in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by the femtosecond laser. Additionally, ex-vivo iris heating due to femtosecond laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation.

  6. Extrusion properties of porcine intestines and surrogate materials for ventral hernia modelling.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-02-01

    A physical model of the abdomen can be a clean and cheap surrogate environment to assess new and existing closure solutions for post-laparoscopic wound closure, but a particular challenge is finding a surrogate material to replicate intestines which may protrude through a hernia. The literature shows no focus on this topic, and this paper therefore presents an investigation of the extrusion properties of fresh porcine intestines compared to a number of potential surrogate materials: silicone, edible gelatine, dough and reconstituted powdered potatoes (RPP). An extrusion rig was developed to simulate the mechanical environment of a post-operative hernia formation. Displacement controlled extrusion tests were performed, and the force-extrusion relationships at different extrusion velocities were compared for the intestines and the surrogate materials. The intestines showed a peak extrusion force ranging from 9 N to 14.8 N when pushed through a 13 mm hole, and similar extrusion properties between cleaned and uncleaned fresh porcine intestines were observed. The tests on surrogate materials showed that the surface tension properties of silicone gel resulted in high friction, that edible gelatine extruded like a liquid and that dough is very stiff, rendering all three materials unsuitable for use as surrogates. However, the RPP mix showed very similar force-extrusion properties compared to both the cleaned and uncleaned intestines. Viscoelastic testing (7.5 mm/min, 15 mm/min and 30 mm/min) showed little rate dependency in the extrusion properties for either the porcine intestines or the RPP. Despite the complexity of intestinal tissue and the obvious physical differences between intestine and RPP, it was found that there is no statistical difference between the yield strength of intestines and RPP (P values ranged between 0.14 and 0.3) at the rates tested.

  7. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments.

  8. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J.; S. de Aluja, Aline; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments. PMID:26252878

  9. A novel device to create consistent deep dermal burns in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Bertinetti, Monique; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik R La; Holland, Andrew Ja

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate a novel device to create a consistent and reproducible deep partial thickness burn in a porcine model. A thermostatically controlled, heated aluminium disc device was fashioned by the Biomedical Department of our institution. Contact burns were made on the flank of two Great White pigs by applying the device heated to 92°C at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 seconds to four separate test areas area of skin. Biopsies for histological analysis of burn depth were taken on day 0 at 10 minutes post burn and on day 8. Biopsies taken at day 0 revealed superficial to mid-dermal burns, with minimal dermal edema and necrosis. Those from day 8 showed mid to deep dermal edema and necrosis in all four test areas following a 20 second contact duration burn. The new contact burn device was able to create a consistent deep dermal burn after 20 seconds of contact. We anticipate that this new device could be used to investigate the development of hypertrophic scarring in a porcine model.

  10. Porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 and Chlamydia suis to modelize ocular chlamydiosis.

    PubMed

    Käser, Tobias; Cnudde, Thomas; Hamonic, Glenn; Rieder, Meghanne; Pasternak, J Alex; Lai, Ken; Tikoo, Suresh K; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, François

    2015-08-15

    Human ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections can lead to trachoma, the major cause of infectious blindness worldwide. Trachoma control strategies are very helpful but logistically challenging, and a trachoma vaccine is needed but not available. Pigs are a valuable large animal model for various immunological questions and could facilitate the study of human ocular chlamydial infections. In addition, a recent study identified the zoonotic potential of Chlamydia suis, the natural pathogen of pigs. In terms of the One Health Initiative, understanding the host-pathogen-interactions and finding a vaccine for porcine chlamydia infections would also benefit human health. Thus, we infected the porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 with C. suis and analyzed the chlamydial life cycle and the innate immune response of the infected cells. Our results indicate that C. suis completes its life cycle in VIDO R1 cells within 48 h, comparable to C. trachomatis in humans. C. suis infection of VIDO R1 cells led to increased levels of various innate immune mediators like pathogen recognition receptors, cytokines and chemokines including IL6, TNFα, and MMP9, also most relevant in human C. trachomatis infections. These results illustrate the first steps in the host-pathogen-interactions of ocular C. suis infections in pigs and show their similarity to C. trachomatis infections in humans, justifying further testing of pigs as an animal model for human trachoma.

  11. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Flohé, Sascha; Fröhlich, Matthias; Keibl, Claudia; Seekamp, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Witte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients' life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C) was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals' hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26170533

  12. Ventricular Arrhythmias and Mortality Associated with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in a Porcine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de Prado, Armando Perez; Altónaga, Jose R; Cuellas-Ramón, Carlos; Ajenjo-Silverio, Jose M; Orden, Asuncion; Gonzalo-Orden, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium can lead to reversible or irreversible injury depending on the severity and duration of the preceding ischemia. Here we compared sevoflurane and isoflurane with particular reference to their hemodynamic effects and ability to modify the effects of acute severe myocardial ischemia and reperfusion on ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Female Large White pigs were premedicated with ketamine, midazolam, and atropine. Propofol was given intravenously for the anesthetic induction, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Endovascular, fluoroscopy-guided, coronary procedures were performed to occlude the midleft anterior descending artery by using a coronary angioplasty balloon. After 75 min, the balloon catheter system was withdrawn and the presence of adequate reperfusion flow was verified. The pigs were followed for 2 mo, and overall mortality rate was calculated. The isoflurane group showed lower arterial pressure throughout the procedure, with the difference reaching statistical significance after induction of myocardial ischemia. The ventricular fibrillation rate was higher in isoflurane group (81.3%) than the sevoflurane group (51.7%; relative risk, 1.57 [1.03 to 2.4]). Overall survival was lower in the isoflurane group (75%) than the sevoflurane group (96.4%). In conclusion, in this porcine model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, sevoflurane was associated with higher hemodynamic stability and fewer ventricular arrhythmias and mortality than was isoflurane. PMID:21333167

  13. Percentile growth charts for biomedical studies using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Corson, A M; Laws, J; Laws, A; Litten, J C; Lean, I J; Clarke, L

    2008-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity and heart disease are compromising quality of life for a growing number of people. There is much research linking adult disease with the growth and development both in utero and during the first year of life. The pig is an ideal model for studying the origins of developmental programming. The objective of this paper was to construct percentile growth curves for the pig for use in biomedical studies. The body weight (BW) of pigs was recorded from birth to 150 days of age and their crown-to-rump length was measured over the neonatal period to enable the ponderal index (PI; kg/m3) to be calculated. Data were normalised and percentile curves were constructed using Cole's lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method for BW and PI. The construction of these percentile charts for use in biomedical research will allow a more detailed and precise tracking of growth and development of individual pigs under experimental conditions.

  14. [The isolated perfused porcine kidney model for investigations concerning surgical therapy procedures].

    PubMed

    Peters, Kristina; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Matis, Ulrike; Häcker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Experiments to develop innovative surgical therapy procedures are conventionally conducted on animals, as crucial aspects like tissue removal and bleeding disposition cannot be investigated in vitro. Extracorporeal organ models however reflect these aspects and could thus reduce the use of animals for this purpose fundamentally in the future. The aim of this work was to validate the isolated perfused porcine kidney model with regard to its use for surgical purposes on the basis of histological and radiological procedures. The results show that neither storage nor artificial perfusion led to any structural or functional damage which would affect the quality of the organ. The kidney model is highly suitable for simulating the main aspects of renal physiology and allows a constant calibration of perfusion pressure and tissue temperature. Thus, with only a moderate amount of work involved, the kidney model provides a cheap and readily available alternative to conventional animal experiments; it allows standardised experimental settings and provides valid results.

  15. Percutaneous transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy in a porcine survival model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Chen, Su-Yu; Wang, Yong-Guang; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Cai, He-Li; Lin, Kai; Xie, Zhao-Fei; Dong, Fen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To introduce natural orifice transgastric endoscopic surgery (NOTES) tube ileostomy using pelvis-directed submucosal tunneling endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopic tube ileostomy. METHODS Six live pigs (three each in the non-survival and survival groups) were used. A double-channeled therapeutic endoscope was introduced perorally into the stomach. A gastrostomy was made using a 2-cm transversal mucosal incision following the creation of a 5-cm longitudinal pelvis-directed submucosal tunnel. The pneumoperitoneum was established via the endoscope. In the initial three operations of the series, a laparoscope was transumbilically inserted for guiding the tunnel direction, intraperitoneal spatial orientation and distal ileum identification. Endoscopic tube ileostomy was conducted by adopting an introducer method and using a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Catheter Kit equipped with the Loop Fixture. The distal tip of the 15 Fr catheter was placed toward the proximal limb of the ileum to optimize intestinal content drainage. Finally, the tunnel entrance of the gastrostomy was closed using nylon endoloops with the aid of a twin grasper. The gross and histopathological integrity of gastrostomy closure and the abdominal wall-ileum stoma tract formation were assessed 1 wk after the operation. RESULTS Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy was successful in all six pigs, without major bleeding. The mean operating time was 71 min (range: 60-110 min). There were no intraoperative complications or hemodynamic instability. The post-mortem, which was conducted 1-wk postoperatively, showed complete healing of the gastrostomy and adequate stoma tract formation of ileostomy. CONCLUSION Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy is technically feasible and reproducible in an animal model, and this technique is worthy of further improvement. PMID:27729743

  16. Replication of porcine circoviruses.

    PubMed

    Faurez, Florence; Dory, Daniel; Grasland, Béatrice; Jestin, André

    2009-05-18

    Porcine circoviruses are circular single-stranded DNA viruses that infect swine and wild boars. Two species of porcine circoviruses exist. Porcine circovirus type 1 is non pathogenic contrary to porcine circovirus type 2 which is associated with the disease known as Post-weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome. Porcine circovirus DNA has been shown to replicate by a rolling circle mechanism. Other studies have revealed similar mechanisms of rolling-circle replication in plasmids and single-stranded viruses such as Geminivirus. Three elements are important in rolling-circle replication: i) a gene encoding initiator protein, ii) a double strand origin, and iii) a single strand origin. However, differences exist between viruses and plasmids and between viruses. Porcine circovirus replication probably involves a "melting pot" rather than "cruciform" rolling-circle mechanism.This review provides a summary of current knowledge of replication in porcine circoviruses as models of the Circovirus genus. Based on various studies, the factors affecting replication are defined and the mechanisms involved in the different phases of replication are described or proposed.

  17. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Wedge Locking Plate in a Porcine Tibial Model

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeong-Ku; Yeom, Chul Hyun; Jang, Ho Su; Song, Han Eui; Lee, Sung Jae; Kim, Kang Hee; Chung, Kyu Sung; Bhat, Mahendar Gururaj

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to analyze biomechanical properties of a novel wedge locking plate in medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) in a porcine tibial model. Methods A uniform 8-mm OWHTO was performed in 12 porcine tibiae. Six of them were subsequently fixed with the plate without a wedge, whereas the other 6 were additionally reinforced with a metal wedge of 8 mm. Biomechanical properties (stiffness, displacement of the osteotomy gap, and failure load) were evaluated under axial load. The different modes of failure were also investigated. Results The plate showed an axial stiffness of 2,457 ± 450 N/mm with a wedge and 1,969 ± 874 N/mm without a wedge. The maximum failure load was 5,380 ± 952 N with a wedge and 4,354 ± 607 N without a wedge. The plate with a wedge had a significantly greater failure load and significantly less displacement of medial gap at failure than that without a wedge (p = 0.041 and p = 0.002, respectively). The axial stiffness was not different between the two types of fixation. Most failures were caused by lateral cortex breakage and there was no implant failure. Conclusions The novel wedge locking plate showed excellent biomechanical properties and an additional wedge provided significant improvement. This plate can be a good fixation method for OWHTO. PMID:27904718

  18. Novel A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits carotid artery restenosis in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-hua; Peng, Jing; Meng, Zhao-you; Chen, Lin; Huang, Jia-Lu; Huang, He-qing; Li, Li; Zeng, Wen; Wei, Yong; Zhu, Chu-Hong; Chen, Kang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid artery stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although carotid angioplasty and stenting using an embolic protection device has been introduced as a less invasive carotid revascularization approach, in-stent restenosis limits its long-term efficacy and safety. The objective of this study was to test the anti-restenosis effects of local stent-mediated delivery of the A20 gene in a porcine carotid artery model. Materials and methods The pCDNA3.1EHA20 was firmly attached onto stents that had been collagen coated and treated with N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol)propionate solution and anti-DNA immunoglobulin fixation. Anti-restenosis effects of modified vs control (the bare-metal stent and pCDNA3.1 void vector) stents were assessed by Western blot and scanning electron microscopy, as well as by morphological and inflammatory reaction analyses. Results Stent-delivered A20 gene was locally expressed in porcine carotids in association with significantly greater extent of re-endothelialization at day 14 and of neointimal hyperplasia inhibition at 3 months than stenting without A20 gene expression. Conclusion The A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits neointimal hyperplasia while promoting re-endothelialization and therefore constitutes a novel potential alternative to prevent restenosis while minimizing complications. PMID:27540277

  19. Technique of right lymphatic duct cannulation for pulmonary lymph collection in an acute porcine model.

    PubMed

    Chuang, G J; Gao, C X; Mulder, D S; Chiu, R C

    1986-12-01

    The pig is an increasingly preferred model for biomedical research, including studies for pulmonary pathophysiology. However, in piglets, the technique for cannulating the right lymphatic duct, which is subject to more anatomical variations and technically more demanding than that in dogs, has not been described. Our technique evolved to enable this collection of porcine lung lymph in acute experiments. The lymphatic ampulla is cannulated via one of the cervical lymphatics. The right lymphatic duct is invariably dorsal to the cranial vena cava and classically leads to the lymphatic ampulla. Yet in 18% of our pigs, cannulation was difficult or not feasible because the lymphatic duct either drained directly into the cranial vena cava at a distance from the lymphatic ampulla, or into the axillary lymph node of the first rib or the caudal deep cervical lymph nodes. Gently squeezing back regurgitated blood in the lymphatic ampulla before tying the suture and frequently withdrawing lymph with a syringe when the flow is small enabled us to collect clear lymph, usually immediately after completing the cannulation. The rate of lymph flow varied widely (1.7 +/- 0.6 ml/hr) and increased when the left atrial pressure was raised. The lymph protein was 2.8 +/- 0.2 g% with lymph/plasma protein ratio at 0.55 +/- 0.04. The anatomical variations encountered in our 34 dissections, as well as the technical maneuvers found to be useful in the successful cannulation and collection of the porcine lung lymph, are described in detail.

  20. An Immunomodulatory Device Improves Insulin Resistance in Obese Porcine Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Angela J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with tissue inflammation which is a crucial etiology of insulin resistance. This inflammation centers around circulating monocytes which form proinflammatory adipose tissue macrophages (ATM). Specific approaches targeting monocytes/ATM may improve insulin resistance without the adverse side effects of generalized immunosuppression. In this regard, a biomimetic membrane leukocyte processing device, called the selective cytopheretic device (SCD), was evaluated in an Ossabaw miniature swine model of insulin resistance with metabolic syndrome. Treatment with the SCD in this porcine model demonstrated a decline in circulating neutrophil activation parameters and monocyte counts. These changes were associated with improvements in insulin resistance as determined with intravenous glucose tolerance testing. These improvements were also reflected in lowering of homeostatic model assessment- (HOMA-) insulin resistant (IR) scores for up to 2 weeks after SCD therapy. These results allow for the planning of first-in-man studies in obese type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:27819007

  1. Visible Lesion Thresholds and Model Predictions for Q-Switched 1318-nm and 1540-nm Laser Exposures to Porcine Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    collected using the Yucatan mini-pig ( Sus scrofa domestica) as the in vivo model. The Yucatan mini-pig was selected due to the similarity of its flank...Johnson, M. A. Mitchell, B. H. Saladino, and W. P. Roach, "Median Effective Dose Determination and Histologic Characterization of Porcine ( Sus scrofa domestica

  2. Percutaneous catheter-based intracoronary infusion of insulin--a dose finding study in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Slettom, Grete; Jonassen, Anne K; Tuseth, Vegard; Pettersen, Reidar J; Larsen, Terje H; Seifert, Reinhard; Nordrehaug, Jan E

    2011-06-01

    Insulin given at immediate reperfusion reduces myocardial infarct size in the in vitro and the ex vivo rat heart. In vivo, insulin may cause hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia and elevation of catecholamines, potentially harmful during an acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tolerance and safety of intracoronary insulin infusions in a porcine model applying percutaneous intervention techniques.

  3. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M.; Harding, John C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research. PMID:24082397

  4. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  5. Monitoring Survivability and Infectivity of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDv) in the Infected On-Farm Earthen Manure Storages (EMS)

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Hein M.; Cai, Zhangbin; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) has caused major epidemics, which has been a burden to North America’s swine industry. Low infectious dose and high viability in the environment are major challenges in eradication of this virus. To further understand the viability of PEDv in the infected manure, we longitudinally monitored survivability and infectivity of PEDv in two open earthen manure storages (EMS; previously referred to as lagoon) from two different infected swine farms identified in the province of Manitoba, Canada. Our study revealed that PEDv could survive up to 9 months in the infected EMS after the initial outbreak in the farm. The viral load varied among different layers of the EMS with an average of 1.1 × 105 copies/ml of EMS, independent of EMS temperature and pH. In both studied EMS, the evidence of viral replication was observed through increased viral load in the later weeks of the samplings while there was no new influx of infected manure into the EMS, which was suggestive of presence of potential alternative hosts for PEDv within the EMS. Decreasing infectivity of virus over time irrespective of increased viral load suggested the possibility of PEDv evolution within the EMS and perhaps in the new host that negatively impacted virus infectivity. Viral load in the top layer of the EMS was low and mostly non-infective suggesting that environmental factors, such as UV and sunlight, could diminish the replicability and infectivity of the virus. Thus, frequent agitation of the EMS that could expose virus to UV and sunlight might be a potential strategy for reduction of PEDv load and infectivity in the infected EMS. PMID:27014197

  6. Monitoring Survivability and Infectivity of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDv) in the Infected On-Farm Earthen Manure Storages (EMS).

    PubMed

    Tun, Hein M; Cai, Zhangbin; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) has caused major epidemics, which has been a burden to North America's swine industry. Low infectious dose and high viability in the environment are major challenges in eradication of this virus. To further understand the viability of PEDv in the infected manure, we longitudinally monitored survivability and infectivity of PEDv in two open earthen manure storages (EMS; previously referred to as lagoon) from two different infected swine farms identified in the province of Manitoba, Canada. Our study revealed that PEDv could survive up to 9 months in the infected EMS after the initial outbreak in the farm. The viral load varied among different layers of the EMS with an average of 1.1 × 10(5) copies/ml of EMS, independent of EMS temperature and pH. In both studied EMS, the evidence of viral replication was observed through increased viral load in the later weeks of the samplings while there was no new influx of infected manure into the EMS, which was suggestive of presence of potential alternative hosts for PEDv within the EMS. Decreasing infectivity of virus over time irrespective of increased viral load suggested the possibility of PEDv evolution within the EMS and perhaps in the new host that negatively impacted virus infectivity. Viral load in the top layer of the EMS was low and mostly non-infective suggesting that environmental factors, such as UV and sunlight, could diminish the replicability and infectivity of the virus. Thus, frequent agitation of the EMS that could expose virus to UV and sunlight might be a potential strategy for reduction of PEDv load and infectivity in the infected EMS.

  7. Influence of two different levels of intra-abdominal hypertension on bacterial translocation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to quantify bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes due to different levels of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH; 15 vs. 30 mmHg) lasting for 24 h in a porcine model. Methods We examined 18 anesthetized and intubated pigs (52.3 ± 4.7 kg) which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups (each n = 6) and studied over a period of 24 h. After preparation and establishing a steady state, the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was increased stepwise to 30 mmHg in six animals using a carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflator (IAP-30 group). In the second group, IAP was increased to 15 mmHg (IAP-15 group), while IAP remained unchanged in another six pigs (control group). Using a pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO®) monitoring system, hemodynamic parameters as well as blood gases were recorded periodically. Moreover, peripheral and portal vein blood samples were taken for microbiological examinations. Lymph nodes from the ileocecal junction were sampled during an intra-vital laparotomy at the end of the observational period. After sacrificing the animals, bowel tissue samples and corresponding mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were extracted for histopathological and microbiological analyses. Results Cardiac output decreased in all groups. In IAP-30 animals, volumetric preload indices significantly decreased, while those of IAP-15 pigs did not differ from those of controls. Under IAH, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the IAP-30 group declined, while MAP in the IAP-15 group was significantly elevated (controls unchanged). PO2 and PCO2 remained unchanged. The grade of ischemic damage of the intestines (histopathologically quantified using the Park score) increased significantly with different IAH levels. Accordingly, the amount of translocated bacteria in intestinal wall specimens as well as in MLN significantly increased with the level of IAH. Lymph node cultures confirmed the relation between bacterial translocation

  8. In vivo response to an implanted shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N; Clubb, Fred J; Wilson, Thomas S; Miller, Matthew W; Fossum, Theresa W; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane-based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology, and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy imaging after 0, 30, and 90 days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time 0 (<1 h exposure to blood before euthanization), partial healing was observed at 30 days, and almost complete healing had occurred at 90 days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response.

  9. Analysis of regional compliance in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Soodt, Thomas; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Bickenbach, Johannes

    2012-10-15

    Lung protective ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) focuses on using low tidal volumes and adequate levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Identifying optimal pressure is difficult because pressure-volume (PV) relations differ regionally. Precise analysis demands local measurements of pressures and related alveolar morphologies. In a porcine model of surfactant depletion (n=24), we combined measuring static pressures with endoscopic microscopy and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to examine regional PV loops and morphologic heterogeneities between healthy (control group; CON) and ALI lungs ventilated with low (LVT) or high tidal volumes (HVT). Quantification included indices for microscopy (Volume Air Index (VAI), Heterogeneity and Circularity Index), EIT analysis and calculation of regional compliances due to generated PV loops. We found that: (1) VAI decreased in lower lobe after ALI, (2) electrical impedance decreased in dorsal regions and (3) PV loops differed regionally. Further studies should prove the potentials of these techniques on individual respiratory settings and clinical outcome.

  10. In vivo tissue response following implantation of shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Clubb, Fred J.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Miller, Matthew W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) imaging after zero, thirty and ninety days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time zero (less than one hour exposure to blood prior to euthanization), partial healing was observed at thirty days, and almost complete healing had occurred at ninety days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. PMID:23650278

  11. A Porcine Liver Model for Validation of Registration Accuracy in Image-Guided Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterhans, Matthias; Dagon, Benoît; Berg, Anne Vom; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Baur, Charles; Weber, Stefan

    Correct registration between pre-operative high-resolution images and intra-operative data of lower detail is a fundamental requirement in image-guided liver surgery. We propose a multi modality liver model for measuring the accuracy of such registration methods. A freshly explanted porcine liver is artificially perfused by a peristaltic pump and liver motion is simulated by means of inflatable objects positioned around the liver. Co-registered ultrasound and CT data sets are acquired in different deformation scenarios and allow compar-ing registration outcomes with a CT data set serving as ground truth. The pre-sent work describes the experimental setup and summarizes the results from ultrasound and CT imaging.

  12. The effect of whole-body resonance vibration in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Chak, Jason; Dressler, Dan; Manouchehri, Neda; Okon, Elena B; Anderson, Lisa M; Melnyk, Angela D; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2015-06-15

    Whole-body vibration has been identified as a potential stressor to spinal cord injury (SCI) patients during pre-hospital transportation. However, the effect that such vibration has on the acutely injured spinal cord is largely unknown, particularly in the frequency domain of 5 Hz in which resonance of the spine occurs. The objective of the study was to investigate the consequences of resonance vibration on the injured spinal cord. Using our previously characterized porcine model of SCI, we subjected animals to resonance vibration (5.7±0.46 Hz) or no vibration for a period of 1.5 or 3.0 h. Locomotor function was assessed weekly and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected to assess different inflammatory and injury severity markers. Spinal cords were evaluated histologically to quantify preserved white and gray matter. No significant differences were found between groups for CSF levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and lL-8. Glial fibrillary acidic protein levels were lower in the resonance vibration group, compared with the non-vibrated control group. Spared white matter tissue was increased within the vibrated group at 7 d post-injury but this difference was not apparent at the 12-week time-point. No significant difference was observed in locomotor recovery following resonance vibration of the spine. Here, we demonstrate that exposure to resonance vibration for 1.5 or 3 h following SCI in our porcine model is not detrimental to the functional or histological outcomes. Our observation that a 3.0-h period of vibration at resonance frequency induces modest histological improvement at one week post-injury warrants further study.

  13. Effect of Stents Coated with Artemisinin or Dihydroartemisinin in a Porcine Coronary Restenosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Suyoung; Lim, Kyung Seob; Bae, In Ho; Park, Jun-Kyu; Park, Dae Sung; Shim, Jae Won; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Artemisinin and dihydroartemisinin are drugs used to treat malaria. These drugs suppress inflammatory reactions. The aim of this study was to examine the anti-intima hyperplasia effect of a novel drug-eluting stent with artemisinin or dihydroartemisinin in a porcine coronary restenosis model. Materials and Methods Pigs were randomized into four groups; in the first, the coronary arteries (20 pigs, a total of 40 coronary arteries, with 10 coronary arteries in each group) was implanted with bare metal stents (BMS, n=10); the second group was given polymer-coated stents (PCS, n=10); the third group was treated with artemisinin-eluting stents (AES, n=10); and the fourth group was given dihydroartemisinin-eluting stents (DAES, n=10). Histopathologic analysis was performed 28 days after stenting. Results The injury and fibrin scores among the four groups were not significantly different. However, the internal elastic lamina, lumen area, and neointima area were significantly different. Moreover, the percent area of stenosis (46.2±18.66% in BMS vs. 89.4±10.92% in PCS vs. 83.3±17.07% in AES vs. 36.7±11.20% in DAES, p<0.0001) and inflammation score (1.0 [range: 1.0-1.0] vs. 3.0 [range: 2.25-3.0] vs. 3.0 [range: 1.0-3.0] vs. 2.0 [range: 1.75-3.0] in BMS, PCS, AES, and DAES, respectively; p<0.001) were markedly decreased in the DAES group compared to the PCS group. Conclusion DES, which uses a natural substance, dihydroartemisinin, showed a neointima and inflammatory suppressive effect in a porcine coronary restenosis model. PMID:28154599

  14. Microparticulate ICE slurry for renal hypothermia: laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in a porcine model.

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanov, S; Wille, M; Large, M; Razmaria, A; Lifshitz, D; Chang, A; Wu, Y; Kasza, K; Shalhav, A

    2010-10-01

    Previously, we described the feasibility of renal hypothermia using microparticulate ice slurry during laparoscopy. In the present study, we compared surface cooling with the ice slurry versus near-frozen saline or warm ischemia (WI) during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) in a porcine model. We used a single-kidney porcine model. Animals in 5 equal groups (n = 6 each) underwent right laparoscopic complete nephrectomy. In Phase I, left LPN was performed under 90 minutes of ischemia and 90-minute renal cooling with either slurry (Slurry group 1) or saline (Saline group 1). No cooling was applied in the WI group. In Phase II, to simulate more extreme condition, ischemia time was extended to 120 minutes and cooling shortened to 10 minutes (Slurry group 2 and Saline group 2). The study endpoints were renal and core temperature during the surgery and serum creatinine at baseline and days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after the procedure. The ice slurry was easily produced and delivered. Nadir renal temperature (mean {+-} SD) was 8 {+-} 4 C in Slurry group 1 vs. 22.5 {+-} 3 C in Saline group 1 (P < .0001). Renal rewarming to 30 C occurred after 61 {+-} 7 minutes in Slurry group 2 vs. 24 {+-} 6 minutes in Saline group 2 (P < .0001). Core temperature decreased on average to 35 C in the Saline groups compared with 37 C in the Slurry groups (P < .0001). Serum creatinine did not differ between the Saline and Slurry groups in Phases I and II at any time point. Ice slurry provides superior renal cooling compared with near-frozen saline during LPN without associated core hypothermia.

  15. Methotrexate loaded SAE coated coronary stents reduce neointimal hyperplasia in a porcine coronary model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y; Salu, K; Liu, X; Li, S; Wang, L; Verbeken, E; Bosmans, J; De Scheerder, I

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of stent based methotrexate delivery on neointimal hyperplasia. Methods: Stainless steel coronary stents and biological polymer coated (SAE) stents were randomly implanted in coronary arteries of pigs with a stent to artery ratio of 1.1:1. The pigs were killed after five days (10 stents) or four weeks (20 stents). Second, stainless steel coronary stents were dip coated in a 10 mg/ml methotrexate–SAE polymer solution, resulting in a total load of 150 μg methotrexate/stent. SAE coated stents and methotrexate loaded stents were randomly implanted in porcine coronary arteries with a stent to artery ratio of 1.2:1 and followed up to four weeks. Results: SAE coated stents and bare stents elicited a similar tissue response at five days. At four weeks, neointimal hyperplasia induced by the coated stents was less pronounced than with the bare stents (1.32 (0.66) v 1.73 (0.93) mm2, p > 0.05). In vitro drug release studies showed that 50% of the methotrexate was released in 24 hours, and all drug was released within four weeks. No impact on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation or viability was observed in in vitro cell cultures. At four weeks the arteries with methotrexate loaded stents had decreased peristrut inflammation and neointimal hyperplasia (1.22 (0.34) v 2.25 (1.28) mm2, p < 0.01). Conclusions: SAE coating had an excellent biocompatibility with vascular tissue. Stent based delivery of methotrexate in the SAE coating effectively reduced neointimal hyperplasia in a porcine coronary stent model, potentially due to reduced peristrut inflammation. PMID:14729797

  16. A porcine model: surgical anatomy of the orbit for maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Kyllar, Michal; Štembírek, Jan; Danek, Zdenek; Hodan, Radek; Stránský, Jiří; Machoň, Vladimír; Foltán, René

    2016-04-01

    Due to its similarity to humans, the pig has proven to be a suitable biomodel for both research purposes and for training medical professionals, particularly in surgical specializations. For example, new implant materials have been tested on pig jaws and pigs have also been used in the development of new surgical techniques. For optimizing the effectiveness of such research or training, detailed data on the anatomy of their particular features are needed. At present, however, only limited information related to surgical and imaging anatomy of the facial and orbital areas of the pig and its comparison to human structures from the experimental surgery point of view is available in the literature. The aim of this study was to obtain such data and to compare the morphological structures of the porcine and human orbital regions and to lay down the foundation for practical use in experimental surgery. Ten pig heads were examined using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and, subsequently, a dissection of the orbit was carried out. Attention was focused on the structure of the orbit (floor, rim and nerves) frequently affected by pathological processes in humans (such as trauma, infection or tumours) and which consequently are frequently the subject of maxillofacial surgery. The porcine orbit is suitable for use in experimental medicine. However, if used in experiments, its anatomical peculiarities must be taken into consideration. Our study presents a foundation of basic knowledge for researchers who plan to use the pig as a biomedical model to investigate alternative treatments in the head region.

  17. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M; Mansy, Hansen A; Sandler, Richard H; Royston, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This "subject-specific" model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment.

  18. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M.; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This “subject-specific” model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  19. Model based vibration monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Esat, I.; Paya, B.; Badi, M.N.M.

    1996-11-01

    The principal source of vibratory excitation of gear system is the unsteady component of the relative angular motion of pair of meshing spur gears. This vibratory excitation is described by the transmission error. The transmission error present itself as a varying force at the contact point of the meshing gear teeth. The varying force is also influenced by the varying tooth stiffness due to change of orientation of teeth relative to each other, during the contact phase of each pair. Such a varying force produces both lateral and torsional excitation to the gear system. This paper presents analytical formulation of a simple two meshing spur gear system as a three mass system (18 DOF). The mathematical model also incorporates the analytical formulation of the tooth stiffness. The analytical results are compared with the experimental results. At this stage of analysis the procedure developed for handling the nonlinear influences of the tooth geometry is not fully implemented and the tooth stiffness taken as a constant value representing the average tooth stiffness. The comparison between the analytical and experimental results are encouraging as three main frequency obtained from FFT of the experimental results correlates very closely with the analytical results.

  20. Development and translational imaging of a TP53 porcine tumorigenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, Jessica C.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T.; Newell, John D.; Hammond, Emily; Rohret, Judy A.; Rohret, Frank A.; Struzynski, Jason T.; Goeken, J. Adam; Naumann, Paul W.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Taghiyev, Agshin; Van Rheeden, Richard; Hagen, Jussara; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.; Rogers, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the second deadliest disease in the United States, necessitating improvements in tumor diagnosis and treatment. Current model systems of cancer are informative, but translating promising imaging approaches and therapies to clinical practice has been challenging. In particular, the lack of a large-animal model that accurately mimics human cancer has been a major barrier to the development of effective diagnostic tools along with surgical and therapeutic interventions. Here, we developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer in which animals express a mutation in TP53 (which encodes p53) that is orthologous to one commonly found in humans (R175H in people, R167H in pigs). TP53R167H/R167H mutant pigs primarily developed lymphomas and osteogenic tumors, recapitulating the tumor types observed in mice and humans expressing orthologous TP53 mutant alleles. CT and MRI imaging data effectively detected developing tumors, which were validated by histopathological evaluation after necropsy. Molecular genetic analyses confirmed that these animals expressed the R167H mutant p53, and evaluation of tumors revealed characteristic chromosomal instability. Together, these results demonstrated that TP53R167H/R167H pigs represent a large-animal tumor model that replicates the human condition. Our data further suggest that this model will be uniquely suited for developing clinically relevant, noninvasive imaging approaches to facilitate earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of human cancers. PMID:25105366

  1. Endovascular Broad-Neck Aneurysm Creation in a Porcine Model Using a Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlenbruch, Georg Nikoubashman, Omid; Steffen, Bjoern; Dadak, Mete; Palmowski, Moritz; Wiesmann, Martin

    2013-02-15

    Ruptured cerebral arterial aneurysms require prompt treatment by either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. Training for these sophisticated endovascular procedures is essential and ideally performed in animals before their use in humans. Simulators and established animal models have shown drawbacks with respect to degree of reality, size of the animal model and aneurysm, or time and effort needed for aneurysm creation. We therefore aimed to establish a realistic and readily available aneurysm model. Five anticoagulated domestic pigs underwent endovascular intervention through right femoral access. A total of 12 broad-neck aneurysms were created in the carotid, subclavian, and renal arteries using the Amplatzer vascular plug. With dedicated vessel selection, cubic, tubular, and side-branch aneurysms could be created. Three of the 12 implanted occluders, two of them implanted over a side branch of the main vessel, did not induce complete vessel occlusion. However, all aneurysms remained free of intraluminal thrombus formation and were available for embolization training during a surveillance period of 6 h. Two aneurysms underwent successful exemplary treatment: one was stent-assisted, and one was performed with conventional endovascular coil embolization. The new porcine aneurysm model proved to be a straightforward approach that offers a wide range of training and scientific applications that might help further improve endovascular coil embolization therapy in patients with cerebral aneurysms.

  2. Development of an ex vivo human-porcine respiratory model for preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Perinel, Sophie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Leclerc, Lara; Avet, John; Durand, Marc; Prévôt, Nathalie; Cottier, Michèle; Vergnon, Jean M.

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical models to study aerosol delivery impose huge limitations and extrapolation to humans remains controversial. This study aimed to develop and validate an ex vivo human-like respiratory tract model easy to use and relevant to compare to in vivo human data. A human plastinated head is connected to an ex vivo porcine pulmonary tract ventilated artificially by passive expansion. A physiological study measures “pleural” depressions, tidal volumes, and minute ventilation for the respiratory rates chosen (10, 15, and 20 per minute) with three inspiratory/expiratory ratios (1/1, 1/2, and 1/3). Scintigraphy with 81mKrypton assesses the homogeneity of the ventilation. Forty different experiments were set for validation, with 36 (90%) ventilating successfully. At a respiratory rate of 15/minute with inspiratory/expiratory ratio of 1/2, the tidal volume average was 824 mL (standard deviation, 207 mL). The scintigraphy performed on 16 ex vivo models (44.4%), showed homogenous ventilation with great similarity to human physiological studies. Ratio of the peripheral to central count rates were equally correlated with human data published in the literature. This new model, combining research feasibility and human physiology likeness, provides a realistic approach to human inhalation and therefore can be an interesting tool in aerosol regional deposition studies. PMID:28233793

  3. Development of an ex vivo human-porcine respiratory model for preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Perinel, Sophie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Leclerc, Lara; Avet, John; Durand, Marc; Prévôt, Nathalie; Cottier, Michèle; Vergnon, Jean M

    2017-02-24

    Anatomical models to study aerosol delivery impose huge limitations and extrapolation to humans remains controversial. This study aimed to develop and validate an ex vivo human-like respiratory tract model easy to use and relevant to compare to in vivo human data. A human plastinated head is connected to an ex vivo porcine pulmonary tract ventilated artificially by passive expansion. A physiological study measures "pleural" depressions, tidal volumes, and minute ventilation for the respiratory rates chosen (10, 15, and 20 per minute) with three inspiratory/expiratory ratios (1/1, 1/2, and 1/3). Scintigraphy with (81m)Krypton assesses the homogeneity of the ventilation. Forty different experiments were set for validation, with 36 (90%) ventilating successfully. At a respiratory rate of 15/minute with inspiratory/expiratory ratio of 1/2, the tidal volume average was 824 mL (standard deviation, 207 mL). The scintigraphy performed on 16 ex vivo models (44.4%), showed homogenous ventilation with great similarity to human physiological studies. Ratio of the peripheral to central count rates were equally correlated with human data published in the literature. This new model, combining research feasibility and human physiology likeness, provides a realistic approach to human inhalation and therefore can be an interesting tool in aerosol regional deposition studies.

  4. The Effect of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension Incorporating Severe Acute Pancreatitis in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhi-hui; Ni, Hai-bin; Ding, Wei-wei; Sun, Jia-kui; Li, Wei-qin; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-shou

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and intra abdominal hypertension(IAH) are common clinical findings in patients with severe acute pancreatitis(SAP). It is thought that an increased intra abdominal pressure(IAP) is associated with poor prognosis in SAP patients. But the detailed effect of IAH/ACS on different organ system is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of SAP combined with IAH on hemodynamics, systemic oxygenation, and organ damage in a 12 h lasting porcine model. Measurements and Methods Following baseline registrations, a total of 30 animals were divided into 5 groups (6 animals in each group): SAP+IAP30 group, SAP+IAP20 group, SAP group, IAP30 group(sham-operated but without SAP) and sham-operated group. We used a N2 pneumoperitoneum to induce different levels of IAH and retrograde intra-ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate to induce SAP. The investigation period was 12 h. Hemodynamic parameters (CO, HR, MAP, CVP), urine output, oxygenation parameters(e.g., SvO2, PO2, PaCO2), peak inspiratory pressure, as well as serum parameters (e.g., ALT, amylase, lactate, creatinine) were recorded. Histological examination of liver, intestine, pancreas, and lung was performed. Main Results Cardiac output significantly decreased in the SAP+IAH animals compared with other groups. Furthermore, AST, creatinine, SUN and lactate showed similar increasing tendency paralleled with profoundly decrease in SvO2. The histopathological analyses also revealed higher grade injury of liver, intestine, pancreas and lung in the SAP+IAH groups. However, few differences were found between the two SAP+IAH groups with different levels of IAP. Conclusions Our newly developed porcine SAP+IAH model demonstrated that there were remarkable effects on global hemodynamics, oxygenation and organ function in response to sustained IAH of 12 h combined with SAP. Moreover, our model should be helpful to study the mechanisms of IAH/ACS-induced exacerbation and

  5. Validation of a realistic, simple, and inexpensive EUS-FNA training model using isolated porcine stomach

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Imbe, Koh

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Trainees are required to learn EUS-FNA using a model before working with a patient. The aim of the current study was to validate a new training model developed for EUS-FNA. Patients and methods: Several fresh chicken tenderloins were embedded as target lesions in the submucosal layer of an isolated porcine stomach. The stomach was fixed to a plate with nails, and was placed in a tub filled with water. The primary endpoint was feasibility of the newly developed model for EUS-FNA training, evaluated as follows: 1) visualization of the target lesion with blinding for lesion location; 2) penetrability of the needle; 3) sampling rate of macroscopic specimen; and 4) ROSE capability. Secondary endpoints were its durability and utility for multiple EUS-FNA procedures during EUS-FNA training, and the ease and cost of preparing the model. Results: Six endoscopists (1 expert, 5 trainees) attempted EUS-FNA procedures using this model. The target lesion could be identified clearly, and EUS-FNA could be performed with realistic resistance felt. In addition, rapid on-site evaluation could be easily achieved. Based on 10 needlings by each endoscopist, adequate specimens for histology could be macroscopically taken with an average 85 % success rate. Visibility and maneuverability were maintained throughout all needlings. Preparation time for this model was less than 30 minutes with a total cost of $ 22. Conclusions: An easy-to-use and inexpensive training model with a realistic feel of needling was created. This model can potentially enable beginners to practice safe and effective EUS-FNA procedures. PMID:27652292

  6. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided placement of a transhepatic portal vein stent in a live porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kang, Hyeon-Ji; Cho, Min Keun; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Percutaneous portal vein (PV) stent placement is used to manage PV occlusion or stenosis caused by malignancy. The use of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has expanded to include vascular interventions. The aim of this study was to examine the technical feasibility and safety of EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement in a live porcine model. Materials and Methods: EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement was performed in six male miniature pigs under general anesthesia using forward-viewing echoendoscope. Under EUS guidance, the left intrahepatic PV was punctured with a 19-gauge fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle and a 0.025 inch guidewire inserted through the needle and into the main PV. The FNA needle was then withdrawn and a needle-knife inserted to dilate the tract. Under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance, a noncovered metal stent was inserted over the guidewire and released into the main PV. Results: A PV stent was placed successfully in all six pigs with no technical problems or complications. The patency of the stent in the main PV was confirmed using color Doppler EUS and transhepatic portal venography. Necropsy of the first three animals revealed no evidence of bleeding and damage to intra-abdominal organs or vessels. No complications occurred in the remaining three animals during the 8 weeks observation period. Conclusions: EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement can be both technically feasible and safe in a live animal model. PMID:27803904

  7. Comparative Efficacy of Nebivolol and Metoprolol to Prevent Tachycardia-Induced Cardiomyopathy in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Nazeri, Alireza; Elayda, MacArthur A.; Segura, Ana Maria; Stainback, Raymond F.; Nathan, Joanna; Lee, Vei-Vei; Bove, Christina; Sampaio, Luiz; Grace, Brian; Massumi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tachycardia is a well-known cause of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that nebivolol, a β-blocker with nitric oxide activity, would be superior to a pure β-blocker in preventing tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in a porcine model. Fifteen healthy Yucatan pigs were randomly assigned to receive nebivolol, metoprolol, or placebo once a day. All pigs underwent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation. The medication was started the day after the pacemaker implantation. On day 7 after implantation, each pacemaker was set at atrioventricular pace (rate, 170 beats/min), and the pigs were observed for another 7 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiograms, serum catecholamine levels, and blood chemistry data were obtained at baseline and at the end of the study. At the end of week 8, the pigs were euthanized, and complete histopathologic studies were performed. All the pigs developed left ventricular cardiomyopathy but remained hemodynamically stable and survived to the end of the study. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction decreased from baseline by 34%, 20%, and 20% in the nebivolol, metoprolol, and placebo groups, respectively. These changes did not differ significantly among the 3 groups (P =0.51). Histopathologic analysis revealed mild left ventricular perivascular fibrosis with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in 14 of the 15 pigs. Both nebivolol and metoprolol failed to prevent cardiomyopathy in our animal model of persistent tachycardia and a high catecholamine state. PMID:28100964

  8. Comparing the Effectiveness of Polymer Debriding Devices Using a Porcine Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Holly N.; McBain, Andrew J.; Stephenson, Christian; Hardman, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Debridement to remove necrotic and/or infected tissue and promote active healing remains a cornerstone of contemporary chronic wound management. While there has been a recent shift toward less invasive polymer-based debriding devices, their efficacy requires rigorous evaluation. Approach: This study was designed to directly compare monofilament debriding devices to traditional gauze using a wounded porcine skin biofilm model with standardized application parameters. Biofilm removal was determined using a surface viability assay, bacterial counts, histological assessment, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Quantitative analysis revealed that monofilament debriding devices outperformed the standard gauze, resulting in up to 100-fold greater reduction in bacterial counts. Interestingly, histological and morphological analyses suggested that debridement not only removed bacteria, but also differentially disrupted the bacterially-derived extracellular polymeric substance. Finally, SEM of post-debridement monofilaments showed structural changes in attached bacteria, implying a negative impact on viability. Innovation: This is the first study to combine controlled and defined debridement application with a biologically relevant ex vivo biofilm model to directly compare monofilament debriding devices. Conclusion: These data support the use of monofilament debriding devices for the removal of established wound biofilms and suggest variable efficacy towards biofilms composed of different species of bacteria. PMID:27867752

  9. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of metastatic lesions in bone: studies in rat and porcine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, S.; Bisland, Stuart K.; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Bogaards, Arjen; Moseley, Douglas; Yee, A.; Finkelstein, J.; Wilson, Brian

    2004-06-01

    This study represents the first reported use of photodynamic therapy in bone and specifically, as a treatment for spinal metastases. A metastatic model in rat confirmed the efficacy of benzoporphyrin derivative-monoacid-mediated PDT for treating lesions within the spine and appendicular bone. Fluorimetry confirmed the selective accumulation of drug into the tumor(s) at 3 hours post-injection. 48 hrs post light delivery into the vertebral body of the rat spine loss of bioluminescent signal and histological analyses of sectioned spine confirmed MT-1 tumor cell kill in vivo as previously confirmed in vitro using an established cell viability assay. Porcine vertebrae provided a model comparable to that of human for light propagation and PDT response. Light measurements were recorded at 2.5 mm increments as the detector probe was retracted out of the vertebral body away from a diffusing fiber at 70-90° planar angle to it. At 30 minutes or 1hr post BPD-MA administration (6 mg/m2), light (648 J, 150 mW/cm, 690 nm) was delivered to vertebrae L1 and/or L2. Vertebrae were harvested and sectioned for histology 48 hrs following PDT. Light propagation was plotted as distance (μm) from the emitting source. Results support the application of PDT to the treatment of primary or metastatic lesions within bone.

  10. Finite element model of the temperature increase in excised porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-07-01

    In order to model the thermal effect of laser exposure of the iris during laser corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris. The simulation data for the 60 kHz FS60 Laser showed that the temperature increased up to 1.23°C and 2.45°C (at laser pulse energy 1 and 2 µJ, respectively) by the 24 second procedure time. Calculated temperature profiles show good agreement with data obtained from ex vivo experiments using porcine cadaver iris. Simulation results of different types of femtosecond lasers indicate that the Laser in situ keratomileusis procedure does not present a safety hazard to the iris.

  11. Towards the Establishment of a Porcine Model to Study Human Amebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Cognie, Juliette; Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Larcher, Thibaut; Melo, Sandrine; Bruel, Timothée; Guibon, Roseline; Chérel, Yan; Sarradin, Pierre; Salmon, Henri; Guillén, Nancy; Meurens, François

    2011-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica is an important parasite of the human intestine. Its life cycle is monoxenous with two stages: (i) the trophozoite, growing in the intestine and (ii) the cyst corresponding to the dissemination stage. The trophozoite in the intestine can live as a commensal leading to asymptomatic infection or as a tissue invasive form producing mucosal ulcers and liver abscesses. There is no animal model mimicking the whole disease cycle. Most of the biological information on E. histolytica has been obtained from trophozoite adapted to axenic culture. The reproduction of intestinal amebiasis in an animal model is difficult while for liver amebiasis there are well-described rodent models. During this study, we worked on the assessment of pigs as a new potential model to study amebiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We first co-cultured trophozoites of E. histolytica with porcine colonic fragments and observed a disruption of the mucosal architecture. Then, we showed that outbred pigs can be used to reproduce some lesions associated with human amebiasis. A detailed analysis was performed using a washed closed-jejunal loops model. In loops inoculated with virulent amebas a severe acute ulcerative jejunitis was observed with large hemorrhagic lesions 14 days post-inoculation associated with the presence of the trophozoites in the depth of the mucosa in two out four animals. Furthermore, typical large sized hepatic abscesses were observed in the liver of one animal 7 days post-injection in the portal vein and the liver parenchyma. Conclusions The pig model could help with simultaneously studying intestinal and extraintestinal lesion development. PMID:22205970

  12. Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Detection of Microcirculatory Dysfunction in Small Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haifeng; Li, Ruokun; Qiang, Jinwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Li; Sun, Rongxun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate multi-slice computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging (CTPI) for identifying microcirculatory dysfunction in small intestinal ischemia−reperfusion (IR) injury in a porcine model. Materials and Methods Fifty-two pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1) the IR group (n = 24), where intestinal ischemia was induced by separating and clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 2 h, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h (IR-1h, IR-2h, IR-3h, and IR-4h; n = 6, respectively); (2) the sham-operated (SO) group (n = 20), where the SMA was separated without clamping and controlled at postoperative 3, 4, 5, and 6 h (SO-3h, SO-4h, SO-5h, and SO-6h; n = 5, respectively); (3) the ischemia group (n = 4), where the SMA was separated and clamped for 2 h, without reperfusion, and (4) baseline group (n = 4), an additional group that was not manipulated. Small intestinal CTPI was performed at corresponding time points and perfusion parameters were obtained. The distal ileum was resected to measure the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and for histopathological examination. Results The perfusion parameters of the IR groups showed significant differences compared with the corresponding SO groups and the baseline group (before ischemia). The blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability surface (PS) among the 4 IR groups were significantly different. BF and BV were significantly negatively correlated with MDA, and significantly positively correlated with SOD in the IR groups. Histopathologically, the effects of the 2-h ischemic loops were not significantly exacerbated by reperfusion. Conclusion CTPI can be a valuable tool for detecting microcirculatory dysfunction and for dynamic monitoring of small intestinal IR injury. PMID:27458696

  13. Acute Multi-modal Neuroimaging in a Porcine Model of Endothelin-1-Induced Cerebral Ischemia: Defining the Acute Infarct Core.

    PubMed

    d'Esterre, Christopher D; Aviv, Richard I; Morrison, Laura; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting Yim

    2015-06-01

    In a porcine ischemic stroke model, we sought to compare the acute predicted infarct core volume (PIV) defined by CT perfusion (CTP)-hemodynamic parameters and MR-diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI)/apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), with the true infarct core volume (TIV) as defined by histology. Ten Duroc-cross pigs had a CTP scan prior to injection of endothelin-1 (ET-1) into the left striatum. CTP scans were used to monitor ischemic progression. A second dose of ET-1 was injected 2 h from the first injection. The animal was moved to a 3-T MRI scanner where DWI was performed. CTP imaging was acquired immediately after the MR imaging. Next, the brain was removed and stained with tetrazolium chloride (TTC). Linear regression and Bland-Altman plots were used to correlate the PIV measured by each imaging modality to that of the TIV from the histological gold standard. The CTP-cerebral blood flow (CBF) parameter had the highest R (2) value and slope closest to unity, while the CTP-cerebral blood volume (CBV) had the lowest R(2) value and slope furthest away from unity. The CTP-CBF • CBV product parameter had a higher R(2) value but lower slope than both MR parameers. The best Bland-Altman agreement was observed with the CTP-CBF parameter. PIV from MR-DWI, ADC, and CTP-CBF overestimated the TIV defined with histology. We show that the PIV defined with absolute gray and white matter CT-CBF thresholds correlates best with the TIV and is similar to both MR-DWI and ADC-defined PIVs. Further, the acute CBF • CBV mismatch may not indicate penumbral tissue in the acute stroke setting.

  14. In vivo images of the epidural space with two- and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Background No reports exist concerning in vivo optical coherence tomography visualization of the epidural space and the blood patch process in the epidural space. In this study, we produced real-time two-dimensional and reconstructed three-dimensional images of the epidural space by using optical coherence tomography in a porcine model. We also aimed to produce three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images of the dura puncture and blood patch process. Methods Two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images were obtained using a swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system. Four laboratory pigs were intubated and ventilated after the induction of general anesthesia. An 18-gauge Tuohy needle was used as a tunnel for the optical coherence tomography probe to the epidural space. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstruction optical coherence tomography images of the epidural space were acquired in four stages. Results In stage 1, real-time two-dimensional and reconstructed three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of the lumbar and thoracic epidural space were successfully acquired. In stage 2, the epidural catheter in the epidural space was successfully traced in the 3D optical coherence tomography images. In stage 3, water injection and lumbar puncture were successfully monitored in all study animals. In stage 4, 10 mL of fresh blood was injected into the epidural space and two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images were successfully acquired. Conclusions These animal experiments suggest the potential capability of using an optical coherence tomography-based imaging needle in the directed two-dimensional and three-dimensional visualization of the epidural space. More investigations involving humans are required before optical coherence tomography can be recommended for routine use. However, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography may provide a novel, minimally invasive

  15. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor).

  16. In vivo microscopy in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Czaplik, Michael; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf

    2010-07-31

    Regional inhomogeneity and alveolar mechanics in a porcine model of acute lung injury (ALI) was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM was performed through thoracic windows of the upper and lower lobes. Image quantification was conducted by use of a volume air index (VAI). Twelve anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to non-injury (control group, n = 6) or ALI induced by surfactant depletion (ALI group, n = 6). CLSM was performed at baseline, after 1 h at 5 mbar and after 2 h at 15 mbar positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Haemodynamics, respiratory mechanics and calculation of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion distribution by MIGET were determined. At baseline, VAI was not different. In the upper lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group, with no changes after PEEP application. In the lower lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group. Incremental PEEP significantly increased VAI in ALI, but not in control group. Haemodynamics were significantly compromised in the ALI group. A significant deterioration in oxygenation and ventilation-perfusion distribution could be seen being restored after PEEP adjustment. The VAI may help to assess regional inhomogeneity of the acutely injured lung.

  17. Antibody Responses to Sarcoptes scabiei Apolipoprotein in a Porcine Model: Relevance to Immunodiagnosis of Recent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, Melanie; Walton, Shelley F.; Holt, Deborah C.; Pasay, Cielo; Kelly, Andrew; Currie, Bart J.; McCarthy, James S.; Mounsey, Kate E.

    2013-01-01

    No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA). Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8–16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations. PMID:23762351

  18. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Erin M.; Voeller, Guy R.; Roth, J. Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Iannitti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency. PMID:23762628

  19. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  20. Brief report: biomarkers of aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection in a porcine model with Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Langerhuus, S N; Tønnesen, E K; Jensen, K H; Damgaard, B M; Heegaard, P M H; Halekoh, U; Lauridsen, C

    2010-11-01

    Aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection (AVPGI) with Staphylococcus aureus is a feared post-operative complication. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical signs and potential biomarkers of infection in a porcine AVPGI model. The biomarkers evaluated were: C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, white blood cells (WBC), major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II) density, lymphocyte CD4:CD8 ratio and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in vitro responsiveness. Sixteen pigs were included in the study, and randomly assigned into four groups (n = 4): "SHAM" pigs had their infra-renal aorta exposed by laparotomy; "CLEAN" pigs had an aortic graft inserted; "LOW" and "HIGH" pigs had an aortic graft inserted and, subsequently, S. aureus were inoculated on the graft material (5 × 10(4) colony-forming units [CFU] and 1 × 10(6) CFU, respectively). Biomarkers were evaluated prior to surgery and on day 2, 5, 7, and 14 post-operatively in blood samples. Of all biomarkers evaluated, CRP was superior for diagnosing S. aureus AVPGI in pigs, with a sensitivity of 0.86 and a specificity of 0.75.

  1. Comparison of percutaneous cryoablation with microwave ablation in a porcine liver model.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lizhi; Li, Jialiang; Zeng, Jianying; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Song; Zhou, Xulong; Sheng, Lin; Chen, Jibing; Xu, Kecheng

    2014-04-01

    We compared imaging and pathological changes between argon-helium cryosurgical (AH) and microwave (MW) ablation in a porcine liver model. Immediately after ablation, computed tomography (CT) imaging showed that the area affected by MW ablation was considerably greater than that affected by AH ablation; moreover, the surface area of necrotic tissue was considerably greater in the AH group, whereas the depth of the necrotic area was similar. Seven days after ablation, the affected area had not changed much in the AH group, but it had significantly increased in the MW group; similarly, the surface and depth of the necrotic areas had not changed much in the AH group, but they had increased significantly in the MW group. The pathological findings showed similar definitive areas for both groups at both time points. The findings indicated that long time after both therapies, complete tissue necrosis can be achieved, but the extent and depth of necrosis differ: necrosis foci after AH ablation could be predicted by ice ball under CT image, and necrosis foci after MW ablation will increase obviously. MW ablation might therefore be suitable for tumors with a larger volume and simple anatomical structures, and AH ablation might be suitable for tumors with complex anatomical structures or those located near important organs. These two methods could therefore be used in combination in clinical settings, but details of the procedure need to be studied.

  2. Studies using a porcine model: what insights into human calcium oxalate stone formation mechanisms has this model facilitated?

    PubMed

    Penniston, Kristina L; Patel, Sutchin R; Schwahn, Denise J; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2017-02-01

    Animal models are useful in the study of many human diseases. Our current understanding of the biological, physiological, and biochemical aspects of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis has been greatly informed by studies using animals. Recently, limitations in the extrapolation to humans of research results derived from laboratory rodents have been identified. The use in biomedical research of a variety of organisms, including large animals, is increasingly encouraged. The purpose of this article is to review the use of pigs in biomedical and stone research, to provide a rationale for using pigs in metabolic stone research, and to describe our 8-year experience in developing a porcine platform for studying hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis. In this article, we share and review some of the highlights of our findings. We also report results from a recent feeding swine study that demonstrated oxalate-induced renal nephropathy. Finally, we offer ideas for future directions in urolithiasis research using swine.

  3. Feasibility of (68)Ga-labeled Siglec-9 peptide for the imaging of acute lung inflammation: a pilot study in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Jaime; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Borges, João Batista; Feinstein, Ricardo; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Antoni, Gunnar; Hedenstierna, Göran; Roivainen, Anne; Larsson, Anders; Velikyan, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for noninvasive, specific and quantitative imaging of inherent inflammatory activity. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) translocates to the luminal surface of endothelial cells upon inflammatory challenge. We hypothesized that in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), positron emission tomography (PET) with sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) based imaging agent targeting VAP-1 would allow quantification of regional pulmonary inflammation. ARDS was induced by lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamics, respiratory system compliance (Crs) and blood gases were monitored. Dynamic examination using [(15)O]water PET-CT (10 min) was followed by dynamic (90 min) and whole-body examination using VAP-1 targeting (68)Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-ethylene glycol-conjugated Siglec-9 motif peptide ([(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9). The animals received an anti-VAP-1 antibody for post-mortem immunohistochemistry assay of VAP-1 receptors. Tissue samples were collected post-mortem for the radioactivity uptake, histology and immunohistochemistry assessment. Marked reduction of oxygenation and Crs, and higher degree of inflammation were observed in ARDS animals. [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET showed significant uptake in lungs, kidneys and urinary bladder. Normalization of the net uptake rate (Ki) for the tissue perfusion resulted in 4-fold higher uptake rate of [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 in the ARDS lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed positive VAP-1 signal in the injured lungs. Detection of pulmonary inflammation associated with a porcine model of ARDS was possible with [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET when using kinetic modeling and normalization for tissue perfusion.

  4. Feasibility of 68Ga-labeled Siglec-9 peptide for the imaging of acute lung inflammation: a pilot study in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Jaime; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Borges, João Batista; Feinstein, Ricardo; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Antoni, Gunnar; Hedenstierna, Göran; Roivainen, Anne; Larsson, Anders; Velikyan, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for noninvasive, specific and quantitative imaging of inherent inflammatory activity. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) translocates to the luminal surface of endothelial cells upon inflammatory challenge. We hypothesized that in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), positron emission tomography (PET) with sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) based imaging agent targeting VAP-1 would allow quantification of regional pulmonary inflammation. ARDS was induced by lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamics, respiratory system compliance (Crs) and blood gases were monitored. Dynamic examination using [15O]water PET-CT (10 min) was followed by dynamic (90 min) and whole-body examination using VAP-1 targeting 68Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-ethylene glycol-conjugated Siglec-9 motif peptide ([68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9). The animals received an anti-VAP-1 antibody for post-mortem immunohistochemistry assay of VAP-1 receptors. Tissue samples were collected post-mortem for the radioactivity uptake, histology and immunohistochemistry assessment. Marked reduction of oxygenation and Crs, and higher degree of inflammation were observed in ARDS animals. [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET showed significant uptake in lungs, kidneys and urinary bladder. Normalization of the net uptake rate (Ki) for the tissue perfusion resulted in 4-fold higher uptake rate of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 in the ARDS lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed positive VAP-1 signal in the injured lungs. Detection of pulmonary inflammation associated with a porcine model of ARDS was possible with [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET when using kinetic modeling and normalization for tissue perfusion. PMID:27069763

  5. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, Gerardus PJ; Teuben, Michel PJ; Heeres, Marjolein; de Maat, Steven; de Jong, Renate; Maas, Coen; Kouwenberg, Lisanne HJA; Koenderman, Leo; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Jager, Saskia CA; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting translational failure. Experimentally, MI is induced artificially and the effect of the experimental procedures may influence outcome and thus clinical applicability. The aim of this study was to investigate if invasive surgery, as in the common open chest MI model affects IS and cardiac function. Twenty female landrace pigs were subjected to MI by transluminal balloon occlusion. In 10 of 20 pigs, balloon occlusion was preceded by invasive surgery (medial sternotomy). After 72 hrs, pigs were subjected to echocardiography and Evans blue/triphenyl tetrazoliumchloride double staining to determine IS and area at risk. Quantification of IS showed a significant IS reduction in the open chest group compared to the closed chest group (IS versus area at risk: 50.9 ± 5.4% versus 69.9 ± 3.4%, P = 0.007). End systolic LV volume and LV ejection fraction measured by echocardiography at follow-up differed significantly between both groups (51 ± 5 ml versus 65 ± 3 ml, P = 0.033; 47.5 ± 2.6% versus 38.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.005). The inflammatory response in the damaged myocardium did not differ between groups. This study indicates that invasive surgery reduces IS and preserves cardiac function in a porcine MI model. Future studies need to elucidate the effect of infarct induction technique on the efficacy of pharmacological therapies in large animal cardioprotection studies. PMID:26282710

  6. Development of a Bronchial Wall Model: Triple Culture on a Decellularized Porcine Trachea.

    PubMed

    Melo, Esther; Kasper, Jennifer Y; Unger, Ronald E; Farré, Ramon; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2015-09-01

    In vitro coculture models mimicking the bronchial barrier are a significant step forward in investigating the behavior and function of the upper respiratory tract mucosa. To date, mostly synthetic materials have been used as substrates to culture the cells. However, decellularized tissues provide a more in vivo-like environment based on the native extracellular matrix. In this study, an in vitro, bronchial wall coculture model has been established using a decellularized, porcine luminal trachea membrane and employing three relevant human cell types. The tissue was decellularized and placed in plastic transwell supports. The human bronchial epithelial cell line, 16HBE14o-, was seeded on the apical side of the membrane with the human lung fibroblast cell line, Wi-38, and/or the microvascular endothelial cell line, ISO-HAS-1, seeded on the basolateral side. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured over 10 days and tight/adherens junctions (ZO-1, occludin/β-catenin) were studied through immunofluorescence. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to evaluate microvilli and cilia formation. All cultures grew successfully on the membrane. TER values of 555 Ω·cm(2) (±21, SEM) were achieved in the monoculture. Cocultures with fibroblasts reached 565 Ω·cm(2) (±41, SEM), with endothelial cells at 638 Ω·cm(2) (±37, SEM), and the triple culture achieved 552 Ω·cm(2) (±38, SEM). ZO-1, occludin, and β-catenin were expressed in 16HBE14o- under all culture conditions. Using SEM, a dense microvilli population was found. Prominent cell-cell contacts and clusters of emerging cilia could be identified. Fibroblasts and endothelial cells strengthened the formation of a tight barrier by the 16HBE14o-. Thus, the coculture of three relevant cell types in combination with native decellularized scaffolds as a substrate approaches more closely the in vivo situation and could be used to study mechanisms of upper respiratory damage and regeneration.

  7. Degenerative effects of cobalt-chloride treatment on neurons and microglia in a porcine retina organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, S; Hurst, J; Rensinghoff, F; Tsai, T; Grauthoff, S; Satgunarajah, Y; Dick, H B; Schnichels, S; Joachim, S C

    2017-01-12

    In order to understand the pathological processes of retinal diseases, experimental models are necessary. Cobalt, as part of the vitamin B12 complex, is important for neuronal integrity. However, it is known that high quantities of cobalt induce cytotoxic mechanisms via hypoxia mimicry. Therefore, we tested the degenerative effect of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on neurons and microglia in a porcine retina organ culture model. Organotypic cultures of porcine retinas were cultured and treated with different concentrations of CoCl2 (0, 100, 300 and 500 μM) for 48 h. After four and eight days, CoCl2 induced a strong degeneration of the porcine retina, starting at 300 μM. A loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, Brn-3a), amacrine cells (calretinin) and bipolar cells (PKCα) was observed. Additionally, a high expression of hypoxia induced factor-1a (HIF-1a) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was noted at both points in time. Also, the Caspase 3 protein was activated and P21 expression was induced. However, only at day four, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was increased. The effect of CoCl2 was not restricted to neurons. CoCl2 concentrations reduced the microglia amount (Iba1) and activity (Iba1 + Fcγ-Receptor) at both points in time. These damaging effects on microglia were surprising, since CoCl2 causes hypoxia and a pro-inflammatory environment. However, high concentrations of CoCl2 also seem to be toxic to these cells. Similar degenerative mechanisms as in comparison to retinal ischemia animal models were observed. In summary, an effective and reproducible hypoxia-mimicking organotypic model for retinal degeneration was established, which is easy to handle and ready for drug studies.

  8. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  9. Carbon dioxide laser ablation with immediate autografting in a full-thickness porcine burn model.

    PubMed Central

    Glatter, R D; Goldberg, J S; Schomacker, K T; Compton, C C; Flotte, T J; Bua, D P; Greaves, K W; Nishioka, N S; Sheridan, R L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term clinical and histologic outcome of immediate autografting of full-thickness burn wounds ablated with a high-power continuous-wave CO2 laser to sharply débrided wounds in a porcine model. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Continuous-wave CO2 lasers have performed poorly as tools for burn excision because the large amount of thermal damage to viable subeschar tissues precluded successful autografting. However, a new technique, in which a high-power laser is rapidly scanned over the eschar, results in eschar vaporization without significant damage to underlying viable tissues, allowing successful immediate autografting. METHODS: Full-thickness paravertebral burn wounds measuring 36 cm2 were created on 11 farm swine. Wounds were ablated to adipose tissue 48 hours later using either a surgical blade or a 150-Watt continuous-wave CO2 laser deflected by an x-y galvanometric scanner that translated the beam over the tissue surface, removing 200 microm of tissue per scan. Both sites were immediately autografted and serially evaluated clinically and histologically for 180 days. RESULTS: The laser-treated sites were nearly bloodless. The mean residual thermal damage was 0.18+/-0.05 mm. The mean graft take was 96+/-11% in manual sites and 93+/-8% in laser sites. On postoperative day 7, the thickness of granulation tissue at the graft-wound bed interface was greater in laser-debrided sites. By postoperative day 180, the manual and laser sites were histologically identical. Vancouver scar assessment revealed no differences in scarring at postoperative day 180. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term scarring, based on Vancouver scar assessments and histologic evaluation, was equivalent at 6 months in laser-ablated and sharply excised sites. Should this technology become practical, the potential clinical implications include a reduction in surgical blood loss without sacrifice of immediate engraftment rates or long-term outcome. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  10. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janice V; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E B; Greyson, Clifford R; Schwartz, Gregory G

    2013-03-15

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates.

  11. Comparison of solvents for removing pesticides from skin using an in vitro porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J L; Smith, M A; Eiteman, M A; Williams, P L; Boeniger, M F

    2000-01-01

    This study compared four solvents (1-propanol, polyethylene glycol [avg. MW 400], 10% Ivory Liquid and water, and D-TAM) for their ability to remove selected pesticides from an in vitro porcine skin model using a solvent-moistened wipe. Wipes were performed 90 min after pesticide was applied to the skin. The four pesticides selected (glyphosate, alachlor, methyl parathion, and trifluralin) were chosen because of their differences in water solubility. This study also determined whether pretreatment of skin with a solvent prior to pesticide application would either increase or decrease recovery of the pesticide. Recovery efficiencies for all solvents and pesticides were affected by the amount of contaminant on the skin. Although pesticide recoveries from all four solvents were similar (range: 45-57%), on average 1-propanol had significantly higher recoveries, followed by soap and water. There was no significant difference between polyethylene glycol, and D-TAM. When skin was pretreated with any of the four solvents before pesticide application, the recoveries of the more water soluble compounds, glyphosate and alachlor, decreased. When pretreatment with solvent preceded application of trifluralin, the pesticide with the lowest water solubility, recoveries increased. 1-Propanol or soap and water were more effective in removing pesticides from skin than polyethylene glycol or D-TAM, but the amount of pesticide recovered from skin was affected by the chemical characteristics of the pesticide (such as water solubility) and the amount of pesticide originally on the skin. This study provides information useful to the interpretation of skin wipe sample results collected in field studies.

  12. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Janice V.; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E. B.; Greyson, Clifford R.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates. PMID:23335793

  13. Assessment of Chronological Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Hilar Bile Ducts in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae Woong Lu, David S. K. Osuagwu, Ferdnand Raman, Steven; Lassman, Charles

    2013-11-07

    PurposeTo evaluate the chronological effects of irreversible electroporation (IRE) on large hilar bile ducts in an in vivo porcine model correlated with computed tomography (CT) cholangiography and histopathology.Materials and MethodsTwelve IRE zones were made along hilar bile ducts intraoperatively under ultrasound (US)-guidance in 11 pigs. Paired electrodes were placed either on opposing sides of the bile duct (straddle [STR]) or both on one side of the bile duct (one-sided [OSD]). The shortest electrode-to-duct distance was classified as periductal (≤2 mm) or nonperiductal (>2 mm). CT cholangiography and laboratory tests were performed before IRE and again at 2 days, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after IRE. Degree of bile duct injury were graded as follows: grade 0 = no narrowing; grade 1 = ≤50 % duct narrowing; grade 2 = >50 % narrowing without proximal duct dilatation; grade 3 = grade 2 with proximal duct dilatation; and grade 4 = grade 3 with enzyme elevation. Pigs were selected for killing and histopathology at 2 days, 4, and 8 weeks.ResultsNonperiductal electrode placement produced no long-term strictures in 5 of 5 ducts. Periductal electrode placement produced mild narrowing in 6 of 7 ducts: 5 grade 1 and 1 grade 2. None showed increased enzymes. There was no significant difference between STR versus OSD electrode placement. Histopathology showed minor but relatively greater ductal mural changes in narrowed ducts.ConclusionIn the larger hilar ducts, long-term patency and mural integrity appear resistant to IRE damage with the energy deposition used, especially if the electrode is not immediately periductal in position.

  14. Laparoendoscopic single-site simple nephrectomy using a magnetic anchoring system in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hyo; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Seo Yeon; Han, Deok Hyun; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic anchoring devices may reduce the number of port sites needed in laparoscopic surgery. In this study, we prospectively assessed the feasibility of using a magnetic anchoring and guidance system (MAGS) in laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery performed by novices. Materials and Methods A total of 10 LESS simple nephrectomies were performed with or without MAGS in a nonsurvival porcine model by 6 operators with no previous LESS surgery experience. After installation of the homemade single port, an intra-abdominal magnet was fixed to the renal parenchyma with suturing and stabilized by an external magnet placed on the flank so that the position of the kidney could be easily changed by moving the external handheld magnet. The length of the procedure and any intraoperative complications were evaluated. Results Operative time (mean±standard deviation) was shorter in the group using the magnetic anchoring device (M-LESS-N) than in the group with conventional LESS nephrectomy (C-LESS-N) (63±20.8 minutes vs. 82±40.7 minutes, respectively). Although all nephrectomies were completed uneventfully in the M-LESS-N group, renal vein injury occurred during dissection of the renal hilum in two cases of C-LESS-N and was resolved by simultaneous transection of the renal artery and vein with an Endo-GIA stapler. Conclusions LESS-N using MAGS is a feasible technique for surgeons with no LESS surgery experience. Taking into account the 2 cases of renal vein injury in the C-LESS-N group, the application of MAGS may be beneficial for overcoming the learning curve of LESS surgery. PMID:27195320

  15. Human keratinocyte growth factor effects in a porcine model of epidermal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Krueger, J. G.; Rubin, J. S.; D'limi, S.; Vallat, V. P.; Valentino, L.; Fahey, T.; Hawes, A.; Kingston, G.; Madden, M. R.; Mathwich, M.; Gottlieb, A.; Aaronson, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family (hence the alternative designation FGF-7). It is produced by stromal cells, but acts as a mitogen for epithelial cells. We examined the effects of topically applied KGF on healing of wounds in a porcine model. In partial-thickness wounds, KGF stimulated the rate of reepithelialization (p < 0.0002), associated with a thickening of the epidermis (p < 0.0001). Epidermis from KGF-treated full-thickness wound sites was significantly thicker (0.31 +/- 0.22 mm) compared with mirror image control sites (0.18 +/- 0.12 mm) (p < 0.0001). Moreover, the majority (77%) of KGF-treated wounds exhibited epidermis with a deep rete ridge pattern as compared with control sites. These effects were observed as early as 14 d and persisted for at least 4 wk. KGF treatment also increased the number of serrated basal cells associated with increased deposition of collagen fibers in the superficial dermis adjacent to the acanthotic epidermis. Electron microscopy revealed better developed hemidesmosomes associated with thicker bundles of tonofilaments in the serrated cells. The pattern of epidermal thickening observed in KGF-treated wounds resembled psoriasis. Psoriasis is a disease associated with epidermal thickening, parakeratosis as well as hyperproliferation that extends beyond the basal layer. In striking contrast to psoriasis, KGF-treated wounds exhibited normal orthokeratotic maturation, and proliferation was localized to the basal cells. Our present findings have significant implications concerning the role of KGF as a paracrine modulator of epidermal proliferation and differentiation. PMID:8350059

  16. Serum-stabilized naked caspase-3 siRNA protects autotransplant kidneys in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Zhao, Tian; Zhao, Zitong; Jia, Yichen; Li, Long; Zhang, Yufang; Song, Mangen; Rong, Ruiming; Xu, Ming; Nicholson, Michael L; Zhu, Tongyu; Yang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    The naked small interfering RNA (siRNA) of caspase-3, a key player in ischemia reperfusion injury, was effective in cold preserved and hemoreperfused kidneys, but not autotransplanted kidneys in our porcine models. Here, chemically modified serum stabilized caspase-3 siRNAs were further evaluated. The left kidney was retrieved and infused by University of Wisconsin solution with/without 0.3 mg caspase-3 or negative siRNA into the renal artery for 24-hour cold storage (CS). After an intravenous injection of 0.9 mg siRNA and right-uninephrectomy, the left kidney was autotransplanted for 2 weeks. The effectiveness of caspase-3 siRNA was confirmed by caspase-3 knockdown in the post-CS and/or post-transplant kidneys with reduced apoptosis and inflammation, while the functional caspase-3 siRNA in vivo was proved by detected caspase-3 mRNA degradation intermediates. HMGB1 protein was also decreased in the post-transplanted kidneys; correlated positively with renal IL-1β mRNA, but negatively with serum IL-10 or IL-4. The minimal off-target effects of caspase-3 siRNA were seen with favorable systemic responses. More importantly, renal function, associated with active caspase-3, HMGB1, apoptosis, inflammation, and tubulointerstitial damage, was improved by caspase-3 siRNA. Taken together, the 2-week autotransplanted kidneys were protected when caspase-3 siRNA administrated locally and systemically, which provides important evidence for future clinical trials.

  17. Effects of xenon and isoflurane on apoptosis and inflammation in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Sopka, Sasa; Mertens, Christine; Roehl, Anna Bettina; Schiffl, Katharina; Rossaint, Rolf; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2013-03-01

    Volatile anaesthetics can reduce the infarction size in myocardial tissue when administered before and during experimentally induced ischaemia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether xenon is beneficial compared to isoflurane in limiting myocardial tissue apoptosis and inflammation induced by experimental ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine right ventricular infarction model. Twenty-one animals used for this study randomly received isoflurane, xenon or thiopental, (n=6-8 per group). Myocardial infarction was induced for 90min, followed by reperfusion for 120min. Tissues from the left and right ventricles were removed from the sites of infarction, reperfusion and remote areas, and processed for immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis (caspase-3 staining) and neutrophilic infiltration (naphthol AS-D chloroacetate-specific esterase) were assessed and evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using an ANOVA of repeated measures. Density of apoptotic cells were higher in tissues from animals that were anesthetized with xenon. This effect was significant in comparison to isoflurane (p=0.0177). Neutrophilic infiltration was significantly higher in the right compared to the left ventricle (p<0.001), whereas no significant differences in the number of granulocytes based on the anaesthetic regime or the different tissue areas were found. We conclude that xenon, in the early phase of ischaemia and reperfusion, induces a significant increase in apoptosis compared to isoflurane. Therefore, clinical use of this anaesthetic in cardiocompromised patients should be taken with care until more long-term studies have been carried out. The increased neutrophilic infiltration in the right vs. the left ventricle indicates the right ventricle being more susceptible to ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

  18. Irreversible Electroporation of the Pancreas Using Parallel Plate Electrodes in a Porcine Model: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Steffi J. E.; Nijkamp, Maarten W.; van Dijck, Willemijn P. M.; Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Konings, Maurits; van Hillegersberg, R.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Wittkampf, Fred H.; Molenaar, I. Quintus

    2017-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) with needle electrodes is being explored as treatment option in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Several studies have shown promising results with IRE needles, positioned around the tumor to achieve tumor ablation. Disadvantages are the technical difficulties for needle placement, the time needed to achieve tumor ablation, the risk of needle track seeding and most important the possible occurrence of postoperative pancreatic fistula via the needle tracks. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new IRE-technique using two parallel plate electrodes, in a porcine model. Methods Twelve healthy pigs underwent laparotomy. The pancreas was mobilized to enable positioning of the paddles. A standard monophasic external cardiac defibrillator was used to perform an ablation in 3 separate parts of the pancreas; either a single application of 50 or 100J or a serial application of 4x50J. After 6 hours, pancreatectomy was performed for histology and pigs were terminated. Results Histology showed necrosis of pancreatic parenchyma with neutrophil influx in 5/12, 11/12 and 12/12 of the ablated areas at 50, 100, and 4x50J respectively. The electric current density threshold to achieve necrosis was 4.3, 5.1 and 3.4 A/cm2 respectively. The ablation threshold was significantly lower for the serial compared to the single applications (p = 0.003). The content of the ablated areas differed between the applications: areas treated with a single application of 50 J often contained vital areas without obvious necrosis, whereas half of the sections treated with 100 J showed small islands of normal looking cells surrounded by necrosis, while all sections receiving 4x 50 J showed a homogeneous necrotic lesion. Conclusion Pancreatic tissue can be successfully ablated using two parallel paddles around the tissue. A serial application of 4x50J was most effective in creating a homogeneous necrotic lesion. PMID:28052102

  19. Comparative assessment of drug-eluting balloons in an advanced porcine model of coronary restenosis.

    PubMed

    Joner, M; Byrne, R A; Lapointe, J-M; Radke, P W; Bayer, G; Steigerwald, K; Wittchow, E

    2011-05-01

    The advent of drug-eluting balloon (DEB) therapy has represented an important development in interventional cardiology. Nevertheless, preclinical data with this technology remain scant, and comparative studies have not previously been published. Bare metal stents were implanted in the coronary arteries of 15 pigs followed by balloon angioplasty. Animals were allocated to treatment with a 60-second inflation of one of four different balloon catheters: a conventional untreated plain angioplasty balloon (PBA, Biotronik AG), the Pantera Lux DEB (3.0 μg/mm2 paclitaxel; BTHC excipient, Biotronik AG), the Elutax DEB (2.0 μg/mm2 paclitaxel; no excipient; Aachen Resonance), or the SeQuent Please DEB (3.0 μg/mm2 paclitaxel; iopromide excipient: B. Braun). Twenty-eight days following balloon deployment, animals underwent repeat angiography for quantitative coronary angiography analysis and euthanasia for histopathologic assessment. By histology, the mean neointimal thickness was 0.44 ± 0.19 mm with PBA, 0.35 ± 0.13 mm with Pantera Lux , 0.61 ± 0.20 mm with Elutax , and 0.47 ± 0.21 mm with SeQuent Please DEB (p=0.02). In comparison with PBA, deployment of the Pantera Lux or the SeQuent Please DEB resulted in delayed healing characterised by significant increases in fibrin, neointimal cell vacuity and delayed re-endothelialisation. In conclusion, investigation of comparative DEB performance in a porcine model of advanced coronary restenosis reveals significant heterogeneity of neointimal suppression between the devices tested with numerically lowest values seen in the Pantera Lux group. On the other hand, evidence of delayed healing was observed in the most effective DEB groups.

  20. Inhibition of vascular remodelling in a porcine coronary injury model by herbal extract XS0601

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Shi, Dazhuo; Chen, Keji

    2006-01-01

    Background Arterial remodelling is a major pathologic change of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Our previous studies showed that XS0601 (consisting of Chuangxingol and paeoniflorin) had some effects on the prevention of restenosis after PCI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether and how its mechanism was related to the regulation of the arterial remodelling after endothelial injury by balloon dilation. Methods Twenty Chinese mini-pigs were randomized into four groups: control, probucol, low-dose XS0601 and high-dose XS0601 group before oversized balloon injury of the left anterior descending coronary arteries. Starting from two days before balloon injury, the mini-pigs in the treated group were administered with probucol (2 g/day) and XS0601 (0.02 g/kg/day for low dose; 0.04 g/kg/day for high dose) for four weeks after balloon injury. The animals receiving balloon injury alone were used as control. Morphometric and angiographic analysis of the injured arteries were performed. Results The contribution of intimal hyperplasia and arterial remodelling to angiographic late lumen loss was 41% and 59% respectively. XS0601 markedly inhibited proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and transformation of SMCs from contractile to synthetic phenotype in neointima, inhibited hyperplasia-related indices of morphometric analysis and reduce late angiographic lumen loss. The reduction of the late angiographic lumen loss resulting from vascular remodelling was greater after XS0601 treatment. Conclusion Both intimal hyperplasia and vascular remodelling are attributed to late lumen loss in this porcine coronary injury model. XS0601 markedly reduced angiographic late lumen loss resulting from intimal hyperplasia, vascular remodelling and XS0601 may be a potential agent to prevent restenosis after PCI. PMID:17302965

  1. Geophysical Model Applications for Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Gok, R; Rodgers, A

    2005-07-11

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics and their applications: (1) surface wave models, (2) receiver function profiles, (3) regional tomography models, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. First, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. One application of the group velocities is to construct phase-matched filters in combination with regional surface-wave magnitude formulas to improve the mb:Ms discriminant and extend it to smaller magnitude events. Next, we are using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In the past year, we have been focusing on deployments throughout the Middle East, including the Arabian Peninsula and Turkey. By assembling the results from many stations, we can see how regional seismic phases are affected by complicated upper mantle structure, including lithospheric thickness and anisotropy. The next geophysical model item, regional tomography models, can be used to predict regional travel times such as Pn and Sn. The times derived by the models can be used as a background model for empirical measurements or, where these don't exist, simply used as is. Finally, we have been exploring methodologies such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to generate data-driven stochastic models. We have applied this technique to the YSKP region using surface wave dispersion data, body wave travel time data, receiver functions, and gravity data. The models

  2. An innovative ex-vivo porcine upper gastrointestinal model for submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection (STER)

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Baldwin; Chiu, Philip; Teoh, Anthony; Zheng, Linfu; Chan, Shannon; Lam, Kelvin; Tang, Raymond; Ng, Enders K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection (STER) is a novel endoscopic technique to remove submucosal tumour (SMT). We propose a novel, low cost simulator for training of techniques for STER. Patients and methods: The model consisted of an ex-planted porcine oesophagus, stomach and duodenum with marbles embedded surgically in the submucosal plane. Two expert endoscopists with experience in submucosal tunnelling and 5 board-certified endoscopists with no experience in submucosal tunnelling were recruited. Participants were asked to perform a diagnostic endoscopy and 2 STER procedures, 1 in the oesophagus and 1 in the stomach. They also answered a structured questionnaire. Factors including operative time, mucosal and muscular injury rate, injection volume and accuracy of endoscopic closure were assessed. Results: The median time for localization of all SMTs was 40.1 seconds for experts and 38.5 seconds for novices (P = 1.000). For esophageal STER, the length of mucosal incisions and tunnelling distances were comparable between the 2 groups. The median volume injected by the novice group was significantly lower than the experts (15 mL vs 42.5 mL (P = 0.05). The median tunnelling time per length was 25.9 seconds/mm for the experts and 40.8 seconds/mm for the novice group (P = 0.38). There was a higher rate of mucosal injury and muscular perforation in the novice group (8 vs 0; P = 0.05). For gastric STER, the length of mucosal incisions and tunnel distances were comparable between the 2 groups. The median tunnelling time per length for the experts was 23.3 seconds/mm and 34.6 seconds/mm for the novice group (P = 0.38). One mucosal injury was incurred by a novice. The rate of dissection in the stomach and the oesophagus was not statistically different (P = 0.620). All participants voted that the model provides a realistic simulation and recommended it for training. Conclusions: STER is an advanced endoscopic

  3. A surfactant-based wound dressing can reduce bacterial biofilms in a porcine skin explant model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingping; Larose, Christelle; Della Porta, Alessandra C; Schultz, Gregory S; Gibson, Daniel J

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been found in many, if not all, chronic wounds. Their excessive extracellular matrix secretion and the metabolic changes that they undergo render them highly tolerant of many antibiotic and antimicrobial treatments. Physical removal and/or disruption are a common approach to treating wounds suspected of having bacterial biofilms. While many of these techniques use mechanical energy as the primary means of removal, we have begun to investigate if surfactants could facilitate the removal of bacterial biofilms, or if they might sensitise the biofilms to antimicrobial interventions. We tested a new surfactant-based wound gel on an ex vivo porcine skin explant model infected with a functionally tolerant 3-day biofilm. The wounds were dressed with a surfactant-based gel directly on the wound or with moistened gauze. The wounds were then wiped daily with moistened gauze, and the gel or gauze was re-applied. Each day, an explant from each group was harvested and tested for total viable bacteria counts and viable biofilm-protected bacteria counts. The results show that daily wiping with moistened gauze led to an initial decrease of bacteria, but by day 3, the biofilm had been fully re-established to the same level prior to the beginning of treatment. For the surfactant-based treatment, there was no detectable functional biofilm after the first treatment. The gauze control, which was also subjected to daily wiping, still contained functional biofilms, indicating that this result was not due to wiping alone. The total bacteria in the surfactant-treated explants steadily decreased through day 3, when there were no detectable bacteria, while the wiping-only control bacteria counts remained steady. The use of a moist gauze to wipe the visually apparent slime off of a wound appears to be insufficient to reduce biofilm over a 3-day period. Daily application of the surfactant gel dressing and wiping reduced the biofilm to undetectable levels within 3 days in

  4. First update of the International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--Chapter 5: recipient monitoring and response plan for preventing disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim; Tönjes, Ralf R; Takeuchi, Yasu; Fishman, Jay; Scobie, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs may be associated with the transmission of porcine microorganisms to the human recipient. A previous, 2009, version of this consensus statement focused on strategies to prevent transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs). This version addresses potential transmission of all porcine microorganisms including monitoring of the recipient and provides suggested approaches to the monitoring and prevention of disease transmission. Prior analyses assumed that most microorganisms other than the endogenous retroviruses could be eliminated from donor animals under appropriate conditions which have been called "designated pathogen-free" (DPF) source animal production. PERVs integrated as proviruses in the genome of all pigs cannot be eliminated in that manner and represent a unique risk. Certain microorganisms are by nature difficult to eliminate even under DPF conditions; any such clinically relevant microorganisms should be included in pig screening programs. With the use of porcine islets in clinical trials, special consideration has to be given to the presence of microorganisms in the isolated islet tissue to be used and also to the potential use of encapsulation. It is proposed that microorganisms absent in the donor animals by sensitive microbiological examination do not need to be monitored in the transplant recipient; this will reduce costs and screening requirements. Valid detection assays for donor and manufacturing-derived microorganisms must be established. Special consideration is needed to preempt potential unknown pathogens which may pose a risk to the recipient. This statement summarizes the main achievements in the field since 2009 and focus on issues and solutions with microorganisms other than PERV.

  5. Effects of C1 inhibitor on tissue damage in a porcine model of controlled hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Li, Yansong; Simovic, Milomir; Pusateri, Anthony E; Falabella, Michael; Dubick, Michael A; Tsokos, George C

    2012-07-01

    Activation of the complement system has been associated with tissue injury after hemorrhage and resuscitation in animals. We investigated whether administration of recombinant human C1-esterase inhibitor (rhC1-INH), a regulator of complement and contact activation systems, reduces tissue damage and cytokine release and improves metabolic acidosis in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Male Yorkshire swine were assigned to experimental groups and subjected to controlled, isobaric hemorrhage to a target mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg. Hypotension was maintained for 20 min followed by a bolus intravenous injection of rhC1-INH or vehicle; animals were then observed for 3 h. Blood chemistry and physiologic parameters were recorded. Lung and small intestine tissue samples were subjected to histopathologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry to determine the extent of injury and deposition of complement proteins. Cytokine levels and quantitative assessment of renal and hepatic function were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and chemistry analyzer, respectively. Pharmacokinetics of rhC1-INH revealed dose proportionality for maximum concentration, half-life, and the time span in which the functional C1-INH level was greater than 1 IU/mL. Recombinant human C1-INH significantly reduced renal, intestinal, and lung tissue damage in a dose-dependent manner (100 and 250 IU/kg). In addition, rhC1-INH (250 IU/kg) markedly improved hemorrhage-induced metabolic acidosis and circulating tumor necrosis factor α. The tissue-protective effects of rhC1-INH appear to be related to its ability to reduce tissue complement activation and deposition. Recombinant human C1-INH decreased tissue complement activation and deposition in hemorrhaged animals, improved metabolic acidosis, reduced circulating tumor necrosis factor α, and attenuated tissue damage in this model. The observed beneficial effects of rhC1-INH treatment on tissue injury 20 min into severe hypotension

  6. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  7. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-04-29

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting.

  8. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Bishop, James H; Fox, James R; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J; Henry, Sharon M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back "sprains" is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a "hobble" device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted.

  9. Comparison of Two Gelatin and Thrombin Combination Hemostats in a Porcine Liver Abrasion Model

    PubMed Central

    Atlee, Holly D.; Mannone, Angela J.; Dwyer, Joseph; Lin, Lawrence; Goppelt, Andreas; Redl, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical hemostasis is achieved using adjunctive hemostats when conventional methods fail. Objective: This study compares the effectiveness of two adjunctive gelatin-thrombin hemostats. Hypothesis: To determine effectiveness, hemostats were compared in vivo, in vitro, and using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods: In vivo, a heparinized porcine liver abrasion model was used to compare hemostatic success, degree of bleeding, and blood loss at 2, 5, and 10 minutes post-treatment. In vitro, thrombin in the supernatant of each hemostat and Red Blood Cells (RBC'S) in the supernatant of clots formed by each was compared. Results: Ultrastructure of one gelatin was smooth and the other stellate. In vivo, smooth gelatin provided superior hemostatic success at 5 (85% vs. 60%; OR: 5.3; 95% CI: 1.66 to 17.9) and 10 mins (72.5% vs. 47.5%; OR: 5.0; 95% CI: 1.55 to 16.1). Smooth gelatin had a statistically different degree of bleeding at 5 (0.58 ± 0.87 [Mean ± SD] vs. 1.03 ± 1.12; OR: 3.36; 95% CI: 1.34 to 8.41) and 10 mins (1.13 ± 1.14 vs. 1.65 ± 1.05; OR: 3.87; 95% CI: 1.62 to 9.21). Mean blood loss was less with smooth gelatin at 2 (0.07 ± 0.19 vs. 0.13 ± 0.63 ml/min), 5 (0.04 ± 0.13 vs. 0.23 ± 0.45 ml/min), and 10 mins (0.09 ± 0.24 vs. 0.21 ± 0.32 ml/min). In vitro, supernatant of smooth gelatin had significantly less thrombin (6.81 vs. 10.9 IU/ml, p = .001), and significantly less RBC's than stellate gelatin (0.07 vs. 0.09 × 106/ul, p = .0085). Conclusion: Smooth gelatin has an increased ability to retain thrombin and RBC's in vitro which may explain why it provides superior hemostatic effectiveness, superior control of bleeding, and greater reduced blood loss in vivo. PMID:23514063

  10. A new prosthetic implant for inguinal hernia repair: its features in a porcine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Amato, Giuseppe; Lo Monte, Attilio I; Cassata, Giovanni; Damiano, Giuseppe; Romano, Giorgio; Bussani, Rossana

    2011-08-01

    using inherent radial recoil, vertical buffering, friction, and delivering the device in a constrained state. A secondary benefit of this "dynamic" design is that the implant moves in a three-dimensional way in unison with the movements of the myotendineal structures of the groin. The results appear to show that the three-dimensional structure not only acts as a suitable scaffold for a full thickness ingrowth of a tissue barrier but also seems to induce an ordered, supple, elastic tissue, which allows for neorevascularization and neoneural growth. The outcomes indicate a reduced impact of fibrotic shrinkage on the implant/scar tissue when compared with shrinkage of polypropylene meshes reported in the literature. This pilot study shows the features of such an implant in a porcine experimental model.

  11. Recombinant human prothrombin reduced blood loss in a porcine model of dilutional coagulopathy with uncontrolled bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Kenny M; Johansson, Karin J; Wingren, Cecilia; Fries, Dietmar; Nelander, Karin; Lövgren, Ann

    2017-04-01

    : Uncontrolled bleeding remains one of the leading causes of trauma-induced death. Treatment recommendations focus on fresh frozen plasma and blood cell transfusions, whereas plasma concentrates or single coagulation factors have been studied in recent years. The effect of recombinant human prothrombin factor II (rhFII, 8 mg/kg), activated recombinant human factor VII (rhFVIIa, 300 μg/kg), plasma-derived human fibrinogen (pdhFib) (200 mg/kg), activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC, 40 IU/kg), a three-factor combination intended as a minimal PCC (8 mg/kg rhFII, 640 μg/kg recombinant human factor X (rhFX), and 12 μg/kg rhFVIIa), and vehicle were investigated in a porcine model of dilutional coagulopathy with uncontrolled bleeding. Survival time and blood loss were determined up to 120 min after induction of liver injury. Rotational thromboelastometry EXTEM coagulation time and maximum clot firmness, prothrombin time, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), thrombin generation (endogenous thrombin potential, ETP) were measured at baseline, after dilution, drug administration, and end of experiment. rhFII, the three-factor combination, and aPCC significantly (P < 0.01) decreased blood loss vs. vehicle and rhFII also vs. fibrinogen (P < 0.05). Survival times increased significantly for rhFII, aPCC, rhFVIIa, and pdhFib vs. vehicle (P < 0.05), and, coagulation time, maximum clot firmness, and prothrombin time improved in all groups. TAT and ETP increased transiently for rhFII and three-factor combination, whereas persistently increased for aPCC. PdhFib and rhFVIIa did not increase TAT and ETP. rhFII decreased blood loss and improved hemostatic markers and survival. In vivo, thrombin generation (TAT) and potential to form thrombin (ETP) were transiently elevated by rhFII. Addition of rhFVIIa and rhFX to rhFII did not further improve hemostatic efficacy.

  12. Scabies Mites Alter the Skin Microbiome and Promote Growth of Opportunistic Pathogens in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Pearl M.; Zakrzewski, Martha; Kelly, Andrew; Krause, Lutz; Fischer, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei) are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. Conclusions/Significance This is the first

  13. Evaluation of lincomycin in drinking water for treatment of induced porcine proliferative enteropathy using a Swine challenge model.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Winkelman, Nathan L; Moreira, Frederico P; Elfring, Gregory D

    2004-01-01

    A single-location, challenge-model study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of lincomycin against porcine proliferative enteropathy when administered through the drinking water at 125 and 250 mg/gallon. The primary variables of interest were pig removal rate, diarrhea scores, demeanor scores, and abdominal appearance scores. Ancillary performance variables examined included average daily feed intake, average daily gain, and feed per gain. After a 3-day acclimation period, pigs were challenged on 2 consecutive days with a mucosal homogenate containing a total dose of 1.4 x 10(9) cells of Lawsonia intracellularis. Five days later, when porcine proliferative enteropathy was well established, drinking water medicated with 125 mg (L125) or 250 mg (L250) lincomycin/gallon was provided to two groups of pigs for 10 days. Pigs were observed for 13 days following the treatment period. A third group of pigs served as controls and received unmedicated drinking water throughout the study. The L250 group experienced a significantly lower (P < .05) pig removal rate than the control group over the 23-day observation period. Additionally, for every primary variable, the L250 group experienced a significantly decreased (P < .01) number of abnormal days compared with the control group. The L125 group showed a significant reduction (P < .05) in abnormal demeanor and abnormal abdominal appearance scores compared with controls.

  14. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  15. Evaluation of a novel laparoscopic camera for characterization of renal ischemia in a porcine model using digital light processing (DLP) hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olweny, Ephrem O.; Tan, Yung K.; Faddegon, Stephen; Jackson, Neil; Wehner, Eleanor F.; Best, Sara L.; Park, Samuel K.; Thapa, Abhas; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2012-03-01

    Digital light processing hyperspectral imaging (DLP® HSI) was adapted for use during laparoscopic surgery by coupling a conventional laparoscopic light guide with a DLP-based Agile Light source (OL 490, Optronic Laboratories, Orlando, FL), incorporating a 0° laparoscope, and a customized digital CCD camera (DVC, Austin, TX). The system was used to characterize renal ischemia in a porcine model.

  16. Blocking porcine sialoadhesin improves extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Joshua P.; Vogel, Thomas; Burlak, Christopher; Coussios, Constantin; Dominguez, Javier; Friend, Peter; Rees, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients in fulminant hepatic failure currently do not have a temporary means of support while awaiting liver transplantation. A potential therapeutic approach for such patients is the use of extracorporeal perfusion with porcine livers as a form of “liver dialysis”. During a 72-hour extracorporeal perfusion of porcine livers with human blood, porcine Kupffer cells bind to and phagocytose human red blood cells (hRBC) causing the hematocrit to decrease to 2.5% of the original value. Our laboratory has identified porcine sialoadhesin expressed on Kupffer cells as the lectin responsible for binding N-acetylneuraminic acid on the surface of the hRBC. We evaluated whether blocking porcine sialoadhesin prevents the recognition and subsequent destruction of hRBCs seen during extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion. Ex vivo studies were performed using wild type pig livers perfused with isolated hRBCs for 72-hours in the presence of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody or isotype control. The addition of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody to an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model reduces the loss of hRBC over a 72 hour period. Sustained liver function was demonstrated throughout the perfusion. This study illustrates the role of sialoadhesin in mediating the destruction of hRBCs in an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model. PMID:23822217

  17. Testing Danegaptide Effects on Kidney Function after Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a New Porcine Two Week Model

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Anna K.; Hansen, Rie Schultz; Nørregaard, Rikke; Krag, Søren Palmelund; Møldrup, Ulla; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Birn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R-I) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) and is associated with increased mortality. Danegaptide is a selective modifier of the gap junction protein connexion 43. It has cytoprotective as well as anti-arrhythmic properties and has been shown to reduce the size of myocardial infarct in pigs. The aim of this study was to investigate the ischemia-protective effect of Danegaptide in a porcine renal I/R-I model with two weeks follow up. Methods Unilateral renal I/R-I was induced in pigs by clamping the left renal artery over a two hour period. The model allowed examination of renal blood flow by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the measurement of single kidney GFR two weeks after injury. Eleven animals were randomized to Danegaptide-infusion while nine animals received placebo. Kidney histology and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) excretion were included as markers of AKI. Results Unilateral kidney I/R-I resulted in an immediate ~50% GFR reduction, associated with a four-fold increase in urinary NGAL-excretion. Fourteen days after I/R-I, the total GFR was ~75% of baseline with a significantly lower GFR in the injured left kidney compared to the right kidney. No differences in GFR were observed between the treated and non-treated animals immediately after I/R-I or at Day 14. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the urinary excretion of NGAL, renal blood flow or other markers of renal function. Conclusions As expected this porcine renal I/R-I model was associated with reduced GFR two weeks after injury. Danegaptide did not improve renal function after I/R-I. PMID:27760220

  18. A bio-artificial renal epithelial cell system conveys survival advantage in a porcine model of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Angela J.; Buffington, Deborah A.; Johnston, Kimberly A.; Smith, Peter L.; Pino, Christopher J.; Humes, H. David

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell therapy using the hollow fiber based renal assist device (RAD) improved survival time in an animal model of septic shock (SS) through the amelioration of cardiac and vascular dysfunction. Safety and ability of the RAD to improve clinical outcomes was demonstrated in a Phase II clinical trial, in which patients had high prevalence of sepsis. Even with these promising results, clinical delivery of cell therapy is hampered by manufacturing hurdles, including cell sourcing, large-scale device manufacture, storage and delivery. To address these limitations, the bioartificial renal epithelial cell system (BRECS) was developed. The BRECS contains human renal tubule epithelial cells derived from adult progenitor cells using enhanced propagation techniques. Cells were seeded onto trabeculated disks of niobium-coated carbon, held within cryopreservable, perfusable, injection-molded polycarbonate housing. The study objective was to evaluate the BRECS in a porcine model of SS to establish conservation of efficacy after necessary cell sourcing and design modifications; a pre-clinical requirement to move back into clinical trials. SS was incited by peritoneal injection of E. coli simultaneous to insertion of BRECS (n=10) or control (n=15), into the ultrafiltrate biofeedback component of an extracorporeal circuit. Comparable to RAD, prolonged survival of the BRECS cohort was conveyed through stabilization of cardiac output and vascular leak. In conclusion, the demonstration of conserved efficacy with BRECS therapy in a porcine SS model represents a crucial step toward returning renal cell therapy to the clinical setting, initially targeting ICU patients with acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy. PMID:25424193

  19. Development of an in vitro porcine aorta model to study the stability of stent grafts in motor vehicle accidents.

    PubMed

    Darvish, Kurosh; Shafieian, Mehdi; Romanov, Vasily; Rotella, Vittorio; Salvatore, Michael D; Blebea, John

    2009-04-01

    Endovascular stent grafts for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms have become increasingly utilized and yet their locational stability in moderate chest trauma is unknown. A high speed impact system was developed to study the stability of aortic endovascular stent grafts in vitro. A straight segment of porcine descending aorta with stent graft was constrained in a custom-made transparent urethane casing. The specimen was tested in a novel impact system at an anterior inclination of 45 deg and an average deceleration of 55 G, which represented a frontal automobile crash. Due to the shock of the impact, which was shown to be below the threshold of aortic injury, the stent graft moved 0.6 mm longitudinally. This result was repeatable. The presented experimental model may be helpful in developing future grafts to withstand moderate shocks experienced in motor vehicle accidents or other dynamic loadings of the chest.

  20. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma as a shielding technique after endoscopic mucosal resection in rat and porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Boix, Jaume; Moreno de Vega, Vicente; Bon, Ignacio; Marín, Ingrid; Bartolí, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The aims were to assess the efficacy of endoscopic application of Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to prevent delayed perforation and to induce mucosal healing after endoscopic resections. Patients and methods: Colonic induced lesions were performed in rats (n = 16) and pigs (n = 4). Animals were randomized to receive onto the lesions saline (control) or PRP. Animals underwent endoscopic follow-up. Thermal injury was assessed with a 1 – 4 scale: (1) mucosal necrosis; (2) submucosal necrosis; (3) muscularis propria necrosis; and (4) serosal necrosis Results: Saline treatment showed 50 % of mortality in rats (P = 0.02). Mean ulcerated area after 48 hours and 7 days was significantly smaller with PRP than with saline (0.27 ± 0.02 cm2 and 0.08 ± 0.01 cm2 vs. 0.56 ± 0.1 cm2 and 0.40 ± 0.06 cm2; P < 0.001). The incidence of thermal injury was significantly lower with PRP (1.25 ± 0.46) than in controls (2.25 ± 0.50); P = 0.006. The porcine model showed a trend toward higher mucosal restoration in animals treated with PRP than with saline at weeks 1 and 2 (Median area in cm2: 0.55 and 0.40 vs. 1.32 and 0.79) Conclusions: Application of PRP to colonic mucosal lesions showed strong healing properties in rat and porcine models. PMID:27540573

  1. Comparison of three magnetic nanoparticle tracers for sentinel lymph node biopsy in an in vivo porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Pouw, Joost J; Ahmed, Muneer; Anninga, Bauke; Schuurman, Kimberley; Pinder, Sarah E; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Douek, Michael; ten Haken, Bennie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer staging with sentinel lymph node biopsy relies on the use of radioisotopes, which limits the availability of the procedure worldwide. The use of a magnetic nanoparticle tracer and a handheld magnetometer provides a radiation-free alternative, which was recently evaluated in two clinical trials. The hydrodynamic particle size of the used magnetic tracer differs substantially from the radioisotope tracer and could therefore benefit from optimization. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of three different-sized magnetic nanoparticle tracers for sentinel lymph node biopsy within an in vivo porcine model. Materials and methods Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed within a validated porcine model using three magnetic nanoparticle tracers, approved for use in humans (ferumoxytol, with hydrodynamic diameter dH =32 nm; Sienna+®, dH =59 nm; and ferumoxide, dH =111 nm), and a handheld magnetometer. Magnetometer counts (transcutaneous and ex vivo), iron quantification (vibrating sample magnetometry), and histopathological assessments were performed on all ex vivo nodes. Results Transcutaneous “hotspots” were present in 12/12 cases within 30 minutes of injection for the 59 nm tracer, compared to 7/12 for the 32 nm tracer and 8/12 for the 111 nm tracer, at the same time point. Ex vivo magnetometer counts were significantly greater for the 59 nm tracer than for the other tracers. Significantly more nodes per basin were excised for the 32 nm tracer compared to other tracers, indicating poor retention of the 32 nm tracer. Using the 59 nm tracer resulted in a significantly higher iron accumulation compared to the 32 nm tracer. Conclusion The 59 nm tracer demonstrated rapid lymphatic uptake, retention in the first nodes reached, and accumulation in high concentration, making it the most suitable tracer for intraoperative sentinel lymph node localization. PMID:25709445

  2. Effects of Intracoronary Administration of Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Park, Jong Ha; Kim, Bo Won; Ahn, Jinhee; Kim, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Sup; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong; Park, Tae Sik; Kim, Sang-Pil; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Mi Hwa; Jung, Jin Sup

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are known to be potentially effective in regeneration of damaged tissue. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of intracoronary administration of ADSCs in reducing the infarction area and improving function after acute transmural myocardial infarction (MI) in a porcine model. Materials and Methods ADSCs were obtained from each pig's abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue by simple liposuction. After 3 passages of 14-days culture, 2 million ADSCs were injected into the coronary artery 30 min after acute transmural MI. At baseline and 4 weeks after the ADSC injection, 99mTc methoxyisobutylisonitrile-single photon emission computed tomography (MIBI-SPECT) was performed to evaluate the left ventricular volume, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; %), and perfusion defects as well as the myocardial salvage (%) and salvage index. At 4 weeks, each pig was sacrificed, and the heart was extracted and dissected. Gross and microscopic analyses with specific immunohistochemistry staining were then performed. Results Analysis showed improvement in the perfusion defect, but not in the LVEF in the ADSC group (n=14), compared with the control group (n=14) (perfusion defect, -13.0±10.0 vs. -2.6±12.0, p=0.019; LVEF, -8.0±15.4 vs. -15.9±14.8, p=0.181). There was a tendency of reducing left ventricular volume in ADSC group. The ADSCs identified by stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) staining were well co-localized by von Willebrand factor and Troponin T staining. Conclusion Intracoronary injection of cultured ADSCs improved myocardial perfusion in this porcine acute transmural MI model. PMID:26446632

  3. New Radiofrequency Device to Reduce Bleeding after Core Needle Biopsy: Experimental Study in a Porcine Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. Materials and Methods A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments. PMID:28096727

  4. Decolonisation of MRSA, S. aureus and E. coli by Cold-Atmospheric Plasma Using a Porcine Skin Model In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Tim; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years new antibacterial agents approved by the U.S. FDA decreased whereas in parallel the resistance situation of multi-resistant bacteria increased. Thus, community and nosocomial acquired infections of resistant bacteria led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapy, prolonging treatment time and increasing healthcare costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of cold atmospheric plasma for decolonisation of Gram-positive (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) using an ex vivo pig skin model. Freshly excised skin samples were taken from six month old female pigs (breed: Pietrain). After application of pure bacteria on the surface of the explants these were treated with cold atmospheric plasma for up to 15 min. Two different plasma devices were evaluated. A decolonisation efficacy of 3 log10 steps was achieved already after 6 min of plasma treatment. Longer plasma treatment times achieved a killing rate of 5 log10 steps independently from the applied bacteria strains. Histological evaluations of untreated and treated skin areas upon cold atmospheric plasma treatment within 24 h showed no morphological changes as well as no significant degree of necrosis or apoptosis determined by the TUNEL-assay indicating that the porcine skin is still vital. This study demonstrates for the first time that cold atmospheric plasma is able to very efficiently kill bacteria applied to an intact skin surface using an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results emphasize the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a new possible treatment option for decolonisation of human skin from bacteria in patients in the future without harming the surrounding tissue. PMID:22558091

  5. Pericytes support neutrophil transmigration via interleukin-8 across a porcine co-culture model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Christian; Pieloch, Paulina; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-02

    Transmigration of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to an inflamed brain tissue is an important process during neuronal inflammation. The process of neutrophil activation as well as their way of rolling along the endothelium and their transmigration is quite well understood. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the fate of neutrophils after they have transmigrated through the endothelium. The role of the other cells of the neurovascular unit in this process is also poorly understood. Here we studied the potential of pericytes to chemo-attract neutrophils under inflammatory conditions. Quantitative real time PCR, western blot analysis, and a chemotaxis assay showed that pericytes are able to chemo-attract neutrophils by interleukin-8 (IL-8) after stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), or interleukin-1beta (IL-1β). Then, a co-culture model consisting of primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCECs) and primary porcine brain capillary pericytes (PBCPs) was used to analyze neutrophil transmigration across the BBB. As a model for inflammation, LPS was used and the effects of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were analyzed. In general, all stimulants apart from IFN-γ were able to increase transendothelial neutrophil migration. This effect was significantly reduced by a specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9. MMP-2/-9 secretion is expected to decrease adhesion to pericytes and thus support the transmigration of neutrophils. Additionally, in an adhesion experiment, we showed that MMP-2/-9 inhibition significantly enhances the adhesion of neutrophils to pericytes.

  6. Malignant infarction of the middle cerebral artery in a porcine model. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Valverde, Tamara; Sánchez-Guerrero, Ángela; Campos, Mireia; Esteves, Marielle; Gandara, Dario; Torné, Ramon; Castro, Lidia; Dalmau, Antoni; Tibau, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Interspecies variability and poor clinical translation from rodent studies indicate that large gyrencephalic animal stroke models are urgently needed. We present a proof-of-principle study describing an alternative animal model of malignant infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the common pig and illustrate some of its potential applications. We report on metabolic patterns, ionic profile, brain partial pressure of oxygen (PtiO2), expression of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1), and the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4). Methods A 5-hour ischemic infarct of the MCA territory was performed in 5 2.5-to-3-month-old female hybrid pigs (Large White x Landrace) using a frontotemporal approach. The core and penumbra areas were intraoperatively monitored to determine the metabolic and ionic profiles. To determine the infarct volume, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and immunohistochemistry analysis was performed to determine SUR1 and TRPM4 expression. Results PtiO2 monitoring showed an abrupt reduction in values close to 0 mmHg after MCA occlusion in the core area. Hourly cerebral microdialysis showed that the infarcted tissue was characterized by reduced concentrations of glucose (0.03 mM) and pyruvate (0.003 mM) and increases in lactate levels (8.87mM), lactate-pyruvate ratio (4202), glycerol levels (588 μM), and potassium concentration (27.9 mmol/L). Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased expression of SUR1-TRPM4 channels. Conclusions The aim of the present proof-of-principle study was to document the feasibility of a large animal model of malignant MCA infarction by performing transcranial occlusion of the MCA in the common pig, as an alternative to lisencephalic animals. This model may be useful for detailed studies of cerebral ischemia mechanisms and the development of neuroprotective strategies. PMID:28235044

  7. In vivo evaluation of the delivery and efficacy of a sirolimus-laden polymer gel for inhibition of hyperplasia in a porcine model of arteriovenous hemodialysis graft stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Li, Huan; Zhuplatov, Ilya; Blumenthal, Donald K.; Kim, Seong-Eun; Owen, Shawn C.; Kholmovski, Eugene G.; Fowers, Kirk D.; Rathi, Ramesh; Cheung, Alfred K.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic arteriovenous (AV) hemodialysis grafts are plagued by hyperplasia resulting in occlusion and graft failure yet there are no clinically available preventative treatments. Here the delivery and degradation of a sirolimus-laden polymer gel was monitored in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its efficacy for inhibiting hyperplasia was evaluated in a porcine model of AV graft stenosis. Synthetic grafts were placed between the carotid artery and ipsilateral jugular vein of swine. A biodegradable polymer gel loaded with sirolimus (2.5 mg/mL) was immediately applied perivascularly to the venous anastomosis, and reapplied by ultrasound-guided injections at one, two and three weeks. Control grafts received neither sirolimus nor polymer. The lumen cross-sectional area at the graft-vein anastomosis was assessed in vivo by non-invasive MRI. The explanted tissues also underwent histological analysis. A specifically developed MRI pulse sequence provided a high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the polymer and surrounding tissue that allowed confirmation of gel location after injection. Polymer signal decreased up to 80% at three to four weeks after injection, slightly faster than its degradation kinetics in vitro. The MR image of the polymer was confirmed by visual assessment at necropsy. On histological assessment, the mean hyperplasia surface area of the treated graft was 52% lower than that of the control grafts (0.43 mm2 vs. 0.89 mm2; p < 0.003), while the minimum cross-sectional lumen area, as measured on MRI, was doubled (5.3 mm2 vs 2.5 mm2; p < 0.05). In conclusion, customized MRI allowed non-invasive monitoring of the location and degradation of drug-delivery polymer gels in vivo. Perivascular application of sirolimus-laden polymer yielded a significant decrease in hyperplasia development and an increase in lumen area at the venous anastomosis of AV grafts. PMID:22465391

  8. Investigation of the thermal and tissue injury behaviour in microwave thermal therapy using a porcine kidney model.

    PubMed

    He, X; McGee, S; Coad, J E; Schmidlin, F; Iaizzo, P A; Swanlund, D J; Kluge, S; Rudie, E; Bischof, J C

    2004-09-01

    Minimally invasive microwave thermal therapies are being developed for the treatment of small renal cell carcinomas (RCC, d<3 cm). This study assessed the thermal history and corresponding tissue injury patterns resulting from microwave treatment of the porcine renal cortex. Three groups of kidneys were evaluated: (1) in vitro treated, (2) in vivo with 2-h post-treatment perfusion (acute) and (3) in vivo with 7-day post-treatment perfusion (chronic). The kidneys were treated with an interstitial water-cooled microwave probe (Urologix, Plymouth, MN) that created a lesion centered in the renal cortex (50 W for 10 min). The thermal histories were recorded at 0.5 cm radial intervals from the probe axis for correlation with the histologic cellular and vascular injury. The kidneys showed a reproducible 2 cm chronic lesion with distinct histologic injury zones identified. The thermal histories at the edge of these zones were found using Lagrangian interpolation. The threshold thermal histories for microvascular injury and stasis appeared to be lower than that for renal epithelial cell injury. The Arrhenius kinetic injury models were fit to the thermal histories and injury data to determine the kinetic parameters (i.e. activation energy and frequency factor) for the thermal injury processes. The resultant activation energies are consistent in magnitude with those for thermally induced protein denaturation. A 3-D finite element thermal model based on the Pennes bioheat equation was developed and solved using ANSYS (V7.0). The real geometry of the kidneys studied and temperature dependent thermal properties were used in this model. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the microwave probe required for the thermal modelling was experimentally determined. The results from the thermal modelling suggest that the complicated change of local renal blood perfusion with temperature and time during microwave thermal therapy can be predicted, although a first order kinetic model may

  9. Evaluation of intravascular microdialysis for continuous blood glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Schierenbeck, Fanny; Wallin, Mats; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Liska, Jan

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, no hypoglycemia occurred in our earlier studies, prompting further evaluation of the accuracy of intravascular microdialysis in the hypoglycemic range. Thus, this animal study was performed. A porcine model was developed; hypoglycemia was induced using insulin injections. The pigs were monitored with intravascular microdialysis integrated in a triple-lumen central venous catheter. As reference, venous blood gas samples were taken every 5 minutes and analyzed in a blood gas analyzer. Ethical permission for the animal experiments was obtained from the Stockholm Regional Ethical Committee, reference no N397/09. A total of 213 paired samples were obtained for analysis, and 126 (59.2%) of these were in the hypoglycemic range (<74 mg/dl). Using Clarke error grid analysis, 100% of the paired samples were in region AB and 99% in region A. The ISO standard (ISO15197) was met. Bland-Altman analysis showed bias (mean difference) ± limits of agreement was -0.18 ± 16.2 mg/dl. No influence from glucose infusions was seen. The microdialysis monitoring system was found to be very responsive in rapid changes in blood glucose concentration. This study shows that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia in a porcine experimental model. Furthermore, the system was not influenced by glucose administration and was found to be responsive in rapid blood glucose fluctuations.

  10. Changes in chondrocyte gene expression following in vitro impaction of porcine articular cartilage in an impact injury model.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Melissa S; Gonda, Michael G; Gray, Kent; Maltecca, Christian; O'Nan, Audrey T; Cassady, Joseph P; Mente, Peter L

    2013-03-01

    Our objective was to monitor chondrocyte gene expression at 0, 3, 7, and 14 days following in vitro impaction to the articular surface of porcine patellae. Patellar facets were either axially impacted with a cylindrical impactor (25 mm/s loading rate) to a load level of 2,000 N or not impacted to serve as controls. After being placed in organ culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days, total RNA was isolated from full thickness cartilage slices and gene expression measured for 17 genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Targeted genes included those encoding proteins involved with biological stress, inflammation, or anabolism and catabolism of cartilage extracellular matrix. Some gene expression changes were detected on the day of impaction, but most significant changes occurred at 14 days in culture. At 14 days in culture, 10 of the 17 genes were differentially expressed with col1a1 most significantly up-regulated in the impacted samples, suggesting impacted chondrocytes may have reverted to a fibroblast-like phenotype.

  11. Hybrid Modeling Improves Health and Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Scientific Monitoring Inc. was awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to create a new, simplified health-monitoring approach for flight vehicles and flight equipment. The project developed a hybrid physical model concept that provided a structured approach to simplifying complex design models for use in health monitoring, allowing the output or performance of the equipment to be compared to what the design models predicted, so that deterioration or impending failure could be detected before there would be an impact on the equipment's operational capability. Based on the original modeling technology, Scientific Monitoring released I-Trend, a commercial health- and performance-monitoring software product named for its intelligent trending, diagnostics, and prognostics capabilities, as part of the company's complete ICEMS (Intelligent Condition-based Equipment Management System) suite of monitoring and advanced alerting software. I-Trend uses the hybrid physical model to better characterize the nature of health or performance alarms that result in "no fault found" false alarms. Additionally, the use of physical principles helps I-Trend identify problems sooner. I-Trend technology is currently in use in several commercial aviation programs, and the U.S. Air Force recently tapped Scientific Monitoring to develop next-generation engine health-management software for monitoring its fleet of jet engines. Scientific Monitoring has continued the original NASA work, this time under a Phase III SBIR contract with a joint NASA-Pratt & Whitney aviation security program on propulsion-controlled aircraft under missile-damaged aircraft conditions.

  12. Enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein with single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound-assisted processing.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ye; Ding, Yangyang; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Yao; Wu, Huiyu; Wang, Xintong; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigated the enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein (PCP) which was pretreated by single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound. The kinetic constants for ultrasonic pretreated and traditional enzymolysis have been determined. Results showed that the value of KM in ultrasonic PCP (UPCP) enzymolysis decreased by 9% over that in the traditional enzymolysis. The values of reaction rate constant (k) for UPCP enzymolysis increased by 207%, 121%, 62%, and 45% at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K, respectively. For the thermodynamic parameters, ultrasound decreased activation energy (Ea), change in enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) by 76%, 82% and 31% in PCP, respectively. However, ultrasound had little change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG) value in the temperature range of 293-323 K. Therefore, a general kinetic equation for the enzymolysis model of UPCP by a simple empirical equation was suggested. The experimental values fits with the enzymolysis kinetic model with a low average relative error (4%) confirmed that the kinetic model was accurate to reflect the enzymolysis process. The positive effect of single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound in this study and application of the kinetic model may be useful for the release of bioactive peptides from meat processing by-products.

  13. Assessment of ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography for monitoring tissue effects caused by laser photocoagulation of ex-vivo porcine retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Patrick; Enzmann, Volker; Wolf, Sebastian; Bossen, Anke; Meier, Christoph; Sznitman, Raphael

    2015-03-01

    Retinal laser photocoagulation is an established and successful treatment for a variety of retinal diseases. While being a valuable treatment modality, laser photocoagulation shows the drawback of employing high energy lasers which are capable of physically destroying the neural retina. For reliable therapy, it is therefore crucial to closely monitor the therapy effects caused in the retinal tissue. A depth resolved representation of optical tissue properties as provided by optical coherence tomography may provide valuable information about the treatment effects in the retinal layers if recorded simultaneously to laser coagulation. Therefore, in this work, the use of ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography to represent tissue changes caused by conventional and selective retinal photocoagulation is investigated. Laser lesions were placed on porcine retina ex-vivo using a 577 nm laser as well as a pulsed laser at 527 nm built for selective treatment of the retinal pigment epithelium. Applied energies were varied to generate lesions best representing the span from under- to overtreatment. The lesions were examined using a custom-designed optical coherence tomography system with an axial resolution of 1.78 μm and 70 kHz Ascan rate. Optical coherence tomography scans included volume scans before and after irradiation, as well as time lapse scans (Mscan) of the lesions. Results show OCT lesion visibility thresholds to be below the thresholds of ophthalmoscopic inspection. With the ultra-high resolution OCT, 42% - 44% of ophthalmoscopically invisible lesions could be detected and lesions that were under- or overexposed could be distinguished using the OCT data.

  14. Formation of reactive aldehydes (MDA, HHE, HNE) during the digestion of cod liver oil: comparison of human and porcine in vitro digestion models.

    PubMed

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Larsson, Karin; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Comi, Irene; Scheers, Nathalie; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated lipid oxidation of cod liver oil during gastrointestinal (GI) digestion using two types of in vitro digestion models. In the first type of model, we used human GI juices, while we used digestive enzymes and bile from porcine origin in the second type of model. Human and porcine models were matched with respect to factors important for lipolysis, using a standardized digestion protocol. The digests were analysed for reactive oxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-hexenal (HHE) by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS), and for free fatty acids (FFA) obtained during the digestion by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation of the oxidation products MDA, HHE, and HNE was low during the gastric digestion, however, it increased during the duodenal digestion. The formation of the oxidation products reached higher levels when digestive juices of human origin were used (60 μM of MDA, 0.96 μM of HHE, and 1.6 μM of HNE) compared to when using enzymes and bile of porcine origin (9.8, and 0.36 μM of MDA; 0.16, and 0.026 μM of HHE; 0.23, and 0.005 μM of HNE, respectively, in porcine models I and II). In all models, FFA release was only detected during the intestinal step, and reached up to 31% of total fatty acids (FA). The findings in this work may be of importance when designing oxidation oriented lipid digestion studies.

  15. An environmentally relevant organochlorine mixture impairs sperm function and embryo development in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Céline; Guillemette, Christine; Paradis, René; Sirard, Marc-André; Ayotte, Pierre; Bailey, Janice L

    2002-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of an environmentally relevant mixture of more than 15 organochlorines on the development of pig oocytes and sperm during in vitro fertilization (IVF). Oocytes were cocultured with sperm in IVF medium containing increasing concentrations of an organochlorine mixture, similar to that found in women of highly exposed populations. Exposure to the organochlorine mixture diminished oocyte penetration rates and polyspermy in a linear manner. The mixture did not affect rates of cleavage nor development to multicell embryos. However, rates of development to the blastocyst stage were lower at the highest concentration at which oocyte penetration was observed. The same experiment was performed using oocytes that were preexposed during in vitro maturation. This greater exposure to the mixture also reduced penetration in a dose-response manner and affected polyspermy. Frozen-thawed pig sperm were also cultured in IVF medium containing the same organochlorine concentrations. Sperm motility parameters were immediately reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the organochlorines, followed by diminished viability 2 h later. From these results, it appears that reduced sperm quality would account for decreases in fertilization, polyspermy, and blastocyst formation. These results suggest that exposing porcine oocytes and sperm to an environmentally pertinent organochlorine mixture in vitro disrupts the oocyte block to polyspermy, sperm fertility, and further embryonic development, and supports recent concerns that such pollutants harm reproductive health in humans and other species.

  16. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, Ajita; Monette, Sebastien; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  17. In-vivo tissue repair using light-activated surgical adhesive in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Riley, Jill N.; Dickson, Tonya J.; Hou, Dong Ming; Rogers, Pamela; March, Keith L.

    2001-05-01

    An in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility, mechanical function, and chronic biocompatibility of a new light-activated surgical adhesive for achieving rapid hemostasis of the puncture site following diagnostic catheterization and interventional cardiac procedures. Porcine carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) were exposed, and an incision was made in the arterial walls using a 16G needle. The surgical adhesive, composed of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold doped with the traditional protein solder mix of serum albumin and indocyanine green dye, was used to close the incisions in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Blood flow was restored to the vessels immediately after the procedure and the incision sites were checked for patency. The strength and hemostatic abilities of the new surgical adhesive were evaluated in the context of arterial pressure, persistence of hemostatis and presence of any inflammatory reaction after 3 days. After this evaluation period, the surgical procedure was repeated on the carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) of three additional animals that had been heparinized prior to surgery to closer approximate the conditions seen in a typical vascular surgical setting.

  18. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Eamon B; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-03-07

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread.

  19. Fed state prior to hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma in a porcine model results in altered liver transcriptomic response.

    PubMed

    Determan, Charles; Anderson, Rebecca; Becker, Aaron; Witowski, Nancy; Lusczek, Elizabeth; Mulier, Kristine; Beilman, Greg J

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of trauma-related mortality in both civilian and military settings. Resuscitation often results in reperfusion injury and survivors are susceptible to developing multiple organ failure (MOF). The impact of fed state on the overall response to shock and resuscitation has been explored in some murine models but few clinically relevant large animal models. We have previously used metabolomics to establish that the fed state results in a different metabolic response in the porcine liver following hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. In this study, we used our clinically relevant model of hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma and the Illumina HiSeq platform to determine if the liver transcriptomic response is also altered with respect to fed state. Functional analysis of the response to shock and resuscitation confirmed several typical responses including carbohydrate metabolism, cytokine inflammation, decreased cholesterol synthesis, and apoptosis. Our findings also suggest that the fasting state, relative to a carbohydrate prefed state, displays decreased carbohydrate metabolism, increased cytoskeleton reorganization and decreased inflammation in response to hemorrhagic shock and reperfusion. Evidence suggests that this is a consequence of a shrunken, catabolic state of the liver cells which provides an anti-inflammatory condition that partially mitigates hepatocellar damage.

  20. Development of a novel ex vivo porcine skin explant model for the assessment of mature bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingping; Phillips, Priscilla L; Sampson, Edith M; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Jin, Shouguang; Antonelli, Patrick; Schultz, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been proposed to be a major factor contributing to the failure of chronic wounds to heal because of their increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents and the prolonged inflammation they cause. Phenotypic characteristics of bacterial biofilms vary depending on the substratum to which they attach, the nutritional environment, and the microorganisms within the biofilm community. To develop an ex vivo biofilm model that more closely mimics biofilms in chronic skin wounds, we developed an optimal procedure to grow mature biofilms on a central partial-thickness wound in 12-mm porcine skin explants. Chlorine gas produced optimal sterilization of explants while preserving histological properties of the epidermis and dermis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus developed mature biofilms after 3 days that had dramatically increased tolerance to gentamicin and oxacillin (∼100× and 8,000× minimal inhibitory concentration, respectively) and to sodium hypochlorite (0.6% active chlorine). Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy verified extensive exopolymeric biofilm structures on the explants. Despite a significant delay, a ΔlasI quorum-sensing mutant of P. aeruginosa developed biofilm as antibiotic-tolerant as wild-type after 3 days. This ex vivo model simulates growth of biofilms on skin wounds and provides an accurate model to assess effects of antimicrobial agents on mature biofilms.

  1. Candidate chemosensory cells in the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Widmayer, Patricia; Breer, Heinz; Hass, Nicole

    2011-07-01

    A continuous chemosensory monitoring of the ingested food is of vital importance for adjusting digestive processes according to diet composition. Although any dysfunction of this surveillance system may be the cause of severe gastrointestinal disorders, information about the cellular and molecular basis of chemosensation in the gastrointestinal tract is limited. The porcine alimentary canal is considered as an appropriate model for the human gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the gastric mucosa of swine for cells which express gustatory transduction elements such as TRPM5 or PLCβ2, and thus may represent candidate "chemosensors". It was found that the porcine stomach indeed contains cells expressing gustatory marker molecules; however, the morphology and topographic distribution of putative chemosensory cells varied significantly from that in mice. Whereas in the murine stomach these cells were clustered at a distinct region near the gastric entrance, no such compact cell cluster was found in the pig stomach. These results indicate substantial differences regarding the phenotype of candidate chemosensory cells of mice and swine and underline the importance of choosing the most suitable model organisms.

  2. Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction in a Porcine Model: Effects of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension. A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Margallo, F. M.; Latorre, R.; López-Albors, O.; Wise, R.; Malbrain, M. L. N. G.; Castellanos, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical intestinal obstruction is a disorder associated with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. As the large intestine intraluminal and intra-abdominal pressures are increased, so the patient’s risk for intestinal ischaemia. Previous studies have focused on hypoperfusion and bacterial translocation without considering the concomitant effect of intra-abdominal hypertension. The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a mechanical intestinal obstruction model in pigs similar to the human pathophysiology. Materials and Methods Fifteen pigs were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 5) and two groups of 5 pigs with intra-abdominal hypertension induced by mechanical intestinal obstruction. The intra-abdominal pressures of 20 mmHg were maintained for 2 and 5 hours respectively. Hemodynamic, respiratory and gastric intramucosal pH values, as well as blood tests were recorded every 30 min. Results Significant differences between the control and mechanical intestinal obstruction groups were noted. The mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, dynamic pulmonary compliance and abdominal perfusion pressure decreased. The systemic vascular resistance index, central venous pressure, pulse pressure variation, airway resistance and lactate increased within 2 hours from starting intra-abdominal hypertension (p<0.05). In addition, we observed increased values for the peak and plateau airway pressures, and low values of gastric intramucosal pH in the mechanical intestinal obstruction groups that were significant after 3 hours. Conclusion The mechanical intestinal obstruction model appears to adequately simulate the pathophysiology of intestinal obstruction that occurs in humans. Monitoring abdominal perfusion pressure, dynamic pulmonary compliance, gastric intramucosal pH and lactate values may provide insight in predicting the effects on endorgan function in patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction. PMID

  3. In-vivo regional myocardial perfusion measurements in a porcine model by ECG-gated multislice computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Meyer, Cristopher A.; Teague, Shawn; Stecker, Michael; Hutchins, Gary; McLennan, Gordon; Persohn, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether functional multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) can identify regional areas of normally perfused and ischemic myocardium in a porcine model. Material and Methods: Three out bred pigs, two of which had ameroids surgically implanted to constrict flow within the LAD and LCx coronary arteries, were injected with 25 mL of iopromide (Isovue) at a rate of 5 mL/second via the femoral or jugular vein. Sixty axial scans along the short axis of the heart was acquired on a 16-slice CT scanner (Philips MX8000-IDT) triggered at end-diastole of the cardiac cycle and acquiring an image within 270 msec. A second series of scans were taken after an intravenous injection of a vasodilator, 150 μg/kg/min of adenosine. ROIs were drawn around the myocardial tissue and the resulting time-density curves were used to extract perfusion values. Results: Determination of the myocardial perfusion and fractional blood volume implementing three different perfusion models. A 5-point averaging or 'smoothing' algorithm was employed to effectively filter the data due to its noisy nature. The (preliminary) average perfusion and fractional blood volume values over selected axial slices for the pig without an artificially induced stenosis were measured to be 84 +/- 22 mL/min/100g-tissue and 0.17 +/- 0.04 mL/g-tissue, the former is consistent with PET scan and EBCT results. The pig with a stenosis in the left LAD coronary artery showed a reduced global perfusion value -- 45 mL/min/100g-tissue. Correlations in regional perfusion values relative to the stenosis were weak. During the infusion of adenosine, averaged perfusion values for the three subjects increased by 46 (+/-45) percent, comparable to increases measured with PET. Conclusion: Quantifying global perfusion values using MDCT appear encouraging. Future work will focus resolving the systematic effects from noise due to signal fluctuation from the porcine tachyardia (80-93 BPM) and provide a more robust measurement

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Inflammation in a Porcine Acute Terminal Ileitis Model: US with a Molecularly Targeted Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaijun; Felt, Stephen A.; Machtaler, Steven; Guracar, Ismayil; Luong, Richard; Bettinger, Thierry; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of ultrasonography (US) performed with dual-selectin–targeted contrast agent microbubbles (MBs) for assessment of inflammation in a porcine acute terminal ileitis model, with histologic findings as a reference standard. Materials and Methods The study had institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval. Acute terminal ileitis was established in 19 pigs; four pigs served as control pigs. The ileum was imaged with clinical-grade dual P- and E-selectin–targeted MBs (MBSelectin) at increasing doses (0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, and 20 × 108 MB per kilogram of body weight) and with control nontargeted MBs (MBControl). For reproducibility testing, examinations were repeated twice after the MBSelectin and MBControl injections. After imaging, scanned ileal segments were analyzed ex vivo both for inflammation grade (by using hematoxylin-eosin staining) and for expression of selectins (by using quantitative immunofluorescence analysis). Statistical analysis was performed by using the t test, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Spearman correlation analysis. Results Imaging signal increased linearly (P < .001) between a dose of 0.5 and a dose of 5.0 × 108 MB/kg and plateaued between a dose of 10 and a dose of 20 × 108 MB/kg. Imaging signals were reproducible (ICC = 0.70), and administration of MBSelectin in acute ileitis resulted in a significantly higher (P < .001) imaging signal compared with that in control ileum and MBControl. Ex vivo histologic grades of inflammation correlated well with in vivo US signal (ρ = 0.79), and expression levels of both P-selectin (37.4% ± 14.7 [standard deviation] of vessels positive; P < .001) and E-selectin (31.2% ± 25.7) in vessels in the bowel wall of segments with ileitis were higher than in control ileum (5.1% ± 3.7 for P-selectin and 4.8% ± 2.3 for E-selectin). Conclusion Quantitative measurements of inflammation obtained by using dual-selectin–targeted US

  5. Joint use of monitoring and modelling.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, L F; Refsgaard, J C; Højberg, A L

    2007-01-01

    There is much to gain in joining monitoring and modelling efforts, especially in the present process of implementing the European Water Framework Directive. Nevertheless, it is rare to see forces combined in these two disciplines. To bring the monitoring and the modelling communities together, a number of workshops have been arranged with discussions on benefits and constraints in joint use of monitoring and modelling. The workshops have been attended by scientists, water managers, policy makers as well as stakeholders and consultants. Emphasis has been put on data availability and accessibility, remote sensing and data assimilation techniques, monitoring programmes and modelling support to the design or optimisation of these as well as potential benefits of using supporting modelling tools in the process of designing Programmes of Measures by impact assessment etc. The way models can support in extrapolation in time and space, in data analysis, in process understanding (conceptual models), in accessing correct interaction between pressures and impacts etc. have also been elaborated. Although practitioners have been open-minded to the presented ideas, they are somewhat reluctant towards how to implement this in their daily work. This paper presents some experiences from the workshops.

  6. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  7. Impact of Mixed Xenogeneic Porcine Hematopoietic Chimerism on Human NK Cell Recognition in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Li, H W; Vishwasrao, P; Hölzl, M A; Chen, S; Choi, G; Zhao, G; Sykes, M

    2017-02-01

    Mixed chimerism is a promising approach to inducing allograft and xenograft tolerance. Mixed allogeneic and xenogeneic chimerism in mouse models induced specific tolerance and global hyporesponsiveness, respectively, of host mouse natural killer (NK) cells. In this study, we investigated whether pig/human mixed chimerism could tolerize human NK cells in a humanized mouse model. Our results showed no impact of induced human NK cell reconstitution on porcine chimerism. NK cells from most pig/human mixed chimeric mice showed either specifically decreased cytotoxicity to pig cells or global hyporesponsiveness in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mixed xenogeneic chimerism did not hamper the maturation of human NK cells but was associated with an alteration in NK cell subset distribution and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in the bone marrow. In summary, we demonstrate that mixed xenogeneic chimerism induces human NK cell hyporesponsiveness to pig cells. Our results support the use of this approach to inducing xenogeneic tolerance in the clinical setting. However, additional approaches are required to improve the efficacy of tolerance induction while ensuring adequate NK cell functions.

  8. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Polhamus, Garrett D.; Roach, William P.; Stolarski, David J.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Stockton, Kevin; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Chen, Bo; Welch, Ashley J.

    2006-07-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 µs) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 Jcm-2 for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 Jcm-2 for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  9. Constitutive modeling of stress softening and permanent set in a porcine skin tissue: Impact of the storage preservation.

    PubMed

    Caro-Bretelle, A S; Ienny, P; Leger, R; Corn, S; Bazin, I; Bretelle, F

    2016-09-06

    Prior to testing, soft tissues are usually maintained in different media and additives (solution, air, cryopreservant…) under various environment conditions (temperature, storage duration….). In many cases, results from mechanical tests performed on these stored tissues are supposed to be as closed as possible to the fresh ones. In the present work, cyclic tensile tests were performed with increasing values of strain on porcine skin tissues (excised following the Langer's lines) to enhance tissues mechanical nonlinearity such as softening behavior and permanent set. Optical methods were used to follow the in-plane strains evolution. These latest values were used as data to simulate the structural behavior of these heterogeneous materials. The numerical simulation is based on the constitutive pseudo-elastic model accounting for the softening behavior as well as the permanent set. As a result, reliable material parameters were extracted from the experiments/model comparison for each storage solution. The result of this study reveals that preservation conditions must be carefully chosen: at low strain the tissues store in fridge in a saline solution during a short time, or in freezer (-80°C) in water with cryopreservant and the fresh one lead to a similar mechanical response. For larger strain, the freezing (-80°C) in water with cryopreservant is the only procedure for which the tissue recovers its initial behavior.

  10. Delivery of gelfoam-enabled cells and vectors into the pericardial space using a percutaneous approach in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Ladage, D; Turnbull, IC; Ishikawa, K; Takewa, Y; Rapti, K; Morel, C; Karakikes, I; Müller-Ehmsen, J; Costa, KD; Hajjar, RJ; Kawase, Y

    2013-01-01

    Intrapericardial drug delivery is a promising procedure, with the ability to localize therapeutics with the heart. Gelfoam particles are nontoxic, inexpensive, nonimmunogenic and biodegradable compounds that can be used to deliver therapeutic agents. We developed a new percutaneous approach method for intrapericardial injection, puncturing the pericardial sac safely under fluoroscopy and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. In a porcine model of myocardial infarction (MI), we deployed gelfoam particles carrying either (a) autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or (b) an adenovirus encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) 48 h post-MI. The presence of MSCs and viral infection at the infarct zone was confirmed by immunoflourescence and PCR. Puncture was performed successfully in 16 animals. Using IVUS, we successfully determined the size of the pericardial space before the puncture, and safely accessed that space in setting of pericardial effusion and also adhesions induced by the MI. Intrapericardial injection of gelfoam was safe and reliable. Presence of the MSCs and eGFP expression from adenovirus in the myocardium were confirmed after delivery. Our novel percutaneous approach to deliver (stem-) cells or adenovirus was safe and efficient in this pre-clinical model. IVUS-guided delivery is a minimally invasive procedure that seems to be a promising new strategy to deliver therapeutic agents locally to the heart. PMID:21512506

  11. Reconstruction of porcine critical-sized mandibular defects with free fibular flaps: the development of a craniomaxillofacial surgery model.

    PubMed

    Dorafshar, Amir H; Mohan, Raja; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Brown, Emile N; Kelamis, Alex J; Bojovic, Branko; Christy, Michael R; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2014-05-01

    Vascularized bone flaps are the well-known standards of care for reconstruction of segmental mandibular defects ≥ 6 cm. We developed a large animal critical-sized mandibular defect model in which osseous free fibula flaps were used for reconstruction.In this study a total of eight 3-month-old Yorkshire pigs underwent 6 cm full-thickness resection of the left hemimandible. An osseous free fibula flap from the left leg was harvested and contoured to the mandibular defect. Bone placement and plate position was confirmed with fluoroscopy. Animals were followed with serial radiographs and clinical evaluations.Free fibulas were transferred successfully in all eight animals. The average operative time was 346 minutes, and the average flap ischemia time was 86 minutes. The average volume ratio of reconstructed hemimandibles to nonoperated control hemimandibles was 0.72 ± 0.33. The average maximum fracture load was 689 ± 262 N, and the average ratio of biomechanical fracture load for these samples compared with contralateral control hemimandibles was 0.88 ± 0.25.It is concluded that the porcine osseous free fibula flaps can be reliably harvested and viably transferred to critical-sized posterior mandibular defects with acceptable long-term results. The described microsurgical large animal model is acceptable for use in craniomaxillofacial experimentation.

  12. Hemofiltration with the Cascade system in an experimental porcine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Rimmelé, Thomas; Wey, Pierre-François; Bernard, Nicolas; Monchi, Mehran; Semenzato, Nicolas; Benatir, Farida; Boselli, Emmanuel; Etienne, Jérôme; Goudable, Joëlle; Chassard, Dominique; Bricca, Giampiero; Allaouchiche, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    High-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) has been suggested as an adjuvant treatment of septic shock because of its capacities to remove inflammatory mediators from blood. Nevertheless, HVHF presents some important drawbacks, such as the depletion of low molecular weight molecules (nutriments, vitamins, trace elements and antibiotics) due to the high ultrafiltration rate, or the significant financial cost and nursing workload due to the frequent changes of large amounts of expensive sterile substitution fluids. A new hemofiltration system called "Cascade" has been developed, allowing very high ultrafiltration rates (120 mL/kg/h) limiting these drawbacks by using a special extracorporeal circuit. The objective of this study was to assess the technical feasibility of the Cascade system and to compare its hemodynamic impact to that of the standard HVHF system. Twenty sepsis-induced pigs were randomized in two groups: one group was hemofiltered with the standard HVHF system and the other with the Cascade system during a six-hour session. No technical problems were observed with the Cascade system during the experiment. At the end of the experiment, colloid requirements (989 +/- 355 mL vs. 1913 +/- 538 mL, P = 0.006), epinephrine requirements (0.82 +/- 0.42 mg vs. 3.27 +/- 3.02 mg, P < 0.001), lactic acidosis (pH = 7.33 +/- 0.08 vs. 7.10 +/- 0.07, P < 0.001) and mean pulmonary arterial pressure were less pronounced in the Cascade group. These results suggest that Cascade hemofiltration is technically feasible and safe. Moreover, compared with standard HVHF, it can reduce the severity of porcine septic shock.

  13. Fluid-structure interaction model of aortic valve with porcine-specific collagen fiber alignment in the cusps.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Peleg, Mor; Halevi, Rotem; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Raanani, Ehud; Hamdan, Ashraf; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2013-10-01

    Native aortic valve cusps are composed of collagen fibers embedded in their layers. Each valve cusp has its own distinctive fiber alignment with varying orientations and sizes of its fiber bundles. However, prior mechanical behavior models have not been able to account for the valve-specific collagen fiber networks (CFN) or for their differences between the cusps. This study investigates the influence of this asymmetry on the hemodynamics by employing two fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models, one with asymmetric-mapped CFN from measurements of porcine valve and the other with simplified-symmetric CFN. The FSI models are based on coupled structural and fluid dynamic solvers. The partitioned solver has nonconformal meshes and the flow is modeled by employing the Eulerian approach. The collagen in the CFNs, the surrounding elastin matrix, and the aortic sinus tissues have hyperelastic mechanical behavior. The coaptation is modeled with a master-slave contact algorithm. A full cardiac cycle is simulated by imposing the same physiological blood pressure at the upstream and downstream boundaries for both models. The mapped case showed highly asymmetric valve kinematics and hemodynamics even though there were only small differences between the opening areas and cardiac outputs of the two cases. The regions with a less dense fiber network are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher principal stress in the tissues and a higher level of flow shear stress. This asymmetric flow leeward of the valve might damage not only the valve itself but also the ascending aorta.

  14. A head-to-head hands-on comparison of ERCP mechanical simulator (EMS) and Ex-vivo Porcine Stomach Model (PSM).

    PubMed

    Leung, Joseph W; Wang, Dong; Hu, Bing; Lim, Brian; Leung, Felix W

    2011-07-01

    BACKGROUND: ERCP mechanical simulator (EMS) and ex-vivo porcine stomach model (PSM) have been described. No direct comparison was reported on endoscopists' perception regarding their efficacy for ERCP training OBJECTIVE: Comparative assessment of EMS and PSM. DESIGN: Questionnaire survey before and after practice. SETTING: Hands-on practice workshops. SUBJECTS: 22 endoscopists with prior experience in 111±225 (mean±SD) ERCP. INTERVENTIONS: Participants performed scope insertion, selective bile duct cannulation with guide wire and insertion of a single biliary stent. Simulated fluoroscopy with external pin-hole camera (EMS), or with additional transillumination (PSM) was used to monitor exchange of accessories. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Participants rated their understanding and confidence before and after hands-on practice, and credibility of each simulator for ERCP training. Comparative efficacy of EMS and PSM for ERCP education was scored (1=not, 10=very) based on pre and post practice surveys: realism (tissue pliability, papilla anatomy, visual/cannulation realism, wire manipulation, simulated fluoroscopy, overall experience); usefulness (assessment of results, supplementing clinical experience, easy for trainees to learn new skills) and application (overall ease of use, prepare trainees to use real instrument and ease of incorporation into training). RESULTS: Before hands-on practice, both EMS and PSM received high scores. After practice, there was a significantly greater increase in confidence score for EMS than PSM (p<0.003). Participants found EMS more useful for training (p=0.017). LIMITATIONS: Subjective scores. CONCLUSIONS: Based on head-to-head hands-on comparison, endoscopists considered both EMS and PSM credible options for improving understanding and supplementing clinical ERCP training. EMS is more useful for basic learning.

  15. Comparison of shape memory polymer foam versus bare metal coil treatments in an in vivo porcine sidewall aneurysm model.

    PubMed

    Horn, John; Hwang, Wonjun; Jessen, Staci L; Keller, Brandis K; Miller, Matthew W; Tuzun, Egemen; Hartman, Jonathan; Clubb, Fred J; Maitland, Duncan J

    2016-06-03

    The endovascular delivery of platinum alloy bare metal coils has been widely adapted to treat intracranial aneurysms. Despite the widespread clinical use of this technique, numerous suboptimal outcomes are possible. These may include chronic inflammation, low volume filling, coil compaction, and recanalization, all of which can lead to aneurysm recurrence, need for retreatment, and/or potential rupture. This study evaluates a treatment alternative in which polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) foam is used as an embolic aneurysm filler. The performance of this treatment method was compared to that of bare metal coils in a head-to-head in vivo study utilizing a porcine vein pouch aneurysm model. After 90 and 180 days post-treatment, gross and histological observations were used to assess aneurysm healing. At 90 days, the foam-treated aneurysms were at an advanced stage of healing compared to the coil-treated aneurysms and showed no signs of chronic inflammation. At 180 days, the foam-treated aneurysms exhibited an 89-93% reduction in cross-sectional area; whereas coiled aneurysms displayed an 18-34% area reduction. The superior healing in the foam-treated aneurysms at earlier stages suggests that SMP foam may be a viable alternative to current treatment methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  16. Effectiveness of a polyhexanide irrigation solution on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a porcine wound model.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen C; Harding, Andrew; Gil, Joel; Parajon, Fernando; Valdes, Jose; Solis, Michael; Higa, Alex

    2017-03-07

    Irrigation and removal of necrotic debris can be beneficial for proper healing. It is becoming increasingly evident that wounds colonized with biofilm forming bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus (SA), can be more difficult to eradicate. Here we report our findings of the effects of an irrigation solution containing propyl-betaine and polyhexanide (PHMB) on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms in a porcine wound model. Thirty-nine deep partial thickness wounds were created with six wounds assigned to one of six treatment groups: (i) PHMB, (ii) Ringer's solution, (iii) hypochlorous acid/sodium hypochlorite, (iv) sterile water, (v) octenidine dihydrochloride, and (vi) octenilin. Wounds were inoculated with MRSA and covered with a polyurethane dressing for 24 hours to allow biofilm formation. The dressings were then removed and the wounds were irrigated twice daily for 3 days with the appropriate solution. MRSA from four wounds were recovered from each treatment group at 3 days and 6 days hours after initial treatment. Irrigation of wounds with the PHMB solution resulted in 97·85% and 99·64% reductions of MRSA at the respective 3 days and 6 days assessment times when compared to the untreated group. Both of these reductions were statistically significant compared to all other treatment groups (P values <0·05).

  17. Effect of continuous compression and 30:2 cardiopulmonary resuscitation on cerebral microcirculation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of rescue breathing on neurologic prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is controversial. Therefore, we investigated the cerebral microcirculatory and oxygen metabolism during continuous compression (CC) and 30:2 CPR (VC) in a porcine model of cardiac arrest to determine which is better for neurologic prognosis after CPR. Methods After 4 min of ventricular fibrillation, 20 pigs were randomised into two groups (n=10/group) receiving CC-CPR or VC-CPR. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow were measured continuously using laser Doppler flowmetry. Haemodynamic data were recorded at baseline and 5 min, 30 min, 2 h and 4 h after restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Compared with the VC group, the mean cortical cerebral blood flow was significantly higher at 5 min ROSC in the CC group (P<0.05), but the difference disappeared after that time point. Brain percutaneous oxygen partial pressures were higher, and brain percutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressures were lower, in the VC group from 30 min to 4 h after ROSC; significant differences were found between the two groups (P<0.05). However, no significant difference of the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction existed between the two groups. Conclusions Inconsistency of systemic circulation and cerebral microcirculation with regard to blood perfusion and oxygen metabolism is common after CPR. No significant differences in cortical blood flow and oxygen metabolism were found between the CC-CPR and VC-CPR groups after ROSC. PMID:23849600

  18. Effect of age and maternal antibodies on the systemic and mucosal immune response after neonatal immunization in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Bautista, Edgar R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carlos E; Gama-Espinosa, Alicia L; Ramirez-Estudillo, Carmen; Rojas-Gomez, Oscar I; Vega-Lopez, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Newborn mammals are highly susceptible to respiratory infections. Although maternal antibodies (MatAb) offer them some protection, they may also interfere with their systemic immune response to vaccination. However, the impact of MatAb on the neonatal mucosal immune response remains incompletely described. This study was performed to determine the effect of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific MatAb on the anti-OVA antibody response in sera, nasal secretions and saliva from specific pathogen-free Vietnamese miniature piglets immunized at 7 or 14 days of age. Our results demonstrated that MatAb increased antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in sera, and transiently enhanced an early secretory IgA response in nasal secretions of piglets immunized at 7 days of age. In contrast, we detected a lower mucosal (nasal secretion and saliva) anti-OVA IgG response in piglets with MatAb immunized at 14 days of age, compared with piglets with no MatAb, suggesting a modulatory effect of antigen-specific maternal factors on the isotype transfer to the mucosal immune exclusion system. In our porcine model, we demonstrated that passive maternal immunity positively modulated the systemic and nasal immune responses of animals immunized early in life. Our results, therefore, open the possibility of inducing systemic and respiratory mucosal immunity in the presence of MatAb through early vaccination. PMID:24754050

  19. Pharmacological Relaxation of the Ureter When Using Ureteral Access Sheaths during Ureterorenoscopy: A Randomized Feasibility Study in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lildal, Søren Kissow; Andreassen, Kim Hovgaard; Christiansen, Frederikke Eichner; Jung, Helene; Pedersen, Malene Roland

    2016-01-01

    Objective. High intraluminal pressure during ureterorenoscopy (URS) increases risk of infectious and haemorrhagic complications. Intrarenal pressure may be reduced by the use of ureteral access sheaths (UASs), which on the other hand may cause ureteral damage. We have previously shown that the β-agonist isoproterenol (ISO), when administered topically in the irrigation fluid, is able to inhibit ureteral muscle tone and lower intrarenal pressure during URS. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ISO on the success rate of UAS insertion in a porcine model. Materials and Methods. 22 pigs in which a UAS could not initially be placed were randomized to endoluminal irrigation with either ISO (0.1 μg/mL) or saline before a new insertion trial. Subsequently, it was registered whether the UAS could be passed without resistance. During extraction of the sheath, any ureteral lesions were characterized ureteroscopically using the PULS classification system. Surgeons were blinded to randomization. Results. In the ISO group, the observed effect of irrigation was 63% successful UAS insertions, compared to 27% in the saline group. No serious lesions (

  20. Use of a production region model to assess the airborne spread of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Andrea; Deen, John; Dee, Scott

    2009-04-14

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an emerging and re-emerging disease of pigs and a growing threat to the global swine industry. For sustainable disease control, it is critical to prevent the spread of the etiologic agent, PRRS virus, between pig populations. Therefore, a clear understanding of the role of aerosol transmission in the spread of PRRS virus is needed as well as information on how to reduce this risk. To enhance the knowledge of PRRS aerobiology we used a production region model to quantify infectious virus in bioaerosols, document airborne spread of the virus out to 120m, identify climactic conditions associated with the presence of virus in bioaerosols, and demonstrate the ability to protect at-risk populations using a system of air filtration. These findings confirm the importance of the airborne spread of PRRS virus, provide new information regarding its aerobiology and describe for the first time an effective means of disease control that can protect healthy, vulnerable populations of pigs.

  1. Comparison of thermal coagulation profiles for bipolar forceps with different cooling mechanisms in a porcine model of spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Roland K.; Than, Khoi D.; Wang, Anthony C.; Park, Paul; Shih, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coagulation accomplished using bipolar forceps is common in neurosurgery. Control of thermal spread from the forceps tips into surrounding neural tissues is a persistent concern, as neural tissues are especially vulnerable to heat injury. The purpose of our investigation was to compare the efficacy of cooling mechanisms for four different bipolar forceps and to understand thermal spread when coagulating vessels on the spinal cord. Methods: Immediately following euthanasia, the dura mater of an ex vivo porcine model was opened to expose vessels on the spinal cord for coagulation. Temperature profiles were measured at generator power of 25 W and at fixed 5-second activation times. The bipolar forceps used in this study included regular stainless steel, titanium, heat-pipe embedded, and SILVERGlide forceps. Temperature was measured by micro-thermistor at the midpoint between the bipolar tips, and 1 and 2 mm away from the midpoint along the centerline. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate temperature differences. Results: Temperature profiles indicated that heat-pipe embedded forceps create the least amount of temperature increase and the highest normalized temperature decreasing slope after activation. The decreasing slope of SILVERGlide forceps is slightly higher than that of regular stainless steel forceps. Conclusions: Bipolar forceps incorporating either heat-pipe embedded technology or SILVERGlide coating can effectively limit excessive thermal spread, thus decreasing potential injury to adjacent tissues when compared with standard stainless steel and titanium bipolar forceps. Of the two, heat-pipe embedded technology appeared safest, having better cooling efficiency at higher temperature. PMID:24083049

  2. Protective Effect of Shen-Fu Injection on Neuronal Mitochondrial Function in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wei; Hou, XiaoMin; Zhou, Haijiang; Li, ChunSheng

    2014-01-01

    Background. Shen-Fu injection (SFI) following cardiac arrest exhibits neurological effects, but its effect on neurological dysfunction is unclear. This study sought to investigate the protective effect of SFI on nerve cells in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. Methods. After eight minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation (VF) and 2 minutes of basic life support, 24 pigs were randomized and divided into three cardiopulmonary resuscitation groups, which received central venous injection of either Shen-Fu (SFI group; 1.0 ml/kg), epinephrine (EP group; 0.02 mg/kg), or saline (SA group). Surviving pigs were sacrificed at 24 h after ROSC and brains were removed for analysis for morphologic changes of mitochondria by electron microscopy, for mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) by flow cytometry, and for opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by mitochondrial light scattering. Results. Compared with the EP and SA groups, SFI treatment reduced opening of MPTP, showing higher MMP. In addition, animals treated with SFI showed slight cerebral ultrastructure damage under the electron microscopy. Conclusion. Shen-Fu injection alleviated brain injury, improved neurological ultrastructure, stabilized membrane potential, and inhibited opening of MPTP. Therefore, SFI could significantly attenuate postresuscitation cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury by modulating mitochondrial dysfunction of nerve cells. PMID:25505924

  3. ICG angiography predicts burn scarring within 48 h of injury in a porcine vertical progression burn model.

    PubMed

    Fourman, Mitchell S; McKenna, Peter; Phillips, Brett T; Crawford, Laurie; Romanelli, Filippo; Lin, Fubao; McClain, Steve A; Khan, Sami U; Dagum, Alexander B; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-08-01

    The current standard of care in determining the need to excise and graft a burn remains with the burn surgeon, whose clinical judgment is often variable. Prior work suggests that minimally invasive perfusion technologies are useful in burn prognostication. Here we test the predictive capabilities of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and indocyanine green dye (ICG) angiography in the prediction of burn scarring 28 days after injury using a previously validated porcine burn model that shows vertical progression injury. Twelve female Yorkshire swine were burned using a 2.5 × 2.5 cm metal bar at variable temperature and application times to create distinct burn depths. Six animals (48 injuries total) each were analyzed with LDI or ICG angiography at 1, 24, 48, and 72 h following injury. A linear regression was then performed correlating perfusion measurements against wound contraction at 28 days after injury. ICG angiography showed a peak linear correlate (r(2)) of .63 (95% CI .34 to .92) at 48 h after burn. This was significantly different from the LDI linear regression (p < .05), which was measured at r(2) of .20 (95% CI .02 to .39). ICG angiography linear regression was superior to LDI at all timepoints. Findings suggest that ICG angiography may have significant potential in the prediction of long-term burn outcomes.

  4. Radiosurgical Ablation of the Renal Nerve in a Porcine Model: A Minimally Invasive Therapeutic Approach to Treat Refractory Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Long, Sarah A; Gardner, Edward A; Tay, Jonathan; Ladich, Elena; Chamberlain, David; Fogarty, Thomas J.; Maguire, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension is strongly associated with cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, and has been correlated with an increased risk for heart attack. Current treatment regimens for hypertension are highly inadequate, with reports indicating that only 50.1% of the clinical population with the disease has their blood pressure under control. Objective To study the feasibility of using minimally invasive radiosurgery to ablate the renal nerves as a novel treatment for refractory hypertension, and to assess the safety and efficacy of such an approach. Methods A Hanford porcine (miniswine) model (N = 6) was used to investigate the feasibility of using the CyberHeart radiosurgical platform (CyberHeart Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA) to create safe renal nerve ablations. Norepinephrine (NE) levels were measured pre and post treatment. Additionally, renal nerve and arterial histology were studied to examine effect. Results Plasma norepinephrine levels showed a decrease over the six-month time point. Urea, nitrogen, and creatinine levels showed no changes post procedure. Histology documented no significant arterial injury in targeted areas. Renal nerves documented histologic change consistent with nerve ablation. Conclusion CyberHeart radiosurgery of the renal nerve is feasible and resulted in norepinephrine reduction and renal nerve injury consistent with radiosurgical targeted ablation. PMID:28367392

  5. Geophysical Models for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Flanagan, M

    2003-07-16

    Geophysical models are increasingly recognized as an important component of regional calibrations for seismic monitoring. The models can be used to predict geophysical measurements, such as body wave travel times, and can be derived from direct regional studies or even by geophysical analogy. While empirical measurements of these geophysical parameters might be preferred, in aseismic regions or regions without seismic stations, this data might not exist. In these cases, models represent a 'best guess' of the seismic properties in a region, which improves on global models such as the PREM (Preliminary Reference Earth Model) or the IASPEI (International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior) models. The model-based predictions can also serve as a useful background for the empirical measurements by removing trends in the data. To this end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the WENA model for Western Eurasia and North Africa. This model is constructed using a regionalization of several dozen lithospheric (crust and uppermost mantle) models, combined with the Laske sediment model and 3SMAC upper mantle. We have evaluated this model using a number of data sets, including travel times, surface waves, receiver functions, and waveform analysis. Similarly, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed a geophysical model for East Asia, allowing LLNL/LANL to construct a model for all of Eurasia and North Africa. These models continue to evolve as new and updated datasets are used to critically assess the predictive powers of the model. Research results from this meeting and other reports and papers can be used to update and refine the regional boundaries and regional models. A number of other groups involved in monitoring have also developed geophysical models. As these become available, we will be assessing the models and their constitutive components for their suitability for inclusion in the National Nuclear Security

  6. System monitoring and diagnosis with qualitative models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    A substantial foundation of tools for model-based reasoning with incomplete knowledge was developed: QSIM (a qualitative simulation program) and its extensions for qualitative simulation; Q2, Q3 and their successors for quantitative reasoning on a qualitative framework; and the CC (component-connection) and QPC (Qualitative Process Theory) model compilers for building QSIM QDE (qualitative differential equation) models starting from different ontological assumptions. Other model-compilers for QDE's, e.g., using bond graphs or compartmental models, have been developed elsewhere. These model-building tools will support automatic construction of qualitative models from physical specifications, and further research into selection of appropriate modeling viewpoints. For monitoring and diagnosis, plausible hypotheses are unified against observations to strengthen or refute the predicted behaviors. In MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), multiple hypothesized models of the system are tracked in parallel in order to reduce the 'missing model' problem. Each model begins as a qualitative model, and is unified with a priori quantitative knowledge and with the stream of incoming observational data. When the model/data unification yields a contradiction, the model is refuted. When there is no contradiction, the predictions of the model are progressively strengthened, for use in procedure planning and differential diagnosis. Only under a qualitative level of description can a finite set of models guarantee the complete coverage necessary for this performance. The results of this research are presented in several publications. Abstracts of these published papers are presented along with abtracts of papers representing work that was synergistic with the NASA grant but funded otherwise. These 28 papers include but are not limited to: 'Combined qualitative and numerical simulation with Q3'; 'Comparative analysis and qualitative integral representations

  7. GULF OF MEXICO HYPOXIA MONITORING AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greene, Richard M. and Russell G. Kreis. In press. Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Monitoring and Modeling (Abstract). To be presented at the EPA Science Forum: Healthy Communities and Ecosystems, 1-3 June 2004, Washington, DC. 1 p. (ERL,GB R990).

    Oxygen-depleted or hypoxic bottom...

  8. Monitoring issues from a modeling perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahlman, Jerry D.

    1993-01-01

    Recognition that earth's climate and biogeophysical conditions are likely changing due to human activities has led to a heightened awareness of the need for improved long-term global monitoring. The present long-term measurement efforts tend to be spotty in space, inadequately calibrated in time, and internally inconsistent with respect to other instruments and measured quantities. In some cases, such as most of the biosphere, most chemicals, and much of the ocean, even a minimal monitoring program is not available. Recently, it has become painfully evident that emerging global change issues demand information and insights that the present global monitoring system simply cannot supply. This is because a monitoring system must provide much more than a statement of change at a given level of statistical confidence. It must describe changes in diverse parts of the entire earth system on regional to global scales. It must be able to provide enough input to allow an integrated physical characterization of the changes that have occurred. Finally, it must allow a separation of the observed changes into their natural and anthropogenic parts. The enormous policy significance of global change virtually guarantees an unprecedented level of scrutiny of the changes in the earth system and why they are happening. These pressures create a number of emerging challenges and opportunities. For example, they will require a growing partnership between the observational programs and the theory/modeling community. Without this partnership, the scientific community will likely fall short in the monitoring effort. The monitoring challenge before us is not to solve the problem now, but rather to set appropriate actions in motion so as to create the required framework for solution. Each individual piece needs to establish its role in the large problem and how the required interactions are to take place. Below, we emphasize some of the needs and opportunities that could and should be

  9. Visible Lesion Thresholds with Pulse Duration, Spot Size Dependency, and Model Predictions for 1.54-mum Near-Infrared Laser Pulses Penetrating Porcine Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-22

    laser hazard evaluation methods, see Marshall et al.6 The Yucatan mini-pig Sus scrofa domestica was used in this study as the model for determining the...D. Oler, andJournal of Biomedical Optics 024001- Downloaded from SPIE Digital Library on 30 Nov 2009 to T. E. Johnson, “Comparison of two porcine Sus ... scrofa domestica skin models for in vivo near-infrared laser exposure,” Compar. Med. 504, 391–397 2000. 9. National Research Council, Federal

  10. Watershed modeling and monitoring for assessing nutrient ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presentation for the American Water Works Association Water Sustainability Conference. The presentation highlights latest results from water quality trading research conducted by ORD using the East Fork Watershed in Southwestern Ohio as a case study. The watershed has a nutrient enrichment problem that is creating harmful algal blooms in a reservoir used for drinking water and recreation. Innovative modeling and monitoring is combined to understand how to best manage this water quality problem and costs associated with this endeavor. The presentation will provide an overview of the water quality trading feasibility research. The research includes the development and evaluation of innovative modeling and monitoring approaches to manage watersheds for nutrient pollution using a whole systems approach.

  11. A review of the human vs. porcine female genital tract and associated immune system in the perspective of using minipigs as a model of human genital Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Emma; Follmann, Frank; Jungersen, Gregers; Agerholm, Jørgen S

    2015-09-28

    Sexually transmitted diseases constitute major health issues and their prevention and treatment continue to challenge the health care systems worldwide. Animal models are essential for a deeper understanding of the diseases and the development of safe and protective vaccines. Currently a good predictive non-rodent model is needed for the study of genital chlamydia in women. The pig has become an increasingly popular model for human diseases due to its close similarities to humans. The aim of this review is to compare the porcine and human female genital tract and associated immune system in the perspective of genital Chlamydia infection. The comparison of women and sows has shown that despite some gross anatomical differences, the structures and proportion of layers undergoing cyclic alterations are very similar. Reproductive hormonal cycles are closely related, only showing a slight difference in cycle length and source of luteolysing hormone. The epithelium and functional layers of the endometrium show similar cyclic changes. The immune system in pigs is very similar to that of humans, even though pigs have a higher percentage of CD4(+)/CD8(+) double positive T cells. The genital immune system is also very similar in terms of the cyclic fluctuations in the mucosal antibody levels, but differs slightly regarding immune cell infiltration in the genital mucosa - predominantly due to the influx of neutrophils in the porcine endometrium during estrus. The vaginal flora in Göttingen Minipigs is not dominated by lactobacilli as in humans. The vaginal pH is around 7 in Göttingen Minipigs, compared to the more acidic vaginal pH around 3.5-5 in women. This review reveals important similarities between the human and porcine female reproductive tracts and proposes the pig as an advantageous supplementary model of human genital Chlamydia infection.

  12. Quantitative analysis of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) viremia profiles from experimental infection: a statistical modelling approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the most economically significant viral disease facing the global swine industry. Viremia profiles of PRRS virus challenged pigs reflect the severity and progression of the infection within the host and provide crucial information for subsequen...

  13. Effects of continuous renal replacement therapy on intestinal mucosal barrier function during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been recommended for treatment of acute, potentially reversible, life-threatening respiratory failure unresponsive to conventional therapy. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction is one of the most critical pathophysiological disorders during ECMO. This study aimed to determine whether combination with CRRT could alleviate damage of intestinal mucosal barrier function during VV ECMO in a porcine model. Methods Twenty-four piglets were randomly divided into control(C), sham(S), ECMO(E) and ECMO + CRRT(EC) group. The animals were treated with ECMO or ECMO + CRRT for 24 hours. After the experiments, piglets were sacrificed. Jejunum, ileum and colon were harvested for morphologic examination of mucosal injury and ultrastructural distortion. Histological scoring was assessed according to Chiu’s scoring standard. Blood samples were taken from the animals at -1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h during experiment. Blood, liver, spleen, kidney and mesenteric lymphnode were collected for bacterial culture. Serum concentrations of diamine oxidase (DAO) and intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) were tested as markers to assess intestinal epithelial function and permeability. DAO levels were determined by spectrophotometry and I-FABP levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results Microscopy findings showed that ECMO-induced intestinal microvillus shedding and edema, morphological distortion of tight junction between intestinal mucous epithelium and loose cell-cell junctions were significantly improved with combination of CRRT. No significance was detected on positive rate of serum bacterial culture. The elevated colonies of bacterial culture in liver and mesenteric lymphnode in E group reduced significantly in EC group (p < 0.05). Compared with E group, EC group showed significantly decreased level of serum DAO and I-FABP (p < 0.05). Conclusions CRRT can alleviate the intestinal mucosal dysfunction

  14. Effects of Fibrinogen Concentrate on Thrombin Generation, Thromboelastometry Parameters, and Laboratory Coagulation Testing in a 24-Hour Porcine Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zentai, Christian; Solomon, Cristina; van der Meijden, Paola E. J.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Schnabel, Jonas; Rossaint, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In a 24-hour porcine model of liver injury, we showed that fibrinogen supplementation does not downregulate endogenous fibrinogen synthesis. Here we report data from the same study showing the impact of fibrinogen on coagulation variables. Materials and Methods: Coagulopathy was induced in 20 German land race pigs by hemodilution and blunt liver injury. Animals randomly received fibrinogen concentrate (100 mg/kg) or saline. Coagulation parameters were assessed and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was performed. Results: Fibrinogen concentrate significantly reduced the prolongations of EXTEM clotting time, EXTEM clot formation time, and prothrombin time induced by hemodilution and liver injury. A decrease in clot strength was also ameliorated. Endogenous thrombin potential was significantly higher in the fibrinogen group than in the control group, 20 minutes (353 ± 24 vs 289 ± 22 nmol/L·min; P < .05) and 100 minutes (315 ± 40 vs 263 ± 38 nmol/L·min; P < .05) after the start of infusion. However, no significant between-group differences were seen in other thrombin generation parameters or in d-dimer or thrombin–antithrombin levels. Fibrinogen–platelet binding was reduced following liver injury, with no significant differences between groups. No significant between-group differences were observed in any parameter at ∼12 and ∼24 hours. Conclusion: This study suggests that, in trauma, fibrinogen supplementation may shorten some measurements of the speed of coagulation initiation and produce a short-lived increase in endogenous thrombin potential, potentially through increased clotting substrate availability. Approximately 12 and 24 hours after starting fibrinogen concentrate/saline infusion, all parameters measured in this study were comparable in the 2 study groups. PMID:25948634

  15. Assessment of Novel Anti-thrombotic Fusion Proteins for Inhibition of Stenosis in a Porcine Model of Arteriovenous Graft

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Christi M.; Zhuplatov, Ilya; He, Yuxia; Wun, Tze-Chein; Kim, Seong-Eun; Cheung, Alfred K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis arteriovenous synthetic grafts (AVG) provide high volumetric blood flow rates shortly after surgical placement. However, stenosis often develops at the vein-graft anastomosis contributing to thrombosis and early graft failure. Two novel fusion proteins, ANV-6L15 and TAP-ANV, inhibit the tissue factor/factor VIIa coagulation complex and the factor Xa/factor Va complex, respectively. Each inhibitor domain is fused to an annexin V domain that targets the inhibitor activity to sites of vascular injury to locally inhibit thrombosis. This study’s objective was to determine if these antithrombotic proteins are safe and effective in inhibiting AVG stenosis. Methods A bolus of either TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 fusion protein was administered intravenously immediately prior to surgical placement of a synthetic graft between the external jugular vein and common carotid artery in a porcine model. At surgery, the vein and artery were irrigated with the anti-thrombotic fusion protein. Control animals received intravenous heparin. At 4 weeks, MRI was performed to evaluate graft patency, the pigs were then euthanized and grafts and attached vessels were explanted for histomorphometric assessment of neointimal hyperplasia at the vein-graft anastomosis. Blood was collected at surgery, immediately after surgery and at euthanasia for serum metabolic panels and coagulation chemistries. Results No acute thrombosis occurred in the control group or in either experimental group. No abnormal serum chemistries, activated clotting times or PT, PTT values were observed after treatment in experimental or control animals. However, at the vein-graft anastomosis, there was no difference between the control and experimental groups in cross-sectional lumen areas, as measured on MRI, and no difference in hyperplasia areas as determined by histomorphometry. These results suggest that local irrigation of TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 intra-operatively was as effective in inhibiting acute graft

  16. A Comparison between splenic fossa and subhepatic fossa auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Wang, Zhifei; Shen, Jie; Yu, Feiyan; Xie, Limei; Pan, Yongming; Lin, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To test the alternative possible locations for the placement of a liver graft and the relevant surgical technique issues, we developed a porcine model of auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation (APHLT) and evaluated the difference between 2 styles of liver transplantation, either subhepatic fossa or splenic fossa APHLT, by comparing survival and biochemical indexes. Thirty‐eight miniature pigs were randomly divided into 2 groups. A left hemihepatic graft without the middle hepatic vein (HV) was procured from the living donor. In group A (n = 9), an 8 mm diameter polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft approximately 2.5 cm long was connected to the left HV while another PTFE graft of the same size was connected to the left portal vein (PV). The liver graft was implanted in the right subhepatic fossa following splenectomy and right nephrectomy. In group B (n = 10), a PTFE graft of the same size was connected to the left HV while the liver graft was implanted in the splenic fossa following splenectomy and left nephrectomy. Survival rate and complications were observed at 2 weeks after transplantation. Data were collected from 5 animals in group A and 6 animals in group B that survived longer than 2 weeks. The liver function and renal function of the recipients returned to normal at 1 week after surgery in both groups. Eighty‐eight percent (14/16) of the PTFE grafts remained patent at 2 weeks after surgery, but 44% of the PTFE grafts (7/16) developed mural thrombus. No significant differences in the survival rate and biochemistry were found between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the splenic fossa APHLT can achieve beneficial outcomes similar to the subhepatic fossa APHLT in miniature pigs, although it also has a high morbidity rate due to hepatic artery thrombosis, PV thrombosis, and PTEF graft mural thrombus formation. Liver Transplantation 22 812–821 2016 AASLD. PMID:26785299

  17. The influence of acute unloading on left ventricular strain and strain rate by speckle tracking echocardiography in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Dahle, Geir Olav; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-05-15

    Noninvasive measurements of myocardial strain and strain rate by speckle tracking echocardiography correlate to cardiac contractile state but also to load, which may weaken their value as indices of inotropy. In a porcine model, we investigated the influence of acute dynamic preload reductions on left ventricular strain and strain rate and their relation to the pressure-conductance catheter-derived preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LV-dP/dtmax). Speckle tracking strain and strain rate in the longitudinal, circumferential, and radial directions were measured during acute dynamic reductions of end-diastolic volume during three different myocardial inotropic states. Both strain and strain rate were sensitive to unloading of the left ventricle (P < 0.001), but the load dependency for strain rate was modest compared with strain. Changes in longitudinal and circumferential strain correlated more strongly to changes in end-diastolic volume (r = -0.86 and r = -0.72) than did radial strain (r = 0.35). Longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain significantly correlated with LV-dP/dtmax (r = -0.53, r = -0.46, and r = 0.86), whereas only radial strain correlated with PRSW (r = 0.55). Strain rate in the longitudinal, circumferential and radial direction significantly correlated with both PRSW (r = -0.64, r = -0.58, and r = 0.74) and LV-dP/dtmax (r = -0.95, r = -0.70, and r = 0.85). In conclusion, the speckle tracking echocardiography-derived strain rate is more robust to dynamic ventricular unloading than strain. Longitudinal and circumferential strain could not predict load-independent contractility. Strain rates, and especially in the radial direction, are good predictors of preload-independent inotropic markers derived from conductance catheter.

  18. Ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound in an in vivo porcine liver model

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Starr, Frank; Paun, Marla; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for noninvasive tissue ablation has been recently gaining momentum. In HIFU, ultrasound energy from an extracorporeal source is focused within the body to ablate tissue at the focus while leaving the surrounding organs and tissues unaffected. Most HIFU therapies are designed to use heating effects resulting from the absorption of ultrasound by tissue to create a thermally coagulated treatment volume. Although this approach is often successful, it has its limitations, such as the heat sink effect caused by the presence of a large blood vessel near the treatment area or heating of the ribs in the transcostal applications. HIFU-induced bubbles provide an alternative means to destroy the target tissue by mechanical disruption or, at its extreme, local fractionation of tissue within the focal region. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a recently developed approach to HIFU-induced ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation in an in vivo pig model. In this approach, termed boiling histotripsy, a millimeter-sized boiling bubble is generated by ultrasound and further interacts with the ultrasound field to fractionate porcine liver tissue into subcellular debris without inducing further thermal effects. Tissue selectivity, demonstrated by boiling histotripsy, allows for the treatment of tissue immediately adjacent to major blood vessels and other connective tissue structures. Furthermore, boiling histotripsy would benefit the clinical applications, in which it is important to accelerate resorption or passage of the ablated tissue volume, diminish pressure on the surrounding organs that causes discomfort, or insert openings between tissues. PMID:24843132

  19. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  20. Blood-Brain Barrier Opening by MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound: Preclinical Testing on a Trans-Human Skull Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuexi; Alkins, Ryan; Schwartz, Michael L.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test a protocol in preparation for a clinical trial on blood-brain-barrier opening (BBBO) by magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) for chemo-drug delivery to brian tumors. Materials and Methods The procedures were approved by the Institutional Animal Care Committee. A trans-human skull porcine model was designed for the preclinical testing. Wide craniotomies were applied on 11 porcine subjects (~15 kg). A partial human skull was positioned over the animal’s brain. A modified clinical MRgFUS brain system (ExAblate 4000, 230 kHz) was used with a 3T MR scanner (Signa MR750, GE Healthcare). The ultrasound beam was steered during sonications over a 3×3 grid at 3 mm spacing. Acoustic power levels from 3 to 20 W were tested. Bolus injections of Definity microbubble at 4 ul/kg were tested for each sonication. Levels of BBB opening, hemorrhage and cavitation signal were measured by MR imaging, histology and cavitation receivers, respectively. A cavitation safety algorithm was developed based on logistic regression of the measurements and tested to minimize risks of hemorrhage. Results BBBO of approximately 1 cm3 in volume were visualized by Gd-enhanced MR imaging post sonication at ~5 W acoustic powers. Gross examination of histology confirmed Evans blue (bound to macromolecule albumin) extravasation, and H&E staining detected only scattered extravasation of red blood cells. In cases where cavitation signals were above thresholds, sonications were terminated immediately without causing hemorrhage. Conclusion With a trans-human skull porcine model, this study demonstrated BBBO with the 230 kHz ExAblate system in preparation for a clinical trial. PMID:27420647

  1. Multiple Probe Hepatic Radio-Frequency Ablation: Ex-Vivo Experiments in the Porcine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    temperatures) were scaled to 80% of the data used for the first model. The model of dynamic system B approximated a situation where higher blood...sample B (initial temperature 27 °C). t ee KeKu n m mm nn ∆⋅ +⋅+⋅= = − 1 1 ip 2 (2) 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 200 400 Time (s) A ve ra g e T ip T em

  2. Evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation in a porcine model following radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krigsfeld, G. S.; Shah, J. B.; Sanzari, J. K.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) plays an integral role in death at the LD50 dose of either gamma or solar particle event (SPE)-like proton radiation in ferrets. In these studies, Yucatan minipigs were evaluated to determine whether they were susceptible to the development of radiation induced DIC. Yucatan minipigs were exposed to a dose of 2.5 Gray (Gy) with X-rays and monitored over the course of 30 days. Evidence of DIC was evaluated by way of thromboelastometry parameters, platelet counts, fibrinogen concentration, and the d-dimer assay. Pigs exposed to X-rays developed signs of DIC within 2 days' post-irradiation. The development of DIC was exacerbated over the course of the studies, and one of the pigs died at day 14 and another had to be euthanized on day 16 post-irradiation. For both of these pigs, DIC was evident at the time of death. The following observations were indicated or were suggestive of DIC: whole blood clotting was impaired (as evidenced by thromboelastometry alterations), there were decreased platelet counts, elevated d-dimer concentrations in the blood, and/or hemorrhaging and the presence of fibrin in tissues observed during post-mortem examination. The extrapolation of data from these studies, in combination with other published data, have led to the hypothesis that there could be a correlation between the propensity to develop DIC, as indicated by hemorrhaging at death at relatively low doses of radiation, and the LD50 for a particular species. Our data suggest that the development of DIC may contribute to death at the LD50 dose in large mammals.

  3. Evidence of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in a Porcine Model Following Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Krigsfeld, G.S.; Shah, J.B.; Sanzari, J.K.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) plays an integral role in death at the LD50 dose of either gamma or solar particle event (SPE)-like proton radiation in ferrets. In these studies, Yucatan minipigs were evaluated to determine whether they were susceptible to the development of radiation induced DIC. Yucatan minipigs were exposed to a dose of 2.5 Gray (Gy) with x-rays and monitored over the course of 30 days. Evidence of DIC was evaluated by way of thromboelastometry parameters, platelet counts, fibrinogen concentration, and the d-dimer assay. Pigs exposed to x-rays developed signs of DIC within 2 days post-irradiation. The development of DIC was exacerbated over the course of the studies, and one of the pigs died at day 14 and another had to be euthanized on day 16 post-irradiation. For both of these pigs, DIC was evident at the time of death. The following observations were indicated or were suggestive of DIC: whole blood clotting was impaired (as evidenced by thromboelastometry alterations), there were decreased platelet counts, elevated d-dimer concentrations in the blood, and/or hemorrhaging and the presence of fibrin in tissues observed during post-mortem examination. The extrapolation of data from these studies, in combination with other published data, have led to the hypothesis that there could be a correlation between the propensity to develop DIC, as indicated by hemorrhaging at death at relatively low doses of radiation, and the LD50 for a particular species. Our data suggest that the development of DIC may contribute to death at the LD50 dose in large mammals. PMID:25197627

  4. Pharmacological targeting of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 in porcine polytrauma and hemorrhage models

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Harold H.; Wong, Yee M.; LaPorte, Heather M.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent evidence suggests that chemokine receptor CXCR4 regulates vascular α1-adrenergic receptor function and that the noncognate CXCR4 agonist ubiquitin has therapeutic potential after trauma/hemorrhage. Pharmacologic properties of ubiquitin in large animal trauma models, however, are poorly characterized. Thus, the aims of the present study were to determine the effects of CXCR4 modulation on resuscitation requirements after polytrauma, to assess whether ubiquitin influences survival times after lethal polytrauma-hemorrhage, and to characterize its dose-effect profile in porcine models. METHODS Anesthetized pigs underwent polytrauma (PT, femur fractures/lung contusion) alone (Series 1) or PT/hemorrhage (PT/H) to a mean arterial blood pressure of 30 mmHg with subsequent fluid resuscitation (Series 2 and 3) or 40% blood volume hemorrhage within 15 minutes followed by 2.5% blood volume hemorrhage every 15 minutes without fluid resuscitation (Series 4). In Series 1, ubiquitin (175 and 350 nmol/kg), AMD3100 (CXCR4 antagonist, 350 nmol/kg), or vehicle treatment 60 minutes after PT was performed. In Series 2, ubiquitin (175, 875, and 1,750 nmol/kg) or vehicle treatment 60 minutes after PT/H was performed. In Series 3, ubiquitin (175 and 875 nmol/kg) or vehicle treatment at 60 and 180 minutes after PT/H was performed. In Series 4, ubiquitin (875 nmol/kg) or vehicle treatment 30 minutes after hemorrhage was performed. RESULTS In Series 1, resuscitation fluid requirements were significantly reduced by 40% with 350-nmol/kg ubiquitin and increased by 25% with AMD3100. In Series 2, median survival time was 190 minutes with vehicle, 260 minutes with 175-nmol/kg ubiquitin, and longer than 420 minutes with 875-nmol/kg and 1,750-nmol/kg ubiquitin (p < 0.05 vs. vehicle). In Series 3, median survival time was 288 minutes with vehicle and 336 minutes and longer than 420 minutes (p < 0.05 vs. vehicle) with 175-nmol/kg and 875-nmol/kg ubiquitin, respectively. In Series 4

  5. Generating a Natural Porcine Model of Gastrointestinal Food Allergy to Peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an extremely potent allergen and is one of the most life-threatening food sensitivities known. Peanuts cause the majority of food-related anaphylaxis in children, adolescents, and adults. There is no good animal model currently in place to study peanut allergies. Exp...

  6. Fluorescence imaging preparation methods for tissue scaffolds implanted into a green fluorescent protein porcine model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; White, Richard A; Grant, David A; Grant, Sheila A

    2015-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) animal models have become increasingly popular due to their potential to enhance in vivo imaging and their application to many fields of study. We have developed a technique to observe host tissue integration into scaffolds using GFP expressing swine and fluorescence imaging. Current fluorescence imaging preparation methods cannot be translated to a full GFP animal model due to several challenges and limitations that are investigated here. We have implanted tissue scaffolds into GFP expressing swine and have prepared explanted scaffolds for fluorescence imaging using four different methods including formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, vapor fixation, freshly prepared paraformaldehyde fixation, and fresh frozen tissue. Explanted scaffolds and tissue were imaged using confocal microscopy with spectral separation to evaluate the GFP animal model for visualization of host tissue integration into explanted scaffolds. All methods except fresh frozen tissue induced autofluorescence of the scaffold, preventing visualization of detail between host tissue and scaffold fibers. Fresh frozen tissue preparation allowed for the most reliable visualization of fluorescent host tissue integration into non-fluorescent scaffolds. It was concluded that fresh frozen tissue preparation is the best method for fluorescence imaging preparation when using scaffolds implanted into GFP whole animal models.

  7. Georeferenced model simulations efficiently support targeted monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlekamp, Jürgen; Klasmeier, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) demands the good ecological and chemical status of surface waters. To meet the definition of good chemical status of the WFD surface water concentrations of priority pollutants must not exceed established environmental quality standards (EQS). Surveillance of the concentrations of numerous chemical pollutants in whole river basins by monitoring is laborious and time-consuming. Moreover, measured data do often not allow for immediate source apportionment which is a prerequisite for defining promising reduction strategies to be implemented within the programme of measures. In this context, spatially explicit model approaches are highly advantageous because they provide a direct link between local point emissions (e.g. treated wastewater) or diffuse non-point emissions (e.g. agricultural runoff) and resulting surface water concentrations. Scenario analyses with such models allow for a priori investigation of potential positive effects of reduction measures such as optimization of wastewater treatment. The geo-referenced model GREAT-ER (Geography-referenced Regional Exposure Assessment Tool for European Rivers) has been designed to calculate spatially resolved averaged concentrations for different flow conditions (e.g. mean or low flow) based on emission estimations for local point source emissions such as treated effluents from wastewater treatment plants. The methodology was applied to selected pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, sotalol, metoprolol, carbamazepin) in the Main river basin in Germany (approx. 27,290 km²). Average concentrations of the compounds were calculated for each river reach in the whole catchment. Simulation results were evaluated by comparison with available data from orienting monitoring and used to develop an optimal monitoring strategy for the assessment of water quality regarding micropollutants at the catchment scale.

  8. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Planche, Olivier; Teriitehau, Christophe; Boudabous, Sana; Robinson, Joey Marie; Rao, Pramod; Deschamps, Frederic; Farouil, Geoffroy; Baere, Thierry de

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 {+-} 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 {+-} 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 {+-} 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 {+-} 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 {+-} 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 {+-} 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of {<=}4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of {<=}6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  9. A porcine model of hypertensive cardiomyopathy: implications for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzl, Michael; Hamdani, Nazha; Seiler, Sebastian; Alogna, Alessio; Manninger, Martin; Reilly, Svetlana; Zirngast, Birgit; Kirsch, Alexander; Steendijk, Paul; Verderber, Jochen; Zweiker, David; Eller, Philipp; Höfler, Gerald; Schauer, Silvia; Eller, Kathrin; Maechler, Heinrich; Pieske, Burkert M; Linke, Wolfgang A; Casadei, Barbara; Post, Heiner

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) evolves with the accumulation of risk factors. Relevant animal models to identify potential therapeutic targets and to test novel therapies for HFPEF are missing. We induced hypertension and hyperlipidemia in landrace pigs (n = 8) by deoxycorticosteroneacetate (DOCA, 100 mg/kg, 90-day-release subcutaneous depot) and a Western diet (WD) containing high amounts of salt, fat, cholesterol, and sugar for 12 wk. Compared with weight-matched controls (n = 8), DOCA/WD-treated pigs showed left ventricular (LV) concentric hypertrophy and left atrial dilatation in the absence of significant changes in LV ejection fraction or symptoms of heart failure at rest. The LV end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship was markedly shifted leftward. During simultaneous right atrial pacing and dobutamine infusion, cardiac output reserve and LV peak inflow velocities were lower in DOCA/WD-treated pigs at higher LV end-diastolic pressures. In LV biopsies, we observed myocyte hypertrophy, a shift toward the stiffer titin isoform N2B, and reduced total titin phosphorylation. LV superoxide production was increased, in part attributable to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling, whereas AKT and NOS isoform expression and phosphorylation were unchanged. In conclusion, we developed a large-animal model in which loss of LV capacitance was associated with a titin isoform shift and dysfunctional NOS, in the presence of preserved LV ejection fraction. Our findings identify potential targets for the treatment of HFPEF in a relevant large-animal model.

  10. Characterization of blunt chest trauma in a long-term porcine model of severe multiple trauma

    PubMed Central

    Horst, K.; Simon, T. P.; Pfeifer, R.; Teuben, M.; Almahmoud, K.; Zhi, Q.; Santos, S. Aguiar; Wembers, C. Castelar; Leonhardt, S.; Heussen, N.; Störmann, P.; Auner, B.; Relja, B.; Marzi, I.; Haug, A. T.; van Griensven, M.; Kalbitz, M.; Huber-Lang, M.; Tolba, R.; Reiss, L. K.; Uhlig, S.; Marx, G.; Pape, H. C.; Hildebrand, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chest trauma has a significant relevance on outcome after severe trauma. Clinically, impaired lung function typically occurs within 72 hours after trauma. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. Therefore, we aimed to establish an experimental long-term model to investigate physiological, morphologic and inflammatory changes, after severe trauma. Male pigs (sus scrofa) sustained severe trauma (including unilateral chest trauma, femur fracture, liver laceration and hemorrhagic shock). Additionally, non-injured animals served as sham controls. Chest trauma resulted in severe lung damage on both CT and histological analyses. Furthermore, severe inflammation with a systemic increase of IL-6 (p = 0.0305) and a local increase of IL-8 in BAL (p = 0.0009) was observed. The pO2/FiO2 ratio in trauma animals decreased over the observation period (p < 0.0001) but not in the sham group (p = 0.2967). Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) revealed differences between the traumatized and healthy lung (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, a clinically relevant, long-term model of blunt chest trauma with concomitant injuries has been developed. This reproducible model allows to examine local and systemic consequences of trauma and is valid for investigation of potential diagnostic or therapeutic options. In this context, EIT might represent a radiation-free method for bedside diagnostics. PMID:28000769

  11. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds.

  12. High dose intracoronary N-acetylcysteine in a porcine model of ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Markus; Bell, Stephen P; Chen, Zengyi; Nyotowidjojo, Iwan; Lachapelle, Richard R; Christian, Timothy F; Gibson, Pamela C; Keating, Friederike F; Dauerman, Harold L; LeWinter, Martin M

    2013-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on ischemia and reperfusion in a pig model focusing on cardio-renal protection. High doses of NAC may provide protection from contrast induced nephropathy (CIN). NAC has also been demonstrated to reduce myocardial infarction size and improve left ventricular function after ischemia in both humans and animals studies. In this study we tested the safety and cardiorenal protective efficacy of intracoronary NAC delivered in the radiographic contrast agent in a pig model that simulates the catheter based reperfusion therapy of ST elevation myocardial infarctions. 27 pigs underwent 45 min of ischemia after surgical ligation of distal left descending coronary artery. With coronary reperfusion the animals received at total of 200 mL of the contrast agent Iopamidol with and without NAC to mimic radiographic contrast use during invasive reperfusion therapy. At 24 h the following endpoints were compared: LV function (MRI, echocardiography), myocardial injury (infarct size, area-at-risk, troponin, creatinine kinase) and CIN (creatinine, BUN and renal histology). The effects of NAC on platelet reactivity were also evaluated. Intracoronary administration of NAC administered in the contrast agent is safe. NAC reduces platelet reactivity and there was a trend towards a better cardiac function at 24 h. There was no significant difference in the size of the myocardial infarction. In this model of ischemia-reperfusion high dose NAC did not protect from CIN. High dose intracoronary NAC administered with the radiographic contrast is safe but does not provide significant cardio-renal protection.

  13. Microvascular Porcine Model for the Optimization of Vascularized Composite Tissue Transplantation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-21

    animal model Microvascular techniques Ischemia Reperfusion injury Gracilis flap a b s t r a c t Background: Devastating extremity injuries are...the neck. Flaps then undergo either immediate or delayed inset and reperfusion (1 h [n¼ 6] or 3 h [n¼ 6] of ischemia , respectively). Flaps designated...reperfusion injury [5,6]. LDH peaked for both ischemic time groups at 24 h (Fig. 10). Those flaps that were subjected to 1 h of ischemia had a mean

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: Immunomodulatory Evaluation in an Antigen-Induced Synovitis Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Javier G.; Blázquez, Rebeca; Vela, Francisco Javier; Álvarez, Verónica; Tarazona, Raquel; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Synovitis is an inflammatory process associated with pain, disability, and discomfort, which is usually treated with anti-inflammatory drugs or biological agents. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been also successfully used in the treatment of inflammatory-related diseases such as synovitis or arthritis. In the last years, the exosomes derived from MSCs have become a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory-related diseases and their therapeutic effect is thought to be mediated (at least in part) by their immunomodulatory potential. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of these exosomes in an antigen-induced synovitis animal model. To our knowledge, this is the first report where exosomes derived from MSCs have been evaluated in an animal model of synovitis. Our results demonstrated a decrease of synovial lymphocytes together with a downregulation of TNF-α transcripts in those exosome-treated joints. These results support the immunomodulatory effect of these exosomes and point out that they may represent a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of synovitis. PMID:28377922

  15. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Scott J.; Rumberg, Aaron; Visscher, Marty; Billmire, David A.; Schwentker, Ann S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our complete understanding of hypertrophic scarring is still deficient, as portrayed by the poor clinical outcomes when treating them. To address the need for alternative treatment strategies, we assess the swine animal burn model as an initial approach for immature scar evaluation and therapeutic application. Methods: Thermal contact burns were created on the dorsum of 3 domestic swine with the use of a branding iron at 170°F for 20 seconds. Deep partial-thickness burns were cared for with absorptive dressings over 10 weeks and wounds evaluated with laser and negative pressure transduction, histology, photographic analysis, and RNA isolation. Results: Overall average stiffness (mm Hg/mm) increased and elasticity (mm) decreased in the scars from the initial burn injury to 8 weeks when compared with normal skin (P < 0.01). Scars were thicker, more erythematous, and uniform in the caudal dorsum. The percent change of erythema in wounds increased from weeks 6 to 10. Histology demonstrated loss of dermal papillae, increased myofibroblast presence, vertically oriented vessels, epidermal and dermal hypercellularity, and parallel-layered collagen deposition. Immature scars remained elevated at 10 weeks, and minimal RNA was able to be isolated from the tissue. Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model. PMID:25750848

  16. Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevent fibrosis and preserve renal function in a preclinical porcine model of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baulier, Edouard; Favreau, Frederic; Le Corf, Amélie; Jayle, Christophe; Schneider, Fabrice; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Feraud, Olivier; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Hauet, Thierry; Turhan, Ali G

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that ischemia/reperfusion injuries strongly affect the success of human organ transplantation. Development of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy is the main deleterious phenomenon involved. Stem cells are a promising therapeutic tool already validated in various ischemic diseases. Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (af-MSCs), a subpopulation of multipotent cells identified in amniotic fluid, are known to secrete growth factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, these cells are easy to collect, present higher proliferation and self-renewal rates compared with other adult stem cells (ASCs), and are suitable for banking. Consequently, af-MSCs represent a promising source of stem cells for regenerative therapies in humans. To determine the efficiency and the safety of af-MSC infusion in a preclinical porcine model of renal autotransplantation, we injected autologous af-MSCs in the renal artery 6 days after transplantation. The af-MSC injection improved glomerular and tubular functions, leading to full renal function recovery and abrogated fibrosis development at 3 months. The strong proof of concept generated by this translational porcine model is a first step toward evaluation of af-MSC-based therapies in human kidney transplantation.

  17. Scaffold-Based Delivery of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis: Preliminary Studies in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zongyang; Tee, Boon Ching; Kennedy, Kelly S.; Kennedy, Patrick M.; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Mallery, Susan R.; Fields, Henry W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone regeneration through distraction osteogenesis (DO) is promising but remarkably slow. To accelerate it, autologous mesenchymal stem cells have been directly injected to the distraction site in a few recent studies. Compared to direct injection, a scaffold-based method can provide earlier cell delivery with potentially better controlled cell distribution and retention. This pilot project investigated a scaffold-based cell-delivery approach in a porcine mandibular DO model. Materials and Methods Eleven adolescent domestic pigs were used for two major sets of studies. The in-vitro set established methodologies to: aspirate bone marrow from the tibia; isolate, characterize and expand bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs); enhance BM-MSC osteogenic differentiation using FGF-2; and confirm cell integration with a gelatin-based Gelfoam scaffold. The in-vivo set transplanted autologous stem cells into the mandibular distraction sites using Gelfoam scaffolds; completed a standard DO-course and assessed bone regeneration by macroscopic, radiographic and histological methods. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and t-tests were used for statistical analyses. Results From aspirated bone marrow, multi-potent, heterogeneous BM-MSCs purified from hematopoietic stem cell contamination were obtained. FGF-2 significantly enhanced pig BM-MSC osteogenic differentiation and proliferation, with 5 ng/ml determined as the optimal dosage. Pig BM-MSCs integrated readily with Gelfoam and maintained viability and proliferative ability. After integration with Gelfoam scaffolds, 2.4–5.8×107 autologous BM-MSCs (undifferentiated or differentiated) were transplanted to each experimental DO site. Among 8 evaluable DO sites included in the final analyses, the experimental DO sites demonstrated less interfragmentary mobility, more advanced gap obliteration, higher mineral content and faster mineral apposition than the control sites, and all transplanted scaffolds were completely

  18. Assessment of distribution and evolution of Mechanical dyssynchrony in a porcine model of myocardial infarction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to investigate the relationship between infarct and dyssynchrony post- myocardial infarct (MI), in a porcine model. Mechanical dyssynchrony post-MI is associated with left ventricular (LV) remodeling and increased mortality. Methods Cine, gadolinium-contrast, and tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) were performed pre-MI, 9 ± 2 days (early post-MI), and 33 ± 10 days (late post-MI) post-MI in 6 pigs to characterize cardiac morphology, location and extent of MI, and regional mechanics. LV mechanics were assessed by circumferential strain (eC). Electro-anatomic mapping (EAM) was performed within 24 hrs of CMR and prior to sacrifice. Results Mean infarct size was 21 ± 4% of LV volume with evidence of post-MI remodeling. Global eC significantly decreased post MI (-27 ± 1.6% vs. -18 ± 2.5% (early) and -17 ± 2.7% (late), p < 0.0001) with no significant change in peri-MI and MI segments between early and late time-points. Time to peak strain (TTP) was significantly longer in MI, compared to normal and peri-MI segments, both early (440 ± 40 ms vs. 329 ± 40 ms and 332 ± 36 ms, respectively; p = 0.0002) and late post-MI (442 ± 63 ms vs. 321 ± 40 ms and 355 ± 61 ms, respectively; p = 0.012). The standard deviation of TTP in 16 segments (SD16) significantly increased post-MI: 28 ± 7 ms to 50 ± 10 ms (early, p = 0.012) to 54 ± 19 ms (late, p = 0.004), with no change between early and late post-MI time-points (p = 0.56). TTP was not related to reduction of segmental contractility. EAM revealed late electrical activation and greatly diminished conduction velocity in the infarct (5.7 ± 2.4 cm/s), when compared to peri-infarct (18.7 ± 10.3 cm/s) and remote myocardium (39 ± 20.5 cm/s). Conclusions Mechanical dyssynchrony occurs early after MI and is the result of delayed electrical and mechanical activation in the infarct. PMID:22226320

  19. Dynamic myocardial perfusion in a porcine balloon-induced ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Levi, Jacob; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging is an application that should greatly benefit from spectral CT through the significant reduction of beam hardening (BH) artifacts using mono-energetic (monoE) image reconstructions. We used a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare) and developed advanced processing tools (registration, segmentation, and deconvolution-based flow estimation) for quantitative myocardial CTP in a porcine ischemia model with different degrees of coronary occlusion using a balloon catheter. The occlusion severity was adjusted with fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. The SDCT scanner is a single source, dual-layer detector system, which allows simultaneous acquisitions of low and high energy projections, hence enabling accurate projection-based material decomposition and effective reduction of BH-artifacts. In addition, the SDCT scanner eliminates partial scan artifacts with fast (0.27s), full gantry rotation acquisitions. We acquired CTP data under different hemodynamic conditions and reconstructed conventional 120kVp images and projection-based monoenergetic (monoE) images for energies ranging from 55keV-to-120keV. We computed and compared myocardial blood flow (MBF) between different reconstructions. With balloon completely deflated (FFR=1), we compared the mean attenuation in a myocardial region of interest before iodine arrival and at peak iodine enhancement in the left ventricle (LV), and we found that monoE images at 70keV effectively minimized the difference in attenuation, due to BH, to less than 1 HU compared to 14 HU with conventional 120kVp images. Flow maps under baseline condition (FFR=1) were more uniform throughout the myocardial wall at 70keV, whereas with 120kVp data about 12% reduction in blood flow was noticed on BH-hypoattenuated areas compared to other myocardial regions. We compared MBF maps at different keVs under an ischemic condition (FFR < 0.7), and we found that flow

  20. A mouse model to study infection against porcine circovirus type 2: viral distribution and lesions in mouse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little information is known about viral distribution and transmission of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in species other than swine. It is still a debated topic whether the PCV2 could be infected and caused clinical lesions. Our study is aimed to estimate the susceptibility of Kunming mouse to PCV2. Forty-eight, 6-week-old Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. Group A (C1-C12) was inoculated with PK-15 cell culture as a control group. Group B (sPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml). Group C (mPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml) and a booster inoculation at days 14 and 28 after the first inoculation. Group D (MixPCV1-12) was unvaccinated but released into Group C. Each group was sacrificed at 7, 14, 28, and 42 days post-inoculation, respectively. Necropsy was checked on every mouse. Sera samples were collected for the test of PCV2 specific antibody. Tissues were collected for histopathology study and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The results showed that viral replication, seroconversion, and microscopic lesions were found in inoculated mice. Continuous existence of PCV2 viruses in lymph nodes have been confirmed by PCR, which took at least seven days for the virus to be transferred into other organs from the primary interface, and the diffusion to thymus had been retarded for seven days. Special PCV2 antibody could be found in PCV2 inoculation mice and was significantly higher than that in the control. Further more, microscopic lesions and the main target of PCV2 focused in the lymph nodes with a characteristic depletion and occasional necrosis of lymphocytes in the cortex and paracortex were found in inoculated mice. Conclusions The Kunming mouse could be infected by PCV2 virus and used as a PCV2 infected experimental model. PMID:20630105

  1. A Porcine Model for Initial Surge Mechanical Ventilator Assessment and Evaluation of Two Limited Function Ventilators

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P; Hotchkin, David L; Lamm, Wayne JE; Hinkson, Carl; Pierson, David J; Glenny, Robb W; Rubinson, Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Objective To adapt an animal model of acute lung injury for use as a standard protocol for a screening, initial evaluation of limited function, or “surge,” ventilators for use in mass casualty scenarios. Design Prospective, experimental animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects 12 adult pigs. Interventions 12 spontaneously breathing pigs (6 in each group) were subjected to acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) via pulmonary artery infusion of oleic acid. Following development of respiratory failure, animals were mechanically ventilated with a limited function ventilator (Simplified Automatic Ventilator [SAVe] I or II; Automedx) for one hour or until the ventilator could not support the animal. The limited function ventilator was then exchanged for a full function ventilator (Servo 900C; Siemens). Measurements and Main Results Reliable and reproducible levels of ALI/ARDS were induced. The SAVe I was unable to adequately oxygenate 5 animals, with PaO2 (52.0 ± 11.1 torr) compared to the Servo (106.0 ± 25.6 torr; p=0.002). The SAVe II was able to oxygenate and ventilate all 6 animals for one hour with no difference in PaO2 (141.8 ± 169.3 torr) compared to the Servo (158.3 ± 167.7 torr). Conclusions We describe a novel in vivo model of ALI/ARDS that can be used to initially screen limited function ventilators considered for mass respiratory failure stockpiles, and is intended to be combined with additional studies to defintively assess appropriateness for mass respiratory failure. Specifically, during this study we demonstrate that the SAVe I ventilator is unable to provide sufficient gas exchange, while the SAVe II, with several more functions, was able to support the same level of hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to ALI/ARDS for one hour. PMID:21187747

  2. Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humlum, O.; Christiansen, H.; Neumann, U.; Eckerstorfer, M.; Sjöblom, A.; Stalsberg, K.; Rubensdotter, L.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard Ole Humlum 1,3, Hanne H. Christiansen 1, Ulrich Neumann 1, Markus Eckerstorfer 1, Anna Sjöblom 1, Knut Stalsberg 2 and Lena Rubensdotter 2. 1: The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS). 2: Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) 3: University of Oslo Ground based transportation in Svalbard landscape all takes place across mountainous terrain affected by different geomorphological slope processes. Traffic in and around the Svalbard settlements is increasing, and at the same time global climate models project substantial increases in temperature and precipitation in northern high latitudes for coming century. Therefore improved knowledge on the effect of climatic changes on slope processes in such high arctic landscapes is becoming increasingly important. Motivated by this, the CRYOSLOPE Svalbard research project since 2007 has carried out field observations on snow avalanche frequency and associated meteorological conditions. Snow avalanches are important geomorphic agents of erosion and deposition, and have long been a source of natural disasters in many mid-latitude mountain areas. Avalanches as a natural hazard has thereby been familiar to inhabitants of the Alps and Scandinavia for centuries, while it is a more recent experience in high arctic Svalbard. In addition, overall climate, topography and especially high winter wind speeds makes it difficult to apply snow avalanche models (numerical or empirical) developed for use at lower latitudes, e.g. in central Europe. In the presentation we examplify results from the ongoing (since winter 2006-07) monitoring of snow avalanches in Svalbard along a 70 km long observational route in the mountains. In addition, we present observations on the geomorphological impact of avalanches, with special reference to the formation of rock glaciers. Finally, we also present some initial results from numerical attempts of snow avalanche risk modelling within the study area.

  3. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn; Wei, Lihui

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision.

  4. Use of a tacrolimus-eluting stent to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia in a porcine coronary model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanming; Salu, Koen; Wang, Lan; Liu, Xiaoshun; Li, Shengqiao; Lorenz, Gunter; Wnendt, Stephan; Verbeken, Eric; Bosmans, Johan; Van de Werf, Frans; De Scheerder, Ivan

    2005-03-01

    In-stent restenosis remains an unresolved problem which occurs in 5-20% of patients undergoing coronary stenting within the first 3-6 months. Neointimal formation is the main contributor to in-stent restenosis. Stent-induced arterial injury and peri-strut inflammation are involved in the process of neointimal formation by activating cytokines and growth factors which induce smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation, migration, and proliferation. Histopathological studies found that neointimal hyperplasia is principally composed of smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, and extracellular matrix. Stent-based delivery of anti-proliferative and/or anti-inflammatory agents have shown beneficial effects on neointimal hyperplasia in experimental studies and clinical trials. Tacrolimus (FK506) is a water-insoluble macrolide immunosuppressant discovered in 1984. It has been widely used in reducing the incidence and severity of allograft rejection after organ transplantation. It has also been used to treat other inflammatory conditions such as atopic dermatitis. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of stent-based delivery of tacrolimus on inflammation and neointimal formation in an overstretched coronary stent model.

  5. Photochemotherapy of intimal hyperplasia using psoralen activated by uv light in porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Lisa A.; Gregory, Kenton W.; Bahlman, Deborah T.; Shangguan, HanQun; Fahrenbach, Henner; Rosenthal, Eli; Block, Peter C.

    1996-05-01

    Psoralen activated by UVA light (PUVA) was investigated as a means of inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation resulting from balloon injury. Twenty kilogram domestic swine were anesthetized and underwent balloon angioplasty to create a 133% overstretch injury. Assignments of treatment and control were randomized between the left anterior descending (LAD) and circumflex (LCX) coronaries arteries. The animals were given with 5 mg/kg of 8- methoxypsoralen eternally. Treatment vessels received 600 mJ/cm2 of 364 nm light during balloon inflation to activate the psoralen. Control vessels received drug and balloon injury only. Serum was obtained during the light delivery to assess psoralen levels. At 30 days, animals were sacrificed and the coronary arteries perfusion fixed. Five sections per vessel were analyzed morphometrically to determine percent intimal area and extent of injury. The restenosis injury index was 0.21 plus or minus .02 in treatment vessels and 0.14 plus or minus .01 in the controls with a p-value less than .02. In this large animal model of balloon angioplasty injury, psoralen activated by ultraviolet light increased intimal hyperplasia.

  6. Inflammation in Response to n3 Fatty Acids in a Porcine Obesity Model

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Richard J; Boddicker, Rebecca L; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Li, Jenny; Jones, Douglas E; Spurlock, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids have distinct cellular effects related to inflammation and insulin sensitivity. Dietary saturated fat activates toll-like receptor 4, which in turn can lead to chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue macrophage infiltration. Conversely, n3 fatty acids are generally antiinflammatory and promote insulin sensitivity, in part via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Ossabaw swine are a useful biomedical model of obesity. We fed Ossabaw pigs either a low-fat control diet or a diet containing high-fat palm oil with or without additional n3 fatty acids for 30 wk to investigate the effect of saturated fats and n3 fatty acids on obesity-linked inflammatory markers. The diet did not influence the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, TNFα, IL6, or IL12. In addition, n3 fatty acids attenuated the increase in inflammatory adipose tissue CD16–CD14+ macrophages induced by high palm oil. High-fat diets with and without n3 fatty acids both induced hyperglycemia without hyperinsulinemia. The high-fat only group but not the high-fat group with n3 fatty acids showed reduced insulin sensitivity in response to insulin challenge. This effect was not mediated by decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase B. Therefore, in obese Ossabaw swine, n3 fatty acids partially attenuate insulin resistance but only marginally change inflammatory status and macrophage phenotype in adipose tissue. PMID:23561883

  7. Acute Hematological Effects of Solar Particle Event Proton Radiation in the Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, J. K.; Wan, X. S.; Wroe, A. J.; Rightnar, S.; Cengel, K. A.; Diffenderfer, E. S.; Krigsfeld, G. S.; Gridley, D. S.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) is expected to occur in astronauts during large solar particle events (SPEs). One parameter associated with ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which can result from decreased numbers of circulating blood cells in those exposed to radiation. The peripheral blood cells are critical for an adequate immune response, and low blood cell counts can result in an increased susceptibility to infection. In this study, Yucatan minipigs were exposed to proton radiation within a range of skin dose levels expected for an SPE (estimated from previous SPEs). The proton-radiation exposure resulted in significant decreases in total white blood cell count (WBC) within 1 day of exposure, 60% below baseline control value or preirradiation values. At the lowest level of the blood cell counts, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils were decreased up to 89.5%, 60.4%, 73.2% and 75.5%, respectively, from the preirradiation values. Monocytes and lymphocytes were decreased by an average of 70% (compared to preirradiation values) as early as 4 h after radiation exposure. Skin doses greater than 5 Gy resulted in decreased blood cell counts up to 90 days after exposure. The results reported here are similar to studies of ARS using the nonhuman primate model, supporting the use of the Yucatan minipig as an alternative. In addition, the high prevalence of hematologic abnormalities resulting from exposure to acute, whole-body SPE-like proton radiation warrants the development of appropriate countermeasures to prevent or treat ARS occurring in astronauts during space travel. PMID:23672458

  8. Biomechanical investigation of impact induced rib fractures of a porcine infant surrogate model.

    PubMed

    Blackburne, William B; Waddell, J Neil; Swain, Michael V; Alves de Sousa, Ricardo J; Kieser, Jules A

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the structural, biomechanical and fractographic features of rib fractures in a piglet model, to test the hypothesis that fist impact, apart from thoracic squeezing, may result in lateral costal fractures as observed in abused infants. A mechanical fist with an accelerometer was constructed and fixed to a custom jig. Twenty stillborn piglets in the supine position were impacted on the thoracic cage. The resultant force versus time curves from the accelerometer data showed a number of steps indicative of rib fracture. The correlation between impact force and number of fractures was statistically significant (Pearson׳s r=0.528). Of the fractures visualized, 15 completely pierced the parietal pleura of the thoracic wall, and 5 had butterfly fracture patterning. Scanning electron microscopy showed complete bone fractures, at the zone of impact, were normal to the axis of the ribs. Incomplete vertical fractures, with bifurcation, occurred on the periphery of the contact zone. This work suggests the mechanism of rib failure during a fist impact is typical of the transverse fracture pattern in the anterolateral region associated with cases of non-accidental rib injury. The impact events investigated have a velocity of ~2-3m/s, approximately 2×10(4) times faster than previous quasi-static axial and bending tests. While squeezing the infantile may induce buckle fractures in the anterior as well as posterior region of the highly flexible bones, a fist punch impact event may result in anterolateral transverse fractures. Hence, these findings suggest that the presence of anterolateral rib fractures may result from impact rather than manual compression.

  9. Acute hematological effects of solar particle event proton radiation in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, J K; Wan, X S; Wroe, A J; Rightnar, S; Cengel, K A; Diffenderfer, E S; Krigsfeld, G S; Gridley, D S; Kennedy, A R

    2013-07-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) is expected to occur in astronauts during large solar particle events (SPEs). One parameter associated with ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which can result from decreased numbers of circulating blood cells in those exposed to radiation. The peripheral blood cells are critical for an adequate immune response, and low blood cell counts can result in an increased susceptibility to infection. In this study, Yucatan minipigs were exposed to proton radiation within a range of skin dose levels expected for an SPE (estimated from previous SPEs). The proton-radiation exposure resulted in significant decreases in total white blood cell count (WBC) within 1 day of exposure, 60% below baseline control value or preirradiation values. At the lowest level of the blood cell counts, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils were decreased up to 89.5%, 60.4%, 73.2% and 75.5%, respectively, from the preirradiation values. Monocytes and lymphocytes were decreased by an average of 70% (compared to preirradiation values) as early as 4 h after radiation exposure. Skin doses greater than 5 Gy resulted in decreased blood cell counts up to 90 days after exposure. The results reported here are similar to studies of ARS using the nonhuman primate model, supporting the use of the Yucatan minipig as an alternative. In addition, the high prevalence of hematologic abnormalities resulting from exposure to acute, whole-body SPE-like proton radiation warrants the development of appropriate countermeasures to prevent or treat ARS occurring in astronauts during space travel.

  10. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C.; Gridley, Daila S.; Seykora, John T.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed.

  11. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C; Gridley, Daila S; Seykora, John T; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed.

  12. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C.; Gridley, Daila S.; Seykora, John T.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the dermis upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed. PMID:26256624

  13. Size dependent skin penetration of nanoparticles in murine and porcine dermatitis models.

    PubMed

    Try, Céline; Moulari, Brice; Béduneau, Arnaud; Fantini, Oscar; Pin, Didier; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-03-01

    A major limitation in the current topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases is the inability to selectively deliver the drug to the inflammation site. Recently, smart drug delivery systems such as nanocarriers are being investigated to enhance the selective deposition of anti-inflammatory drugs in inflamed areas of the skin to achieve higher therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Of such systems, polymeric nanoparticles are considered very efficient carriers for the topical drug delivery. In the current work, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles of nominal sizes of 70nm (NP70) and 300nm (NP300) were studied for their intra-epidermal distribution in murine and pig atopic dermatitis models over time against the respective healthy controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopical examination of skin biopsies was utilized for the qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of nanoparticles skin deposition and penetration depth. While no skin penetration was found for any of the particles in healthy skin, the accumulation of NP70 was significantly higher than NP300 in inflamed skin (15-fold in mice, 5-fold in pigs). Penetration depth of NP70 decreased over time in mice from 55±3μm to 20±2μm and similar tendencies were observed for the other formulations. In inflamed pig skin, a similar trend was found for the penetration depth (NP70: 46±12μm versus NP300: 23±3μm); however, the NP amount remained constant for the whole analyzed period. Their ability to penetrate specifically into inflamed skin combined with minimal effects on healthy skin underlines small polymeric nanoparticles' potential as selective drug carriers in future treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis.

  14. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  <  0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  <  0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50  ±  0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition in a healthy

  15. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G; Wilson, David L

    2016-03-21

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR < 0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29 ± 0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42 ± 0.01 (p < 0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50 ± 0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition in a healthy territory. This ratio was 1.00 ± 0.08 at 70 ke

  16. Mycotoxin detoxifiers attenuate deoxynivalenol-induced pro-inflammatory barrier insult in porcine enterocytes as an in vitro evaluation model of feed mycotoxin reduction.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Kim, Dongwook; Moon, Yuseok

    2017-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), the most prevalent mycotoxin worldwide, leads to economic losses for animal food production. Swine is a most sensitive domestic animal to DON due to rapid absorption and low detoxification by gut microbiota. Specifically, DON can severely damage pig intestinal tissue by disrupting the intestinal barrier and inducing inflammatory responses. We evaluated the effects of several mycotoxin detoxifiers including bentonites, yeast cell wall components, and mixture-typed detoxifier composed of mineral, microorganisms, and phytogenic substances on DON-insulted intestinal barrier and pro-inflammatory responses using in vitro porcine enterocyte culture model. DON-induced disruption of the in vitro gut barrier was attenuated by all three mycotoxin detoxifiers in dose-dependent manners. These mycotoxin detoxifiers also suppressed DON-induced pro-inflammatory chemokine expression to different degrees, which was mediated by downregulation of mitogen-activated kinases and early growth response-1. Of note, the mixture-typed detoxifier was the most prominent mitigating agent at the cellular levels whereas the high dose of bentonite clay also had suppressive action against DON-induced pro-inflammatory insult. The in vitro porcine enterocyte-based assessment of intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory signals provides sensitive and simplified alternative bioassay of feed additives such as detoxifiers against enteropathogenic mycotoxins with comprehensive mechanistic confirmation.

  17. Evaluation of a Novel Laser-assisted Coronary Anastomotic Connector - the Trinity Clip - in a Porcine Off-pump Bypass Model

    PubMed Central

    Stecher, David; Bronkers, Glenn; Noest, Jappe O.T.; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Hoefer, Imo E.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Buijsrogge, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    To simplify and facilitate beating heart (i.e., off-pump), minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery, a new coronary anastomotic connector, the Trinity Clip, is developed based on the excimer laser-assisted nonocclusive anastomosis technique. The Trinity Clip connector enables simplified, sutureless, and nonocclusive connection of the graft to the coronary artery, and an excimer laser catheter laser-punches the opening of the anastomosis. Consequently, owing to the complete nonocclusive anastomosis construction, coronary conditioning (i.e., occluding or shunting) is not necessary, in contrast to the conventional anastomotic technique, hence simplifying the off-pump bypass procedure. Prior to clinical application in coronary artery bypass grafting, the safety and quality of this novel connector will be evaluated in a long-term experimental porcine off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) study. In this paper, we describe how to evaluate the coronary anastomosis in the porcine OPCAB model using various techniques to assess its quality. Representative results are summarized and visually demonstrated. PMID:25490000

  18. Safety and feasibility for pediatric cardiac regeneration using epicardial delivery of autologous umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells established in a porcine model system.

    PubMed

    Cantero Peral, Susana; Burkhart, Harold M; Oommen, Saji; Yamada, Satsuki; Nyberg, Scott L; Li, Xing; O'Leary, Patrick W; Terzic, Andre; Cannon, Bryan C; Nelson, Timothy J

    2015-02-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) requiring surgical palliation mandate new treatment strategies to optimize long-term outcomes. Despite the mounting evidence of cardiac regeneration, there are no long-term safety studies of autologous cell-based transplantation in the pediatric setting. We aimed to establish a porcine pipeline to evaluate the feasibility and long-term safety of autologous umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MNCs) transplanted into the right ventricle (RV) of juvenile porcine hearts. Piglets were born by caesarean section to enable UCB collection. Upon meeting release criteria, 12 animals were randomized in a double-blinded fashion prior to surgical delivery of test article (n=6) or placebo (n=6). The UCB-MNC (3×10(6) cells per kilogram) or control (dimethyl sulfoxide, 10%) products were injected intramyocardially into the RV under direct visualization. The cohorts were monitored for 3 months after product delivery with assessments of cardiac performance, rhythm, and serial cardiac biochemical markers, followed by terminal necropsy. No mortalities were associated with intramyocardial delivery of UCB-MNCs or placebo. Two animals from the placebo group developed local skin infection after surgery that responded to antibiotic treatment. Electrophysiological assessments revealed no arrhythmias in either group throughout the 3-month study. Two animals in the cell-therapy group had transient, subclinical dysrhythmia in the perioperative period, likely because of an exaggerated response to anesthesia. Overall, this study demonstrated that autologous UCB-MNCs can be safely collected and surgically delivered in a pediatric setting. The safety profile establishes the foundation for cell-based therapy directed at the RV of juvenile hearts and aims to accelerate cell-based therapies toward clinical trials for CHD.

  19. Subpixels analysis model applied to floodplain monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo Osorio, J. D.; García Galiano, S. G.

    2009-04-01

    The traditional techniques to gauge hydrological events often fail with the extreme events. A particular case is the floods spatial detection. In this work, the remote sensing techniques and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been merged to develop a key tool for monitoring of floods. The low density of gauge stations networks in the development countries becomes remote sensing techniques the most suitable and economic way to delimitate the flood area and compute the damages cost. The common classification techniques of satellite images use "hard methods" in the sense of a pixel is assigned to an unique land cover class. For coarse resolution, the pixels inevitably will be mixed, so "soft methods" can be used in order to assign several land cover classes according to the surface fractions covered by each one. The main objective of this work is the dynamic monitoring of floods in large areas, based on satellite images -with moderate spatial resolution but with high time resolution- and Digital Elevation Model (DEM). Classified maps with finer spatial resolution can be built through the methodology of Subpixels Analysis developed. The procedure is supported on both the Linear Mixture Model (LMM) and Spatial Coherence Analysis (SCA) hypothesis. The LMM builds the land cover fraction maps through an optimization procedure which uses Lagrange Multipliers, while the SCA defines the most likely place for the land cover fractions within the coarse pixel using linear programming. A subsequent procedure improves the flooded area identification using both the drainage direction and flow accumulation raster maps derived from DEM of the study zone. The Subpixels Analysis technique was validated using historical data of floods which were obtained from satellite images. The procedure improves the spatial resolution of classified maps from satellite images with coarse resolution, while the "hard methods" keep the spatial resolution from the input coarse satellite image.

  20. Identification of co-expression gene networks, regulatory genes and pathways for obesity based on adipose tissue RNA Sequencing in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a complex metabolic condition in strong association with various diseases, like type 2 diabetes, resulting in major public health and economic implications. Obesity is the result of environmental and genetic factors and their interactions, including genome-wide genetic interactions. Identification of co-expressed and regulatory genes in RNA extracted from relevant tissues representing lean and obese individuals provides an entry point for the identification of genes and pathways of importance to the development of obesity. The pig, an omnivorous animal, is an excellent model for human obesity, offering the possibility to study in-depth organ-level transcriptomic regulations of obesity, unfeasible in humans. Our aim was to reveal adipose tissue co-expression networks, pathways and transcriptional regulations of obesity using RNA Sequencing based systems biology approaches in a porcine model. Methods We selected 36 animals for RNA Sequencing from a previously created F2 pig population representing three extreme groups based on their predicted genetic risks for obesity. We applied Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) to detect clusters of highly co-expressed genes (modules). Additionally, regulator genes were detected using Lemon-Tree algorithms. Results WGCNA revealed five modules which were strongly correlated with at least one obesity-related phenotype (correlations ranging from -0.54 to 0.72, P < 0.001). Functional annotation identified pathways enlightening the association between obesity and other diseases, like osteoporosis (osteoclast differentiation, P = 1.4E-7), and immune-related complications (e.g. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxity, P = 3.8E-5; B cell receptor signaling pathway, P = 7.2E-5). Lemon-Tree identified three potential regulator genes, using confident scores, for the WGCNA module which was associated with osteoclast differentiation: CCR1, MSR1 and SI1 (probability scores respectively 95.30, 62.28, and

  1. Use of porcine vaginal tissue ex-vivo to model environmental effects on vaginal mucosa to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Catherine C.; Baccam, Mekhine; Mantz, Mary J.; Osborn, Thomas W.; Hill, Donna R.; Squier, Christopher A.

    2014-01-15

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS) is a rare, recognizable, and treatable disease that has been associated with tampon use epidemiologically. It involves a confluence of microbial risk factors (Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce the superantigen—TSST-1), as well as environmental characteristics of the vaginal ecosystem during menstruation and host susceptibility factors. This paper describes a series of experiments using the well-characterized model of porcine vaginal mucosa ex-vivo to assess the effect of these factors associated with tampon use on the permeability of the mucosa. The flux of radiolabeled TSST-1 and tritiated water ({sup 3}H{sub 2}O) through porcine vaginal mucosa was determined at various temperatures, after mechanical disruption of the epithelial surface by tape stripping, after treatment with surfactants or other compounds, and in the presence of microbial virulence factors. Elevated temperatures (42, 47 and 52 °C) did not significantly increase flux of {sup 3}H{sub 2}O. Stripping of the epithelial layers significantly increased the flux of labeled toxin in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of benzalkonium chloride (0.1 and 0.5%) and glycerol (4%) significantly increased the flux of {sup 3}H{sub 2}O but sodium lauryl sulfate at any concentration tested did not. The flux of the labeled toxin was significantly increased in the presence of benzalkonium chloride but not Pluronic® L92 and Tween 20 and significantly increased with addition of α-hemolysin but not endotoxin. These results show that the permeability of porcine vagina ex-vivo to labeled toxin or water can be used to evaluate changes to the vaginal environment and modifications in tampon materials, and thus aid in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Model assessed local effects of tampon use on vaginal mucosa. • Risks were evaluated using two tracers to assess permeability in an ex vivo model. • Mechanical damage to the epithelial surface increased tracer penetration.

  2. Hydrometeorological network for flood monitoring and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koussis, Antonis D.; Lykoudis, Spyros; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Christofides, Antonis; Karavokiros, George; Kappos, Nikos; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2013-08-01

    Due to its highly fragmented geomorphology, Greece comprises hundreds of small- to medium-size hydrological basins, in which often the terrain is fairly steep and the streamflow regime ephemeral. These are typically affected by flash floods, occasionally causing severe damages. Yet, the vast majority of them lack flow-gauging infrastructure providing systematic hydrometric data at fine time scales. This has obvious impacts on the quality and reliability of flood studies, which typically use simplistic approaches for ungauged basins that do not consider local peculiarities in sufficient detail. In order to provide a consistent framework for flood design and to ensure realistic predictions of the flood risk -a key issue of the 2007/60/EC Directive- it is essential to improve the monitoring infrastructures by taking advantage of modern technologies for remote control and data management. In this context and in the research project DEUCALION, we have recently installed and are operating, in four pilot river basins, a telemetry-based hydro-meteorological network that comprises automatic stations and is linked to and supported by relevant software. The hydrometric stations measure stage, using 50-kHz ultrasonic pulses or piezometric sensors, or both stage (piezometric) and velocity via acoustic Doppler radar; all measurements are being temperature-corrected. The meteorological stations record air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation. Data transfer is made via GPRS or mobile telephony modems. The monitoring network is supported by a web-based application for storage, visualization and management of geographical and hydro-meteorological data (ENHYDRIS), a software tool for data analysis and processing (HYDROGNOMON), as well as an advanced model for flood simulation (HYDROGEIOS). The recorded hydro-meteorological observations are accessible over the Internet through the www-application. The system is operational and its

  3. The topical administration of rhEGF-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (rhEGF-NLC) improves healing in a porcine full-thickness excisional wound model.

    PubMed

    Gainza, Garazi; Bonafonte, Diego Celdran; Moreno, Beatriz; Aguirre, José Javier; Gutierrez, Francisco Borja; Villullas, Silvia; Pedraz, José Luis; Igartua, Manoli; Hernandez, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-10

    The development of an effective treatment able to reduce the healing time of chronic wounds is a major health care need. In this regard, our research group has recently demonstrated the in vivo effectiveness of the topical administration of rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles in healing-impaired db/db mice. Here we report the effectiveness of rhEGF-NLC (rhEGF loaded nanostructured lipid carriers) in a more relevant preclinical model of wound healing, the porcine full-thickness excisional wound model. The rhEGF-NLC showed a particle size of around 335nm, negative surface charge (-27mV) and a high encapsulation efficiency of 94%. rhEGF plasma levels were almost undetectable, suggesting that no systemic absorption occurred, which may minimise potential side effects and improve treatment safety. In vivo healing experiments carried out in large white pigs demonstrated that 20μg of rhEGF-NLC topically administered twice a week increased the wound closure and percentage of healed wounds by day 25, compared with the same number of intralesional administrations of 75μg free rhEGF and empty NLC. Moreover, rhEGF-NLC improved the wound healing quality expressed in terms of number of arranged microvasculature, fibroblast migration and proliferation, collagen deposition and evolution of the inflammatory response. Overall, these findings demonstrated that topically administered rhEGF-NLC may generate de novo intact skin after full thickness injury in a porcine model, thereby confirming their potential clinical application for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  4. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  5. Percutaneous transapical access for pulmonary vein mapping and ablation in a porcine model with a new high-density electroanatomical mapping system

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Andreas; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Hilbert, Sebastian; John, Silke; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The porcine model is generally accepted for the development and testing of new forms oftherapy including ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the challenging left atrial (LA) and pulmonary vein (PV) anatomy enables only limited percutaneous catheter-based PV access. Results: Here we present I) an alternative percutaneous transapical access, which enables easy and safe retrograde transmitral LA and PV mapping and ablation; II) early experience of LA mapping and successful circumferential PV isolation with novel mapping system (RhythmiaTM) and new generation of ablation catheter equipped with micro electrodes (IntellaTip MiFi). Conclusion: Although the experience with the transapical approach is limited, the initial results are promising as this may offer an alternative approach for tasting new technologies and translational research. PMID:26550175

  6. Effects of resuscitation with polymerized porcine hemoglobin (pPolyHb) on hemodynamic stability and oxygen delivery in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Fang; Yan, Kunping; Pan, Wencan; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Huifang; Yan, Chengbin; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Hongli

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of polymerized porcine hemoglobin (pPolyHb) on hemodynamic stability and oxygen delivery in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Rats underwent controlled hemorrhage, resulting in the loss of 65% of their blood volume in 90 minutes. The results showed that pPolyHb was superior to hetastarch and saline, and similar to whole blood, in restoring hemodynamic stability and reversing anaerobic metabolism caused by hemorrhage. Furthermore, pPolyHb improved oxygen supply and increased blood oxygen content. These data suggest that pPolyHb can be effective in improving tissue perfusion under conditions of severe hemorrhagic shock.

  7. Generation of transgenic fibroblasts expressing pancreas‑specific and doxycycline-inducible ICER Iγ for the establishment of a porcine model of human diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Young; Jung, Eui-Man; Hong, Eui-Ju; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2014-08-01

    Inducible cyclic AMP (cAMP) early repressor (ICER) Iγ acts as an endogenous inhibitor and disrupts the transcriptional regulation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREBP) responsive genes. Since the overexpression of ICER Iγ induces severe diabetes in a transgenic mouse model, with characteristics similar to human diabetes mellitus, an ICER Iγ construct containing an adjustable pancreas tissue specific promoter was utilized in the present study. Using the human insulin promoter region, a doxycycline (dox)‑inducible ICER Iγ expression system was established using the tetracycline (tet)-controlled transactivator (tTA) with a TA response element (TRE) promoter. A unitary tet-on system that combined a tet-on activator cassette was also developed and was controlled by the human insulin promoter with a responder cassette containing genes encoding ICER Iγ regulated by the TRE promoter. To determine whether dox-enhanced ICER Iγ expression affected insulin production, the unitary tet-on ICER Iγ vector was introduced into a mouse pancreatic β-cell line and then the cells were treated with 0.1-1 mg/ml dox. The results revealed a robust increase in ICER Iγ expression and decreased insulin production. Therefore, this in vitro system may be useful for studying human diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes using tissue-specific promoters and a dox-inducible transgene. In addition, porcine transgenic fibroblasts containing dox-inducible ICER Iγ were generated. These fibroblasts may serve as a cell source for somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate a porcine model of human diabetes mellitus.

  8. An Ultrasound Image-Based Dynamic Fusion Modeling Method for Predicting the Quantitative Impact of In Vivo Liver Motion on Intraoperative HIFU Therapies: Investigations in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    N'Djin, W. Apoutou; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Melodelima, David

    2015-01-01

    Organ motion is a key component in the treatment of abdominal tumors by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU), since it may influence the safety, efficacy and treatment time. Here we report the development in a porcine model of an Ultrasound (US) image-based dynamic fusion modeling method for predicting the effect of in vivo motion on intraoperative HIFU treatments performed in the liver in conjunction with surgery. A speckle tracking method was used on US images to quantify in vivo liver motions occurring intraoperatively during breathing and apnea. A fusion modeling of HIFU treatments was implemented by merging dynamic in vivo motion data in a numerical modeling of HIFU treatments. Two HIFU strategies were studied: a spherical focusing delivering 49 juxtapositions of 5-second HIFU exposures and a toroidal focusing using 1 single 40-second HIFU exposure. Liver motions during breathing were spatially homogenous and could be approximated to a rigid motion mainly encountered in the cranial-caudal direction (f = 0.20Hz, magnitude >13mm). Elastic liver motions due to cardiovascular activity, although negligible, were detectable near millimeter-wide sus-hepatic veins (f = 0.96Hz, magnitude <1mm). The fusion modeling quantified the deleterious effects of respiratory motions on the size and homogeneity of a standard “cigar-shaped” millimetric lesion usually predicted after a 5-second single spherical HIFU exposure in stationary tissues (Dice Similarity Coefficient: DSC<45%). This method assessed the ability to enlarge HIFU ablations during respiration, either by juxtaposing “cigar-shaped” lesions with spherical HIFU exposures, or by generating one large single lesion with toroidal HIFU exposures (DSC>75%). Fusion modeling predictions were preliminarily validated in vivo and showed the potential of using a long-duration toroidal HIFU exposure to accelerate the ablation process during breathing (from 0.5 to 6 cm3·min-1). To improve HIFU treatment control

  9. In vitro porcine blood-brain barrier model for permeability studies: pCEL-X software pKa(FLUX) method for aqueous boundary layer correction and detailed data analysis.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Siti R; Avdeef, Alex; Abbott, N Joan

    2014-12-18

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models from primary brain endothelial cells can closely resemble the in vivo BBB, offering valuable models to assay BBB functions and to screen potential central nervous system drugs. We have recently developed an in vitro BBB model using primary porcine brain endothelial cells. The model shows expression of tight junction proteins and high transendothelial electrical resistance, evidence for a restrictive paracellular pathway. Validation studies using small drug-like compounds demonstrated functional uptake and efflux transporters, showing the suitability of the model to assay drug permeability. However, one limitation of in vitro model permeability measurement is the presence of the aqueous boundary layer (ABL) resulting from inefficient stirring during the permeability assay. The ABL can be a rate-limiting step in permeation, particularly for lipophilic compounds, causing underestimation of the permeability. If the ABL effect is ignored, the permeability measured in vitro will not reflect the permeability in vivo. To address the issue, we explored the combination of in vitro permeability measurement using our porcine model with the pKa(FLUX) method in pCEL-X software to correct for the ABL effect and allow a detailed analysis of in vitro (transendothelial) permeability data, Papp. Published Papp using porcine models generated by our group and other groups are also analyzed. From the Papp, intrinsic transcellular permeability (P0) is derived by simultaneous refinement using a weighted nonlinear regression, taking into account permeability through the ABL, paracellular permeability and filter restrictions on permeation. The in vitro P0 derived for 22 compounds (35 measurements) showed good correlation with P0 derived from in situ brain perfusion data (r(2)=0.61). The analysis also gave evidence for carrier-mediated uptake of naloxone, propranolol and vinblastine. The combination of the in vitro porcine model and the software

  10. Magnetic resonance elastography of the lung parenchyma in an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver: correlation of shear stiffness with trans-respiratory system pressures.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Kolipaka, Arunark; Manduca, Armando; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Ehman, Richard L; Araoz, Philip; McGee, Kiaran P

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of lung parenchyma is an active field of research due to the association of this metric with normal function, disease initiation and progression. A phase contrast MRI-based elasticity imaging technique known as magnetic resonance elastography is being investigated as a method for measuring the shear stiffness of lung parenchyma. Previous experiments performed with small animals using invasive drivers in direct contact with the lungs have indicated that the quantification of lung shear modulus with (1) H based magnetic resonance elastography is feasible. This technique has been extended to an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver placed on the chest wall. This approach was tested to measure the change in parenchymal stiffness as a function of airway opening pressure (P(ao) ) in 10 adult pigs. In all animals, shear stiffness was successfully quantified at four different P(ao) values. Mean (±STD error of mean) pulmonary parenchyma density corrected stiffness values were calculated to be 1.48 (±0.09), 1.68 (±0.10), 2.05 (±0.13), and 2.23 (±0.17) kPa for P(ao) values of 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm H2O, respectively. Shear stiffness increased with increasing P(ao) , in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that in an in situ porcine lung shear stiffness can be quantitated with (1) H magnetic resonance elastography using a noninvasive mechanical driver and that it is feasible to measure the change in shear stiffness due to change in P(ao) .

  11. Corneal-protective effects of an artificial tear containing sodium hyaluronate and castor oil on a porcine short-term dry eye model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takashi; Amako, Hideki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tazawa, Mariko; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    The corneal-protective effects of an artificial tear containing sodium hyaluronate (SH) and castor oil (CO) were evaluated on a porcine short-term dry eye model. Fresh porcine eyes with an intact cornea were treated with an artificial tear of saline, SH solution (0.1%, 0.5% or 1%), CO solution (0.5%, 1% or 5%) or a mixture solution containing 0.5% SH and 1% CO and then desiccated for 60, 90 or 180 min. To assess corneal damage, the eyes were stained with methylene blue (MB) or lissamine green (LG). The staining score of MB, absorbance of MB extracted from the cornea and staining density of LG increased significantly with increasing desiccation time in untreated and all artificial tear-treated eyes, although there were no significant differences in staining scores and absorbance of MB between eyes treated continuously with saline and 1% SH-treated ones at 60 and 90 min of desiccation or the mixture-treated eyes at 60 min of desiccation. No significant differences in the staining density of LG were also found between continuous saline-treated eyes and ones desiccated for 60 min and treated with 1% SH and the mixture. Mild cytoplasmic vacuolations were histopathologically observed in the basal and wing cells in eyes desiccated for 60 min and treated with 1% SH and the mixture. The mixture solution containing 0.5% SH and 1% CO has protective effects against corneal desiccation similar to those of 1% SH and would be helpful as an artificial tear.

  12. Novel Sensor-Enabled Ex Vivo Bioreactor: A New Approach towards Physiological Parameters and Porcine Artery Viability

    PubMed Central

    Mundargi, Raghavendra; Venkataraman, Divya; Kumar, Saranya; Mogal, Vishal; Ortiz, Raphael; Loo, Joachim; Venkatraman, Subbu; Steele, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to design and construct an ex vivo bioreactor system to assess the real time viability of vascular tissue. Porcine carotid artery as a model tissue was used in the ex vivo bioreactor setup to monitor its viability under physiological conditions such as oxygen, pressure, temperature, and flow. The real time tissue viability was evaluated by monitoring tissue metabolism through a fluorescent indicator “resorufin.” Our ex vivo bioreactor allows real time monitoring of tissue responses along with physiological conditions. These ex vivo parameters were vital in determining the tissue viability in sensor-enabled bioreactor and our initial investigations suggest that, porcine tissue viability is considerably affected by high shear forces and low oxygen levels. Histological evaluations with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining show intact endothelium with fresh porcine tissue whereas tissues after incubation in ex vivo bioreactor studies indicate denuded endothelium supporting the viability results from real time measurements. Hence, this novel viability sensor-enabled ex vivo bioreactor acts as model to mimic in vivo system and record vascular responses to biopharmaceutical molecules and biomedical devices. PMID:26609536

  13. Mathematical models and lymphatic filariasis control: monitoring and evaluating interventions.

    PubMed

    Michael, Edwin; Malecela-Lazaro, Mwele N; Maegga, Bertha T A; Fischer, Peter; Kazura, James W

    2006-11-01

    Monitoring and evaluation are crucially important to the scientific management of any mass parasite control programme. Monitoring enables the effectiveness of implemented actions to be assessed and necessary adaptations to be identified; it also determines when management objectives are achieved. Parasite transmission models can provide a scientific template for informing the optimal design of such monitoring programmes. Here, we illustrate the usefulness of using a model-based approach for monitoring and evaluating anti-parasite interventions and discuss issues that need addressing. We focus on the use of such an approach for the control and/or elimination of the vector-borne parasitic disease, lymphatic filariasis.

  14. A preliminary study of reliability of impedance measurement to detect iatrogenic initial pedicle perforation (in the porcine model).

    PubMed

    Bolger, Ciaran; Carozzo, C; Roger, T; McEvoy, Linda; Nagaria, Jabir; Vanacker, Gerard; Bourlion, Maurice

    2006-03-01

    Accidental perforation of the vertebral pedicle wall is a well-known complication associated with standard approach of pedicle screw insertion. Depending on detection criteria, more than 20% of screws are reported misplaced. Serious clinical consequences, from dysesthesia to paraplegia, although not common, may result from these misplaced screws. Many techniques have been described to address this issue such as somatosensory evoked potentials, electromyography, surgical navigation, etc. Each of these techniques presents advantages and drawbacks, none is simple and ergonomic. A new drilling tool was evaluated which allows for instant detection of pedicle perforation by emission of variable beeps. This new device is based on two original principles: the device is integrated in the drilling or screwing tool, the technology allows real-time detection of perforation through two independent parameters, impedance variation and evoked muscular contractions. A preliminary animal study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of this system based upon electrical conductivity. A total of 168 manual pedicle drillings followed by insertion of implants were performed in 11 young porcine lumbar and thoracic spines. The presence or absence of perforation detection, which defines the reliability of the device, was correlated with necropsic examination of the spines. Using this protocol the device demonstrated 100% positive predictive value, 96% negative predictive value, 100% specificity, and 97% sensitivity. Of 168 drillings there were three (1.79%) false-negatives, leading to a minor effraction, cranially in the intervertebral disks, nine (5.36%) screw threads breaching the vertebral cortex when inserting screws, although preparation of the holes did not indicate any perforation, 34 (36%) breaches detected by the instrument and not detected by the surgeon. These results confirm that the impedance variation detection capability of this device offers a simple and effective

  15. Modeling of human movement monitoring using Bluetooth Low Energy technology.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, G; Zhang, Q; Karunanithi, M

    2015-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a wireless communication technology which can be used to monitor human movements. In this monitoring system, a BLE signal scanner scans signal strength of BLE tags carried by people, to thus infer human movement patterns within its monitoring zone. However to the extent of our knowledge one main aspect of this monitoring system which has not yet been thoroughly investigated in literature is how to build a sound theoretical model, based on tunable BLE communication parameters such as scanning time interval and advertising time interval, to enable the study and design of effective and efficient movement monitoring systems. In this paper, we proposed and developed a statistical model based on Monte-Carlo simulation, which can be utilized to assess impacts of BLE technology parameters in terms of latency and efficiency, on a movement monitoring system, and can thus benefit a more efficient system design.

  16. Sildenafil Protects against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Following Cardiac Arrest in a Porcine Model: Possible Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-11-12

    Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sold as Viagra, is a cardioprotector against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Our study explored whether sildenafil protects against I/R-induced damage in a porcine cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) model via modulating the renin-angiotensin system. Male pigs were randomly divided to three groups: Sham group, Saline group, and sildenafil (0.5 mg/kg) group. Thirty min after drug infusion, ventricular fibrillation (8 min) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min) was conducted in these animals. We found that sildenafil ameliorated the reduced cardiac function and improved the 24-h survival rate in this model. Sildenafil partly attenuated the increases of plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang (1-7) levels after CAR. Sildenafil also decreased apoptosis and Ang II expression in myocardium. The increases of expression of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE), ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), and the Ang (1-7) receptor Mas in myocardial tissue were enhanced after CAR. Sildenafil suppressed AT1R up-regulation, but had no effect on ACE, ACE2, and Mas expression. Sildenafil further boosted the upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and inducible nitric oxide synthase(iNOS). Collectively, our results suggest that cardioprotection of sildenafil in CAR model is accompanied by an inhibition of Ang II-AT1R axis activation.

  17. Gradient-dependent release of the model drug TRITC-dextran from FITC-labeled BSA hydrogel nanocarriers in the hair follicles of porcine ear skin.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngo Bich Nga Nathalie; Knorr, Fanny; Mak, Wing Cheung; Cheung, Kwan Yee; Richter, Heike; Meinke, Martina; Lademann, Jürgen; Patzelt, Alexa

    2016-09-29

    Hair follicle research is currently focused on the development of drug-loaded nanocarriers for the targeting of follicular structures in the treatment of skin and hair follicle-related disorders. In the present study, a dual-label nanocarrier system was implemented in which FITC-labeled BSA hydrogel nanocarriers loaded with the model drug and dye TRITC-dextran were applied topically to porcine ear skin. Follicular penetration and the distribution of both dyes corresponding to the nanocarriers and the model drug in the follicular ducts subsequent to administration to the skin were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The release of TRITC-dextran from the particles was induced by washing of the nanocarriers, which were kept in a buffer containing TRITC-labeled dextran to balance out the diffusion of the dextran during storage, thereby changing the concentration gradient. The results showed a slightly but statistically significantly deeper follicular penetration of fluorescent signals corresponding to TRITC-dextran as opposed to fluorescence corresponding to the FITC-labeled particles. The different localizations of the dyes in the cross-sections of the skin samples evidenced the release of the model drug from the labeled nanoparticles.

  18. A Porcine Animal Model for Early Meniscal Degeneration – Analysis of Histology, Gene Expression and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Six Months after Resection of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kreinest, Michael; Reisig, Gregor; Ströbel, Philipp; Dinter, Dietmar; Attenberger, Ulrike; Lipp, Peter; Schwarz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective The menisci of the mammalian knee joint balance the incongruence between femoral condyle and tibial plateau and thus menisci absorb and distribute high loads. Degeneration processes of the menisci lead to pain syndromes in the knee joint. The origin of such degenerative processes on meniscal tissue is rarely understood and may be described best as an imbalance of anabolic and catabolic metabolism. A standardized animal model of meniscal degeneration is needed for further studies. The aim of the current study was to develop a porcine animal model with early meniscal degeneration. Material and Methods Resection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLR) was performed on the left knee joints of eight Göttingen minipigs. A sham operation was carried out on the right knee joint. The grade of degeneration was determined 26 weeks after the operation using histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, the expression of 14 genes which code for extracellular matrix proteins, catabolic matrix metalloproteinases and inflammation mediators were analyzed. Results Degenerative changes were detected by a histological analysis of the medial meniscus after ACLR. These changes were not detected by MRI. In terms of their gene expression profile, these degenerated medial menisci showed a significantly increased expression of COL1A1. Conclusion This paper describes a new animal model for early secondary meniscal degeneration in the Göttingen minipig. Histopathological evidence of the degenerative changes could be described. This early degenerative changes could not be seen by NMR imaging. PMID:27434644

  19. Self-, other-, and joint monitoring using forward models.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Martin J; Garrod, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In the psychology of language, most accounts of self-monitoring assume that it is based on comprehension. Here we outline and develop the alternative account proposed by Pickering and Garrod (2013), in which speakers construct forward models of their upcoming utterances and compare them with the utterance as they produce them. We propose that speakers compute inverse models derived from the discrepancy (error) between the utterance and the predicted utterance and use that to modify their production command or (occasionally) begin anew. We then propose that comprehenders monitor other people's speech by simulating their utterances using covert imitation and forward models, and then comparing those forward models with what they hear. They use the discrepancy to compute inverse models and modify their representation of the speaker's production command, or realize that their representation is incorrect and may develop a new production command. We then discuss monitoring in dialogue, paying attention to sequential contributions, concurrent feedback, and the relationship between monitoring and alignment.

  20. Self-calibrating models for dynamic monitoring and diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    A method for automatically building qualitative and semi-quantitative models of dynamic systems, and using them for monitoring and fault diagnosis, is developed and demonstrated. The qualitative approach and semi-quantitative method are applied to monitoring observation streams, and to design of non-linear control systems.

  1. Intrinsic Monitoring Using Behaviour Models in IPv6 Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfig, Edzard; Coşkun, Hakan

    In conventional networks, correlating path information to resource utilisation on the granularity of packets is a hard problem when using policy-based traffic handling schemes. We introduce a new approach termed ‘intrinsic monitoring’ which relies on the use of IPv6 extension headers in combination with formal behaviour models to gather resource information along a path. This allows a network monitoring system to delegate monitoring functionality to the network devices themselves, with the result of a drastic reduction in management traffic due to the increased autonomy of the monitoring system. As monitoring information travels in-band with the network traffic, path information remains perfectly accurate.

  2. Non-destructive monitoring of viability in an ex vivo organ culture model of osteochondral tissue.

    PubMed

    Elson, K M; Fox, N; Tipper, J L; Kirkham, J; Hall, R M; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2015-06-30

    Organ culture is an increasingly important tool in research, with advantages over monolayer cell culture due to the inherent natural environment of tissues. Successful organ cultures must retain cell viability. The aim of this study was to produce viable and non-viable osteochondral organ cultures, to assess the accumulation of soluble markers in the conditioned medium for predicting tissue viability. Porcine femoral osteochondral plugs were cultured for 20 days, with the addition of Triton X-100 on day 6 (to induce necrosis), camptothecin (to induce apoptosis) or no toxic additives. Tissue viability was assessed by the tissue destructive XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide tetrazolium salt) assay method and LIVE/DEAD® staining of the cartilage at days 0, 6 and 20. Tissue structure was assessed by histological evaluation using haematoxylin & eosin and safranin O. Conditioned medium was assessed every 3-4 days for glucose depletion, and levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (AP), glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Necrotic cultures immediately showed a reduction in glucose consumption, and an immediate increase in LDH, GAG, MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels. Apoptotic cultures showed a delayed reduction in glucose consumption and delayed increase in LDH, a small rise in MMP-2 and MMP-9, but no significant effect on GAGs released into the conditioned medium. The data showed that tissue viability could be monitored by assessing the conditioned medium for the aforementioned markers, negating the need for tissue destructive assays. Physiologically relevant whole- or part-joint organ culture models, necessary for research and pre-clinical assessment of therapies, could be monitored this way, reducing the need to sacrifice tissues to determine viability, and hence reducing the sample numbers necessary.

  3. Topographic Findings of the Porcine Cornea

    PubMed Central

    HEICHEL, Jens; WILHELM, Frank; KUNERT, Kathleen S.; HAMMER, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The porcine eye is often used as an ex vivo animal model in ophthalmological research. It is well suited for investigations concerning refractive surgery; however, corneal topography data are scarce. This study investigated the corneal topography and pachymetry of the porcine eye to provide further reproducible data. We evaluated freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 16) by performing computerized corneal topographies (Orbscan® IIz, Bausch and Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA). We assessed the steepest and flattest keratometric powers (K1 and K2, units in diopters (D)), astigmatism (D), white-to-white (WTW) diameter (mm), thinnest point pachymetry (µm), anterior and posterior best-fit sphere (BFS) (D), refractive power of the anterior and posterior curvatures, and total refractive power of the cornea (D). The mean keratometric powers were 39.6 ± 0.89 D (K1) and 38.5 ± 0.92 D (K2), and the mean astigmatism was 1.1 ± 0.78 D. The mean WTW diameter was 13.81 ± 0.83 mm, and the mean corneal thickness was 832.6 ± 40.18 µm. The BFSs were 38.14 ± 0.73 D (anterior) and 42.56 ± 1.15 D (posterior), and the mean refractive powers were 43.27 ± 1.08 D (anterior) and -5.15 ± 0.20 D (posterior); therefore, the mean of the total refractive power was 38.16 ± 1.00 D. The topography and pachymetry of the porcine cornea showed a specific configuration differing from the human cornea. When using animal ex vivo models such as porcine corneas for experimental corneal surgery, findings such as these should be considered. PMID:28293660

  4. Porcine Dendritic Cells as an In Vitro Model to Assess the Immunological Behaviour of Streptococcus suis Subunit Vaccine Formulations and the Polarizing Effect of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Martelet, Léa; Lacouture, Sonia; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Beauchamp, Guy; Surprenant, Charles; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela

    2017-01-01

    An in vitro porcine bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (DC) culture was developed as a model for evaluating immune polarization induced by adjuvants when administered with immunogens that may become vaccine candidates if appropriately formulated. The swine pathogen Streptococcus suis was chosen as a prototype to evaluate proposed S. suis vaccine candidates in combination with the adjuvants Poly I:C, Quil A ®, Alhydrogel ®, TiterMax Gold ® and Stimune ®. The toll-like receptor ligand Poly I:C and the saponin Quil A ® polarized swine DC cytokines towards a type 1 phenotype, with preferential production of IL-12 and TNF-α. The water-in-oil adjuvants TiterMax Gold ® and Stimune ® favoured a type 2 profile as suggested by a marked IL-6 release. In contrast, Alhydrogel ® induced a type 1/type 2 mixed cytokine profile. The antigen type differently modified the magnitude of the adjuvant effect, but overall polarization was preserved. This is the first comparative report on swine DC immune activation by different adjuvants. Although further swine immunization studies would be required to better characterize the induced responses, the herein proposed in vitro model is a promising approach that helps assessing behaviour of the vaccine formulation rapidly at the pre-screening stage and will certainly reduce numbers of animals used while advancing vaccinology science. PMID:28327531

  5. Improved arterial oxygenation with biologically variable or fractal ventilation using low tidal volumes in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boker, Abdulaziz; Graham, M Ruth; Walley, Keith R; McManus, Bruce M; Girling, Linda G; Walker, Elizabeth; Lefevre, Gerald R; Mutch, W Alan C

    2002-02-15

    We compared biologically variable ventilation (V (bv); n = 9) with control mode ventilation (V (c); n = 8) at low tidal volume (VT)--initial 6 ml/kg--in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Hemodynamics, respiratory gases, airway pressures, and VT data were measured. Static P-V curves were generated at 5 h. Interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 were measured in serum and tracheal aspirate. By 5 h, higher Pa(O(2)) (173 +/- 30 mm Hg versus 119 +/- 23 mm Hg; mean +/- SD; p < 0.0001 group x time interaction [G x T]), lower shunt fraction (6 +/- 1% versus 9 +/- 3%; p = 0.0026, G x T) at lower peak airway pressure (21 +/- 2 versus 24 +/- 1 cm H(2)O; p = 0.0342; G x T) occurred with V (bv). IL-8 concentrations in tracheal aspirate and wet:dry weight ratios were inversely related; p = 0.011. With V (c), IL-8 concentrations were 3.75-fold greater at wet:dry weight ratio of 10. IL-10 concentrations did not differ between groups. In both groups, ventilation was on the linear portion of the P-V curve. With V (bv), VT variability demonstrated an inverse power law indicating fractal behavior. In this model of ARDS, V (bv) improved Pa(O(2)) at lower peak airway pressure and IL-8 levels compared with V (c).

  6. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring and Remediation of Radionuclides in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, T. J.; Cady, R.

    2009-12-01

    NRC sponsors research to identify and assess characterization, modeling, monitoring and remediation methods used to quantify and evaluate radionuclide release and migration in the subsurface. The need for and selection of remediation methods is based on a dose assessment to determine compliance with regulatory criteria. If remediation is warranted, the choice of remediation methods is based upon site- and source-characterization data. This data is integrated in a Conceptual Site Model (CSM). The assumptions and parameterization of the CSM are tested using a program of field tests and confirmatory monitoring. In particular, the features, events and processes in the unsaturated zone where many leaks and spills originate need characterization and confirmatory monitoring. The choice of the remediation method, if warranted, is based upon the confirmed CSM and the monitoring baseline. Remediation strategies being considered are: in situ bioremediation; pump, treat, monitor and release; monitored natural attenuation. Successful remediation strategies include monitoring programs to determine their efficacy. This monitoring is coupled to performance assessment models using performance indicators (PIs). These PIs provide a measurable indication of remediation performance, and are derived from analysis of the CSM and the hydrologic, chemical and microbial functions of the chosen remediation method. Case studies illustrate these observations and provide detailed examples of CSMs and PIs.

  7. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes. PMID:27594908

  8. Xenotransplantation and porcine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Porcine microorganisms may be transmitted to the human recipient when xenotransplantation with pig cells, tissues, and organs will be performed. Most of such microorganisms can be eliminated from the donor pig by specified or designated pathogen-free production of the animals. As human cytomegalovirus causes severe transplant rejection in allotransplantation, considerable concern is warranted on the potential pathogenicity of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) in the setting of xenotransplantation. On the other hand, despite having a similar name, PCMV is different from HCMV. The impact of PCMV infection on pigs is known; however, the influence of PCMV on the human transplant recipient is unclear. However, first transplantations of pig organs infected with PCMV into non-human primates were associated with a significant reduction of the survival time of the transplants. Sensitive detection methods and strategies for elimination of PCMV from donor herds are required.

  9. Service models for remote healthcare monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Bridget A

    2010-01-01

    These scenarios reflect where the future is heading for remote health monitoring technology and service expectations. Being able to manage a "system of systems" with timely service hand-off over seams of responsibility and system interfaces will become very important for a BMET or clinical engineer. These interfaces will include patient homes, clinician homes, commercial/civilian infrastructure, public utilities, vendor infrastructure as well as internal departmental domains. Concurrently, technology is changing rapidly resulting in newer software delivery modes and hardware appliances as well as infrastructure changes. Those who are able to de-construct the complex systems and identify infrastructure assumptions and seams of servicing responsibility will be able to better understand and communicate the expectations for service of these systems. Moreover, as identified in Case 1, prodigious use of underlying system monitoring tools (managing the "meta-data") could move servicing of these remote systems from a reactive approach to a proactive approach. A prepared healthcare organization will identify their current and proposed future service combination use cases and design service philosophies and expectations for those use cases, while understanding the infrastructure assumptions and seams of responsibility. This is the future of technical service to the healthcare clinicians and patients.

  10. Smart health monitoring systems: an overview of design and modeling.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; Gholamhosseini, Hamid

    2013-04-01

    Health monitoring systems have rapidly evolved during the past two decades and have the potential to change the way health care is currently delivered. Although smart health monitoring systems automate patient monitoring tasks and, thereby improve the patient workflow management, their efficiency in clinical settings is still debatable. This paper presents a review of smart health monitoring systems and an overview of their design and modeling. Furthermore, a critical analysis of the efficiency, clinical acceptability, strategies and recommendations on improving current health monitoring systems will be presented. The main aim is to review current state of the art monitoring systems and to perform extensive and an in-depth analysis of the findings in the area of smart health monitoring systems. In order to achieve this, over fifty different monitoring systems have been selected, categorized, classified and compared. Finally, major advances in the system design level have been discussed, current issues facing health care providers, as well as the potential challenges to health monitoring field will be identified and compared to other similar systems.

  11. Evaluation of Control Strategies for Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Swine Breeding Herds Using a Discrete Event Agent-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Andréia Gonçalves; Friendship, Robert; Carpenter, Jane; Greer, Amy; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a discrete event agent-based stochastic model to explore the likelihood of the occurrence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) outbreaks in swine herds with different PRRS control measures in place. The control measures evaluated included vaccination with a modified-live attenuated vaccine and live-virus inoculation of gilts, and both were compared to a baseline scenario where no control measures were in place. A typical North American 1,000-sow farrow-to-wean swine herd was used as a model, with production and disease parameters estimated from the literature and expert opinion. The model constructed herein was not only able to capture individual animal heterogeneity in immunity to and shedding of the PRRS virus, but also the dynamic animal flow and contact structure typical in such herds under field conditions. The model outcomes included maximum number of females infected per simulation, and time at which that happened and the incidence of infected weaned piglets during the first year of challenge-virus introduction. Results showed that the baseline scenario produced a larger percentage of simulations resulting in outbreaks compared to the control scenarios, and interestingly some of the outbreaks occurred over long periods after virus introduction. The live-virus inoculation scenario showed promising results, with fewer simulations resulting in outbreaks than the other scenarios, but the negative impacts of maintaining a PRRS-positive population should be considered. Finally, under the assumptions of the current model, neither of the control strategies prevented the infection from spreading to the piglet population, which highlights the importance of maintaining internal biosecurity practices at the farrowing room level. PMID:27875546

  12. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection: induction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in the gnotobiotic swine model of PCV2-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowka, Steven; Ellis, John; McNeilly, Francis; Waldner, Cheryl; Rings, D Michael; Allan, Gordon

    2007-07-01

    Groups (5 to 15 per group) of gnotobiotic swine were infected oronasally with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) at 3 days of age and then given 1 of 6 different commercial Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) bacterins as either a single dose (7 d of age, 1 application products) or 2 doses (7 and 21 d of age, 2 application product). Control groups received PCV2 alone (n = 9) or were infected with PCV2 and immunized twice with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (ICFA) (n = 7). Five of 7 (71%) PCV2-infected piglets immunized with KLH/ICFA developed mild or overt PMWS, whereas none of 9 piglets infected with PCV2 alone developed PMWS. Five of 12 (42%) piglets vaccinated with a commercial bacterin containing mineral oil adjuvant developed PMWS following vaccination. None of the PCV2-infected piglets in the other bacterin-vaccinated groups developed PMWS in this model of PCV2-associated disease. This difference in prevalence of PMWS in piglets given the mineral oil-adjuvanted M. hyopneumoniae bacterin and the other M. hyopneumoniae bacterin vaccination groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05).

  13. Transplantation of epidermal cell sheets by endoscopic balloon dilatation to avoid esophageal re-strictures: initial experience in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Masanori; Hosoi, Takahiro; Fukai, Fumio; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamato, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Epidermal cell sheet (ECS) transplantation immediately after aggressive endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been shown to be safe and effective in the prevention of esophageal strictures. This study evaluated the feasibility of ECS transplantation after endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) in a porcine model. Methods: Six pigs underwent circumferential esophageal ESD under general anesthesia. Two weeks later, two pigs underwent EBD and transplantation of an autologous ECS, two underwent EBD alone, and two underwent endoscopic observation only (control). Results: The two pigs in the transplantation group underwent six ECS transplants after EBD with five of the six (83 %) being successful, as shown by engraftment of transplanted ECSs after 7 days. No adverse events were observed. Stricture rates were lower in the two transplanted pigs (55 % and 60 %) than in the control (92.2 % and 87.7 %) and EBD-treated (71.7 % and 78.2 %) pigs. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was significantly lower in the transplanted pigs than in the control and EBD-treated pigs. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate the stability of the ECS transplantation procedure and the engraftment of transplanted ECS in the tears after EBD. This proof-of-concept study suggests that covering tears with ECSs after EBD may avoid re-strictures. PMID:27853736

  14. Virulence and immunogenicity of genetically defined human and porcine isolates of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in an experimental mouse infection

    PubMed Central

    Vluggen, Christelle; Roupie, Virginie; Duytschaever, Lucille; Van den Poel, Christophe; Denoël, Joseph; Wattiez, Ruddy; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Fretin, David; Rigouts, Leen; Chapeira, Ophélie; Mathys, Vanessa; Saegerman, Claude; Huygen, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) represents a health concern for humans and to a lesser extent for pigs, but its zoonotic potential remains elusive. Using multispacer sequence typing (MST) we previously identified 49 different genotypes of Mah among Belgian clinical and porcine isolates, with 5 MSTs shared by both hosts. Using experimental intranasal infection of BALB/c mice, we compared the virulence and immunogenicity of porcine and clinical human isolates with shared genotype or with a genotype only found in humans or pigs. Bacterial replication was monitored for 20 weeks in lungs, spleen and liver and mycobacteria specific spleen cell IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 production as well as serum antibody responses were analyzed. Isolates varied in virulence, with human and porcine isolates sharing MST22 genotype showing a thousand fold higher bacterial replication in lungs and more dissemination to spleen and liver than the human and porcine MST91 isolates. Virulent MST22 type was also associated with progressive suppression of IFN-γ and IL-17 responses, and increased IL-10 production. Whole genome sequencing of the two virulent isolates with MST22 genotype and two avirulent isolates of genotype MST91 and comparison with two well-studied M. avium subsp. hominissuis reference strains i.e. Mah 104 and Mah TH135, identified in the two MST22 isolates nine specific virulence factors of the mammalian cell entry family, that were identical with Mah 104 strain. Despite the obvious limitations of the mouse model, a striking link of virulence and identity at the genome level of porcine and human isolates with the same multisequence type, for which no correlation of place of residence (humans) or farm of origin (pigs) was observed, seems to point to the existence in the environment of certain genotypes of Mah which may be more infectious both for humans and pigs than other genotypes. PMID:28182785

  15. Virulence and immunogenicity of genetically defined human and porcine isolates of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in an experimental mouse infection.

    PubMed

    Bruffaerts, Nicolas; Vluggen, Christelle; Roupie, Virginie; Duytschaever, Lucille; Van den Poel, Christophe; Denoël, Joseph; Wattiez, Ruddy; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Fretin, David; Rigouts, Leen; Chapeira, Ophélie; Mathys, Vanessa; Saegerman, Claude; Huygen, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) represents a health concern for humans and to a lesser extent for pigs, but its zoonotic potential remains elusive. Using multispacer sequence typing (MST) we previously identified 49 different genotypes of Mah among Belgian clinical and porcine isolates, with 5 MSTs shared by both hosts. Using experimental intranasal infection of BALB/c mice, we compared the virulence and immunogenicity of porcine and clinical human isolates with shared genotype or with a genotype only found in humans or pigs. Bacterial replication was monitored for 20 weeks in lungs, spleen and liver and mycobacteria specific spleen cell IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 production as well as serum antibody responses were analyzed. Isolates varied in virulence, with human and porcine isolates sharing MST22 genotype showing a thousand fold higher bacterial replication in lungs and more dissemination to spleen and liver than the human and porcine MST91 isolates. Virulent MST22 type was also associated with progressive suppression of IFN-γ and IL-17 responses, and increased IL-10 production. Whole genome sequencing of the two virulent isolates with MST22 genotype and two avirulent isolates of genotype MST91 and comparison with two well-studied M. avium subsp. hominissuis reference strains i.e. Mah 104 and Mah TH135, identified in the two MST22 isolates nine specific virulence factors of the mammalian cell entry family, that were identical with Mah 104 strain. Despite the obvious limitations of the mouse model, a striking link of virulence and identity at the genome level of porcine and human isolates with the same multisequence type, for which no correlation of place of residence (humans) or farm of origin (pigs) was observed, seems to point to the existence in the environment of certain genotypes of Mah which may be more infectious both for humans and pigs than other genotypes.

  16. A Mathematical Model for Analyzing the Elasticity, Viscosity, and Failure of Soft Tissue: Comparison of Native and Decellularized Porcine Cardiac Extracellular Matrix for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bronshtein, Tomer; Au-Yeung, Gigi Chi Ting; Sarig, Udi; Nguyen, Evelyne Bao-Vi; Mhaisalkar, Priyadarshini S.; Boey, Freddy Yin Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The clinical success of tissue-engineered constructs commonly requires mechanical properties that closely mimic those of the human tissue. Determining the viscoelastic properties of such biomaterials and the factors governing their failure profiles, however, has proven challenging, although collecting extensive data regarding their tensile behavior is straightforward. The easily calculated Young's modulus remains the most reported mechanical measure, regardless of its limitations, even though single-relaxation-time (SRT) models can provide much more information, which remain scarce due to a lack of manageable tools for implementing these models. We developed an easy-to-use algorithm for applying the Zener SRT model and determining the elastic moduli, viscosity, and failure profiles of materials under different mechanical tests in a user-independent manner. The algorithm was validated on the data resulting from tensile tests on native and decellularized porcine cardiac tissue, previously suggested as a promising scaffold material for cardiac tissue engineering. This analysis yields new and more accurate measurements such as the elastic moduli and viscosity, the model's relaxation time, and information on the factors governing the materials' failure profiles. These measurements indicate that the viscoelasticity and strength of the decellularized acellular extracellular matrix (ECM) are similar to those of native tissue, although its elasticity and apparent viscosity are higher. Nonetheless, reseeding and culturing the ECM with mesenchymal stem cells was shown to partially restore the mechanical properties lost after decellularization. We propose this algorithm as a platform for soft-tissue analysis that can provide comparable and unbiased measures for characterizing viscoelastic biomaterials commonly used in tissue engineering. PMID:23265414

  17. The porcine ear skin as a model system for the human integument: influence of storage conditions on basic features of epidermis structure and function--a histological and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Zschemisch, N H; Godynicki, S

    2003-01-01

    Based on careful tissue processing, detailed structural analysis, and histochemical as well as cytophotometrical evaluation of the epidermis, the study presents data with respect to changes of tissue integrity during two storing modes (room temperature and 4 degrees C) and various storage times of the porcine auricle. Structural degeneration was first noted in the barrier region of the epidermis from where such changes spread, independent of storage conditions, from small horizontal necrotic islands and continuously with increasing storage time. The histochemical results corroborated these observations, emphasizing, however, that the lower epidermal layers seemed intact for a longer time period than the upper layers. Cytophotometrical evaluation of histochemical stainings showed, with regard to the enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, that oxidative metabolism was negatively affected in the early stages of storage, whereas epidermal lipids (neutral fats, glycolipids) remained relatively stable, even during storage at room temperature. In conclusion, it was obvious that the barrier region is the most sensitive element of the porcine ear epidermis. Taking into consideration that this part of the epidermis is most important for permeation studies, it seems reasonable to avoid any storage of porcine auricles at room temperature, and to use only auricles that have been stored at 4 degrees C for not more than 4 to 6 hours, immediately after delivery from the slaughter-house. In this way better tissue preservation can be achieved, whereby the use of shinkage-free water-soluble plastic embedding would generally improve the histological control of structural integrity, and the application of an easy to handle enzyme histochemical procedure (e.g. succinate dehydrogenase demonstration) to unfixed fresh-frozen sections would help to control basic aspects of tissue functions. The results are discussed in relation to the use of porcine integument as a model in human dermatological

  18. Xenotransplantation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells Does Not Improve Cardiac Function in a Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure. Results from a Randomized, Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jansen of Lorkeers, Sanne J.; Gho, Johannes M. I. H.; Koudstaal, Stefan; van Hout, Gerardus P. J.; Zwetsloot, Peter Paul M.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; van Eeuwijk, Esther C. M.; Leiner, Tim; Hoefer, Imo E.; Goumans, Marie-José; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs) were successfully isolated from fetal and adult human hearts. Direct intramyocardial injection of human CMPCs (hCMPCs) in experimental mouse models of acute myocardial infarction significantly improved cardiac function compared to controls. Aim Here, our aim was to investigate whether xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of fetal hCMPCs in a pig model of chronic myocardial infarction is safe and efficacious, in view of translation purposes. Methods & Results We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo controlled trial. Four weeks after ischemia/reperfusion injury by 90 minutes of percutaneous left anterior descending artery occlusion, pigs (n = 16, 68.5 ± 5.4 kg) received intracoronary infusion of 10 million fetal hCMPCs or placebo. All animals were immunosuppressed by cyclosporin (CsA). Four weeks after infusion, endpoint analysis by MRI displayed no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and left ventricular end systolic volumes between both groups. Serial pressure volume (PV-)loop and echocardiography showed no differences in functional parameters between groups at any timepoint. Infarct size at follow-up, measured by late gadolinium enhancement MRI showed no difference between groups. Intracoronary pressure and flow measurements showed no signs of coronary obstruction 30 minutes after cell infusion. No premature death occurred in cell treated animals. Conclusion Xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of hCMPCs is feasible and safe, but not associated with improved left ventricular performance and infarct size compared to placebo in a porcine model of chronic myocardial infarction. PMID:26678993

  19. Local delivery of allogeneic bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for cutaneous wound healing in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Summer E; Kleinbeck, Kyle R; Cantu, David; Kim, Jaeyhup; Bentz, Michael L; Faucher, Lee D; Kao, W John; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing remains a major challenge in modern medicine. Bone marrow- (BM) and adipose tissue- (AT) derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are of great interest for tissue reconstruction due to their unique immunological properties and regenerative potential. The purpose of this study was to characterize BM and AT-MSCs and evaluate their effect when administered in a porcine wound model. MSCs were derived from male Göttingen Minipigs and characterized according to established criteria. Allogeneic BM- or AT-MSCs were administered intradermally (1 x 10(6) cells) into partial-thickness wounds created on female animals, and covered with Vaseline® gauze or fibrin in a randomized pattern. Animals were euthanized at 7, 10, 14 and 21 days. Tissues were analyzed visually for healing and by microscopic examination for epidermal development and remodelling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of male DNA in the specimens. All wounds were healed by 14 days. MSC-injected wounds were associated with improved appearance and faster re-epithelialization compared to saline controls. Evaluation of rete ridge depth and architecture showed that MSC treatment promoted a faster rate of epidermal maturation. Male DNA was detected in all samples at days 7 and 10, suggesting the presence of MSCs. We showed the safety, feasibility and potential efficacy of local injection of allogeneic BM- and AT-MSCs for treatment of wounds in a preclinical model. Our data in this large animal model support the potential use of BM- and AT-MSC for treatment of cutaneous wounds through modulation of healing and epithelialization.

  20. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of porcine skin: implications for human wound healing studies

    PubMed Central

    VARDAXIS, N. J.; BRANS, T. A.; BOON, M. E.; KREIS, R. W.; MARRES, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of porcine skin as examined by light microscopy is reviewed and its similarities to and differences from human skin are highlighted. Special imaging techniques and staining procedures are described and their use in gathering morphological information in porcine skin is discussed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was employed to examine the structure of porcine skin and the findings are presented as an adjunct to the information already available in the literature. It is concluded that CLSM provides valuable additional morphological information to material examined by conventional microscopy and is useful for wound healing studies in the porcine model. PMID:9183682

  1. Avian Conservation on Military Lands Monitoring Modeling and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    management both positively and negatively impacts Birds of Conservation Concern Implications type, frequency, and timing of management (e.g. fire...is critical to conservation goals Solution monitor, model, and management of populations of Birds of Conservation Concern in important habitats...demographic estimates (trends, vital rates). • Effectively monitors 30+ landbird species, of which 10 species are U.S. Fish and Wildlife “ Birds of Conservation

  2. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION MODELING AND MONITORING OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk presents an overview of the capabilities and roles that regional atmospheric deposition models can play with respect to multi-media environmental problems. The focus is on nutrient deposition (nitrogen). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an important contributor to...

  3. Generation of a Stable Transgenic Swine Model Expressing a Porcine Histone 2B-eGFP Fusion Protein for Cell Tracking and Chromosome Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Sean; Collins, Bruce; Sommer, Jeff; Petters, Robert M.; Caballero, Ignacio; Platt, Jeff L.

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic pigs have become an attractive research model in the field of translational research, regenerative medicine, and stem cell therapy due to their anatomic, genetic and physiological similarities with humans. The development of fluorescent proteins as molecular tags has allowed investigators to track cell migration and engraftment levels after transplantation. Here we describe the development of two transgenic pig models via SCNT expressing a fusion protein composed of eGFP and porcine Histone 2B (pH2B). This fusion protein is targeted to the nucleosomes resulting a nuclear/chromatin eGFP signal. The first model (I) was generated via random insertion of pH2B-eGFP driven by the CAG promoter (chicken beta actin promoter and rabbit Globin poly A; pCAG-pH2B-eGFP) and protected by human interferon-β matrix attachment regions (MARs). Despite the consistent, high, and ubiquitous expression of the fusion protein pH2B-eGFP in all tissues analyzed, two independently generated Model I transgenic lines developed neurodegenerative symptoms including Wallerian degeneration between 3–5 months of age, requiring euthanasia. A second transgenic model (II) was developed via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated homology-directed repair (HDR) of IRES-pH2B-eGFP into the endogenous β-actin (ACTB) locus. Model II transgenic animals showed ubiquitous expression of pH2B-eGFP on all tissues analyzed. Unlike the pCAG-pH2B-eGFP/MAR line, all Model II animals were healthy and multiple pregnancies have been established with progeny showing the expected Mendelian ratio for the transmission of the pH2B-eGFP. Expression of pH2B-eGFP was used to examine the timing of the maternal to zygotic transition after IVF, and to examine chromosome segregation of SCNT embryos. To our knowledge this is the first viable transgenic pig model with chromatin-associated eGFP allowing both cell tracking and the study of chromatin dynamics in a large animal model. PMID:28081156

  4. Modeling, Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Spacecraft Air Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, W. Fred; Skliar, Mikhail; Narayan, Anand; Morgenthaler, George W.; Smith, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Progress and results in the development of an integrated air quality modeling, monitoring, fault detection, and isolation system are presented. The focus was on development of distributed models of the air contaminants transport, the study of air quality monitoring techniques based on the model of transport process and on-line contaminant concentration measurements, and sensor placement. Different approaches to the modeling of spacecraft air contamination are discussed, and a three-dimensional distributed parameter air contaminant dispersion model applicable to both laminar and turbulent transport is proposed. A two-dimensional approximation of a full scale transport model is also proposed based on the spatial averaging of the three dimensional model over the least important space coordinate. A computer implementation of the transport model is considered and a detailed development of two- and three-dimensional models illustrated by contaminant transport simulation results is presented. The use of a well established Kalman filtering approach is suggested as a method for generating on-line contaminant concentration estimates based on both real time measurements and the model of contaminant transport process. It is shown that high computational requirements of the traditional Kalman filter can render difficult its real-time implementation for high-dimensional transport model and a novel implicit Kalman filtering algorithm is proposed which is shown to lead to an order of magnitude faster computer implementation in the case of air quality monitoring.

  5. Porcine circovirus diseases.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim; Allan, Gordon M; Domingo, Mariano

    2005-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a member of the family Circoviridae, a recently established virus family composed of small, non-enveloped viruses, with a circular, single-stranded DNA genome. PCV2, which is found all over the world in the domestic pig and probably the wild boar, has been recently associated with a number of disease syndromes, which have been collectively named porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome (PDNS) and reproductive disorders are the most relevant ones. Among them, only PMWS is considered to have a severe impact on domestic swine production. PMWS mainly affects nursery and/or fattening pigs; wasting is considered the most representative clinical sign in this disease. Diagnosis of this disease is confirmed by histopathological examination of lymphoid tissues and detection of a moderate to high amount of PCV2 in damaged tissues. Since PMWS is considered a multifactorial disease in which other factors in addition to PCV2 are needed in most cases to trigger the clinical disease, effective control measures have focused on the understanding of the co-factors involved in individual farms and the control or elimination of these triggers. PDNS, an immuno-complex disease characterized by fibrino-necrotizing glomerulonephritis and systemic necrotizing vasculitis, has been linked to PCV2, but a definitive proof of this association is still lacking. PCV2-associated reproductive disease seems to occur very sporadically under field conditions, but it has been characterized by late-term abortions and stillbirths, extensive fibrosing and/or necrotizing myocarditis in fetuses and the presence of moderate to high amounts of PCV2 in these lesions. Taking into account that scientific information on PCV2 and its associated diseases has been markedly expanded in the last 8 years, the objective of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the most

  6. Porcine Burn Shock - Development of a Reliable Model and Response to Sodium, Water, and Plasma Loads Administered for Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-06-01

    temperature dropped post anes- thesia but thereafter was stable and within normal limits. The pulse rate was within the range of normal values...is retlatively Si g- ni ficant thait oile - hialf thne animals Ii the Burn. Non- Resutsci tate’d (Group 11) tri-Atment Vrwip (lid, i’spiecially III...Monitor, Type 410 Tektronix, Inc. S. W. Millikan Way P. 0. Box 500 Beaverton, OR 97005 Numechron Tymeter Tymeter Electronics Pennwood Numechron Company

  7. Desert Dust Properties, Modelling, and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gupta, Pawan; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Bartzokas, Aristides

    2013-01-01

    This paper is just the three-page introduction to a Special Issue of Advances in Meteorology focusing on desert dust. It provides a paragraph each on 13 accepted papers, most relating to the used of satellite data to assess attributes or distribution of airborne desert dust. As guest Associate Editors of this issue, we organized the papers into a systematic whole, beginning with large-scale transport and seasonal behavior, then to regional dust transport, transport history, and climate impacts, first in the Mediterranean region, then India and central Asia, and finally focusing on transport model assessment and the use of lidar as a technique to constrain dust spatial-temporal distribution.

  8. Noninvasive Carbon Dioxide Monitoring in a Porcine Model of Acute Lung Injury Due to Smoke Inhalation and Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    critically ill intubated patients, assessment of adequacy of ventilation relies on measuring partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2), which...recorded in the PaCO2 range of 25 to 85 mmHg. Overlapping data sets were analyzed based on respiratory and hemodynamic status of animals. Acute lung injury...instability, we recorded the frequency of changes in the respiratory rate (as set on the ventilator ) and in the FIO2. We defined hemo dynamic instability as

  9. Model-Based, Noninvasive Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    are twice as good as in our earlier validation studies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Intracranial pressure (ICP), noninvasive monitoring, cerebrovascular model...of these waveforms exploits a simplified dynamic model of cerebrovascular physiology that relates the measured signals to ICP [1, 2, 3]. Validation...aggregated mechanistic model of the cerebrovascular space. Figure 2.2.1 shows successive abstractions of the relevant physiology, resulting in the circuit

  10. Multi-metric model-based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hongki; Spencer, B. F.

    2014-04-01

    ABSTRACT The inspection and maintenance of bridges of all types is critical to the public safety and often critical to the economy of a region. Recent advanced sensor technologies provide accurate and easy-to-deploy means for structural health monitoring and, if the critical locations are known a priori, can be monitored by direct measurements. However, for today's complex civil infrastructure, the critical locations are numerous and often difficult to identify. This paper presents an innovative framework for structural monitoring at arbitrary locations on the structure combining computational models and limited physical sensor information. The use of multi-metric measurements is advocated to improve the accuracy of the approach. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the proposed hybrid monitoring framework, particularly focusing on fatigue life assessment of steel structures.

  11. Tissue damage by laser radiation: an in vitro comparison between Tm:YAG and Ho:YAG laser on a porcine kidney model.

    PubMed

    Huusmann, Stephan; Wolters, Mathias; Kramer, Mario W; Bach, Thorsten; Teichmann, Heinrich-Otto; Eing, Andreas; Bardosi, Sebastian; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of tissue damage by laser radiation is very important for the safety in the application of surgical lasers. The objective of this study is to evaluate cutting, vaporization and coagulation properties of the 2 µm Tm:YAG laser (LISA Laser Products OHG, GER) in comparison to the 2.1 µm Ho:YAG laser (Coherent Medical Group, USA) at different laser power settings in an in vitro model of freshly harvested porcine kidneys. Laser radiation of both laser generators was delivered by using a laser fiber with an optical core diameter of 550 µm (RigiFib, LISA Laser GER). Freshly harvested porcine kidneys were used as tissue model. Experiments were either performed in ambient air or in aqueous saline. The Tm:YAG laser was adjusted to 5 W for low and 120 W for the high power setting. The Ho:YAG laser was adjusted to 0.5 J and 10 Hz (5 W average power) for low power setting and to 2.0 J and 40 Hz (80 W average power) for high power setting, accordingly. The specimens of the cutting experiments were fixed in 4 % formalin, embedded in paraffin and stained with Toluidin blue. The laser damage zone was measured under microscope as the main evaluation criteria. Laser damage zone consists of an outer coagulation zone plus a further necrotic zone. In the ambient air experiments the laser damage zone for the low power setting was 745 ± 119 µm for the Tm:YAG and 614 ± 187 µm for the Ho:YAG laser. On the high power setting, the damage zone was 760 ± 167 µm for Tm:YAG and 715 ± 142 µm for Ho:YAG. The incision depth in ambient air on the low power setting was 346 ± 199 µm for Tm:YAG, 118 ± 119 µm for Ho:YAG. On the high power setting incision depth was 5083 ± 144 µm (Tm:YAG) and 1126 ± 383 µm (Ho:YAG) respectively. In the saline solution experiments, the laser damage zone was 550 ± 137 µm (Tm:YAG) versus 447 ± 65 µm (Ho:YAG), on the low power setting and 653 ± 137 µm (Tm:YAG) versus 677 ± 134 µm (Ho

  12. Import risk assessment incorporating a dose-response model: introduction of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome into Australia via illegally imported raw pork.

    PubMed

    Brookes, V J; Hernández-Jover, M; Holyoake, P; Ward, M P

    2014-03-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has spread through parts of south-east Asia, posing a risk to Australia. The objective of this study was to assess the probability of infection of a feral or domestic pig in Australia with highly pathogenic PRRS following ingestion of illegally imported raw pork. A conservative scenario was considered in which 500 g of raw pork was imported from the Philippines into Australia without being detected by border security, then discarded from a household and potentially accessed by a pig. Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional, stochastic model was used to estimate the probability of entry and exposure, and the probability of infection was assessed by incorporating a virus-decay and mechanistic dose-response model. Results indicated that the probability of infection of a feral pig after ingestion of raw meat was higher than the probability of infection of a domestic pig. Sensitivity analysis was used to assess the influence of input parameters on model output probability estimates, and extension of the virus-decay and dose-response model was used to explore the impact of different temperatures and time from slaughter to ingestion of the meat, different weights of meat, and the level of viraemia at slaughter on the infectivity of meat. Parameters with the highest influence on the model output were the level of viraemia of a pig prior to slaughter and the probability of access by a feral pig to food-waste discarded on property surrounding a household. Extension of the decay and dose-response model showed that small pieces of meat (10 g) from a highly pathogenic PRRS viraemic pig could contain enough virus to have a high probability of infection of a pig, and that routes to Australia by sea or air from all highly pathogenic PRRS virus endemic countries were of interest dependent on the temperature of the raw meat during transport. This study highlighted the importance of mitigation strategies such

  13. Model-aware Monitoring of SOAs for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Ta'id; Mulo, Emmanuel; Zdun, Uwe; Dustdar, Schahram

    Business processes today are supported by process-driven service oriented architectures. Due to the increasing importance of compliance of an organization with regulatory requirements and internal policies, there is a need for appropriate techniques to monitor organizational information systems as they execute business processes. Event-based monitoring of processes is one of the ways to provide runtime process-state information. This type of monitoring, however, has limitations mostly related to the type and amount of information available in events and process engines. We propose a novel approach - model-aware monitoring of business processes - to address these limitations. Emitted events contain unique identifiers of models that can be retrieved dynamically during runtime from a model-aware repository and service environment (MORSE). The size of the events is kept small and patterns of events that signify interesting occurrences are identified through complex event processing and are signaled to interesting components such as a business intelligence. To illustrate our approach we present an industry case study where we have applied this generic infrastructure for the compliance monitoring of business processes.

  14. Antecedent thermal injury worsens split-thickness skin graft quality: A clinically relevant porcine model of full-thickness burn, excision and grafting.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders H; Rose, Lloyd F; Fletcher, John L; Wu, Jesse C; Leung, Kai P; Chan, Rodney K

    2017-02-01

    Current standard of care for full-thickness burn is excision followed by autologous split-thickness skin graft placement. Skin grafts are also frequently used to cover surgical wounds not amenable to linear closure. While all grafts have potential to contract, clinical observation suggests that antecedent thermal injury worsens contraction and impairs functional and aesthetic outcomes. This study evaluates the impact of antecedent full-thickness burn on split-thickness skin graft scar outcomes and the potential mediating factors. Full-thickness contact burns (100°C, 30s) were created on the backs of anesthetized female Yorkshire Pigs. After seven days, burn eschar was tangentially excised and covered with 12/1000th inch (300μm) split-thickness skin graft. For comparison, unburned wounds were created by sharp excision to fat before graft application. From 7 to 120days post-grafting, planimetric measurements, digital imaging and biopsies for histology, immunohistochemistry and gene expression were obtained. At 120days post-grafting, the Observer Scar Assessment Scale, colorimetry, contour analysis and optical graft height assessments were performed. Twenty-nine porcine wounds were analyzed. All measured metrics of clinical skin quality were significantly worse (p<0.05) in burn injured wounds. Histological analysis supported objective clinical findings with marked scar-like collagen proliferation within the dermis, increased vascular density, and prolonged and increased cellular infiltration. Observed differences in contracture also correlated with earlier and more prominent myofibroblast differentiation as demonstrated by α-SMA staining. Antecedent thermal injury worsens split-thickness skin graft quality, likely by multiple mechanisms including burn-related inflammation, microscopically inadequate excision, and dysregulation of tissue remodeling. A valid, reliable, clinically relevant model of full-thickness burn, excision and skin replacement therapy has been

  15. Preclinical Study of Single-Dose Moxidectin, a New Oral Treatment for Scabies: Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics Compared to Two-Dose Ivermectin in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bernigaud, Charlotte; Aho, Ludwig Serge; Dreau, Dominique; Kelly, Andrew; Sutra, Jean-François; Moreau, Francis; Lilin, Thomas; Botterel, Françoise; Guillot, Jacques; Chosidow, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Scabies is one of the commonest dermatological conditions globally; however it is a largely underexplored and truly neglected infectious disease. Foremost, improvement in the management of this public health burden is imperative. Current treatments with topical agents and/or oral ivermectin (IVM) are insufficient and drug resistance is emerging. Moxidectin (MOX), with more advantageous pharmacological profiles may be a promising alternative. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a porcine scabies model, 12 pigs were randomly assigned to receive orally either MOX (0.3 mg/kg once), IVM (0.2 mg/kg twice) or no treatment. We evaluated treatment efficacies by assessing mite count, clinical lesions, pruritus and ELISA-determined anti-S. scabiei IgG antibodies reductions. Plasma and skin pharmacokinetic profiles were determined. At day 14 post-treatment, all four MOX-treated but only two IVM-treated pigs were mite-free. MOX efficacy was 100% and remained unchanged until study-end (D47), compared to 62% (range 26–100%) for IVM, with one IVM-treated pig remaining infected until D47. Clinical scabies lesions, pruritus and anti-S. scabiei IgG antibodies had completely disappeared in all MOX-treated but only 75% of IVM-treated pigs. MOX persisted ~9 times longer than IVM in plasma and skin, thereby covering the mite’s entire life cycle and enabling long-lasting efficacy. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that oral single-dose MOX was more effective than two consecutive IVM-doses, supporting MOX as potential therapeutic approach for scabies. PMID:27732588

  16. Neuronal tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β expression in a porcine model of intracerebral haemorrhage: Modulation by U-74389G.

    PubMed

    Bimpis, Alexios; Papalois, Apostolos; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Oláh, Orsolya; Tiszlavicz, Lazlo; Liapi, Charis

    2015-07-30

    Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) are important mediators of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) inflammatory response. Lazaroids, established antioxidants and neuroprotectants, have been studied in several brain pathologies. The present study was designed to investigate: a) TNF-α and IL-1β changes, in neurons and b) U-74389G effects, 4 and 24h after haematoma induction in a porcine model of intracerebral haemorrhage. In twenty male landrace pigs (swines) aged 135-150 days old, autologous whole blood was injected around the right basal ganglia territory; in ten of the pigs the lazaroid compound U-74389G was administered. Brain TNF-α and IL-1β immunopositive neurons were determined by immunoarray techniques at 4 and 24h timepoints. After the haematoma induction the number of TNF-α immunopositive neurons ipsilateral to the haematoma was significantly higher compared to the contralateral site at 4h (p<0.0005), while U-74389G significantly reduced the number of TNF-α immunopositive neurons, ipsilateral to the haematoma, at 4h (p=0.002); at 24h, TNF-α immunopositive neurons were found significantly lower in the control group ipsilateral to the haematoma in comparison to 4h timepoint(p<0.0005). The number of IL-1β immunopositive neurons at 4h after the hematoma induction was significantly higher ipsilateral to the haematoma site (p<0.0005). U-74389G had no statistical significant effect. TNF-α and IL-1β, increase in neurons, 4h after the haematoma induction, ipsilateral to the haematoma site. The administration of the antioxidant compound U-74389G, results in early (at 4h) decrease of TNF-α immunopositive neurons but shows no statistical significant effect to IL-1β immunopossitive neurons.

  17. Circulating microRNAs Reveal Time Course of Organ Injury in a Porcine Model of Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Luisa A.; Lee, Karla C. L.; Palacios Jimenez, Carolina; Alibhai, Hatim; Chang, Yu-Mei; Leckie, Pamela J.; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Davies, Nathan A.; Andreola, Fausto; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare but catastrophic condition which can progress rapidly to multi-organ failure. Studies investigating the onset of individual organ injury such as the liver, kidneys and brain during the evolution of acute liver failure, are lacking. MicroRNAs are short, non-coding strands of RNA that are released into the circulation following tissue injury. In this study, we have characterised the release of both global microRNA and specific microRNA species into the plasma using a porcine model of acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. Pigs were induced to acute liver failure with oral acetaminophen over 19h±2h and death occurred 13h±3h thereafter. Global microRNA concentrations increased 4h prior to acute liver failure in plasma (P<0.0001) but not in isolated exosomes, and were associated with increasing plasma levels of the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, genomic DNA (P<0.0001). MiR122 increased around the time of onset of acute liver failure (P<0.0001) and was associated with increasing international normalised ratio (P<0.0001). MiR192 increased 8h after acute liver failure (P<0.0001) and was associated with increasing creatinine (P<0.0001). The increase in miR124-1 occurred concurrent with the pre-terminal increase in intracranial pressure (P<0.0001) and was associated with decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure (P<0.002). Conclusions MicroRNAs were released passively into the circulation in response to acetaminophen-induced cellular damage. A significant increase in global microRNA was detectable prior to significant increases in miR122, miR192 and miR124-1, which were associated with clinical evidence of liver, kidney and brain injury respectively. PMID:26018205

  18. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  19. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  20. Self-, other-, and joint monitoring using forward models

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Martin J.; Garrod, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In the psychology of language, most accounts of self-monitoring assume that it is based on comprehension. Here we outline and develop the alternative account proposed by Pickering and Garrod (2013), in which speakers construct forward models of their upcoming utterances and compare them with the utterance as they produce them. We propose that speakers compute inverse models derived from the discrepancy (error) between the utterance and the predicted utterance and use that to modify their production command or (occasionally) begin anew. We then propose that comprehenders monitor other people’s speech by simulating their utterances using covert imitation and forward models, and then comparing those forward models with what they hear. They use the discrepancy to compute inverse models and modify their representation of the speaker’s production command, or realize that their representation is incorrect and may develop a new production command. We then discuss monitoring in dialogue, paying attention to sequential contributions, concurrent feedback, and the relationship between monitoring and alignment. PMID:24723869

  1. Model-based monitoring of stormwater runoff quality.

    PubMed

    Birch, Heidi; Vezzaro, Luca; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of micropollutants (MP) in stormwater is essential to evaluate the impacts of stormwater on the receiving aquatic environment. The aim of this study was to investigate how different strategies for monitoring of stormwater quality (combining a model with field sampling) affect the information obtained about MP discharged from the monitored system. A dynamic stormwater quality model was calibrated using MP data collected by automatic volume-proportional sampling and passive sampling in a storm drainage system on the outskirts of Copenhagen (Denmark) and a 10-year rain series was used to find annual average (AA) and maximum event mean concentrations. Use of this model reduced the uncertainty of predicted AA concentrations compared to a simple stochastic method based solely on data. The predicted AA concentration, obtained by using passive sampler measurements (1 month installation) for calibration of the model, resulted in the same predicted level but with narrower model prediction bounds than by using volume-proportional samples for calibration. This shows that passive sampling allows for a better exploitation of the resources allocated for stormwater quality monitoring.

  2. Model Selection for Monitoring CO2 Plume during Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-31

    The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly includes four steps: (1) assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, (2) model clustering using multidimensional scaling coupled with k-mean clustering, (3) model selection using the Bayes' rule in the reduced model space, (4) model expansion using iterative resampling of the posterior models. The fourth step expresses one of the advantages of the method: it provides a built-in means of quantifying the uncertainty in predictions made with the selected models. In our application to plume monitoring, by expanding the posterior space of models, the final ensemble of representations of geological model can be used to assess the uncertainty in predicting the future displacement of the CO2 plume. The software implementation of this approach is attached here.

  3. Simulation of between-farm transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Ontario, Canada using the North American Animal Disease Spread Model.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Krishna K; Revie, Crawford W; Hurnik, Daniel; Poljak, Zvonimir; Sanchez, Javier

    2015-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), a viral disease of swine, has major economic impacts on the swine industry. The North American Animal Disease Spread Model (NAADSM) is a spatial, stochastic, farm level state-transition modeling framework originally developed to simulate highly contagious and foreign livestock diseases. The objectives of this study were to develop a model to simulate between-farm spread of a homologous strain of PRRS virus in Ontario swine farms via direct (animal movement) and indirect (sharing of trucks between farms) contacts using the NAADSM and to compare the patterns and extent of outbreak under different simulated conditions. A total of 2552 swine farms in Ontario province were allocated to each census division of Ontario and geo-locations of the farms were randomly generated within the agriculture land of each Census Division. Contact rates among different production types were obtained using pig movement information from four regions in Canada. A total of 24 scenarios were developed involving various direct (movement of infected animals) and indirect (pig transportation trucks) contact parameters in combination with alternating the production type of the farm in which the infection was seeded. Outbreaks were simulated for one year with 1000 replications. The median number of farms infected, proportion of farms with multiple outbreaks and time to reach the peak epidemic were used to compare the size, progression and extent of outbreaks. Scenarios involving spread only by direct contact between farms resulted in outbreaks where the median percentage of infected farms ranged from 31.5 to 37% of all farms. In scenarios with both direct and indirect contact, the median percentage of infected farms increased to a range from 41.6 to 48.6%. Furthermore, scenarios with both direct and indirect contact resulted in a 44% increase in median epidemic size when compared to the direct contact scenarios. Incorporation of both animal

  4. Computational models of performance monitoring and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, William H.; Brown, Joshua W.

    2011-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been the subject of intense interest as a locus of cognitive control. Several computational models have been proposed to account for a range of effects including error detection, conflict monitoring, error likelihood prediction, and numerous other effects observed with single-unit neurophysiology, fMRI, and lesion studies. Here we review the state of computational models of cognitive control and offer a new theoretical synthesis of the mPFC as signaling response-outcome predictions. This new synthesis has two interacting components. The first component learns to predict the various possible outcomes of a planned action, and the second component detects discrepancies between the actual and intended responses; the detected discrepancies in turn update the outcome predictions. This single construct is consistent with a wide array of performance monitoring effects in mPFC and suggests a unifying account of the cognitive role of medial PFC in performance monitoring. PMID:21359126

  5. Coupled thermal and geophysical modelling for monitoring of permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rings, Jörg; Scherler, Martin; Hauck, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Geophysical methods, and especially the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method, are being recognised as standard tools for the detection and monitoring of permafrost. Recent advances in automated data acquisition and processing have made their application worthwhile for continuous monitoring systems even in harsh and heterogeneous terrain. ERT yields 2- and 3-dimensional data of the subsurface and is sensitive to the unfrozen water and ice content, which is complementary to the 1-dimensional temperature measurements conducted in boreholes. For future autonomous and widespread monitoring systems for permafrost, a purely geophysical approach is envisaged, because the low costs and minimal disturbance of the system to be monitored is one of the major advantages of geophysics as opposed to boreholes. However, the link between the indirectly measured geophysical property (e.g. electrical resistivity in case of ERT) of the subsurface and temperature is often non-trivial and cannot be determined without ground truth data from boreholes or extensive laboratory calibration. In this contribution, we introduce a Bayesian filtering approach of coupled geophysical and thermal modelling to predict subsurface temperatures based on ERT monitoring data without the need for borehole or laboratory data. We use sequential Bayesian filtering or particle filtering, which has the advantage of continuously providing probability distributions of state (temperature) and parameters (e.g. the link between resistivity and temperature) whenever measurements become available. A particle filter approximates these distributions by a set of discrete, weighted particles. For each particle, initial state and parameter are drawn from prior distributions and thermal conduction is modelled independently. The modelled change in temperature is transferred to change in resistivity by a linear relation, and an ERT forward model is used to simulate the system response. Then, the particles are

  6. Systemic thioridazine in combination with dicloxacillin against early aortic graft infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus in a porcine model: In vivo results do not reproduce the in vitro synergistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Michael; Behr-Rasmussen, Carsten; Klein, Kasper; Grønnemose, Rasmus B.; Andersen, Thomas Emil; Klitgaard, Janne K.; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Conservative treatment solutions against aortic prosthetic vascular graft infection (APVGI) for inoperable patients are limited. The combination of antibiotics with antibacterial helper compounds, such as the neuroleptic drug thioridazine (TDZ), should be explored. Aim To investigate the efficacy of conservative systemic treatment with dicloxacillin (DCX) in combination with TDZ (DCX+TDZ), compared to DCX alone, against early APVGI caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) in a porcine model. Methods The synergism of DCX+TDZ against MSSA was initially assessed in vitro by viability assay. Thereafter, thirty-two pigs had polyester grafts implanted in the infrarenal aorta, followed by inoculation with 106 CFU of MSSA, and were randomly administered oral systemic treatment with either 1) DCX or 2) DCX+TDZ. Treatment was initiated one week postoperatively and continued for a further 21 days. Weight, temperature, and blood samples were collected at predefined intervals. By termination, bacterial quantities from the graft surface, graft material, and perigraft tissue were obtained. Results Despite in vitro synergism, the porcine experiment revealed no statistical differences for bacteriological endpoints between the two treatment groups, and none of the treatments eradicated the APVGI. Accordingly, the mixed model analyses of weight, temperature, and blood samples revealed no statistical differences. Conclusion Conservative systemic treatment with DCX+TDZ did not reproduce in vitro results against APVGI caused by MSSA in this porcine model. However, unexpected severe adverse effects related to the planned dose of TDZ required a considerable reduction to the administered dose of TDZ, which may have compromised the results. PMID:28278183

  7. Model-free execution monitoring in behavior-based robotics.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Ola; Karlsson, Lars; Saffiotti, Alessandro

    2007-08-01

    In the near future, autonomous mobile robots are expected to help humans by performing service tasks in many different areas, including personal assistance, transportation, cleaning, mining, or agriculture. In order to manage these tasks in a changing and partially unpredictable environment without the aid of humans, the robot must have the ability to plan its actions and to execute them robustly and safely. The robot must also have the ability to detect when the execution does not proceed as planned and to correctly identify the causes of the failure. An execution monitoring system allows the robot to detect and classify these failures. Most current approaches to execution monitoring in robotics are based on the idea of predicting the outcomes of the robot's actions by using some sort of predictive model and comparing the predicted outcomes with the observed ones. In contrary, this paper explores the use of model-free approaches to execution monitoring, that is, approaches that do not use predictive models. In this paper, we show that pattern recognition techniques can be applied to realize model-free execution monitoring by classifying observed behavioral patterns into normal or faulty execution. We investigate the use of several such techniques and verify their utility in a number of experiments involving the navigation of a mobile robot in indoor environments.

  8. Screening and Characterization of Spontaneous Porcine Congenital Heart Defects for Gene Identification and Models of Human Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rodent models of human congenital birth defects have been instrumental for gene discovery and investigation of mechanisms of disease. However, these models are limited by their small size making practiced intervention or detailed anatomic evaluation difficult. Swine have similar anato...

  9. Human Xenografts Are Not Rejected in a Naturally Occurring Immunodeficient Porcine Line: A Human Tumor Model in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Basel, Matthew T.; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P.; Kerrigan, Maureen A.; Pyle, Marla M.; Dekkers, Jack C.M.; Wyatt, Carol R.; Rowland, Robert R.R.; Anderson, David E.; Bossmann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans. PMID:23514746

  10. Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus Scrofa) of Adult Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest in Addition to Standard Epinephrine Therapy?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-17

    UDIIILI: oa. I..UN I ItA!.. I NUMDI:It Does Glucagon improve survival in a porcine (Sus Scrofa ) of adult asphyxial cardiac arrest in addition to...EXPIRATION DATE: 25 Mar 13 PROTOCOL TITLE: Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus scrofa ) Model of Adult Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest in Addition...Additions: Deletions: 2 Protocol No: A-2007-03 Protocol Title: Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus scrofa ) Model of Adult Asphyxial

  11. Towards Comprehensive Variation Models for Designing Vehicle Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdams, Daniel A.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When designing vehicle vibration monitoring systems for aerospace devices, it is common to use well-established models of vibration features to determine whether failures or defects exist. Most of the algorithms used for failure detection rely on these models to detect significant changes in a flight environment. In actual practice, however, most vehicle vibration monitoring systems are corrupted by high rates of false alarms and missed detections. This crucial roadblock makes their implementation in real vehicles (e.g., helicopter transmissions and aircraft engines) difficult, making their operation costly and unreliable. Research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center has determined that a major reason for the high rates of false alarms and missed detections is the numerous sources of statistical variations that are not taken into account in the modeling assumptions. In this paper, we address one such source of variations, namely, those caused during the design and manufacturing of rotating machinery components that make up aerospace systems. We present a novel way of modeling the vibration response by including design variations via probabilistic methods. Using such models, we develop a methodology to account for design and manufacturing variations, and explore the changes in the vibration response to determine its stochastic nature. We explore the potential of the methodology using a nonlinear cam-follower model, where the spring stiffness values are assumed to follow a normal distribution. The results demonstrate initial feasibility of the method, showing great promise in developing a general methodology for designing more accurate aerospace vehicle monitoring systems.

  12. Effects of Pharmacologic Intervention on Oxygenation, Lung Water and Protein Leak in the Pseudomonas ARDS Porcine Model. Subtitle: Effects of Pharmacologic and Immunologic Intervention on the Porcine Pseudomonas Model of Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Respiratory Distress Syndrome ( ARDS ) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Harvey J. Sugerman, M.D. AUTHORS: Patrick G. Mullen, M.B., F.R.C.S.I., Alastair C.J...Pseudomonas Model of Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome ( ARDS ) Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 92-29868 Almost twenty-five years after...explosive form of lung injury in critically ill patients, which they termed adult respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ), the mortality and

  13. Development of an Ex Vivo Porcine Lung Model for Studying Growth, Virulence, and Signaling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Muruli, Aneesha; Higgins, Steven; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Research into chronic infection by bacterial pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uses various in vitro and live host models. While these have increased our understanding of pathogen growth, virulence, and evolution, each model has certain limitations. In vitro models cannot recapitulate the complex spatial structure of host organs, while experiments on live hosts are limited in terms of sample size and infection duration for ethical reasons; live mammal models also require specialized facilities which are costly to run. To address this, we have developed an ex vivo pig lung (EVPL) model for quantifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, quorum sensing (QS), virulence factor production, and tissue damage in an environment that mimics a chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. In a first test of our model, we show that lasR mutants, which do not respond to 3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone (HSL)-mediated QS, exhibit reduced virulence factor production in EVPL. We also show that lasR mutants grow as well as or better than a corresponding wild-type strain in EVPL. lasR mutants frequently and repeatedly arise during chronic CF lung infection, but the evolutionary forces governing their appearance and spread are not clear. Our data are not consistent with the hypothesis that lasR mutants act as social “cheats” in the lung; rather, our results support the hypothesis that lasR mutants are more adapted to the lung environment. More generally, this model will facilitate improved studies of microbial disease, especially studies of how cells of the same and different species interact in polymicrobial infections in a spatially structured environment. PMID:24866798

  14. Hydrogeologic Modeling for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification of Geologic Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolian, M.; De Figueiredo, M.; Lisa, B.

    2011-12-01

    In December 2010, EPA finalized Subpart RR of the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Program, which requires facilities that conduct geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2) to report GHG data to EPA annually. The GHG Reporting Program requires reporting of GHGs and other relevant information from certain source categories in the United States, and information obtained through Subpart RR will inform Agency decisions under the Clean Air Act related to the use of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration for mitigating GHGs. This paper examines hydrogeologic modeling necessities and opportunities in the context of Subpart RR. Under Subpart RR, facilities that conduct GS by injecting CO2 for long-term containment in subsurface geologic formations are required to develop and implement an EPA-approved site-specific monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) plan; and report basic information on CO2 received for injection, annual monitoring activities and the amount of CO2 geologically sequestered using a mass balance approach. The major components of the MRV plan include: identification of potential surface leakage pathways for CO2 and the likelihood, magnitude, and timing, of surface leakage of CO2 through these pathways; delineation of the monitoring areas; strategy for detecting and quantifying any surface leakage of CO2; and the strategy for establishing the expected baselines for monitoring CO2 surface leakage. Hydrogeologic modeling is an integral aspect of the design of an MRV plan. In order to prepare an adequate monitoring program that addresses site specific risks over the full life of the project the MRV plan must reflect the full spatial extent of the free phase CO2 over time. Facilities delineate the maximum area that the CO2 plume is predicted to cover and how monitoring can be phased in over this area. The Maximum Monitoring Area (MMA) includes the extent of the free phase CO2 plume over the lifetime of the project plus a buffer zone of one

  15. Model-based condition monitoring for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taesic; Wang, Yebin; Fang, Huazhen; Sahinoglu, Zafer; Wada, Toshihiro; Hara, Satoshi; Qiao, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Condition monitoring for batteries involves tracking changes in physical parameters and operational states such as state of health (SOH) and state of charge (SOC), and is fundamentally important for building high-performance and safety-critical battery systems. A model-based condition monitoring strategy is developed in this paper for Lithium-ion batteries on the basis of an electrical circuit model incorporating hysteresis effect. It systematically integrates 1) a fast upper-triangular and diagonal recursive least squares algorithm for parameter identification of the battery model, 2) a smooth variable structure filter for the SOC estimation, and 3) a recursive total least squares algorithm for estimating the maximum capacity, which indicates the SOH. The proposed solution enjoys advantages including high accuracy, low computational cost, and simple implementation, and therefore is suitable for deployment and use in real-time embedded battery management systems (BMSs). Simulations and experiments validate effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  16. Optical Dynamic Analysis of Thrombus Inside a Centrifugal Blood Pump During Extracorporeal Mechanical Circulatory Support in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Sakota, Daisuke; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Endo, Shu; Tahara, Tomoki; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Oi, Keiji; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Arai, Hirokuni

    2017-03-20

    Complications due to pump thrombus remain the weak point of mechanical circulatory support (MCS), such as the use of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, leading to poor outcomes. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an effective imaging method using a hyperspectral (HS) camera, which comprises a spectrophotometer and a charge-coupled device camera to discriminate thrombus from whole blood. Animal experiments were conducted to analyze dynamic imaging of thrombus inside a prototype of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump using an HSI system. Six pigs were divided into a venous circulation group (n = 3) and an arterial circulation group (n = 3). Inflow and outflow cannulae were inserted into the jugular veins in the venous circulation group. The latter simulated an LVAD application. To create thrombogenic conditions, pump flow was maintained at 1 L/min without anticoagulation. An image of the bottom surface of the pump was captured by the HS camera every 4 nm over the wavelength range of 608-752 nm. Real-time dynamic images of the inside of the pump were displayed on the monitor. Appearance of an area displaying thrombus was detected within 24 h after the start of the circulation in every experiment. This imaging system also succeeded in determining the origins of pump thrombus: from inside the pump in two cases, and from outside in four cases. Two main possible sources of pump thrombus originating outside the pump were identified on autopsy: wedge thrombus around the inflow cannula; and string-like thrombus at the junction between the pump inlet and circuit tube. The results of this study from close observation of the changing appearance of pump thrombus may contribute to improvements in the safety of extracorporeal MCS.

  17. Fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual partial pressure of carbon dioxide during hemorrhagic shock in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiefeng; Ma, Linhao; Sun, Shijie; Lu, Xiaoye; Wu, Xiaobo; Li, Zilong; Tang, Wanchun

    2013-04-01

    To avoid aggressive fluid resuscitation during hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation is best guided by a specific measurement of tissue perfusion. We investigated whether fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 would reduce the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock. Ten male domestic pigs weighing between 34 and 37 kg were used. Forty-five percent of estimated blood volume was removed during an interval of 1 h. The animals were then randomized to receive fluid resuscitation based on either sublingual PCO2 or blood pressure (BP). In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when sublingual PCO2 exceeded 70 Torr and stopped when it decreased to 50 Torr. In the BP-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when mean aortic pressure decreased to 60 mmHg and stopped when it increased to 90 mmHg. First, Ringer's lactate solution (RLS) of 30 mL kg was administered; subsequently, the shed blood was transfused if sublingual PCO2 remained greater than 50 Torr in the sublingual PCO2-guided group or mean aortic pressure was less than 90 mmHg in the BP-guided group. All the animals were monitored for 4 h and observed for an additional 68 h. In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, fluid resuscitation was required in only 40% of the animals. In addition, a significantly lower volume of RLS (170 ± 239 mL, P = 0.005 vs. BP-guided group) was administered without the need for blood infusion in this group. However, in the BP-guided group, all the animals required a significantly larger volume of fluid (955 ± 381 mL), including both RLS and blood. There were no differences in postresuscitation tissue microcirculation, myocardial and neurologic function, and 72-h survival between groups. During hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 significantly reduced the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock.

  18. Permacol (porcine dermal collagen) and Alloderm (acellular cadaveric dermis) as a vascular patch repair for common carotid arteriotomy in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Tsai, John W; Ayubi, Farhan S; Rice, Robert D; Zhang, Zhou; Armstrong, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Occult injuries to arteries are common in trauma and evolution of their repair has been observed throughout military conflicts. Currently, autogenous vein and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are used as patch agents for arterial trauma. However, suitable vein is often lacking in multitrauma patients, and PTFE is prone to infection in the contaminated combat wound. The purpose of this study is to evaluate Permacol, porcine dermal collagen, and Alloderm, acellular cadaveric dermis, as suitable alternatives to PTFE with the potential benefit of being used in contaminated wounds. A New Zealand White rabbit common carotid arteriotomy model was used to compare Permacol (n = 12), Alloderm (n = 11), and PTFE (n = 13) for patch repair. Thrombin generation was examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for thrombin-antithrombin complex. Histological samples were taken to analyze vessel lumen area, vessel diameter, intimal thickness, and medial thickness. Pathological examinations were made to compare rates of intimal hyperplasia, aneurysm, patency, and thrombus formation. The Permacol group showed equivalent rates of thrombus, aneurysm, and patency compared with PTFE. Increased lumen area was seen in the Permacol group, 0.344 mm2 (p = 0.02) compared with the PTFE group, 0.204 mm2. Permacol also had decreased incidence of intimal hyperplasia compared with PTFE, 50.0% versus 92% (p < 0.05). Alloderm had increased rates of aneurysm formation, 63.6% (p = 0.004) compared with PTFE, 0.0%, and Permacol groups, 8.3%. Alloderm also had increased intimal thickness through the patch, 0.076 mm (p = 0.18), compared with PTFE, 0.026 mm, and Permacol groups, 0.024 mm. Vessel diameter through the patch showed the Alloderm group, 1.87 mm (p = 0.004), was significantly larger than both the Permacol, 1.41 mm, and PTFE groups, 1.28 mm. Furthermore, Alloderm showed leukocyte migration around the patch. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for thrombin-antithrombin complex was only elevated

  19. In vivo tracking and immunological properties of pulsed porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crisci, Elisa; Fraile, Lorenzo; Novellas, Rosa; Espada, Yvonne; Cabezón, Raquel; Martínez, Jorge; Cordoba, Lorena; Bárcena, Juan; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Montoya, María

    2015-02-01

    Cellular therapies using immune cells and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are being increasingly applied in clinical trials and vaccines. Their success partially depends on accurate delivery of cells to target organs or migration to lymph nodes. Delivery and subsequent migration of cells to regional lymph nodes is essential for effective stimulation of the immune system. Thus, the design of an optimal DC therapy would be improved by optimizing technologies for monitoring DC trafficking. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents a powerful tool for non-invasive imaging of DC migration in vivo. Domestic pigs share similarities with humans and represent an excellent animal model for immunological studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility using pigs as models for DC tracking in vivo. Porcine monocyte derived DC (MoDC) culture with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles was standardized on the basis of SPIO concentration and culture viability. Phenotype, cytokine production and mixed lymphocyte reaction assay confirmed that porcine SPIO-MoDC culture were similar to mock MoDCs and fully functional in vivo. Alike, similar patterns were obtained in human MoDCs. After subcutaneous inoculation in pigs, porcine SPIO-MoDC migration to regional lymph nodes was detected by MRI and confirmed by Perls staining of draining lymph nodes. Moreover, after one dose of virus-like particles-pulsed MoDCs specific local and systemic responses were confirmed using ELISPOT IFN-γ in pigs. In summary, the results in this work showed that after one single subcutaneous dose of pulsed MoDCs, pigs were able to elicit specific local and systemic immune responses. Additionally, the dynamic imaging of MRI-based DC tracking was shown using SPIO particles. This proof-of-principle study shows the potential of using pigs as a suitable animal model to test DC trafficking with the aim of improving cellular therapies.

  20. Using models for the optimization of hydrologic monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Hunt, Randall J.; Doherty, John E.; Reeves, Howard W.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologists are often asked what kind of monitoring network can most effectively support science-based water-resources management decisions. Currently (2011), hydrologic monitoring locations often are selected by addressing observation gaps in the existing network or non-science issues such as site access. A model might then be calibrated to available data and applied to a prediction of interest (regardless of how well-suited that model is for the prediction). However, modeling tools are available that can inform which locations and types of data provide the most 'bang for the buck' for a specified prediction. Put another way, the hydrologist can determine which observation data most reduce the model uncertainty around a specified prediction. An advantage of such an approach is the maximization of limited monitoring resources because it focuses on the difference in prediction uncertainty with or without additional collection of field data. Data worth can be calculated either through the addition of new data or subtraction of existing information by reducing monitoring efforts (Beven, 1993). The latter generally is not widely requested as there is explicit recognition that the worth calculated is fundamentally dependent on the prediction specified. If a water manager needs a new prediction, the benefits of reducing the scope of a monitoring effort, based on an old prediction, may be erased by the loss of information important for the new prediction. This fact sheet focuses on the worth or value of new data collection by quantifying the reduction in prediction uncertainty achieved be adding a monitoring observation. This calculation of worth can be performed for multiple potential locations (and types) of observations, which then can be ranked for their effectiveness for reducing uncertainty around the specified prediction. This is implemented using a Bayesian approach with the PREDUNC utility in the parameter estimation software suite PEST (Doherty, 2010). The

  1. Porcine Skin Visible Lesion Thresholds for Near-Infrared Lasers Including Modeling at Two Pulse Durations and Spot Sizes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    2 Experimental setup tor thermal dynamics imaging experiment. Reading of skin exposure sites was performed acutely at one hour, and 24-h...Phoenix model, Indigo Systems, Santa Barbara, California). To acquire reference IR image frames prior to laser exposure, the IR camera was operating in...free-running mode at a frame rate of 100 Hz and image size of 256 X 256 pixels. The IR camera lens was extended to provide spatial resolution

  2. Development of a Porcine Delayed Wound-Healing Model and Its Use in Testing a Novel Cell-Based Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hadad, Ivan; Johnstone, Brian H.; Brabham, Jeffrey G.; Blanton, Matthew W.; Rogers, Pamela I.; Fellers, Cory; Solomon, James L.; Merfeld-Clauss, Stephanie; DesRosiers, Colleen M.; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Coleman, John J.; March, Keith L.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: A delayed full-thickness wound-healing model was developed and used for examining the capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), either alone or in platelet-rich fibrin gels, to promote healing. Methods and Materials: Four pigs received electron beam radiation to the dorsal skin surface. Five weeks after radiation, subcutaneous fat was harvested from nonirradiated areas and processed to yield ASCs. Two weeks later, 28 to 30 full-thickness 1.5-cm{sup 2} wounds were made in irradiated and nonirradiated skin. Wounds were treated with either saline solution, ASCs in saline solution, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) fibrin gel, ASCs in PRP, or non-autologous green fluorescence protein-labeled ASCs. Results: The single radiation dose produced a significant loss of dermal microvasculature density (75%) by 7 weeks. There was a significant difference in the rate of healing between irradiated and nonirradiated skin treated with saline solution. The ASCs in PRP-treated wounds exhibited a significant 11.2% improvement in wound healing compared with saline solution. Enhancement was dependent on the combination of ASCs and PRP, because neither ASCs nor PRP alone had an effect. Conclusions: We have created a model that simulates the clinically relevant late radiation effects of delayed wound healing. Using this model, we showed that a combination of ASCs and PRP improves the healing rates of perfusion-depleted tissues, possibly through enhancing local levels of growth factors.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of 1-methyl-L-tryptophan after single and repeated subcutaneous application in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Wirthgen, Elisa; Kanitz, Ellen; Tuchscherer, Margret; Tuchscherer, Armin; Domanska, Grazyna; Weitschies, Werner; Seidlitz, Anne; Scheuch, Eberhard; Otten, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Increased activity of the tryptophan-metabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is associated with immunological and neurological disorders, and inhibition of its enzyme activity could be a therapeutic approach for treatment of these disorders. The aim of the present study was to establish a large animal model to study the accumulation of the potential IDO inhibitor 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT) in blood and different organs of domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domestica). Because 1-MT has not been previously evaluated in pigs, the pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous 1-MT application was investigated. Based on this kinetic study, a profile for repeated 1-MT applications over a period of five days was simulated and tested. The results show that a single administration of 1-MT increases its concentrations in blood, with the maximum concentration being obtained at 12 h. Repeated daily injections of 1‑MT generated increasing plasma concentrations followed by a steady-state after two days. Twelve hours after the final application, accumulation of 1-MT was observed in the brain and other organs, with a substantial variability among various tissues. The concentrations of 1-MT measured in plasma and tissues were similar to, or even higher, than those of tryptophan. Our data indicate that repeated subcutaneous injections of 1-MT provide a suitable model for accumulation of 1-MT in plasma and tissues of domestic pigs. These findings provide a basis for further research on the immunoregulatory functions of IDO in a large animal model. PMID:26725587

  4. Monitoring Water Resources Status with Distributed Snowmelt Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artan, G.; Dwyer, J.; Verdin, J.; Budde, M.

    2005-12-01

    A large amount of the Afghanistan water supply comes from reservoirs fed by snowmelt runoff, therefore, monitoring the status of snow cover in key areas during the winter and spring is very import to the water resources and disaster management entities of the country. In this study we investigated the utility of monitoring the status of the snow over Afghanistan by employing a spatially distributed snow accumulation and ablation model forced solely with remotely sensed data, weather model assimilation fields, and globally available near-real time meteorological data. The snowmelt model we used was a spatially distributed version of the Utah Energy Balance (UEB) model. A fundamental input variable that went into the model was a dynamic MODIS-based albedo. The MODIS-based snow albedo we used was an integrated 8-days running average value calculated for areas that were established to be cloud-free by the MODIS cloud mask and snow covered by the MODIS snow algorithm (Klein and Stroeve, 2002). The modeled spatial distribution of snow water equivalent provided a good early indication of the relative magnitude of the water available in spring of 2005 for irrigation. The modeled snow water maps were also useful in mapping of basins that were likely to experience a higher risk for floods after the spring snow melts.

  5. Determining the effect of an oak bark formulation on methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus and wound healing in porcine wound models.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen C; Mertz, Patricia M

    2008-10-01

    Control of wound infections, especially those associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is necessary for the wound healing process. Selection of topical agents should be based not only on their ability to eliminate pathogenic bacteria, but also on whether they may be detrimental to tissue repair. Two randomized, controlled in vivo studies using different porcine models were conducted to evaluate the effect of a topical oak bark ointment (treatment) on 1) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in partial-thickness wounds, and 2) healing of second-degree burn wounds. Silver sulfadiazine, oak bark ointment vehicle control (polyethylene glycol), and no treatment (untreated wounds) were used as controls in both studies. In the first study, 108 partial-thickness wounds in three animals were inoculated with a methicillin-resistant S. aureus suspension (average 6.96+/-0.4 log CFU/mL) and covered for 24 hours with a polyurethane film. After polyurethane film removal, treatments were applied twice daily and nine wounds per day (three per animal) from each treatment group were cultured after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization was lowest in the active treatment group at all three assessment times and after 72 hours ranged from (5.01+/-1.1 CFU/mL) in the treatment to (6.20+/-0.8 CFU/mL) in the vehicle control treated wounds. In the second study, treatments were applied twice daily to second-degree burn wounds (n = 720) on eight animals. Daily epithelialization assessment (n = five wounds) was performed on day 7 through 10 after wounding. At every assessment time, the proportion of wounds healed was higher in the treatment than in the control treatment groups - days 8, 9, and 10 (active versus vehicle and untreated), P <0.01; days 9 and 10 (vehicle versus untreated), P <0.001. The oak bark formulation studied reduces methicillin-resistant S aureus contamination and facilitates healing in vivo. Research to ascertain the

  6. Reduced platelet concentration does not harm PRP effectiveness for ACL repair in a porcine in vivo model

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, AN; Vavken, P; Fleming, BC; Harrison, SL; Murray, MM

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced primary repair of the ACL using a collagen scaffold loaded with platelets has been shown to improve the functional healing of suture repair in animal models. In this study, our objectives were to determine if lowering the platelet concentration would reduce the structural properties of the repaired ACL and increase postoperative knee laxity. Eight Yucatan minipigs underwent bilateral suture repair. In one knee, the repair was augmented with a collagen scaffold saturated with platelet-rich plasma containing five times the systemic baseline of platelets (5X) while the contralateral knee had a collagen scaffold saturated with platelet-rich plasma containing three times the systemic baseline of platelets (3X). After thirteen weeks of healing, knee joint laxity and the structural properties of the ACL were measured. The 3X platelet concentration resulted in a 24.1% decrease in cellular density of the repair tissue (p<0.05), but did not significantly decrease the structural properties [3Xvs 5X: 314 vs 298 N (p=0.596) and 65 vs 64 N/mm (p=0.532) for the yield load and linear stiffness, respectively]. The 3x platelet concentration also did not significantly change the mean anteroposterior knee laxity at 30° and 90° of flexion [5X vs. 3X: 3.5 vs. 5.1 mm (p=0.140), and 6.1 vs. 6.3 mm (p=0.764)] but did result in a lower AP laxity at 60° [5X vs. 3X: 8.6 vs. 7.3 mm (p=0.012)]. The decrease in platelet concentration from 5X to 3X to enhance suture repair of the ACL did not significantly harm the mechanical outcomes in this animal model. PMID:21337615

  7. The impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on normal metabolism in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Andreas; Ekelund, Mikael; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Ståhlman, Marcus; Pierzynowski, Stefan; Gomez, Maria F.; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Groop, Leif; Hedenbro, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background A growing body of literature on Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) has generated inconclusive results on the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects on weight loss and glycaemia, partially due to the problems of designing clinical studies with the appropriate controls. Moreover, RYGB is only performed in obese individuals, in whom metabolism is perturbed and not completely understood. Methods In an attempt to isolate the effects of RYGB and its effects on normal metabolism, we investigated the effect of RYGB in lean pigs, using sham-operated pair-fed pigs as controls. Two weeks post-surgery, pigs were subjected to an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and circulating metabolites, hormones and lipids measured. Bile acid composition was profiled after extraction from blood, faeces and the gallbladder. Results A similar weight development in both groups of pigs validated our experimental model. Despite similar changes in fasting insulin, RYGB-pigs had lower fasting glucose levels. During an IVGTT RYGB-pigs had higher insulin and lower glucose levels. VLDL and IDL were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs. RYGB-pigs had increased levels of most amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids, but these were more efficiently suppressed by glucose. Levels of bile acids in the gallbladder were higher, whereas plasma and faecal bile acid levels were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs. Conclusion In a lean model RYGB caused lower plasma lipid and bile acid levels, which were compensated for by increased plasma amino acids, suggesting a switch from lipid to protein metabolism during fasting in the immediate postoperative period. PMID:28257455

  8. Real Time Fire Reconnaissance Satellite Monitoring System Failure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino Prieto, Omar Ariosto; Colmenares Guillen, Luis Enrique

    2013-09-01

    In this paper the Real Time Fire Reconnaissance Satellite Monitoring System is presented. This architecture is a legacy of the Detection System for Real-Time Physical Variables which is undergoing a patent process in Mexico. The methodologies for this design are the Structured Analysis for Real Time (SA- RT) [8], and the software is carried out by LACATRE (Langage d'aide à la Conception d'Application multitâche Temps Réel) [9,10] Real Time formal language. The system failures model is analyzed and the proposal is based on the formal language for the design of critical systems and Risk Assessment; AltaRica. This formal architecture uses satellites as input sensors and it was adapted from the original model which is a design pattern for physical variation detection in Real Time. The original design, whose task is to monitor events such as natural disasters and health related applications, or actual sickness monitoring and prevention, as the Real Time Diabetes Monitoring System, among others. Some related work has been presented on the Mexican Space Agency (AEM) Creation and Consultation Forums (2010-2011), and throughout the International Mexican Aerospace Science and Technology Society (SOMECYTA) international congress held in San Luis Potosí, México (2012). This Architecture will allow a Real Time Fire Satellite Monitoring, which will reduce the damage and danger caused by fires which consumes the forests and tropical forests of Mexico. This new proposal, permits having a new system that impacts on disaster prevention, by combining national and international technologies and cooperation for the benefit of humankind.

  9. Mapping, Monitoring and Modeling Submersed Aquatic Vegetation Species and Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartis, Brett Michael

    Aquatic macrophyte communities are critically important habitat species in aquatic systems worldwide. None are more important than those found beneath the water's surface, commonly referred to as submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV). Although vital to such systems, many native submersed plants have shown near irreversible declines in recent decades as water quality impairment, habitat destruction, and encroachment by invasive species have increased. In the past, aquatic plant science has emphasized the restoration and protection of native species and the management of invasive species. Comparatively little emphasis has been directed toward adequately mapping and monitoring these resources to track their viability over time. Modeling the potential intrusion of certain invasive plant species has also been given little attention, likely because aquatic systems in general can be difficult to assess. In recent years, scientists and resource managers alike have begun paying more attention to mapping SAV communities and to address the spread of invasive species across various regions. This research attempts to provide new, cutting-edge techniques to improve SAV mapping and monitoring efforts in coastal regions, at both community and individual species levels, while also providing insights about the establishment potential of Hydrilla verticillata, a noxious, highly invasive submersed plant. Technological advances in satellite remote sensing, interpolation and spatial analysis in geographic information systems, and state-of-the-art climate envelope modeling techniques were used to further assess the dynamic nature of SAV on various scales. This work contributes to the growing science of mapping, monitoring, and modeling of SAV

  10. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  11. Regional evidence of modulation of cardiac adiponectin level in dilated cardiomyopathy: pilot study in a porcine animal model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of systemic and myocardial adiponectin (ADN) in dilated cardiomyopathy is still debated. We tested the regulation of both systemic and myocardial ADN and the relationship with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in a swine model of non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Methods and results Cardiac tissue was collected from seven instrumented adult male minipigs by pacing the left ventricular (LV) free wall (180 beats/min, 3 weeks), both from pacing (PS) and opposite sites (OS), and from five controls. Circulating ADN levels were inversely related to global and regional cardiac function. Myocardial ADN in PS was down-regulated compared to control (p < 0.05), yet ADN receptor 1 was significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05). No modifications of AMPK were observed in either region of the failing heart. Similarly, myocardial mRNA levels of PPARγ, PPARα, TNFα, iNOS were unchanged compared to controls. Conclusions Paradoxically, circulating ADN did not show any cardioprotective effect, confirming its role as negative prognostic biomarker of heart failure. Myocardial ADN was reduced in PS compared to control in an AMPK-independent fashion, suggesting the occurrence of novel mechanisms by which reduced cardiac ADN levels may regionally mediate the decline of cardiac function. PMID:23164042

  12. Porcine salivary analysis by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis in 3 models of acute stress: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Rubio, María; Cerón, José J.; de Torre, Carlos; Escribano, Damián; Gutiérrez, Ana M.; Tecles, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study changes in the salivary proteome of healthy pigs in stressful situations to identify any potential new salivary biomarker of stress. Three groups of animals were subjected to 3 stress models: snaring restraint followed by simulated sampling of vena cava blood; brief transport by road; and restriction of movement in a digestibility cage. Saliva was obtained from each animal before and 15 and 30 min after the induction of stress. The samples from the animals that showed the greatest increase in salivary cortisol concentration were pooled and run on 2-dimensional gels. Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250 was used for spot detection and mass spectrometry for spot identification. Statistical analyses showed that 2 proteins had significant differences in expression before and after the induction of stress. These proteins were identified as odorant-binding protein and fragments of albumin. Further studies will be necessary to confirm the value of using these proteins as salivary biomarkers of stress in pigs. PMID:24688174

  13. Self-calibrating models for dynamic monitoring and diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    1994-01-01

    The present goal in qualitative reasoning is to develop methods for automatically building qualitative and semiquantitative models of dynamic systems and to use them for monitoring and fault diagnosis. The qualitative approach to modeling provides a guarantee of coverage while our semiquantitative methods support convergence toward a numerical model as observations are accumulated. We have developed and applied methods for automatic creation of qualitative models, developed two methods for obtaining tractable results on problems that were previously intractable for qualitative simulation, and developed more powerful methods for learning semiquantitative models from observations and deriving semiquantitative predictions from them. With these advances, qualitative reasoning comes significantly closer to realizing its aims as a practical engineering method.

  14. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  15. Treatment with the C5a receptor antagonist ADC-1004 reduces myocardial infarction in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils, stimulated by the activated complement factor C5a, have been implicated in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. ADC-1004 is a competitive C5a receptor antagonist that has been shown to inhibit complement related neutrophil activation. ADC-1004 shields the neutrophils from C5a activation before they enter the reperfused area, which could be a mechanistic advantage compared to previous C5a directed reperfusion therapies. We investigated if treatment with ADC-1004, according to a clinically applicable protocol, would reduce infarct size and microvascular obstruction in a large animal myocardial infarct model. Methods In anesthetized pigs (42-53 kg), a percutaneous coronary intervention balloon was inflated in the left anterior descending artery for 40 minutes, followed by 4 hours of reperfusion. Twenty minutes after balloon inflation the pigs were randomized to an intravenous bolus administration of ADC-1004 (175 mg, n = 8) or saline (9 mg/ml, n = 8). Area at risk (AAR) was evaluated by ex vivo SPECT. Infarct size and microvascular obstruction were evaluated by ex vivo MRI. The observers were blinded to the treatment at randomization and analysis. Results ADC-1004 treatment reduced infarct size by 21% (ADC-1004: 58.3 ± 3.4 vs control: 74.1 ± 2.9%AAR, p = 0.007). Microvascular obstruction was similar between the groups (ADC-1004: 2.2 ± 1.2 vs control: 5.3 ± 2.5%AAR, p = 0.23). The mean plasma concentration of ADC-1004 was 83 ± 8 nM at sacrifice. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood-gas data. Conclusions ADC-1004 treatment reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and represents a novel treatment strategy of myocardial infarct with potential clinical applicability. PMID:20875134

  16. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  18. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  19. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  1. Myocardial function after polarizing versus depolarizing cardiac arrest with blood cardioplegia in a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass†

    PubMed Central

    Aass, Terje; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Dahle, Geir Olav; Chambers, David J.; Markou, Thomais; Eliassen, Finn; Urban, Malte; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Potassium-based depolarizing St Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution No 2 administered as intermittent, oxygenated blood is considered as a gold standard for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. However, the alternative concept of polarizing arrest may have beneficial protective effects. We hypothesize that polarized arrest with esmolol/adenosine/magnesium (St Thomas' Hospital Polarizing cardioplegic solution) in cold, intermittent oxygenated blood offers comparable myocardial protection in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODS Twenty anaesthetized young pigs, 42 ± 2 (standard deviation) kg on standardized tepid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were randomized (10 per group) to depolarizing or polarizing cardiac arrest for 60 min with cardioplegia administered in the aortic root every 20 min as freshly mixed cold, intermittent, oxygenated blood. Global and local baseline and postoperative cardiac function 60, 120 and 180 min after myocardial reperfusion was evaluated with pressure–conductance catheter and strain by Tissue Doppler Imaging. Regional tissue blood flow, cleaved caspase-3 activity, GRK2 phosphorylation and mitochondrial function and ultrastructure were evaluated in myocardial tissue samples. RESULTS Left ventricular function and general haemodynamics did not differ between groups before CPB. Cardiac asystole was obtained and maintained during aortic cross-clamping. Compared with baseline, heart rate was increased and left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic pressures decreased in both groups after weaning. Cardiac index, systolic pressure and radial peak systolic strain did not differ between groups. Contractility, evaluated as dP/dtmax, gradually increased from 120 to 180 min after declamping in animals with polarizing cardioplegia and was significantly higher, 1871 ± 160 (standard error) mmHg/s, compared with standard potassium-based cardioplegic arrest, 1351 ± 70 mmHg/s, after 180 min of reperfusion (P = 0

  2. Spatio-temporal statistical models for river monitoring networks.

    PubMed

    Clement, L; Thas, O; Vanrolleghem, P A; Ottoy, J P

    2006-01-01

    When introducing new wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), investors and policy makers often want to know if there indeed is a beneficial effect of the installation of a WWTP on the river water quality. Such an effect can be established in time as well as in space. Since both temporal and spatial components affect the output of a monitoring network, their dependence structure has to be modelled. River water quality data typically come from a river monitoring network for which the spatial dependence structure is unidirectional. Thus the traditional spatio-temporal models are not appropriate, as they cannot take advantage of this directional information. In this paper, a state-space model is presented in which the spatial dependence of the state variable is represented by a directed acyclic graph, and the temporal dependence by a first-order autoregressive process. The state-space model is extended with a linear model for the mean to estimate the effect of the activation of a WWTP on the dissolved oxygen concentration downstream.

  3. Hierarchical Bayesian spatial models for multispecies conservation planning and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Carlos; Johnson, Devin S; Dunk, Jeffrey R; Zielinski, William J

    2010-12-01

    Biologists who develop and apply habitat models are often familiar with the statistical challenges posed by their data's spatial structure but are unsure of whether the use of complex spatial models will increase the utility of model results in planning. We compared the relative performance of nonspatial and hierarchical Bayesian spatial models for three vertebrate and invertebrate taxa of conservation concern (Church's sideband snails [Monadenia churchi], red tree voles [Arborimus longicaudus], and Pacific fishers [Martes pennanti pacifica]) that provide examples of a range of distributional extents and dispersal abilities. We used presence-absence data derived from regional monitoring programs to develop models with both landscape and site-level environmental covariates. We used Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms and a conditional autoregressive or intrinsic conditional autoregressive model framework to fit spatial models. The fit of Bayesian spatial models was between 35 and 55% better than the fit of nonspatial analogue models. Bayesian spatial models outperformed analogous models developed with maximum entropy (Maxent) methods. Although the best spatial and nonspatial models included similar environmental variables, spatial models provided estimates of residual spatial effects that suggested how ecological processes might structure distribution patterns. Spatial models built from presence-absence data improved fit most for localized endemic species with ranges constrained by poorly known biogeographic factors and for widely distributed species suspected to be strongly affected by unmeasured environmental variables or population processes. By treating spatial effects as a variable of interest rather than a nuisance, hierarchical Bayesian spatial models, especially when they are based on a common broad-scale spatial lattice (here the national Forest Inventory and Analysis grid of 24 km(2) hexagons), can increase the relevance of habitat models to multispecies

  4. Monitoring Network Design for Discriminating and Reducing Models in Bayesian Model Averaging Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, F. T.; Pham, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    Bayesian model averaging (BMA) is often adopted to quantify model prediction and uncertainty using multiple models generated from various sources of uncertainty. Due to the lack of data and knowledge, the number of models with non-dominant posterior model probabilities can be overwhelming. Conducting prediction and uncertainty analysis using a great deal of computationally intensive simulation models (e.g., groundwater models) can become intractable under the BMA framework. Moreover, prediction results using the BMA can be useless when prediction uncertainty is very high. This study implements a monitoring network design under the BMA framework to discriminate groundwater models and in turn reduce the number of models. The posterior model probabilities are re-evaluated by using BMA prediction as 'future observation data' and historical data. Given a design criterion of posterior model probability (e.g. 85%), the monitoring network design aims to find the optimal number and location of monitoring wells at existing wells for continuous observation. If using existing wells cannot achieve the design criterion, then exploration of new monitoring well location is necessary. Once the design criterion is met, other models will be discriminated from the best model. Between-model variance will be significantly reduced. We use the monitoring network design to discriminate 18 complex groundwater models that include the '1,200-foot', '1,500-foot', and '1,700-foot' sands in the Baton Rouge area, southeastern Louisiana. The sources of uncertainty that creates the groundwater models are from hydrostratigraphic architecture, fault permeability architecture, and boundary conditions. To speed up model calibration, we develop a parallel version of CMA-ES and implement it to SuperMike II cluster at Louisiana State University. Results show that in the model calibration period from 1975 to 2010, eleven models have posterior model probabilities ranging from 3.5% to 17.4%. The purpose of

  5. Modeling, Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Spacecraft Air Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, W. Fred; Skliar, Mikhail; Narayan, Anand; Morgenthaler, George W.; Smith, Gerald J.

    1998-01-01

    Control of air contaminants is a crucial factor in the safety considerations of crewed space flight. Indoor air quality needs to be closely monitored during long range missions such as a Mars mission, and also on large complex space structures such as the International Space Station. This work mainly pertains to the detection and simulation of air contaminants in the space station, though much of the work is easily extended to buildings, and issues of ventilation systems. Here we propose a method with which to track the presence of contaminants using an accurate physical model, and also develop a robust procedure that would raise alarms when certain tolerance levels are exceeded. A part of this research concerns the modeling of air flow inside a spacecraft, and the consequent dispersal pattern of contaminants. Our objective is to also monitor the contaminants on-line, so we develop a state estimation procedure that makes use of the measurements from a sensor system and determines an optimal estimate of the contamination in the system as a function of time and space. The real-time optimal estimates in turn are used to detect faults in the system and also offer diagnoses as to their sources. This work is concerned with the monitoring of air contaminants aboard future generation spacecraft and seeks to satisfy NASA's requirements as outlined in their Strategic Plan document (Technology Development Requirements, 1996).

  6. Geophysical Monitoring for Validation of Transient Permafrost Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, C.; Hilbich, C.; Marmy, A.; Scherler, M.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost is a widespread phenomenon at high latitudes and high altitudes and describes the permanently frozen state of the subsurface in lithospheric material. In the context of climate change, both, new monitoring and modelling techniques are required to observe and predict potential permafrost changes, e.g. the warming and degradation which may lead to the liberation of carbon (Arctic) and the destabilisation of permafrost slopes (mountains). Mountain permafrost occurrences in the European Alps are characterised by temperatures only a few degrees below zero and are therefore particularly sensitive to projected climate changes in the 21st century. Traditional permafrost observation techniques are mainly based on thermal monitoring in vertical and horizontal dimension, but they provide only weak indications of physical properties such as ice or liquid water content. Geophysical techniques can be used to characterise permafrost occurrences and to monitor their changes as the physical properties of frozen and unfrozen ground measured by geophysical techniques are markedly different. In recent years, electromagnetic, seismic but especially electrical methods have been used to continuously monitor permafrost occurrences and to detect long-term changes within the active layer and regarding the ice content within the permafrost layer. On the other hand, coupled transient thermal/hydraulic models are used to predict the evolution of permafrost occurrences under different climate change scenarios. These models rely on suitable validation data for a certain observation period, which is usually restricted to data sets of ground temperature and active layer depth. Very important initialisation and validation data for permafrost models are, however, ground ice content and unfrozen water content in the active layer. In this contribution we will present a geophysical monitoring application to estimate ice and water content and their evolution in time at a permafrost station in

  7. Advanced Performance Modeling with Combined Passive and Active Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dovrolis, Constantine; Sim, Alex

    2015-04-15

    To improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling of scientific data transfers on high-speed networks, the "Advanced Performance Modeling with combined passive and active monitoring" (APM) project investigates and models a general-purpose, reusable and expandable network performance estimation framework. The predictive estimation model and the framework will be helpful in optimizing the performance and utilization of networks as well as sharing resources with predictable performance for scientific collaborations, especially in data intensive applications. Our prediction model utilizes historical network performance information from various network activity logs as well as live streaming measurements from network peering devices. Historical network performance information is used without putting extra load on the resources by active measurement collection. Performance measurements collected by active probing is used judiciously for improving the accuracy of predictions.

  8. Monitoring Mediterranean marine pollution using remote sensing and hydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Loggia, Goffredo; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; Drago, Aldo; Maltese, Antonino

    2011-11-01

    Human activities contaminate both coastal areas and open seas, even though impacts are different in terms of pollutants, ecosystems and recovery time. In particular, Mediterranean offshore pollution is mainly related to maritime transport of oil, accounting for 25% of the global maritime traffic and, during the last 25 years, for nearly 7% of the world oil accidents, thus causing serious biological impacts on both open sea and coastal zone habitats. This paper provides a general review of maritime pollution monitoring using integrated approaches of remote sensing and hydrodynamic modeling; focusing on the main results of the MAPRES (Marine pollution monitoring and detection by aerial surveillance and satellite images) research project on the synergistic use of remote sensing, forecasting, cleanup measures and environmental consequences. The paper also investigates techniques of oil spill detection using SAR images, presenting the first results of "Monitoring of marine pollution due to oil slick", a COSMO-SkyMed funded research project where X-band SAR constellation images provided by the Italian Space Agency are used. Finally, the prospect of using real time observations of marine surface conditions is presented through CALYPSO project (CALYPSO-HF Radar Monitoring System and Response against Marine Oil Spills in the Malta Channel), partly financed by the EU under the Operational Programme Italia-Malta 2007-2013. The project concerns the setting up of a permanent and fully operational HF radar observing system, capable of recording surface currents (in real-time with hourly updates) in the stretch of sea between Malta and Sicily. A combined use of collected data and numerical models, aims to optimize intervention and response in the case of marine oil spills.

  9. Conceptual models as hypotheses in monitoring urban landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lookingbill, Todd R; Gardner, Robert H; Townsend, Philip A; Carter, Shawn L

    2007-08-01

    Many problems and challenges of ecosystem management currently are driven by the rapid pace and spatial extent of landscape change. Parks and reserves within areas of high human population density are especially challenged to meet the recreational needs of local populations and to preserve valued environmental resources. The complex problem of managing multiple objectives and multiple resources requires an enormous quantity of information, and conceptual models have been proposed as tools for organizing and interpreting this information. Academics generally prefer a bottom-up approach to model construction that emphasizes ecologic theory and process, whereas managers often use a top-down approach that takes advantage of existing information to address more pragmatic objectives. The authors propose a formal process for developing, applying, and testing conceptual models to be used in landscape monitoring that reconciles these seemingly opposing perspectives. The four-step process embraces the role of hypothesis testing in the development of models and evaluation of their utility. An example application of the process to a network of national parks in and around Washington, DC illustrates the ability of the approach to systematically identify monitoring data that would both advance ecologic theory and inform management decisions.

  10. THE IMPORTANCE OF CONCURRENT MONITORING AND MODELING FOR UNDERSTANDING MERCURY EXPOSURE IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the cycling processes governing mercury exposure in the environment requires sufficient process-based modeling and monitoring data. Monitoring provides ambient concentration data for specific sample times and locations. Modeling provides a tool for investigating the...

  11. Meteor velocity distribution and an optimum monitoring mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, N. G.; Salimov, O. N.

    1987-01-01

    At present, there are a great number of radio meteor, ionosphere and rocket observation data for the altitude range of 80 to 100 km which indicate the existence of large scale circulation systems in the mesopause to low thermosphere range which change regularly with season and latitude. But the existing observation network and observation programs are not optimal for revealing the main factors forming the circulation mode at these altitudes. A generalized optimum monitoring mathematical model is offered for consideration. The model input data are distribution density, response function, individual measurement root mean square uncertainty and detection effectiveness function. The model makes it possible to obtain the observation distribution density, the minimal possible dispersion and optimized system effectiveness.

  12. An in-depth comparison of the porcine, murine and human inflammasomes; lessons from the porcine genome and transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that swine are a scientifically acceptable intermediate species between rodents and humans to model immune function relevant to humans. The swine genome has recently been sequenced and several preliminary structural and functional analysis of the porcine immunome have been...

  13. Monitoring and modeling agricultural drought for famine early warning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, J. P.; Funk, C.; Budde, M. E.; Lietzow, R.; Senay, G. B.; Smith, R.; Pedreros, D.; Rowland, J.; Artan, G. A.; Husak, G. J.; Michaelsen, J.; Adoum, A.; Galu, G.; Magadzire, T.; Rodriguez, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) makes quantitative estimates of food insecure populations, and identifies the places and periods during which action must be taken to assist them. Subsistence agriculture and pastoralism are the predominant livelihood systems being monitored, and they are especially drought-sensitive. At the same time, conventional climate observation networks in developing countries are often sparse and late in reporting. Consequently, remote sensing has played a significant role since FEWS NET began in 1985. Initially there was heavy reliance on vegetation index imagery from AVHRR to identify anomalies in landscape greenness indicative of drought. In the latter part of the 1990s, satellite rainfall estimates added a second, independent basis for identification of drought. They are used to force crop water balance models for the principal rainfed staple crops in twenty FEWS NET countries. Such models reveal seasonal moisture deficits associated with yield reduction on a spatially continuous basis. In 2002, irrigated crops in southwest Asia became a concern, and prompted the implementation of a gridded energy balance model to simulate the seasonal mountain snow pack, the main source of irrigation water. MODIS land surface temperature data are also applied in these areas to directly estimate actual seasonal evapotranspiration on the irrigated lands. The approach reveals situations of reduced irrigation water supply and crop production due to drought. The availability of MODIS data after 2000 also brought renewed interest in vegetation index imagery. MODIS NDVI data have proven to be of high quality, thanks to significant spectral and spatial resolution improvements over AVHRR. They are vital to producing rapid harvest assessments for drought-impacted countries in Africa and Asia. The global food crisis that emerged in 2008 has led to expansion of FEWS NET monitoring to over 50 additional countries. Unlike previous practice, these

  14. Phenotypic map of porcine retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Crespo, Patricia; del Río, Patricia; Blindert, Marcel; Ueffing, Marius; Hauck, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Porcine retina is an excellent model for studying diverse retinal processes and diseases. The morphologies of porcine retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) have, however, not yet been described comprehensively. The aim of the present study was to créate a classification of the RGCs using the 1, 1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) tracing method. Methods About 170 RGCs were retrogradely labeled by injecting DiI into the optic nerve of postmortem eyes and statistically analyzed by two different clustering methods: Ward’s algorithm and the K-means clustering. Major axis length of the soma, soma area size, and dendritic field area size were selected as main parameters for cluster classification. Results RGC distribution in clusters was achieved according to their morphological parameters. It was feasible to combine both statistical methods, thereby obtaining a robust clustering distribution. Morphological analysis resulted in a classification of RGCs in three groups according to the soma size and dendritic field: A (large somas and large dendritic fields), B (medium to large somas and medium to large dendritic fields), C (medium to small somas and medium to small dendritic fields). Within groups, fine clustering defined several subgroups according to dendritic arborization and level of stratification. Additionally, cells stratifying in two different levels of the inner plexiform layer were observed within the clusters. Conclusions This comprehensive study of RGC morphologies in the porcine retina provides fundamental knowledge about RGC cell types and provides a basis for functional studies toward selective RGC cell degeneration in retinal disorders. PMID:23687427

  15. Transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus 1 to and from vaccinated pigs in a one-to-one model.

    PubMed

    Pileri, E; Gibert, E; Martín-Valls, G E; Nofrarias, M; López-Soria, S; Martín, M; Díaz, I; Darwich, L; Mateu, E

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined transmission by contact of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) 1 in a one-to-one model to vaccinated and unvaccinated pigs and from vaccinated infected pigs to other vaccinated pigs. The experiment started by randomly assigning weaned pigs to groups V (n=24) and U (n=26). V pigs were vaccinated with a commercial live attenuated PRRSV vaccine and the U animals were kept as unvaccinated controls. Twenty-eight days later, 6U pigs were separated and allocated in individual boxes. The remaining 20U pigs were intranasally inoculated with PRRSV isolate 3267 (from now on designated as seeder (S) pigs) and 48h later were distributed in boxes where they were commingled with either V or U pigs in 1:1 groups (first contact phase), resulting in 6S:U and 14S:V pairs. As soon as a V pig was detected to be viremic because of contact with a S, the infected V (from now on designated as Vinf) was transferred (<24h after detection) to a new pen where it was comingled with a new V pig (designated as V2) in a second contact phase. For the first contact phase, pigs were maintained 21days at maximum and for the second contact phase the maximum exposure period was 14days. Two V pigs tested positive for the vaccine virus (>99.5% similarity) when they were relocated with the corresponding V2 pigs and they were removed; thus, only 12Vinf were finally considered. All V pigs (12/12) exposed to S animals became infected although the first detection of viremia occurred at 13.6±3.6days, one week later than in U (p<0.05). Also, duration of viremia was shorter for Vinf compared to U, (5.5±4.3days versus 12.5±2.7days). The Vinf group showed remarkable individual variability: eight animals had a viremic period of 5 or less days (3.0±1.4) while the remaining four had a longer viremic period of more than one week (10.8±2.9). This situation was not observed in U. In the second contact phase, transmission from Vinf to V2 pigs occurred in 7/8 cases

  16. Peculiarity of Porcine Amniotic Membrane and Its Derived Cells: A Contribution to the Study of Cell Therapy from a Large Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Corradetti, Bruna; Bertani, Sabrina; Notarstefano, Valentina; Perrini, Claudia; Marini, Maria Giovanna; Arrighi, Silvana; Bosi, Giampaolo; Belloli, Angelo; Pravettoni, Davide; Locatelli, Valentina; Cremonesi, Fausto; Bizzaro, Davide

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to provide, for the first time, a protocol for isolation and characterization of stem cells from porcine amniotic membrane in view of their potential uses in regenerative medicine. From three samples of allanto-amnion recovered at delivery, the amniotic membrane was stripped from overlying allantois and digested with trypsin and collagenase to isolate epithelial (amniotic epithelial cells [AECs]) and mesenchymal cells, respectively. Proliferation, differentiation, and characterization studies by molecular biology and flow cytometry were performed. Histological examination revealed very few mesenchymal cells in the stromal layer, and a cellular yield of AECs of 10 × 10(6)/gram of digested tissue was achieved. AECs readily attached to plastic culture dishes displaying typical cuboidal morphology and, although their proliferative capacity decreased to the fifth passage, AECs showed a mean doubling time of 24.77 ± 6 h and a mean frequency of one fibroblast colony-forming unit (CFU-F) for every 116.75 plated cells. AECs expressed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mRNA markers (CD29, CD166, CD90, CD73, CD117) and pluripotent markers (Nanog and Oct 4), whereas they were negative for CD34 and MHCII. Mesodermic, ectodermic, and endodermic differentiation was confirmed by staining and expression of specific markers. We conclude that porcine amniotic membrane can provide an attractive source of stem cells that may be a useful tool for biomedical research.

  17. Gastrotomy closure with a new tissue anchoring device: A porcine survival study

    PubMed Central

    Guarner-Argente, Carlos; Córdova, Henry; Martínez-Pallí, Graciela; Navarro-Ripoll, Ricard; Rodríguez-d’Jesús, Antonio; de Miguel, Cristina Rodríguez; Beltrán, Mireia; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility, reproducibility and efficacy of a new tissue anchoring device in a porcine survival model. METHODS: Gastrotomies were performed using a needle-knife and balloon dilator in 10 female Yorkshire pigs weighing 30-35 kg. Gastric closure was attempted using a new tissue anchoring device. The tightness of the closure was confirmed by means of air insufflation and the ability to maintain gastric distension with stability in peritoneal pressure measured with a Veress needle. All animals were monitored daily for signs of peritonitis and sepsis over 14 d. During necropsy, the peritoneal cavity and the gastric access site were examined. RESULTS: Transgastric access, closure and 14 d survival was achieved in all pigs. The mean closure time was 18.1 ± 19.2 min and a mean of 2.1 ± 1 devices were used. Supplementary clips were necessary in 2 cases. The closure time was progressively reduced (24.8 ± 13.9 min in the first 5 pigs vs 11.4 ± 5.9 min in the last 5, P = NS). At necropsy, the gastric access site was correctly closed in all cases with all brace-bars present. One device was misplaced in the mesocolon. Minimal adhesions were observed in 3 pigs and signs of mild peritonitis and adhesions in one. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this new tissue anchoring device in porcine stomachs is feasible, reproducible and effective and requires a short learning curve. PMID:21483634

  18. Velocity model optimization for surface microseismic monitoring via amplitude stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haiyu; Wang, Zhongren; Zeng, Xiaoxian; Lü, Hao; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    A usable velocity model in microseismic projects plays a crucial role in achieving statistically reliable microseismic event locations. Existing methods for velocity model optimization rely mainly on picking arrival times at individual receivers. However, for microseismic monitoring with surface stations, seismograms of perforation shots have such low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) that they do not yield sufficiently reliable picks. In this study, we develop a framework for constructing a 1-D flat-layered a priori velocity model using a non-linear optimization technique based on amplitude stacking. The energy focusing of the perforation shot is improved thanks to very fast simulated annealing (VFSA), and the accuracies of shot relocations are used to evaluate whether the resultant velocity model can be used for microseismic event location. Our method also includes a conventional migration-based location technique that utilizes successive grid subdivisions to improve computational efficiency and source location accuracy. Because unreasonable a priori velocity model information and interference due to additive noise are the major contributors to inaccuracies in perforation shot locations, we use velocity model optimization as a compensation scheme. Using synthetic tests, we show that accurate locations of perforation shots can be recovered to within 2 m, even with pre-stack S/N ratios as low as 0.1 at individual receivers. By applying the technique to a coal-bed gas reservoir in Western China, we demonstrate that perforation shot location can be recovered to within the tolerance of the well tip location.

  19. Advanced modelling, monitoring, and process control of bioconversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elliott C.

    Production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an increasingly important area of research and industrialization throughout the world. In order to be competitive with fossil-based fuels and chemicals, maintaining cost-effectiveness is critical. Advanced process control (APC) and optimization methods could significantly reduce operating costs in the biorefining industry. Two reasons APC has previously proven challenging to implement for bioprocesses include: lack of suitable online sensor technology of key system components, and strongly nonlinear first principal models required to predict bioconversion behavior. To overcome these challenges batch fermentations with the acetogen Moorella thermoacetica were monitored with Raman spectroscopy for the conversion of real lignocellulosic hydrolysates and a kinetic model for the conversion of synthetic sugars was developed. Raman spectroscopy was shown to be effective in monitoring the fermentation of sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw hydrolysate, where univariate models predicted acetate concentrations with a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.9 and 1.0 g L-1 for bagasse and straw, respectively. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) models were employed to predict acetate, xylose, glucose, and total sugar concentrations for both hydrolysate fermentations. The PLS models were more robust than univariate models, and yielded a percent error of approximately 5% for both sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw. In addition, a screening technique was discussed for improving Raman spectra of hydrolysate samples prior to collecting fermentation data. Furthermore, a mechanistic model was developed to predict batch fermentation of synthetic glucose, xylose, and a mixture of the two sugars to acetate. The models accurately described the bioconversion process with an RMSEP of approximately 1 g L-1 for each model and provided insights into how kinetic parameters changed during dual substrate

  20. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the number one disease affecting US swine. It is caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV) and is recognized as reproductive failure of sows and respiratory problems of piglets and growing pigs. This book chapter is part of the Office of International E...

  1. Ultrasonic transducers for cure monitoring: design, modelling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Montagna, Francesco; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2011-12-01

    The finite element method (FEM) has been applied to simulate the ultrasonic wave propagation in a multilayered transducer, expressly designed for high-frequency dynamic mechanical analysis of polymers. The FEM model includes an electro-acoustic (active element) and some acoustic (passive elements) transmission lines. The simulation of the acoustic propagation accounts for the interaction between the piezoceramic and the materials in the buffer rod and backing, and the coupling between the electric and mechanical properties of the piezoelectric material. As a result of the simulations, the geometry and size of the modelled ultrasonic transducer has been optimized and used for the realization of a prototype transducer for cure monitoring. The transducer performance has been validated by measuring the velocity changes during the polymerization of a thermosetting matrix of composite materials.

  2. Osteogenic and adipogenic potential of porcine adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chang-qing; Zhang, Guo-hua; Zhang, Li-jie; Yang, Gong-she

    2007-02-01

    Human, rat, and mouse studies have demonstrated the existence of a population of adipose mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) that can undergo multilineage differentiation in vitro. Understanding the clinical potential of AMSCs may require their use in preclinical large-animal models such as pigs. Thus, the objectives of this study were to establish a protocol for the isolation of porcine AMSCs from adipose tissue and to examine their ex vivo differentiation potential to adipocytes and osteoblast. The porcine AMSCs from passage 4 were selected for differentiation analysis. The adipocytes were identified morphologically by staining with Oil Red O, and the adipogenic marker genes were examined by RT-PCR technique. Osteogenic lineage was documented by deposition of calcium stained with Alzarin Red S, visualization of alkaline phosphatase activity, and expression of marker gene. Our result indicates that porcine AMSCs have been successfully isolated and induced differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts. This study suggested that porcine AMSCs are also a valuable model system for the study on the mesenchymal lineages for basic research and tissue engineering.

  3. Artificial neural network model for earthquake prediction with radon monitoring.

    PubMed

    Külahci, Fatih; Inceöz, Murat; Doğru, Mahmut; Aksoy, Ercan; Baykara, Oktay

    2009-01-01

    Apart from the linear monitoring studies concerning the relationship between radon and earthquake, an artificial neural networks (ANNs) model approach is presented starting out from non-linear changes of the eight different parameters during the earthquake occurrence. A three-layer Levenberg-Marquardt feedforward learning algorithm is used to model the earthquake prediction process in the East Anatolian Fault System (EAFS). The proposed ANN system employs individual training strategy with fixed-weight and supervised models leading to estimations. The average relative error between the magnitudes of the earthquakes acquired by ANN and measured data is about 2.3%. The relative error between the test and earthquake data varies between 0% and 12%. In addition, the factor analysis was applied on all data and the model output values to see the statistical variation. The total variance of 80.18% was explained with four factors by this analysis. Consequently, it can be concluded that ANN approach is a potential alternative to other models with complex mathematical operations.

  4. Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  5. Kangaroo vs. porcine aortic valves: calcification potential after glutaraldehyde fixation.

    PubMed

    Narine, K; Chéry, Cyrille C; Goetghebeur, Els; Forsyth, R; Claeys, E; Cornelissen, Maria; Moens, L; Van Nooten, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the calcification potential of kangaroo and porcine aortic valves after glutaraldehyde fixation at both low (0.6%) and high (2.0%) concentrations of glutaraldehyde in the rat subcutaneous model. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing the time-related, progressive calcification of these two species in the rat subcutaneous model. Twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were each implanted with two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 0.6% glutaraldehyde and two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 2% glutaraldehyde respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h and thereafter weekly for up to 10 weeks after implantation. Calcium content was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and confirmed histologically. Mean calcium content per milligram of tissue (dry weight) treated with 0.6 and 2% glutaraldehyde was 116.2 and 110.4 microg/mg tissue for kangaroo and 95.0 and 106.8 microg/mg tissue for porcine valves. Calcium content increased significantly over time (8.8 microg/mg tissue per week) and was not significantly different between groups. Regression analysis of calcification over time showed no significant difference in calcification of valves treated with 0.6 or 2% glutaraldehyde within and between the two species. Using the subcutaneous model, we did not detect a difference in calcification potential between kangaroo and porcine aortic valves treated with either high or low concentrations of glutaraldehyde.

  6. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Chemometric Modeling for Bioprocess Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Faassen, Saskia M.; Hitzmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    On-line sensors for the detection of crucial process parameters are desirable for the monitoring, control and automation of processes in the biotechnology, food and pharma industry. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a highly developed and non-invasive technique that enables the on-line measurements of substrate and product concentrations or the identification of characteristic process states. During a cultivation process significant changes occur in the fluorescence spectra. By means of chemometric modeling, prediction models can be calculated and applied for process supervision and control to provide increased quality and the productivity of bioprocesses. A range of applications for different microorganisms and analytes has been proposed during the last years. This contribution provides an overview of different analysis methods for the measured fluorescence spectra and the model-building chemometric methods used for various microbial cultivations. Most of these processes are observed using the BioView® Sensor, thanks to its robustness and insensitivity to adverse process conditions. Beyond that, the PLS-method is the most frequently used chemometric method for the calculation of process models and prediction of process variables. PMID:25942644

  7. Watershed monitoring and modelling and USA regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Turner, B G; Boner, M C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the Columbus program was to implement a comprehensive watershed monitoring-network including water chemistry, aquatic biology and alternative sensors to establish water environment health and methods for determining future restoration progress and early warning for protection of drinking water supplies. The program was implemented to comply with USA regulatory requirements including Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) rules of the Clean Water Act (CWA) and Source Water Assessment and Protection (SWAP) rules under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). The USEPA Office of Research and Development and the Water Environment Research Foundation provided quality assurance oversight. The results obtained demonstrated that significant wet weather data is necessary to establish relationships between land use, water chemistry, aquatic biology and sensor data. These measurements and relationships formed the basis for calibrating the US EPA BASINS Model, prioritizing watershed health and determination of compliance with water quality standards. Conclusions specify priorities of cost-effective drainage system controls that attenuate stormwater flows and capture flushed pollutants. A network of permanent long-term real-time monitoring using combination of continuous sensor measurements, water column sampling and aquatic biology surveys and a regional organization is prescribed to protect drinking water supplies and measure progress towards water quality targets.

  8. Stochastic model to monitor mechanical vibrations in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using neutron flux and core-exit temperature signals in PWRs for estimating core coolant flow velocity has been demonstrated using normal operational data from both the LOFT reactor and a commerical PWR. The LOFT analysis further showed that the core coolant velocity can be accurately monitored for various flow rates using the linear phase-frequency relationship in the frequency range 0.1 to 2 Hz. The development of the technique for monitoring core coolant velocity in PWRs provides a valuable alternative for flow measurement. Theoretical studies of core heat transfer in PWRs showed that the fluctuating heat sources have a dominating effect on the core-exit temperature compared to fluctuations of the coolant flow rate and core inlet coolant temperature. In the present analysis a detailed distributed parameter model of a PWR core was developed with the purpose of studying the following aspects of core coolant flow rate measurement: the mechanisms causing linear phase relationship between neutron flux and coolant temperature signals due to various perturbation sources; the effect of axial flux shape on the phase slope (or estimated transit delay time); and the relationship between transit delay time and effective distance of temperature noise propagation to maintain the flow velocity invariant.

  9. In-vessel activation monitors in JET: Progress in modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, Georges; Lengar, I.; Syme, B.; Popovichev, S.; Arnold, Dirk; Laubenstein, Matthias

    2008-10-15

    Activation studies were performed in JET with new in-vessel activation monitors. Though primarily dedicated to R and D in the challenging issue of lost {alpha} diagnostics for ITER, which is being addressed at JET with several techniques, these monitors provide for both neutron and charged particle fluences. A set of samples with different orientation with respect to the magnetic field is transported inside the torus by means of a manipulator arm (in contrast with the conventional JET activation system with pneumatic transport system). In this case, radionuclides with longer half-life were selected and ultralow background gamma-ray measurements were needed. The irradiation was closer to the plasma and this potentially reduces the neutron scattering problem. This approach could also be of interest for ITER, where the calibration methods have yet to be developed. The MCNP neutron transport model for JET was modified to include the activation probe and so provide calculations to help assess the new data. The neutron induced activity on the samples are well reproduced by the calculations.

  10. Molecular interactions of a model bile salt and porcine bile with (1,3:1,4)-β-glucans and arabinoxylans probed by (13)C NMR and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Purnima; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Mata, Jitendra P; Gilbert, Elliot P; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-04-15

    Two main classes of interaction between soluble dietary fibres (SDFs), such as (1,3:1,4)-β-D-glucan (βG) and arabinoxylan (AX) and bile salt (BS) or diluted porcine bile, were identified by (13)C NMR and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Small chemical shift differences of BS NMR resonances were consistent with effective local concentration or dilution of BS micelles mostly by βG, suggesting dynamic interactions; whilst the reduced line widths/intensities observed were mostly caused by wheat AX and the highest molecular size and concentrations of βG. SAXS showed evidence of changes in βG but not AX in the presence of BS micelles, at >13 nm length scale consistent with molecular level interactions. Thus intermolecular interactions between SDF and BS depend on both SDF source and its molecular weight and may occur alone or in combination.

  11. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus.

  12. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  13. Monitoring with Trackers Based on Semi-Quantitative Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    1997-01-01

    In three years of NASA-sponsored research preceding this project, we successfully developed a technology for: (1) building qualitative and semi-quantitative models from libraries of model-fragments, (2) simulating these models to predict future behaviors with the guarantee that all possible behaviors are covered, (3) assimilating observations into behaviors, shrinking uncertainty so that incorrect models are eventually refuted and correct models make stronger predictions for the future. In our object-oriented framework, a tracker is an object which embodies the hypothesis that the available observation stream is consistent with a particular behavior of a particular model. The tracker maintains its own status (consistent, superceded, or refuted), and answers questions about its explanation for past observations and its predictions for the future. In the MIMIC approach to monitoring of continuous systems, a number of trackers are active in parallel, representing alternate hypotheses about the behavior of a system. This approach is motivated by the need to avoid 'system accidents' [Perrow, 1985] due to operator fixation on a single hypothesis, as for example at Three Mile Island. As we began to address these issues, we focused on three major research directions that we planned to pursue over a three-year project: (1) tractable qualitative simulation, (2) semiquantitative inference, and (3) tracking set management. Unfortunately, funding limitations made it impossible to continue past year one. Nonetheless, we made major progress in the first two of these areas. Progress in the third area as slower because the graduate student working on that aspect of the project decided to leave school and take a job in industry. I enclosed a set of abstract of selected papers on the work describe below. Several papers that draw on the research supported during this period appeared in print after the grant period ended.

  14. Metabolic Pattern of the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Novel Porcine Model: Studies with Cerebral Microdialysis with High Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Engström, Elisabeth Ronne

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may produce cerebral ischemia and systemic responses including stress. To study immediate cerebral and systemic changes in response to aneurysm rupture, animal models are needed. Objective To study early cerebral energy changes in an animal model. Methods Experimental SAH was induced in 11 pigs by autologous blood injection to the anterior skull base, with simultaneous control of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor concentrations of glucose, pyruvate and lactate. Results In nine of the pigs, a pattern of transient ischemia was produced, with a dramatic reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure soon after blood injection, associated with a quick glucose and pyruvate decrease. This was followed by a lactate increase and a delayed pyruvate increase, producing a marked but short elevation of the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Glucose, pyruvate, lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio thereafter returned toward baseline. The two remaining pigs had a more severe metabolic reaction with glucose and pyruvate rapidly decreasing to undetectable levels while lactate increased and remained elevated, suggesting persisting ischemia. Conclusion The animal model simulates the conditions of SAH not only by deposition of blood in the basal cisterns, but also creating the transient global ischemic impact of aneurysmal SAH. The metabolic cerebral changes suggest immediate transient substrate failure followed by hypermetabolism of glucose upon reperfusion. The model has features that resemble spontaneous bleeding, and is suitable for future research of the early cerebral and systemic responses to SAH that are difficult to study in humans. PMID:24940881

  15. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

  16. Comparison of autologous 111In-leukocytes, 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga-citrate for diagnostic nuclear imaging in a juvenile porcine haematogenous staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis model

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole L; Afzelius, Pia; Bender, Dirk; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Leifsson, Páll S; Nielsen, Karin M; Larsen, Jytte O; Jensen, Svend B; Alstrup, Aage KO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 111In-labeled leukocyte single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to PET with tracers that potentially could improve detection of osteomyelitis. We chose 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga-citrate and validated their diagnostic utility in a porcine haematogenous osteomyelitis model. Four juvenile 14-15 weeks old female pigs were scanned seven days after intra-arterial inoculation in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of Staphylococcus aureus using a sequential scan protocol with 18F-FDG, 68Ga-citrate, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195, 99mTc-Nanocoll and 111In-labelled autologous leukocytes. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs and gross pathology, histopathology and microbial examination. The pigs developed a total of five osteomyelitis lesions, five lesions characterized as abscesses/cellulitis, arthritis in three joints and five enlarged lymph nodes. None of the tracers accumulated in joints with arthritis. By comparing the 10 infectious lesions, 18F-FDG accumulated in nine, 111In-leukocytes in eight, 11C-methionine in six, 68Ga-citrate in four and 11C-PK11195 accumulated in only one lesion. Overall, 18F-FDG PET was superior to 111In-leukocyte SPECT in marking infectious and proliferative, i.e. hyperplastic, lesions. However, leukocyte SPECT was performed as early scans, approximately 6 h after injection of the leukocytes, to match the requirements of the 18 h long scan protocol. 11C-methionine and possibly 68Ga-citrate may be useful for diagnosis of soft issue lesions. PMID:25973338

  17. Magnetic resonance Elastography of the Lung parenchyma in an in situ porcine model with a non-invasive mechanical driver: Correlation of Shear Stiffness with Trans-respiratory system Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Kolipaka, Arunark; Manduca, Armando; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Ehman, Richard L; Araoz, Philip; McGee, Kiaran P

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of lung parenchyma is an active field of research due to the association of this metric with normal function, disease initiation and progression. A phase contrast MRI-based elasticity imaging technique known as magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is being investigated as a method for measuring the shear stiffness of lung parenchyma. Previous experiments performed with small animals using invasive drivers in direct contact with the lungs have indicated that the quantification of lung shear modulus with 1H based MRE is feasible. This technique has been extended to an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver placed on the chest wall. This approach was tested to measure the change in parenchymal stiffness as a function of airway opening pressure (Pao) in 10 adult pigs. In all animals, shear stiffness was successfully quantified at four different Pao values. Mean (± std error of mean) pulmonary parenchyma density corrected stiffness values were calculated to be 1.48 (±0.09), 1.68 (±0.10), 2.05 (±0.13) and 2.23 (±0.17) kPa for Pao values of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm H2O respectively. Shear stiffness increased with increasing Pao, in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that in an in situ porcine lung shear stiffness can be quantitated with 1H MRE using a noninvasive mechanical driver, and that it is feasible to measure the change in shear stiffness due to change in Pao. PMID:21590723

  18. Future Developments in Modeling and Monitoring of Volcanic Ash Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadonna, Costanza; Folch, Arnau; Loughlin, Sue

    2011-03-01

    IAVCEI-WMO Workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation; Geneva, Switzerland, 18-20 October 2010; The April-May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption brought to light the harmful effects of volcanic ash on civil aviation and the importance of robust ash forecasting based on the combination of numerical weather prediction (NWP), volcanic ash transport and dispersal models (VATDMs), and data acquisition. The Workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation has produced a consensual document describing the characteristics and range of application of different VATDMs, identifying the needs of the modeling community, investigating new data acquisition strategies, and discussing how to improve communication between the volcanology community and operational agencies. The workshop was held at the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Geneva headquarters under the sponsorship of the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Geneva, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI), and the canton of Geneva and was organized by scientists from the University of Geneva (Switzerland), the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (Spain), the Aeronautical Meteorology Division of the WMO, and the British Geological Survey (United Kingdom). Fifty-two volcanologists, meteorologists, atmospheric dispersion modelers, and space- and ground-based monitoring specialists from 12 different countries were gathered (attendance was by invitation only), including representatives from six Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and related institutions.

  19. Expiratory model-based method to monitor ARDS disease state

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Model-based methods can be used to characterise patient-specific condition and response to mechanical ventilation (MV) during treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Conventional metrics of respiratory mechanics are based on inspiration only, neglecting data from the expiration cycle. However, it is hypothesised that expiratory data can be used to determine an alternative metric, offering another means to track patient condition and guide positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) selection. Methods Three fully sedated, oleic acid induced ARDS piglets underwent three experimental phases. Phase 1 was a healthy state recruitment manoeuvre. Phase 2 was a progression from a healthy state to an oleic acid induced ARDS state. Phase 3 was an ARDS state recruitment manoeuvre. The expiratory time-constant model parameter was determined for every breathing cycle for each subject. Trends were compared to estimates of lung elastance determined by means of an end-inspiratory pause method and an integral-based method. All experimental procedures, protocols and the use of data in this study were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the University of Liege Medical Faculty. Results The overall median absolute percentage fitting error for the expiratory time-constant model across all three phases was less than 10 %; for each subject, indicating the capability of the model to capture the mechanics of breathing during expiration. Provided the respiratory resistance was constant, the model was able to adequately identify trends and fundamental changes in respiratory mechanics. Conclusion Overall, this is a proof of concept study that shows the potential of continuous monitoring of respiratory mechanics in clinical practice. Respiratory system mechanics vary with disease state development and in response to MV settings. Therefore, titrating PEEP to minimal elastance theoretically results in optimal PEEP selection. Trends matched clinical

  20. Feature and Statistical Model Development in Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Inho

    All structures suffer wear and tear because of impact, excessive load, fatigue, corrosion, etc. in addition to inherent defects during their manufacturing processes and their exposure to various environmental effects. These structural degradations are often imperceptible, but they can severely affect the structural performance of a component, thereby severely decreasing its service life. Although previous studies of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) have revealed extensive prior knowledge on the parts of SHM processes, such as the operational evaluation, data processing, and feature extraction, few studies have been conducted from a systematical perspective, the statistical model development. The first part of this dissertation, the characteristics of inverse scattering problems, such as ill-posedness and nonlinearity, reviews ultrasonic guided wave-based structural health monitoring problems. The distinctive features and the selection of the domain analysis are investigated by analytically searching the conditions of the uniqueness solutions for ill-posedness and are validated experimentally. Based on the distinctive features, a novel wave packet tracing (WPT) method for damage localization and size quantification is presented. This method involves creating time-space representations of the guided Lamb waves (GLWs), collected at a series of locations, with a spatially dense distribution along paths at pre-selected angles with respect to the direction, normal to the direction of wave propagation. The fringe patterns due to wave dispersion, which depends on the phase velocity, are selected as the primary features that carry information, regarding the wave propagation and scattering. The following part of this dissertation presents a novel damage-localization framework, using a fully automated process. In order to construct the statistical model for autonomous damage localization deep-learning techniques, such as restricted Boltzmann machine and deep belief network

  1. Monitoring and modelling terbuthylazine and desethyl-terbuthylazine in groundwater.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fait, G.; Balderacchi, M.; Ferrari, F.; Capri, E.; Trevisan, M.

    2009-04-01

    the future. Therefore, after the monitoring study the leaching of terbuthylazine and desethyl-terbuthylazine in groundwater was simulated with the aim to: 1) to verify a possible dilution effect due to lateral recharge; 2) to verify that the sampling time during the monitoring study was appropriate; 3) to verify the leaching of the metabolites in time. The model MACRO (version 5.1) was used. MACRO is a physically based one-dimensional model, which considers preferential flow (i.e. 'micropores' and 'macropores') to describe the transport of water and solutes in soils. Using the data coming from the monitoring (i.e.: soil, climatic, geology and hydrological data) a scenario was set in each of the eleven Italian sites monitored from 2005 to 2007. A maize monoculture was simulated for 20 years in each site, with a pre-emergence treatment every year. Daily measurements of groundwater table depth were available for each site, and then these data were used in order to reach a good calibration of the soil hydrology. Two sets of soil data were used: soil data acquired from the analysis of the soil core sampled in each site and soil data of the corresponding reference profile obtained from the regional soil maps. Furthermore, in order to estimate soil hydraulic parameters, two sets of pedotransfer functions were used: one developed for the northern Europe soils and one developed for the Po Valley soils. The results showed that the groundwater table depth simulated fitted quite well with the measured data, and then it was demonstrated that the groundwater recharge was constant in time. Only in one site measured and simulated groundwater table depth did not match to each other. This case suggested that hydrological equilibrium was not given only by precipitation/irrigation and evapotranspiration, then lateral or bottom recharge and a consequent dilution effect were assumed. Furthermore, in order to estimate the lateral recharge "Darcy's Law" was applied and it was demonstrated

  2. Structural and functional annotation of the porcine immunome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is known as an excellent model for human immunology and the two species share many pathogens. Susceptibility to infectious disease is one of the major constraints on swine performance, yet the structure and function of genes comprising the pig immunome are not well-characterized. The completion of the pig genome provides the opportunity to annotate the pig immunome, and compare and contrast pig and human immune systems. Results The Immune Response Annotation Group (IRAG) used computational curation and manual annotation of the swine genome assembly 10.2 (Sscrofa10.2) to refine the currently available automated annotation of 1,369 immunity-related genes through sequence-based comparison to genes in other species. Within these genes, we annotated 3,472 transcripts. Annotation provided evidence for gene expansions in several immune response families, and identified artiodactyl-specific expansions in the cathelicidin and type 1 Interferon families. We found gene duplications for 18 genes, including 13 immune response genes and five non-immune response genes discovered in the annotation process. Manual annotation provided evidence for many new alternative splice variants and 8 gene duplications. Over 1,100 transcripts without porcine sequence evidence were detected using cross-species annotation. We used a functional approach to discover and accurately annotate porcine immune response genes. A co-expression clustering analysis of transcriptomic data from selected experimental infections or immune stimulations of blood, macrophages or lymph nodes identified a large cluster of genes that exhibited a correlated positive response upon infection across multiple pathogens or immune stimuli. Interestingly, this gene cluster (cluster 4) is enriched for known general human immune response genes, yet contains many un-annotated porcine genes. A phylogenetic analysis of the encoded proteins of cluster 4 genes showed that 15% exhibited an accelerated

  3. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno; Stensballe, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing proteomic methods to investigate the proteome of healthy porcine synovial fluid (Bennike et al., 2014 [1]). We included an evaluation of different proteolytic sample preparation techniques, and an analysis of posttranslational modifications with a focus on glycosylation. We used pig (Sus Scrofa) as a model organism, as the porcine immune system is highly similar to human and the pig genome is sequenced. Furthermore, porcine model systems are commonly used large animal models to study several human diseases. In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935. PMID:26543887

  4. An ecohydraulic model to identify and monitor moapa dace habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, James R.; Batt, Thomas R.; Scoppettone, Gayton G.; Dixon, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Moapa dace (Moapa coriacea) is a critically endangered thermophilic minnow native to the Muddy River ecosystem in southeastern Nevada, USA. Restricted to temperatures between 26.0 and 32.0°C, these fish are constrained to the upper two km of the Muddy River and several small tributaries fed by warm springs. Habitat alterations, nonnative species invasion, and water withdrawals during the 20th century resulted in a drastic decline in the dace population and in 1979 the Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was created to protect them. The goal of our study was to determine the potential effects of reduced surface flows that might result from groundwater pumping or water diversions on Moapa dace habitat inside the Refuge. We accomplished our goal in several steps. First, we conducted snorkel surveys to determine the locations of Moapa dace on three warm-spring tributaries of the Muddy River. Second, we conducted hydraulic simulations over a range of flows with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Third, we developed a set of Moapa dace habitat models with logistic regression and a geographic information system. Fourth, we estimated Moapa dace habitat over a range of flows (plus or minus 30% of base flow). Our spatially explicit habitat models achieved classification accuracies between 85% and 91%, depending on the snorkel survey and creek. Water depth was the most significant covariate in our models, followed by substrate, Froude number, velocity, and water temperature. Hydraulic simulations showed 2-11% gains in dace habitat when flows were increased by 30%, and 8-32% losses when flows were reduced by 30%. To ensure the health and survival of Moapa dace and the Muddy River ecosystem, groundwater and surface-water withdrawals and diversions need to be carefully monitored, while fully implementing a proactive conservation strategy.

  5. Modeling flow cytometry data for cancer vaccine immune monitoring.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Jacob; Ottinger, Janet; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2010-09-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. In all these applications, the challenge is to detect extremely rare cell subsets while avoiding spurious positive events. To achieve this objective, it helps to be able to analyze FCM data using multiple markers simultaneously, since the additional information provided often helps to minimize the number of false positive and false negative events, hence increasing both sensitivity and specificity. However, with manual gating, at most two markers can be examined in a single dot plot, and a sequential strategy is often used. As the sequential strategy discards events that fall outside preceding gates at each stage, the effectiveness of the strategy is difficult to evaluate without laborious and painstaking back-gating. Model-based analysis is a promising computational technique that works using information from all marker dimensions simultaneously, and offers an alternative approach to flow analysis that can usefully complement manual gating in the design of optimal gating strategies. Results from model-based analysis will be illustrated with examples from FCM assays commonly used in cancer immunotherapy laboratories.

  6. A model for monitoring of Hsp90-buffered genetic variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, Liudmyla

    Genetic material of terrestrial organisms can be considerably injured by cosmic rays and UV-radiation in the space environment. Organisms onboard are also exposed to the entire complex of negative physical factors which can generate genetic variations and affect morphogenesis. However, species phenotypes must be robust to genetic variation, requiring "buffering" systems to ensure normal development. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 can serve as such "a buffer". It is important in the maturation and conformational regulation of a diverse set of signal transducers. The requirement of many principal regulatory proteins for Hsp90 renders entire metabolic pathways sensitive to impairment of its function. So inhibition of Hsp90 function can open cryptic genetic variations and produce morphological changes. In this paper, we present a model for monitoring of cryptic Hsp90-buffered genetic variations arising during exposure to space and spaceflight factors. This model has been developed with Arabidopsis thaliana seeds gathered in natural habitats with high anthropogenic pressure and wild type (Col-0) seeds subjected to negative influences (UV, heavy metals) experimentally. The phenotypic traits of early seedlings grown under reduction of Hsp90 activity were characterized to estimate Hsp90-buffered genetic variations. Geldanamycin was used as an inhibitor of Hsp90 function.

  7. Immunodiagnosis of porcine cysticercosis: identification of candidate antigens through immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Masmela, Yuliet; Fragoso, Gladis; Ambrosio, Javier R; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rosas, Gabriela; Estrada, Karel; Carrero, Julio César; Sciutto, Edda; Laclette, Juan P; Bobes, Raúl J

    2013-12-01

    Cysticercosis, caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium, is a zoonotic disease affecting pigs and humans that is endemic to developing countries in Latin America, Africa and South East Asia. The prevalence of infection in pigs, the intermediate host for T. solium, has been used as an indicator for monitoring disease transmission in endemic areas. However, accurate and specific diagnostic tools for porcine cysticercosis remain to be established. Using proteomic approaches and the T. solium genome sequence, seven antigens were identified as specific for porcine cysticercosis, namely, tropomyosin 2, alpha-1 tubulin, beta-tubulin 2, annexin B1, small heat-shock protein, 14-3-3 protein, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. None of these proteins were cross-reactive when tested with sera from pigs infected with Ascaris spp., Cysticercus tenuicollis and hydatid cysts of Echinococcus spp. or with serum from a Taenia saginata-infected cow. Comparison with orthologues, indicated that the amino acid sequences of annexin B1 and cAMP-dependent protein kinase possessed highly specific regions, which might make them suitable candidates for development of a specific diagnostic assay for porcine cysticercosis.

  8. Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand s...

  9. Renal Artery Embolization Combined With Radiofrequency Ablation in a Porcine Kidney Model: Effect of Small and Narrowly Calibrated Microparticles as Embolization Material on Coagulation Diameter, Volume, and Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Kortes, N.; Zelzer, S.; Arnegger, F. U.; Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Gehrig, T.; Nickel, F.; Kenngott, H. G.; Mogler, C.; Longerich, T.; Meinzer, H. P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles on the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) in porcine kidneys. Forty-eight RFAs were performed in 24 kidneys of 12 pigs. In 6 animals, bilateral renal artery embolization was performed with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles. Upper and lower kidney poles were ablated with identical system parameters. Applying three-dimensional segmentation software, RFAs were segmented on registered 2 mm-thin macroscopic slices. Length, depth, width, volume{sub s}egmented, and volume{sub c}alculated were determined to describe the size of the RFAs. To evaluate the shape of the RFAs, depth-to-width ratio (perfect symmetry-to-lesion length was indicated by a ratio of 1), sphericity ratio (perfect sphere was indicated by a sphericity ratio of 1), eccentricity (perfect sphere was indicated by an eccentricity of 0), and circularity (perfect circle was indicated by a circularity of 1) were determined. Embolized compared with nonembolized RFAs showed significantly greater depth (23.4 {+-} 3.6 vs. 17.2 {+-} 1.8 mm; p < 0.001) and width (20.1 {+-} 2.9 vs. 12.6 {+-} 3.7 mm; p < 0.001); significantly larger volume{sub s}egmented (8.6 {+-} 3.2 vs. 3.0 {+-} 0.7 ml; p < 0.001) and volume{sub c}alculated (8.4 {+-} 3.0 ml vs. 3.3 {+-} 1.1 ml; p < 0.001); significantly lower depth-to-width (1.17 {+-} 0.10 vs. 1.48 {+-} 0.44; p < 0.05), sphericity (1.55 {+-} 0.44 vs. 1.96 {+-} 0.43; p < 0.01), and eccentricity (0.84 {+-} 0.61 vs. 1.73 {+-} 0.91; p < 0.01) ratios; and significantly greater circularity (0.62 {+-} 0.14 vs. 0.45 {+-} 0.16; p < 0.01). Renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles affected the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of RFAs in porcine kidneys. Embolized RFAs were significantly larger and more spherical compared with nonembolized RFAs.

  10. Modeling ultrasonic NDE and guided wave based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Nitin B.; Rathod, Vivek T.; Chakraborty, Nibir.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Sridaran, Ramanan; Boller, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems require integration of non-destructive technologies into structural design and operational processes. Modeling and simulation of complex NDE inspection processes are important aspects in the development and deployment of SHM technologies. Ray tracing techniques are vital simulation tools to visualize the wave path inside a material. These techniques also help in optimizing the location of transducers and their orientation with respect to the zone of interrogation. It helps in increasing the chances of detection and identification of a flaw in that zone. While current state-of-the-art techniques such as ray tracing based on geometric principle help in such visualization, other information such as signal losses due to spherical or cylindrical shape of wave front are rarely taken into consideration. The problem becomes a little more complicated in the case of dispersive guided wave propagation and near-field defect scattering. We review the existing models and tools to perform ultrasonic NDE simulation in structural components. As an initial step, we develop a ray-tracing approach, where phase and spectral information are preserved. This enables one to study wave scattering beyond simple time of flight calculation of rays. Challenges in terms of theory and modelling of defects of various kinds are discussed. Various additional considerations such as signal decay and physics of scattering are reviewed and challenges involved in realistic computational implementation are discussed. Potential application of this approach to SHM system design is highlighted and by applying this to complex structural components such as airframe structures, SHM is demonstrated to provide additional value in terms of lighter weight and/or longevity enhancement resulting from an extension of the damage tolerance design principle not compromising safety and reliability.

  11. Hydrological modelling of slopes from field monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comegna, Luca; Damiano, Emilia; Greco, Roberto; Guida, Andrea; Olivares, Lucio; Picarelli, Luciano

    2013-04-01

    A simplified hydrological model of a steep slope covered with loose granular pyroclastic deposits is presented. The slope is located in the mountains northern of Naples, and the soil cover, constituted by layers of loose volcanic ashes and pumices with a total thickness of 2.5m, lays upon a fractured limestone bedrock. At the interface between the bedrock and the soil cover, a layer of weathered ashes, with significant clay fraction, is sometimes observed. The slope has a fairly regular inclination of 40°, and is covered by chestnut woods and thick brushwood growing in late spring. The inclination of the slope is comparable with the internal friction angle of the ashes, thus the equilibrium is possible thanks to the contribution offered to the shear strength by the soil suction in unsaturated conditions. Indeed, in December 1999, a landslide was triggered by prolonged and intense precipitations. As it frequently happens with similar pyroclastic covers, the triggered slide exhibited a flow-like behavior, covering 2km in few minutes, heavily hitting the nearby town of Cervinara (AV). Since then, the slope has been constantly monitored, and during the last two years an automated station with seven TDR probes for the measurement of soil water content, eight tensiometers for the measurement of soil suction, and a rain gauge, has been operating. The data, collected every two hours, allowed getting more insight of the hydrological behavior of the slope and building up an effective hydrological model. In the model, the layered soil profile has been replaced with a single homogeneous layer, with water retention curve estimated by coupling the values of water content and suction measured at various depths. A seasonal top boundary condition has been introduced, related to the annual cycle of the vegetation: the observed precipitations quickly caused changes of soil suction at the depth of -50cm during the entire year, with the exception of the period between the end of May

  12. Localization and neurochemical features of the sympathetic trunk ganglia neurons projecting to the urethral muscle. An experimental study in a porcine animal model.

    PubMed

    Botti, Maddalena; Ragionieri, Luisa; Gazza, Ferdinando; Panu, Rino

    2014-07-01

    The striated perineal urethral muscle (UM) is involved in the voluntary control of the micturition requiring complex interactions between afferent and efferent (autonomic and somatic) pathways to store and periodically eliminate urine. Our aim was to define the site, cross sectional area and phenotype of sympathetic trunk ganglia (STG) neurons projecting to the porcine UM, combining retrograde neuronal tracer Fast Blue (FB) and double immunohistochemical labelling methods. The research was carried out on 3 male intact pigs, in which we counted a total number of 4992.67 ± 834.35 (mean ± S.E.M., n = 3) FB+ neurons distributed in the bilateral T12-S3 STG. These neurons were significantly larger in lumbar STG than in the sacral ones. Moreover we highlighted the presence of Dopamine β hydroxylase (DβH), Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT), neuronal Nitric Oxyde Sinthase (n-NOS), Calcitonine Gene Related Peptide (CGRP), Leu-Enkephaline (LENK), Neuropeptide Y (NPY), Substance P (SP), Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP) and Somatostatine (SOM) and their eventual co-existence with Tyrosine Hydroxylase(TH) in both lumbar and sacral FB+ neurons. In particular, lumbar and sacral STG neurons expressed similar percentages of immunoreactivity for TH, SP and CGRP, but showed significantly different levels of immunoreactivity for NPY, VIP, VAChT, LENK, nNOS, DβH and SOM. Taken together, these data indicate a different contribution of lumbar and sacral pathways in the sympathetic transmission to the boar UM.

  13. The implantation of non-cell-based materials to prevent the recurrent disc herniation: an in vivo porcine model using quantitative discomanometry examination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Hung; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent disc herniation is frequently observed due to leakage of nucleus pulposus through injured anulus fibrosus. There is no effective treatment to prevent recurrent disc herniation yet. In this study, we proposed to implant non-cell-based materials into the porcine disc to stimulate the growth of fibrous tissue and thereby increase the disc functional integrity. The disc herniation was simulated by anular punctures using the spinal needles. Four clinically used implantation materials, i.e., gelfoam, platinum coil, bone cement and tissue glue, were delivered into the discs via percutaneous spinal needles. Two months after the surgery, the swine were killed. The degree of disc integrity of intact, naturally healed and implanted discs, was examined by quantitative discomanometry apparatus. We found the disc injury could not recover after 2 months of healing, and the disc implantation affected the degree of disc integrity. The disc integrity of gelfoam-implanted discs was better than that of coil-, bone cement-, and glue-implanted discs. The implantation of non-cell-based material was proved to be a potentially clinically applicable method to recover the integrity of injured discs and to prevent recurrent disc herniation. PMID:17252217

  14. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  15. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  16. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  18. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  19. Perforation forces of the intact porcine anterior lens capsule.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Franziska; Lussi, Jonas; Felekis, Dimitrios; Michels, Stephan; Petruska, Andrew J; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-09-01

    During the first step of cataract surgery, the lens capsule is perforated and a circular hole is created with a sharp instrument, a procedure called capsulorhexis. To develop automated systems that can assist ophthalmologists during capsulorhexis, the forces required must be quantified. This study investigates perforation forces of the central anterior lens capsule in porcine eyes, which are used as a conservative model for the human eye. A micro-mechanical characterisation method is presented that measures capsular bag perforation forces with a high precision positioning and high-resolution force sensing system. The force during perforation of the anterior lens capsule was measured with various sized needles and indentation speeds and is found to be 15-35mN. A bio-mechanical model is identified that describes an exponential correlation between indentation force and depth, indicating strain hardening behaviour of the porcine anterior lens capsule.

  20. A Structural and Functional Model of Teachers' Monitoring Skills Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Barinova, Nataliya A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the present issue is caused by a strong need to conduct monitoring processes in all types of teaching processes and a poor development of theoretical, content and technological, scientific and methodological material for teachers' monitoring skills development during their teaching practice. The aim of the article is to create and…

  1. Modeling and monitoring the hydrological effects of the Sand Engine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaars, Frans; Hoogmoed, Merel; van Vliet, Frank; Stuyfzand, Pieter; Groen, Michel; van der Made, Kees-Jan; Caljé, Ruben; Auken, Esben; Bergsted Pedersen, Jesper

    2013-04-01

    Since 1887, Dunea Water Company produces high quality drinking water using the dune area at Monster (Province of South Holland, the Netherlands). Annually, 8 billion liters of water is produced here using artificial recharge and recovery with shallow wells and infiltration lakes. The dunes are an important step in producing drinking water serving as an underground buffer, leveling fluctuating in temperature and quality and removing bacteria and viruses from the infiltrated water in a natural way. Since space is limited in the Netherlands, the drinking water production of Dunea is closely matched with surrounding land uses and natural constraints. This prevents groundwater nuisance, upconing and intrusion of salt water and, in this case, movement of a nearby groundwater pollution. This is especially true in the Monster area where the dunes are fairly low and small; the coast is less than 350 meters from the recovery wells. The coast of Monster was identified as a weak link in the coastal defense of The Netherlands. Because of this, two coastal defense projects were carried out between 2009 and 2011. The first project involved creating an extra dune ridge in front of existing dunes which leads to intrusion of a large volume of seawater. Directly after completion, the Sand Engine was constructed. This hook shaped sand peninsula will supply the coast with sand for the coming decades due to erosion and deposition along the coast. These two large coastal defense projects would obviously influence the tightly balanced hydrological system of Monster. Without hydrological intervention, the drinking water production would no longer be sustainable in this area. To study the effects of these projects and to find a solution to combine coastal defense and drinking water supply, field research and effect (geochemical) modeling were used interactively. To prevent negative effects it was decided to construct interception wells on top of the new dune ridge (28 in total). A

  2. Silencing porcine CMAH and GGTA1 genes significantly reduces xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by porcine livers

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James R.; Paris, Leela L.; Blankenship, Ross L.; Sidner, Richard A.; Martens, Gregory R.; Ladowski, Joeseph M.; Li, Ping; Estrada, Jose L; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background A profound thrombocytopenia limits hepatic xenotransplantation in the pig-to-primate model. Porcine livers also have shown the ability to phagocytose human platelets in the absence of immune-mediate injury. Recently, inactivation of the porcine ASGR1 gene has been shown to decrease this phenomenon. Inactivating GGTA1 and CMAH genes has reduced the antibody-mediated barrier to xenotransplantation; herein we describe the effect that these modifications have on xenogeneic consumption of human platelets in the absence of immune-mediated graft injury. Methods WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/−CMAH−/− knockout pigs were compared for their xenogeneic hepatic consumption of human platelets. An in vitro assay was established to measure the association of human platelets with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) by immunohistochemistry. Perfusion models were used to measure human platelet uptake in livers from WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− pigs. Results GGTA1−/−, CMAH−/− LSECs exhibited reduced levels of human platelet binding in vitro, when compared to GGTA1−/− and WT LSECs. In a continuous perfusion model, GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers consumed fewer human platelets than GGTA1−/− and WT livers. GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers also consumed fewer human platelets than ASGR1−/− livers in a single pass model. Conclusions Silencing the porcine carbohydrate genes necessary to avoid antibody-mediated rejection in a pig-to-human model also reduces the xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by the porcine liver. The combination of these genetic modifications may be an effective strategy to limit the thrombocytopenia associated with pig-to-human hepatic xenotransplantation. PMID:26906939

  3. Prospective Study in a Porcine Model of Sarcoptes scabiei Indicates the Association of Th2 and Th17 Pathways with the Clinical Severity of Scabies

    PubMed Central

    Mounsey, Kate E.; Murray, Hugh C.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Pasay, Cielo; Holt, Deborah C.; Currie, Bart J.; Walton, Shelley F.; McCarthy, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding of scabies immunopathology has been hampered by the inability to undertake longitudinal studies in humans. Pigs are a useful animal model for scabies, and show clinical and immunologic changes similar to those in humans. Crusted scabies can be readily established in pigs by treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex). Methodology/ Principal Findings Prospective study of 24 pigs in four groups: a) Scabies+/Dex+, b) Scabies+/Dex-, c) Scabies-/Dex+ and d) Scabies-/Dex-. Clinical symptoms were monitored. Histological profiling and transcriptional analysis of skin biopsies was undertaken to compare changes in cell infiltrates and representative cytokines. A range of clinical responses to Sarcoptes scabiei were observed in Dex treated and non-immunosuppressed pigs. An association was confirmed between disease severity and transcription of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, and up-regulation of the Th17 cytokines IL-17 and IL-23 in pigs with crusted scabies. Immunohistochemistry revealed marked infiltration of lymphocytes and mast cells, and strong staining for IL-17. Conclusions/ Significance While an allergic Th2 type response to scabies has been previously described, these results suggest that IL-17 related pathways may also contribute to immunopathology of crusted scabies. This may lead to new strategies to protect vulnerable subjects from contracting recurrent crusted scabies. PMID:25730203

  4. Engaging stakeholders in review and recommendations for models of outcome monitoring for substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Rush, Brian; Martin, Garth; Corea, Larry; Rotondi, Nooshin Khobzi

    2012-10-01

    We present an example of a collaborative process designed to review models of outcome monitoring for substance abuse services, with a view to assessing the feasibility of different approaches in Ontario, Canada. A conceptual framework that describes the parameters of an outcome monitoring system and four models of outcome monitoring were identified. Consultations were held with stakeholders (managers, directors, researchers, clinicians, and governmental representatives) about the types of information they would like to obtain from an outcome monitoring system. Our process is useful as a model for collaborative research with respect to performance measurement. The study's implications and limitations are noted.

  5. A model-based reasoning approach to sensor placement for monitorability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doyle, Richard; Homemdemello, Luiz

    1992-01-01

    An approach is presented to evaluating sensor placements to maximize monitorability of the target system while minimizing the number of sensors. The approach uses a model of the monitored system to score potential sensor placements on the basis of four monitorability criteria. The scores can then be analyzed to produce a recommended sensor set. An example from our NASA application domain is used to illustrate our model-based approach to sensor placement.

  6. Enzymes enhance degradation of the fiber-starch-protein matrix of distillers dried grains with solubles as revealed by a porcine in vitro fermentation model and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jha, R; Woyengo, T A; Li, J; Bedford, M R; Vasanthan, T; Zijlstra, R T

    2015-03-01

    Effects of treating corn and wheat distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) with a multicarbohydrase alone or in combination with a protease on porcine in vitro fermentation characteristics and the matrix structure of the DGGS before and after the fermentation were studied. Three DDGS samples (wheat DDGS sample 1 [wDDGS1], wheat DDGS sample 2 [wDDGS2], and corn DDGS [cDDGS]) were predigested with pepsin and pancreatin. Residues were then subjected to in vitro fermentation using buffered mineral solution inoculated with fresh pig feces without or with a multicarbohydrase alone or in combination with protease in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement. Accumulated gas production was measured for up to 72 h. Concentration of VFA was measured in fermented solutions. The matrix of native DDGS and their residues after fermentation was analyzed using confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine internal and external structures, respectively. On a DM basis, wDDGS1, wDDGS2, and cDDGS contained 35.5, 43.4, and 29.0% CP; 2.23, 0.51, and 6.40% starch; 0.82, 0.80, and 0.89% available Lys; and 24.8, 22.5, and 23.0% total nonstarch polysaccharides, respectively. The in vitro digestibility of DM for wDDGS1, wDDGS2, and cDDGS was 67.7, 72.1, and 59.6%, respectively. The cDDGS had greater ( < 0.05) total gas and VFA production than both wheat DDGS. The wDDGS2 had lower ( < 0.05) total gas production than wDDGS1. Multicarbohydrase increased ( < 0.05) total gas production for cDDGS and total VFA production for wDGGS1 but did not increase gas or VFA production for wDDGS2. Addition of protease with multicarbohydrase to DDGS reduced ( < 0.05) total gas and VFA productions and increased ( < 0.05) branched-chain VFA regardless of DDGS type. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that DDGS were mainly aggregates of resistant and nonfermentable starchy and nonstarchy complexes formed during DDGS production. After in vitro

  7. Validation of an immunoturbidimetric method for determination of porcine serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Saco, Yolanda; Fraile, Lorenzo; Giménez, Mercè; Canalias, Francesca; Bassols, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Measurement of porcine C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum is an important tool for monitoring health and welfare in pigs. In this study, an immunoturbidimetric method from Olympus System Reagent (OSR 6147) used to measure human CRP in serum that employ a human traceable calibrator has been evaluated in porcine serum samples. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision were lower than that obtained with the porcine-specific commercially available ELISA. The expected difference in serum CRP between healthy and non-healthy pigs was detected. CRP values measured by the immunoturbidimetric method showed a good correlation with those obtained by ELISA, although differences in absolute CRP values were observed. When an in-house porcine standard was used a better agreement was obtained. In conclusion, the immunoturbidimetric method of Olympus can be used with porcine samples. The easier use of this method should facilitate the implementation of CRP serum determination for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in swine medicine. The results emphasize the need to establish species-specific standard and methods to decrease inter-laboratory discrepancies.

  8. Optofluidic phantom mimicking optical properties of porcine livers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Ruiqi; King, Travis; Akl, Tony; Ericson, Milton Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.; McShane, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    One strategy for assessing efficacy of a liver transplant is to monitor perfusion and oxygenation after transplantation. An implantable optical sensor is being developed to overcome inadequacies of current monitoring approaches. To facilitate sensor design while minimizing animal use, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based liver phantom was developed to mimic the optical properties of porcine liver in the 630-1000 nm wavelength range and the anatomical geometry of liver parenchyma. Using soft lithography to construct microfluidic channels in pigmented elastomer enabled the 2D approximation of hexagonal liver lobules with 15mm sinusoidal channels, which will allow perfusion with blood-mimicking fluids to facilitate the development of the liver perfusion and oxygenation monitoring system.

  9. Landslide risk mitigation through integrated monitoring and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, Oreste Giuseppe; Gariano, Stefano Luigi; Iovine, Giulio G. R.

    2014-05-01

    In winter 2008-09, exceptional prolonged rains triggered numerous landslides in Calabria (southern Italy). Among these, a large rock slide was triggered on 28 January 2009 in weathered metamorphic rocks at San Benedetto Ullano (CS), involving fractured and altered migmatitic gneiss and biotitic schist. A detailed geomorphological survey was carried out during the entire phase of mobilization, allowing to recognize the evolution of the phenomenon. A series of benchmarks was promptly placed in correspondence of fractures on the body and along the sides of the landslide, allowing for frequent measurements of surface movements. In addition, a network of real-time monitoring extensometers were implemented at the surface of the landslide, combined with a meteorological station. The survey site and the data of the monitoring system allowed, from the early stages of activation of the phenomenon, to implement a support system to handle the emergency. In the following months, a clear retrogressive distribution could be identified, coupled with a tendency towards the enlargement of the flanks. In early May, the first crisis ended up. After the arrest of the phenomenon, a geological-technical scheme of the slope could be drawn, also based on data collected through a set of 5 exploratory wells (equipped with 4 inclinometers and 1 piezometer). The landslide mobilized a thickness from 15 to 35 meters along the longitudinal profile. To examine the stability of the slope affected by the landslide, and to quantify the role of fluctuations of the water table in destabilizing the slope, a parametric limit equilibrium analysis was conducted. The analysis confirmed the first interpretation of the process: the first activation of the landslide was expected, in fact, in the central portion of the slope in case, in the same area, the groundwater levels are close to ground level. Between 31 January 31 and 1 February 2010, following a further period of exceptional rainfall, the network of

  10. Lowering Perfusate Temperature From 37°C to 32°C Diminishes Function in a Porcine Model of Ex Vivo Kidney Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Thomas D.; Patel, Meeta; Hosgood, Sarah A.; Nicholson, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Ex vivo perfusion (EVP) is a novel method of preservation. However, optimal perfusion conditions remain undetermined. Reducing the temperature of the perfusate to subnormothermia may be beneficial during EVP and improve early graft function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether subnormothermia would influence the conditioning effect of EVP when compared with normothermic perfusion, and standard cold static storage (CS). Methods Porcine kidneys underwent static CS for 23 hours followed by 1 hour of EVP using leukocyte-depleted blood at a mean temperature of 32°C or 37°C. After this, kidneys were reperfused with whole autologous blood at 37°C for 3 hours to assess renal function and injury. These were compared with a control group that underwent 24 hours CS. Results During EVP, kidneys perfused at 37°C had a higher level of renal blood flow and oxygen consumption compared with EVP at 32°C (P = 0.001, 0.002). During reperfusion, 32°C EVP kidneys had lower creatinine clearance and urine output than control (P = 0.023, 0.011) and a higher fractional excretion of sodium, serum potassium, and serum aspartate transaminase than 37°C EVP kidneys (P = 0.01, 0.023, 0.009). Conclusions Tubular and renal functions were better preserved by a near-physiological temperature of 37°C during 1 hour of EVP, when compared to EVP at 32°C or cold storage. PMID:28361124

  11. Cell surface glycoengineering improves selectin-mediated adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs): Pilot validation in porcine ischemia-reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi Y; Weil, Brian R; Palka, Beth A; Momeni, Arezoo; Canty, John M; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Promising results are emerging in clinical trials focused on stem cell therapy for cardiology applications. However, the low homing and engraftment of the injected cells to target tissue continues to be a problem. Cellular glycoengineering can address this limitation by enabling the targeting of stem cells to sites of vascular injury/inflammation. Two such glycoengineering methods are presented here: i. The non-covalent incorporation of a P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) mimetic 19Fc[FUT7(+)] via lipid-protein G fusion intermediates that intercalate onto the cell surface, and ii. Over-expression of the α(1,3)fucosyltransferse FUT7 in cells. Results demonstrate the efficient coupling of 19Fc[FUT7(+)] onto both cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), with coupling being more efficient when using protein G fused to single-tailed palmitic acid rather than double-tailed DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). This non-covalent cellular modification was mild since cell proliferation and stem-cell marker expression was unaltered. Whereas coupling using 19Fc[FUT7(+)] enhanced cell capture on recombinant P-selectin or CHO-P cell surfaces, α(1,3)fucosylation was necessary for robust binding to E-selectin and inflamed endothelial cells under shear. Pilot studies confirm the safety and homing efficacy of the modified stem cells to sites of ischemia-reperfusion in the porcine heart. Overall, glycoengineering with physiological selectin-ligands may enhance stem cell engraftment.

  12. What Kind of Capsule Endoscope Is Suitable for a Controllable Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope? Experimental Study Using a Porcine Stomach Model for Clinical Application (with Videos)

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Nouda, Sadaharu; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Iguchi, Munetaka; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Inoue, Takuya; Shindo, Yasunori; Uesugi, Kenshiro; Fujito, Yoshiaki; Nishihara, Hironori; Ohtsuka, Naotake; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Background We have been developing the Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope (SPCE) that allows for controllability from outside of the body and real-time observation. What kind of capsule endoscope (CE) is suitable for a controllable SPCE is unclear and a very critical point for clinical application. We compared observing ability of three kinds of SPCEs with different viewing angles and frame rates. Methods Eleven buttons were sewed in an excised porcine stomach. Four examiners controlled the SPCE using PillCamSB2, -ESO2, and -COLON2 (Given Imaging Ltd., Israel), for 10 minutes each with the aim of detecting as many buttons and examining them as closely as possible. The ability to find lesions was assessed based on the number of detected buttons. The SPCE-performance score (SPS) was used to evaluate the ability to examine the lesions in detail. Results The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 detected 11 [interquartile range (IQR): 0], 10.5 (IQR, 0.5), and 8 (IQR, 1.0) buttons, respectively. The SPCE-ESO2 and -COLON2 had a significantly better ability to detect lesions than the -SB2 (p < 0.05). The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 had significantly different SPS values of 22 (IQR, 0), 16.5 (IQR, 1.5), and 14 (IQR, 1.0), respectively (p < 0.05 for all comparisons; SPCE-SB2 vs. -ESO2, -SB2 vs. -COLON2, and -ESO2 vs. -COLON2). Conclusions PillCamESO2 is most suitable in different three CEs for SPCE for examining lesions in detail of the stomach. PMID:26447694

  13. Porous Gelatin Particles for Uterine Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study of Intra-Arterial Distribution, Uterine Necrosis, and Inflammati