Science.gov

Sample records for monitoring glycerol secretion

  1. Rapid monitoring of glycerol in fermentation growth media: Facilitating crude glycerol bioprocess development.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sergi; Pérez, Xavier; Planas, Antoni; Turon, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the need for crude glycerol valorisation from the biodiesel industry has generated many studies for practical and economic applications. Amongst them, fermentations based on glycerol media for the production of high value metabolites are prominent applications. This has generated a need to develop analytical techniques which allow fast and simple glycerol monitoring during fermentation. The methodology should be fast and inexpensive to be adopted in research, as well as in industrial applications. In this study three different methods were analysed and compared: two common methodologies based on liquid chromatography and enzymatic kits, and the new method based on a DotBlot assay coupled with image analysis. The new methodology is faster and cheaper than the other conventional methods, with comparable performance. Good linearity, precision and accuracy were achieved in the lower range (10 or 15 g/L to depletion), the most common range of glycerol concentrations to monitor fermentations in terms of growth kinetics.

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Stimulate Insulin Secretion in Rat Pancreatic Islets: Studies Using Mono-Oleoyl-Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Ada; Shirihai, Orian; Corkey, Barbara E.; Deeney, Jude T.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic exposure (24–72 hrs) of pancreatic islets to elevated glucose and fatty acid leads to glucolipoxicity characterized by basal insulin hypersecretion and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Our aim was to determine the mechanism for basal hypersecretion of insulin. We used mono-oleoyl-glycerol (MOG) as a tool to rapidly increase lipids in isolated rat pancreatic ß-cells and in the clonal pancreatic ß-cell line INS-1 832/13. MOG (25–400 µM) stimulated basal insulin secretion from ß-cells in a concentration dependent manner without increasing intracellular Ca2+ or O2 consumption. Like GSIS, MOG increased NAD(P)H and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The mitochondrial reductant ß-hydroxybutyrate (ß-OHB) also increased the redox state and ROS production, while ROS scavengers abrogated secretion. Diazoxide (0.4 mM) did not prevent the stimulatory effect of MOG, confirming that the effect was independent of the KATP-dependent pathway of secretion. MOG was metabolized to glycerol and long-chain acyl-CoA (LC-CoA), whereas, acute oleate did not similarly increase LC-CoA. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) did not mimic the effect of MOG on insulin secretion, indicating that MOG did not act primarily by inhibiting DGK. Inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) reduced the stimulatory effect of MOG on basal insulin secretion by 30% indicating a role for LC-CoA. These data suggest that basal insulin secretion is stimulated by increased ROS production, due to an increase in the mitochondrial redox state independent of the established components of GSIS. PMID:22272304

  3. 2-Arachidonoyl glycerol sensitizes the pars distalis and enhances forskolin-stimulated prolactin secretion in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Yasuo, Shinobu; Fischer, Claudia; Bojunga, Joerg; Iigo, Masayuki; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2014-04-01

    2-Arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) is a major endocannabinoid and an important regulator of neuroendocrine system. In Syrian hamster and human, we found that 2-AG is synthesized in the hypophysial pars tuberalis (PT), an interface between photoperiodic melatonin signals and neuroendocrine output pathways. The target of 2-AG produced in the PT is likely to be the pars distalis (PD). Here we demonstrate that 2-AG in combination with forskolin stimulated prolactin secretion from PD organ cultures of Syrian hamsters, whereas incubation with 2-AG alone had no effect. Forskolin-induced prolactin secretion was also significantly enhanced when cultured PD tissue was preincubated with 2-AG. The stimulatory effects of 2-AG on prolactin secretion were blocked by AM251, a selective CB1 antagonist, and were still observed in the presence of quinpirole, a D2-class dopamine receptor agonist. 2-AG also enhanced prolactin secretion in the presence of adenosine, while it had little effect when applied together with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, the effect of forskolin was mimicked by adenosine in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our data suggest that 2-AG sensitizes the PD tissue to potentiate the stimulating effects of forskolin and adenosine on prolactin secretion and thus provide novel insight into the mode of action of 2-AG in the PD.

  4. Sequential injection kinetic flow assay for monitoring glycerol in a sugar fermentation process by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Karina B Hueso; Tóth, Ildikó V; Souto, M Renata S; Mendes, Filipa; De María, Cándido García; Vasconcelos, Isabel; Rangel, António O S S

    2010-03-01

    A sequential injection system to monitor glycerol in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation process was developed. The method relies on the rate of formation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its reduced form (NADH, measured spectrophotometrically at 340 nm) from the reaction of glycerol with NAD(+) cofactor, catalysed by the enzyme glycerol dehydrogenase present in solution. This procedure enables the determination of glycerol between 0.046 and 0.46 g/l, (corresponding to yeast fermentation samples with concentrations up to 50 g/l) with good repeatability (relative standard deviation for n = 10 lower than 2.2% for three different samples) at a sampling frequency of 25/h. The detection and quantification limits using a miniaturised spectrophotometer were 0.13 and 0.44 mM, respectively. Reagent consumption was of 0.45 mumol NAD(+) and 1.8 microg enzyme per assay, and the waste production was 2.8 ml per determination. Results obtained for samples were in agreement with those obtained with a high-performance liquid chromatography method.

  5. Monitoring of monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, ethanol and glycerol during wort fermentation by biosensors, HPLC and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Monošík, Rastislav; Magdolen, Peter; Stredanský, Miroslav; Šturdík, Ernest

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze sugar levels (namely maltose, maltotriose, glucose and fructose) and alcohols (ethanol and glycerol) during the fermentation process in wort samples by amperometric enzymatic biosensors developed by our research group for industrial application, HPLC and spectrophotometry, and to compare the suitability of the presented methods for determination of individual analytes. We can conclude that for the specific monitoring of maltose or maltotriose only the HPLC method was suitable. On the other hand, biosensors and spectrophotometry reflected a decrease in total sugar concentration better and were able to detect both glucose and fructose in the later stages of fermentation, while HPLC was not. This can be attributed to the low detection limits and good sensitivity of the proposed methods. For the ethanol and glycerol analysis all methods proved to be suitable. However, concerning the cost expenses and time analysis, biosensors represented the best option.

  6. On-line near infrared monitoring of glycerol-boosted anaerobic digestion processes: evaluation of process analytical technologies.

    PubMed

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Lomborg, Carina Juel; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Esbensen, Kim H

    2008-02-01

    A study of NIR as a tool for process monitoring of thermophilic anaerobic digestion boosted by glycerol has been carried out, aiming at developing simple and robust Process Analytical Technology modalities for on-line surveillance in full scale biogas plants. Three 5 L laboratory fermenters equipped with on-line NIR sensor and special sampling stations were used as a basis for chemometric multivariate calibration. NIR characterisation using Transflexive Embedded Near Infra-Red Sensor (TENIRS) equipment integrated into an external recurrent loop on the fermentation reactors, allows for representative sampling, of the highly heterogeneous fermentation bio slurries. Glycerol is an important by-product from the increasing European bio-diesel production. Glycerol addition can boost biogas yields, if not exceeding a limiting 5-7 g L(-1) concentration inside the fermenter-further increase can cause strong imbalance in the anaerobic digestion process. A secondary objective was to evaluate the effect of addition of glycerol, in a spiking experiment which introduced increasing organic overloading as monitored by volatile fatty acids (VFA) levels. High correlation between on-line NIR determinations of glycerol and VFA contents has been documented. Chemometric regression models (PLS) between glycerol and NIR spectra needed no outlier removals and only one PLS-component was required. Test set validation resulted in excellent measures of prediction performance, precision: r(2) = 0.96 and accuracy = 1.04, slope of predicted versus reference fitting. Similar prediction statistics for acetic acid, iso-butanoic acid and total VFA proves that process NIR spectroscopy is able to quantify all pertinent levels of both volatile fatty acids and glycerol. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. OCT monitoring of diffusion of water and glycerol through tooth dentine in different geometry of wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunina, N. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2010-02-01

    In our previous work optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proved to be a useful tool for monitoring of diffusion of chemical agents (water, glycerol) within human tooth dentine. Such diffusion studies are interesting for tooth therapy (diffusion of medicinal preparations) and cosmetics (chemical whitening agents). Here we compare different wetting schemes in which the sample is either merged in the liquid agent so that the probe beam is to pass through a layer of liquid, or subjected to wetting through a special window from the back side. In spite of certain difference revealed, the order of magnitude of the diffusion time constant and the permeability coefficient are shown to be the same in both cases.

  8. The use of capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection for monitoring of glycerol in adipose tissues during a sporting performance.

    PubMed

    Tůma, Petr; Málková, Klára; Wedellová, Zuzana; Samcová, Eva; Stulík, Karel

    2010-06-01

    A CE procedure employing capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection has been developed for direct determination of the glycerol and mannitol polyalcohols in biological and pharmacological samples. Both glycerol and mannitol are fully separated from the sample matrix within very short times of 3.0 and 3.9 min, respectively, when using the optimized BGE, 60 mM H3BO3+30 mM LiOH (pH 9.1). The LODs amount to 0.5 microM for glycerol and 0.3 microM for mannitol. The repeatability of the glycerol determination in real biological materials is characterized by the coefficient of variation values, 0.5 and 3.2%, for the migration time and the peak area, respectively. The procedure has been used to monitor the free glycerol concentration in adipose tissue microdialyzates. A physiological study has demonstrated that the lipolysis occurring during a sporting action can be stimulated by local application of adrenaline. The procedure has further been utilized to determine mannitol in a pharmacological preparation.

  9. In vivo determination of triglyceride (TG) secretion in rats fed different dietary saturated fats using (2- sup 3 H)-glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.C.; Yang, H.; Lasekan, J.; Clayton, M.; Ney, D.M. )

    1990-02-26

    Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (154{plus minus}1 g) were fed diets containing 2% corn oil (CO) + 14% butterfat (BF), beef tallow (BT), olive oil (OO) or coconut oil (CN) vs a 16% CO control diet for 5 weeks. Changes in plasma TG specific activity (dpm/mg TG) were determined in individual unanesthetized rats after injection of 100 {mu}Ci (2-{sup 3}H)-glycerol via a carotid cannula. Fractional rate constants were obtained using a 2-compartment model and nonlinear regression analysis. Results demonstrated no difference in the fractional rate constants among dietary groups; but, differences in the rates of hepatic TG secretion were noted. Rats fed BT showed a higher rate of hepatic TG secretion than rats fed CO. Rats fed BF, OO or CN showed somewhat higher rates of hepatic TG secretion than CO. VLDL TG, phospholipid, and apolipoprotein B and E levels were higher with saturated fats vs CO. The data suggest that the higher plasma TG levels noted in response to feeding saturated fats vs corn oil can be explained, in part, by an increased flux of hepatic TG secretion.

  10. Dynamic OCT monitoring and quantification of light penetration enhancement for normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissues at different concentrations of glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Shu-wen Tan; Ying Jin; Hui Yu; Guo-yong Wu

    2013-10-31

    We have evaluated the dynamic effects of the analyte diffusion on the 1/e light penetration depths of normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro, as well as have monitored and quantified the dynamic change in the light penetration depths of the mentioned human lung tissue after application of 25 % and 50 % glycerol solution, respectively. The light penetration depths of the analyte diffusion in the lung tissue are measured using the Fourierdomain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). Experimental results show that the application of glycerol as a chemical agent can significantly enhance light penetration depths into the human normal lung (NL), lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue. In-depth transport of the glycerol molecules in the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are faster than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), and the 1/e light penetration depths at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are smaller than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), respectively. Their differences in the maximal 1/e light penetration depths of the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a higher and a lower glycerol concentrations were only 8.8 %, 6.8 % and 4.7 %, respectively. (biophotonics)

  11. Dual Monitoring of Secretion and ATP Levels during Chondrogenesis Using Perfusion Culture-Combined Bioluminescence Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon; Han, Youngbae

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal pattern formation in limb development depends on prechondrogenic condensation which prefigures the cartilage template. However, although morphogens such as TGF-βs and BMPs have been known to play essential roles in skeletal patterning, how the morphogens induce prechondrogenic cells to aggregate and determine patterns of cartilage elements has remained unclear. Our previous study reported that ATP oscillations are induced during chondrogenesis. This result suggests the possibility that ATP oscillations lead to the oscillatory secretion of morphogens, due to the fact that secretion process requires ATP. To examine the correlation between ATP oscillations and secretion levels of morphogens, we have developed perfusion culture-combined bioluminescence monitoring system to simultaneously monitor intracellular ATP levels and secretion levels. Using this system, we found that secretory activity oscillates in phase with ATP oscillations and that secretion levels of TGF-β1 and BMP2 oscillate during chondrogenesis. The oscillatory secretion of the morphogens would contribute to amplifying the fluctuation of the morphogens, underlie the spatial patterning of morphogens, and consequently lead to skeletal pattern formation.

  12. On chip real time monitoring of B-cells hybridoma secretion of immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Milgram, Sarah; Cortes, Sandra; Villiers, Marie-Bernadette; Marche, Patrice; Buhot, Arnaud; Livache, Thierry; Roupioz, Yoann

    2011-01-15

    The secretions of molecules by cells are of tremendous interest for both fundamental insights studies and medical purposes. In this study, we propose a new biochip-based approach for the instantaneous monitoring of protein secretions, using antibody production by B lymphocytes cultured in vitro. This was possible thanks to the Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) of a protein biochip where antigen proteins (Hen Egg Lysozyme, HEL) were micro-arrayed along with series of control proteins. B cell hybridomas were cultured on the chip and the secretion of immunoglobulins (antibody) specific to HEL was monitored in real-time and detected within only few minutes rather than after a 30-60 min incubation with standard ELISA experiments. This fast and sensitive detection was possible thanks to the sedimentation of the cells on the biochip sensitive surface, where local antibody concentrations are much higher before dilution in the bulk medium. An other interesting feature of this approach for the secretion monitoring was the independence of the SPR response--after normalization--regarding to the density of the surface-immobilized probes. Such biosensor might thus pave the way to new tools capable of both qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of proteins secreted by other immune cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A sampling design framework for monitoring secretive marshbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Gibbs, J.P.; Herzog, M.; Lor, S.; Niemuth, N.D.; Ribic, C.A.; Seamans, M.; Shaffer, T.L.; Shriver, W.G.; Stehman, S.V.; Thompson, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    A framework for a sampling plan for monitoring marshbird populations in the contiguous 48 states is proposed here. The sampling universe is the breeding habitat (i.e. wetlands) potentially used by marshbirds. Selection protocols would be implemented within each of large geographical strata, such as Bird Conservation Regions. Site selection will be done using a two-stage cluster sample. Primary sampling units (PSUs) would be land areas, such as legal townships, and would be selected by a procedure such as systematic sampling. Secondary sampling units (SSUs) will be wetlands or portions of wetlands in the PSUs. SSUs will be selected by a randomized spatially balanced procedure. For analysis, the use of a variety of methods as a means of increasing confidence in conclusions that may be reached is encouraged. Additional effort will be required to work out details and implement the plan.

  14. Inhibition of secreted phospholipase A2. 4-glycerol derivatives of 4,5-dihydro-3-(4-tetradecyloxybenzyl)-1,2,4-4H-oxadiazol-5-one with broad activities.

    PubMed

    Touaibia, Mohamed; Djimdé, Atimé; Cao, Fei; Boilard, Eric; Bezzine, Sofiane; Lambeau, Gérard; Redeuilh, Catherine; Lamouri, Aazdine; Massicot, France; Chau, François; Dong, Chang-Zhi; Heymans, Françoise

    2007-04-05

    Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) have been reported to play an important role in various inflammatory conditions and thus represent an attractive therapeutic target. Previous SAR studies from our laboratory have revealed certain important features of our recently discovered specific hGIIA sPLA2 inhibitors, and we report here the synthesis and biological activities of glycerol-containing derivatives of our lead compound III (Figure 1). Efficient and selective synthesis methods have been developed to make glycerol trisubstituted by different groups on desired positions. In terms of biological activities, the best compounds (A3, A6, and A15) are more active than III (Figure 1), as potent as Me-Indoxam, an sPLA2s inhibitor of reference, against hGIIA, hGV, and hGX sPLA2s and at least 10 times less active toward the GIB enzymes in two in vitro assay systems. By synthesis of enantiopure (S)-A6, we demonstrated that no important improvement of the inhibitory potency could be achieved by this approach. Furthermore, the results show that the global lipophilicity is likely responsible for the anti-PLA2 activity and two oxadiazolone moieties seem too big to be accommodated by the active site of the hGIIA enzyme.

  15. Novel Authentication of Monitoring Data Through the use of Secret and Public Cryptographic Keys

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Jacob M.; Tolk, Keith; Tanner, Jennifer E.

    2014-07-21

    The Office of Nuclear Verification (ONV) is supporting the development of a piece of equipment to provide data authentication and protection for a suite of monitoring sensors as part of a larger effort to create an arms control technology toolkit. This device, currently called the Red Box, leverages the strengths of both secret and public cryptographic keys to authenticate, digitally sign, and pass along monitoring data to allow for host review, and redaction if necessary, without the loss of confidence in the authenticity of the data by the monitoring party. The design of the Red Box will allow for the addition and removal of monitoring equipment and can also verify that the data was collected by authentic monitoring equipment prior to signing the data and sending it to the host and for review. The host will then forward the data to the monitor for review and inspection. This paper will highlight the progress to date of the Red Box development, and will explain the novel method of leveraging both symmetric and asymmetric (secret and public key) cryptography to authenticate data within a warhead monitoring regime.

  16. Secreted protein-based reporter systems for monitoring inflammatory events: critical interference by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Kasai, Ayumi; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Nagai, Kaoru; Kubota, Takeo; Yao, Jian; Kitamura, Masanori

    2006-08-31

    A number of recent reports have used secreted protein-based reporter assays for monitoring intercellular and intracellular events involved in inflammation. However, we found that these assay systems are critically affected by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. When reporter mesangial cells that express secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of NF-kappaB were exposed to IL-1beta or TNF-alpha, induction of SEAP activity was markedly reduced under ER stress conditions. Downregulation of SEAP activity was observed regardless of cell types and type of regulatory elements; e.g., when reporter hepatocytes that express SEAP under the control of the dioxin responsive elements were exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or benzo[a]pyrene, ER stress similarly suppressed the increase in SEAP activity despite its transcriptional upregulation. Activity of constitutively expressed SEAP in various cells was also reduced by ER stress in a magnitude-dependent manner, and it was associated with disturbed subcellular transport of SEAP to the Golgi. Furthermore, interference by ER stress was similarly observed in other reporter assay using secreted luciferase. These results evidenced critical interference by ER stress in secreted protein-based reporter systems. The suppression of reporter responses by ER stress should be considered carefully for experimental design and interpretation of data when secreted protein-based reporter systems are used for investigation.

  17. Aptamer-Based Microfluidic Electrochemical Biosensor for Monitoring Cell-Secreted Trace Cardiac Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Kim, Duck-Jin; Manbohi, Ahmad; Avci, Huseyin; Silvestri, Antonia; Aleman, Julio; Hu, Ning; Kilic, Tugba; Keung, Wendy; Righi, Martina; Assawes, Pribpandao; Alhadrami, Hani A; Li, Ronald A; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-10-04

    Continual monitoring of secreted biomarkers from organ-on-a-chip models is desired to understand their responses to drug exposure in a noninvasive manner. To achieve this goal, analytical methods capable of monitoring trace amounts of secreted biomarkers are of particular interest. However, a majority of existing biosensing techniques suffer from limited sensitivity, selectivity, stability, and require large working volumes, especially when cell culture medium is involved, which usually contains a plethora of nonspecific binding proteins and interfering compounds. Hence, novel analytical platforms are needed to provide noninvasive, accurate information on the status of organoids at low working volumes. Here, we report a novel microfluidic aptamer-based electrochemical biosensing platform for monitoring damage to cardiac organoids. The system is scalable, low-cost, and compatible with microfluidic platforms easing its integration with microfluidic bioreactors. To create the creatine kinase (CK)-MB biosensor, the microelectrode was functionalized with aptamers that are specific to CK-MB biomarker secreted from a damaged cardiac tissue. Compared to antibody-based sensors, the proposed aptamer-based system was highly sensitive, selective, and stable. The performance of the sensors was assessed using a heart-on-a-chip system constructed from human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes following exposure to a cardiotoxic drug, doxorubicin. The aptamer-based biosensor was capable of measuring trace amounts of CK-MB secreted by the cardiac organoids upon drug treatments in a dose-dependent manner, which was in agreement with the beating behavior and cell viability analyses. We believe that, our microfluidic electrochemical biosensor using aptamer-based capture mechanism will find widespread applications in integration with organ-on-a-chip platforms for in situ detection of biomarkers at low abundance and high sensitivity.

  18. Enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seokhyeon; Park, Chulhwan

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we report the enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol and methyl acetate. Lipases are essential for the catalysis of this reaction. To find the optimum conditions for glycerol acetate production, sequential experiments were designed. Type of lipase, lipase concentration, molar ratio of reactants, reaction temperature and solvents were investigated for the optimum conversion of glycerol to glycerol acetate. As the result of lipase screening, Novozym 435 (Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B) was turned out to be the optimal lipase for the reaction. Under the optimal conditions (2.5 g/L of Novozym 435, 1:40 molar ratio of glycerol to methyl acetate, 40 °C and tert-butanol as the solvent), glycerol acetate production was achieved in 95.00% conversion.

  19. Computerised lung sound monitoring to assess effectiveness of chest physiotherapy and secretion removal: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ntoumenopoulos, G; Glickman, Y

    2012-09-01

    To explore the feasibility of computerised lung sound monitoring to evaluate secretion removal in intubated and mechanically ventilated adult patients. Before and after observational investigation. Intensive care unit. Fifteen intubated and mechanically ventilated adult patients receiving chest physiotherapy. Chest physiotherapy included combinations of standard closed airway suctioning, saline lavage, postural drainage, chest wall vibrations, manual-assisted cough and/or lung hyperinflation, dependent upon clinical indications. Lung sound amplitude at peak inspiration was assessed using computerised lung sound monitoring. Measurements were performed immediately before and after chest physiotherapy. Data are reported as mean [standard deviation (SD)], mean difference and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Significance testing was not performed due to the small sample size and the exploratory nature of the study. Fifteen patients were included in the study [11 males, four females, mean age 65 (SD 14) years]. The mean total lung sound amplitude at peak inspiration decreased two-fold from 38 (SD 59) units before treatment to 17 (SD 19) units after treatment (mean difference 22, 95% CI of difference -3 to 46). The mean total lung sound amplitude from the lungs of patients with a large amount of secretions (n=9) was over four times 'louder' than the lungs of patients with a moderate or small amount of secretions (n=6) [56 (SD 72) units vs 12 (13) units, respectively; mean difference -44, 95% CI of difference -100 to 11]. The mean total lung sound amplitude decreased in the group of 'loud' right and left lungs (n=15) from 37 (SD 36) units before treatment to 15 (SD 13) units after treatment (mean difference 22, 95% CI of difference 6 to 38). Computerised lung sound monitoring in this small group of patients demonstrated a two-fold decrease in lung sound amplitude following chest physiotherapy. Subgroup analysis also demonstrated decreasing trends in lung sound amplitude in

  20. Non-invasive evaluation of skin cytokines secretion: an innovative complementary method for monitoring skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Kohen, Ron

    2013-05-15

    In this review, a novel non-invasive approach based on skin surface wash sampling is described. Since the epidermis possesses a high metabolic activity, the secretion of various biomarkers can be exploited to develop non-invasive procedures for skin measurement to monitor disorders and to define a therapeutic strategy. Thus, we developed a method for the quantification of skin surface compounds. In this procedure, a well is placed on skin surface and is attached using an adhesive pad. Extraction buffer is introduced into the well for 30 min incubation period and the secretion of different biomarkers on skin surface can be measured: cytokines, antioxidants, peptides, RNA, DNA volatile organic compounds etc. Here, the focus is on cytokine measurement. After collecting skin samples cytokines can be quantified using ELISA assay. Since so far cytokine levels in skin have been evaluated mostly by invasive and prolonged procedures (punch biopsy, blister fluid and scrapping), employing this method has important implications, because it allows assessing cytokine amount with minimal invasion and high accuracy. We have already applied skin surface wash sampling for cytokine quantification in different clinical conditions: psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and chronic renal failure. A distinct pattern of cytokine secretion has been demonstrated for each disorder. Differences were also observed between lesional and non-lesional areas. The obtained results shed a new light on cutaneous cytokine expression in different clinical conditions. Moreover, the interplay between cytokines and other soluble compounds can give an added value in understanding the mechanism of skin pathologies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemical monitoring of cellular signal transduction with a secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter system.

    PubMed

    Torisawa, Yu-Suke; Ohara, Noriko; Nagamine, Kuniaki; Kasai, Shigenobu; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2006-11-15

    Electrochemical monitoring of cellular signal transduction under three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture conditions has been demonstrated by combining cell-based microarrays with a secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter system. The cells were genetically engineered to produce SEAP under the control of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) enhancer elements, and they were embedded with a small volume of a collagen gel matrix on a pyramidal-shaped silicon microstructure. Cellular SEAP expression triggered by NFkappaB activation was assessed by two types of electrochemical systems. First, SEAP expression of a 3-D cell array on a chip was continuously monitored in situ for 2 days by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Since the SECM-based assay enables the evaluation of cellular respiratory activity, simultaneous measurements of cellular viability and signal transduction were possible. Further, we have developed an electrode-integrated cell culture device for parallel evaluation of cellular SEAP expression. The detector electrode was integrated around the silicon microhole. Two kinds of cells were immobilized on the array of microholes on the same chip for comparative characterization of their SEAP activity. This electrochemical microdevice can be applied to evaluate the SEAP expression activity in multiple cellular microarrays by a high-throughput method.

  2. Rivoflavin may interfere with on-line monitoring of secreted green fluorescence protein fusion proteins in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Surribas, Anna; Resina, David; Ferrer, Pau; Valero, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Background Together with the development of optical sensors, fluorometry is becoming an increasingly attractive tool for the monitoring of cultivation processes. In this context, the green fluorescence protein (GFP) has been proposed as a molecular reporter when fused to target proteins to study their subcellular localization or secretion behaviour. The present work evaluates the use of the GFP fusion partner for monitoring extracellular production of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) in Pichia pastoris by means of 2D-fluorimetric techniques Results In this study, the GFP-ROL fusion protein was successfully produced as a secreted fusion form in P. pastoris batch cultivations. Furthermore, both the fusion enzyme and the fluorescent protein (GFP S65T mutant) retained their biological activity. However, when multiwavelength spectrofluorometry was used for extracellular fusion protein monitoring, riboflavin appeared as a major interfering component with GFP signal. Only when riboflavin was removed by ultrafiltration from cultivation supernatants, GFP fluorescence signal linearly correlated to lipase activity Conclusion P. pastoris appears to secrete/excrete significant amounts of riboflavin to the culture medium. When attempting to monitor extracellular protein production in P. pastoris using GFP fusions combined with multiwavelength spectrofluorimetric techniques, riboflavin may interfere with GFP fluorescence signal, thus limiting the application of some GFP variants for on-line extracellular recombinant protein quantification and monitoring purposes. PMID:17511861

  3. Glycerol combustion and emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the growing capacity in biodiesel production and the resulting glut of the glycerol by-product, there is increasing interest in finding alternative uses for crude glycerol. One option may be to burn it locally for combined process heat and power, replacing fossil fuels and i...

  4. Glycerol combustion and emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the growing capacity in biodiesel production and the resulting glut of the glycerol by-product, there is increasing interest in finding alternative uses for crude glycerol. One option may be to burn it locally for combined process heat and power, replacing fossil fuels and i...

  5. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-21

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips.

  6. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips. PMID:27098564

  7. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips.

  8. Electrochemical valorisation of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Simões, Mário; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The worldwide glycerol stocks are increasing; to make the biodiesel industry sustainable economically, this chemical could be used as a secondary primary raw material. Electric energy or hydrogen and added-value-chemical cogeneration becomes more and more an important research topic for increasing economical and industrial interests towards electrochemical technologies. Studies on glycerol electrooxidation for fuel or electrolysis cell applications are scarce. The valorisation of glycerol is generally performed by organic chemistry reactions forming, for example, esters, glycerol carbonates, ethers, acetals or ketals. Glycerol oxidation is made up of complex pathway reactions that can produce a large number of useful intermediates or valuable fine chemicals with presently limited market impact due to expensive production processes. Many of these chemical oxidation routes lead to significant amounts of undesired by-products, and enzymatic processes are limited. Converse to classical heterogeneous processes, electrocatalytic oxidation processes can be tuned by controlling the nature, composition and structure of the electrocatalyts as well as the electrode potential. Such control may lead to very high selectivity and activity, avoiding or limiting product separation steps. The coupling of glycerol oxidation to produce chemicals with the oxygen reduction reaction in a fuel cell or water reduction reaction in an electrolysis cell on Pt-free catalysts results either in coproduction of electrical energy or hydrogen for energy storage. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  10. Liquid dynamics in partially crystalline glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    We present a dielectric study on the dynamics of supercooled glycerol during crystallization. We explore the transformation into a solid phase in real time by monitoring the temporal evolution of the amplitude of the dielectric signal. Neither the initial nucleation nor the crystal growth influences the liquid dynamics visibly. For one of the samples studied, a tiny fraction of glycerol remained in the disordered state after the end of the transition. We examined the nature of the α relaxation in this frustrated crystal and find that it is virtually identical to the bulk dynamics. In addition, we have found no evidence that supercooled glycerol transforms into a peculiar phase in which either a new solid amorphous state or nano-crystals dispersed in a liquid matrix are formed.

  11. A metabolic engineering strategy for producing free fatty acids by the Yarrowia lipolytica yeast based on impairment of glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Y; Mostova, Elizaveta B; Andreeva, Natalia I; Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Fedorov, Alexander S; Konova, Irina A; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2017-08-19

    In recent years, bio-based production of free fatty acids from renewable resources has attracted attention for their potential as precursors for the production of biofuels and biochemicals. In this study, the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica was engineered to produce free fatty acids by eliminating glycerol metabolism. Free fatty acid production was monitored under lipogenic conditions with glycerol as a limiting factor. Firstly, the strain W29 (Δgpd1), which is deficient in glycerol synthesis, was obtained. However, W29 (Δgpd1) showed decreased biomass accumulation and glucose consumption in lipogenic medium containing a limiting supply of glycerol. Analysis of substrate utilization from a mixture of glucose and glycerol by the parental strain W29 revealed that glycerol was metabolized first and glucose utilization was suppressed. Thus, the Δgpd1Δgut2 double mutant, which is deficient also in glycerol catabolism, was constructed. In this genetic background, growth was repressed by glycerol. Oleate toxicity was observed in the Δgpd1Δgut2Δpex10 triple mutant strain which is deficient additionally in peroxisome biogenesis. Consequently, two consecutive rounds of selection of spontaneous mutants were performed. A mutant released from growth repression by glycerol was able to produce 136.8 mg L(-1) of free fatty acids in a test tube, whereas the wild type accumulated only 30.2 mg L(-1) . Next, an isolated oleate-resistant strain produced 382.8 mg L(-1) of free fatty acids. Finely, acyl-CoA carboxylase gene (ACC1) over-expression resulted to production of 1436.7 mg L(-1) of free fatty acids. The addition of dodecane promoted free fatty acid secretion and enhanced the level of free fatty acids up to 2033.8 mg L(-1) during test tube cultivation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced glycerol incorporation into phospholipids contributes to impaired intra-erythrocytic growth of glycerol kinase knockout Plasmodium falciparum parasites.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kubendran; Coetzer, Theresa L

    2013-11-01

    Malaria is a devastating disease and Plasmodium falciparum is the most lethal parasite infecting humans. Understanding the biology of this parasite is vital in identifying potential novel drug targets. During every 48-hour intra-erythrocytic asexual replication cycle, a single parasite can produce up to 32 progeny. This extensive proliferation implies that parasites require substantial amounts of lipid precursors for membrane biogenesis. Glycerol kinase is a highly conserved enzyme that functions at the interface of lipid synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. P. falciparum glycerol kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glycerol to glycerol-3-phosphate, a major phospholipid precursor. The P. falciparum glycerol kinase gene was disrupted using double crossover homologous DNA recombination to generate a knockout parasite line. Southern hybridization and mRNA analysis were used to verify gene disruption. Parasite growth rates were monitored by flow cytometry. Radiolabelling studies were used to assess incorporation of glycerol into parasite phospholipids. Disruption of the P. falciparum glycerol kinase gene produced viable parasites, but their growth was significantly reduced to 56.5±1.8% when compared to wild type parasites. (14)C-glycerol incorporation into the major phospholipids of the parasite membrane, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, was 48.4±10.8% and 53.1±5.7% relative to an equivalent number of wild type parasites. P. falciparum glycerol kinase is required for optimal intra-erythrocytic asexual parasite development. Exogenous glycerol may be used as an alternative carbon source for P. falciparum phospholipid biogenesis, despite the lack of glycerol kinase to generate glycerol-3-phosphate. These studies provide new insight into glycerolipid metabolism in P. falciparum. © 2013.

  13. Assessment of lactotroph axis functionality in mice: longitudinal monitoring of PRL secretion by ultrasensitive-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Guillou, Anne; Romanò, Nicola; Steyn, Frederik; Abitbol, Karine; Le Tissier, Paul; Bonnefont, Xavier; Chen, Chen; Mollard, Patrice; Martin, Agnès O

    2015-05-01

    The pattern of prolactin (PRL) secretion depends on the physiological state. Due to insufficient detection sensitivity of existing assays, the precise description of these patterns in mice is lacking. We described an ultrasensitive ELISA assay that can detect mouse PRL in small fractions of whole blood, allowing longitudinal studies of PRL secretion profiles in freely moving mice. Over a 24-hour period, males displayed no oscillation in PRL levels, whereas virgin and lactating females showed large pulses. Peaks of PRL secretion reached 30-40 ng/mL in lactating female mice and rarely exceeded 10 ng/mL in virgin females. These pulses of PRL in lactating females were associated with suckling. The return of pups after an experimental 12-hour weaning induced a pulse of PRL release, reaching 100 ng/mL. This approach also enabled us to assess the inhibitory tone from hypothalamic dopamine neurons on PRL secretion. We used a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist to relieve pituitary lactotrophs from the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic inhibitory tone and demonstrate a D2-induced PRL rise that can be used to evaluate both the secretory capacity of lactotrophs and the magnitude of the inhibitory tone on pituitary PRL release. We demonstrate that, although lactotroph function is altered to enhance chronic PRL output, their secretory response to acute stimulus is not modified during lactation and that chronic hyperprolactinemia is linked to a lower inhibitory tone. The combination of a sensitive PRL ELISA and administration of D2 receptor antagonist provide a unique opportunity to investigate the function and plasticity of the lactotroph axis in freely moving mice.

  14. A mathematical method for extracting cell secretion rate from affinity biosensors continuously monitoring cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yandong; Zhou, Qing; Matharu, Zimple; Liu, Ying; Kwa, Timothy; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed miniature aptasensors that may be integrated at the site of a small group of cells for continuous detection of cell secreted molecules such as inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In a system such as this, the signal measured at the sensor surfaces is a complex function of transport, reaction, as well as of cellular activity. Herein, we report on the development of a mathematical framework for extracting cell production rates from binding curves generated with affinity biosensors. This framework consisted of a diffusion-reaction model coupled to a root finding algorithm for determining cell production rates values causing convergence of a predetermined criterion. To experimentally validate model predictions, we deployed a microfluidic device with an integrated biosensor for measuring the IFN-γ release from CD4 T cells. We found close agreement between secretion rate observed theoretically and those observed experimentally. After taking into account the differences in sensor geometry and reaction kinetics, the method for cell secretion rate determination described in this paper may be broadly applied to any biosensor continuously measuring cellular activity. PMID:24803956

  15. Monitoring the dynamics of clonal tumour evolution in vivo using secreted luciferases

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Joël P.; Fuchs, Jeannette; Hefter, Mirjam; Vischedyk, Jonas B.; Kleint, Maximilian; Vogiatzi, Fotini; Schäfer, Jonas A.; Nist, Andrea; Timofeev, Oleg; Wanzel, Michael; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tumours are heterogeneous cell populations that undergo clonal evolution during tumour progression, metastasis and response to therapy. Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) generate stable loss-of-function phenotypes and are versatile experimental tools to explore the contribution of individual genetic alterations to clonal evolution. In these experiments tumour cells carrying shRNAs are commonly tracked with fluorescent reporters. While this works well for cell culture studies and leukaemia mouse models, fluorescent reporters are poorly suited for animals with solid tumours—the most common tumour types in cancer patients. Here we develop a toolkit that uses secreted luciferases to track the fate of two different shRNA-expressing tumour cell clones competitively, both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that secreted luciferase activities can be measured robustly in the blood stream of tumour-bearing mice to accurately quantify, in a minimally invasive manner, the dynamic evolution of two genetically distinct tumour subclones in preclinical mouse models of tumour development, metastasis and therapy. PMID:24889111

  16. Monitoring the dynamics of clonal tumour evolution in vivo using secreted luciferases.

    PubMed

    Charles, Joël P; Fuchs, Jeannette; Hefter, Mirjam; Vischedyk, Jonas B; Kleint, Maximilian; Vogiatzi, Fotini; Schäfer, Jonas A; Nist, Andrea; Timofeev, Oleg; Wanzel, Michael; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2014-06-03

    Tumours are heterogeneous cell populations that undergo clonal evolution during tumour progression, metastasis and response to therapy. Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) generate stable loss-of-function phenotypes and are versatile experimental tools to explore the contribution of individual genetic alterations to clonal evolution. In these experiments tumour cells carrying shRNAs are commonly tracked with fluorescent reporters. While this works well for cell culture studies and leukaemia mouse models, fluorescent reporters are poorly suited for animals with solid tumours--the most common tumour types in cancer patients. Here we develop a toolkit that uses secreted luciferases to track the fate of two different shRNA-expressing tumour cell clones competitively, both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that secreted luciferase activities can be measured robustly in the blood stream of tumour-bearing mice to accurately quantify, in a minimally invasive manner, the dynamic evolution of two genetically distinct tumour subclones in preclinical mouse models of tumour development, metastasis and therapy.

  17. Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Wei

    1997-10-08

    Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell (βTC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.

  18. An in vivo mouse reporter gene (human secreted alkaline phosphatase) model to monitor ovarian tumor growth and response to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric E; Westfall, Suzanne D; McDonald, Claudia; Lison, Tiffany; Sadler-Riggleman, Ingrid; Skinner, Michael K

    2002-02-01

    Developing new anticancer therapeutic regimens requires the measurement of tumor cell growth in response to treatment. This is often accomplished by injecting immunocompromised mice with cells from cancer tissue or cell lines. After treating the animals, tumor weight or volume is measured. Such methods are complicated by inaccuracies in measuring tumor mass and often animals must be killed to measure tumor burden. An in vivo tumor model system is presented in which the tumor cell line was stably transfected with a constitutively expressed marker gene: secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase protein (SEAP). The SEAP gene codes for a heat-stable protein that is produced at levels proportional to the amount of tumor cells in the animal. The SEAP protein is detectable in small blood samples so that animals can be repeatedly sampled over the trial period to monitor the course of tumor progression. OCC1 ovarian carcinoma cells were stably transfected with pCMV-SEAP. The OCC1-SEAP cells were maintained in vitro to monitor the relationship between cell number and SEAP production. Experiments were performed in vivo to determine whether SEAP levels in blood corresponded to tumor burden. OCC1-SEAP cells were injected s.c. or intraperitoneally into nude mice and tumor volume was measured as well as plasma SEAP levels as the tumors developed. S.c. tumor volume correlated well with plasma SEAP levels ( R(2)=0.95). OCC1-SEAP cells were also injected intraperitoneally into nude mice and grown as abdominal tumors. After 3 weeks the animals were killed and the tumors were dissected and weighed. SEAP levels in plasma samples from the time of death correlated with intraperitoneal tumor weight ( R(2)=0.87). Experiments were performed to determine whether measuring SEAP levels could be used to monitor ovarian carcinoma cell response to platinum-containing chemotherapeutic drugs. OCC1-SEAP cells cultured in vitro were treated with the platinum-containing drug carboplatin

  19. Revealing the secret life of pre-implantation embryos by time-lapse monitoring: A review.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Azita; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Micara, Giulietta; Agha-Rahimi, Azam

    2017-05-01

    High implantation success following in vitro fertilization cycles are achieved via the transfer of embryos with the highest developmental competence. Multiple pregnancies as a result of the transfer of several embryos per cycle accompany with various complication. Thus, single-embryo transfer (SET) is the preferred practice in assisted reproductive technique (ART) treatment. In order to improve the pregnancy rate for SET, embryologists need reliable biomarkers to aid their selection of embryos with the highest developmental potential. Time-lapse technology is a noninvasive alternative conventional microscopic assessment. It provides uninterrupted and continues the survey of embryo development to transfer day. Today, there are four time-lapse systems that are commercially available for ART centers. In world and Iran, the first time lapse babies were born in 2010 and 2015, respectively, conceived by SET. Here, we review the use of time-lapse monitoring in the observation of embryogenesis as well as its role in SET. Although, the findings from our review support common use of time-lapse monitoring in ART centers; but, future large studies assessing this system in well-designed trials are necessary.

  20. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II, monitored by gel electrophoresis, occurs during polysaccharide synthesis and secretion but not post-secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Messenger, David J; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The cell-wall pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is cross-linked via borate diester bridges, which influence the expansion, thickness and porosity of the wall. Previously, little was known about the mechanism or subcellular site of this cross-linking. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) to separate monomeric from dimeric (boron-bridged) RG-II, we confirmed that Pb2+ promotes H3BO3-dependent dimerisation in vitro. H3BO3 concentrations as high as 50 mm did not prevent cross-linking. For in-vivo experiments, we successfully cultured ‘Paul's Scarlet’ rose (Rosa sp.) cells in boron-free medium: their wall-bound pectin contained monomeric RG-II domains but no detectable dimers. Thus pectins containing RG-II domains can be held in the wall other than via boron bridges. Re-addition of H3BO3 to 3.3 μm triggered a gradual appearance of RG-II dimer over 24 h but without detectable loss of existing monomers, suggesting that only newly synthesised RG-II was amenable to boron bridging. In agreement with this, Rosa cultures whose polysaccharide biosynthetic machinery had been compromised (by carbon starvation, respiratory inhibitors, anaerobiosis, freezing or boiling) lost the ability to generate RG-II dimers. We conclude that RG-II normally becomes boron-bridged during synthesis or secretion but not post-secretion. Supporting this conclusion, exogenous [3H]RG-II was neither dimerised in the medium nor cross-linked to existing wall-associated RG-II domains when added to Rosa cultures. In conclusion, in cultured Rosa cells RG-II domains have a brief window of opportunity for boron-bridging intraprotoplasmically or during secretion, but secretion into the apoplast is a point of no return beyond which additional boron-bridging does not readily occur. PMID:24320597

  1. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II, monitored by gel electrophoresis, occurs during polysaccharide synthesis and secretion but not post-secretion.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Messenger, David J; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-02-01

    The cell-wall pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is cross-linked via borate diester bridges, which influence the expansion, thickness and porosity of the wall. Previously, little was known about the mechanism or subcellular site of this cross-linking. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) to separate monomeric from dimeric (boron-bridged) RG-II, we confirmed that Pb(2+) promotes H3 BO3 -dependent dimerisation in vitro. H3 BO3 concentrations as high as 50 mm did not prevent cross-linking. For in-vivo experiments, we successfully cultured 'Paul's Scarlet' rose (Rosa sp.) cells in boron-free medium: their wall-bound pectin contained monomeric RG-II domains but no detectable dimers. Thus pectins containing RG-II domains can be held in the wall other than via boron bridges. Re-addition of H3 BO3 to 3.3 μm triggered a gradual appearance of RG-II dimer over 24 h but without detectable loss of existing monomers, suggesting that only newly synthesised RG-II was amenable to boron bridging. In agreement with this, Rosa cultures whose polysaccharide biosynthetic machinery had been compromised (by carbon starvation, respiratory inhibitors, anaerobiosis, freezing or boiling) lost the ability to generate RG-II dimers. We conclude that RG-II normally becomes boron-bridged during synthesis or secretion but not post-secretion. Supporting this conclusion, exogenous [(3) H]RG-II was neither dimerised in the medium nor cross-linked to existing wall-associated RG-II domains when added to Rosa cultures. In conclusion, in cultured Rosa cells RG-II domains have a brief window of opportunity for boron-bridging intraprotoplasmically or during secretion, but secretion into the apoplast is a point of no return beyond which additional boron-bridging does not readily occur. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A fluorimetry-based ssYFP secretion assay to monitor vasopressin-induced exocytosis in LLC-PK1 cells expressing aquaporin-2

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Hasler, Udo; McKee, Mary; Lu, Hua A. J.; Bouley, Richard; Brown, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP)-induced exocytosis was dissected in native and aquaporin-2 (AQP2)-expressing renal LLC-PK1 cells by a fluorimetric exocytosis assay based on soluble secreted yellow fluorescent protein (ssYFP). YFP was targeted to the secretory pathway by addition of an 18-amino acid signal peptide from hen egg white lysozyme. Immunofluorescence labeling, together with analysis of Alexa 555-dextran internalization, revealed that ssYFP is exclusively located in the secretory pathway. Immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy showed significant colocalization of ssYFP and AQP2. Fluorimetry and Western blot analysis demonstrated similar constitutive ssYFP secretion in native LLC-PK1 and AQP2-expressing cells. In AQP2-expressing cells, a twofold increase in ssYFP secretion was observed within 15 min of VP stimulation. This transient burst of ssYFP secretion was abolished by the PKA inhibitor H-89 and was not observed in native cells. The endocytotic inhibitor methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which also promotes membrane accumulation of AQP2, had no effect on ssYFP secretion. Although cells expressing phosphorylation-deficient AQP2-S256A showed significantly lower baseline levels of constitutive secretion, VP induced a significant increase in exocytosis. Our data indicate that 1) this assay can monitor exocytosis in cultured epithelial cells, 2) VP has an acute stimulatory effect on ssYFP secretion in AQP2-expressing, but not native, cells, and 3) phosphorylation of AQP2 at S256 may be involved in the regulation of constitutive AQP2 exocytosis and play only a minor role in the VP-induced burst. These results support the idea that, in addition to its role in reducing AQP2 endocytosis, VP increases AQP2 exocytosis. PMID:18799651

  3. Flow-injection enzymatic analysis for glycerol and triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Chen; Cheng, Chien-Ming

    2005-11-15

    A flow-injection enzymatic analytical system was developed for determination of glycerol and triacylglycerol based on enzymatic reactions in capillary followed by electrochemical detection. The hydrogen peroxide produced from the enzyme reaction was monitored by a platinum-based electrochemical probe. Different immobilization strategies on silica support were studied. The best and most effective configuration found for the measurement of glycerol and triacylglycerols in this system was the tandem connection of a lipase column and a silica-fused capillary column coimmobilized with glycerokinase (GK) and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO). Lipase helps the breakdown of triacylglycerol to yield free fatty acids and glycerol, while glycerokinase catalyzes the adenosine-5-triphosphate-dependent phosphorylation of glycerol to yield alpha-glycerol phosphate, which can subsequently be oxidized by 3-glycerol phosphate oxidase to produce hydrogen peroxide. Response-surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the proposed system for glycerol. Experiment settings were designed by central composite design to investigate the combined effects of pH, flow rate, reaction temperature, and ATP concentration on collected signals. The fitted model, per RSM, showed that the optimum conditions of the system are 2 mM ATP in 0.1 M carbonate buffer (pH 11.0), flow rate of 0.18 mL/min, temperature of 35 degrees C, 20 microL of sample injection, and applied voltage of 0.650 V. The proposed biosensing system using lipase, GK, and GPO exhibited a flow-injection analysis peak response of 2.5 min and a detection limit of 5 x 10(-5) M glycerol (S/N = 3) with acceptable reproducibility (CV < 4.30%). It also had linear working ranges from 10(-4) to 10(-2) M for glycerol and from 10(-3) to 10(-2) M for triacylglycerol. The capillary enzyme reactor was stable up to 2 months in continuous operation, and it was possible to analyze up to 15 samples per hour. The present biosensing system holds

  4. Rotation of ultrasonically levitated glycerol drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Leung, E. W.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation is used to suspend single millimeter-size glycerol drops in a rectangular chamber. Audio-frequency laterally standing waves set up in the chamber are used to torque the suspended drops. The shape evolution of the drop under the combined effect of centrifugal forces and the acoustic radiation stress, along with its angular velocity are monitored, using video imaging and light scattering techniques. The results show good qualitative agreement with the theoretically predicted shape evolution as a function of angular velocity.

  5. Monitoring human neutrophil granule secretion by flow cytometry: secretion and membrane potential changes assessed by light scatter and a fluorescent probe of membrane potential

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, M.P.; Seligmann, B.E.

    1985-04-01

    Purified human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were incubated at 37 degrees C with the fluorescent membrane potential sensitive cyanine dye di-O-C(5)(3) and exposed to a number of stimulatory agents (N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), cytochalasin B (cyto B) + FMLP, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Flow cytometry was utilized to measure changes in forward light scatter (FS), orthogonal light scatter (90 degrees-SC), and fluorescence intensity of individual cells over time. A saturating (10(-6) M) dose of FMLP lead to a significant increase in the cells' FS without a change in 90 degrees-SC as well as a heterogeneous loss of di-O-C(5)(3) fluorescence. PMA (100 ng/ml) also caused an increase in FS but a uniform loss of dye fluorescence by all cells (apparent depolarization). Cyto B + FMLP produced an increase in FS, a marked loss of 90 degrees-SC, and a uniform loss of fluorescence. Secretion experiments under identical incubation conditions indicated a significantly positive relationship between loss of enzyme markers or cell granularity and orthogonal light scatter (r . 0.959, 0.998, and 0.989 for loss of 90 degrees-SC vs lysozyme, beta-glucuronidase, and granularity index, respectively). Flow cytometric light scatter measurements may yield important information on the extent of prior cell degranulation or activation.

  6. Characterization of crude glycerol from biodiesel plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengjun; Luo, Xiaolan; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2012-06-13

    Characterization of crude glycerol is very important to its value-added conversion. In this study, the physical and chemical properties of five biodiesel-derived crude glycerol samples were determined. Three methods, including iodometric-periodic acid method, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography (GC), were shown to be suitable for the determination of glycerol content in crude glycerol. The compositional analysis of crude glycerol was successfully achieved by crude glycerol fractionation and characterization of the obtained fractions (aqueous and organic) using titrimetric, HPLC, and GC analyses. The aqueous fraction consisted mainly of glycerol, methanol, and water, while the organic fraction contained fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), free fatty acids (FFAs), and glycerides. Despite the wide variations in the proportion of their components, all raw crude glycerol samples were shown to contain glycerol, soap, methanol, FAMEs, water, glycerides, FFAs, and ash.

  7. Glycerol production of various strains of saccharomyces

    SciTech Connect

    Radler, F.; Schuetz, H.

    1982-01-01

    The quantity of glycerol as principal by-product of the alcoholic fermentation depends to a large extent on the yeast strain. Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to form amounts of glycerol varying between 4.2 to 10.4 g/L. The formation of glycerol is regarded as a result of the competition between alcohol dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that compete for the reduced coenzyme NADH/sub 2/. High and low glycerol forming yeast strains showed large differences in the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and only small variation in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase. The total amount of glycerol formed was also influenced by amino acids. In thiamine deficient media a decrease in glycerol formation was observed. Experiments indicate a correlation between the formation of acetaldehyde and glycerol and the production of cell mass that may be of practical interest. (Refs. 12).

  8. Glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Supplemental glycerol inhibits rumen lipolysis, a prerequisite for rumen biohydrogenation, which is responsible for the saturation of dietary fatty acids consumed by ruminant animals. Feeding excess glycerol, however, adversely affects dry matter digestibility. To more clearly define the effect of...

  9. In-situ FTIR-ATR spectroscopic observation on the dynamic efflorescence/deliquescence processes of Na2SO4 and mixed Na2SO4/glycerol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-Ning; Chen, Hong-Nan; Luan, Ye-Mei; Tan, See-Hua; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2014-02-01

    The FTIR-ATR spectra of Na2SO4 and mixed Na2SO4/glycerol (1:1) aerosols are monitored in the dehumidifying and humidifying process. It shows that glycerol suppresses both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation of Na2SO4/glycerol aerosols on the ZnSe substrate, while the water uptake of surrounding glycerol leads to lower deliquescence relative humidity of mixed Na2SO4/glycerol aerosols. In mixed Na2SO4/glycerol aerosols, glycerol restrains the formation of contact ion pairs between Na+ and SO42-, resulting in the delay of the efflorescence relative humidity. And glycerol molecular conformations transform from γγ to αα type in the dehumidifying process.

  10. Transport of glycerol by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tsay, S S; Brown, K K; Gaudy, E T

    1971-10-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transport of glycerol was shown to be genetically controlled and to be dependent on induction by glycerol. Accumulation of (14)C-glycerol was almost completely absent in uninduced cells and in a transport-negative mutant. Kinetic studies with induced cells suggested that glycerol may be transported by two systems with different affinities for glycerol. Osmotically shocked cells did not transport glycerol, and the supernatant fluid from shocked cells contained glycerol-binding activity demonstrable by equilibrium dialysis. The binding protein was not glycerol kinase. Binding activity was absent in shock fluids from the transport-negative mutant and from uninduced cells. The glycerol-binding protein was partially purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate. Mild heat treatment completely eliminated the binding activity of shock fluid and of the partially purified protein. Sodium azide and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited both transport by whole cells and binding of glycerol by shock fluid. It is concluded that transport of glycerol by P. aeruginosa involves a binding protein responsible for recognition of glycerol and may occur by facilitated diffusion or active transport. A requirement for energy has not been demonstrated.

  11. Production of glycerol by Hansenula anomala

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, S.R.; Pandey, N.K.

    1985-07-01

    Production of glycerol by Hansenula anomala in molasses-corn steep liquor based media was studied. The accumulation and yield of glycerol was dependent on the medium composition and aeration rate; pH control did not affect the yield. Intermittent addition of sugar during fermentation resulted in significant increase in production of glycerol. 13 references.

  12. Ammonia control and neurocognitive outcome among urea cycle disorder patients treated with glycerol phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Diaz, George A; Krivitzky, Lauren S; Mokhtarani, Masoud; Rhead, William; Bartley, James; Feigenbaum, Annette; Longo, Nicola; Berquist, William; Berry, Susan A; Gallagher, Renata; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Bartholomew, Dennis; Harding, Cary O; Cederbaum, Stephen; McCandless, Shawn E; Smith, Wendy; Vockley, Gerald; Bart, Stephen A; Korson, Mark S; Kronn, David; Zori, Roberto; Merritt, J Lawrence; C S Nagamani, Sandesh; Mauney, Joseph; Lemons, Cynthia; Dickinson, Klara; Moors, Tristen L; Coakley, Dion F; Scharschmidt, Bruce F; Lee, Brendan

    2013-06-01

    Glycerol phenylbutyrate is under development for treatment of urea cycle disorders (UCDs), rare inherited metabolic disorders manifested by hyperammonemia and neurological impairment. We report the results of a pivotal Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, crossover trial comparing ammonia control, assessed as 24-hour area under the curve (NH3 -AUC0-24hr ), and pharmacokinetics during treatment with glycerol phenylbutyrate versus sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) in adult UCD patients and the combined results of four studies involving short- and long-term glycerol phenylbutyrate treatment of UCD patients ages 6 and above. Glycerol phenylbutyrate was noninferior to NaPBA with respect to ammonia control in the pivotal study, with mean (standard deviation, SD) NH3 -AUC0-24hr of 866 (661) versus 977 (865) μmol·h/L for glycerol phenylbutyrate and NaPBA, respectively. Among 65 adult and pediatric patients completing three similarly designed short-term comparisons of glycerol phenylbutyrate versus NaPBA, NH3 -AUC0-24hr was directionally lower on glycerol phenylbutyrate in each study, similar among all subgroups, and significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the pooled analysis, as was plasma glutamine. The 24-hour ammonia profiles were consistent with the slow-release behavior of glycerol phenylbutyrate and better overnight ammonia control. During 12 months of open-label glycerol phenylbutyrate treatment, average ammonia was normal in adult and pediatric patients and executive function among pediatric patients, including behavioral regulation, goal setting, planning, and self-monitoring, was significantly improved. Glycerol phenylbutyrate exhibits favorable pharmacokinetics and ammonia control relative to NaPBA in UCD patients, and long-term glycerol phenylbutyrate treatment in pediatric UCD patients was associated with improved executive function (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00551200, NCT00947544, NCT00992459, NCT00947297). (HEPATOLOGY 2012). Copyright © 2012 American Association for the

  13. Esterification of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ilham, Zul; Saka, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate was studied by esterification with dimethyl carbonate in a non-catalytic supercritical condition. It was found that in a non-catalytic supercritical condition, glycerol at higher purity gave higher yield of glycerol carbonate at 98 wt% after reaction at 300 °C/20-40 MPa/15 min. The yield of glycerol carbonate was observed to increase with molar ratio, temperature, pressure and time until a certain equilibrium limit. The existence of impurities such as water and remnants of alkaline catalyst in crude glycerol will direct the reaction to produce glycidol. Although impurities might not be desirable, the non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate could be an alternative method for conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to value-added glycerol carbonate.Graphical abstractPlausible reaction scheme for conversion of glycerol to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate.

  14. Haemodynamic and cerebrovascular responses to glycerol infusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chen, J L; Wang, Y C; Wang, J Y

    1989-11-01

    1. The response of cerebral blood vessels to hyperosmolar agents in vivo remains controversial, and little is known about the effect of glycerol on cerebral vessels. In this study we investigated the cerebrovascular response to intravenous administration of glycerol (1 g/kg, infused over 25 min) in dogs under pentobarbital anaesthesia. 2. intracranial pressure, systemic arterial pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, serum osmolarity and packed cell volume were continuously monitored, and blood gases were checked frequently. Through a parietal cranial window, pial vessel diameter was measured by means of a surgical microscope and a video image-analyser. 3. Pial vessel diameter increased gradually with a maximum at 30 min after the beginning of glycerol infusion. The maximum increase in diameter in small (less than or equal to 100 microns) vessels was 14.3%, whereas that in large (greater than 100 microns) vessels was 10.3%. There was only a slight increase (less than 4%) in pial vessel diameter in vehicle-infused animals. The intracranial pressure decreased drastically after glycerol infusion, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure remained constant. There were correlations between the rise in serum osmolarity, fall in packed cell volume and vasodilatation, indicating that glycerol caused vasodilatation accompanied by plasma volume expansion. 4. Our data suggest that glycerol produces cerebral vasodilatation, which might be beneficial in cerebral ischaemia and vasospasm, in addition to its intracranial pressure-reducing effect on normal or oedematous brain. The degree of vasodilatation was not sufficient to affect the predominant intracranial pressure drop resulting from cerebral dehydration.

  15. Blockade of MUC1 expression by glycerol guaiacolate inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, J S; Colon, J; Madero-Visbal, R; Isley, B; Konduri, S D; Baker, C H

    2010-10-01

    We sought to determine whether administration of glycerol guaiacolate at an optimal biological dose inhibits human breast cancer cell growth. Human breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 cells were treated with glycerol guaiacolate and the therapeutic efficacy and biological activity of this drug was investigated on breast cancer cell growth. MCF-7 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of overectamized female athymic nude mice. Ten days later, animals were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of glycerol guaiacolate for six weeks. Tumor size and volume was monitored and immunohistochemistry analysis on MUC1, p21 and ki-67 was performed. Glycerol guaiacolate decreased breast cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, decreased cell migration, and caused G1 cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate inhibits MUC1 protein and mRNA expression levels and significantly increased p21 expression in human breast cancer cells as well as induced PARP cleavage. Similarly, glycerol guaiacolate inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo as well as enhanced p21 expression and decreased breast tumor cell proliferation (ki-67 expression). Collectively, our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate decreased MUC1 expression and enhanced cell growth inhibition by inducing p21 expression in breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that glycerol guaiacolate may provide a novel and effective approach for the treatment of human breast cancer.

  16. Effects of glycerol on the molecular mobility and hydrogen bond network in starch matrix.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Ludescher, Richard D

    2015-01-22

    The effects of glycerol on molecular mobility and hydrogen bonding network in an amorphous glassy starch matrix were studied using phosphorescence and IR spectroscopy. Amorphous potato starch films containing varying amounts of glycerol (0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.%) were formulated by rapidly dehydrating aqueous potato starch gel (5%, w/v) with a corresponding content of glycerol; X-ray diffraction data confirm that the films contained negligible content of crystalline starch. Erythrosin B (Ery B) phosphorescence was used to monitor the molecular mobility of these matrices over the temperature range from 0 to 100°C. Analysis of Ery B emission peak frequency, band width and intensity decay provided information about thermally-activated modes of molecular mobility in the matrix. Dipolar relaxation around the triplet state of Ery B was enhanced by addition of glycerol and the extent of relaxation increased at low and intermediate but decreased at higher temperature. The glycerol content-dependent onset temperature for this transition was 70°C for pure starch and decreased to 40°C for a matrix with 30% glycerol. Measurements of the rate of non-radiative decay from the Ery B triplet state indicated that glycerol plasticized the starch matrix above ∼10 wt.% while acting as an antiplastizer to increase the matrix molecular mobility at lower content. These matrix properties were related to glycerol-dependent increases in hydrogen bond strength as measured by IR.

  17. Mathematical modeling of glycerol biotransformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova-Krumova, Petya; Yankova, Sofia; Ilieva, Biliana

    2013-12-01

    A method for mathematical modeling of glycerol biotransformation by Klebsiella oxytoca is presented. Glycerol is a renewable resource for it is formed as a by-product during biodiesel production. Because of its large volume production, it seems to be a good idea to develop a technology that converts this waste into products of high value (1, 3-Propanediol; 2, 3-Butanediol). The kinetic model of this process consists of many equations and parameters. The minimization of the least square function will be used for model parameters identification. In cases of parameters identification in multiparameter models the minimization of the least square function is very difficult because it is multiextremal. This is the main problem in the multiextremal function minimization which will be solved on the base a hierarchical approach, using a polynomial approximation of the experimental data.

  18. Spatiotemporal monitoring of the antibiome secreted by Bacillus biofilms on plant roots using MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Debois, Delphine; Jourdan, Emmanuel; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Thonart, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin; Ongena, Marc

    2014-05-06

    Some soil Bacilli living in association with plant roots can protect their host from infection by pathogenic microbes and are therefore being developed as biological agents to control plant diseases. The plant-protective activity of these bacteria has been correlated with the potential to secrete a wide array of antibiotic compounds upon growth as planktonic cells in isolated cultures under laboratory conditions. However, in situ expression of these antibiotics in the rhizosphere where bacterial cells naturally colonize root tissues is still poorly understood. In this work, we used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) to examine spatiotemporal changes in the secreted antibiome of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens developing as biofilms on roots. Nonribosomal lipopeptides such as the plant immunity elicitor surfactin or the highly fungitoxic iturins and fengycins were readily produced albeit in different time frames and quantities in the surrounding medium. Interestingly, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments performed directly from the gelified culture medium also allowed us to identify a new variant of surfactins released at later time points. However, no other bioactive compounds such as polyketides were detected at any time, strongly suggesting that the antibiome expressed in planta by B. amyloliquefaciens does not reflect the vast genetic arsenal devoted to the formation of such compounds. This first dynamic study reveals the power of MALDI MSI as tool to identify and map antibiotics synthesized by root-associated bacteria and, more generally, to investigate plant-microbe interactions at the molecular level.

  19. A cell line that secretes inducibly a reporter protein for monitoring herpes simplex virus infection and drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Liu, Wu-Tse; Sun, Jun-Ren; Tai, Yi-Er; Kung, Szu-Hao

    2002-12-01

    A cell line modified genetically (Vero-ICP10-SEAP) that responds to infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) was established. The cell line was constructed by stable transfection of Vero cell with a plasmid encoding the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) driven by the promoter of the HSV-2 ICP10 gene. Following infection with HSV, the stable line secretes a high level of the SEAP in the supernatants as measured by a chemiluminescence-based assay. The detection system is sensitive to an HSV titer as low as a single plaque-forming unit (PFU), with a linear range up to the equivalent of 2.5 x 10(4) PFU inoculum after infection for 24 h. There was no detectable enhancement in SEAP activities following inoculations with several viruses other than HSV. The Vero-ICP10-SEAP cell line was also utilized to develop an assay for determination of antiviral susceptibility given that the induced SEAP activity appeared to reflect the numbers of plaque. Evaluations of the stable line with representative acyclovir (ACV)-sensitive and-resistant HSV isolates demonstrated that their drug susceptibilities were determined accurately. In summary, this novel SEAP reporter system is a sensitive means for rapid diagnosis, quantitation, and drug susceptibility testing for HSV, with potential to the development of an automated assay. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. [Secret medicines].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, H

    2001-01-01

    Secret medicines had two characteristics: their formula remained unknown and they were prepared by many kinds of people. Before 1728 there were no general laws about these secret medicines but only peculiar rules. From 1728 to 1778, the King edicted rigorous rules in order to limit the number of secret medicines. Between 1778 and 1789, the law became more definite and the Royal Society of Medicine gave advices. The Law of Germinal An-XI forbid secret medicines but since 1805, some compromises took place. Slowly, secret medicines were replaced by pharmaceutics and new set of laws.

  1. Glycerol-3-phosphatase of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Steffen N; Meiswinkel, Tobias M; Panhorst, Maren; Youn, Jung-Won; Wiefel, Lars; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-06-15

    Formation of glycerol as by-product of amino acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum has been observed under certain conditions, but the enzyme(s) involved in its synthesis from glycerol-3-phosphate were not known. It was shown here that cg1700 encodes an enzyme active as a glycerol-3-phosphatase (GPP) hydrolyzing glycerol-3-phosphate to inorganic phosphate and glycerol. GPP was found to be active as a homodimer. The enzyme preferred conditions of neutral pH and requires Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺ for its activity. GPP dephosphorylated both L- and D-glycerol-3-phosphate with a preference for the D-enantiomer. The maximal activity of GPP was estimated to be 31.1 and 1.7 U mg⁻¹ with K(M) values of 3.8 and 2.9 mM for DL- and L-glycerol-3-phosphate, respectively. For physiological analysis a gpp deletion mutant was constructed and shown to lack the ability to produce detectable glycerol concentrations. Vice versa, gpp overexpression increased glycerol accumulation during growth in fructose minimal medium. It has been demonstrated previously that intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate is growth inhibitory as shown for a recombinant C. glutamicum strain overproducing glycerokinase and glycerol facilitator genes from E. coli in media containing glycerol. In this strain, overexpression of gpp restored growth in the presence of glycerol as intracellular glycerol-3-phosphate concentrations were reduced to wild-type levels. In C. glutamicum wild type, GPP was shown to be involved in utilization of DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as source of phosphorus, since growth with DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as sole phosphorus source was reduced in the gpp deletion strain whereas it was accelerated upon gpp overexpression. As GPP homologues were found to be encoded in the genomes of many other bacteria, the gpp homologues of Escherichia coli (b2293) and Bacillus subtilis (BSU09240, BSU34970) as well as gpp1 from the plant Arabidosis thaliana were overexpressed in E. coli MG1655 and

  2. Enhancing biological phosphorus removal with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Sparling, R; Lagasse, P; Lee, Y M; Taniguchi, D; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2010-01-01

    An enhanced biological phosphorus removal process (EBPR) was successfully operated in presence of acetate. When glycerol was substituted for acetate in the feed the EBPR process failed. Subsequently waste activated sludge (WAS) from the reactor was removed to an off-line fermenter. The same amount of glycerol was added to the WAS fermenter which led to significant volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. By supplying the system with the VFA-enriched supernatant of the fermentate, biological phosphorus removal was enhanced. It was concluded that, if glycerol was to be used as an external carbon source in EBPR, the effective approach was to ferment glycerol with waste activated sludge.

  3. Calibrating the glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether temperature signal in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Alison J.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Palaeotemperature proxies based on glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) lipids have been established for marine and lacustrine environments, but there has been relatively little study of their application in speleothems. In this study we analyse the GDGT content of 33 speleothem samples from 16 different sites around the globe, and test whether proxies based on isoprenoid tetraethers (TEX86) or branched tetraethers (MBT/CBT) are correlated with measured surface and cave mean annual air temperature (MAT). The results show that the TEX86 has a strong relationship with measured temperature (r2 = 0.78, standard error of the estimate 2.3 °C, when calibrated with surface MAT). Furthermore, the MBT/CBT also showed a significant relationship with temperature (r2 = 0.73, standard error of the estimate 2.7 °C, when calibrated with surface MAT). Some issues remain requiring future work, in particular the development of a larger calibration sample set with measured cave temperature data, and the investigation of controls other than temperature on GDGT distribution, but overall the results indicate that GDGT based proxies derived from speleothems may be highly viable new methods for reconstructing continental palaeotemperatures.

  4. Esters of oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol): New biobased oligomeric surfactants.

    PubMed

    Holmiere, Sébastien; Valentin, Romain; Maréchal, Philippe; Mouloungui, Zéphirin

    2017-02-01

    Glycerol carbonate is one of the most potentially multifunction glycerol-derived compounds. Glycerol is an important by-product of the oleochemical industry. The oligomerization of glycerol carbonate, assisted by the glycerol, results in the production of polyhydroxylated oligomers rich in linear carbonate groups. The polar moieties of these oligomers (Mw<1000Da) were supplied by glycerol and glycerol carbonate rather than ethylene oxide as in most commercial surfactants. The insertion of linear carbonate groups into the glycerol-based skeleton rendered the oligomers amphiphilic, resulting in a decrease in air/water surface tension to 57mN/m. We improved the physical and chemical properties of the oligomers, by altering the type of acylation reaction and the nature of the acyl donor. The polar head is constituted of homo-oligomers and hetero-oligomers. Homo-oligomers are oligoglycerol and/or oligocarbonate, hetero-oligomers are oligo(glycerol-glycerol carbonate). Coprah oligoesters had the best surfactant properties (CMC<1mg/mL, πcmc<30mN/m), outperforming molecules of fossil origin, such as ethylene glycol monododecyl ether, glycol ethers and fatty acid esters of sorbitan polyethoxylates. The self-assembling properties of oligocarbonate esters were highlighted by their ability to stabilize inverse and multiple emulsions. The oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol ether) with relatively low molecular weights showed properties of relatively high-molecular weight molecules, and constitute a viable "green" alternative to ethoxylated surfactants.

  5. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae can biosynthesis phospholipid de novo from 2-oleoyl-glycerol and glycerol precursors.

    PubMed

    Li, Keshuai; Olsen, Rolf Erik; Østensen, Mari-Ann; Altin, Dag; Kjørsvik, Elin; Olsen, Yngvar

    2016-02-01

    The dietary requirement of phospholipid (PL) of fish larvae has been suggested to originate in an inefficient ability for de novo biosynthesis of PL based on dietary triacylglycerol (TAG). The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether cod larvae could synthesis PL from sn-2-monoacylglycerol (2-MAG) and glycerol precursors. A tube feeding method was used to deliver equal molar aliquots of 2-oleoyl-[1,2,3-(3)H]glycerol and [U-(14)C] glycerol together with bovine serum albumin (BSA) bound 16:0 (palmitic acid) and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA), with or without choline chloride to the foregut of anesthetized cod larvae and thereafter monitoring the metabolism of these components in the larvae through 4 h following injection. Our results showed that both 2-MAG and glycerol precursors contributed to the de novo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and the 2-MAG pathway predominated over the G-3-P (glycerol-3-phosphate) pathway in the synthesis of TAG and PC. The molecular ratio of PC/TAG obtained from the 2-MAG and the G-3-P pathways was 0.44-0.74 and 1.02-2.06 within the first hour of tube feeding, suggesting they might have comparable biosynthesis ability of PC and TAG under the conditions of the present study. Furthermore, supplementation of choline chloride significantly increased PC/TAG ratio (p < 0.05) for both pathways. However, further studies are needed to quantify the enzyme activity involved in the CDP-choline (cytidine diphosphate choline) pathway, and the function of choline either in simulating PC synthesis or TAG catabolism or both needs further investigation.

  6. Toward glycerol biorefinery: metabolic engineering for the production of biofuels and chemicals from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    As an inevitable by-product of the biofuel industry, glycerol is becoming an attractive feedstock for biorefinery due to its abundance, low price and high degree of reduction. Converting crude glycerol into value-added products is important to increase the economic viability of the biofuel industry. Metabolic engineering of industrial strains to improve its performance and to enlarge the product spectrum of glycerol biotransformation process is highly important toward glycerol biorefinery. This review focuses on recent metabolic engineering efforts as well as challenges involved in the utilization of glycerol as feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals, especially for the production of diols, organic acids and biofuels.

  7. Glycerol citrate polyesters produced through microwave heating

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The influence of various heating methods without catalysis to prepare copolyesters from citric acid:glycerol blends were studied. In the presence of short term microwave treatments, i.e., 60 sec at 1200 W, blends of glycerol and citric acid invariably formed solid amorphous copolyesters. Fourier tra...

  8. Thermal and physical characterization of glycerol polyesters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycerol polyesters were prepared by the condensation of glycerol and adipic acid, azelaic acid, sebacic acid, or suberic acids. After 48 hours at 125 deg C the polymers were clear and flexible. Samples of the reaction mixtures were analyzed by modulated differential scanning calorimetry to identi...

  9. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  10. Long-Chain Glycerol Diether and Polyol Dialkyl Glycerol Triether Lipids of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    PubMed Central

    Langworthy, Thomas A.; Mayberry, William R.; Smith, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    Cells of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius contain about 2.5% total lipid on a dry-weight basis. Total lipid was found to contain 10.5% neutral lipid, 67.6% glycolipid, and 21.7% polar lipid. The lipids contained C40H80 isopranol glycerol diethers. Almost no fatty acids were present. The glycolipids were composed of about equal amounts of the glycerol diether analogue of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride and a glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. The latter compound contained an unidentified polyol attached by an ether bond to the glycerol diether. The polar lipids contained a small amount of sulfolipid, which appeared to be the monosulfate derivative of glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. About 40% of the lipid phosphorus was found in the diether analogue of phosphatidyl inositol. The remaining lipid phosphorus was accounted for by approximately equal amounts of two inositol monophosphate-containing phosphoglycolipids, inositolphosphoryl glucosyl galactosyl glycerol diether and inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. Images PMID:4407015

  11. Long-chain glycerol diether and polyol dialkyl glycerol triether lipids of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Langworthy, T A; Mayberry, W R; Smith, P F

    1974-07-01

    Cells of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius contain about 2.5% total lipid on a dry-weight basis. Total lipid was found to contain 10.5% neutral lipid, 67.6% glycolipid, and 21.7% polar lipid. The lipids contained C(40)H(80) isopranol glycerol diethers. Almost no fatty acids were present. The glycolipids were composed of about equal amounts of the glycerol diether analogue of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride and a glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. The latter compound contained an unidentified polyol attached by an ether bond to the glycerol diether. The polar lipids contained a small amount of sulfolipid, which appeared to be the monosulfate derivative of glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. About 40% of the lipid phosphorus was found in the diether analogue of phosphatidyl inositol. The remaining lipid phosphorus was accounted for by approximately equal amounts of two inositol monophosphate-containing phosphoglycolipids, inositolphosphoryl glucosyl galactosyl glycerol diether and inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol glycerol diether.

  12. Biosynthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol by lipase in dimethyl carbonate as the solvent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Park, Chang-Ho; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2010-11-01

    Glycerol carbonate was synthesized from renewable glycerol and dimethyl carbonate using lipase in solvent-free reaction system in which excess dimethyl carbonate played as the reaction medium. A variety of lipases have been tested for their abilities to catalyze transesterification reaction, and Candida antartica lipase B and Novozyme 435 exhibited higher catalytic activities. The silica-coated glycerol with a 1:1 ratio was supplied to prevent two-phase formation between hydrophobic dimethyl carbonate and hydrophilic glycerol. Glycerol carbonate was successfully synthesized with more than 90% conversion from dimethyl carbonate and glycerol with a molar ratio of 10 using Novozyme 435-catalyzed transesterification at 70 °C. The Novozyme 435 [5% (w/w) and 20% (w/w)] and silica gel were more than four times recycled with good stability in a repeated batch operation for the solvent-free synthesis of glycerol carbonate.

  13. Microbial recycling of glycerol to biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Zhu, Zhi; Wang, Weihua; Lu, Xuefeng

    2013-12-01

    The sustainable supply of lipids is the bottleneck for current biodiesel production. Here microbial recycling of glycerol, byproduct of biodiesel production to biodiesel in engineered Escherichia coli strains was reported. The KC3 strain with capability of producing fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) from glucose was used as a starting strain to optimize fermentation conditions when using glycerol as sole carbon source. The YL15 strain overexpressing double copies of atfA gene displayed 1.7-fold increase of FAEE productivity compared to the KC3 strain. The titer of FAEE in YL15 strain reached to 813 mg L(-1) in minimum medium using glycerol as sole carbon source under optimized fermentation conditions. The titer of glycerol-based FAEE production can be significantly increased by both genetic modifications and fermentation optimization. Microbial recycling of glycerol to biodiesel expands carbon sources for biodiesel production.

  14. Glycerol esters as fuel economy additives

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, P.W.; Smith, C.R.; Gowland, F.W.

    1987-07-28

    A lubricating oil composition formulated is described for use as a crankcase lubricating oil composition for gasoline or diesel engines consisting essentially of a major amount of a mineral oil of a lubricating viscosity which has incorporated about 0.20 weight percent of a glycerol partial ester. The partial ester is a mixture of glycerol monooleate and glycerol dioleate. The mixture has a weight ratio of 3 parts of glycerol monooleate to 2 parts of glycerol dioleate the ester providing a fuel economy improvement of about 1 to 3 percent when the lubricating oil composition is employed in the crankcase of the engine. An ashless dispersant, a metal detergent additive, a zinc dihdyrocarbyl dithiophosphate anti-wear additive and an antioxidant. The dispersant, detergent, anti-wear additive and antioxidant are present in conventional amounts to provide their normal attendant functions.

  15. Ecotoxicology of Glycerol Monolaurate nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Leonardo Q S; Santos, Cayane G; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo; Raffin, Renata P; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Baretta, Dilmar; Maccari, Ana Paula; Giombelli, Laura Caroline D D; Volpato, Andreia; Arruda, Jessyka; de Ávila Scheeren, Cecília; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Santos, Roberto C V

    2017-05-01

    Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) is a compound with known antimicrobial potential, however it is not much used due to its low solubility in water and high melting point. The nanoencapsulation of some drugs offers several advantages such as improved stability and solubility in water. The present study aimed to produce, characterize, and evaluate the ecotoxicity of GML nanocapsules. The nanocapsules were produced and presented a mean diameter of 210nm, polydispersity index of 0.044, and zeta potential of -23.4mV. The electron microscopy images showed the nanometric size and spherical shape. The assay in soil showed that GML has a high toxicity while the GML nanocapsules showed decreased toxic effects. Nanostructuration also protected the Rhamdia quelen against the toxic effects of GML. Concluding, the formulation shows positive results and is useful to predict the success of development besides not damaging the soil.

  16. A new humanized in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis monitored using a secreted luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Siham; Zhang, Yanyan; Hugonin, Caroline; Mangean, Mallorie Depond; He, Liang; Wedeh, Ghaith; Launay, Jean-Marie; Van Rijn, Sjoerd; Würdinger, Thomas; Louache, Fawzia; Arock, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis are rare neoplasms characterized by accumulation of mast cells in at least one internal organ. The majority of systemic mastocytosis patients carry KIT D816V mutation, which activates constitutively the KIT receptor. Patient with advanced forms of systemic mastocytosis, such as aggressive systemic mastocytosis or mast cell leukemia, are poorly treated to date. Unfortunately, the lack of in vivo models reflecting KIT D816V+ advanced disease hampers pathophysiological studies and preclinical development of new therapies for such patients. Here, we describe a new in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis developed by transplantation of the human ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc mast cell line in NOD-SCID IL-2R g−/− mice, using Gaussia princeps luciferase as a reporter. Intravenous injection of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells led, in 4 weeks, to engraftment in all injected primary recipient mice. Engrafted cells were found at high levels in bone marrow, and at lower levels in spleen, liver and peripheral blood. Disease progression was easily monitored by repeated quantification of Gaussia princeps luciferase activity in peripheral blood. This quantification evidenced a linear relationship between the number of cells injected and the neoplastic mast cell burden in mice. Interestingly, the secondary transplantation of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells increased their engraftment capability. To conclude, this new in vivo model mimics at the best the features of human KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis. In addition, it is a unique and convenient tool to study the kinetics of the disease and the potential in vivo activity of new drugs targeting neoplastic mast cells. PMID:27783996

  17. A new humanized in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis monitored using a secreted luciferase.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Siham; Zhang, Yanyan; Hugonin, Caroline; Mangean, Mallorie Depond; He, Liang; Wedeh, Ghaith; Launay, Jean-Marie; Van Rijn, Sjoerd; Würdinger, Thomas; Louache, Fawzia; Arock, Michel

    2016-12-13

    Systemic mastocytosis are rare neoplasms characterized by accumulation of mast cells in at least one internal organ. The majority of systemic mastocytosis patients carry KIT D816V mutation, which activates constitutively the KIT receptor. Patient with advanced forms of systemic mastocytosis, such as aggressive systemic mastocytosis or mast cell leukemia, are poorly treated to date. Unfortunately, the lack of in vivo models reflecting KIT D816V+ advanced disease hampers pathophysiological studies and preclinical development of new therapies for such patients. Here, we describe a new in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis developed by transplantation of the human ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc mast cell line in NOD-SCID IL-2R γ-/- mice, using Gaussia princeps luciferase as a reporter. Intravenous injection of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells led, in 4 weeks, to engraftment in all injected primary recipient mice. Engrafted cells were found at high levels in bone marrow, and at lower levels in spleen, liver and peripheral blood. Disease progression was easily monitored by repeated quantification of Gaussia princeps luciferase activity in peripheral blood. This quantification evidenced a linear relationship between the number of cells injected and the neoplastic mast cell burden in mice. Interestingly, the secondary transplantation of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells increased their engraftment capability. To conclude, this new in vivo model mimics at the best the features of human KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis. In addition, it is a unique and convenient tool to study the kinetics of the disease and the potential in vivo activity of new drugs targeting neoplastic mast cells.

  18. Glycerol in micellar confinement with tunable rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannert, Michael; Müller, Allyn; Gouirand, Emmanuel; Talluto, Vincenzo; Rosenstihl, Markus; Walther, Thomas; Stühn, Bernd; Blochowicz, Thomas; Vogel, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the glassy dynamics of glycerol in the confinement of a microemulsion system, which is stable on cooling down to the glass transition of its components. By changing the composition, we vary the viscosity of the matrix, while keeping the confining geometry intact, as is demonstrated by small angle X-ray scattering. By means of 2H NMR, differential scanning calorimetry, and triplet solvation dynamics we, thus, probe the dynamics of glycerol in confinements of varying rigidity. 2H NMR results show that, at higher temperatures, the dynamics of confined glycerol is unchanged compared to bulk behavior, while the reorientation of glycerol molecules becomes significantly faster than in the bulk in the deeply supercooled regime. However, comparison of different 2H NMR findings with data from calorimetry and solvation dynamics reveals that this acceleration is not due to the changed structural relaxation of glycerol, but rather due to the rotational motion of essentially rigid glycerol droplets or of aggregates of such droplets in a more fluid matrix. Thus, independent of the matrix mobility, the glycerol dynamics remains unchanged except for the smallest droplets, where an increase of Tg and, thus, a slowdown of the structural relaxation is observed even in a fluid matrix.

  19. Two potential fish glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A

    2015-06-01

    Winter-acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax Mitchill) produce high levels of glycerol as an antifreeze. A common pathway to glycerol involves the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), but no GPP has yet been identified in fish or any other animal. Here, two phosphatases assembled from existing EST libraries (from winter-acclimated smelt and cold-acclimated smelt hepatocytes) were found to resemble a glycerol-associated phosphatase from a glycerol-producing alga, Dunaliella salina, and a recently discovered GPP from a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recombinant proteins were generated and were found to have GPP activity on the order of a few μMol Pi/mg enzyme/min. The two enzymes have acidic pH optima (~5.5) similar to that previously determined for GPP activity in liver tissue, with about 1/3 of their peak activities at neutral pH. The two enzymes appear to account for the GPP activity of smelt liver, but due to their reduced activities at neutral pH, their contributions to glycerol production in vivo remain unclear. Similar enzymes may be active in a glycerol-producing insect, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

  20. Tolerance of human corneal endothelium to glycerol.

    PubMed

    Brunette, I; Nelson, L R; Bourne, W M

    1989-12-01

    As an initial step in the development of a method for corneal cryopreservation by vitrification, we attempted to establish the maximum concentration of glycerol to which human corneal endothelium could be exposed at 4 degrees C for 15 min without damage. Damage was defined as an increase in mean endothelial cell size or the inability to maintain corneal thickness for 1 week after exposure to glycerol. Using a system for long-term corneal perfusion, we perfused 24 paired human corneas with glycerol at 4 degrees C. The concentration of glycerol increased at a rate of 20% (w/v) (2.2 M) per hour until the desired maximum concentration was reached for that cornea, stabilized for 15 min, and then decreased at the same rate. The corneas were then perfused at 37 degrees C with Dulbecco's medium at a rate of 5 microliters/min under 18 mm Hg intracameral pressure for 7 days with daily measurements of corneal thickness. Endothelial morphology was examined by specular microscopy and by scanning electron microscopy. After 7 days of perfusion at 37 degrees C, there was a statistically significant direct relationship between the maximum concentration of glycerol to which the experimental eyes had been exposed and the increase in mean endothelial cell size. The mean endothelial cell size increased in corneas exposed to glycerol concentrations of 40, 50, and 60% (w/v), but did not differ significantly from baseline measurements in the corneas exposed to 30% glycerol or less. Thus, there was no detectable damage to human corneas exposed to 30% (w/v) (3.3 M) glycerol in this system. Tolerance of higher concentrations may be achieved by changes in the rates of addition and removal of glycerol or in the composition of the perfusate.

  1. The Secrets of Acinetobacter Secretion.

    PubMed

    Weber, Brent S; Kinsella, Rachel L; Harding, Christian M; Feldman, Mario F

    2017-02-16

    Infections caused by the bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are a mounting concern for healthcare practitioners as widespread antibiotic resistance continues to limit therapeutic treatment options. The biological processes used by A. baumannii to cause disease are not well defined, but recent research has indicated that secreted proteins may play a major role. A variety of mechanisms have now been shown to contribute to protein secretion by A. baumannii and other pathogenic species of Acinetobacter, including a type II secretion system (T2SS), a type VI secretion system (T6SS), autotransporter, and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of secretion systems in Acinetobacter species, and highlight their unique aspects that contribute to the pathogenicity and persistence of these emerging pathogens.

  2. Ethanolysis of rapeseed oil - distribution of ethyl esters, glycerides and glycerol between ester and glycerol phases.

    PubMed

    Cernoch, Michal; Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    The distribution of ethyl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, and glycerol between the ester and glycerol phase was investigated after the ethanolysis of rapeseed oil at various reaction conditions. The determination of these substances in the ester and glycerol phases was carried out by the GC method. The amount of ethyl esters in the glycerol phase was unexpectedly high and therefore the possibility of the reduction of this amount was investigated. The distribution coefficients and the weight distributions of each investigated substance were calculated and compared mutually. The distribution coefficients between the ester and glycerol phase increase in this sequence: glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters, and triglycerides. Soaps and monoglycerides in the reaction mixture cause a worse separation of ethyl esters from the reaction mixture. The existence of a non-separable reaction mixture was observed also, and its composition was determined. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  4. Synthesis of prebiotic glycerol in interstellar ices.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ralf I; Maity, Surajit; Jones, Brant M

    2015-01-02

    Contemporary mechanisms for the spontaneous formation of glycerol have not been able to explain its existence on early Earth. The exogenous origin and delivery of organic molecules to early Earth presents an alternative route to their terrestrial in situ formation since biorelevant molecules like amino acids, carboxylic acids, and alkylphosphonic acids have been recovered from carbonaceous chondrites. Reported herein is the first in situ identification of glycerol, the key building block of all cellular membranes, formed by exposure of methanol-based - interstellar model ices to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. These results provide compelling evidence that the radiation-induced formation of glycerol in low-temperature interstellar model ices is facile. Synthesized on interstellar grains and eventually incorporated into the "building material" of solar systems, biorelevant molecules such as glycerol could have been dispensed to habitable planets such as early Earth by comets and meteorites.

  5. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Haider, Muhammad H; Dummer, Nicholas F; Knight, David W; Jenkins, Robert L; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  6. Insoluble and flexible silk films containing glycerol.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shenzhou; Wang, Xiaoqin; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kluge, Jonathan A; Uppal, Neha; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-11

    We directly prepared insoluble silk films by blending with glycerol and avoiding the use of organic solvents. The ability to blend a plasticizer like glycerol with a hydrophobic protein like silk and achieve stable material systems above a critical threshold of glycerol is an important new finding with importance for green chemistry approaches to new and more flexible silk-based biomaterials. The aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, and well-documented use of glycerol as a plasticizer with other biopolymers prompted its inclusion in silk fibroin solutions to assess impact on silk film behavior. Processing was performed in water rather than organic solvents to enhance the potential biocompatibility of these biomaterials. The films exhibited modified morphologies that could be controlled on the basis of the blend composition and also exhibited altered mechanical properties, such as improved elongation at break, when compared with pure silk fibroin films. Mechanistically, glycerol appears to replace water in silk fibroin chain hydration, resulting in the initial stabilization of helical structures in the films, as opposed to random coil or beta-sheet structures. The use of glycerol in combination with silk fibroin in materials processing expands the functional features attainable with this fibrous protein, and in particular, in the formation of more flexible films with potential utility in a range of biomaterial and device applications.

  7. Glycerol induces reuterin production and decreases Escherichia coli population in an in vitro model of colonic fermentation with immobilized human feces.

    PubMed

    Cleusix, Valentine; Lacroix, Christophe; Vollenweider, Sabine; Le Blay, Gwenaëlle

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 is a probiotic strain that produces, in the presence of glycerol, reuterin, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial substance. This strain has been shown to prevent intestinal infections in vivo; however, its mechanisms of action, and more specifically whether reuterin production occurs within the intestinal tract, are not known. In this study, the effects of L. reuteri ATCC 55730 on intestinal microbiota and its capacity to secrete reuterin from glycerol in a novel in vitro colonic fermentation model were tested. Two reactors were inoculated with adult immobilized fecal microbiota and the effects of daily addition of L. reuteri into one of the reactors (c.10(8) CFU mL(-1)) without or with glycerol were tested on major bacterial populations and compared with addition of glycerol or reuterin alone. The addition of glycerol alone or with L. reuteri increased numbers of the Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group and decreased Escherichia coli. The addition of reuterin significantly and selectively decreased E. coli without affecting other bacterial populations. The observed decrease in E. coli concentration during the addition of glycerol (in presence or absence of L. reuteri) could be due to in situ reuterin production because 1,3-propanediol, a typical product of glycerol fermentation, was detected during the addition of glycerol.

  8. Intracellular glycerol influences resistance to freeze stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: analysis of a quadruple mutant in glycerol dehydrogenase genes and glycerol-enriched cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Sato, Machiko; Yokoigawa, Kumio; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    Glycerol is well known as a cryoprotectant similar to trehalose. However, there is little information about the effects of intracellular glycerol on the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of yeast. Through analysis of a quadruple-knockout mutant of glycerol dehydrogenase genes (ara1 Delta gcy1 Delta gre3 Delta ypr1 Delta) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we revealed that the decrease in glycerol dehydrogenase activity led to increased levels of intracellular glycerol. We also found that this mutant showed higher tolerance to freeze stress than wild type strain W303-1A. Furthermore, we demonstrated that intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells cultured in glycerol medium acquire tolerance to freeze stress and retain high leavening ability in dough even after frozen storage for 7 days. These results suggest the possibility of using intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells to develop better frozen dough.

  9. Glycerol monooleate-blood interactions.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Emma M; Faxälv, Lars; Weissenrieder, Anna; Askendal, Agneta; Lindahl, Tomas L; Tengvall, Pentti

    2009-01-01

    In the present study the initial blood compatibility of glycerol monooleate (GMO)-coated surfaces was evaluated after deposition to surfaces and in bulk. The model surface was silica onto which multiple layers of fibrinogen or human serum albumin (HSA) was immobilized. The protein-coated surfaces were subsequently dip-coated in GMO in ethanol and used for blood plasma and whole blood experiments. The characterization methods included null ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy, imaging of coagulation, hemolysis test and whole blood coagulation time by free oscillation rheometry. The results showed a GMO film thickness of approximately 350 A (approximately 4 microg/cm(2)) upon dip-coating in ethanolic solution. A major part of the deposited layer detached in aqueous solutions, especially during shear conditions. The coagulation time on GMO was significantly prolonged compared to that on HSA coated silica. Whole blood tests showed that GMO is a very weak hemolytic agent. Deposited GMO detached easily from surfaces upon rinsing or shearing, although a stable layer with undefined phase structure and a thickness of 50-70 A remained on HSA and fibrinogen precoated surfaces. This indicates that GMO has stronger adhesive forces to its substrate compared to the cohesive forces acting within the bulk GMO. The ability of GMO to detach from itself and tentatively form micelles or lipid bilayers when subjected to flowing blood may be of use in extravascular applications. It is concluded that GMO results in weak blood activation, and the material may in spite of this be suitable in selected biomaterial applications, especially as a biosealant and in colloidal dispersions.

  10. Synthesis of Glycerol Carbonate by Transesterification of Glycerol with Urea Over Zn/Al Mixed Oxide.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Young Bok; Baek, Jae Ho; Kim, Yangdo; Lee, Man Sig

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of glycerol carbonate using glycerol and urea have been carried out previously using ZnSO4 and ZnO catalysts, and high yields have been reported using ZnSO4 as catalyst. However, this salt is soluble in glycerol, and recycling of catalyst is difficult after the reaction. In this study, we prepared a mixed metal oxide catalyst using Zn and Al, and this catalyst consisted of a mixture of ZnO and ZnAl2O4. We confirmed the conversion of glycerol and the yield of glycerol carbonate of the amount of Al. As a result, we obtained a yield of 82.3% and a conversion of 82.7%. In addition we obtained high yield in recycling of catalyst. The yield of the glycerol carbonate increases with an increase of acid and base site of catalysts and the highest catalytic activity was obtained when acid/base ratio was approx. 1. From this result, we may conclude that the acid and base site density and ratio of catalysts were very important parameters in the synthesis of glycerol carbonate from urea and glycerol.

  11. Feruloyl glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl glycerol antioxidant behavior in phospholipid vesicles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enzymatically synthesized feruloyl¬-sn¬-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (F2G) were both found to partition and incorporate well into 1,2-dioleoylphosphocholine vesicles. Incorporation resulted in vesicles that were as or slightly more stable than the unloaded ones. FG and F2G both demon...

  12. Glycerol elicits energy taxis of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zhulin, I B; Rowsell, E H; Johnson, M S; Taylor, B L

    1997-05-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium show positive chemotaxis to glycerol, a chemical previously reported to be a repellent for E. coli. The threshold of the attractant response in both species was 10(-6) M glycerol. Glycerol chemotaxis was energy dependent and coincident with an increase in membrane potential. Metabolism of glycerol was required for chemotaxis, and when lactate was present to maintain energy production in the absence of glycerol, the increases in membrane potential and chemotactic response upon addition of glycerol were abolished. Methylation of a chemotaxis receptor was not required for positive glycerol chemotaxis in E. coli or S. typhimurium but is involved in the negative chemotaxis of E. coli to high concentrations of glycerol. We propose that positive chemotaxis to glycerol in E. coli and S. typhimurium is an example of energy taxis mediated via a signal transduction pathway that responds to changes in the cellular energy level.

  13. Glycerol-induced folding of unstructured disulfide-deficient lysozyme into a native-like conformation.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Keiko; Hirai, Ken-Ichi; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Kouta; Yusa, Mitsunobu; Tokunaga, Naoki; Doi, Gakuji; Noda, Yasuo; Tachibana, Hideki; Segawa, Shin-Ichi

    2009-08-01

    2SS[6-127,64-80] variant of lysozyme which has two disulfide bridges, Cys6-Cys127 and Cys64-Cys80, and lacks the other two disulfide bridges, Cys30-Cys115 and Cys76-Cys94, was quite unstructured in water, but a part of the polypeptide chain was gradually frozen into a native-like conformation with increasing glycerol concentration. It was monitored from the protection factors of amide hydrogens against H/D exchange. In solution containing various concentrations of glycerol, H/D exchange reactions were carried out at pH* 3.0 and 4 degrees C. Then, (1)H-(15)N-HSQC spectra of partially deuterated protein were measured in a quenching buffer for H/D exchange (95% DMSO/5% D(2)O mixture at pH* 5.5 adjusted with dichloroacetate). In a solution of 10% glycerol, the protection factors were nearly equal to 10 at most of residues. With increasing glycerol concentration, some selected regions were further protected, and their protection factors reached about a 1000 in 30% glycerol solution. The highly protected residues were included in A-, B-, and C-helices and beta3-strand, and especially centered on Ile 55 and Leu 56. In 2SS[6-127,64-80], long-range interactions were recovered due to the preferential hydration by glycerol in the hydrophobic box of the alpha-domain. Glycerol-induced recovering of the native-like structure is discussed from the viewpoint of molten globules growing with the protein folding. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 665-675, 2009.This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The "Published Online" date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com.

  14. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  15. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Monica Mihet, Maria Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  16. Enhanced cellulase production by Trichoderma harzianum by cultivation on glycerol followed by induction on cellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Delabona, Priscila da Silva; Lima, Deise Juliana; Robl, Diogo; Rabelo, Sarita Cândida; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz

    2016-05-01

    The use of glycerol obtained as an intermediate of the biodiesel manufacturing process as carbon source for microbial growth is a potential alternative strategy for the production of enzymes and other high-value bioproducts. This work evaluates the production of cellulase enzymes using glycerol for high cell density growth of Trichoderma harzianum followed by induction with a cellulosic material. Firstly, the influence of the carbon source used in the pre-culture step was investigated in terms of total protein secretion and fungal morphology. Enzymatic productivity was then determined for cultivation strategies using different types and concentrations of carbon source, as well as different feeding procedures (batch and fed-batch). The best strategy for cellulase production was then further studied on a larger scale using a stirred tank bioreactor. The proposed strategy for cellulase production, using glycerol to achieve high cell density growth followed by induction with pretreated sugarcane bagasse, achieved enzymatic activities up to 2.27 ± 0.37 FPU/mL, 106.40 ± 8.87 IU/mL, and 9.04 ± 0.39 IU/mL of cellulase, xylanase, and β-glucosidase, respectively. These values were 2 times higher when compared to the control experiments using glucose instead of glycerol. This novel strategy proved to be a promising approach for improving cellulolytic enzymes production, and could potentially contribute to adding value to biomass within the biofuels sector.

  17. Determination of dihydroxyacetone and glycerol in fermentation process by GC after n-methylimidazole catalyzed acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Li, Ming-Hua; Lin, Jin-Ping; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2011-05-01

    A gas chromatographic method that accurately measures glycerol and dihydroxyacetone from a fermentation broth is described in this paper. The method incorporates a sample derivatization reaction using n-methylimidazole as catalyst in the presence of acetic anhydride. Resulting derivatives are separated on a DB-5 capillary column and flame ionization detector. Results show that 10 μL n-methylimidazole and 75 μL acetic anhydride are sufficient to complete the acetylation for glycerol and dihydroxyacetone at room temperature for 5 min. The present method exhibits good linearity at a concentration range of 1-100 g/L with excellent regression (R(2) > 0.9997). The limits of detection are 0.025 and 0.013 g/L for dihydroxyacetone and glycerol, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to the monitoring and control of the fermentation process, and recoveries are in the range of 95.5-98.8% with relative standard deviations below 1%.

  18. Carbon and electron fluxes during the electricity driven 1,3-propanediol biosynthesis from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Chen, Jingwen; Freguia, Stefano; Rabaey, Korneel; Keller, Jürg

    2013-10-01

    1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PDO) can be produced biologically through glycerol fermentation. While such a process typically involves a pure culture system, particularly for crude glycerol, there would be operational advantages if a mixed population could be used. However, in the latter case the yield is typically low. Here, we use electrical current as the driving force for a mixed population fermenting glycerol in the cathode of a microbial bioelectrochemical system (BES). The carbon and electron flows were monitored by a titration and off-gas analysis (TOGA) sensor, and the syntrophic interactions in the BES were also investigated. Results show that on a carbon yield basis, current enhanced 1,3-PDO production from 24.8% (without current) to 50.1% (with a polarized biocathode at -0.9 V versus standard hydrogen electrode, SHE). Flux analysis indicated that the reductive current can be integrated into glycerol metabolism to enhance 1,3-PDO yield and that glycerol metabolism was redirected from propionate fermentation to 1,3-PDO production. A polarization of -0.6 V (vs SHE) resulted in more fermentative hydrogen production (from 2.7% to 8.0% on electron basis). 1,3-PDO production was also enhanced with hydrogen supply (37.7% on carbon basis), by suppressing hydrogen fermentation. Moreover, interspecies hydrogen transfer encouraged hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which was also accelerated by the cathodic polarization.

  19. Skin ice nucleators and glycerol in the freezing-tolerant frog Litoria ewingii.

    PubMed

    Rexer-Huber, Kalinka M J; Bishop, Phillip J; Wharton, David A

    2011-08-01

    The brown tree frog (Litoria ewingii) is the only known Southern Hemisphere vertebrate that can survive full-body freezing. Freezing challenges living organisms in many ways, with ice formation in the body producing a suite of physical and metabolic stresses which can damage cells and tissues. The present study looked at two mechanisms that address some of these stresses: cryoprotectants and ice nucleating agents (INAs). Skin secretions from L. ewingii were sampled along with microhabitat substrate and tested for the presence of INAs, which help control ice formation in the body. L. ewingii plasma was tested for seasonal and freezing-induced changes in both glucose and glycerol, which may have a cryoprotective role in freezing-tolerant frogs. Glycerol levels increased on freezing and decreased on thawing, while glucose levels did not change on freezing but increased on thawing. This suggests that glycerol may be acting as a cryoprotectant, although levels are low compared to other frogs. A clear seasonal change was seen in INA activity, with greater activity in winter than in summer. While potent INAs came from the microhabitat substrate, this work has shown for the first time that skin secretions also contain active INAs.

  20. From symmetric glycerol derivatives to dissymmetric chlorohydrins.

    PubMed

    Solarte, Carmen; Escribà, Marc; Eras, Jordi; Villorbina, Gemma; Canela, Ramon; Balcells, Mercè

    2011-03-02

    The anticipated worldwide increase in biodiesel production will result in an accumulation of glycerol for which there are insufficient conventional uses. The surplus of this by-product has increased rapidly during the last decade, prompting a search for new glycerol applications. We describe here the synthesis of dissymmetric chlorohydrin esters from symmetric 1,3-dichloro-2-propyl esters obtained from glycerol. We studied the influence of two solvents: 1,4-dioxane and 1-butanol and two bases: sodium carbonate and 1-butylimidazole, on the synthesis of dissymmetric chlorohydrin esters. In addition, we studied the influence of other bases (potassium and lithium carbonates) in the reaction using 1,4-dioxane as the solvent. The highest yield was obtained using 1,4-dioxane and sodium carbonate.

  1. Effects of Locally Applied Glycerol and Xylitol on the Hydration, Barrier Function and Morphological Parameters of the Skin.

    PubMed

    Korponyai, Csilla; Szél, Edit; Behány, Zoltán; Varga, Erika; Mohos, Gábor; Dura, Ágnes; Dikstein, Shabtay; Kemény, Lajos; Erős, Gábor

    2017-02-08

    Glycerol and xylitol hydrate the skin and improve its barrier function over a short period. We studied the effects of glycerol and xylitol on the physiological properties and morphology of the skin after longer-term application. Twelve volunteers with dry skin were examined. Three areas on the arms were determined. Area 1 served as untreated control. The vehicle was applied to area 2, while area 3 was treated twice daily with a formulation containing glycerol (5%) and xylitol (5%) for 14 days. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), hydration and biomechanical properties of the skin were monitored. Biopsies were taken for routine histology and immunohistochemistry for filaggrin and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). The polyols increased the skin hydration and protein quantity of filaggrin, elevated the interdigitation index, decreased the TEWL and improved the biomechanical properties of the skin, but did not change the protein expression of MMP-1. A combination of glycerol and xylitol can be useful additional therapy for dry skin.

  2. Bioconversion of glycerol to ethanol by a mutant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Res; Shahbazi, A; Wang, L; Ibrahim, S; Worku, M; Schimmel, K

    2012-03-29

    The main objective of this research is to develop, by adaptive evolution, mutant strains of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 that are capable of withstanding high glycerol concentration as well as resisting ethanol-inhibition. The mutant will be used for high ethanol fermentation from glycerol feedstock. Ethanol production from pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol using the stock was evaluated. A six-tube-subculture-generations method was used for developing the mutant. This involved subculturing the organism six consecutive times in tubes containing the same glycerol and ethanol concentrations at the same culture conditions. Then, the glycerol and/or ethanol concentration was increased and the six subculture generations were repeated. A strain capable of growing in 200 g/L glycerol and 30 g/L ethanol was obtained. The ability of this mutant, vis-à-vis the original strain, in utilizing glycerol in a high glycerol containing medium, with the concomitant ethanol yield, was assessed. Tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) was used as the fermentation medium. Fermentation products were analyzed using HPLC.In a 20 g/L glycerol TSB, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 converted 18.5 g/L P-glycerol and 17.8 g/L R-glycerol into 12 and 12.8 g/L ethanol, respectively. In a 50 g/L P-glycerol TSB, it utilized only 15.6 g/L glycerol; but the new strain used up 39 g/L, yielding 20 g/L ethanol after 120 h, an equivalence of 1.02 mol ethanol/mol-glycerol. This is the highest ethanol yield reported from glycerol bioconversion. The result of this P-glycerol fermentation can be duplicated using the R-glycerol from biodiesel production.

  3. Replacing corn with glycerol in diets for transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, E R; Schmelz-Roberts, N S; White, H M; Doane, P H; Donkin, S S

    2011-02-01

    Expansion of the biofuels industry has increased the availability of glycerol as an alternative feed for dairy cows. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of glycerol on feed intake, milk production, rumen volatile fatty acids, and metabolic parameters in transition dairy cows. Multiparous Holstein cows were fed diets containing either high-moisture corn (n=11) or glycerol (n=12) from -28 to +56 d relative to calving. Glycerol was included at 11.5 and 10.8% of the ration dry matter for the pre- and postpartum diets, respectively. Prepartum feed intake was not changed by glycerol feeding (14.9 vs. 14.6 kg/d, control vs. glycerol) nor did postpartum feed intake differ (19.8 vs. 20.7 kg/d, control vs. glycerol). Overall milk yield did not differ (35.8 vs. 37 kg/d, control vs. glycerol) and milk composition, milk urea nitrogen, somatic cells, and energy balance were not different with glycerol feeding. Blood glucose content was decreased in cows fed glycerol during the prepartum period (59.1 vs. 53.4 mg/dL), and β-hydroxybutyrate concentration was increased (0.58 vs. 0.82 mmol/L, control vs. glycerol). Concentrations of blood nonesterified fatty acids did not differ between the treatment groups, and no response to glycerol for blood metabolites during the postpartum period was observed. Total rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations (mmol/L) did not differ between treatments, but proportions of rumen propionate and butyrate were greater for cows fed glycerol (22.7 vs. 28.6% of propionate, control vs. glycerol; and 11.5 vs. 15.3% of butyrate, control vs. glycerol) at the expense of acetate (61.4 vs. 51.5%, control vs. glycerol). These data indicate that glycerol is a suitable replacement for corn grain in diets for transition dairy cows.

  4. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  5. Biorefinery for Glycerol Rich Biodiesel Industry Waste.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Prakash, Jyotsana; Koul, Shikha

    2016-06-01

    The biodiesel industry has the potential to meet the fuel requirements in the future. A few inherent lacunae of this bioprocess are the effluent, which is 10 % of the actual product, and the fact that it is 85 % glycerol along with a few impurities. Biological treatments of wastes have been known as a dependable and economical direction of overseeing them and bring some value added products as well. A novel eco-biotechnological strategy employs metabolically diverse bacteria, which ensures higher reproducibility and economics. In this article, we have opined, which organisms and what bioproducts should be the focus, while exploiting glycerol as feed.

  6. Effects of intravenous infusion of glycerol on blood parameters and urinary glycerol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Dohi, Michiko; Kageyama, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    In sports, the oral intake and intravenous administration of glycerol as a potential masking agent have been prohibited. The effect of glycerol on blood parameters was investigated by comparing the intravenous administration of glycerol (20g/200mL) with that of an electrolyte (8g glucose/200mL) as a comparator (n=7, fixed-dose-rate i.v. infusion, 200mL in 1h). This study was also designed to evaluate whether the urinary concentrations reached the positivity threshold after the intravenous infusion of glycerol. Significant decreases of the haemoglobin (HGB, g/dL), haematocrit (HCT, %) and OFF-h Score (OFF-score) values were observed after the infusion of glycerol (P<0.05 at 1-6h). The differences in the HGB, HCT and OFF-score between pre- and post-administration were -0.49±0.23g/dL (2h), -1.54±0.73% (2h) and -3.89±3.66 (2h), respectively. Glycerol infusion significantly increased the plasma volume by 12.1% (1h), 6.3% (2h) and 5.7% (3h) compared with the initial values. The infusion of the comparator also increased the plasma volume by 9.6% (1h), 5.8% (2h) and 4.9% (3h) compared with the values before infusion. There were no significant differences in the change of the plasma volume between the intravenous infusions of glycerol and the glucose-based electrolyte (as the comparator) (P≥0.05). This finding might indicate that glycerol itself only exhibited limited effects on the expansion of plasma. After administration of glycerol, the urinary glycerol concentrations increased from 0.0013±0.0004mg/mL to 6.86±2.86mg/mL at 1h and 6.45±3.08mg/mL at 2h. The intravenous infusion of glycerol can most likely be detected using the current urine analysis; however, the dependence of the concentration of urinary glycerol on the urine volume should be considered.

  7. Genetic construction of recombinant Pseudomonas chlororaphis for improved glycerol utilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study is to improve by genetic engineering the glycerol metabolic capability of Pseudomonas chlororaphis which is capable of producing commercially valuable biodegradable poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) and biosurfactant rhamnolipids (RLs). In the study, glycerol uptake facilitat...

  8. Evidence for direct binding of glycerol to photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Hussels, Martin; Brecht, Marc

    2011-08-04

    The interaction between glycerol and photosystem I (PSI) was investigated using low temperature single-molecule spectroscopy. PSI complexes were dissolved in three different solutions: in buffer solution, in 66% glycerol/buffer solution, and in 66% glycerol/buffer solution that was afterwards diluted by buffer; the final glycerol concentration was <1‰. Mean fluorescence spectra and intercomplex heterogeneity of PSI complexes in 66% glycerol/buffer solution and in the re-diluted solution show high similarity, but differ from complexes in buffer solution indicating that the glycerol concentration is not the determining factor modifying the spectral properties. However, the exposure of PSI to a high glycerol concentration during sample preparation affects PSI and the effect is maintained if glycerol is removed from the solution.

  9. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin, gum rosin, or tall oil rosin may be safely... or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of citrus oils used in the preparation of...

  10. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin... purified by countercurrent steam distillation or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of...

  11. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin... purified by countercurrent steam distillation or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of...

  12. Glycerol production by fermentation: a fed-batch approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vijaikishore, P.; Karanth, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    In this investigation the bioconversion of glycerol from glucose was studied in a laboratory fermentor using an alkaline medium with a fed batch mode of carbon source addition yielding 30% glycerol concentration in the final broth. (Refs. 9).

  13. Glycerol Hypersensitivity in a Drosophila Model for Glycerol Kinase Deficiency Is Affected by Mutations in Eye Pigmentation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Patrick J.; Jackson, George R.; Dipple, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol kinase plays a critical role in metabolism by converting glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate in an ATP dependent reaction. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency results in a wide range of phenotypic variability; patients can have severe metabolic and CNS abnormalities, while others possess hyperglycerolemia and glyceroluria with no other apparent phenotype. In an effort to help understand the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic variation, we have created a Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency by RNAi targeting of dGyk (CG18374) and dGK (CG7995). As expected, RNAi flies have reduced glycerol kinase RNA expression, reduced phosphorylation activity and elevated glycerol levels. Further investigation revealed these flies to be hypersensitive to fly food supplemented with glycerol. Due to the hygroscopic nature of glycerol, we predict glycerol hypersensitivity is a result of greater susceptibility to desiccation, suggesting glycerol kinase to play an important role in desiccation resistance in insects. To evaluate a role for genetic modifier loci in determining severity of the glycerol hypersensitivity observed in knockdown flies, we performed a preliminary screen of lethal transposon insertion mutant flies using a glycerol hypersensitive survivorship assay. We demonstrate that this type of screen can identify both enhancer and suppressor genetic loci of glycerol hypersensitivity. Furthermore, we found that the glycerol hypersensitivity phenotype can be enhanced or suppressed by null mutations in eye pigmentation genes. Taken together, our data suggest proteins encoded by eye pigmentation genes play an important role in desiccation resistance and that eye pigmentation genes are strong modifiers of the glycerol hypersensitive phenotype identified in our Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency. PMID:22427807

  14. How does glycerol enhance the bioprotective properties of trehalose? Insight from protein-solvent dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Giuseppe; Paccou, Laurent; Guinet, Yannick; Hédoux, Alain

    2014-07-31

    We present Raman investigations on lysozyme/trehalose/glycerol solutions at low water content, from room temperature up to the occurrence of the protein thermal denaturation. We studied the Amide I band and the low-frequency spectrum as a function of the glycerol content. The former allows us to monitor the protein unfolding; the latter probes the protein and solvent dynamics in anharmonic and quasi-harmonic regimes. It was shown that adding a small amount of glycerol to trehalose stiffens the dry matrix in which proteins are embedded, thus improving their stability. The analysis of the Amide I band reveals that glycerol enhances the stabilization effect of trehalose on proteins for low water content, but still liquid, systems. Data show that the protein unfolding temperature has a maximum value around 5% Glyc/TRE g/g. The overlapping low-frequency contributions, corresponding to fast anharmonic and quasi-harmonic motions, respectively, related to the mean square displacement ⟨u(2)⟩ and the vibrational density of states (VDOS) usually determined by neutron scattering experiments, have been carefully analyzed to understand the effect of glycerol. The intensity of the quasi-elastic scattering (QES) peak reveals a dynamical-like transition at high temperatures, close to the denaturation temperature. This one, as well as the low-frequency vibrational modes, reflects the same enhanced trend of the Amide I band with respect to the glycerol concentration, but at lower temperatures. A linear correlation is found among the transition temperatures of both the dynamical-like transition and the low-frequency modes, as well as the temperature dependent change of the Amide I frequency. This confirms the solvent dynamics as a necessary precursor to promote protein unfolding. Glycerol anti-plasticizes the matrix with respect to the trehalose by enhancing the stability of the protein in a more rigid trehalose/water/glycerol matrix. As expected from the analysis of the Amide I

  15. Glycerol, ethylene glycol and propanediol elicit pimaricin biosynthesis in the PI-factor-defective strain Streptomyces natalensis npi287 and increase polyene production in several wild-type actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Recio, Eliseo; Aparicio, Jesús F; Rumbero, Angel; Martín, Juan F

    2006-10-01

    Production of pimaricin by Streptomyces natalensis ATCC 27448 is elicited by the PI-factor, an autoinducer secreted by the producer strain during the rapid growth phase. Exogenous PI-factor restored pimaricin production in a mutant strain npi287 defective in PI-factor biosynthesis. During purification of the PI-factor, a second pimaricin-inducing fraction different from PI-factor was isolated from the culture broth of wild-type S. natalensis ATCC 27448. After purification by HPLC and analysis by MS and NMR, this active fraction was shown to contain glycerol and lactic acid. Pure glycerol restored pimaricin production in liquid cultures of the autoinducer-defective npi287 mutant. A similar effect was exerted by ethylene glycol, 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-propanediol but not by higher polyalcohols or by glycerol acetate or glycerol lactate esters. Glycerol stimulated (30-270 %) the production of six different polyene macrolide antibiotics by their respective producer strains. Addition of glycerol to the inducer-defective npi287 strain restored pimaricin production but did not result in extracellular or intracellular accumulation of PI-factor. Exogenously added PI-factor was internalized by the cells in the presence of glycerol, and a mixture of both PI-factor and glycerol produced a slightly higher inducing effect on pimaricin production than PI-factor alone. In summary, glycerol, ethylene glycol and propanediol exert a bypass of the PI-factor inducing effect on pimaricin biosynthesis.

  16. Biological valorization of pure and crude glycerol into 1,3-propanediol using a novel isolate Lactobacillus brevis N1E9.3.3.

    PubMed

    Vivek, Narisetty; Pandey, Ashok; Binod, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate a novel onsite enrichment approach to isolate a crude glycerol utilizing facultative anaerobic bacteria. An onsite enrichment in natural conditions resulted an isolate, Lactobacillus brevis N1E9.3.3, that can utilize glycerol and produce 1,3-propanediol with a yield of 0.89g1,3-PDO/gGlycerol and productivity of 0.78g1,3-PDO/l/h at pH-8.5 under anaerobic conditions. Batch fermentation experiments with glycerol-glucose co-fermentation strategy was carried out to evaluate the production of 1,3-propanediol and other byproducts. The effect of other carbon sources as co-substrate was also evaluated. At the optimized condition, 18.6g/l 1,3-propanediol was monitored when biodiesel industry generated crude glycerol and 2.5% glucose were used as the substrate.

  17. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glycerol ester of rosin. 172.735 Section 172.735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin...

  18. Digestable and Metabolizable Energy of Crude Glycerol in Growing Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apparent DE and ME value of crude glycerol for growing pigs was determined in a series of 5 experiments using crude glycerol (86.95% glycerol) from a biodiesel production facility with soybean oil used as the initial feedstock (AG Processing Inc., Sergeant Bluff, IA). Dietary treatments were 0, ...

  19. 1,2-Isopropylidene glycerol carbonate: preparation, characterization, and hydrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The utilization of excess glycerol supplies derived from the burgeoning biodiesel industry is of major importance to the oleochemical industry as the economic viability of the biodiesel and oleochemical industries are closely linked to glycerol prices. Carbonate compounds based on glycerol, such as...

  20. Determining Atmospheric Pressure with a Eudiometer and Glycerol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Jed; Rohald, Kate; Sutton, Atasha

    2010-01-01

    We consider a volume of air trapped over a glycerol column in a eudiometer. We demonstrate that there is an approximately linear relationship between the volume of trapped air and the height of the glycerol column. Simply by moving the eudiometer up and down, we cause the glycerol-column height and trapped-air volume to vary. The plot of volume…

  1. Determining Atmospheric Pressure with a Eudiometer and Glycerol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Jed; Rohald, Kate; Sutton, Atasha

    2010-01-01

    We consider a volume of air trapped over a glycerol column in a eudiometer. We demonstrate that there is an approximately linear relationship between the volume of trapped air and the height of the glycerol column. Simply by moving the eudiometer up and down, we cause the glycerol-column height and trapped-air volume to vary. The plot of volume…

  2. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas.

  3. Glycerol prevents dehydration in lipid cubic phases.

    PubMed

    Richardson, S J; Staniec, P A; Newby, G E; Rawle, J L; Slaughter, A R; Terrill, N J; Elliott, J M; Squires, A M

    2015-07-21

    Lipid cubic phase samples dry out and undergo phase transitions when exposed to air. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that adding glycerol controllably lowers the humidity at which cubic phases form. These results broaden the potential applications of cubic phases and open up the potential of a new humidity-responsive nanomaterial.

  4. Synthesis of glycerol mono-laurate from lauric acid and glycerol for food antibacterial additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setianto, W. B.; Wibowo, T. Y.; Yohanes, H.; Illaningtyas, F.; Anggoro, D. D.

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of glycerol mono-laurate (GML) has been performed using esterification reaction of glycerol and lauric acid. The reaction was performed at the condition of temperature of 120-140 °C within 7 hour, variation of molar ratio of glycerol - lauric acid, and was using heterogeneous catalyst of zeolist Y. Without catalyst dealumination the maximum acid conversion was 78%, with GML contained in the sample was 38.6%, and it was obtained at the reaction condition of 140 oC, 15wt% catalyst, and 8:1 molar ratio of glycerol - lauric acid. At the same condition, using dealuminated catalyst, the maximum acid conversion was increased up to 98%, with GML contained in the sample was 50.4%. The GML antibacterial activity was examined. It was observed that the GML has antibacterial activity against gram positive bacterial such as B. cereus and S. aureus.

  5. An efficient palladium catalyst system for the oxidative carbonylation of glycerol to glycerol carbonate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianglin; Gu, Yanlong; Guan, Zhenhong; Li, Jinjin; Mo, Wanling; Li, Tao; Li, Guangxing

    2011-12-16

    Glycerol carbonate can be readily synthesized from the oxidative carbonylation of glycerol catalyzed by PdCl(2)(phen) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) with the aid of CuI. High conversion (95 %) and selectivity (98 %) are achieved and the turnover frequency (TOF) reaches 455 h(-1). Furthermore, a new zeolite-Y-confined Pd catalyst, PdCl(2)(phen)@Y, has been successfully prepared by a ''flexible ligand'' method. The structure and composition of the heterogeneous catalyst have been characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy, elemental analysis, N(2) sorption, XRD, FTIR, solid-state NMR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This catalyst exhibits a comparable activity to its homogeneous counterpart and could be reused five times without significant decrease in activity. This is the most efficient heterogeneous system for synthesizing glycerol carbonate by the oxidative carbonylation of glycerol to date. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and urea with gold-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ceri; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A; Ab Rahim, Mohd Hasbi; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Jenkins, Robert L; Carley, Albert F; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Knight, David W; Hutchings, Graham J

    2011-04-21

    The reaction of glycerol with urea to form glycerol carbonate is mostly reported in the patent literature and to date there have been very few fundamental studies of the reaction mechanism. Furthermore, most previous studies have involved homogeneous catalysts whereas the identification of heterogeneous catalysts for this reaction would be highly beneficial. This is a very attractive reaction that utilises two inexpensive and readily available raw materials in a chemical cycle that overall, results in the chemical fixation of CO(2). This reaction also provides a route to up-grade waste glycerol produced in large quantities during the production of biodiesel. Previous reports are largely based on the utilisation of high concentrations of metal sulfates or oxides, which suffer from low intrinsic activity and selectivity. We have identified heterogeneous catalysts based on gallium, zinc, and gold supported on a range of oxides and the zeolite ZSM-5, which facilitate this reaction. The addition of each component to ZSM-5 leads to an increase in the reaction yield towards glycerol carbonate, but supported gold catalysts display the highest activity. For gold-based catalysts, MgO is the support of choice. Catalysts have been characterised by XRD, TEM, STEM and XPS, and the reaction has been studied with time-on-line analysis of products via a combination of FT-IR spectroscopy, HPLC, (13)C NMR and GC-MS analysis to evaluate the reaction pathway. Our proposed mechanism suggests that glycerol carbonate forms via the cyclization of a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl carbamate and that a subsequent reaction of glycerol carbonate with urea yields the carbamate of glycerol carbonate. Stability and reactivity studies indicate that consecutive reactions of glycerol carbonate can limit the selectivity achieved and reaction conditions can be selected to avoid this. The effect of the catalyst in the proposed mechanism is discussed.

  7. Competitive inhibition of AQP7-mediated glycerol transport by glycerol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Katano, Takahiro; Ito, Yuko; Ohta, Kinya; Yasujima, Tomoya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporin 7 (AQP7) is an aquaglyceroporin that has recently been found to operate as a facilitative carrier rather than a channel for glycerol, although its primary function is as a water channel. To probe into its substrate specificity, we examined the inhibitory effect of a series of acyl glycerol derivatives on glycerol transport mediated by human AQP7 stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. According to kinetic analyses, AQP7-mediated glycerol transport was found to be competitively inhibited by monoacetin, monobutyrin and diacetin. Therefore, it may be possible that they all could be recognized as substrates by AQP7. The inhibition constant (Ki) of monoacetin (134 µM) was smaller than that of diacetin (420 µM), but greater than the Michaelis constant for glycerol (11.8 µM). Considering another finding that inhibition by triacetin was insignificant, it is likely that a decrease in the number of hydroxyl groups in the glycerol molecule by acetyl derivatization leads to a decrease in affinity for AQP7. The Ki of monobutyrin (80 µM) was, on the other hand, comparable with that of monoacetin, suggesting that the extension of the acyl chain by two hydrocarbon units does not have an impact on affinity for AQP7.

  8. Glycerol and glycerol carbonate as ultraviscous solvents for mixture analysis by NMR.

    PubMed

    Lameiras, Pedro; Boudesocque, Leslie; Mouloungui, Zéphirin; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    NMR of weakly polar analytes in an apolar ultraviscous solvent has recently been proposed for mixture analysis as a pertinent alternative to the DOSY experiment. The present article reports the first use of glycerol and glycerol carbonate as polar solvents for the NMR analysis of a model mixture of dipeptides. This work demonstrates the high potentiality of these solvents for the analysis of mixtures made of polar and potentially bioactive compounds. Medium-sized molecules slowly reorient in glycerol and glycerol carbonate under particular temperature conditions, so that solute resonances may show spin diffusion in NOESY spectra, thus opening the way to mixture analysis. Glycerol and glycerol carbonate have turned out to be ultraviscous solvents of choice for the individualization of four structurally close mixed dipeptides: Leu-Val, Leu-Tyr, Gly-Tyr and Ala-Tyr by means of 1D and 2D NOESY experiments. Selective sample excitation and signal detection were implemented to eliminate the intense proton signals of the non-deuterated solvents. Moreover, the recording of a multiplet selective 2D NOESY-TOCSY has shown that the analytical power of NMR in highly viscous solvents is not limited to the extraction of mixture component 1D subspectra but may also yield some supplementary information about atom connectivity within components. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antioxidant behavior of 1-feruloyl-sn-glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol in phospholipid liposomes 1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1-Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (DFG) are two natural plant compounds that may be useful in cosmeceutical, food, and skin care applications because of excellent antioxidant properties. FG and DFG enzymatically synthesized through esterification of glycerol and soybean oil...

  10. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle in mouse pancreatic islets abolishes glucagon secretion without affecting insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Jelena A; Andersson, Lotta E; Adriaenssens, Alice E; Bagge, Annika; Sharoyko, Vladimir V; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Wollheim, Claes B; Mulder, Hindrik; Spégel, Peter

    2015-05-15

    Altered secretion of insulin as well as glucagon has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the mechanisms controlling glucagon secretion from α-cells largely remain unresolved. Therefore, we studied the regulation of glucagon secretion from αTC1-6 (αTC1 clone 6) cells and compared it with insulin release from INS-1 832/13 cells. We found that INS-1 832/13 and αTC1-6 cells respectively secreted insulin and glucagon concentration-dependently in response to glucose. In contrast, tight coupling of glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism was observed only in INS-1 832/13 cells. Although glycolytic metabolism was similar in the two cell lines, TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle metabolism, respiration and ATP levels were less glucose-responsive in αTC1-6 cells. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle, using phenyl succinate (PhS), abolished glucose-provoked ATP production and hormone secretion from αTC1-6 but not INS-1 832/13 cells. Blocking the malate-aspartate shuttle increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate only in INS-1 832/13 cells. Accordingly, relative expression of constituents in the glycerol phosphate shuttle compared with malate-aspartate shuttle was lower in αTC1-6 cells. Our data suggest that the glycerol phosphate shuttle augments the malate-aspartate shuttle in INS-1 832/13 but not αTC1-6 cells. These results were confirmed in mouse islets, where PhS abrogated secretion of glucagon but not insulin. Furthermore, expression of the rate-limiting enzyme of the glycerol phosphate shuttle was higher in sorted primary β- than in α-cells. Thus, suppressed glycerol phosphate shuttle activity in the α-cell may prevent a high rate of glycolysis and consequently glucagon secretion in response to glucose. Accordingly, pyruvate- and lactate-elicited glucagon secretion remains unaffected since their signalling is independent of mitochondrial shuttles.

  11. Unsaturated glycerol monoethers as novel skin penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Loftsson, T; Petersen, D S; Le Goffic, F; Olafsson, J H

    1997-06-01

    A mixture of glycerol monoethers was extracted from the liver oil of deep sea shark (Centroporus squamosus). It consisted mainly of monoethers of glycerol and linear monounsaturated octadecanol, and glycerol and linear monounsaturated hexadecanol. Only about 11% of the extract consisted of glycerol monoethers derived from linear saturated fatty alcohols. The glycerol monoether extract was somewhat less effective as skin penetration enhancer than oleic acid and other potent fatty acid penetration enhancers, but it was still a very effective enhancer in the hairless mouse skin model used in this study.

  12. An improved glycerol biosensor with an Au-FeS-NAD-glycerol-dehydrogenase anode.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Aishwarya; Fernando, Sandun

    2017-06-15

    An improved glycerol biosensor was developed via direct attachment of NAD(+)-glycerol dehydrogenase coenzyme-apoenzyme complex onto supporting gold electrodes, using novel inorganic iron (II) sulfide (FeS)-based single molecular wires. Sensing performance factors, i.e., sensitivity, a detection limit and response time of the FeS and conventional pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-based biosensor were evaluated by dynamic constant potential amperometry at 1.3V under non-buffered conditions. For glycerol concentrations ranging from 1 to 25mM, a 77% increase in sensitivity and a 53% decrease in detection limit were observed for the FeS-based biosensor when compared to the conventional PQQ-based counterpart. The electrochemical behavior of the FeS-based glycerol biosensor was analyzed at different concentrations of glycerol, accompanied by an investigation into the effects of applied potential and scan rate on the current response. Effects of enzyme stimulants ((NH4)2SO4 and MnCl2·4H2O) concentrations and buffers/pH (potassium phosphate buffer pH 6-8, Tris buffer pH 8-10) on the current responses generated by the FeS-based glycerol biosensor were also studied. The optimal detection conditions were 0.03M (NH4)2SO4 and 0.3µm MnCl2·4H2O in non-buffered aqueous electrolyte under stirring whereas under non-stirring, Tris buffer at pH 10 with 0.03M (NH4)2SO4 and 30µm MnCl2·4H2O were found to be optimal detection conditions. Interference by glucose, fructose, ethanol, and acetic acid in glycerol detection was studied. The observations indicated a promising enhancement in glycerol detection using the novel FeS-based glycerol sensing electrode compared to the conventional PQQ-based one. These findings support the premise that FeS-based bioanodes are capable of biosensing glycerol successfully and may be applicable for other enzymatic biosensors.

  13. Influence of altered CSF solute composition on parotid salivary secretion in goats.

    PubMed

    Olsson, K

    1976-06-01

    Infusions of hypertonic NaCl solution into the CSF of the lateral cerebral ventricle of the goat caused a marked reduction in parotid salivary flow concomitant with a rise in salivary [Na+]. Corresponding infusions of iso- or hypertonic glucose and glycerol solutions affected salivary secretion in the opposite direction. The possibility is discussed that a periventricular sodium-sensitive mechanism, which is of importance in the central control of fluid balance, also may participate in the regulation of parotid secretion in the goat. This interpretation of the results is to some extent obscured by the observation of a high incidence of intermittent rumination during the intraventricular infusions of glucose and glycerol solution.

  14. Glycerol stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Cellular responses and evolved adaptations.

    PubMed

    Mattenberger, Florian; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Hallsworth, John E; Fares, Mario A

    2017-03-01

    Glycerol synthesis is key to central metabolism and stress biology in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet the cellular adjustments needed to respond and adapt to glycerol stress are little understood. Here, we determined impacts of acute and chronic exposures to glycerol stress in S. cerevisiae. Glycerol stress can result from an increase of glycerol concentration in the medium due to the S. cerevisiae fermenting activity or other metabolic activities. Acute glycerol-stress led to a 50% decline in growth rate and altered transcription of more than 40% of genes. The increased genetic diversity in S. cerevisiae population, which had evolved in the standard nutrient medium for hundreds of generations, led to an increase in growth rate and altered transcriptome when such population was transferred to stressful media containing a high concentration of glycerol; 0.41 M (0.990 water activity). Evolution of S. cerevisiae populations during a 10-day period in the glycerol-containing medium led to transcriptome changes and readjustments to improve control of glycerol flux across the membrane, regulation of cell cycle, and more robust stress response; and a remarkable increase of growth rate under glycerol stress. Most of the observed regulatory changes arose in duplicated genes. These findings elucidate the physiological mechanisms, which underlie glycerol-stress response, and longer-term adaptations, in S. cerevisiae; they also have implications for enigmatic aspects of the ecology of this otherwise well-characterized yeast.

  15. Continual production of glycerol from carbon dioxide by Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yvonne Y S; Goh, Serena J M; Su, Ziheng; Ng, Daphne H P; Lim, Chan Yuen; Lim, Natalie Y N; Lin, Huixin; Fang, Lei; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2013-05-01

    Microalgae have high photosynthetic efficiencies and produce many valuable compounds from carbon dioxide. The Dunaliella genus accumulates glycerol, yet no commercial process currently exists for glycerol production from this microalga. Here it was found that in addition to intracellular accumulation, Dunaliella tertiolecta also releases glycerol into the external medium continuously, forming a large and stable carbon pool. The process is not affected by nutrient starvation or onset of cell death. Carbon dioxide was fixed at a constant rate, the bulk of it being channelled to extracellular glycerol (82%), resulting in enhanced photosynthetic carbon assimilation of 5 times that used for biomass production. The final extracellular glycerol concentration was 34 times the maximum concentration of intracellular glycerol; the latter declined further during cell death. Findings from this work will assist in the development of a bioconversion process to produce glycerol using D. tertiolecta without the need for cell harvest or disruption. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetic mechanism of indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Schlee, Sandra; Dietrich, Susanne; Kurćon, Tomasz; Delaney, Pamela; Goodey, Nina M; Sterner, Reinhard

    2013-01-08

    The (βα)(8)-barrel enzyme indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) catalyzes the multistep transformation of 1-(o-carboxyphenylamino)-1-deoxyribulose 5-phosphate (CdRP) into indole-3-glycerol phosphate (IGP) in tryptophan biosynthesis. Mutagenesis data and crystal structure analysis of IGPS from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS) allowed for the formulation of a plausible chemical mechanism of the reaction, and molecular dynamics simulations suggested that flexibility of active site loops might be important for catalysis. Here we developed a method that uses extrinsic fluorophores attached to active site loops to connect the kinetic mechanism of sIGPS to structure and conformational motions. Specifically, we elucidated the kinetic mechanism of sIGPS and correlated individual steps in the mechanism to conformational motions of flexible loops. Pre-steady-state kinetic measurements of CdRP to IGP conversion monitoring changes in intrinsic tryptophan and IGP fluorescence provided a minimal three-step kinetic model in which fast substrate binding and chemical transformation are followed by slow product release. The role of sIGPS loop conformational motion during substrate binding and catalysis was examined via variants that were covalently labeled with fluorescent dyes at the N-terminal extension of the enzyme and mobile active site loop β1α1. Analysis of kinetic data monitoring dye fluorescence revealed a conformational change that follows substrate binding, suggesting an induced-fit-type binding mechanism for the substrate CdRP. Global fitting of all kinetic results obtained with wild-type sIGPS and the labeled variants was best accommodated by a four-step kinetic model. In this model, both the binding of CdRP and its on-enzyme conversion to IGP are accompanied by conformational transitions. The liberation of the product from the active site is the rate-limiting step of the overall reaction. Our results confirm the importance of flexible active loops for substrate

  17. Ultrasound assisted enzyme catalyzed synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Govind V; Vetal, Mangesh D; Rathod, Virendra K

    2015-01-01

    The present work illustrates the transesterification of glycerol to glycerol carbonate (GlyC) from dimethyl carbonate (DMC) using commercial immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) under ultrasonic irradiation. The experiments were performed in a batch reactor placed in an ultrasonic water bath using a sequence of experimental protocol to evaluate the effects of temperature, molar ratios of substrates, enzyme loading, duty cycle and ultrasound power on the conversion of glycerol to GlyC. It has been found that ultrasound-assisted lipase-catalyzed transesterification of glycerol would be a potential alternative to conventional alkali-catalyzed method, as high conversion (99.75%) was obtained at mild operating conditions: molar ratio of DMC to glycerol 3:1, catalyst amount of 13% (w/w), lower power input (100W), duty cycle 50% and temperature (60°C) in a relatively short reaction time (4h) using Novozym 435 as catalyst. Ultrasound reduces the reaction time up to 4h as compared to conventional stirring method (14h) catalyzed by Novozym 435. The repeated use of the catalyst under the optimum experimental condition resulted in decay in both enzyme activity and product conversion.

  18. Catalytic synthesis of hydroxymethyl-2-oxazolidinones from glycerol or glycerol carbonate and urea.

    PubMed

    Dibenedetto, Angela; Nocito, Francesco; Angelini, Antonella; Papai, Imre; Aresta, Michele; Mancuso, Raffaella

    2013-02-01

    Oxazolidinones have been synthesized by reacting glycerol carbonate or glycerol with urea in the presence of γ-Zr phosphate as a catalyst. The conversion yield of the polyol or its carbonate depends on the temperature. Below 408 K the selectivity is 100 % with a conversion of up to 25 %, whereas increasing the temperature means that conversion yield grows, but the selectivity decreases, which makes the separation process more difficult. Starting from glycerol carbonate, two isomers, 6 and 6', are formed with a quasi 1:1 molar ratio because urea can attack the carbonate moiety on both sides of the carboxylic CO moiety. From glycerol the formation of the 6' isomer is preferred: the ratio of 6'/6 is close to 7. The oxazolidinones formed act as templates because they interact through hydrogen bonding with glycerol. The intensity of the interaction depends on the 6 or 6' isomer: DFT calculations showed that the energy was 22.6 kcal mol(-1) for 6-oxazolidinone and 25.7 kcal mol(-1) for 6'-oxazolidinone. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Biological Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwachukwu, Raymond E. S.

    In a search to turn the economically and environmentally non-valuable "waste" streams of biodiesel production into a profitable byproduct, a mutant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 was developed by six-tube subculturing technique. This technique is based on the principle of adaptive evolution, and involved subculturing the bacterium in a tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) containing specific glycerol and ethanol concentration for six consecutive times. Then, the six consecutive subculturing was repeated in a fresh TSB of higher glycerol and ethanol concentrations. A new mutant strain, E. aerogenes S012, which could withstand a combination of 200 g/l glycerol and 30 g/l ethanol concentrations, was developed. The wild and mutant strains were used for the fermentation of pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol. Taguchi and full factorial methods of design of experiments were used to screen and optimize the important process factors that influence the microbial production of ethanol. A statistically sound regression model was used to establish the mathematical relationship between the process variables and ethanol production. Temperature of 38°C, agitation speed of 200 rpm, pH of 6.3-6.6, and microaerobic condition were the optimum process conditions. Different pretreatment methods to recover glycerol from the crude glycerol and the subsequent fermentation method showed that direct acidification using 85% H3PO4 was the best. The R-glycerol contained 51% pure glycerol and 21% methanol. The wild strain, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048, produced only 12 g/l and 12.8 g/l ethanol from 20 g/l P- and R-glycerol respectively, and could not utilize higher glycerol concentrations. The mutant, E. aerogenes S012, produced ethanol amount and yield of 43 g/l and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol from P-glycerol, respectively within 96 h. It also produced ethanol amount and yield of 26.8 g/l and 1.07 mol/mol-glycerol, respectively, from R-glycerol within the same duration. In a

  20. Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  1. Infanticide secrets

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jennieffer A.; Beck, Cheryl T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore thoughts of infanticide that did not lead to the act among mothers with postpartum depression. DESIGN A phenomenologic hermeneutic study in which women were invited to share their experiences of having thoughts of infanticide. SETTING Community setting in a large metropolitan city, Brisbane, Australia. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen women who had been diagnosed as clinically depressed with postpartum onset whose babies were 12 months of age or younger. METHOD Audiotaped, in-depth interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis commenced immediately after the first interview, and data collection continued until saturation was achieved. A questioning approach that reflected hermeneutics was facilitated by use of journals by the researchers. MAIN FINDINGS Six themes emerged from the data: imagined acts of infanticide, the experience of horror, distorted sense of responsibility, consuming negativity, keeping secrets, and managing the crisis. CONCLUSION Women who experienced nonpsychotic depression preferred not to disclose their thoughts of infanticide to health professionals, including trusted general practitioners or psychiatrists. These women were more likely to mention their suicidal thoughts than their infanticidal thoughts in order to obtain health care. General practitioners and other health professionals should directly ask about whether a woman has been experiencing thoughts of harming herself or her baby, regardless of the reason why she has presented. PMID:19074717

  2. Reduction of glycerol production to improve ethanol yield in an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae using glycerol as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyung Ok; Kim, Seung Wook; Han, Sung Ok

    2010-10-15

    Ethanol plays an important role in substituting the increasingly limited oil as the high-value, renewable fuel. In our previous studies, we successfully established the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by overexpression of pGcyaDak with pGup1Cas in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to increasing ethanol production using glycerol as substrate, we minimized the synthesis of glycerol, which is the main by-product in ethanol fermentation processing. The glycerol production pathway was impaired by deletion of the genes FPS1 and GPD2. Strains deleted for both FPS1 and GPD2 reduce glycerol production and become highly sensitive to osmotic stress. We provide osmotic protection in YPH499fps1Δgpd2Δ by overexpression of Gup1. In this study, S. cerevisiae using glycerol as substrate was modified through one-step gene disruption for redirection of glycerol carbon flux into ethanol by the deletion of two glycerol production genes, FPS1 and GPD2. The overall ethanol production in the modified strain YPH499fps1Δgpd2Δ (pGcyaDak, pGupCas) was about 4.4 gl⁻¹. These results demonstrate the possibility of providing protection against osmotic stress while simultaneously increasing ethanol and reducing glycerol production in S. cerevisiae strains using glycerol as a carbon source.

  3. Protein phase behavior and crystallization: Effect of glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, H.; Cameron, J. E.; Poon, W. C. K.; Egelhaaf, S. U.

    2007-09-01

    Glycerol is widely used as an additive to stabilize proteins in aqueous solution. We have studied the effect of up to 40wt% glycerol on the crystallization of lysozyme from brine. As the glycerol concentration increased, progressively larger amounts of salt were needed to crystallize the protein. Like previous authors, we interpret this as evidence for glycerol changing the interaction between lysozyme molecules. We quantitatively model the interprotein interaction using a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential. We find that the effect of glycerol can be entirely accounted for by the way it modifies the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solvent. Quantifying the interprotein interaction by the second virial coefficient, B2, we find a universal crystallization boundary for all glycerol concentrations.

  4. Protein phase behavior and crystallization: effect of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, H; Cameron, J E; Poon, W C K; Egelhaaf, S U

    2007-09-28

    Glycerol is widely used as an additive to stabilize proteins in aqueous solution. We have studied the effect of up to 40 wt % glycerol on the crystallization of lysozyme from brine. As the glycerol concentration increased, progressively larger amounts of salt were needed to crystallize the protein. Like previous authors, we interpret this as evidence for glycerol changing the interaction between lysozyme molecules. We quantitatively model the interprotein interaction using a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential. We find that the effect of glycerol can be entirely accounted for by the way it modifies the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solvent. Quantifying the interprotein interaction by the second virial coefficient, B(2), we find a universal crystallization boundary for all glycerol concentrations.

  5. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  6. Effect of Ambient Temperature on the Toxicity of Palmitoyl Glycerol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-25

    consumed or its rate of absorption. Similarly, there were no differences between those fed the palmitoyl glycerol diet with or without safflower oil...level. circulating neurotensin in mice fed the palmitoyl glycerol diet wit" or with safflower oil by radioimmunoassay. We found no differe between...involvement, we injected prostaglandin E2 intracisternally into mice fed palmitoyl glycerol with or without safflower oil. This hormone had no effect on

  7. Mechanism for increased hepatic glycerol synthesis in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double-knockout mouse: Urine glycerol and glycerol 3-phosphate as potential diagnostic markers of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Fujimoto, Yuki; Rikimaru, Shizuka; Ushikai, Miharu; Kuroda, Eishi; Kawabe, Kenji; Takano, Katsura; Asakawa, Akihiro; Inui, Akio; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Zhang, Chunhua; Song, Yuan-Zong; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kure, Shigeo; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Endo, Fumio; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Nakamura, Yoichi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Saheki, Takeyori

    2015-09-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier isoform 2 (citrin) and mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) double-knockout mouse has been a useful model of human citrin deficiency. One of the most prominent findings has been markedly increased hepatic glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) following oral administration of a sucrose solution. We aimed to investigate whether this change is detectable outside of the liver, and to explore the mechanism underlying the increased hepatic G3P in these mice. We measured G3P and its metabolite glycerol in plasma and urine of the mice under various conditions. Glycerol synthesis from fructose was also studied using the liver perfusion system. The citrin/mGPD double-knockout mice showed increased urine G3P and glycerol under normal, fed conditions. We also found increased plasma glycerol under fasted conditions, while oral administration of different carbohydrates or ethanol led to substantially increased plasma glycerol. Fructose infusion to the perfused liver of the double-knockout mice augmented hepatic glycerol synthesis, and was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio. Co-infusion of either pyruvate or phenazine methosulfate, a cytosolic oxidant, with fructose corrected the high L/P ratio, leading to reduced glycerol synthesis. Overall, these findings suggest that hepatic glycerol synthesis is cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio-dependent and reveal a likely regulatory mechanism for hepatic glycerol synthesis following a high carbohydrate load in citrin-deficient patients. Therefore, urine G3P and glycerol may represent potential diagnostic markers for human citrin deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fungal biotransformation of crude glycerol into malic acid.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Malic acid production from the biodiesel coproduct crude glycerol by Aspergillus niger ATCC 9142, ATCC 10577 and ATCC 12846 was observed to occur with the highest malic acid level acid being produced by A. niger ATCC 12846. Fungal biomass production from crude glycerol was similar, but ATCC 10577 produced the highest biomass. Fungal biotransformation of crude glycerol into the commercially valuable organic acid malic acid appeared feasible.

  9. Criteria for Quick and Consistent Synthesis of Poly(glycerol sebacate) for Tailored Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinda; Hong, Albert T-L; Naskar, Nilanjon; Chung, Hyun-Joong

    2015-05-11

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and its derivatives make up an attractive class of biomaterial owing to their tunable mechanical properties with programmable biodegradability. In practice, however, the application of PGS is often hampered by frequent inconsistency in reproducing process conditions. The inconsistency stems from the volatile nature of glycerol during the esterification process. In this study, we suggest that the degree of esterification (DE) can be used to predict precisely the physical status, the mechanical properties, and the degradation of the PGS materials. Young's modulus is shown to linearly increase with DE, which is in agreement with an entropic spring theory of rubbers. To provide a processing guideline for researchers, we also provide a physical status map as a function of curing temperature and time. The amount of glycerol loss, obtainable by monitoring the evolution of the total mass loss and the DE during synthesis, is shown to make the predictions even more precise. We expect that these strategies can be applicable to different categories of polymers that involve condensation polymerization with the volatility of the reactants. In addition, we demonstrate that microwave-assisted prepolymerization is a time- and energy-efficient pathway to obtain PGS. For example, 15 min of microwave time is shown to be as efficient as prepolymerization in nitrogen atmosphere for 6 h at 130 °C. The quick synthesis method, however, causes a severe evaporation of glycerol, resulting in a large distortion in the monomer ratio between glycerol and sebacic acid. Consequently, more rigid PGS is produced under a similar curing condition compared to the conventional prepolymerization method. Finally, we demonstrate that the addition of molecularly rigid cross-linking agents and network-structured inorganic nanoparticles are also effective in enhancing the mechanical properties of the PGS-derived materials.

  10. Fermentation of xylose to glycerol by Rhizopus javanicus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Yang, C.W.; Tsao, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Glycerol production from xylose fermentation using Rhizopus javanicus (ATCC 22581) has been investigated in shake flasks. The medium composition (xylose concentration, nitrogen sources), aeration rate, and temperature have been found to affect the accumulation and yield of glycerol. Some of these effects are explained in terms of the critical parameters, osmotic pressure, and dissolved oxygen levels in the medium. Relatively high glycerol yields and concentrations have been obtained at high sugar concentration with high level of aeration at room temperature. The addition of polyethylene glycol or sulfite can improve the yield and accumulation of glycerol.

  11. Fermentation of crude glycerol from biodiesel production by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Torbjørn Olshøj; Kvist, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Christensen, Peter Vittrup; Westermann, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium pasteurianum can utilize glycerol as the sole carbon source for the production of butanol and 1,3-propanediol. Crude glycerol derived from biodiesel production has been shown to be toxic to the organism even in low concentrations. By examination of different pretreatments we found that storage combined with activated stone carbon addition facilitated the utilization of crude glycerol. A pH-controlled reactor with in situ removal of butanol by gas stripping was used to evaluate the performance. The fermentation pattern on pretreated crude glycerol was quite similar to that on technical grade glycerol. C. pasteurianum was able to utilize 111 g/l crude glycerol. The average consumption rate was 2.49 g/l/h and maximum consumption rate was 4.08 g/l/h. At the maximal glycerol consumption rate butanol was produced at 1.3 g/l/h. These rates are higher than those previously reported for fermentations on technical grade glycerol by the same strain. A process including pretreatment and subsequent fermentation of the crude glycerol could be usable for industrial production of butanol by C. pasteurianum.

  12. Photosynthetic production of glycerol by a recombinant cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Savakis, Philipp; Tan, Xiaoming; Du, Wei; Branco dos Santos, Filipe; Lu, Xuefeng; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-02-10

    Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic organisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Glycerol is an important commodity chemical. Introduction of phosphoglycerol phosphatase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae into the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 resulted in a mutant strain that produced a considerable amount of glycerol from light, water and COPhotosynthetic production . Mild salt stress (200 mM NaCl) on the cells led to an increase of the extracellular glycerol concentration of more than 20%. Under these conditions the mutant accumulated glycerol to an extracellular concentration of 14.3 mM after 17 days of culturing.

  13. Acid-catalyzed dehydration of fructose and inulin with glycerol or glycerol carbonate as renewably sourced co-solvent.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Maud; Brissonnet, Yoan; Guélou, Erwan; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Barrault, Joël; Jérôme, François

    2010-11-22

    Ionic liquids (ILs) can be partially substituted by glycerol or glycerol carbonate as cheap, safe, and renewably sourced co-solvents in the acid-catalyzed dehydration of fructose and inulin to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). In the particular case of glycerol, we found that HMF can be conveniently extracted from the IL/glycerol (65:35) mixture with methylisobutylketone, limiting the reactivity of glycerol with HMF and allowing the recovery of HMF with a high purity (95 %). Influences of the fructose content, temperature, and the nature of the ionic liquid are also discussed. The possible use of industrial-grade glycerin is also investigated. We demonstrate that by using glycerol carbonate, up to 90 wt % of the IL can be successfully substituted, decreasing the environmental costs of traditional IL-based processes.

  14. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on the digestive system measured by simultaneous monitoring of gastric motility, gastric emptying activity and postprandial pancreaticobiliary secretion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Akiyoshi; Itoh, Zen

    2005-07-01

    Relationships between the NO synthase inhibitor and gastric and pancreaticobiliary functions measured simultaneously in the digestive state have been little studied. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of NO synthase inhibitor on integrated digestive function in conscious dogs. A strain gauge force transducer was implanted on the gastric antrum of 6 mongrel dogs to measure gastric contractile activity and two duodenal cannulas were inserted into the proximal and distal sites to measure the gastric emptying rate and the pancreaticobiliary output into the duodenum using our novel method. Postprandial pancreatic and biliary secretion were presented as amylase and bile acid activity, respectively. Furthermore, a cervical cannula was placed into the superior vena cava as a route for the administration of NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg-h. In a group given L-NNA, gastric contractile activity after ingestion was significantly enhanced, but the emptying rates of gastric solids and liquids were significantly suppressed in comparison with the control. The mean 0-1 h amylase integrated output was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in comparison with the control, and the mean bile acid integration of 0-1 h output was also significantly (P < 0.01) decreased. A possible explanation for this observation is that smaller volumes of nutrient are delivered into the duodenum; however, it could also be that postprandial pancreaticobiliary secretion is inhibited by an alteration of blood flow or by a change in contractions of the sphincter of Oddi after the administration of L-NNA.

  15. Relationship between the physiology of Enterobacter agglomerans CNCM 1210 grown anaerobically on glycerol and the culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Barbirato, F; Bories, A

    1997-01-01

    In a preliminary study, levels of activity of enzymes involved in anaerobic glycerol catabolism by Enterobacter agglomerans grown in batch cultures regulated in a pH range of 6.5-8.0 were monitored. That study showed that activities of key enzymes of the downstream metabolism of glycerol--glyceradehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP-DH), lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate lyase--were strongly dependent on the culture pH. To investigate the influence of pH on the physiology of the strain, E. agglomerans was grown anaerobically in a continuous culture supplied with glycerol as the sole carbon source and regulated at pH 8. A complete biochemical analysis was performed and was compared with that previously described for the continuous culture regulated at pH 7. A limitation of the glycolytic flux at the level of GAP-DH was demonstrated at high dilution rate, resulting in an overflow metabolism through the 1,3-propanediol formation pathway. Increasing the specific rate of glycerol consumption also resulted in enhanced lactate production due to limitation by the pyruvate decarboxylation step. Finally, changing the culture pH significantly modified the enzymatic profile of E. agglomerans, and it enabled the stability of the culture to be increased by preventing the accumulation in the fermentation broth of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, an inhibitory metabolite, when the glycerol supply was suddenly increased.

  16. Effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production using sugarcane bagasse pretreated by acidified glycerol solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanying; Wong, Heng H; Albertson, Peter L; Harrison, Mark D; Doherty, William O S; O'Hara, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time the effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation were investigated. Enzymatic hydrolysis was inhibited slightly with 2.0 wt% glycerol, leading to reduction in glucan digestibility from 84.9% without glycerol to 82.9% (72 h). With 5.0 wt% and 10.0 wt% glycerol, glucan digestibility was reduced by 4.5% and 11.0%, respectively. However, glycerol did not irreversibly inhibit cellulase enzymes. Ethanol fermentation was not affected by glycerol up to 5.0 wt%, but was inhibited slightly at 10.0 wt% glycerol, resulting in reduction in ethanol yield from 86.0% in the absence of glycerol to 83.7% (20 h). Based on the results of laboratory and pilot-scale experiments, it was estimated that 0.142 kg ethanol can be produced from 1.0 kg dry bagasse (a glucan content of 38.0%) after pretreatment with acidified glycerol solution.

  17. Re-evaluation of glycerol utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: characterization of an isolate that grows on glycerol without supporting supplements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycerol has attracted attention as a carbon source for microbial production processes due to the large amounts of crude glycerol waste resulting from biodiesel production. The current knowledge about the genetics and physiology of glycerol uptake and catabolism in the versatile industrial biotechnology production host Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been mainly based on auxotrophic laboratory strains, and carried out in the presence of growth-supporting supplements such as amino acids and nucleic bases. The latter may have resulted in ambiguous conclusions concerning glycerol growth in this species. The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate growth of S. cerevisiae in synthetic glycerol medium without the addition of supplements. Results Initial experiments showed that prototrophic versions of the laboratory strains CEN.PK, W303, and S288c did not exhibit any growth in synthetic glycerol medium without supporting supplements. However, a screening of 52 S. cerevisiae isolates for growth in the same medium revealed a high intraspecies diversity. Within this group significant variation with respect to the lag phase and maximum specific growth rate was observed. A haploid segregant of one good glycerol grower (CBS 6412-13A) was selected for detailed analysis. Single deletions of the genes encoding for the glycerol/H+ symporter (STL1), the glycerol kinase (GUT1), and the mitochondrial FAD+-dependent glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GUT2) abolished glycerol growth in this strain, implying that it uses the same glycerol utilization pathway as previously identified in auxotrophic laboratory strains. Segregant analysis of a cross between CBS 6412-13A and CEN.PK113-1A revealed that the glycerol growth phenotype is a quantitative trait. Genetic linkage and reciprocal hemizygosity analysis demonstrated that GUT1 CBS 6412-13A is one of the multiple genetic loci contributing to the glycerol growth phenotype. Conclusion The S. cerevisiae intraspecies diversity

  18. Minimization of glycerol production during the high-performance fed-batch ethanolic fermentation process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using a metabolic model as a prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Bideaux, Carine; Alfenore, Sandrine; Cameleyre, Xavier; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Guillouet, Stéphane E

    2006-03-01

    On the basis of knowledge of the biological role of glycerol in the redox balance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a fermentation strategy was defined to reduce the surplus formation of NADH, responsible for glycerol synthesis. A metabolic model was used to predict the operating conditions that would reduce glycerol production during ethanol fermentation. Experimental validation of the simulation results was done by monitoring the inlet substrate feeding during fed-batch S. cerevisiae cultivation in order to maintain the respiratory quotient (RQ) (defined as the CO2 production to O2 consumption ratio) value between 4 and 5. Compared to previous fermentations without glucose monitoring, the final glycerol concentration was successfully decreased. Although RQ-controlled fermentation led to a lower maximum specific ethanol production rate, it was possible to reach a high level of ethanol production: 85 g.liter-1 with 1.7 g.liter-1 glycerol in 30 h. We showed here that by using a metabolic model as a tool in prediction, it was possible to reduce glycerol production in a very high-performance ethanolic fermentation process.

  19. Structure of glycerol dehydrogenase from Serratia.

    PubMed

    Musille, Paul; Ortlund, Eric

    2014-02-01

    The 1.90 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of glycerol dehydrogenase derived from contaminating bacteria present during routine Escherichia coli protein expression is presented. This off-target enzyme showed intrinsic affinity for Ni(2+)-Sepharose, migrated at the expected molecular mass for the target protein during gel filtration and was crystallized before it was realised that contamination had occurred. In this study, it is shown that liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) can efficiently identify the protein composition of crystals in a crystallization experiment as part of a structure-determination pipeline for an unknown protein. The high-resolution X-ray data enabled sequencing directly from the electron-density maps, allowing the source of contamination to be placed within the Serratia genus. Incorporating additional protein-identity checks, such as tandem LC-MS/MS, earlier in the protein expression, purification and crystallization workflow may have prevented the unintentional structure determination of this metabolic enzyme, which represents the first enterobacterial glycerol dehydrogenase reported to date.

  20. Ruminal fermentation of propylene glycol and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Tjandrakusuma, Siska; Rasmussen, Mark A; Reilly, Peter J

    2007-08-22

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically with 25 mM R-propylene glycol, S-propylene glycol, or glycerol added. After 24 h, all of the propylene glycol enantiomers and approximately 80% of the glycerol were metabolized. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and caproate concentrations, in decreasing order, all increased with incubation time. Addition of any of the three substrates somewhat decreased acetate formation, while addition of either propylene glycol increased propionate formation but decreased that of butyrate. R- and S-propylene glycol did not differ significantly in either their rates of disappearance or the products formed when they were added to the fermentation medium. Fermentations of rumen fluid containing propylene glycol emitted the sulfur-containing gases 1-propanethiol, 1-(methylthio)propane, methylthiirane, 2,4-dimethylthiophene, 1-(methylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl disulfide, 1-(propylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl trisulfide, 3,5-diethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2-ethyl-1,3-dithiane, and 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trithiane. Metabolic pathways that yield each of these gases are proposed. The sulfur-containing gases produced during propylene glycol fermentation in the rumen may contribute to the toxic effects seen in cattle when high doses are administered for therapeutic purposes.

  1. Functional Genomics Via Metabolic Footprinting: Monitoring Metabolite Secretion by Escherichia Coli Tryptophan Metabolism Mutants Using FT–IR and Direct Injection Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kaderbhai, Naheed N.; Broadhurst, David I.; Ellis, David I.; Goodacre, Royston

    2003-01-01

    We sought to test the hypothesis that mutant bacterial strains could be discriminated from each other on the basis of the metabolites they secrete into the medium (their ‘metabolic footprint’), using two methods of ‘global’ metabolite analysis (FT–IR and direct injection electrospray mass spectrometry). The biological system used was based on a published study of Escherichia coli tryptophan mutants that had been analysed and discriminated by Yanofsky and colleagues using transcriptome analysis. Wild-type strains supplemented with tryptophan or analogues could be discriminated from controls using FT–IR of 24 h broths, as could each of the mutant strains in both minimal and supplemented media. Direct injection electrospray mass spectrometry with unit mass resolution could also be used to discriminate the strains from each other, and had the advantage that the discrimination required the use of just two or three masses in each case. These were determined via a genetic algorithm. Both methods are rapid, reagentless, reproducible and cheap, and might beneficially be extended to the analysis of gene knockout libraries. PMID:18629082

  2. Effect of glycerol on intracellular virus survival: implications for the clinical use of glycerol-preserved cadaver skin.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L; Ghosh, M M; Boyce, S G; MacNeil, S; Freedlander, E; Kudesia, G

    1995-08-01

    Glycerol has long been used for the preservation of skin allografts. The antimicrobial activity of glycerol has not been fully documented. This paper reports the results of an investigation of a model studying the effect of glycerol on the inactivation of intracellular viruses. Two viruses--herpes simplex type I (HSV-1) and poliovirus--were cultured within human dermal fibroblasts. These intracellular viruses were incubated with 50 per cent, 85 per cent and 98 per cent glycerol at 4 degrees C and 20 degrees C for 4 weeks. Each week, the cultures in glycerol and controls in fibroblast maintenance medium were assayed for virus infectivity by examining the ability of harvested viruses to infect further fibroblasts. At 4 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol could not fully inactivate intracellular HSV-I or poliovirus even after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (after 3 weeks) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks. At 20 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) and inactivated intracellular poliovirus (after 2 weeks). It is suggested that, on the basis of this study, glycerol can reduce intracellular virus infectivity but that its effects are very dependent on concentration, time and temperature such that we would recommend that allograft skin be exposed to 98 per cent glycerol for a minimum of at least 4 weeks at a minimum temperature of 20 degrees C before clinical use.

  3. Unilamellar DMPC Vesicles in Aqueous Glycerol: Preferential Interactions and Thermochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Γμ1, for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Γμ1 decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of −0.14 ± 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16°C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction. PMID:12524287

  4. Thermal and Structural Properties of Silk Biomaterials Plasticized by Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph E; Davidowski, Stephen K; Xu, Dian; Cebe, Peggy; Onofrei, David; Holland, Gregory P; Kaplan, David L

    2016-12-12

    The molecular interactions of silk materials plasticized using glycerol were studied, as these materials provide options for biodegradable and flexible protein-based systems. Plasticizer interactions with silk were analyzed by thermal, spectroscopic, and solid-state NMR analyses. Spectroscopic analysis implied that glycerol was hydrogen bonded to the peptide matrix, but may be displaced with polar solvents. Solid-state NMR indicated that glycerol induced β-sheet formation in the dried silk materials, but not to the extent of methanol treatment. Fast scanning calorimetry suggested that β-sheet crystal formation in silk-glycerol films appeared to be less organized than in the methanol treated silk films. We propose that glycerol may be simultaneously inducing and interfering with β-sheet formation in silk materials, causing some improper folding that results in less-organized silk II structures even after the glycerol is removed. This difference, along with trace residual glycerol, allows glycerol extracted silk materials to retain more flexibility than methanol processed versions.

  5. Unilamellar DMPC vesicles in aqueous glycerol: preferential interactions and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Gamma( micro 1), for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Gamma( micro 1) decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of -0.14 +/- 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16 degrees C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction.

  6. Functional Characterization of Yersinia pestis Aerobic Glycerol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Willias, Stephan P.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26°C and 37°C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  7. Biodegradation of Glycerol Trinitrate and Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate by Agrobacterium radiobacter

    PubMed Central

    White, G. F.; Snape, J. R.; Nicklin, S.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria capable of metabolizing highly explosive and vasodilatory glycerol trinitrate (GTN) were isolated under aerobic and nitrogen-limiting conditions from soil, river water, and activated sewage sludge. One of these strains (from sewage sludge) chosen for further study was identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter subgroup B. A combination of high-pressure liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the culture medium during the growth of A. radiobacter on basal salts-glycerol-GTN medium showed the sequential conversion of GTN to glycerol dinitrates and glycerol mononitrates. Isomeric glycerol 1,2-dinitrate and glycerol 1,3-dinitrate were produced simultaneously and concomitantly with the disappearance of GTN, with significant regioselectivity for the production of the 1,3-dinitrate. Dinitrates were further degraded to glycerol 1- and 2-mononitrates, but mononitrates were not biodegraded. Cells were also capable of metabolizing pentaerythritol tetranitrate, probably to its trinitrate and dinitrate analogs. Extracts of broth-grown cells contained an enzyme which in the presence of added NADH converted GTN stoichiometrically to nitrite and the mixture of glycerol dinitrates. The specific activity of this enzyme was increased 160-fold by growth on GTN as the sole source of nitrogen. PMID:16535244

  8. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  12. Fabrication of a glycerol from CO2 reaction system, supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication, installation, and testing of a glycerol hydrogenation and a CO2 hydrogenation - CH4 partial oxidation units are reported. The glycerol system proved to be operational while the CO2 system was installed but not bought on operational steam.

  13. The Acrylation of Glycerol: a Precursor to Functionalized Lipids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Didecanoylacryloylglycerol was synthesized from decanoic and acrylic acids and glycerol using K2O as catalyst. This reaction was carried out in hexane in a closed stainless steel reactor at 200°C for 5h. The reactants were added in a 1:3:4 glycerol:decanoic acid:acrylic acid molar ratio. The resu...

  14. Apocrine secretion--fact or artifact?

    PubMed

    Aumüller, G; Wilhelm, B; Seitz, J

    1999-09-01

    In this review, the history of apocrine secretion and the essential categories are briefly mentioned and fused into a more generally applicable terminology. Using the coagulating gland of the male rat as a model, the mechanisms of apocrine secretion, the participation of the cytoskeleton in the formation of the apocrine blebs ("aposomes") and the structure of the secretory proteins, as well as the hormonal regulation of their biosynthesis are described. Apocrine secreted proteins share the following peculiarities: (i) Their biosynthesis and post-translational modification (including an unusual form of glycosylation) take place in the cytoplasm. (ii) Intracellular transport proceeds without participation of the endomembrane system, the Golgi apparatus and secretion granules. (iii) Blood serum derived transsudated albumin entering the secretory cells functions as a carrier of the apocrine-released proteins. Some common molecular features are specific for the apocrine-synthesized proteins studied so far by our group: (a) Their primary sequence is synthesized without a signal peptide. (b) Their N-terminus is blocked by acetylation. (c) The substituting glycanes are neither O- nor N-linked. (d) At least one of the apocrine-synthesized proteins (secretory transglutaminase) contains a glycerol-phosphoinositol (GPI-) anchor. There are a number of still open questions in apocrine secretion, pertaining to (I) the intracellular transport and targeting of the proteins, (II) the coordination of simultaneously occurring apocrine and merocrine secretion in several of the apocrine glands, (III) the biosynthesis of the apical membrane proteins surrounding the aposomes and (IV) the repair mechanisms of the apical cell pole following the release of the aposomes. In conclusion, apocrine release is not an artifact but rather an alternative extrusion mechanism of soluble and membrane-associated proteins, usually linked with sex- or reproductive-related glands, such as the prostate, the

  15. Glycerol, an underestimated flavor precursor in the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Devaud-Goumoens, Stéphanie; Viton, Florian

    2013-10-30

    The objective of the present work was to investigate in depth the role of glycerol in Maillard reactions and its potential to act as an active flavor precursor. Reactions using isotopically labeled compounds (various reducing sugars, proline, and glycerol) unambiguously demonstrated that, in addition to its role of solvent, glycerol actively contributes to the formation of proline-specific compounds in Maillard model systems. Additionally, rhamnose and fucose/proline/glycerol systems generated the 2-propionyl-1(3),4,5,6-tetrahydropyridines, known for their roasty, popcorn aroma. Their formation from such systems is unprecedented. The results presented here have direct implications for flavor generation during thermal processing of foods containing glycerol, which is a ubiquitous food ingredient and an underestimated flavor precursor.

  16. Conserved family of glycerol kinase loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Agosto, Julian A.; McCabe, Edward R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Glycerol kinase (GK) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of glycerol 3-phosphate from ATP and glycerol, the rate-limiting step in glycerol utilization. We analyzed the genome of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster and identified five GK orthologs, including two loci with sequence homology to the mammalian Xp21 GK protein. Using a combination of sequence analysis and evolutionary comparisons of orthologs between species, we characterized functional domains in the protein required for GK activity. Our findings include additional conserved domains that suggest novel nuclear and mitochondrial functions for glycerol kinase in apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Investigation of GK function in Drosophila will inform us about the role of this enzyme in development and will provide us with a tool to examine genetic modifiers of human metabolic disorders. PMID:16545593

  17. Microbial conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.; Biebl, H.; Deckwer, W.D.

    1996-10-01

    Glycerol is a byproduct from the soap and detergent industry and possibly from future biodiesel plants. The conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (PD) is of industrial interest due to the potential use of PD for the synthesis of polyesters. We have been studying the microbial conversion of glycerol to PD with work ranging from strain isolation, medium optimization, pathway analysis, product formation kinetics and growth modeling, downstream processing and reactor scale-up (up to 2000 1). PD yields of nearly 100% of the theoretical maximum (0.72 mol/mol glycerol) and final product concentrations of about 65 g/l were achieved with both Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium butyricum. In addition to summarizing our experimental results the advances of bioconversion of glycerol will be reviewed in this presentation, with emphasis on discussing further research and development needs in this area. Results of process engineering and cost analysis will also be presented.

  18. Toxic and osmotic effects of glycerol on human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, W.J.; Mazur, P.

    1984-11-01

    Human granulocytes are damaged by exposure to concentrations of glycerol as low as 0.5 M. We therefore investigated the addition of glycerol to granulocytes and its subsequent dilution under various conditions to try to distinguish between toxic and harmful osmotic effects of glycerol. The lesion caused by glycerol at 0/sup 0/C was expressed as a loss of plasma membrane integrity (as visualized by fluorescein diacetate) only after incubation (greater than or equal to1 h) at 37/sup 0/C. This damage was not ameliorated when osmotic stress was lessened by reducing the rates of addition and dilution of glycerol to keep the computed cell volume within 80-170% of isotonic cell volume. However, when osmotic stress was reduced further by increasing the temperature of addition and dilution of glycerol from 0/sup 0/ to 22/sup 0/C, the tolerance of the cells to 1 M glycerol increased somewhat. Reducing exposure to glycerol to 3 min or less at 0/sup 0/C greatly increased survival, but this time was too short to allow glycerol to equilibrate intracellularly. Finally, the presence of extra impermeant solute (NaCl or sucrose) in the medium to reduce the equilibrium cell volume to 60% of isotonic cell volume enabled granulocytes to survive 30-min exposure to 1 M glycerol at 0/sup 0/C, but cells had to remain shrunken during the 37/sup 0/C incubation to prevent the loss of membrane integrity. Suspensions that contained damaged granulocytes formed aggregates when incubated at 37/sup 0/C, and these aggregates were responsible for a major fraction of the observed loss in viability.

  19. Glycerol monolaurate inhibits virulence factor production in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Sara M; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2005-04-01

    Anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis, has been brought to the public's attention because of the 2001 bioterrorism attacks. However, anthrax is a disease that poses agricultural threats in the United States as well as human populations in Europe, China, Africa, and Australia. Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a compound that has been shown to inhibit exotoxin production by Staphylococcus aureus and other gram-positive bacteria. Here, we study the effects of GML on growth and toxin production in B. anthracis. The Sterne strain of B. anthracis was grown to post-exponential phase with 0-, 10-, 15-, or 20-microg/ml concentrations of GML and then assayed quantitatively for protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF). After 8 h, GML at concentrations greater than 20 microg/ml was bacteriostatic to growth of the organism. However, a 10-microg/ml concentration of GML was not growth inhibitory, but amounts of PA and LF made were greatly reduced. This effect was not global for all proteins when total secreted protein from culture fluids was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Through quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays, this toxin-inhibitory effect was shown to occur at the transcriptional level, since amounts of mRNA for pagA (PA), lef (LF), and cya (edema factor) were reduced. Surprisingly, mRNA levels of atxA, a regulator of exotoxin gene expression, rose in the presence of GML. These data will be useful in developing therapeutic tools to treat anthrax disease, whether in animals or humans. These results also suggest that mechanisms of virulence regulation exist independent of atxA.

  20. Catalytic performance of functionalized IRMOF-3 for the synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and urea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Do; Park, Gyung-Ah; Kim, Dong-Woo; Park, Dae-Won

    2014-06-01

    A functionalized isoreticular metal organic framework material, F-IRMOF-3, having a quaternary ammonium group was prepared by fast precipitation and solvothermal method. The synthesized MOFs exhibited good catalytic performance in the synthesis of glycerol carbonate (GC) from glycerol and urea. F-IRMOF-3 having a larger alkyl chain structure and a more nucleophilic counter anion than the synthesized congeners, exhibited better reactivity in the synthesis of GC. The introduction of a ZnO defect into the F-IRMOF-3 structure by fast precipitation was more advantageous for the glycerolysis of urea than the conventional solvothermal method because of the incorporation of acid-base bifunctional active sites by the former method. The effects of reaction parameters such as temperature, reaction time, catalyst loading, and degree of vacuum on the reactivity were also investigated. The F-IRMOF-3 catalyst can be easily recovered and reused without considerable loss of its initial activity.

  1. Feruloyl glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl glycerol antioxidant behavior in phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L; Laszlo, Joseph A; Appell, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (F2G), the by-product of biocatalytic transesterification soybean oil and ethyl ferulate, were examined for their behavior in phospholipid vesicles. Based on absorbance and fluorescence methods, FG and F2G both were found to partition into vesicles and incorporate well into 1,2-dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) vesicles. FG and F2G incorporation resulted in vesicles that were as or slightly more stable than the unloaded vesicles. FG and F2G both demonstrated the ability to maintain antioxidant properties within the lipid bilayer. Bilayer depth analysis was conducted using the parallax method and molecular modeling. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Renewable Chemicals: Dehydroxylation of Glycerol and Polyols

    PubMed Central

    ten Dam, Jeroen; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    The production of renewable chemicals is gaining attention over the past few years. The natural resources from which they can be derived in a sustainable way are most abundant in sugars, cellulose and hemicellulose. These highly functionalized molecules need to be de-functionalized in order to be feedstocks for the chemical industry. A fundamentally different approach to chemistry thus becomes necessary, since the traditionally employed oil-based chemicals normally lack functionality. This new chemical toolbox needs to be designed to guarantee the demands of future generations at a reasonable price. The surplus of functionality in sugars and glycerol consists of alcohol groups. To yield suitable renewable chemicals these natural products need to be defunctionalized by means of dehydroxylation. Here we review the possible approaches and evaluate them from a fundamental chemical aspect. PMID:21887771

  3. Liquefaction of lignin by polyethyleneglycol and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yanqiao; Ruan, Xuemin; Cheng, Xiansu; Lü, Qiufeng

    2011-02-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL), isolated from the enzymatic hydrolysis residues of the biomass, was liquefied using the mixed solvents of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) and glycerol at the temperature of 130-170°C with sulfuric acid as a catalyst. The influences of liquefaction parameters, such as the molecular weight of PEG, mass ratio of sulfuric acid to EHL, liquefaction temperature and time, and mass ratio of liquid (liquefying cosolvent) to solid (EHL) on the residue content and hydroxyl number were discussed. The FT-IR spectrum result showed that the liquefaction product of EHL was polyether polyol. The hydroxyl number of the liquefaction product was 80-120 mgKOH/g higher than that of PEG.

  4. Fast dynamics of glass-forming glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, J.; Petry, W.; Coddens, G.; Fujara, F.

    1995-10-01

    The vibrational and relaxational dynamics of glycerol has been measured by incoherent neutron scattering for energy transfers from some 10 μeV to several 10 meV, and for temperatures from 4 to 413 K. On heating towards and above the glass transition, scattering from low-frequency vibrations shows an unspectacular increase that is consistent with ultrasonic data. We propose using the vibrational density of states for calculating the Fourier transformed time correlation function S(q,t) without the cutoff usually imposed by the kinematics of neutron scattering. For high temperatures and low frequencies, structural relaxation is well described by the empirical Kohlrausch law. There is no extended crossover region between vibrations and structural relaxation.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the effect of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether hydroxylation on membrane thermostability.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Carme; Fietz, Susanne; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Daura, Xavier; Costenaro, Lionel

    2017-02-16

    Archaeal tetraether membrane lipids span the whole membrane width and present two C40 isoprenoid chains bound by two glycerol groups (or one glycerol and calditol). These lipids confer stability and maintain the membrane fluidity in mesophile to extremophile environments, making them very attractive for biotechnological applications. The isoprenoid lipid composition in archaeal membranes varies with temperature, which has placed these lipids in the focus of paleo-climatological studies for over a decade. Non-hydroxylated isoprenoid archaeal lipids are typically used as paleo-thermometry proxies, but recently identified hydroxylated (OH) derivatives have also been proposed as temperature proxies. The relative abundance of hydroxylated lipids increases at lower temperatures, but the physiological function of the OH moiety remains unknown. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations of membranes formed by the acyclic glycerol-dialkyl-glycerol-tetraether caldarchaeol (GDGT-0), the most widespread archaeal core lipid, and its mono-hydroxylated variant (OH-GDGT-0) to better understand the physico-chemical properties conferred to the membrane by this additional moiety. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the additional OH group forms hydrogen bonds mainly with the sugar moieties of neighbouring lipids and with water molecules, effectively increasing the size of the polar headgroups. The hydroxylation also introduces local disorder that propagates along the entire alkyl chains, resulting in a slightly more fluid membrane. These changes would help to maintain trans-membrane transport in cold environments, explaining why the relative abundance of hydroxylated Archaea lipids increases at lower temperatures. The in silico approach aids to understand the underlying physiological mechanisms behind the hydroxylated lipid based paleo-thermometer recently proposed.

  6. Use of a surrogate marker (human secreted alkaline phosphatase) to monitor in vivo tumor growth and anticancer drug efficacy in ovarian cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Bao, R; Selvakumaran, M; Hamilton, T C

    2000-09-01

    A limitation to preclinical evaluation of possible anticancer therapy is the objective assessment of efficacy, especially in the presence of small tumor burden or inaccessible disease. This study is designed to test whether human secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) could be used as a soluble marker for in vivo tumor burden. A SEAP expression construct under control of the CMV promoter was created. The SEAP activity in the conditioned medium was evaluated at 24 h and 48 h after the A2780 cell line was transiently transfected with the SEAP vector using Superfect reagent. Stable transfection of A2780 was accomplished by selection of transfectants in G418. SEAP activity of the stable transfectant was determined in conditioned medium and its relationship to tumor cell number was examined. A highly expressing stable transfectant was implanted into immunocompromised mice (2 x 10(6) subcutaneously and 5 x 10(6) intraperitoneally) and peripheral blood was obtained by orbital puncture every 5 days. The relationship between blood SEAP activity and tumor burden was studied. The usefulness of this marker in preclinical assessment of anticancer drug efficacy was evaluated by studying the plasma SEAP activity in xenografted mice treated or not treated with paclitaxel. After transient transfection of the A2780 cell line (5 x 10(5)) with the plasmid, SEAP activity was found in the medium at 24 h (482.0 +/- 2.0 ng/ml) and 48 h (1296.0 +/- 1.0 ng/ml). The in vitro study using a stable transfectant demonstrated that SEAP activity was linearly related to cell numbers (r = 0.99). The in vivo study demonstrated that SEAP was detectable in plasma one day postinjection, long before measurable tumor or detectable intraperitoneal tumor was present. Once detectable SC tumor was present, the SEAP activity correlated well with tumor volume (r = 0. 94-0.97). The plasma SEAP level was reduced after xenografted mice were treated with paclitaxel (20 mg/kg, weekly x5) compared with untreated mice

  7. Design and analysis of biorefineries based on raw glycerol: addressing the glycerol problem.

    PubMed

    Posada, John A; Rincón, Luis E; Cardona, Carlos A

    2012-05-01

    Glycerol as a low-cost by-product of the biodiesel industry can be considered a renewable building block for biorefineries. In this work, the conversion of raw glycerol to nine added-value products obtained by chemical (syn-gas, acrolein, and 1,2-propanediol) or bio-chemical (ethanol, 1,3-propanediol, d-lactic acid, succinic acid, propionic acid, and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) routes were considered. The technological schemes for these synthesis routes were designed, simulated, and economically assessed using Aspen Plus and Aspen Icarus Process Evaluator, respectively. The techno-economic potential of a glycerol-based biorefinery system for the production of fuels, chemicals, and plastics was analyzed using the commercial Commercial Sale Price/Production Cost ratio criteria, under different production scenarios. More income can be earned from 1,3-propanediol and 1,2-propanediol production, while less income would be obtained from hydrogen and succinic acid. This analysis may be useful mainly for biodiesel producers since several profitable alternatives are presented and discussed.

  8. Regulation of protein secretion by ... protein secretion?

    PubMed

    Atmakuri, Krishnamohan; Fortune, Sarah M

    2008-09-11

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires an alternative protein secretion system, ESX1, for virulence. Recently, Raghavan et al. (2008) reported a new regulatory circuit that may explain how ESX1 activity is controlled during infection. Mtb appears to regulate ESX1 by modulating transcription of associated genes rather than structural components of the secretion system itself.

  9. Anaerobic glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Modig, Tobias; Granath, Katarina; Adler, Lennart; Lidén, Gunnar

    2007-05-01

    Glycerol formation is vital for reoxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form; NADH) under anaerobic conditions and for the hyperosmotic stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, relatively few studies have been made on hyperosmotic stress under anaerobic conditions. To study the combined effect of salt stress and anaerobic conditions, industrial and laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae were grown anaerobically on glucose in batch-cultures containing 40 g/l NaCl. The time needed for complete glucose conversion increased considerably, and the specific growth rates decreased by 80-90% when the cells were subjected to the hyperosmotic conditions. This was accompanied by an increased yield of glycerol and other by-products and reduced biomass yield in all strains. The slowest fermenting strain doubled its glycerol yield (from 0.072 to 0.148 g/g glucose) and a nearly fivefold increase in acetate formation was seen. In more tolerant strains, a lower increase was seen in the glycerol and in the acetate, succinate and pyruvate yields. Additionally, the NADH-producing pathway from acetaldehyde to acetate was analysed by overexpressing the stress-induced gene ALD3. However, this had no or very marginal effect on the acetate and glycerol yields. In the control experiments, the production of NADH from known sources well matched the glycerol formation. This was not the case for the salt stress experiments in which the production of NADH from known sources was insufficient to explain the formed glycerol.

  10. Yeast Aquaglyceroporins Use the Transmembrane Core to Restrict Glycerol Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Geijer, Cecilia; Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Palmgren, Madelene; Filipsson, Caroline; Klein, Dagmara Medrala; Tamás, Markus J.; Hohmann, Stefan; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins are transmembrane proteins belonging to the family of aquaporins, which facilitate the passage of specific uncharged solutes across membranes of cells. The yeast aquaglyceroporin Fps1 is important for osmoadaptation by regulating intracellular glycerol levels during changes in external osmolarity. Upon high osmolarity conditions, yeast accumulates glycerol by increased production of the osmolyte and by restricting glycerol efflux through Fps1. The extended cytosolic termini of Fps1 contain short domains that are important for regulating glycerol flux through the channel. Here we show that the transmembrane core of the protein plays an equally important role. The evidence is based on results from an intragenic suppressor mutation screen and domain swapping between the regulated variant of Fps1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the hyperactive Fps1 ortholog from Ashbya gossypii. This suggests a novel mechanism for regulation of glycerol flux in yeast, where the termini alone are not sufficient to restrict Fps1 transport. We propose that glycerol flux through the channel is regulated by interplay between the transmembrane helices and the termini. This mechanism enables yeast cells to fine-tune intracellular glycerol levels at a wide range of extracellular osmolarities. PMID:22593571

  11. Glycerol Enhances the Antifungal Activity of Dairy Propionibacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Helena; Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Jonsson, Hans; Schnürer, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Dairy propionibacteria are widely used in starter cultures for Swiss type cheese. These bacteria can ferment glucose, lactic acid, and glycerol into propionic acid, acetic acid, and carbon dioxide. This research examined the antifungal effect of dairy propionibacteria when glycerol was used as carbon source for bacterial growth. Five type strains of propionibacteria were tested against the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and the molds Penicillium commune and Penicillium roqueforti. The conversion of 13C glycerol by Propionibacterium jensenii was followed with nuclear magnetic resonance. In a dual culture assay, the degree of inhibition of the molds was strongly enhanced by an increase in glycerol concentrations, while the yeast was less affected. In broth cultures, decreased pH in glycerol medium was probably responsible for the complete inhibition of the indicator fungi. NMR spectra of the glycerol conversion confirmed that propionic acid was the dominant metabolite. Based on the results obtained, the increased antifungal effect seen by glycerol addition to cultures of propionibacteria is due to the production of propionic acid and pH reduction of the medium. PMID:21331381

  12. Optimizing aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    Slininger, P J; Bothast, R J

    1985-01-01

    When cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae NRRL B-199 (ATCC 8724) were grown aerobically on a rich glycerol medium and then suspended in buffer supplemented with semicarbazide and glycerol, aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) ensued. Depending on conditions, 0.38 to 0.67 g of 3-HPA were formed per gram of glycerol consumed. This means that up to 83.8% of the carbon invested as glycerol could potentially be recovered as the target product, 3-HPA. Production of 3-HPA was sensitive to the age of cells harvested for resuspension and was nonexistent if cells were cultivated on glucose instead of glycerol as the sole carbon source. Compared with 24- and 72-h cells, 48-h cells produced 3-HPA at the highest rate and with the greatest yield. The cell biomass concentration present during the fermentation was never particularly critical to the 3-HPA yield, but initial fermentation rates and 3-HPA accumulation displayed a linear dependence on biomass concentration that faded when biomass exceeded 3 g/liter. Fermentation performance was a function of temperature, and an optimum initial specific 3-HPA productivity occurred at 32 degrees C, although the overall 3-HPA yield increased continuously within the 25 to 37 degrees C range studied. The pH optimum based on fermentation rate was different from that based on overall yield; 8 versus 7, respectively. Initial glycerol concentrations in the 20 to 50 g/liter range optimized initial 3-HPA productivity and yield. PMID:3911907

  13. Glycerol metabolism and bitterness producing lactic acid bacteria in cidermaking.

    PubMed

    Garai-Ibabe, G; Ibarburu, I; Berregi, I; Claisse, O; Lonvaud-Funel, A; Irastorza, A; Dueñas, M T

    2008-02-10

    Several lactic acid bacteria were isolated from bitter tasting ciders in which glycerol was partially removed. The degradation of glycerol via glycerol dehydratase pathway was found in 22 out of 67 isolates. The confirmation of glycerol degradation by this pathway was twofold: showing their glycerol dehydratase activity and detecting the presence of the corresponding gene by a PCR method. 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDL) and 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) were the metabolic end-products of glycerol utilization, and the accumulation of the acrolein precursor 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) was also detected in most of them. The strain identification by PCR-DGGE rpoB showed that Lactobacillus collinoides was the predominant species and only 2 belonged to Lactobacillus diolivorans. Environmental conditions conducting to 3-HPA accumulation in cidermaking were studied by varying the fructose concentration, pH and incubation temperature in L. collinoides 17. This strain failed to grow with glycerol as sole carbon source and the addition of fructose enhanced both growth and glycerol degradation. Regarding end-products of glycerol metabolism, 1,3-PDL was always the main end-product in all environmental conditions assayed, the only exception being the culture with 5.55 mM fructose, where equimolar amounts of 1,3-PDL and 3-HP were found. The 3-HPA was transitorily accumulated in the culture medium under almost all culture conditions, the degradation rate being notably slower at 15 degrees C. However, no disappearance of 3-HPA was found at pH 3.6, a usual value in cider making. After sugar exhaustion, L. collinoides 17 oxidated lactic acid and/or mannitol to obtain energy and these oxidations were accompanied by the removal of the toxic 3-HPA increasing the 1,3-PDL, 3-HP and acetic acid contents.

  14. Glycerol uptake is by passive diffusion in the heart but by facilitated transport in RBCs at high glycerol levels in cold acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax).

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Driedzic, William R

    2012-04-15

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is a small fish that accumulates glycerol at low winter seawater temperatures. In laboratory-held fish, glycerol concentration typically reaches 225 mM in plasma and in all cells. Glycerol uptake by the heart and red blood cells (RBCs) was assessed by tracking [(14)C(U)]glycerol into the acid-soluble pool. In fish acclimated to 9-10°C a decrease in perfusion/incubation temperature from 8 to 1°C resulted in a decrease in glycerol uptake with a Q(10) of 3.2 in heart and 2.4 in RBCs. Acclimation to ∼1.5°C did not result in an adaptive enhancement of glycerol uptake as rates were unchanged in heart and RBCs. Glycerol uptake at 1°C was by passive diffusion in heart as evidenced by a linear relationship between glycerol uptake and extracellular glycerol concentration and a lack of inhibition by phloretin. In contrast, in RBCs, glycerol uptake with respect to glycerol concentration showed two linear relationships with a transition point around 50 mM extracellular glycerol. The slope of the second phase was much steeper and eliminated with the inclusion of phloretin. In RBCs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a related species that does not accumulate glycerol, glycerol uptake showed only a single linear curve and was not inhibited by phloretin. The data imply a strong facilitated component to glycerol uptake in rainbow smelt RBCs at high glycerol concentrations. We propose this is related to cyclic changes in RBC glycerol content involving a loss of glycerol at the gill and a reaccumulation during passage through the liver.

  15. Accelerated glycerol fermentation in Escherichia coli using methanogenic formate consumption.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli can ferment glycerol anaerobically only under very defined restrictive conditions. Hence, it was the aim of this study to overcome this limitation via a co-cultivation approach. Anaerobic glycerol fermentation by a pure E. coli culture was compared to a co-culture that also contained the formate-oxidizing methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Co-cultivation of the two strains led to a more than 11-fold increased glycerol consumption. Furthermore, it supported a constantly neutral pH and a shift from ethanol to succinate production. Moreover, M. formicicum was analyzed for its ability to grow on different standard media and a surprising versatility could be demonstrated.

  16. Glycerol Dehydrogenase Plays a Dual Role in Glycerol Metabolism and 2,3-Butanediol Formation in Klebsiella pneumoniae *

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) is an important polyol dehydrogenase for glycerol metabolism in diverse microorganisms and for value-added utilization of glycerol in the industry. Two GDHs from Klebsiella pneumoniae, DhaD and GldA, were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized for substrate specificity and kinetic parameters. Both DhaD and GldA could catalyze the interconversion of (3R)-acetoin/(2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol or (3S)-acetoin/meso-2,3-butanediol, in addition to glycerol oxidation. Although purified GldA appeared more active than DhaD, in vivo inactivation and quantitation of their respective mRNAs indicate that dhaD is highly induced by glycerol and plays a dual role in glycerol metabolism and 2,3-butanediol formation. Complementation in K. pneumoniae further confirmed the dual role of DhaD. Promiscuity of DhaD may have vital physiological consequences for K. pneumoniae growing on glycerol, which include balancing the intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio, preventing acidification, and storing carbon and energy. According to the kinetic response of DhaD to modified NADH concentrations, DhaD appears to show positive homotropic interaction with NADH, suggesting that the physiological role could be regulated by intracellular NADH levels. The co-existence of two functional GDH enzymes might be due to a gene duplication event. We propose that whereas DhaD is specialized for glycerol utilization, GldA plays a role in backup compensation and can turn into a more proficient catalyst to promote a survival advantage to the organism. Revelation of the dual role of DhaD could further the understanding of mechanisms responsible for enzyme evolution through promiscuity, and guide metabolic engineering methods of glycerol metabolism. PMID:24429283

  17. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate and alginate from glycerol by Azotobacter vinelandii under nitrogen-free conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Fuminori; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is an interesting feedstock for biomaterials such as biofuels and bioplastics because of its abundance as a by-product during biodiesel production. Here we demonstrate glycerol metabolism in the nitrogen-fixing species Azotobacter vinelandii through metabolomics and nitrogen-free bacterial production of biopolymers, such as poly-d-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and alginate, from glycerol. Glycerol-3-phosphate was accumulated in A. vinelandii cells grown on glycerol to the exponential phase, and its level drastically decreased in the cells grown to the stationary growth phase. A. vinelandii also overexpressed the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene when it was grown on glycerol. These results indicate that glycerol was first converted to glycerol-3-phosphate by glycerol kinase. Other molecules with industrial interests, such as lactic acid and amino acids including γ-aminobutyric acid, have also been accumulated in the bacterial cells grown on glycerol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that glycerol-grown A. vinelandii stored PHB within the cells. The PHB production level reached 33% per dry cell weight in nitrogen-free glycerol medium. When grown on glycerol, alginate-overproducing mutants generated through chemical mutagenesis produced 2-fold the amount of alginate from glycerol than the parental wild-type strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial production of biopolymers from glycerol without addition of any nitrogen source. PMID:25880041

  18. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate and alginate from glycerol by Azotobacter vinelandii under nitrogen-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Fuminori; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is an interesting feedstock for biomaterials such as biofuels and bioplastics because of its abundance as a by-product during biodiesel production. Here we demonstrate glycerol metabolism in the nitrogen-fixing species Azotobacter vinelandii through metabolomics and nitrogen-free bacterial production of biopolymers, such as poly-d-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and alginate, from glycerol. Glycerol-3-phosphate was accumulated in A. vinelandii cells grown on glycerol to the exponential phase, and its level drastically decreased in the cells grown to the stationary growth phase. A. vinelandii also overexpressed the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene when it was grown on glycerol. These results indicate that glycerol was first converted to glycerol-3-phosphate by glycerol kinase. Other molecules with industrial interests, such as lactic acid and amino acids including γ-aminobutyric acid, have also been accumulated in the bacterial cells grown on glycerol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that glycerol-grown A. vinelandii stored PHB within the cells. The PHB production level reached 33% per dry cell weight in nitrogen-free glycerol medium. When grown on glycerol, alginate-overproducing mutants generated through chemical mutagenesis produced 2-fold the amount of alginate from glycerol than the parental wild-type strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial production of biopolymers from glycerol without addition of any nitrogen source.

  19. Glycerol administration before endurance exercise: metabolism, urinary glycerol excretion and effects on doping-relevant blood parameters.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karsten; Braun, Hans; de Marees, Markus; Geyer, Hans; Thevis, Mario; Mester, Joachim; Schaenzer, Wilhelm

    2014-03-01

    Glycerol is prohibited as a masking agent by the World Anti-Doping Agency and a urinary threshold has recently been recommended. However, little is known about urinary glycerol excretion after exercise, when (1) exogenous glycerol is metabolized increasingly and (2) endogenous glycerol levels are elevated. The purpose of the placebo-controlled cross-over study was to determine the effects of pre-exercise glycerol administration on glycerol metabolism, urinary excretion, and selected blood parameters. After administration of glycerol (G; 1.0 g/kg body weight (BW) + 25 ml fluid/kg BW) or placebo (P; 25 ml fluid/kg), 14 cyclists exercised 90 min at 60% VO2max . Samples were taken at 0 h (before administration), 2.5 h (before exercise), 4 h (after exercise) and 6.5 h and additional urine samples were collected until 24 h. Exercise increased endogenous plasma glycerol (0.51 ± 0.21 mmol/l) but peak concentrations were much higher in G (2.5 h: 15.6 ± 7.8 mmol/l). Urinary glycerol increased rapidly (58,428 ± 71,084 µg/ml after 2.5 h) and was significantly higher than in P until 13.6 ± 0.9 h (p < 0.01). In comparison with placebo administration, G caused significantly greater changes in plasma volume and haemoglobin concentrations after 2.5 h. BW and urine production were significantly different between P and G after 2.5 h and post-exercise. Despite exercise-induced increases in endogenous glycerol in the control group, urinary excretion remained well below the previously recommended threshold. In addition, exercise-related glycerol degradation did not appear to negatively affect the detection of exogenously administered glycerol.

  20. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T.; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm3 H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry. PMID:24067754

  1. Recent advances in glycerol polymers: chemistry and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, the underlying chemistry of glycerol that provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations is described. Then, the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth are reviewed. Next, several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity are described. Fourth, the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine is described. Finally, the findings are concluded and summarized, as well as the potential opportunities for continued research efforts are discussed.

  2. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T; Huang, Jun

    2013-09-25

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm(3) H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry.

  3. Recent Advances in Glycerol Polymers: Chemistry and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, we describe the underlying chemistry of glycerol, which provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations. We then review the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth. Next, we describe several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity. Fourth, we describe the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine. Finally we conclude and summarize the findings, as well as discuss potential opportunities for continued research efforts. PMID:25308354

  4. Energetics of glycerol conduction through aquaglyceroporin GlpF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Morten Ø.; Park, Sanghyun; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-05-01

    Aquaglyceroporin GlpF selectively conducts water and linear polyalcohols, such as glycerol, across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. We report steered molecular dynamics simulations of glycerol conduction through GlpF, in which external forces accelerate the transchannel conduction in a manner that preserves the intrinsic conduction mechanism. The simulations reveal channel-glycerol hydrogen bonding interactions and the stereoselectivity of the channel. Employing Jarzynski's identity between free energy and irreversible work, we reconstruct the potential of mean force along the conduction pathway through a time series analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories. This potential locates binding sites and barriers inside the channel; it also reveals a low energy periplasmic vestibule suited for efficient uptake of glycerol from the environment.

  5. Glycerol extracting dealcoholization for the biodiesel separation process.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianchu; Sha, Yong; Zhang, Yun; Yuan, Yunlong; Wu, Housheng

    2011-04-01

    By means of utilizing sunflower oil and Jatropha oil as raw oil respectively, the biodiesel transesterification production and the multi-stage extracting separation were carried out experimentally. Results indicate that dealcoholized crude glycerol can be utilized as the extracting agent to achieve effective separation of methanol from the methyl ester phase, and the glycerol content in the dealcoholized methyl esters is as low as 0.02 wt.%. For the biodiesel separation process utilizing glycerol extracting dealcoholization, its technical and equipment information were acquired through the rigorous process simulation in contrast to the traditional biodiesel distillation separation process, and results show that its energy consumption decrease about 35% in contrast to that of the distillation separation process. The glycerol extracting dealcoholization has sufficient feasibility and superiority for the biodiesel separation process.

  6. Vibrational properties of bioprotectant mixtures of trehalose and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Parker, Stewart F

    2011-09-22

    In this work vibrational spectra of mixtures of two glass-forming bioprotectant systems, i.e., trehalose and glycerol, are collected at very low temperature by using the indirect geometry time-of-flight (t.o.f.) TOSCA spectrometer at the ISIS Pulse Neutron Facility (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxford, U.K.). The main aim of this work is to investigate, through inelastic neutron scattering (INS), the vibrational behavior of trehalose and its mixtures with glycerol at different concentration values in order to characterize the changes induced by glycerol on the trehalose hydrogen bonded network. The obtained experimental findings, which are discussed and interpreted in the framework of previous INS, quasi elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and molecular simulation data obtained on trehalose/glycerol mixtures at different concentration and temperature values, will be linked to the different mixtures bioprotectant effectiveness.

  7. Physicochemical characterization of oil palm mesocarp fibre treated with glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor Hamizah M., A.; Roila, A.; Rahimi M., Y.

    2015-09-01

    Lignocellulose has been identified as another source for conversion into value added products. In the present work, physicochemical features from the oil palm mesocarp fibre treated by using pure glycerol with 2% (w/w) NaOH catalyst and crude glycerol have been studied. Treatment was conducted at temperatures 150 °C for 60 min. Fibre treated by crude glycerol resulted in high percentages of holocellulose and lower content of insoluble lignin. These results suggest that crude glycerol can be used as an alternative solvent for pretreatment process. The characterization treated fibre by means of FTIR and TGA has shown significant differences compared to untreated fibre. It was revealed that treated fibre successful eliminated hemicellulose and reduce of lignin content.

  8. Comprehensive utilization of glycerol from sugarcane bagasse pretreatment to fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqun; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effects of glycerol pretreatment on subsequent glycerol fermentation and biomass fast pyrolysis were investigated. The liquid fraction from the pretreatment process was evaluated to be feasible for fermentation by Paenibacillus polymyxa and could be an economic substrate. The pretreated biomass was further utilized to obtain levoglucosan by fast pyrolysis. The pretreated sugarcane bagasse exhibited significantly higher levoglucosan yield (47.70%) than that of un-pretreated sample (11.25%). The promotion could likely be attributed to the effective removal of alkali and alkaline earth metals by glycerol pretreatment. This research developed an economically viable manufacturing paradigm to utilize glycerol comprehensively and enhance the formation of levoglucosan effectively from lignocellulose.

  9. Energetics of glycerol conduction through aquaglyceroporin GlpF

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten Ø.; Park, Sanghyun; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporin GlpF selectively conducts water and linear polyalcohols, such as glycerol, across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. We report steered molecular dynamics simulations of glycerol conduction through GlpF, in which external forces accelerate the transchannel conduction in a manner that preserves the intrinsic conduction mechanism. The simulations reveal channel-glycerol hydrogen bonding interactions and the stereoselectivity of the channel. Employing Jarzynski's identity between free energy and irreversible work, we reconstruct the potential of mean force along the conduction pathway through a time series analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories. This potential locates binding sites and barriers inside the channel; it also reveals a low energy periplasmic vestibule suited for efficient uptake of glycerol from the environment. PMID:11997475

  10. Diffusion-viscosity decoupling in supercooled glycerol aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Trejo González, José A; Longinotti, M Paula; Corti, Horacio R

    2015-01-08

    The diffusion of ferrocene methanol in supercooled glycerol-water mixtures has been measured over a wide viscosity range, which allowed analyzing the composition dependence of the Stokes-Einstein breakdown (diffusion-viscosity decoupling). The observed decoupling exhibits a common behavior for all studied compositions (glycerol mass fractions between 0.7 and 0.9), determined by the reduced temperature (T/Tg) of the mixtures. This result differs from that reported previously for the diffusion of glycerol in its aqueous solutions, where the reduced temperature for the decoupling decreases with increasing water content. We conclude that the contradictory results are only apparent, and they can be explained by the use of inconsistent extrapolated values of the viscosity of the glycerol-water mixtures in the supercooled region.

  11. Increased levels of glycerol-3-phosphate lead to a stimulation of flux into triacylglycerol synthesis after supplying glycerol to developing seeds of Brassica napus L. in planta.

    PubMed

    Vigeolas, Helene; Geigenberger, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (glycerol-3P) is a primary substrate for triacylglycerol synthesis. In the present study, changes in the levels of glycerol-3P during rape (Brassica napus L.) seed development and the influence of manipulating glycerol-3P levels on triacylglycerol synthesis were investigated. (i) Glycerol-3P levels were high in young seeds and decreased during seed development at 30 and 40 days after flowering (DAF), when lipid accumulation was maximal. (ii) To manipulate glycerol-3P levels in planta, various concentrations of glycerol were injected directly into 30-DAF seeds, which remained otherwise intact within their siliques and attached to the plant. Injection of 0-10 nmol glycerol led to a progressive increase in seed glycerol-3P levels within 28 h. (iii). Increased levels of glycerol-3P were accompanied by an increase in the flux of injected [14C]sucrose into total lipids and triacylglycerol, whereas fluxes to organic acids, amino acids, starch, protein and cell walls were not affected. (iv) When [14C]acetate was injected into seeds, label incorporation into total lipids and triacylglycerol increased progressively with increasing glycerol-3P levels. (v) There was a strong correlation between the level of glycerol-3P and the incorporation of injected [14C]acetate and [14C]sucrose into triacylglycerol. (v) The results provide evidence that the prevailing levels of glycerol-3P co-limit triacylglycerol synthesis in developing rape seeds.

  12. Glycerol metabolism and osmoregulation in the salt-tolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, L; Blomberg, A; Nilsson, A

    1985-01-01

    A glycerol-nonutilizing mutant of the salt-tolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii was isolated. When subjected to salt stress the mutant produced glycerol, and the internal level of glycerol increased linearly in proportion to increases of external salinity as in the wild-type strain. However, at increased salinity the mutant showed a more pronounced decrease of growth rate and growth yield and lost more glycerol to the surrounding medium than did the wild type. Uptake experiments showed glycerol to be accumulated against a strong concentration gradient, and both strains displayed similar kinetic parameters for the uptake of glycerol. An examination of enzyme activities of the glycerol metabolism revealed that the apparent Km of the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.5) was increased 330-fold for sn-glycerol 3-phosphate in the mutant. Based on the findings, a scheme for the pathways of glycerol metabolism is suggested. PMID:3980438

  13. Synthesis and mass spectrometry of 1-acyl and 3-acyl-sn-glycerol carbonates.

    PubMed

    Oehlenschläger, J; Gercken, G

    1978-08-01

    sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate was prepared fromD-serine,sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate fromL-serine, via 1-0- or 3-0-benzyl-sn-glycerol, respectively.sn-Glycerol-2,3-carbonate was also prepared fromD-mannitol orD-serine following thesn-glycerol-3-β,β,β-trichloroethylcarbonate route.sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate andsn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate were acylated with saturated and unsaturated fatty acid chlorides to form 3-acyl-sn-glycerol-1,2-carbonates and 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonates, respectively. The mass spectra of the enantiomeric monoacyl-sn-glycerol carbonates showed molecular ions and acyl cations (RCO(+)) of high intensity. The heterocyclic dioxolan-2-one ring was remarkably stable during electron impact.

  14. Determinants of acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Khanna, M U; Abraham, P

    1990-09-01

    Acid secretion is regulated by hormonal factors acting peripherally and centrally, as well as neural factors. Gastrin and histamine are the two most important peripheral hormonal stimulants, while the vagus is the predominant nerve affecting acid secretion. Meal related acid secretion occurs in three phases: cephalic, gastric and intestinal. Acid secretion is stimulated in the first two phases while it is inhibited in the intestinal phase. Proteins are potent acid stimulants but carbohydrates and fats are inhibitors. Tea, coffee, milk and alcohol are acid stimulants; on the other hand the damaging influence of spices on the stomach may not be related to increased acid secretion. Psychological stress has a variable effect. The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on acid secretion is being elucidated. Many drugs modifying acid secretion are available and are useful in the treatment of acid peptic disease.

  15. A comparison of absorption of glycerol tristearate and glycerol trioleate by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstedt, S.E.; Hayashi, H.; Kritchevsky, D.; Tso, P. )

    1990-09-01

    Generally, fats rich in saturated fatty acids raise serum cholesterol, whereas fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids lower it. There appear to be exceptions; e.g., stearic acid (18:0)-rich fats have little or no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations. This apparent lack of cholesterolemic effect of stearic acid-rich fat could be because intestinal absorption of fat is poor or subsequent plasma and/or tissue metabolism of fat is different. To investigate mechanisms involved, we compared intestinal digestion, uptake, and lymphatic transport of glycerol tristearate (TS) and glycerol trioleate (TO, 18:1). Two groups of rats bearing intestinal lymph fistulas were used. TO rats were fed intraduodenally for 8 h at a constant rate a lipid emulsion of 25 mumols/h of TO (labeled with glycerol tri(9,10 (n)-3H)oleate), 7.8 mumols of egg phosphatidylcholine, and 57 mumols of sodium taurocholate in 3 ml of phosphate-buffered saline. TS rats were fed the same lipid emulsion except that TS replaced TO and the emulsion was labeled with glyceryl (1,3-14C)tristearate. The lymph triglyceride and radioactivity were determined. After infusion, the luminal and mucosal radioactive lipid content was analyzed. The results showed that there was significantly less lipid transported in the lymph of TS rats compared with TO rats. The results also showed a significant decrease in the absorption of TS as compared with TO. This was due in part to poor lipolysis. In addition, the lipid absorbed by the intestine of the TS rats was transported into lymph less efficiently than in TO rats.

  16. Optimizing aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Slininger, P.J.; Bothast, R.J.

    1985-12-01

    Chemical oxidation of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) leads to acrylic acid, an industrially important polymerizable monomer currently derived from petroleum. As the availability of petroleum declines, 3-HPA may become attractive as a product to be obtained through fermentation of glycerol, a renewable resource. When cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae NRRL B-199 (ATCC 8724) were grown aerobically on a rich glycerol medium and then suspended in buffer supplemented with semicarbazide and glycerol, aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) ensued. Depending on conditions, 0.38 to 0.67 g of 3-HPA were formed per gram of glycerol consumed. This means that up to 83.8% of the carbon invested as glycerol could potentially be recovered as the target product, 3-HPA. Production of 3-HPA was sensitive to the age of cells harvested for resuspension and was nonexistent if cells were cultivated on glucose instead of glycerol as the sole carbon source. Compared with 24- and 72-h cells, 48-h cells produced 3-HPA at the highest rate and with the greatest yield. The cell biomass concentration present during the fermentation was never particularly critical to the 3-HPA yield, but initial fermentation rates and 3-HPA accumulation displayed a linear dependence on biomass concentration that faded when biomass exceeded 3 g/liter. Fermentation performance was a function of temperature, and an optimum initial specific 3-HPA productivity occurred at 32/sup 0/C, although the overall 3-HPA yield increased continuously within the 25 to 37/sup 0/C range studied. The pH optimum based on fermentation rate was different from that based on overall yield; 8 versus 7, respectively. Initial glycerol concentrations in the 20 to 50 g/liter range optimized initial 3-HPA productivity and yield.

  17. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  18. Vessel preservation with glycerol: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K D; Dienemann, D

    1990-09-01

    Arterial and venous allografts (aorta and femoral vein or artery) of Sprague-Dawley rats were preserved with glycerol (98%) or by lyophilization and subsequently implanted in Wistar rats. The grafts were removed for histologic examination of vessel patency on days 1, 30, 60, and 100 postoperatively. Whereas the glycerol-preserved vessels exhibited a high patency, the results obtained with the lyophilized vessels were less favorable. Lyophilized veins could not be successfully implanted.

  19. Glycerol accumulation in edema formation following diffuse traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmer; Konakondla, Sanjay; Zwagerman, Nathan T; Peng, Changya; Schafer, Steven; Ding, Jamie Y; Dornbos, David; Sikharam, Chaitanya; Geng, Xiaokun; Guthikonda, Murali; Kreipke, Christian W; Rafols, José A; Ding, Yuchuan

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces brain edema via water and glycerol transport channels, called aquaporins (AQPs). The passage of glycerol across brain cellular compartments has been shown during edema. Using a modified impact/head acceleration rodent model of diffuse TBI, we assessed the role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha in regulating AQP9 expression and glycerol accumulation during the edema formation. Adult (400-425 g) male Sprague-Dawley rats received a closed head injury with a weight drop (450 g, 2-m height) and were allowed to survive up to 48 hours. Some rat groups were administered 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2, a HIF-1alpha inhibitor) 30 minutes after injury and were euthanized at 4 and 24 hours after injury. Brain edema was measured directly by water content, and glycerol concentration was determined by the Cayman Glycerol Assay. HIF-1alpha and AQP9 protein levels were assessed by Western immunoblotting. This study demonstrated a significant (P<0·05) increase in brain water content at 4-48 hours following impact. Cerebral glycerol was significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated at as early as 1 hour and remained at high levels for up to 48 hours. Similarly, significant (P<0.05) increases in HIF-1alpha and AQP9 protein levels were found at 1 hour and up to 48 hours after injury. Compared to untreated but injured rats, inhibition of HIF-1alpha by 2ME2 significantly (P<0.05) reduced the TBI-induced AQP9 up-regulation. This reduction was temporally associated with significant (P<0.05) decreases in both edema and glycerol accumulation. The data suggested an associated induction of HIF-1alpha, AQP9, and extracellular glycerol accumulation in edema formation following diffuse TBI. The implication of HIF-1alpha and AQP9 underlying TBI-induced edema formation offers possibilities for novel TBI therapies.

  20. Comparative study of muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin and glycerol injury.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Mohamed A A; Lei, Hsiao Yin; Wakamatsu, Jun-Ichi; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we examined muscle regeneration following two types of chemical injuries, cardiotoxin (CTX) and glycerol, in order to compare their effect on the morphological characteristics during muscle regeneration, in addition we studied the structural changes of the intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) during the regeneration process, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after digestion of the cellular elements of the muscle with sodium hydroxide. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of adult male mice were injected either with CTX or glycerol. Muscle degeneration was greater in the CTX-injured model than in the glycerol-injured model at day 4 post injection. Muscle regeneration started at day 7 in both the CTX and glycerol models. However, the CTX-injured model showed a higher myotube density and larger myotube diameter than the glycerol-injured model at days 10 and 14 post injection. On other hand, adipocyte infiltration was detected in the glycerol-injured model. In contrast, no adipocytes could be detected in the CTX-injured model. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis showed a significant difference in myofiber damage and regeneration between the two models. SEM of the IMCT showed a transient increase in endomysial collagen deposition at early stages of regeneration in the CTX-injured model. In contrast, glycerol-injured model showed slight endomysial collagen deposition. Our results suggest that changes in IMCT affect the efficiency of muscle regeneration. Studying the three dimensional structure of IMCT may help clinical therapies to reduce skeletal muscle fibrosis. To our knowledge this is the first time the changes in IMCT following CTX and glycerol injury using SEM-cell maceration technique have been compared.

  1. Degradation behavior of poly(glycerol sebacate).

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Krebs, Nicholas; Hart, Alison; Neville, Craig M; Huang, Albert Y; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2009-12-15

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), a promising scaffold material for soft tissue engineering applications, is a soft, tough elastomer with excellent biocompatibility. However, the rapid in vivo degradation rate of PGS limits its use as a scaffold material. To determine the impact of crosslink density on degradation rate, a family of PGS materials was synthesized by incrementally increasing the curing time from 42 to 144 h, at 120 degrees C and 10 mTorr vacuum. As expected, PGS became a stiffer, tougher, and stronger elastomer with increasing curing time. PGS disks were subcutaneously implanted into rats and periodically harvested; only mild tissue responses were observed and the biocompatibility remained excellent. Regardless of crosslink density, surface erosion degradation was observed. The sample dimensions linearly decreased with implantation time, and the mass loss rates were constant after 1-week implantation. As surface erosion degradation frequently correlates with enzymatic digestion, parallel in vitro digestion studies were conducted in lipase solutions which hydrolyze ester bonds. Enzymatic digestion played a significant role in degrading PGS, and the mass loss rates were not a function of curing time. Alternative chemistry approaches will be required to decrease the enzymatic hydrolysis rate of the ester bonds in PGS polymers.

  2. Value-added uses for crude glycerol--a byproduct of biodiesel production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel is a promising alternative, and renewable, fuel. As its production increases, so does production of the principle co-product, crude glycerol. The effective utilization of crude glycerol will contribute to the viability of biodiesel. In this review, composition and quality factors of crude glycerol are discussed. The value-added utilization opportunities of crude glycerol are reviewed. The majority of crude glycerol is used as feedstock for production of other value-added chemicals, followed by animal feeds. PMID:22413907

  3. Control of mechanical properties of chitin nanofiber film using glycerol without losing its characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Ikuta, Akiko; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-30

    Surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber films plasticized with glycerol were prepared to control mechanical properties. Nanofiber networks were able to retain excessive glycerol content up to 70% to obtain self-standing film. All films were flexible and highly transparent independent of glycerol content. Glycerol significantly decreased the Young's moduli and tensile strengths, and increased the fracture strain due to its plasticizing effect. At the same time, glycerol did not change the high transparency or the low thermal expansion of the nanofiber film.

  4. Processes and systems for the production of propylene glycol from glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, John G; Oberg, Aaron A; Zacher, Alan H

    2015-01-20

    Processes and systems for converting glycerol to propylene glycol are disclosed. The glycerol feed is diluted with propylene glycol as the primary solvent, rather than water which is typically used. The diluted glycerol feed is sent to a reactor where the glycerol is converted to propylene glycol (as well as other byproducts) in the presence of a catalyst. The propylene glycol-containing product from the reactor is recycled as a solvent for the glycerol feed.

  5. Microaerobic Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew S.; Li, Mai; Black, Ryan W.; Le, Thao Q.; Puthli, Sharon; Campbell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol has become a desirable feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals due to its availability and low price, but many barriers to commercialization remain. Previous investigators have made significant improvements in the yield of ethanol from glycerol. We have developed a fermentation process for the efficient microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Escherichia coli that presents solutions to several other barriers to commercialization: rate, titer, specific productivity, use of inducers, use of antibiotics, and safety. To increase the rate, titer, and specific productivity to commercially relevant levels, we constructed a plasmid that overexpressed glycerol uptake genes dhaKLM, gldA, and glpK, as well as the ethanol pathway gene adhE. To eliminate the cost of inducers and antibiotics from the fermentation, we used the adhE and icd promoters from E. coli in our plasmid, and we implemented glycerol addiction to retain the plasmid. To address the safety issue of off-gas flammability, we optimized the fermentation process with reduced-oxygen sparge gas to ensure that the off-gas remained nonflammable. These advances represent significant progress toward the commercialization of an E. coli-based glycerol-to-ethanol process. PMID:24584248

  6. Hydration and endocrine responses to intravenous fluid and oral glycerol.

    PubMed

    van Rosendal, S P; Strobel, N A; Osborne, M A; Fassett, R G; Coombes, J S

    2015-06-01

    Athletes use intravenous (IV) saline in an attempt to maximize rehydration. The diuresis from IV rehydration may be circumvented through the concomitant use of oral glycerol. We examined the effects of rehydrating with differing regimes of oral and IV fluid, with or without oral glycerol, on hydration, urine, and endocrine indices. Nine endurance-trained men were dehydrated by 4% bodyweight, then rehydrated with 150% of the fluid lost via four protocols: (a) oral = oral fluid only; (b) oral glycerol = oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg); (c) IV = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid; and (d) IV with oral glycerol = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg), using a randomized, crossover design. They then completed a cycling performance test. Plasma volume restoration was highest in IV with oral glycerol > IV > oral glycerol  > oral. Urine volume was reduced in both IV trials compared with oral. IV and IV with oral glycerol resulted in lower aldosterone levels during rehydration and performance, and lower cortisol levels during rehydration. IV with oral glycerol resulted in the greatest fluid retention. In summary, the IV conditions resulted in greater fluid retention compared with oral and lower levels of fluid regulatory and stress hormones compared with both oral conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Glycerol fermentation by (open) mixed cultures: a chemostat study.

    PubMed

    Temudo, Margarida F; Poldermans, Rolf; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2008-08-15

    Glycerol is an important byproduct of bioethanol and biodiesel production processes. This study aims to evaluate its potential application in mixed culture fermentation processes to produce bulk chemicals. Two chemostat reactors were operated in parallel, one fed with glycerol and the other with glucose. Both reactors operated at a pH of 8 and a dilution rate of 0.1 h(-1). Glycerol was mainly converted into ethanol and formate. When operated under substrate limiting conditions, 60% of the substrate carbon was converted into ethanol and formate in a 1:1 ratio. This product spectrum showed sensitivity to the substrate concentration, which partly shifted towards 1,3-propanediol and acetate in a 2:1 ratio at increasing substrate concentrations. Glucose fermentation mainly generated acetate, ethanol and butyrate. At higher substrate concentrations, acetate and ethanol were the dominant products. Co-fermentations of glucose-glycerol were performed with both mixed cultures, previously cultivated on glucose and on glycerol. The product spectrum of the two experiments was very similar: the main products were ethanol and butyrate (38% and 34% of the COD converted, respectively). The product spectrum obtained for glucose and glycerol fermentation could be explained based on the general metabolic pathways found for fermentative microorganisms and on the metabolic constraints: maximization of the ATP production rate and balancing the reducing equivalents involved.

  8. Microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wong, Matthew S; Li, Mai; Black, Ryan W; Le, Thao Q; Puthli, Sharon; Campbell, Paul; Monticello, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    Glycerol has become a desirable feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals due to its availability and low price, but many barriers to commercialization remain. Previous investigators have made significant improvements in the yield of ethanol from glycerol. We have developed a fermentation process for the efficient microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Escherichia coli that presents solutions to several other barriers to commercialization: rate, titer, specific productivity, use of inducers, use of antibiotics, and safety. To increase the rate, titer, and specific productivity to commercially relevant levels, we constructed a plasmid that overexpressed glycerol uptake genes dhaKLM, gldA, and glpK, as well as the ethanol pathway gene adhE. To eliminate the cost of inducers and antibiotics from the fermentation, we used the adhE and icd promoters from E. coli in our plasmid, and we implemented glycerol addiction to retain the plasmid. To address the safety issue of off-gas flammability, we optimized the fermentation process with reduced-oxygen sparge gas to ensure that the off-gas remained nonflammable. These advances represent significant progress toward the commercialization of an E. coli-based glycerol-to-ethanol process.

  9. Sugar-glycerol cofermentations in lactobacilli: the fate of lactate.

    PubMed

    Veiga da Cunha, M; Foster, M A

    1992-02-01

    The simultaneous fermentation of glycerol and sugar by lactobacillus brevis B22 and Lactobacillus buchneri B190 increases both the growth rate and total growth. The reduction of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol by the lactobacilli was found to influence the metabolism of the sugar cofermented by channelling some of the intermediate metabolites (e.g., pyruvate) towards NADH-producing (rather than NADH-consuming) reactions. Ultimately, the absolute requirement for NADH to prevent the accumulation of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde leads to a novel lactate-glycerol cofermentation. As a result, additional ATP can be made not only by (i) converting pyruvate to acetate via acetyl phosphate rather than to the ethanol usually found and (ii) oxidizing part of the intermediate pyruvate to acetate instead of the usual reduction to lactate but also by (iii) reoxidation of accumulated lactate to acetate via pyruvate. The conversion of lactate to pyruvate is probably catalyzed by NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenases that are found only in the cultures oxidizing lactate and producing 1,3-propanediol, suggesting a correlation between the expression of these enzymes and a raised intracellular NAD/NADH ratio. The enzymes metabolizing glycerol (glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase) were expressed in concert without necessary induction by added glycerol, although their expression may also be influenced by the intracellular NAD/NADH ratio set by the different carbohydrates fermented.

  10. Morphological and functional alterations in glycerol preserved rat aortic allografts.

    PubMed

    Fahner, P J; Idu, M M; Legemate, D A; Vanbavel, E; Borstlap, J; Pfaffendorf, M; van Marle, J; van Gulik, T M

    2004-11-01

    Glycerol preservation is an effective method for long-term preservation of skin allografts and has a potential use in preserving arterial allografts. We evaluated the effect of glycerol concentration and incubation period on vessel-wall integrity of rat aortic allografts. No significant differences were measured in breaking strength (2.3 +/- 0.3 N) and bursting pressure (223 +/- 32 kPa) between standard glycerolized and control segments (1.7 +/- 0.3 N, 226 +/- 17 kPa). Isometric tension measurements showed complete lack of functional contraction and relaxation capacity in allograft segments prepared according to all preservation protocols. Morphologically, thickness of the vessel-wall media diminished after preservation using low (30/50/75%) or high (70/85/98%) concentrations of glycerol, as compared to control segments (i.e. 81 +/- 2.4 microm, 95 +/- 5.6 microm and 125 +/- 3.5 microm, respectively). Confocal microscopy and Fourier analysis demonstrated that vascular collagen and elastin bundle orientation had remained unaltered. Electron microscopy showed defragmentation of luminal endothelial cells. In conclusion, glycerol preservation of rat aorta resulted in an acellular tissue matrix, which maintained biomechanical integrity and extracellular matrix characteristics. The next step in the investigation will be to test the concept of glycerol preservation of arterial allografts in a vascular transplantation model.

  11. Key enzymes catalyzing glycerol to 1,3-propanediol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Shizhen; Wang, Yuanpeng; Fang, Baishan

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel as it is produced from animal fats and vegetable oils, and it produces about 10 % (w/w) glycerol, which is a promising new industrial microbial carbon, as a major by-product. One of the most potential applications of glycerol is its biotransformation to high value chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD), dihydroxyacetone (DHA), succinic acid, etc., through microbial fermentation. Glycerol dehydratase, 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase (1,3-propanediol-oxydoreductase), and glycerol dehydrogenase, which were encoded, respectively, by dhaB, dhaT, and dhaD and with DHA kinase are encompassed by the dha regulon, are the three key enzymes in glycerol bioconversion into 1,3-PD and DHA, and these are discussed in this review article. The summary of the main research direction of these three key enzyme and methods of glycerol bioconversion into 1,3-PD and DHA indicates their potential application in future enzymatic research and industrial production, especially in biodiesel industry.

  12. Identification of a mammalian glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase: Role in metabolism and signaling in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Seifried, Annegrit; Gezzar, Sari; Al-Mass, Anfal; Zhang, Dongwei; Lamontagne, Julien; Attane, Camille; Poursharifi, Pegah; Iglesias, José; Joly, Erik; Peyot, Marie-Line; Gohla, Antje; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-26

    Obesity, and the associated disturbed glycerolipid/fatty acid (GL/FA) cycle, contribute to insulin resistance, islet β-cell failure, and type 2 diabetes. Flux through the GL/FA cycle is regulated by the availability of glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P) and fatty acyl-CoA. We describe here a mammalian Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP), which was not known to exist in mammalian cells, that can directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol. We identified that mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase, with an uncertain function, acts in fact as a G3PP. We found that G3PP, by controlling Gro3P levels, regulates glycolysis and glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, glycerolipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation in pancreatic islet β-cells and hepatocytes, and that glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the response to metabolic stress, e.g., glucolipotoxicity, in β-cells. In vivo overexpression of G3PP in rat liver lowers body weight gain and hepatic glucose production from glycerol and elevates plasma HDL levels. G3PP is expressed at various levels in different tissues, and its expression varies according to the nutritional state in some tissues. As Gro3P lies at the crossroads of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, control of its availability by G3PP adds a key level of metabolic regulation in mammalian cells, and G3PP offers a potential target for type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic disorders.

  13. Identification of a mammalian glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase: Role in metabolism and signaling in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Seifried, Annegrit; Gezzar, Sari; Al-Mass, Anfal; Zhang, Dongwei; Lamontagne, Julien; Attane, Camille; Poursharifi, Pegah; Iglesias, José; Joly, Erik; Peyot, Marie-Line; Gohla, Antje; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, and the associated disturbed glycerolipid/fatty acid (GL/FA) cycle, contribute to insulin resistance, islet β-cell failure, and type 2 diabetes. Flux through the GL/FA cycle is regulated by the availability of glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P) and fatty acyl-CoA. We describe here a mammalian Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP), which was not known to exist in mammalian cells, that can directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol. We identified that mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase, with an uncertain function, acts in fact as a G3PP. We found that G3PP, by controlling Gro3P levels, regulates glycolysis and glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, glycerolipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation in pancreatic islet β-cells and hepatocytes, and that glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the response to metabolic stress, e.g., glucolipotoxicity, in β-cells. In vivo overexpression of G3PP in rat liver lowers body weight gain and hepatic glucose production from glycerol and elevates plasma HDL levels. G3PP is expressed at various levels in different tissues, and its expression varies according to the nutritional state in some tissues. As Gro3P lies at the crossroads of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, control of its availability by G3PP adds a key level of metabolic regulation in mammalian cells, and G3PP offers a potential target for type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:26755581

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Phenylpropanoid Glycerol Glucosides in Different Organs of Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Munafo, John P; Gianfagna, Thomas J

    2015-05-20

    The Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) is esteemed worldwide as an attractive ornamental plant, and the flower buds and bulbs are used for both culinary and medicinal purposes in many parts of the world. L. longiflorum contains significant amounts of phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides, a group of compounds that may contribute to plant pathogen defense, ultraviolet/high-intensity visible light (UV/high light) protection, and the purported medicinal uses of lilies. To define the natural distribution of these compounds within the plant, a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method performed in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode was employed for the quantitative analysis of five phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides, namely, (2S)-1-O-caffeoyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosylglycerol, 1; (2R)-1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2-O-p-coumaroylglycerol, 2; (2S)-1-O-p-coumaroyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosylglycerol, 3; (2S)-1-O-caffeoyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-acetylglycerol, 4; and (2S)-1-O-p-coumaroyl-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-acetylglycerol, 5, in the different organs of L. longiflorum. The p-coumaroyl-based 3 and its acetylated derivative 5 were determined to be the most abundant of the phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides found in Easter lily bulbs, at 776.3 ± 8.4 and 650.7 ± 32.6 μg/g dry weight, respectively. The acetylated p-coumaroyl- and caffeoyl-based derivatives, 5 and 4, accumulated to the highest concentration in the closed flower buds, at 4925.2 ± 512.8 and 3216.8 ± 406.4 μg/g dry weight, respectively. Compound 4, followed by 5 and 1, proved to be the most abundant in the mature flowers, occurring at 6006.2 ± 625.8, 2160.3 ± 556.5, and 1535.8 ± 174.1 μg/g dry weight, respectively. Total concentrations of the phenylpropanoid glycerol glucosides were 10-100-fold higher in the above-ground plant organs as compared to the bulbs and fleshy roots. Two of the five compounds, 1 and 2, were identified in L. longiflorum for the first time. The quantitative

  15. Use of agar/glycerol and agar/glycerol/water as a translucent brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Jermy, Mark C; Winter, Taylor; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The suitability of agar/glycerol/water and agar/glycerol mixtures as brain simulants was investigated. Test specimens (n=15) (50x27×37mm) were fabricated for these different mixtures and conditioned to 12°C, 22°C, and 26°C prior to testing. For comparison, fresh deer brain specimens (n=20) were sourced and prepared to the same dimensions as the agar/glycerol(/water) mixtures and conditioned to 12°C and 37°C. High impact tests were carried out with a 0.22-caliber air rifle pellet and a high-speed camera was used to record the projectile as it passed through the specimens, allowing for energy loss and vertical displacement velocity calculation. Although the agar/glycerol/water mixture presented with similar vertical expansion and contraction of the specimens to the warm and cold deer brains, a two-fold decrease of the vertical expansion and contraction was noticed with the agar/glycerol specimens. Also considerably less extrusion of this mixture out of the exit and entry sides after specimen penetration was observed. Of the simulants tested, agar/glycerol/water was the most suitable brain simulant for ballistic testing and impact studies.

  16. Activation of glycerol metabolic pathway by evolutionary engineering of Rhizopus oryzae to strengthen the fumaric acid biosynthesis from crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Di; Wang, Ru; Du, Wenjie; Wang, Guanyi; Xia, Menglei

    2015-11-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is strictly inhibited by biodiesel-based by-product crude glycerol, which results in low fumaric acid production. In this study, evolutionary engineering was employed to activate the glycerol utilization pathway for fumaric acid production. An evolved strain G80 was selected, which could tolerate and utilize high concentrations of crude glycerol to produce 14.9g/L fumaric acid with a yield of 0.248g/g glycerol. Key enzymes activity analysis revealed that the evolved strain displayed a significant upregulation in glycerol dissimilation, pyruvate consumption and reductive tricarboxylic acid pathways, compared with the parent strain. Subsequently, intracellular metabolic profiling analysis showed that amino acid biosynthesis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid and stress response metabolites accounted for metabolic difference between two strains. Moreover, a glycerol fed-batch strategy was optimized to obtain the highest fumaric acid production of 25.5g/L, significantly increased by 20.9-fold than that of the parent strain of 1.2g/L.

  17. The Holocene Records of Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers From the Northern Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Nam, S.; Polyak, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in Cores HOTRAX 05-01 JPC5 and JPC 8, and ARA02B 01-GC in the northern Chukchi Sea. All of the three cores showed a similar changing pattern in GDGT composition during the Holocene. In the beginning of early Holocene, both isoprenoid and branched GDGT concentrations were low, and BIT and CBT were relatively high. The similar composition is found in modern sediments from the western Arctic Ocean north of 75°N, suggesting that the northern Chukchi Sea was covered by perennial sea ice. GDGT concentration increased, and BIT and CBT decreased during the early Holocene and reached the same level as those in modern sediments at 8 ka. TEX86 and CBT/MBT indices showed millennial-scale variation. We interpret that these proxies did not simply indicate temperatures but were affected by the relative contribution of different sediment sources. Millennial-scale variability likely reflected changes in sediment transport in the northern Chukchi Sea.

  18. Crenarchaeol: the characteristic core glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; van Duin, Adri C T; Geenevasen, Jan A J

    2002-10-01

    The basic structure and stereochemistry of the characteristic glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota has been identified by high field two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques. It contains one cyclohexane and four cyclopentane rings formed by internal cyclisation of the biphytanyl chains. Its structure is similar to that of GDGTs biosynthesized by (hyper)thermophilic crenarchaeota apart from the cyclohexane ring. These findings are consistent with the close phylogenetic relationship of (hyper)thermophilic and pelagic crenarchaeota based 16S rRNA. The latter group inherited the biosynthetic capabilities for a membrane composed of cyclopentane ring-containing GDGTs from the (hyper)thermophilic crenarchaeota. However, to cope with the much lower temperature of the ocean, a small but key step in their evolution was the adjustment of the membrane fluidity by making a kink in one of the bicyclic biphytanyl chains by the formation of a cyclohexane ring. This prevents the dense packing characteristic for the cyclopentane ring-containing GDGTs membrane lipids used by hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota to adjust their membrane fluidity to high temperatures.

  19. Glycerol metabolism and PrfA activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Biju; Mertins, Sonja; Stoll, Regina; Schär, Jennifer; Umesha, Kanasinakatte Rudrappa; Luo, Qin; Müller-Altrock, Stefanie; Goebel, Werner

    2008-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is able to efficiently utilize glycerol as a carbon source. In a defined minimal medium, the growth rate (during balanced growth) in the presence of glycerol is similar to that in the presence of glucose or cellobiose. Comparative transcriptome analyses of L. monocytogenes showed high-level transcriptional upregulation of the genes known to be involved in glycerol uptake and metabolism (glpFK and glpD) in the presence of glycerol (compared to that in the presence of glucose and/or cellobiose). Levels of expression of the genes encoding a second putative glycerol uptake facilitator (GlpF(2)) and a second putative glycerol kinase (GlpK(2)) were less enhanced under these conditions. GlpK(1) but not GlpK(2) was essential for glycerol catabolism in L. monocytogenes under extracellular conditions, while the loss of GlpK(1) affected replication in Caco-2 cells less than did the loss of GlpK(2) and GlpD. Additional genes whose transcription levels were higher in the presence of glycerol than in the presence of glucose and cellobiose included those for two dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinases and many genes that are under carbon catabolite repression control. Transcriptional downregulation in the presence of glycerol (compared to those in the presence glucose and cellobiose) was observed for several genes and operons that are positively regulated by glucose, including genes involved in glycolysis, N metabolism, and the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids. The highest level of transcriptional upregulation was observed for all PrfA-dependent genes during early and late logarithmic growth in glycerol. Under these conditions, a low level of HPr-Ser-P and a high level of HPr-His-P were present in the cells, suggesting that all enzyme IIA (EIIA) (or EIIB) components of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) permeases expressed will be phosphorylated. These and other data suggest that the phosphorylation state of PTS permeases correlates with PrfA activity.

  20. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J; Southern, Peter J; Reilly, Cavan S; Peterson, Marnie L; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G; Nephew, Karla R; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Carlis, John V; Haase, Ashley T

    2009-04-23

    Although there has been great progress in treating human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-rhesus macaque (Macacca mulatta) model point to opportunities at the earliest stages of infection in which a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3alpha (also known as CCL20), plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5(+ )cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruits CD4(+) T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate-a widely used antimicrobial compound with inhibitory activity against the production of MIP-3alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines-can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo it can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This new approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for the development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

  1. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Southern, Peter J.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G.; Nephew, Karla R.; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Carlis, John V.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2009-01-01

    While there has been great progress in treating HIV-1 infection1, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission2–4. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the SIV-rhesus macaque model point to opportunities in the earliest stages of infection where a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry5, 6. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3α, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5+cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruit CD4+T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate, a widely used antimicrobial compound 7 with inhibitory activity against production of MIP-3α and other proinflammatory cytokines8, can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This novel approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission. PMID:19262509

  2. Glycerol decreases the volume and compressibility of protein interior.

    PubMed

    Priev, A; Almagor, A; Yedgar, S; Gavish, B

    1996-02-20

    The addition of hydrogen-bonded cosolvents to aqueous solutions of proteins is known to modify both thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the proteins in a variety of ways. Previous studies suggest that glycerol reduces the free volume and compressibility of proteins. However, there is no directly measured evidence for that. We have measured the apparent specific volume (V) and adiabatic compressibility (K) of a number of proteins, sugars, and amino acids in water and in 30% glycerol at pH 7.4 and 30 degrees C. The values of V and K in water and their changes induced by glycerol were extrapolated to the limit of infinite solute size. The main results were the following: (a) glycerol decreases V and K of proteins, but increases it for amino acids; (b) the V and K values of the protein interior in water were found to be 0.784 +/- 0.026 mL/g and (12.8 +/- 2.5) x 10(-6) mL/g x atm, where the glycerol reduces these values by 8 and 32%, respectively; (c) the coefficient of adiabatic compressibility of the structural component of proteins affected by the glycerol is estimated to be (50 +/- 10) x 10(-6) atm(-1), which is comparable to that of water. We propose that the glycerol induces a release of the so-called "lubricant" water, which maintains conformational flexibility by keeping apart neighboring segments of the polypeptide chain. This is expected to lead to the collapsing of the voids containing the water as well as to increase intramolecular bonding, which explains the observed effect.

  3. Authentication Without Secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Lyndon G.; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  4. Plasticization of a protein-based film by glycerol: a spectroscopic, mechanical, and thermal study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunli; Stading, Mats; Wellner, Nikolaus; Parker, Mary L; Noel, Timothy R; Mills, E N Clare; Belton, Peter S

    2006-06-28

    Kafirin, the seed storage protein of the cereal sorghum, is highly homologous with the maize storage protein zein. The effects of plasticisation of a kafirin film by glycerol in the absence of water were examined by a combination of spectroscopic (NMR and infrared), rheological, and calorimetric methods. The results suggest that at low glycerol levels the glycerol is absorbed onto and possibly into the protein. Increasing the level of glycerol increases the motion of the protein and changes the protein conformation. There are corresponding changes of the mechanical properties of protein films. At 40% (w/w) of glycerol, two glass transition temperatures were observed, one of which corresponded to the glass transition temperature of pure glycerol. This result indicates that at this level of plasticizer there are sufficient glycerol/glycerol interactions occurring to allow a separate glass formation process for glycerol.

  5. Engineering of a Glycerol Utilization Pathway for Amino Acid Production by Corynebacterium glutamicum▿

    PubMed Central

    Rittmann, Doris; Lindner, Steffen N.; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2008-01-01

    The amino acid-producing organism Corynebacterium glutamicum cannot utilize glycerol, a stoichiometric by-product of biodiesel production. By heterologous expression of Escherichia coli glycerol utilization genes, C. glutamicum was engineered to grow on glycerol. While expression of the E. coli genes for glycerol kinase (glpK) and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpD) was sufficient for growth on glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source, additional expression of the aquaglyceroporin gene glpF from E. coli increased growth rate and biomass formation. Glutamate production from glycerol was enabled by plasmid-borne expression of E. coli glpF, glpK, and glpD in C. glutamicum wild type. In addition, a lysine-producing C. glutamicum strain expressing E. coli glpF, glpK, and glpD was able to produce lysine from glycerol as the sole carbon substrate as well as from glycerol-glucose mixtures. PMID:18757581

  6. Crude glycerol-based production of amino acids and putrescine by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Meiswinkel, Tobias M; Rittmann, Doris; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2013-10-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum possesses genes for glycerol kinase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that were shown to support slow growth with glycerol only when overexpressed from a plasmid. Pure glycerol and crude glycerol from biodiesel factories were tested for growth of recombinant strains expressing glpF, glpK and glpD from Escherichia coli. Some, but not all crude glycerol lots served as good carbon sources. Although the inhibitory compound(s) present in these crude glycerol lots remained unknown, the addition of substoichiometric glucose concentrations (below 10% by weight) enabled the utilization of some of the inhibitory crude glycerol lots. Besides growth, production of the amino acids L-glutamate, L-lysine, L-ornithine and L-arginine as well as of the diamine putrescine based on crude glycerol qualities from biodiesel factories was demonstrated.

  7. Engineering of a glycerol utilization pathway for amino acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Doris; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2008-10-01

    The amino acid-producing organism Corynebacterium glutamicum cannot utilize glycerol, a stoichiometric by-product of biodiesel production. By heterologous expression of Escherichia coli glycerol utilization genes, C. glutamicum was engineered to grow on glycerol. While expression of the E. coli genes for glycerol kinase (glpK) and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpD) was sufficient for growth on glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source, additional expression of the aquaglyceroporin gene glpF from E. coli increased growth rate and biomass formation. Glutamate production from glycerol was enabled by plasmid-borne expression of E. coli glpF, glpK, and glpD in C. glutamicum wild type. In addition, a lysine-producing C. glutamicum strain expressing E. coli glpF, glpK, and glpD was able to produce lysine from glycerol as the sole carbon substrate as well as from glycerol-glucose mixtures.

  8. Microbial conversion of glycerol: present status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Swati; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2012-09-01

    Biodiesel has emerged as a potential alternate renewable liquid fuel in the past two decades. Total annual production of biodiesel stands at 6.96 million tons and 11.2 million tons in USA and Europe, respectively. In other countries, Asia and Latin America, biodiesel production has increased at unprecedented rate. Despite this, the economy of biodiesel is not attractive. An obvious solution for boosting the economy of the biodiesel industry is to look for markets for side products of the transesterification process of biodiesel synthesis. The main by-product is glycerol. However, this glycerol is contaminated with alkali/acid catalyst and alcohol, and thus, is not useful for conventional applications such as in toothpaste, drugs, paints and cosmetics. Conversion of this glycerol to value-added product is a viable solution for effective and economic utilization, which would also generate additional revenue for the biodiesel industry. Intensive research has taken place in area of conversion of glycerol to numerous products. The conventional catalytic route of glycerol transformation employs prohibitively harsh conditions of temperature and pressure, and thus, has slim potential for large-scale implementation. In addition, the selectivity of the process is rather small with formation of many undesired side products. The bioconversion processes, on the other hand, are highly selective although with slower kinetics. In this review, we have given an assessment and overview of the literature on bioconversion of glycerol. We have assessed as many as 23 products from glycerol bioconversion, and have reviewed the literature in terms of microorganism used, mode of fermentation, type of fermentor, yield and productivity of the process and recovery/purification of the products. The metabolic pathway of conversion of glycerol to various products has been discussed. We have also pondered over economic and engineering issues of large-scale implementation of process and have

  9. Determination of optimal glycerol concentration for optical tissue clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Eungjun; Son, Taeyoon; Kim, Han-Sung; Jung, Byungjo

    2012-02-01

    The laser scattering in tissue is significant in diagnostic and therapeutic purposes of laser. Many studies have been conducted to minimize laser scattering in tissue and therefore, to maximize the clinical efficacy by enhancing photon density. Optical clearing agents (OCAs) have been employed for optical tissue clearing (OTC). This study was aimed to investigate the optimal concentration of an OCA, glycerol, in topical application,, so that it can be utilized for clinical diagnosis and therapy in dermatology. Glycerol was topically applied to avoid possible edema caused by dermal injection. The effect of OTC was quantitatively evaluated as a function of the concentration of glycerol with various methods. Optical methods such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and an integrating sphere were used to assess the enhancement of light penetration depth and refractive index matching. In addition, a non-optical method, ultrasound scanner, was utilized to evaluate quantitatively collagen dissociation. The results revealed that 70 % glycerol was the optimal concentration of OTC for topical application. This study may provide a guideline regarding to the use of glycerol for optimal diagnostic and therapeutic effects in dermatology.

  10. Titanium glycerolate-based electrorheological fluids with stable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xufeng; Zhao, Hong; Qi, Min; Tao, Wanyong

    2014-04-01

    Titanium glycerolate (TiGly) particles were prepared with different molar ratios of glycerol to tetrabutyltitanate (TBOT) (glycerol/TBOT = 2, 2.5, and 3) by a simple precipitation method. For comparison, titanium propanediol (TiPro) particles were prepared with 1,3-propanediol and TBOT (propanediol/TBOT = 2) by the same route. The composition and morphology of the four kinds of particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results indicate that the secondary hydroxyl groups originating from glycerolate are doped into the TiGly particles, and the four kinds of particles present different morphology. The suspensions prepared with TiGly particles by 60% weight fraction and silicone oil show significant electrorheological (ER) performance, while the TiPro particles-based fluid with the same particles fraction present weak ER properties. Constant shear rate and step-function electric field pulses were applied to investigate the stability of the ER fluids. The TiGly particles synthesized with the molar ratio of glycerol to TBOT equaling 2.5 exhibit significant (˜40 kPa at 5 kV mm-1) and stable ER activity.

  11. Biomechanical and histological evaluation of glycerol-preserved human sclerae.

    PubMed

    Schirmbeck, Tarciso; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco E

    2007-01-01

    To determine the histological and biomechanical characteristics of glycerol-preserved human sclera. A total of 114 paired human sclerae were cleaned and preserved with 98% glycerol under refrigeration at 4 to 8 degrees C. The samples were divided into a control group with no preservation and 5 groups of 19 sclerae in 7, 15, 30, 90 and 180 days of preservation. Each specimen was submitted to histological examination and tested for traction distensibility functions. Preservation in glycerol did not cause alterations in the histological architecture of the scleral tissue. The mean load required to break the scleral tissue increased according to preservation time as a sigmoid function. A significant increase in mechanical resistance and decrease in distension of scleral tissue occurred after 90 days of preservation. Scleral preservation in glycerol keeps tissue integrity. The preserved material is less distensible after 90 days. Surgeons who use sclera in ophthalmic procedures should be aware of the mechanical characteristics of glycerol-preserved sclera and take into account tissue preservation time.

  12. The immunogenicity of glycerol-preserved donor skin.

    PubMed

    Hettich, R; Ghofrani, A; Hafemann, B

    1994-01-01

    Previous clinical observations have suggested that the application of glycerol-preserved donor skin as a temporary wound dressing provokes a weaker rejection reaction than fresh, vital donor skin. Like others, we frequently observed that considerable parts of the allodermis not only remained on the wound for an extended period of time, but even became re-epithelialized in some cases. In order to quantify this effect, we applied the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) test in a rat model, using the two highly inbred, histoincompatible rat strains DA and Lewis as donor and recipient respectively. Using the methodology of the Euro Skin Bank, Beverwijk, The Netherlands, split thickness skin, excised from the back of the rats, was equilibrated in 98 per cent glycerol. The immunological reaction after grafting vital DA-skin, glycerolized DA-skin onto Lewis rats, and vital as well as glycerolized Lewis-skin onto Lewis rats was compared. The results of these experiments do not support the clinical observations that the glycerolization procedure results in decreased immunogenicity of donor skin.

  13. Development of glycerol/O 2 biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechederra, Robert L.; Treu, Becky L.; Minteer, Shelley D.

    Glycerol is an attractive fuel for a fuel cell, because it is non-toxic, non-volatile, non-flammable, has high energy density, and is abundant due to the fact that it is a byproduct of biodiesel production. However, it has not been an effective fuel for low temperature, precious metal catalyzed fuel cells. In this paper, we describe the use of glycerol as a fuel in an enzymatic biofuel cell. An alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase-based bioanode has been developed that oxidizes glycerol, a safe high energy density fuel. Glycerol/O 2 biofuel cells employing these bioanodes have yielded power densities of up to 1.21 mW cm -2, and have the ability to operate at 98.9% fuel concentrations. Previous biofuel cells could not operate effectively at high fuel concentrations due to the nature of the solid fuel such as sugar or the solvent characteristics of fuels such as lower aliphatic alcohols. The glycerol/O 2 biofuel cell provides improved power densities compared to ethanol biofuel cells due to ability to more completely oxidize the fuel.

  14. The mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Trypanosomatidae and the glycosomal redox balance of insect stages of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Daniel G; Decottignies, Anabelle; Bakker, Barbara M; Michels, Paul A M

    2006-10-01

    The genes for the mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were identified in Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major genomes. We have expressed the L. major gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and confirmed the subcellular localization and activity of the produced enzyme. Using cultured T. brucei procyclic and Leishmania mexicana promastigote cells with a permeabilized plasma membrane and containing intact glycosomes, it was shown that dihydroxyacetone phosphate is converted into pyruvate, and stimulates oxygen consumption, indicating that all components of the glycerol 3-phosphate/dihydoxyacetone phosphate shuttle between glycosomes and mitochondrion are present in these insect stages of both organisms. A computer model has been prepared for the energy and carbohydrate metabolism of these cells. It was used in an elementary mode analysis to get insight into the metabolic role of the shuttle in these insect-stage parasites. Our analysis suggests that the shuttle fulfils important roles for these organisms, albeit different from its well-known function in the T. brucei bloodstream form. It allows (1) a high yield of further metabolizable glycolytic products by decreasing the need to produce a secreted end product of glycosomal metabolism, succinate; (2) the consumption of glycerol and glycerol 3-phosphate derived from lipids; and (3) to keep the redox balance of the glycosome finely tuned due to a highly flexible and redundant system.

  15. Effect of NaCl on the accumulation of glycerol by three Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Zidan, M A; Abdel-Mallek, A Y

    1987-01-01

    The accumulation of glycerol was investigated in three Aspergillus species, A. niger, A. ochraceus and A. tamarii after being grown in media containing different NaCl concentrations. Intra-extracellular as well as total glycerol were markedly accumulated by the three organisms in response to increased salinity. However, at salinity levels of 10-14% NaCl, extracellular glycerol was somewhat lowered. In addition, it was found that the maximum accumulation of glycerol in A. niger and A. tamarii was reached within the first 10 hours after salinization. However, after desalinization, the extracellular glycerol was continuously increased within the first 6 hours at the expense of intracellular glycerol.

  16. Chemoselective catalytic conversion of glycerol as a biorenewable source to valuable commodity chemicals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hui Clayton; Beltramini, Jorge N; Fan, Yong-Xian; Lu, G Q Max

    2008-03-01

    New opportunities for the conversion of glycerol into value-added chemicals have emerged in recent years as a result of glycerol's unique structure, properties, bioavailability, and renewability. Glycerol is currently produced in large amounts during the transesterification of fatty acids into biodiesel and as such represents a useful by-product. This paper provides a comprehensive review and critical analysis on the different reaction pathways for catalytic conversion of glycerol into commodity chemicals, including selective oxidation, selective hydrogenolysis, selective dehydration, pyrolysis and gasification, steam reforming, thermal reduction into syngas, selective transesterification, selective etherification, oligomerization and polymerization, and conversion of glycerol into glycerol carbonate.

  17. Secrets to success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-02-01

    A new national study reveals what it takes for physician practices to stay financially viable. Several Texas practices, among those rated as "better performers," share their secrets to success. One of those secrets, a physician says, is "hiring good people and getting out of their way."

  18. In situ production of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in a great basin hot spring (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Wang, Jinxiang; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Williams, Amanda J.; Zhu, Chun; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Zheng, Fengfeng; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (bGDGTs) are predominantly found in soils and peat bogs. In this study, we analyzed core (C)-bGDGTs after hydrolysis of polar fractions using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry and analyzed intact P-bGDGTs using total lipid extract (TLE) without hydrolysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-multiple stage mass spectrometry. Our results show multiple lines of evidence for the production of bGDGTs in sediments and cellulolytic enrichments in a hot spring (62–86°C) in the Great Basin (USA). First, in situ cellulolytic enrichment led to an increase in the relative abundance of hydrolysis-derived P-bGDGTs over their C-bGDGT counterparts. Second, the hydrolysis-derived P- and C-bGDGT profiles in the hot spring were different from those of the surrounding soil samples; in particular, a monoglycosidic bGDGT Ib containing 13,16-dimethyloctacosane and one cyclopentane moiety was detected in the TLE but it was undetectable in surrounding soil samples even after sample enrichments. Third, previously published 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis from the same lignocellulose samples demonstrated the enrichment of thermophiles, rather than mesophiles, and total bGDGT abundance in cellulolytic enrichments correlated with the relative abundance of 16S rRNA gene pyrotags from thermophilic bacteria in the phyla Bacteroidetes, Dictyoglomi, EM3, and OP9 (“Atribacteria”). These observations conclusively demonstrate the production of bGDGTs in this hot spring; however, the identity of organisms that produce bGDGTs in the geothermal environment remains unclear. PMID:23847605

  19. Amperometric triglyceride bionanosensor based on nanoparticles of lipase, glycerol kinase, glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Pundir, C S; Aggarwal, V

    2017-01-15

    The nanoparticles (NPs) aggregates of lipase from porcine pancreas, glycerol kinase (GK) from Cellulomonas sp. and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO) from Aerococcus viridanss were prepared by desolvation and glutaraldehyde crosslinking and functionalized by cysteamine. These enzyme nanoparticles (ENPs) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The functionalzed ENPs aggregates were co-immobilized covalently onto polycrystalline Au electrode through thiolated bond. An improved amperometric triglyceride (TG) bionanosensor was constructed using this ENPs modified Au electrode as working electrode. Biosensor showed optimum current at 1.2 V within 5s, at pH 6.5 and 35 °C.A linear relationship was obtained between current (mA) and triolein concentration in lower concentration range,10-100 mg/dL and higher concentration range, 100-500 mg/dL. Limit of detection (LOD) of bionanosensor was 1.0 μg/ml. Percent analytical recovery of added trolein (50 and 100 mg/dL) in serum was 95.2 ± 0.5 and 96.0 ± 0.17. Within and between batch coefficients of variation (CV) were 2.33% and 2.15% respectively. A good correlation (R(2) = 0.99) was obtained between TG values in sera measured by present biosensor and standard enzymic colorimetric method with the regression equation: y= (0.993x + 0.967). ENPs/Au electrode was used 180 times over a period of 3 months with 50% loss in its initial activity, when stored dry at 4 °C.

  20. Source, settling and degradation of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in the marine water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masanobu; Shimamoto, Akifumi; Fukuhara, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2016-10-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (branched GDGTs) are commonly found in distal marine sediments. However, their presence in the water column, source and delivery process are not fully understood. In this study, we examined seasonal and depth variation in the flux of branched GDGTs in sinking particles and underlying sediment at 39°N, 147°E in the mid-latitude NW Pacific from November 1997 to August 1999. Branched GDGTs showed synchronous variation in their sinking flux at different depths, and the variation was similar to that of lithogenic material of eolian dust origin. Their degrees of cyclization and methylation were nearly constant and bear some resemblance to those of alkaline soils. This suggests that westerly winds transport branched GDGTs to the study site via the atmosphere from continental Asia. The sinking flux of branched GDGTs was higher in 1999 than in 1998, presumably reflecting changes in the migration path of Asian dust in response to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Synchronous variation in branched GDGT concentrations at different depths implies rapid vertical transport of branched GDGTs to deep water with a sinking velocity exceeding 260 m d-1. The sinking flux of the branched GDGTs decreased with increasing depth, but the rate of decrease was much smaller than those of other compounds. The preservation efficiency of branched GDGTs was 3.5-6.4% of surface inputs at the water-sediment interface, which is much higher than those of isoprenoid GDGTs (1.0-1.3%) and other compounds. The branched and isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index values were extremely low (i.e. <0.0015) in comparison with any other studies so far. The BIT values in the surface sediment were five times higher than those in sinking particles, which is attributed to the preferential preservation of branched GDGTs in oxic environments.

  1. Archaeal and bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether lipids in hot springs of yellowstone national park.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T J; Hopmans, Ellen C; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Ward, David M; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2007-10-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are core membrane lipids originally thought to be produced mainly by (hyper)thermophilic archaea. Environmental screening of low-temperature environments showed, however, the abundant presence of structurally diverse GDGTs from both bacterial and archaeal sources. In this study, we examined the occurrences and distribution of GDGTs in hot spring environments in Yellowstone National Park with high temperatures (47 to 83 degrees C) and mostly neutral to alkaline pHs. GDGTs with 0 to 4 cyclopentane moieties were dominant in all samples and are likely derived from both (hyper)thermophilic Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. GDGTs with 4 to 8 cyclopentane moieties, likely derived from the crenarchaeotal order Sulfolobales and the euryarchaeotal order Thermoplasmatales, are usually present in much lower abundance, consistent with the relatively high pH values of the hot springs. The relative abundances of cyclopentane-containing GDGTs did not correlate with in situ temperature and pH, suggesting that other environmental and possibly genetic factors play a role as well. Crenarchaeol, a biomarker thought to be specific for nonthermophilic group I Crenarchaeota, was also found in most hot springs, though in relatively low concentrations, i.e., <5% of total GDGTs. Its abundance did not correlate with temperature, as has been reported previously. Instead, the cooccurrence of relatively abundant nonisoprenoid GDGTs thought to be derived from soil bacteria suggests a predominantly allochthonous source for crenarchaeol in these hot spring environments. Finally, the distribution of bacterial branched GDGTs suggests that they may be derived from the geothermally heated soils surrounding the hot springs.

  2. Noise and gastric secretion.

    PubMed

    Tomei, F; Papaleo, B; Baccolo, T P; Persechino, B; Spanò, G; Rosati, M V

    1994-09-01

    In view of the increasing incidence of diseases such as gastritis and ulcers in workers exposed to noise, we assessed whether noise does in fact affect gastric secretion. Then, considering the conflicting findings published on the effects of noise on gastric secretion, we also investigated whether the response was related to differences in baseline secretion, and whether it was further modified by a hydroalcoholic meal. We studied 50 dyspeptic subjects engaged in various types of work but not occupationally exposed to noise. They were exposed to a "pink noise" stimulus of 95 dB administered through earphones, lasting 15 minutes. Gastric secretion sometimes remained unchanged, sometimes increased, or sometimes even decreased in relation to the baseline hydrochloric acid secretion. The hydroalcoholic meal did not generally modify the effects of noise. These findings might help explain the differences in previous reports on this question.

  3. Simultaneous quantification of labeled (2)H5-glycerol, (13)C6-glucose, and endogenous D-glucose in mouse plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jahouh, Farid; Wang, Rong

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring the level of glucose and glycerol or their labeled derivatives in biological fluid for kinetic studies has always been challenging, especially in mice, because of the limited volume in addition to the complexity of plasma. For such application, we developed a simple, fast, and sensitive method for the simultaneous measurement of absolute concentrations of labeled (2)H5-glycerol and (13)C6-glucose as well as endogenous D-glucose using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In our study, 15.0 μL of mouse plasma was processed by a one-step protein precipitation, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The quantification of the analytes was carried out by monitoring the product ion scan of their corresponding deprotonated molecular ions and constructing the extracted ion fragmentogram by choosing a specific product ion for each analyte (equivalent to precursor ion to product ion transitions). The limit of detection (LOD) was evaluated to be 1.0 μM for both (2)H5-glycerol and (13)C6-glucose, and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was observed to be 5.0 μM for both (2)H5-glycerol and (13)C6-glucose in diluted mice plasma that corresponds to 50 μM in plasma or 4.60 and 9.01 mg/dL of glycerol and glucose in plasma, respectively. The extraction recoveries are 81.9 % (CV = 8.1 %) for (2)H5-glycerol and 26.2 % (CV = 13.6 %) for (13)C6-glucose.

  4. Random lasing from cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres dispersed in glycerol.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate random lasing from a scattering system formed by a cholesteric liquid crystal dispersed in glycerol. Strong scattering of light is produced from the interference between the cholesteric liquid crystal microsphere and glycerol and leads to random lasing. The optical properties of random lasing, such as intensity, threshold, and the temperature effect on lasing emission are demonstrated. The random laser is distinguished from the band-edge laser generated within the cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres by analyzing the positions of the photonic band-edge of the cholesteric liquid crystal and the photoluminescence of the doped laser dye. The random laser from cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres in glycerol possesses a simple fabrication process, small volume, and low threshold, which enable it to be used in speckle-free imaging, target identification, biomedicine, document coding, and other photonic devices.

  5. Glycerol kinase activities in muscles from vertebrates and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Newsholme, E A; Taylor, K

    1969-05-01

    1. Glycerol kinase (EC 2.7.1.30) activity was measured in crude extracts of skeletal muscles by a radiochemical method. The properties of the enzyme from a number of different muscles are very similar to those of the enzyme from rat liver. Glycerol kinase from locust flight muscle was inhibited competitively by l-3-glycerophosphate with a K(i) of 4.0x10(-4)m. 2. The activity of glycerol kinase was measured in a variety of muscles from vertebrates and invertebrates in an attempt to explain the large variation in the activity of this enzyme in different muscles. 3. In vertebrates glycerol kinase activities were generally higher in red muscle than in white muscle; the highest activities (approx. 0.2mumole/min./g. fresh wt.) were found in the red breast muscle of some birds (e.g. pigeon, duck, blue tit) whereas the activities in the white breast muscle of the pheasant and domestic fowl were very low (approx. 0.02mumole/min./g.). 4. On the basis of glycerol kinase activities, muscles from insects can be classified into three groups: muscles that have a low enzyme activity, i.e. <0.3mumole/min./g. (leg muscles of all insects studied and the flight muscles of cockroaches and the tsetse fly); muscles that have an intermediate enzyme activity, i.e. 0.3-1.5mumoles/min./g. (e.g. locusts, cockchafers, moths, water-bugs); and muscles that have a high enzyme activity, i.e. >1.5mumoles/min./g. (e.g. bees, wasps, some blowflies). 5. The function of glycerol kinase in vertebrate and insect muscles that possess a low or intermediate activity is considered to be the removal of glycerol that is produced from lipolysis of triglyceride or diglyceride by the muscle. Therefore in these muscles the activity of glycerol kinase is related to the metabolism of fat, which is used to support sustained muscular activity. A possible regulatory role of glycerol kinase in the initiation of triglyceride or diglyceride lipolysis is discussed. 6. The function of glycerol kinase in the insect muscles

  6. Superlubricity achieved with mixtures of acids and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Ma, Liran; Liu, Yuhong; Luo, Jianbin

    2013-01-08

    In this work, superlubricity between glass and Si(3)N(4) surfaces lubricated by mixtures of acid solutions and glycerol solutions has been found by using a traditional tribometer. Ultralow friction coefficients of between 0.004 and 0.006 were obtained after a running-in period. Related experiments indicate that the hydrogen ions in the mixtures play an important role in achieving superlubricity. Moreover, the ultralow friction is also closely related to the pH value of the acid and the concentration of glycerol. According to these results, the possible superlubricity mechanism has been revealed, which is attributed to a fluid-hydrated water layer between the hydrogen-bonded networks of glycerol and water molecules on the positively charged surfaces.

  7. Ru/FTO: Heterogeneous catalyst for glycerol hydrogenolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Wan Zurina; Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam Wan; Liew, Kin Hong; Nordin, Norazzizi; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi

    2014-09-01

    An introduction of Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) as new catalyst support with Ru metal had enhanced the conversion and selectivity for glycerol hydrogenolysis. A small cluster of Ru were highly dispersed and intercalated over FTO via simple chemical mixture and reduction method. In comparison with various metal (Pd, Os, Cu), Ru/FTO catalyst showed the highest conversion (100%) and highly selectivity of 1,2-propanediol (94%) in the hydrogenolysis of glycerol. The reaction was optimally conducted at 150 °C, 20 bar of H2 pressure and at 8 hours. Ru/FTO catalyst was ascribed as active catalyst due to the amphoteric sites of FTO and small size of Ru metal. This provides high surface concentration of reduction process that involves the chemical bond dissociation in the glycerol hydrogenolysis.

  8. Production of 1,2-propanediol from glycerol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Young; Yun, Hyun Shik; Lee, Jinwon; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2011-08-01

    Glycerol has become an attractive carbon source in the biotechnology industry owing to its low price and reduced state. However, glycerol is rarely used as a carbon source in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because of its low utilization rate. In this study, we used glycerol as a main carbon source in S. cerevisiae to produce 1,2-propanediol. Metabolically engineered S. cerevisiae strains with overexpression of glycerol dissimilation pathway genes, including glycerol kinase (GUT1), glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GUT2), glycerol dehydrogenase (gdh), and a glycerol transporter gene (GUP1), showed increased glycerol utilization and growth rate. More significant improvement of glycerol utilization and growth rate was accomplished by introducing 1,2-propanediol pathway genes, mgs (methylglyoxal synthase) and gldA (glycerol dehydrogenase) from Escherichia coli. By engineering both glycerol dissimilation and 1,2-propanediol pathways, the glycerol utilization and growth rate were improved 141% and 77%, respectively, and a 2.19 g 1,2- propanediol/l titer was achieved in 1% (v/v) glycerolcontaining YEPD medium in engineered S. cerevisiae.

  9. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbers, C. R.; Sauer, D.; Vogel, M.

    2012-03-01

    We use 2H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  10. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices.

    PubMed

    Herbers, C R; Sauer, D; Vogel, M

    2012-03-28

    We use (2)H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  11. Propylene from renewable resources: catalytic conversion of glycerol into propylene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yong-Mei; He, He-Yong; Fan, Kang-Nian; Cao, Yong

    2014-03-01

    Propylene, one of the most demanded commodity chemicals, is obtained overwhelmingly from fossil resources. In view of the diminishing fossil resources and the ongoing climate change, the identification of new efficient and alternative routes for the large-scale production of propylene from biorenewable resources has become essential. Herein, a new selective route for the synthesis of propylene from bio-derived glycerol is demonstrated. The route consists of the formation of 1-propanol (a versatile bulk chemical) as intermediate through hydrogenolysis of glycerol at a high selectivity. A subsequent dehydration produces propylene. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kasina, A; Putzeys, T; Wübbenhorst, M

    2015-12-28

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk Tg and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in cp by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at -75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of "MROL glycerol" to its "normal" (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (∼2%) increase of the glassy cp, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τcal from that of normal "bulk" glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the existence of rigid polar clusters (RPCs

  13. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasina, A.; Putzeys, T.; Wübbenhorst, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk Tg and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in cp by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at -75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of "MROL glycerol" to its "normal" (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (˜2%) increase of the glassy cp, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τcal from that of normal "bulk" glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the existence of rigid polar clusters (RPCs) and

  14. Cryoprotective effect of different glycerol concentrations on domestic cat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Ana Izabel S Balbin; Fioratti, Eduardo G; Penitenti, Marcimara; Ikoma, Maura R V; Tsunemi, Miriam H; Papa, Frederico O; Lopes, Maria D

    2013-10-15

    Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is a pivotal tool in assisted reproduction, and studies aiming to establish optimal freezing/thawing protocols are essential to enhance sperm survival. The objectives of the present study were to (1) compare the cryoprotective efficiency of three different glycerol concentrations (3%, 5%, and 7%) on the basis of post-thaw sperm quality and (2) investigate whether the incidence of morphologically abnormal sperm in fresh samples is related to cryodamage sensitivity. Semen was collected from six tomcats using an artificial vagina (total 18 ejaculates). Each ejaculate was diluted using Tris-egg yolk-based extender (TEY), evaluated, equally divided into three aliquots, and rediluted using TEY with and without glycerol to achieve final concentrations of 3%, 5%, and 7%. Samples were loaded into 0.25 mL straws, equilibrated for 60 minutes at 5 °C, frozen, and then thawed at 46 °C for 12 seconds. Fresh and frozen-thawed samples were evaluated for sperm motion parameters (computer-assisted sperm analysis), plasma membrane integrity (PMI; propidium iodide and carboxyfluorescein diacetate), and DNA integrity (acridine orange). Plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity were assessed by flow cytometry (propidium iodide and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated pea (Pisum sativum) agglutinin) immediately after thawing. Sperm motion parameters were also evaluated at 30 and 60 minutes of postincubation. For all treatment groups, cryopreservation significantly impaired the PMI and sperm motion parameters, except for straightness and amplitude of lateral head displacement. DNA integrity showed a slight reduction (P < 0.05) when 3% glycerol was used. The percentage of total motility, progressive motility, and rapid spermatozoa were significantly lower immediately after thawing and up to 60 minutes of incubation for the 3% glycerol group when compared with 5% and 7%. No difference (P > 0.05) was found for PMI, acrosome integrity, and DNA integrity among

  15. Glycerol and bioglycerol conversion in supercritical water for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yu-Wu, Q M; Weiss-Hortala, E; Barna, R; Boucard, H; Bulza, S

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic transesterification of vegetable oils leads to biodiesel and an alkaline feed (bioglycerol and organic residues, such as esters, alcohols. . .). The conversion ofbioglycerol into valuable organic molecules represents a sustainable industrial process leading to the valorization of a renewable organic resource. The physicochemical properties in the supercritical domain (T > 374 degrees C, P > 22.1 MPa) transform water into a solvent for organics and a reactant favouring radical reactions. In this context, the conversion ofbioglycerol in supercritical water (SCW) into platform molecules and/or high energetic gases (hydrogen, hydrocarbons) could represent an interesting valorization process. The reported research results concern the conversion of bioglycerol compared to pure glycerol. The experiments have been done in batch autoclaves (5 ml and 500 ml stirred). Solutions of pure (5 or 10 wt%) and crude (3.5 wt%) glycerol have been processed with or without catalyst (K2CO3 1.5 wt%) in the range of 450-600 degrees C. The molecular formula of bioglycerol was determined as C4.3H9.7O1.8Na0.1Si0.08. Glycerol was partially decomposed in the batch systems during the heating (42% before reaching 420 degrees C) and some intermediates (propanediol, ethylene glycol . . .) were quantified, leading to a proposition of a reaction pathway. Acrolein, a valuable platform molecule, was mainly produced in the absence of catalyst. No solid phase was recovered after SCW conversion of pure and bioglycerol in batch reactors. The optimal parameters for gasification were 600 degrees C, 25 MPa for bioglycerol and 525 degrees C, 25 MPa, for pure glycerol. In these operating conditions, 1 kg of pure or bioglycerol leads to 15 and, respectively, 10 mol of hydrogen. Supercritical water gasification of crude glycerol favoured the generation of light hydrocarbons, while pure glycerol promoted H2 production. SCW conversion of glycerol (pure and crude) allows to obtain simultaneously energetic

  16. Small gold clusters catalyzing the conversion of glycerol to epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Pembere, Anthony M; Yang, Mengzhou; Luo, Zhixun

    2017-10-04

    The conversion of glycerol to epichlorohydrin (GTE) is of great interest because the product is widely used in plastics, rubbers and adhesives, and also contributes to the disposal of the reactant glycerol, a major by-product in biodiesel production. Here we find effective catalysis by small gold clusters for the GTE reaction in water with an enhanced selectivity towards the desired product. Along with natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis rationalizing the donor-acceptor charge-transfer interactions, we illustrate the mechanism for bond activation in the reactants and intermediates over gold cluster catalysts, and present thermodynamically and kinetically favoured reaction pathways for dehydrochlorination in GTE processes.

  17. Pulse loading of glycerol by electric explosion of wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, S. V.; Bannikova, I. A.; Naimark, O. B.

    2015-11-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the relaxation properties of glycerol under shock-wave loading. The strain rates at the compression wave front were in the range of 105-107 s-1. A modified version of the wire explosion set-up was used. Free surface velocity profiles were recorded by VISAR with fiber-optic sensor. We found that the glycerol exhibits the non-Newtonian liquid behavior: viscosity is higher at the high strain rate. Strain rate at the compressive wave front is found to be dependent on the wave amplitude in power of 1.3.

  18. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Jha, S; Kumar, S

    2009-07-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH) secreting pituitary adenomas are a very rare cause of hyperthyroidism. They typically present with signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and rarely can be asymptomatic. TSH secreting tumors account for 1 percent of all pituitary adenoma. They are a rare cause of thyrotoxicosis in which adenomas completely or partially lose feedback regulation of thyroid hormones and lead to sustained stimulation of thyroid gland. The most definitive treatment of thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas is transsphenoidal removal of tumor after restoring euthyroidism. We report a case of pituitary adenoma associated with elevated serum free thyroid hormones and non-suppressed TSH levels.

  19. DHA system mediating aerobic and anaerobic dissimilation of glycerol in Klebsiella pneumoniae NCIB 418.

    PubMed Central

    Forage, R G; Lin, E C

    1982-01-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae NCIB 418, the pathways normally responsible for aerobic growth on glycerol and sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (the glp system) are superrepressed. However, aerobic growth on glycerol can take place by the intervention of the NAD-linked glycerol dehydrogenase and the ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase of the dha system normally inducible only anaerobically by glycerol or dihydroxyacetone. Conclusive evidence that the dha system is responsible for both aerobic and anaerobic dissimilation of glycerol was provided by a Tn5 insertion mutant lacking dihydroxyacetone kinase. An enzymatically coupled assay specific for this enzyme was devised. Spontaneous reactivation of the glp system was achieved by selection for aerobic growth on sn-glycerol 3-phosphate or on limiting glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source. However, the expression of this system became constitutive. Aerobic operation of the glp system highly represses synthesis of the dha system enzymes by catabolite repression. Images PMID:6284704

  20. Chemical Interactions of Polyethylene Glycols (PEG) and Glycerol with Protein Functional Groups: Applications to PEG, Glycerol Effects on Protein Processes

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, DB; Shkel, Irina A; Phan, Noel M; Sternke, Matt; Lingeman, Emily; Cheng, Xian; Cheng, Lixue; O’Connor, Kevin; Record, M. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Here we obtain the data needed to predict chemical interactions of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and glycerol with proteins and related organic compounds, and thereby interpret or predict chemical effects of PEGs on protein processes. To accomplish this we determine interactions of glycerol and tetraEG with >30 model compounds displaying the major C, N, and O functional groups of proteins. Analysis of these data yields coefficients (α-values) quantifying interactions of glycerol, tetraEG and PEG end (-CH2OH) and interior (-CH2OCH2-) groups with these groups, relative to interactions with water. TetraEG (strongly) and glycerol (weakly) interact favorably with aromatic C, amide N, and cationic N, but unfavorably with amide O, carboxylate O and salt ions. Strongly unfavorable O and salt anion interactions help make both small and large PEGs effective protein precipitants. Interactions of tetraEG and PEG interior groups with aliphatic C are quite favorable, while interactions of glycerol and PEG end groups with aliphatic C are not. Hence tetraEG and PEG 300 favor unfolding of the DNA-binding domain of lac repressor (lacDBD) while glycerol, di- and mono-ethylene glycol are stabilizers. Favorable interactions with aromatic and aliphatic C explain why PEG400 greatly increases the solubility of aromatic hydrocarbons and steroids. PEG400-steroid interactions are unusually favorable, presumably because of simultaneous interactions of multiple PEG interior groups with the fused ring system of the steroid. Using α-values reported here, chemical contributions to PEG m-values can be predicted or interpreted in terms of changes in water-accessible surface area (ΔASA), and separated from excluded volume effects. PMID:25962980

  1. Characterization and optimization of glycerol/sebacate ratio in poly(glycerol-sebacate) elastomer for cell culture application.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Long; Lu, Xi-Li; Dong, De-Li; Sun, Zhi-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS) is an elastomeric biodegradable polyester. Our previous series of studies have showed that PGS has good biocompatibility. In view of the potential use of PGS in bioengineering, we attempt to characterize the PGS polymer with different ratio of glycerol and sebacic acid, and the cell adhesion and growth on these polymers. PGSs with different proportion of glycerol and sebacic acid were synthesized by polycondensation reaction. The microstructure of the series PGSs were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that, with the increase of the ratio of sebacic acid in PGS from 1:0.8, 1:1, to 1:1.2 (ratio of glycerol to sebacic acid), the main diffraction peak in XRD, the sol content and gel swelling increased but then decreased, suggesting that the degree of crosslinking and the inherent degree of order of the series PGS increased and then decreased. With the increase of sebacic acid proportion, water absorption increased and then decreased, and the water absorption ranged from 9.62% to 10.66%. The mass loss of the series of samples in degradation experiments ranged from 24.63% to 40.06% on the 32nd day of degradation. Cell culture data suggested that the polymer with the ratio of 1:0.8 for glycerol and sebacate was suitable for cell adhesion and growth. In conclusion, PGS can be used as the cell culture matrix by modifying the composition ratio of glycerol and sebacic acid to improve the properties of cell adhesion and growth.

  2. Freeze resistance in rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax): seasonal pattern of glycerol and antifreeze protein levels and liver enzyme activity associated with glycerol production.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Johanne M; Ewart, K Vanya; Driedzic, William R

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) inhabit inshore waters along the North American Atlantic coast. During the winter, these waters are frequently ice covered and can reach temperatures as low as -1.9 degrees C. To prevent freezing, smelt accumulate high levels of glycerol, which lower the freezing point via colligative means, and antifreeze proteins (AFP). The up-regulation of the antifreeze response (both glycerol and AFP) occurs in early fall, when water temperatures are 5 degrees -6 degrees C. The accumulation of glycerol appears to be the main mechanism of freeze resistance in smelt because it contributes more to the lowering of the body's freezing point than the activity of the AFP (0.5 degrees C vs. 0.25 degrees C for glycerol and AFP, respectively) at a water temperature of -1.5 degrees C. Moreover, AFP in smelt appears to be a safeguard mechanism to prevent freezing when glycerol levels are low. Significant increases in activities of the liver enzymes glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) during the initiation of glycerol production and significant correlations between enzyme activities and plasma glycerol levels suggest that these enzymes are closely associated with the synthesis and maintenance of elevated glycerol levels for use as an antifreeze. These findings add further support to the concept that carbon for glycerol is derived from amino acids.

  3. Surface properties of Cu/La2O3 and its catalytic performance in the synthesis of glycerol carbonate and monoacetin from glycerol and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; He, Dehua

    2014-04-01

    Cu/La2O3 catalysts with different Cu loadings were prepared by impregnation method and employed in the synthesis of glycerol carbonate and monoacetin from glycerol and CO2 in the presence of CH3CN. The interface between Cu and La2O3 and the structure of catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM, H2-TPR, CO2-TPD, N2O chemisorptions, UV-vis DSR and XPS. Cu/La2O3 exhibited high catalytic activity for the conversion of glycerol to glycerol carbonate and monoacetin under mild reaction conditions. The effect of reaction parameters on the carbonylation of glycerol was also studied. CH3CN can break the thermodynamic limit of the reaction of glycerol with CO2 to glycerol carbonate through its hydrolysis. Over 2.3%Cu/La2O3 catalyst, the conversion of glycerol and the selectivity to glycerol carbonate and monoacetin were 33.4%, 45.4% and 52.9%, respectively (150°C, 7.0 MPa, 12 h). The size effect of Cu nanoparticles and the basic property of the supports were also examined. The characterization results suggested that the Cu sizes and basic sites on Cu/La2O3 had significant effect on the conversion and selectivity in the carbonylation of glycerol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A specific receptor site for glycerol, a new sweet tastant for Drosophila: structure-taste relationship of glycerol in the labellar sugar receptor cell.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Takaya; Koganezawa, Masayuki; Furuyama, Akira; Isono, Kunio; Shimada, Ichiro

    2004-10-01

    Glycerol, a linear triol, is a sweet tastant for mammals but it has not previously been recognized to stimulate the sense of taste in insects. Here we show by electrophysiological experimentation that it effectively stimulates the labellar sugar receptor cell of Drosophila. We also show that in accord with the electrophysiological observations, the behavioral feeding response to glycerol is dose dependent. 3-Amino-1,2-propanediol inhibited the response of the sugar receptor cell to glycerol, specifically and competitively, while it had almost no effect on responses to sucrose, D-glucose, D-fructose and trehalose. In the null Drosophila mutant for the trehalose receptor (DeltaEP19), the response to glycerol showed no change, in sharp contrast with a characteristic drastic decrease in the response to trehalose. The glycerol concentration-response curves for I-type and L-type labellar hairs were statistically indistinguishable, while those for sucrose, D-glucose, D-fructose and trehalose were clearly different. These all indicate the presence of a specific receptor site for glycerol. The glycerol site was characterized by comparing the effectiveness of various derivatives of glycerol. Based on this structure-taste relationship of glycerol, a model is proposed for the glycerol site including three subsites and two steric barriers, which cannot accommodate carbon-ring containing sugars such as D-glucose. Copyright 2004 Oxford University Press

  5. Excess wing in glass-forming glycerol and LiCl-glycerol mixtures detected by neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Arend, N.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.; Stingaciu, L.; Jalarvo, N.; Mamontov, E.; Ohl, M.

    2015-01-22

    The relaxational dynamics in glass-forming glycerol and glycerol mixed with LiCl is investigated using different neutron scattering techniques. The performed neutron spin echo experiments, which extend up to relatively long relaxation time scales of the order of 10 ns, should allow for the detection of contributions from the so-called excess wing. This phenomenon, whose microscopic origin is controversially discussed, arises in a variety of glass formers and, until now, was almost exclusively investigated by dielectric spectroscopy and light scattering. In conclusion, we show here that the relaxational process causing the excess wing can also be detected by neutron scattering, which directly couples to density fluctuations.

  6. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  7. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Dong, Shuang-Li; Sun, Jian-Hu; Chen, Rui-Yun; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2009-09-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  8. Plio-Pleistocene Temperature Variability in the Terrestrial Arctic: Insights from Branched Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, I. S.; Salacup, J.; de Wet, G.; Habicht, M. H.; Keisling, B. A.; Phu, V.; Johnson, J.; Lukas, S.; Lyons, N.; Brigham-Grette, J.

    2014-12-01

    Drill coring at Lake El'gygytgyn (Far East Russia) in 2009 retrieved a 3.6 Ma long sediment core, which is presently the oldest continuous sedimentary record available from the terrestrial Arctic. This unique Plio-Pleistocene record allows for the response of the Arctic to global climate events under a variety of different boundary conditions to be examined. Here we present results of ongoing organic geochemical analyses of Lake El'gygytgyn sediments focusing on the mid-Pliocene warm period, the Plio-Pleistocene transition, the mid-Brunhes transition, and warm Pleistocene interglacial periods including Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5, 9, 11, 19 and 31. Despite the ultra-oligotrophic nature of Lake El'gygytgyn and the generally low sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC) content, we find abundant branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) throughout the entire record and use the methylation and cyclization indices of branched tetraethers (MBT and CBT, respectively) to reconstruct past temperature (Weijers et al., 2007). We hypothesize that the majority of brGDGTs are produced in the lake during the brief summer period of ice free conditions and that MBT/CBT likely reflects a warm season temperature. Trends noted in the MBT/CBT record are in close agreement with pollen-based temperature estimates throughout the entire core. For example, we note a dramatic ~6°C cooling associated with the mid-Pliocene M2 event and thus far MIS 31 has emerged as the warmest period at Lake El'gygytgyn during the past ~ 1 Ma, corroborating the pollen data. Interestingly, a number of abrupt and relatively short-lived cooling events of 2 to 4°C are noted within several of the particularly warm interglacial periods (e.g. MIS 5e, MIS 11 and MIS 31) and are the subject of ongoing investigation. Overall, application of the MBT/CBT paleothermometer to Lake El'gygytgyn sediments is a highly promising technique for generating a Plio-Pleistocene temperature record from the continental

  9. Seasonal variability of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) in a temperate lake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Shannon E.; Russell, James M.; Heureux, Ana M.; D'Andrea, William J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative climate reconstructions are crucial for understanding the magnitude of and mechanisms behind natural and anthropogenic climate change, yet there are few proxies that can reliably reconstruct terrestrial temperature. Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are bacterial membrane lipids that are increasingly used to reconstruct paleotemperature from lake sediments, but despite their potential, we have a poor understanding of (1) autochthonous vs. allochthonous sources of brGDGTs in lakes and (2) the seasonality of and environmental controls on brGDGT production within lakes. To investigate these factors, we examined water column suspended particulate matter (SPM) and settling particles from a sediment trap collected on a biweekly to monthly basis over a period of three years at Lower King Pond, a small kettle lake in northern Vermont, USA. We also compared the concentration and fractional abundances of brGDGTs in SPM and settling particles with those of catchment soils, river sediments, and lake surface sediments to constrain the relative importance of brGDGTs derived from the landscape versus brGDGTs produced within the lake itself. We find significant differences in concentrations and fractional abundances of brGDGTs between soil and river sediment samples from the catchment and lake sediments, indicating a mostly autochthonous source for lacustrine brGDGTs. BrGDGT concentrations, fluxes, and fractional abundances in SPM vary over the annual cycle, indicating that brGDGTs are produced throughout the year and respond to changes within the water column. The total annual flux of brGDGTs settling through the water column is comparable to the brGDGT accumulation rates in surface sediments, indicating that in this lake brGDGTs are mostly produced within the water column, not in the sediment itself. While brGDGTs are produced in all seasons within the water column, the flux to the sediments is highest during periods of spring and fall

  10. Six secrets of champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2015-12-01

    Popping open a bottle of champagne is one of life's great delights, but how much do you really know about the science behind this greatest of wines? Gérard Liger-Belair reveals his six favourite champagne secrets.

  11. Type VI secretion system.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor; Orth, Kim

    2015-03-30

    Bacteria employ a variety of tools to survive in a competitive environment. Salomon and Orth describe one such tool-the Type 6 Secretion Systems used by bacteria to deliver a variety of toxins into competing cells.

  12. Secret quality of love.

    PubMed

    Strachan-Hall, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Many of us can recite three Donabedian dimensions of the quality of care of structure, process and outcome. Recently, I was introduced to another of Avedis Donabedian's quotes about the 'secret quality of love'.

  13. Haemophilus paragallinarum secretes metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Rivero-García, P C; Cruz, C Vázquez; Alonso, P Sánchez; Vaca, S; Negrete-Abascal, E

    2005-10-01

    Haemophilus paragallinarum secretes metalloproteases into different culture media lacking serum. Secreted proteins, concentrated by precipitation with 70% ammonium sulphate ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)) or methanol, displayed proteolytic activity at >100 kDa molecular mass in 10% polyacrylamide gels co-polymerized with porcine gelatin (0.1%). They were active in a broad pH range (4-9); pH 7.5 being the optimum. Protease activity was inhibited by 20 mmol EDTA/L and reactivated by calcium. The proteolytic activity was heat-stable at 40, 50, and 60 degrees C, but its activity diminished at 70 degrees C or higher. Secreted proteins partially degraded chicken immunoglobulin G (IgG) and cross-reacted with a polyclonal serum against a high molecular mass protease secreted by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Extracellular proteases could play a role in infectious coryza caused by H. paragallinarum.

  14. Quantification of the ratio of positional isomer dilinoleoyl-oleoyl glycerols in vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Jakab, A; Jablonkai, I; Forgács, E

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of fatty acids in a triacylglycerol is of great importance from nutritional, biochemical, quality and technological points of view. The ratio of triacylglycerol positional isomers containing two linoleic acid (18:2) and one oleic acid (18:1) moieties--namely, 1(3),2-dilinoleoyl-3(1)-oleoyl glycerol (LLO) and 1,3-dilinoleoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol (LOL)--were quantified in grape seed, olive, pumpkin seed, soybean, sunflower and wheat germ oils by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Relative LOL contents (LOL/(LLO+LOL)) of the oils were calculated from the mass abundances of the [LL]+ and [LO]+ diacylglycerol fragment ions ([M+H-RCOOH]+) using a calibration curve. The calibration curve of the relative diacylglycerol mass abundances was measured in SIM mode. The relative LOL contents were found to be relatively consistent for each oil variety. The relative LOL content in grape seed, sunflower, pumpkin seed, soybean and wheat germ oils accounted for 44.2 +/- 2.6, 26.8 +/- 3.2, 16.7 +/- 4.6, 15.9 +/- 2.9 and 13.9 +/- 4.3%, respectively. Only olive oils contained practically 100% of the LLO isomer. These results indicate that the unsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic and oleic acids have 'non-random' distribution patterns in various oils. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Glycerolized Reticular Dermis as a New Human Acellular Dermal Matrix: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Pietro Maria; Balmativola, Davide; Cambieri, Irene; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Annaratone, Laura; Casarin, Stefania; Fumagalli, Mara; Stella, Maurizio; Sapino, Anna; Castagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    Human Acellular Dermal Matrices (HADM) are employed in various reconstructive surgery procedures as scaffolds for autologous tissue regeneration. The aim of this project was to develop a new type of HADM for clinical use, composed of glycerolized reticular dermis decellularized through incubation and tilting in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). This manufacturing method was compared with a decellularization procedure already described in the literature, based on the use of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), on samples from 28 donors. Cell viability was assessed using an MTT assay and microbiological monitoring was performed on all samples processed after each step. Two surgeons evaluated the biomechanical characteristics of grafts of increasing thickness. The effects of the different decellularization protocols were assessed by means of histological examination and immunohistochemistry, and residual DNA after decellularization was quantified using a real-time TaqMan MGB probe. Finally, we compared the results of DMEM based decellularization protocol on reticular dermis derived samples with the results of the same protocol applied on papillary dermis derived grafts. Our experimental results indicated that the use of glycerolized reticular dermis after 5 weeks of treatment with DMEM results in an HADM with good handling and biocompatibility properties. PMID:26918526

  16. Increasing the penetration depth for ultrafast laser tissue ablation using glycerol based optical clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Ilan; Subramanian, Kaushik G.; Martin, Chris; Yildirim, Murat; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-03-01

    Background: Deep tissue ablation is the next challenge in ultrafast laser microsurgery. By focusing ultrafast pulses below the tissue surface one can create an ablation void confined to the focal volume. However, as the ablation depth increases in a scattering tissue, increase in the required power can trigger undesired nonlinear phenomena out of focus that restricts our ability to ablate beyond a maximum ablation depth of few scattering lengths. Optical clearing (OC) might reduce the intensity and increase the maximal ablation depth by lowering the refractive index mismatch, and therefore reducing scattering. Some efforts to ablate deeper showed out of focus damage, while others used brutal mechanical methods for clearing. Our clinical goal is to create voids in the scarred vocal folds and inject a biomaterial to bring back the tissue elasticity and restore phonation. Materials and methods: Fresh porcine vocal folds were excised and applied a biocompatible OC agent (75% glycerol). Collimated transmittance was monitored. The tissue was optically cleared and put under the microscope for ablation threshold measurements at different depths. Results: The time after which the tissue was optically cleared was roughly two hours. Fitting the threshold measurements to an exponential decay graph indicated that the scattering length of the tissue increased to 83+/-16 μm, which is more than doubling the known scattering length for normal tissue. Conclusion: Optical clearing with Glycerol increases the tissue scattering length and therefore reduces the energy for ablation and increases the maximal ablation depth. This technique can potentially improve clinical microsurgery.

  17. Effect of lipids on insulin, growth hormone and exocrine pancreatic secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Raptis, S; Dollinger, H C; von Berger, L; Kissing, J; Schröder, K E; Klör, U; Pfeiffer, E F

    1975-11-21

    Influences of fat on release of insulin, growth hormone and pancreatic enzyme secretion were studied in 35 metabolically healthy subjects. A fat solution containing 40 g of soy bean oil was administered, I.V., orally and intraduodenally. In all cases there was a similar increase of insulin but the rise in serum insulin after oral or intraduodenal fat administration was not related to the changes in plasma free fatty acids, free glycerol and triglyceride levels. Blood surgar responded according to insulin secretion. The route of fat administration may possibly influence growth hormone secretion. Following intraduodenal fat administration volume and bicarbonate contents of the duodenal juice rose slightly whereas trypsin and bilirubin content increased considerably. These results suggest that insulin secretion after oral or intraduodenal administration of fat is influenced by intestinal factors. Cholecystokinin-pancroezymin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide are qualified to serve as such factors.

  18. Efficient quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2016-05-01

    An efficient quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the dealer generates some single particles and then uses the operations of quantum-controlled-not and Hadamard gate to encode a determinate secret into these particles. The participants get their shadows by performing the single-particle measurements on their particles, and even the dealer cannot know their shadows. Compared to the existing schemes, our scheme is more practical within the present technologies.

  19. Effects of glycerol supply and specific growth rate on methanol-free production of CALB by P. pastoris: functional characterisation of a novel promoter.

    PubMed

    Looser, Verena; Lüthy, Dominik; Straumann, Marcel; Hecht, Katrin; Melzoch, Karel; Kovar, Karin

    2017-04-01

    As Pichia pastoris (syn. Komagataella sp.) yeast can secrete pure recombinant proteins at high rates, it is a desirable production system. The function of a novel synthetic variant of the AOX1 promoter was characterised comprehensively using a strain secreting Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) as a model. A new time-saving approach was introduced to determine, in only one experiment, the hitherto unknown relationship between specific product formation rate (q p) and specific growth rate (μ). Tight control of recombinant protein formation was possible in the absence of methanol, while using glycerol as a sole carbon/energy source. CALB was not synthesised during batch cultivation in excess glycerol (>10 g l(-1)) and at a growth rate close to μ max (0.15 h(-1)). Between 0.017 and 0.115 h(-1) in glycerol-limited fedbatch cultures, basal levels of q p > 0.4 mg g(-1) h(-1) CALB were reached, independent of the μ at which the culture grew. At μ > 0.04 h(-1), an elevated q p occurred temporarily during the first 20 h after changing to fedbatch mode and decreased thereafter to basal. In order to accelerate the determination of the q p(μ) relationship (kinetics of product formation), the entire μ range was covered in a single fedbatch experiment. By linearly increasing and decreasing glycerol addition rates, μ values were repeatedly shifted from 0.004 to 0.074 h(-1) and vice versa. Changes in q p were related to changes in μ. A rough estimation of μ range suitable for production was possible in a single fedbatch, thus significantly reducing the experimental input over previous approaches comprising several experiments.

  20. 21 CFR 172.850 - Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... esters of glycerol and propylene glycol. The food additive lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... additive is a mixture of esters produced by the lactylation of a product obtained by reacting edible fats...

  1. 21 CFR 172.850 - Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.850 Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol. The food additive lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and...

  2. Efficient utilization of crude glycerol as fermentation substrate in the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) biopolymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One refined and 2 crude glycerol samples were utilized to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) by Pseudomonas oleovorans NRRL B-14682. Fermentation conditions were determined to efficiently utilize glycerol while maintaining PHB yields. A batch culture protocol including 1% glycerol and an aerati...

  3. Nitrogen-Corrected Apparent Metabolizable Energy Value of Crude Glycerol for Laying Hens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An experiment was conducted with laying hens to determine the AMEn value of crude glycerol, a co-product of biodiesel production. Crude glycerol (87% glycerol, 9% water, 0.03% methanol, 1.26% Na, and 3,625 kcal/kg gross energy) was obtained from a commercial biodiesel production facility (Ag Process...

  4. Thermal and mechanical properties of glycerol-based polymer films infused with plant cell wall polysaccharides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poly(glutaric acid-co-glycerol) films were produced by first synthesizing polymer gels from uncatalyzed polyesterification of glutaric acid to glycerol in toluene. Residual amounts of starting materials in the gel matrices were determined by gas chromatography (GC) to contain 15 percent glycerol and...

  5. Mechanisms of protein stabilization and prevention of protein aggregation by glycerol.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Yap, Miranda G S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2009-11-24

    The stability of proteins in aqueous solution is routinely enhanced by cosolvents such as glycerol. Glycerol is known to shift the native protein ensemble to more compact states. Glycerol also inhibits protein aggregation during the refolding of many proteins. However, mechanistic insight into protein stabilization and prevention of protein aggregation by glycerol is still lacking. In this study, we derive mechanisms of glycerol-induced protein stabilization by combining the thermodynamic framework of preferential interactions with molecular-level insight into solvent-protein interactions gained from molecular simulations. Contrary to the common conception that preferential hydration of proteins in polyol/water mixtures is determined by the molecular size of the polyol and the surface area of the protein, we present evidence that preferential hydration of proteins in glycerol/water mixtures mainly originates from electrostatic interactions that induce orientations of glycerol molecules at the protein surface such that glycerol is further excluded. These interactions shift the native protein toward more compact conformations. Moreover, glycerol preferentially interacts with large patches of contiguous hydrophobicity where glycerol acts as an amphiphilic interface between the hydrophobic surface and the polar solvent. Accordingly, we propose that glycerol prevents protein aggregation by inhibiting protein unfolding and by stabilizing aggregation-prone intermediates through preferential interactions with hydrophobic surface regions that favor amphiphilic interface orientations of glycerol. These mechanisms agree well with experimental data available in the literature, and we discuss the extent to which these mechanisms apply to other cosolvents, including polyols, arginine, and urea.

  6. Preparation, characterization, and properties of 1,2-isopropylidene glycerol carbonate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The utilization of excess glycerol supplies derived from the burgeoning biodiesel industry is of major importance to the oleochemical industry as the economic viability of the biodiesel and oleochemical industries are closely linked to glycerol prices. Carbonate compounds based on glycerol, such as...

  7. The Effect of Glycerol Ingestion on Performance during Simulated Multisport Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Christopher; Braakhuis, Andrea; Paton, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Glycerol-induced hyperhydration has been applied to endurance sport with limited success as a performance enhancement strategy. Glycerol has been used as a hyperhydrating agent, because it has been shown to be rapidly absorbed and osmotically active; therefore, the fluid intake with glycerol is distributed throughout the body. Hyperhydration with…

  8. Metabolic engineering for high glycerol production by the anaerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Semkiv, Marta V; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Abbas, Charles A; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2017-03-09

    Glycerol is used by the cosmetic, paint, automotive, food, and pharmaceutical industries and for production of explosives. Currently, glycerol is available in commercial quantities as a by-product from biodiesel production, but the purity and the cost of its purification are prohibitive. The industrial production of glycerol by glucose aerobic fermentation using osmotolerant strains of the yeasts Candida sp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been described. A major drawback of the aerobic process is the high cost of production. For this reason, the development of yeast strains that effectively convert glucose to glycerol anaerobically is of great importance. Due to its ability to grow under anaerobic conditions, the yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal system for the development of this new biotechnological platform. To increase glycerol production and accumulation from glucose, we lowered the expression of TPI1 gene coding for triose phosphate isomerase; overexpressed the fused gene consisting the GPD1 and GPP2 parts coding for glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase, respectively; overexpressed the engineered FPS1 gene that codes for aquaglyceroporin; and overexpressed the truncated gene ILV2 that codes for acetolactate synthase. The best constructed strain produced more than 20 g of glycerol/L from glucose under micro-aerobic conditions and 16 g of glycerol/L under anaerobic conditions. The increase in glycerol production led to a drop in ethanol and biomass accumulation.

  9. 21 CFR 172.850 - Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... esters of glycerol and propylene glycol. The food additive lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... additive is a mixture of esters produced by the lactylation of a product obtained by reacting edible...

  10. 21 CFR 172.850 - Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... esters of glycerol and propylene glycol. The food additive lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... additive is a mixture of esters produced by the lactylation of a product obtained by reacting edible...

  11. Glycerol replacement corrects defective skin hydration, elasticity, and barrier function in aquaporin-3-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Mariko; Verkman, A. S.

    2003-01-01

    Mice deficient in the epidermal water/glycerol transporter aquaporin-3 (AQP3) have reduced stratum corneum (SC) hydration and skin elasticity, and impaired barrier recovery after SC removal. SC glycerol content is reduced 3-fold in AQP3 null mice, whereas SC structure, protein/lipid composition, and ion/osmolyte content are not changed. We show here that glycerol replacement corrects each of the defects in AQP3 null mice. SC water content, measured by skin conductance and 3H2O accumulation, was 3-fold lower in AQP3 null vs. wild-type mice, but became similar after topical or systemic administration of glycerol in quantities that normalized SC glycerol content. SC water content was not corrected by glycerol-like osmolytes such as xylitol, erythritol, and propanediol. Orally administered glycerol fully corrected the reduced skin elasticity in AQP3 null mice as measured by the kinetics of skin displacement after suction, and the delayed barrier recovery as measured by transepidermal water loss after tape-stripping. Analysis of [14C]glycerol kinetics indicated reduced blood-to-SC transport of glycerol in AQP3 null mice, resulting in slowed lipid biosynthesis. These data provide functional evidence for a physiological role of glycerol transport by an aquaglyceroporin, and indicate that glycerol is a major determinant of SC water retention, and mechanical and biosynthetic functions. Our findings establish a scientific basis for the >200-yr-old empirical practice of including glycerol in cosmetic and medicinal skin formulations. PMID:12771381

  12. Production of arabitol from glycerol: strain screening and study of factors affecting production yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycerol is a major byproduct from biodiesel production, and developing new uses for glycerol is imperative to overall economics and sustainability of the biodiesel industry. With the aim of producing xylitol and/or arabitol as the value-added products from glycerol, 214 yeast strains, many osmotole...

  13. Dynamical modeling of liver Aquaporin-9 expression and glycerol permeability in hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gena, Patrizia; Buono, Nicoletta Del; D'Abbicco, Marcello; Mastrodonato, Maria; Berardi, Marco; Svelto, Maria; Lopez, Luciano; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Liver is crucial in the homeostasis of glycerol, an important metabolic intermediate. Plasma glycerol is imported by hepatocytes mainly through Aquaporin-9 (AQP9), an aquaglyceroporin channel negatively regulated by insulin in rodents. AQP9 is of critical importance in glycerol metabolism since hepatic glycerol utilization is rate-limited at the hepatocyte membrane permeation step. Glycerol kinase catalyzes the initial step for the conversion of the imported glycerol into glycerol-3-phosphate, a major substrate for de novo synthesis of glucose (gluconeogenesis) and/or triacyglycerols (lipogenesis). A model addressing the glucose-insulin system to describe the hepatic glycerol import and metabolism and the correlation with the glucose homeostasis is lacking so far. Here we consider a system of first-order ordinary differential equations delineating the relevance of hepatocyte AQP9 in liver glycerol permeability. Assuming the hepatic glycerol permeability as depending on the protein levels of AQP9, a mathematical function is designed describing the time course of the involvement of AQP9 in mouse hepatic glycerol metabolism in different nutritional states. The resulting theoretical relationship is derived fitting experimental data obtained with murine models at the fed, fasted or re-fed condition. While providing useful insights into the dynamics of liver AQP9 involvement in male rodent glycerol homeostasis our model may be adapted to the human liver serving as an important module of a whole body-model of the glucose metabolism both in health and metabolic diseases.

  14. The Effect of Glycerol Ingestion on Performance during Simulated Multisport Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Christopher; Braakhuis, Andrea; Paton, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Glycerol-induced hyperhydration has been applied to endurance sport with limited success as a performance enhancement strategy. Glycerol has been used as a hyperhydrating agent, because it has been shown to be rapidly absorbed and osmotically active; therefore, the fluid intake with glycerol is distributed throughout the body. Hyperhydration with…

  15. Synthesis, characterization and nanocomposite formation of poly(glycerol succinate-co-maleate) with cellulose nanowhiskers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel biodegradable polymer based on glycerol, succinic anhydride and maleic anhydride, poly(glycerol succinate-co-maleate), poly(GlySAMA), was synthesized by melt polycondensation and tested as a matrix for composites with cellulose nanowhiskers. This glycerol-based polymer is thermally stable as...

  16. Crude glycerol combustion: particulate, acrolein, and other volatile organic emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crude glycerol is an abundant by-product of biodiesel production. As volumes of this potential waste grow, there is increasing interest in developing new value added uses. One possible use, as a boiler fuel for process heating, offers added advantages of energy integration and ...

  17. Apparent digestible energy value of crude glycerol fed to pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apparent digestible energy of crude glycerol, a co-product of biodiesel production, was determined in two studies conducted at the Iowa State University Swine Nutrition Research Farm, Ames, IA. In the first study, 24 barrows with an average body weight of 11.0 kg were fed 376 g/d of a basal corn...

  18. Performance and carcass characteristics of growing pigs fed crude glycerol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Performance and carcass characteristics of growing pigs fed crude glycerol, a co-product of biodiesel production, were determined in a 138-d feeding trial conducted at the Iowa State University Swine Nutrition Research Farm, Ames, IA. Pigs were weaned at 21d of age and were fed a commercial starter-...

  19. Crude glycerol combustion: particulate, acrolein, and other volatile organic emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crude glycerol is an abundant by-product of biodiesel production. As volumes of this potential waste grow, there is increasing interest in developing new value added uses. One possible use, as a boiler fuel for process heating, offers added advantages of energy integration and ...

  20. Novel Inhibitors of Mitochondrial sn-Glycerol 3-phosphate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Adam L.; Ashok, Deepthi; Sarantos, Melissa R.; Ng, Ryan; Shi, Tong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Hughes, Robert E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) is a ubiquinone-linked enzyme in the mitochondrial inner membrane best characterized as part of the glycerol phosphate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents from cytosolic NADH into the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Despite the widespread expression of mGPDH and the availability of mGPDH-null mice, the physiological role of this enzyme remains poorly defined in many tissues, likely because of compensatory pathways for cytosolic regeneration of NAD+ and mechanisms for glycerol phosphate metabolism. Here we describe a novel class of cell-permeant small-molecule inhibitors of mGPDH (iGP) discovered through small-molecule screening. Structure-activity analysis identified a core benzimidazole-phenyl-succinamide structure as being essential to inhibition of mGPDH while modifications to the benzimidazole ring system modulated both potency and off-target effects. Live-cell imaging provided evidence that iGPs penetrate cellular membranes. Two compounds (iGP-1 and iGP-5) were characterized further to determine potency and selectivity and found to be mixed inhibitors with IC50 and Ki values between ∼1–15 µM. These novel mGPDH inhibitors are unique tools to investigate the role of glycerol 3-phosphate metabolism in both isolated and intact systems. PMID:24587137

  1. Anaerobic digestion of glycerol derived from biodiesel manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Siles López, José Angel; Martín Santos, María de Los Angeles; Chica Pérez, Arturo Francisco; Martín Martín, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    The anaerobic digestion of glycerol derived from biodiesel manufacturing, in which COD was found to be 1010 g/kg, was studied in batch laboratory-scale reactors at mesophilic temperature using granular and non-granular sludge. Due to the high KOH concentration of this by-product, H(3)PO(4) was added to recover this alkaline catalyst as agricultural fertilizer (potassium phosphates). Although it would not be economically viable, a volume of glycerol was distilled and utilised as reference substrate. The anaerobic revalorisation of glycerol using granular sludge achieved a biodegradability of around 100%, while the methane yield coefficient was 0.306 m(3) CH(4)/kg acidified glycerol. Anaerobic digestion could be a good option for revalorising this available, impure and low priced by-product derived from the surplus of biodiesel companies. The organic loading rate studied was 0.21-0.38 g COD/g VSS d, although an inhibition phenomenon was observed at the highest load.

  2. Optimization process of tribenzoine production as a glycerol derived product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayat, Abdurrakhman, Rifianto, Y.; Abdullah, Hadiyanto, Samsudin, Asep M.; Annisa, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Tribenzoin is a derived product from glycerol that can produce from glycerol conversion via esterification process. The product can be used in the food industry, cosmetics industry, polymer industry and also can be used to improve the properties of adhesive materials and water resistance in the ink printer.In the other hand, it advantages is environmentally friendly andrenewable because it is not derived from petroleum. This paper discusses the effect of temperature and catalyst concentration for tribenzoin production. For the responses, yield and product composition were observed. Results showed that the highest yield achieved at optimal variable data processed using Central Composite Design (CCD) which is 63.64 temperature (°C), mole ratio of benzoic acidto glycerol is 3.644:1, and catalyst concentration 6.25% (wt% glycerol). Yield products produced 58.71%. FTIR analysis results showed that the samples contained the results of IR spectra wavelength 1761 cm-1 in the fingerprint region and 3165 cm-1 frequency region group. The existence of these two adjustments that fixed in the area is strong evidence that the compound is tribenzoin.

  3. Toxicity of palmitoyl glycerol to mice: depression of thyroid function

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbo, P.R.; Meuten, D.J.; King, M.W.; Tove, S.B.

    1987-10-01

    Mice given propylthiouracil, a thyroid inhibitor, and fed a diet containing a nontoxic level of rac-1(3)-palmitoyl glycerol showed the hypothermia and mortality expected for a toxic dose, but did not show these signs when linoleate or oleate was added to the diet. Loss of radioiodine from the whole animal and thyroid gland was slower when mice were fed the toxic palmitoyl glycerol diet than when fed the same diet containing 4% safflower oil. However, mice fed the two diets did not differ in the extent of the incorporation of radioiodine, and essentially all was bound to protein in each case. Follicular thyroid cells from mice fed the potentially toxic diet that contained unsaturated fat were normal in appearance. Conversely, cells from mice fed the toxic diet were smaller and more densely stained, showing evidence of glycoprotein inside the cell. These findings show that the thyroid gland is affected by the palmitoyl glycerol diet. However, the thyroid is not the only organ affected, because giving either thyroxine or triiodothyronine had no effect on the toxicity of palmitoyl glycerol.

  4. Adaptation to physical training in rats orally supplemented with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Eric Francelino; Lobato, Raquel Vieira; de Araújo, Ticiana Vasques; Orlando, Débora Ribeiro; Vicente da Costa, Diego; de Oliveira Silva, Víviam; Rogatto, Gustavo Puggina; Zangeronimo, Márcio Gilberto; Rosa, Priscila Vieira; Pereira, Luciano José

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated training adaptation and physical performance parameters in rats orally supplemented with glycerol, glucose, or saline, and submitted to moderate aerobic exercise. Thirty male rats were trained for 6 weeks and administered the supplements during the last 4 weeks of the experiment. Animals were distributed in a completely randomized factorial 2 × 3 design (with or without exercise and 3 substrates). Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and means were compared using the Student-Newmann-Keuls test at 5%. Among the trained animals, none of the substances caused differences in the percentages of protein, fat, or water content in the carcass. Compared with the sedentary animals, the trained animals supplemented with saline and glucose showed a higher protein percentage in the carcass. The relative mass of the heart and adrenal glands was higher in the trained animals. Glycerol improved the protein content in non-trained animals and increased the relative adrenal mass in both groups. Glycerol reduced the variation in levels of lactate and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) during the last exercise session. There was no difference between groups regarding the relative mass of the thymus and gastrocnemius or with the diameter of muscle fibers or the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio. Supplementation with glycerol was efficient at attenuating variation in AST and lactate levels during exercise.

  5. Genetically engineered rhamnolipid-producing organism for glycerol utilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhamnolipid (RL) is a microbial glycolipid currently developed for industrial use as a biobased surfactant. It also possesses antimicrobial activity that is attractive for applications in sanitizing washes. Glycerol byproduct stream from biodiesel production is a promising low-cost substrate for m...

  6. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycerol ester of rosin. 172.735 Section 172.735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  7. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Multifunctional Glycerol Polyhydroxyurethanes PHUs.

    PubMed

    Nohra, Bassam; Candy, Laure; Blanco, Jean-François; Raoul, Yann; Mouloungui, Zéphirin

    2016-09-11

    Glycerol carbonate acrylate is a 5-membered cyclic carbonate synthesized from glycerol that is used as a chemical coupling agent and has proven highly suitable for use in the synthesis of multifunctional polyhydroxyurethanes (PHUs). The multifunctionality of the structure of PHUs is determined by the density of the carbon-amine groups generated by the Aza-Michael reaction and that of the urethane groups and adjacent primary and secondary hydroxyl groups generated by aminolysis. Glycerol carbonate acrylate is polymerized with polyfunctional mono-, di-, tri, and tetra-amines, by type-AB polyaddition, either in bulk or in solution, through stepwise or one-pot reaction strategies in the absence of added catalysts. These approaches result in the generation of linear, interchain, and crosslinked structures, through the polyaddition of linear and branched amines to the ethylene and cyclic carbonate sites of glycerol carbonate acrylate. The resulting collection of organic molecules gives rise to polyethylene amino ester PHUs with a high molar mass, exceeding 20,000 g·mol(-1), with uniform dispersity.

  8. Biocomposites Prepared from Fiber Processing Wastes and Glycerol Polyesters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biocomposites were prepared by the addition of flax fiber processing waste to glycerol and adipic acid mixtures. The processing waste consisted of fiber, cuticle, and shive fragments generated during the commercial cleaning of retted flax bast fibers. These waste materials were added at 1, 3, or 5 w...

  9. Dark fermentative bioconversion of glycerol to hydrogen by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Sharma, Rishi; Ray, Subhasree; Mehariya, Sanjeet; Patel, Sanjay K S; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kalia, Vipin C

    2015-04-01

    Biodiesel manufacturing units discharge effluents rich in glycerol. The need is to convert crude glycerol (CG) into useful products such as hydrogen (H2). Under batch culture, Bacillusthuringiensis EGU45 adapted on pure glycerol (PG, 2% v/v) resulted in an H2 yield of 0.646 mol/mol glycerol consumed on minimal media (250 mL) supplemented with 1% ammonium nitrate at 37°C over 4 days. Here, H2 constituted 67% of the total biogas. Under continuous culture, at 2 days of hydraulic retention time, B. thuringiensis immobilized on ligno-cellulosic materials (banana leaves - BL, 10% v/v) resulted in a H2 yield of 0.386 mol/mol PG consumed. On CG, the maximal H2 yield of 0.393 mol/mol feed consumed was recorded. In brief, B. thuringiensis could transform CG, on limited resources - minimal medium with sodium nitrate, by immobilizing them on cheap and easily available biowaste, which makes it a suitable candidate for H2 production on a large scale.

  10. Dielectric study of the antiplasticization of trehalose by glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anopchenko, A.; Psurek, T.; Vanderhart, D.; Douglas, J. F.; Obrzut, J.

    2006-09-01

    Recent measurements have suggested that the antiplasticizing effect of glycerol on trehalose can significantly increase the preservation times of proteins stored in this type of preservative formulation. In order to better understand the physical origin of this phenomenon, we examine the nature of antiplasticization in trehalose-glycerol mixtures by dielectric spectroscopy. These measurements cover a broad frequency range between 40Hzto18GHz (covering the secondary relaxation range of the fragile glass-former trehalose and the primary relaxation range of the strong glass-former glycerol) and a temperature (T) range bracketing room temperature (220Kto350K) . The Havriliak-Negami function precisely fits our relaxation data and allows us to determine the temperature and composition dependence of the relaxation time τ describing a relative fast dielectric relaxation process appropriate to the characterization of antiplasticization. We observe that increasing the glycerol concentration at fixed T increases τ (i.e., the extent of antiplasticization) until a temperature dependent critical “plasticization concentration” xwp is reached. At a fixed concentration, we find a temperature at which antiplasticization first occurs upon cooling and we designate this as the “antiplasticization temperature,” Tant . The ratio of the τ values for the mixture and pure trehalose is found to provide a useful measure of the extent of antiplasticization, and we explore other potential measures of antiplasticization relating to the dielectric strength.

  11. Ecotoxicity and QSAR studies of glycerol ethers in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Perales, Eduardo; García, Jose Ignacio; Pires, Elisabet; Aldea, Luis; Lomba, Laura; Giner, Beatriz

    2017-09-01

    Glycerol is currently considered a raw, renewable material, which can be used to synthesize new glycerol derivatives that may be used as green solvents. However, these compounds must be environmentally evaluated before their use. The acute ecotoxicity of a series of mono-, di-, and trialkyl ethers synthesized from glycerol for the crustacean Daphnia magna has been studied. The EC50 values of these ethers after 24 h of exposure were determined according to the OECD 202 protocol. Their possible structural-toxicity relationships according to different alkyl substituents have been discussed after applying different QSAR models (with the DARC-PELCO approach and topological parameters). The results of the immobilization test show that most of the glycerol derivatives studied exhibit relatively low ecotoxicity. There is a correlation between the lipophilicity and the increase of the toxic effect in the crustacean biomodel. Furthermore, the length and the number of the alkyl substituents and ecotoxicity are highly related. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and characterisation of the glycerol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Spencer, P; Bown, K J; Scawen, M D; Atkinson, T; Gore, M G

    1989-02-23

    A protocol for the rapid purification of the glycerol dehydrogenase (glycerol: NAD+ 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.6) from the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus has been developed using a combination of chromatographic techniques including affinity chromatography on a Sepharose-immobilised triazine dye (Procion red, HE3B, ICI). Substrate specificity has been examined and Km values determined. The protein has been shown to have an oligomeric Mr of approx. 180,000 and consists of four identical subunits of Mr 42,000. Exposure to chelating agents (e.g., EDTA) leads to total loss of activity; the EDTA-inactivated enzyme can be reactivated by Zn2+ and requires 1 mol equivalent of zinc per subunit for full catalytic activity. Other divalent cations such as Cd2+ and Co2+ will reactivate the apo-enzyme but yields an enzyme of lower specific activity. The enzyme binds 1 equivalent of NADH per subunit and during catalysis transfers the 4-pro-R hydride from the nicotinamide ring of the reduced-coenzyme to the substrate. Glycerol increases the dissociation constant for the interaction between NADH and Zn-metallo-glycerol dehydrogenase (ZnGDH) but has no effect on the equilibrium between NADH and metal-depleted enzyme.

  13. Comprehensive investigations of biobutanol production by a non-acetone and 1,3-propanediol generating Clostridium strain from glycerol and polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxue; Wang, Chao; Dong, Weiliang; Zhang, Wenming; Wu, Hao; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost feedstocks, a single product (butanol), and a high butanol titer are three key points for establishing a sustainable and economically viable process for biological butanol production. Here, we comprehensively investigated the butanol production from mono-substrates, mainly glycerol and polysaccharides, mainly starch and xylan by a newly identified wild-type Clostridium pasteurianum GL11. Strain GL11 produced 14.7 g/L of butanol with a yield of 0.41 g/g from glycerol in the batch mode without formation of by-products of acetone and 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO). With in situ extraction with biodiesel, the amount of butanol was finally improved to 28.8 g/L in the fed-batch mode. Genomic and enzymatic analysis showed that the deficiency of key enzymes involved in acetone and 1,3-PDO pathway within strain GL11 led to the elimination of these by-products, which may also greatly simplify downstream separation. The elimination of acetone and 1,3-PDO and high butanol tolerance contributed to its high butanol production yield from glycerol. More importantly, strain GL11 could directly convert polysaccharides, such as xylan and starch to butanol with secretion of xylanase and amylase via consolidated bioprocessing. The wild-type strain GL11 was found to be particularly advantageous due to its capability of efficient butanol production from glycerol and polysaccharides with elimination of acetone and 1,3-PDO formation. And the high butanol production with in situ extraction by using biodiesel would significantly enhance the economic feasibility of fermentative production of butanol from glycerol. These unique features of C. pasteurianum GL11 open the door to the possibility of cost-effective biofuels production in large scale.

  14. Tryptophan interactions with glycerol/water and trehalose/sucrose cryosolvents: infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Dashnau, Jennifer L; Zelent, Bogumil; Vanderkooi, Jane M

    2005-04-01

    In order to correlate how the solvent affects emission properties of tryptophan, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra of tryptophan and indole model compounds were compared for solid sugar glass (trehalose/sucrose) matrix and glycerol/water solution and under the same conditions, these matrices were examined by infrared spectroscopy. Temperature was varied from 290 to 12 K. In sugar glass, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra are constant over this temperature range and the fluorescence remains red shifted; these results are consistent with the static interaction of OH groups with tryptophan in the sugar glass. In sugar glass containing water, the water retains mobility over the entire temperature range as indicated by the HOH infrared bending frequency. The fluorescence of tryptophan in glycerol/water shifts to the blue as temperature decreases and the frequency change of the absorption of the HOH bend mode is larger than in the sugar glass. These results suggest rearrangement of glycerol and water molecules over the entire temperature change. Shifts in the fluorescence emission maximum of indole and tryptophan were relatively larger than shifts for the phosphorescence emission-as expected for the relatively smaller excited triplet state dipole for tryptophan. The fluorescence emission of tryptophan in glycerol/water at low temperature has maxima at 312, 313, and 316 nm at pH 1.4, 7.0, and 10.6, respectively. The spectral shifts are interpreted to be an indication of a charge, or Stark phenomena, effect on the excited state molecule, as supported by ab initio calculations. To check whether the amino acid remains charged over the temperature range, the infrared spectrum of alanine was monitored over the entire range of temperature. The ratio of infrared absorption characteristic of carboxylate/carbonyl was constant in glycerol/water and sugar glass, which indicates that the charge was retained. Tryptophan buried in proteins, namely

  15. Aquaporin 6 is permeable to glycerol and urea.

    PubMed

    Holm, Lars M; Klaerke, Dan A; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    The passive water permeability ( L(p)) of AQP6 is activated by Hg(2+). Our aim was to test if L(p) was associated with a permeability to small hydrophilic molecules such as glycerol and urea. AQP6 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and activated by 0.3 mM of HgCl(2) in the bathing solution. HgCl(2) caused the oocytes to swell at a rate of about 0.3% min(-1). The L(p) of AQP6 was determined from brief additions or removals of mannitol from the bathing solution, and compared to the L(p) obtained from adding glycerol or urea. In paired experiments, L(p (mannitol)) was 2.4+/-0.1, L(p (glycerol)) 1.5+/-0.2, and L(p (urea)) 0.7+/-0.1 (units: 10(-5) cm s(-1) osmol(-1); 14 oocytes); the latter was not different from L(p)s obtained for native oocytes. The L(p)s were independent of the Hg(2+)-induced swelling and of the magnitude of the osmotic challenge (-75 to +100 mosmol). Hg(2+) stimulated the uptake of [(14)C]glycerol fivefold and [(14)C]urea twofold in AQP6-expressing oocytes. There were no significant uptakes in native oocytes nor in AQP1-expressing oocytes whether these were treated with HgCl(2) or not. We conclude that water, glycerol and urea share an aqueous pathway in AQP6.

  16. The Glycerol-Dependent Metabolic Persistence of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Reflects the Regulatory Logic of the GlpR Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Nikel, Pablo I.; Romero-Campero, Francisco J.; Zeidman, Joshua A.; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The growth of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 on glycerol as the sole carbon source is characterized by a prolonged lag phase, not observed with other carbon substrates. We examined the bacterial growth in glycerol cultures while monitoring the metabolic activity of individual cells. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, as well as the analysis of the temporal start of growth in single-cell cultures, revealed that adoption of a glycerol-metabolizing regime was not the result of a gradual change in the whole population but rather reflected a time-dependent bimodal switch between metabolically inactive (i.e., nongrowing) and fully active (i.e., growing) bacteria. A transcriptional Φ(glpD-gfp) fusion (a proxy of the glycerol-3-phosphate [G3P] dehydrogenase activity) linked the macroscopic phenotype to the expression of the glp genes. Either deleting glpR (encoding the G3P-responsive transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of the glpFKRD gene cluster) or altering G3P formation (by overexpressing glpK, encoding glycerol kinase) abolished the bimodal glpD expression. These manipulations eliminated the stochastic growth start by shortening the otherwise long lag phase. Provision of glpR in trans restored the phenotypes lost in the ΔglpR mutant. The prolonged nongrowth regime of P. putida on glycerol could thus be traced to the regulatory device controlling the transcription of the glp genes. Since the physiological agonist of GlpR is G3P, the arrangement of metabolic and regulatory components at this checkpoint merges a positive feedback loop with a nonlinear transcriptional response, a layout fostering the observed time-dependent shift between two alternative physiological states. PMID:25827416

  17. Rainbow smelt: the unusual case of cryoprotection by sustained glycerol production in an aquatic animal.

    PubMed

    Driedzic, William R

    2015-07-01

    Rainbow smelt flourish at -1.8 °C, the freezing point of sea water. An antifreeze protein contributes to freeze point depression but, more importantly, cryoprotection is due to an elevation in osmotic pressure, by the accumulation of glycerol. The lower the water temperature, the higher the plasma glycerol with levels recorded as high as 400 mmol l(-1). Glycerol freely diffuses out in direct relation to the glycerol concentration and fish may lose as much as 15% of their glycerol reserve per day. Glycerol levels decrease from a maximum in February/March while water temperature is still sub-zero. The decrease in glycerol may respond to a photoperiod signal as opposed to initiation which is triggered by low temperature. The initial increase in glycerol level is supported by liver glycogen but high sustained glycerol level is dependent upon dietary carbohydrate and protein. The metabolic pathways leading to glycerol involve flux from glycogen/glucose to the level of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) via the initial part of glycolysis and from amino acids via a truncated gluconeogenesis again to the level of DHAP. DHAP in turn is converted to glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) and then directly to glycerol. The key to directing DHAP to G3P is a highly active glycerol 3-P dehydrogenase. G3P is converted directly to glycerol via G3P phosphatase, the rate-limiting step in the process. The transition to glycerol production is associated with increased activities of enzymes at key loci in the top part of glycogenolysis/glycolysis. Curtailment of the final section of glycolysis may reside at the level of pyruvate oxidation with an inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) driven by increased levels of PDH kinase. Enzymes associated with amino acid trafficking are elevated as is the pivotal enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

  18. Crystallization and transformation of polymorphic forms of trioleoyl glycerol and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-rac-linoleoyl glycerol.

    PubMed

    Bayés-García, Laura; Calvet, Teresa; Cuevas-Diarte, Miquel Àngel; Ueno, Satoru; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2013-08-08

    This study examined the influence of different thermal treatments on the crystallization and transformation of trioleoyl glycerol (OOO) and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-rac-linoleoyl glycerol (OOL). Two triacylglycerol (TAG) samples were cooled at 0.5-15 °C·min(-1) and heated at 2 and 15 °C·min(-1). The polymorphic characteristics of the two TAGs were analyzed in situ using differential scanning calorimetry, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. Multiple polymorphic forms were identified in OOO (α, β'2, β'1, β2, and β1) and OOL (α, β'2, and β'1). Larger quantities of more stable forms (e.g., β2 and β1 of OOO and β'1 of OOL) were obtained when the samples were slowly cooled and heated. In contrast, less stable polymorphs were obtained with increased cooling and heating rates. Polymorphic transformations occurred in either solid-state or melt-mediation and were influenced by heating rates. The results were analyzed by considering the activation energies for crystallization and transformation of stable and less stable polymorphic forms in comparison with previous studies on 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol and 1, 3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoyl-glycerol.

  19. Disruption of Glycerol Metabolism by RNAi Targeting of Genes Encoding Glycerol Kinase Results in a Range of Phenotype Severity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Patrick J.; Jackson, George R.; Dipple, Katrina M.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, RNAi targeting of either dGyk or dGK can result in two alternative phenotypes: adult glycerol hypersensitivity or larval lethality. Here we compare these two phenotypes at the level of glycerol kinase (GK) phosphorylation activity, dGyk and dGK-RNA expression, and glycerol levels. We found both phenotypes exhibit reduced but similar levels of GK phosphorylation activity. Reduced RNA expression levels of dGyk and dGK corresponded with RNAi progeny that developed into glycerol hypersensitive adult flies. However, quantification of dGyk/dGK expression levels for the larval lethality phenotype revealed unexpected levels possibly due to a compensatory mechanism between dGyk and dGK or RNAi inhibition. The enzymatic role of glycerol kinase converts glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate. As expected, elevated glycerol levels were observed in larvae that went on to develop into glycerol hypersensitive adults. Interestingly, larvae that died before eclosion revealed extremely low glycerol levels. Further characterization identified a wing phenotype that is enhanced by a dGpdh null mutation, indicating disrupted glycerol metabolism underlies the wing phenotype. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) exhibits a wide range of phenotypic variation with no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations. Additionally, disease severity often does not correlate with GK phosphorylation activity. It is intriguing that both human GKD patients and our GKD Drosophila model show a range of phenotype severity. Additionally, the lack of correlation between GK phosphorylation and dGyk/dGK-RNA expression with phenotypic severity suggests further study including understanding the alternative functions of the GK protein, could provide insights into the complex pathogenic mechanism observed in human GKD patients. PMID:24039719

  20. Content of plasmatic glycerol and activity of hepatic glycerol kinase in broiler chickens fed diets containing different sources and concentrations of glycerine.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, V M P; Rodrigues, P B; de Paula Naves, L; Rosa, P V; Zangerônimo, M G; Gomide, E M; Saldanha, M M; Alvarenga, R R

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three sources of glycerine (crude glycerine from soya bean oil - CGSO, mixed crude glycerine from frying oil and lard--MCG, and a semipurified glycerine from soya bean oil--SPGSO) in four concentrations in the diet (17.5, 35.0, 52.5 and 70.0 g of each type of glycerine per kg of feed) on the levels of plasmatic glycerol and the activity of the hepatic enzyme glycerol kinase in broilers of 22-35 days old (experiment I) and 33-42 days old (experiment II). The highest (p < 0.05) plasmatic glycerol level was detected in broilers fed diet containing CGSO. Independent of the source, increasing the concentration of glycerine led to a linear increase (p < 0.05) in the plasmatic glycerol concentration. In experiment I, all the diets containing glycerine resulted in increased concentrations of plasmatic glycerol, in relation to the control diet without glycerine. However, in experiment II, only the diet containing 17.5 g of CGSO per kg of feed and the diets formulated with any of the three types of glycerine in the inclusion concentrations of 35, 52.5 and 70 g/kg of feed resulted in higher plasmatic glycerol levels than those observed in the control broilers. The source of glycerine influenced the glycerol kinase activity only in experiment II, where the use of CGSO in the diet increased the enzyme activity. For both experiments, the glycerol kinase activity increased with the inclusion of glycerine in the diet. In conclusion, based on the absence of saturation of the glycerol kinase activity for the three glycerine sources and for both rearing periods evaluated, the broilers can metabolize the glycerol (at the level of the phosphorylation of the glycerol to glycerol-3-phosphate in the liver) present in the glycerine when the diet is supplemented with up to 70 g of glycerine per kg of feed.

  1. Heterologous expression of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (ZrGPD1) and glycerol dehydrogenase gene (ZrGCY1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuo; Tsuchimoto, Syoko; Tamai, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of heterologous expression of the open reading frames (ORF) of two genes on salt tolerance and glycerol production in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deficient in glycerol synthesis (gpd1Deltagpd2Delta). When the ORF of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (ZrGPD1) was expressed under the control of the GAL10 promoter, salt tolerance and glycerol production increased; when the ORF of the glycerol dehydrogenase gene (ZrGCY1) was expressed under the control of the GAL1 promoter, no such changes were observed. Zrgcy1p had a weak effect on glycerol production. These results suggest that Zrgpd1p is the primary enzyme involved in Z. rouxii glycerol production, following a mechanism similar to that of S. cerevisiae (Gpd1p). When the ORFs of the S. cerevisiae glycerol 3-phosphatase gene (GPP2) and ZrGPD1 were simultaneously expressed, glycerol production increased, compared with that in yeast expressing only ZrGPD1.

  2. Glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase/PGP: Role in intermediate metabolism and target for cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Possik, Elite; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2017-08-04

    Metabolic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome arise because of disturbances in glucose and fat metabolism, which impact associated physiological events such as insulin secretion and action, fat storage and oxidation. Even though, decades of research has contributed to our current understanding of the components involved in glucose and fat metabolism and their regulation, that led to the development of many therapeutics, there are still many unanswered questions. Glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), which is formed during glycolysis, is at the intersection of glucose and fat metabolism, and the availability of this metabolite can regulate energy and intermediary metabolism in mammalian cells. During the course of evolution, mammalian cells are assumed to have lost the capacity to directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol, until the recent discovery from our laboratory showing that a previously known mammalian enzyme, phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP), can function as Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP) and regulate this metabolite levels. Emerging evidence indicates that G3PP/PGP is an evolutionarily conserved "multi-tasking" enzyme that belongs to the superfamily of haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase enzymes, and is capable of hydrolyzing Gro3P, an abundant physiologically relevant substrate, as well as other metabolites including 2-phosphoglycolate, 4-phospherythronate and 2-phospholactate, which are present in much smaller amounts in cells, under normal conditions. G3PP, by regulating Gro3P levels, plays a critical role in intermediary metabolism, including glycolysis, glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, esterification of fatty acids towards glycerolipid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation. Because of G3PP's ability to regulate energy and intermediary metabolism as well as physiological functions such as insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production, and fat synthesis, storage and oxidation, the pathophysiological

  3. Simultaneous determination of free and total glycerol in biodiesel by capillary electrophoresis using multiple short-end injection.

    PubMed

    Spudeit, Daniel Alfonso; Piovezan, Marcel; Dolzan, Maressa D; Vistuba, Jacqueline Pereira; Azevedo, Mônia Stremel; Vitali, Luciano; Leal Oliveira, Marcone Augusto; Oliveira Costa, Ana Carolina; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu

    2013-12-01

    A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of free glycerol (FG) and total glycerol (TG) in biodiesel by CE using a short-end multiple injection (SE/MI) configuration system is described. The sample preparation for FG involves the extraction of glycerol with water and for TG a saponification reaction is carried out followed by extraction as in the case of FG. The glycerol extracted in both cases is submitted to periodate oxidation and the iodate ions formed are measured on a CE-SE/MI system. The relevance of this study lies in the fact that no analytical procedure has been previously reported for the determination of TG (or of FG and TG simultaneously) by CE. The optimum conditions for the saponification/extraction process were 1.25% KOH and 25°C, with a time of only 5 min, and biodiesel mass in the range of 50.0-200.0 mg can be used. Multiple injections were performed hydrodynamically with negative pressure as follows: 50 mbar/3s (FG sample); 50 mbar/6s (electrolyte spacer); 50 mbar/3s (TG sample). The linear range obtained was 1.55-46.5 mg/L with R(2) > 0.99. The LOD and LOQ were 0.16 mg/L and 0.47 mg/L, respectively for TG. The method provides acceptable throughput for application in quality control and monitoring biodiesel synthesis process. In addition, it offers simple sample preparation (saponification process), it can be applied to a variety biodiesel samples (soybean, castor, and waste cooking oils) and it can be used for the determination of two key parameters related to the biodiesel quality with a fast separation (less than 30 s) using an optimized CE-SE/MI system.

  4. Sodium-induced hyperhydration decreases urine output and improves fluid balance compared with glycerol- and water-induced hyperhydration.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Félix A; Dion, Tommy; Asselin, Audrey; Goulet, Eric D B

    2015-01-01

    Before 2010, which is the year the World Anti-Doping Agency banned its use, glycerol was commonly used by athletes for hyperhydration purposes. Through its effect on osmoreceptors, we believe that sodium could prove a viable alternative to glycerol as a hyperhydrating agent. Therefore, this study compared the effects of sodium-induced hyperhydration (SIH), glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) and water-induced hyperhydration (WIH) on fluid balance responses. Using a randomized, double-blind and counterbalanced protocol, 17 men (21 ± 3 years, 64 ± 6 kg fat-free mass (FFM)) underwent three 3-h hyperhydration protocols during which they ingested, over the first 60-min period, 30 mL/kg FFM of water with (i) an artificial sweetener (WIH); (ii) an artificial sweetener + 7.45 g/L of table salt (SIH); or (iii) an artificial sweetener + 1.4 g glycerol/kg FFM (GIH). Changes in body weight (BW), urine production, fluid retention, hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma volume, and perceptual variables were monitored throughout the 3-h trials. After 3 h, SIH was associated with significantly (p < 0.05) lower hemoglobin, hematocrit (SIH: 43.1% ± 2.8%; GIH: 44.9% ± 2.4%), and urine production, as well as greater BW, fluid retention (SIH: 1144 ± 294 mL; GIH: 795 ± 337 mL), and plasma volume (SIH: 11.9% ± 12.0%; GIH: 4.0% ± 6.0%) gains, compared with GIH and WIH. No significant differences in heart rate or abdominal discomfort were observed between treatments. In conclusion, our results indicate that SIH is a superior hyperhydrating technique than, and proves to be a worthwhile alternative to, GIH.

  5. Control of renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Iwao, H; Okahara, T; Yamamoto, K

    1977-03-01

    The present study was designed to examine the interrelationship between the intrarenal vascular receptor and the sympathetic nerve, beta-adrenergic system, for renin secretion in the anesthetized dog. 1) A reduction in renal arterial pressure from a control pressure to 100 mmHg changed neither ther flow rates of all cortex zones nor renin secretion. Further reduction of renal arterial pressure to 75 mmHg resulted in a significant increase of renin secretion and a decrease of blood flow in the outer cortex. Intrarenal arterial infusion of norepinephrine at a control pressure increased a renin secretion. However, norepinephrine infusion at a reduced pressure suppressed the renin release with a recovery of the vascular resistance to the control level. These results suggest that the changes in the degree of blood flow and pressure in the renal afferent arterioles are not essential for the renin secretion,but renin secretion by the pressure reduction might be related to the autoregulatory capacity of afferent arterioles in the outer cortex. 2) At 5 min of hemorrhagic period (75 mmHg) arterial PRA elevated in control, and phenoxybenzamine and propranolol treated groups and any significant difference in responses was not observed among groups. However, at 60 min of hemorrhagic hypotensive period PRA in control and phenoxybenzamine treated groups further increased, but PRA in propranolol treated group was not alter from its 15 min value. These results indicated that the roles of vascular receptor and renal sympathetic nervous sytem in receptor and renal sympathetic nervous system in renin secretion might be separated, and that the renal sympathetic nervous system did not relate to the early response of renin release, but related to the late response. 3) Intrarenal arterial infusion of cAMP and DbcAMP resulted in a significant increase of renin release. In addition, CaC12 solution was infuesed into the renal artery and a significant rise in renal venous PRA was observed

  6. Glycerol extends lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera) and protects against stressors

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Terry W.; Johnston, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    Diet has profound effects on animal longevity and manipulation of nutrient sensing pathways is one of the primary interventions capable of lifespan extension. This often is done through caloric restriction (CR) and a variety of CR mimics have been identified that produce life extending effects without adhering to the rigorous CR dietary regimen. Glycerol is a dietary supplement capable mimicking CR by shifting metabolism away from glycolysis and towards oxidative phosphorylation. Glycerol supplementation has a number of beneficial effects, including lifespan extension, improved stress resistance, and enhanced locomotory and mitochondria activity in older age classes. Using rotifers as a model, we show that supplements of 150–300 mM glycerol produced 40–50% extension of mean lifespan. This effect was produced by raising glycerol concentration only three times higher than its baseline concentration in rotifer tissues. Glycerol supplementation decreased rotifer reliance on glycolysis and reduced the pro-aging effects of glucose. Glycerol also acted as a chemical chaperone, mitigating damage by protein aggregation. Glycerol treatment improved rotifer swimming performance in older age classes and maintained more mitochondrial activity. Glycerol treatment provided increased resistance to starvation, heat, oxidation, and osmotic stress, but not UV stress. When glycerol was co-administered with the hexokinase inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, the lifespan extending effect of glycerol was enhanced. Co-administration of glycerol with inhibitors like 2- deoxyglucose can lower their efficacious doses, thereby reducing their toxic side effects. PMID:24835191

  7. The fate of glycerol entering the rumen of dairy cows and sheep.

    PubMed

    Werner Omazic, A; Kronqvist, C; Zhongyan, L; Martens, H; Holtenius, K

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the fate of glycerol entering the rumen, in particular whether glycerol could be absorbed across the rumen epithelium. Three non-lactating rumen-fistulated cows were used to calculate the overall disappearance rate of glycerol in vivo and evaluate the rate of ruminal glycerol absorption. Rumen epithelial tissues isolated from sheep were used to characterise glycerol transport properties. The rate of rumen microbial degradation of glycerol was then studied in an in vitro system under anaerobic and thermo-regulated conditions. The results showed that glycerol can be absorbed from the rumen in significant amounts. The fractional rate of absorption of glycerol was not affected by variations in glycerol concentration in the buffer solution in the in vivo study. The glycerol absorption apparently occurred largely by passive diffusion and was probably not facilitated by carriers. Glycerol also disappeared via microbial digestion and outflow from the rumen through the omasal orifice. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Expression and functional studies of genes involved in transport and metabolism of glycerol in Pachysolen tannophilus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pachysolen tannophilus is a non-conventional yeast, which can metabolize many of the carbon sources found in low cost feedstocks including glycerol and xylose. The xylose utilisation pathways have been extensively studied in this organism. However, the mechanism behind glycerol metabolism is poorly understood. Using the recently published genome sequence of P. tannophilus CBS4044, we searched for genes with functions in glycerol transport and metabolism by performing a BLAST search using the sequences of the relevant genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as queries. Results Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to unveil the expression patterns of these genes during growth of P. tannophilus on glycerol and glucose as sole carbon sources. The genes predicted to be involved in glycerol transport in P. tannophilus were expressed in S. cerevisiae to validate their function. The S. cerevisiae strains transformed with heterologous genes showed improved growth and glycerol consumption rates with glycerol as the sole carbon source. Conclusions P. tannophilus has characteristics relevant for a microbial cell factory to be applied in a biorefinery setting, i.e. its ability to utilise the carbon sources such as xylose and glycerol. However, the strain is not currently amenable to genetic modification and transformation. Heterologous expression of the glycerol transporters from P. tannophilus, which has a relatively high growth rate on glycerol, could be used as an approach for improving the efficiency of glycerol assimilation in other well characterized and applied cell factories such as S. cerevisiae. PMID:23514356

  9. Enhanced utilization of glycerol for glyceride synthesis in isolated adipocytes from early pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Emilio; del Campo, Sonia; Marciniak, Justyna; Sevillano, Julio; Ramos, Maria Pilar

    2010-09-01

    Adipose tissue normally has low glycerol kinase activity, but its expression is enhanced under conditions of augmented insulin sensitivity and/or obesity. Since these conditions occur during early pregnancy, the comparative utilization of glucose or glycerol by isolated adipocytes from rats at 0, 7, 14, or 20 days of pregnancy was studied. Incubations were carried out in the presence of [U(14)C]-glucose or -glycerol in medium supplemented or not with 5 mM glucose and 100 nM insulin. The conversion of glucose into esterified fatty acids and glyceride glycerol was greatest in adipocytes from 7-day pregnant rats, the effect being further enhanced by insulin. Both the amount of aquoporin 7 and the in vitro conversion of glycerol into glyceride glycerol were greatest in adipocytes of 7-day pregnant rats, the later being unaltered by insulin. In the presence of glucose, the overall glycerol utilization was lower than in its absence and glycerol conversion into glyceride glycerol was further decreased by insulin, the effect only being significant in adipocytes from 7-day pregnant rats. It is proposed that the enhanced utilization of glycerol for glyceride glycerol synthesis in adipose tissue contributes to the net accumulation of fat depots that normally takes place in early pregnancy.

  10. Glycerol extends lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera) and protects against stressors.

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K

    2014-09-01

    Diet has profound effects on animal longevity and manipulation of nutrient sensing pathways is one of the primary interventions capable of lifespan extension. This often is done through caloric restriction (CR) and a variety of CR mimics have been identified that produce life extending effects without adhering to the rigorous CR dietary regimen. Glycerol is a dietary supplement capable mimicking CR by shifting metabolism away from glycolysis and towards oxidative phosphorylation. Glycerol supplementation has a number of beneficial effects, including lifespan extension, improved stress resistance, and enhanced locomotory and mitochondria activity in older age classes. Using rotifers as a model, we show that supplements of 150-300mM glycerol produced 40-50% extension of mean lifespan. This effect was produced by raising glycerol concentration only three times higher than its baseline concentration in rotifer tissues. Glycerol supplementation decreased rotifer reliance on glycolysis and reduced the pro-aging effects of glucose. Glycerol also acted as a chemical chaperone, mitigating damage by protein aggregation. Glycerol treatment improved rotifer swimming performance in older age classes and maintained more mitochondrial activity. Glycerol treatment provided increased resistance to starvation, heat, oxidation, and osmotic stress, but not UV stress. When glycerol was co-administered with the hexokinase inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, the lifespan extending effect of glycerol was enhanced. Co-administration of glycerol with inhibitors like 2-deoxyglucose can lower their efficacious doses, thereby reducing their toxic side effects.

  11. Bi-Functional Biobased Packing of the Cassava Starch, Glycerol, Licuri Nanocellulose and Red Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Samantha Serra; Druzian, Janice Izabel; Machado, Bruna Aparecida Souza; de Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Guimarães, Alaíse Gil

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the bi-functional efficacy of active packaging films produced with starch (4%) and glycerol (1.0%), reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (0–1%) and activated with alcoholic extracts of red propolis (0.4 to 1.0%). The cellulose nanocrystals used in this study were extracted from licuri leaves. The films were characterized using moisture, water-activity analyses and water vapor-permeability tests and were tested regarding their total phenolic compounds and mechanical properties. The antimicrobial and antioxidant efficacy of the films were evaluated by monitoring the use of the active films for packaging cheese curds and butter, respectively. The cellulose nanocrystals increased the mechanical strength of the films and reduced the water permeability and water activity. The active film had an antimicrobial effect on coagulase-positive staphylococci in cheese curds and reduced the oxidation of butter during storage. PMID:25383783

  12. Bi-functional biobased packing of the cassava starch, glycerol, licuri nanocellulose and red propolis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Samantha Serra; Druzian, Janice Izabel; Machado, Bruna Aparecida Souza; de Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Guimarães, Alaíse Gil

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the bi-functional efficacy of active packaging films produced with starch (4%) and glycerol (1.0%), reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (0-1%) and activated with alcoholic extracts of red propolis (0.4 to 1.0%). The cellulose nanocrystals used in this study were extracted from licuri leaves. The films were characterized using moisture, water-activity analyses and water vapor-permeability tests and were tested regarding their total phenolic compounds and mechanical properties. The antimicrobial and antioxidant efficacy of the films were evaluated by monitoring the use of the active films for packaging cheese curds and butter, respectively. The cellulose nanocrystals increased the mechanical strength of the films and reduced the water permeability and water activity. The active film had an antimicrobial effect on coagulase-positive staphylococci in cheese curds and reduced the oxidation of butter during storage.

  13. Effect of crude glycerol impurities on lipid preparation by Rhodosporidium toruloides yeast 32489.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Ma, Yingqun; Wang, Qunhui; Zhang, Min; Wang, Juan; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Crude glycerol (byproduct of biodiesel preparation) was utilised as the carbon source to produce lipid using oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides 32489. Under the same conditions, lipid production with crude glycerol was higher than those produced with glucose and pure glycerol. The effects of 4 main impurities in crude glycerol (methyl oleate, sodium oleate, NaCl and methanol) on lipid production were investigated. Compared with utilising pure glycerol, addition of methyl oleate, sodium oleate, and NaCl impurities increased lipid production by 47.0%, 68.0% and 64.0%, respectively, while methanol decreased lipid production by 17.7%. However, when methanol was mixed with other impurities, its inhibition effect was alleviated due to the promoting effect of other impurities. Hence, crude glycerol could be used as a renewable and low-cost carbon source to replace pure glucose or glycerol for lipid preparation.

  14. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers preserved in stalagmites: a new continental palaeothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, A. J.; Schouten, S.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to recover reliable temperature records is central to palaeoclimatic research, informing our understanding of the past and our models of the future. However, there is a need for new quantitative terrestrial temperature proxies. Here we present a novel palaeothermometer, combining molecular temperature proxies with the strong dating control and established environmental records provided by stalagmites. The results show good correlations between known and calculated temperatures, suggesting that the approach has considerable potential as a climatic proxy. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are microbial membrane lipids, which vary in structure with temperature and pH [1]. In the terrestrial realm, the focus is on bacterially derived GDGTs, which have been used to measure terrestrial organic matter input to aquatic deposits via the BIT index [2], and developed into a temperature related index (MBT/CBT) in soils and near-shore marine sediments (MBT/CBT), based upon the degree of branching and cyclicisation of the carbon skeleton [3]. Stalagmites form an ideal archive for terrestrial climate records, as they are stable, can be easily dated, and contain a number of environmental proxies (stable isotopes, trace elements, organic matter etc). Attempts have been made to develop inorganic temperature proxies in stalagmites, most recently using isotopic analysis of fluid inclusions. However, the use of organic temperature proxies in this context is largely unstudied. Thirty-eight stalagmite or stalactite samples from twenty-one sites around the world were analysed for their GDGT content. Calcite samples were cleaned and decalcified with HCl, and lipids extracted into dichloromethane via liquid-liquid extraction. Each extract was then prepared and analysed via HPLC-MS following Weijers et al. [3]. The results show low but usable levels of GDGTs in all but one sample. Peak size measurements were made for all recognised compounds associated with BIT and

  15. Glycerol carbonate as green solvent for pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanying; Rackemann, Darryn W; Doherty, William O S; O'Hara, Ian M

    2013-10-24

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is a prerequisite for effective saccharification to produce fermentable sugars. In this study, "green" solvent systems based on acidified mixtures of glycerol carbonate (GC) and glycerol were used to treat sugarcane bagasse and the roles of each solvent in deconstructing biomass were determined. Pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse at 90°C for only 30 min with acidified GC produced a solid residue having a glucan digestibility of 90% and a glucose yield of 80%, which were significantly higher than a glucan digestibility of 16% and a glucose yield of 15% obtained for bagasse pretreated with acidified ethylene carbonate (EC). Biomass compositional analyses showed that GC pretreatment removed more lignin than EC pretreatment (84% vs 54%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that fluffy and size-reduced fibres were produced from GC pretreatment whereas EC pretreatment produced compact particles of reduced size. The maximal glucan digestibility and glucose yield of GC/glycerol systems were about 7% lower than those of EC/ethylene glycol (EG) systems. Replacing up to 50 wt% of GC with glycerol did not negatively affect glucan digestibility and glucose yield. The results from pretreatment of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) showed that (1) pretreatment with acidified alkylene glycol (AG) alone increased enzymatic digestibility compared to pretreatments with acidified alkylene carbonate (AC) alone and acidified mixtures of AC and AG, (2) pretreatment with acidified GC alone slightly increased, but with acidified EC alone significantly decreased, enzymatic digestibility compared to untreated MCC, and (3) there was a good positive linear correlation of enzymatic digestibility of treated and untreated MCC samples with congo red (CR) adsorption capacity. Acidified GC alone was a more effective solvent for pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse than acidified EC alone. The higher glucose yield obtained with GC-pretreated bagasse is

  16. sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate transport in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Hengge, R; Larson, T J; Boos, W

    1983-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium contains a transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate that is inducible by growth on glycerol and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate. In fully induced cells, the system exhibited an apparent Km of 50 microM and a Vmax of 2.2 nmol/min . 10(8) cells. The corresponding system in Escherichia coli exhibits, under comparable conditions, a Km of 14 microM and a Vmax of 2.2 nmol/min . 10(8) cells. Transport-defective mutants were isolated by selecting for resistance against the antibiotic fosfomycin. They mapped in glpT at 47 min in the S. typhimurium linkage map, 37% cotransducible with gyrA. In addition to the glpT-dependent system, S. typhimurium LT2 contains, like E. coli, a second, ugp-dependent transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate that was derepressed by phosphate starvation. A S. typhimurium DNA bank containing EcoRI restriction fragments in phage lambda gt7 was used to clone the glpT gene in E. coli. Lysogens that were fully active in the transport of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate with a Km of 33 microM and a Vmax of 2.0 nmol/min . 10(8) cells were isolated in a delta glpT mutant of E. coli. The EcoRI fragment harboring glpT was 3.5 kilobases long and carried only part of glpQ, a gene distal to glpT but on the same operon. The fragment was subcloned in multicopy plasmid pACYC184. Strains carrying this hybrid plasmid produced large amounts of cytoplasmic membrane protein with an apparent molecular weight of 33,000, which was identified as the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate permease. Its properties were similar to the corresponding E. coli permease. The presence of the multicopy glpT hybrid plasmid had a strong influence on the synthesis or assembly of other cell envelope proteins of E. coli. For instance, the periplasmic ribose-binding protein was nearly absent. On the other hand, the quantity of an unidentified E. coli outer membrane protein usually present only in small amounts increased. Images PMID:6408060

  17. Glycerol carbonate as green solvent for pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is a prerequisite for effective saccharification to produce fermentable sugars. In this study, “green” solvent systems based on acidified mixtures of glycerol carbonate (GC) and glycerol were used to treat sugarcane bagasse and the roles of each solvent in deconstructing biomass were determined. Results Pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse at 90°C for only 30 min with acidified GC produced a solid residue having a glucan digestibility of 90% and a glucose yield of 80%, which were significantly higher than a glucan digestibility of 16% and a glucose yield of 15% obtained for bagasse pretreated with acidified ethylene carbonate (EC). Biomass compositional analyses showed that GC pretreatment removed more lignin than EC pretreatment (84% vs 54%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that fluffy and size-reduced fibres were produced from GC pretreatment whereas EC pretreatment produced compact particles of reduced size. The maximal glucan digestibility and glucose yield of GC/glycerol systems were about 7% lower than those of EC/ethylene glycol (EG) systems. Replacing up to 50 wt% of GC with glycerol did not negatively affect glucan digestibility and glucose yield. The results from pretreatment of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) showed that (1) pretreatment with acidified alkylene glycol (AG) alone increased enzymatic digestibility compared to pretreatments with acidified alkylene carbonate (AC) alone and acidified mixtures of AC and AG, (2) pretreatment with acidified GC alone slightly increased, but with acidified EC alone significantly decreased, enzymatic digestibility compared to untreated MCC, and (3) there was a good positive linear correlation of enzymatic digestibility of treated and untreated MCC samples with congo red (CR) adsorption capacity. Conclusions Acidified GC alone was a more effective solvent for pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse than acidified EC alone. The higher glucose yield obtained

  18. Multiparty quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhanjun; Li Yong; Man Zhongxiao

    2005-04-01

    Based on a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol [Phys. Rev. A 69 052319 (2004)], we propose a (n,n)-threshold scheme of multiparty quantum secret sharing of classical messages (QSSCM) using only single photons. We take advantage of this multiparty QSSCM scheme to establish a scheme of multiparty secret sharing of quantum information (SSQI), in which only all quantum information receivers collaborate can the original qubit be reconstructed. A general idea is also proposed for constructing multiparty SSQI schemes from any QSSCM scheme.

  19. Biomass Pretreatment using Ionic Liquid and Glycerol Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynam, Joan Goerss

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable, sustainable resource that can replace or supplement fossil fuels use for liquid fuels and chemicals. However, its recalcitrant structure including interwoven cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin biomacromolecules is challenging to deconstruct. Pretreating biomass so that it can be converted to useful liquids dominates process economics. Many pretreatment methods exist, but most require hazardous chemicals or processing conditions. Many ionic liquids (ILs), salts molten below 100°C, can be used to deconstruct lignocellulosic biomass and are less hazardous than the volatile organic compounds typically used. While effective, relatively safe, and recyclable, ILs are expensive. To reduce costs, dilution with other safe compounds is desirable, if there is no impact on deconstruction efficiency. Glycerol, a food additive, is inexpensive and becoming even more so since it is a by-product of the burgeoning biodiesel industry. Use of glycerol as an additive or diluent for ILs is extensively evaluated in this work. Rice hulls are an abundant biomass, with over 100 million tons produced per year, but with little practical use. The IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium formate ([C2mim][O2CH] or EMIM Form) when mixed with an equal amount of glycerol has been shown to be effective in pretreating rice hulls. Ambient pressure, a pretreatment temperature of 110°C, and a reaction time of three hours produced rice hulls that could be enzymatically hydrolyzed to give reasonably good glucose and xylose yields considering the recalcitrance of this silica-armored biomass. The IL [C2mim][O2CH] was also effective when mixed with an equal amount of glycerol to pretreat loblolly pine, a fast-growing softwood. Loblolly pine was pretreated at 140°C for three hours to produce a solid rich in cellulose and hemicelluloses, while a lignin-rich product could be precipitated from the IL. Similar products were obtained from pretreatment with a mixture of 75% 1

  20. The effect of glycerol treatment on crab muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Papir, D

    1973-04-01

    1. Membrane constants of the closer muscle of the ghost crab, Ocypoda cursor, were determined before and after treatment in hypertonic glycerol solution and return to an artificial sea-water (A.S.W.) solution.2. Muscle contraction was abolished after return of the muscle to A.S.W.3. The membrane capacitance was reduced from 29.0 muF/cm(2) to 10.5 muF/cm(2).4. Other passive properties of the muscle membrane, not dependent on capacitance, were not changed.5. The presynaptic nerve, transmitter release, post-synaptic sensitivity to transmitter and ionic mechanisms of synaptic action were unaffected by glycerol treatment.6. More than 60% of the membrane capacitance/unit area is contributed by the complex tubular system.7. The tubular system in crustacea is necessary for excitation-contraction coupling.

  1. Modified silica-based heterogeneous catalysts for etherification of glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Gholami, Zahra; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi Gholami, Fatemeh; Vakili, Mohammadtaghi

    2015-07-22

    The advent of mesoporous silicas such as MCM-41 has provided new opportunities for research into supported metal catalysis. The loading of metals into framework structures and particularly into the pores of porous molecular sieves, has long been of interest because of their potential catalytic activity. Stable heterogeneous mesoporous basic catalysts were synthesized by wet impregnation of MCM-41 with calcium nitrate and lanthanum nitrate. The surface and structural properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized using BET surface analysis, SEM and TEM. MCM-41 and modified MCM-41 were used in the solventless etherification of glycerol to produce diglycerol as the desired product. The reaction was performed at 250 °C for 8 h, and catalyst activity was evaluated. Catalytic etherification over the 20%Ca{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.6}/MCM-41 catalyst resulted in the highest glycerol conversion of 91% and diglycerol yield of 43%.

  2. Influence of heat shock on glycerol production in alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Berovic, Marin; Pivec, Aleksandra; Kosmerl, Tatjana; Wondra, Mojmir; Celan, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    The influence of single and double heat shocks induced during the exponential growth phase of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation of cultivar Sauvignon Blanc grape must was examined. Rapid temperature changes from 18 degrees C to 34 degrees C have been applied. The effect of the duration of exposure to a high temperature has been analyzed. By the applications of a single heat shock and a double heat shock, up to 8.2 g l(-1) and 11.0 g l(-1) glycerol have been produced, respectively. To prevent the evaporation of fine wine bouquet compounds during the temperature changes, reflux coolers on the top of bioreactors have been employed. By using this method, glycerol production was increased by up to 65%.

  3. Controllable superlubricity of glycerol solution via environment humidity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Shaohua; Luo, Jianbin

    2013-09-24

    The effect of humidity on the lubrication property of glycerol solution between steel surfaces has been investigated in this paper. A stable superlubricity with a friction coefficient about 0.006 has been found under the relative humidity between around 40% RH and 50% RH. Especially, it is noted that the lubrication state can be switched between superlubricity and nonsuperlubricity by adjusting humidity, which is attributed to the humidity-dependent hydrogen-bonding pattern in the solution. The mechanism of such superlubricity is attributed to the hydrated layer of water between the surface layers, which is formed by hydrogen-bonded glycerol and water molecules and strong enough to bear load, absorbed on each side of the solid surfaces. The work has potential applications, providing a simple and environment-friendly way to accomplish controllable superlubrication between steel pairs, which are commonly used in industry.

  4. Modified silica-based heterogeneous catalysts for etherification of glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Zahra; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Gholami, Fatemeh; Vakili, Mohammadtaghi

    2015-07-01

    The advent of mesoporous silicas such as MCM-41 has provided new opportunities for research into supported metal catalysis. The loading of metals into framework structures and particularly into the pores of porous molecular sieves, has long been of interest because of their potential catalytic activity. Stable heterogeneous mesoporous basic catalysts were synthesized by wet impregnation of MCM-41 with calcium nitrate and lanthanum nitrate. The surface and structural properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized using BET surface analysis, SEM and TEM. MCM-41 and modified MCM-41 were used in the solventless etherification of glycerol to produce diglycerol as the desired product. The reaction was performed at 250 °C for 8 h, and catalyst activity was evaluated. Catalytic etherification over the 20%Ca1.6La0.6/MCM-41 catalyst resulted in the highest glycerol conversion of 91% and diglycerol yield of 43%.

  5. Adjuvant properties of a simplified C32 monomycolyl glycerol analogue.

    PubMed

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Minnikin, David E; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Bramwell, Vincent W; Perrie, Yvonne; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2009-04-01

    A simplified C(32) monomycolyl glycerol (MMG) analogue demonstrated enhanced immunostimulatory activity in a dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA)/Ag85B-ESAT-6 formulation. Elevated levels of IFN-gamma and IL-6 were produced in spleen cells from mice immunised with a C(32) MMG analogue comparable activity to the potent Th1 adjuvant, trehalose 6,6'-di-behenate (TDB).

  6. Phosphatidylglycerol homeostasis in glycerol-phosphate auxotrophs of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The balanced synthesis of membrane phospholipids, fatty acids and cell wall constituents is a vital facet of bacterial physiology, but there is little known about the biochemical control points that coordinate these activities in Gram-positive bacteria. In Escherichia coli, the glycerol-phosphate acyltransferase (PlsB) plays a key role in coordinating fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis, but pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus have a different acyltransferase (PlsY), and the headgroup of the major membrane phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol (PtdGro), is used as a precursor for lipoteichoic acid synthesis. Results The PlsY acyltransferase in S. aureus was switched off by depriving strain PDJ28 (ΔgpsA) of the required glycerol supplement. Removal of glycerol from the growth medium led to the rapid cessation of phospholipid synthesis. However, the continued utilization of the headgroup caused a reduction in PtdGro coupled with the accumulation of CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. PtdGro was further decreased by its stimulated conversion to cardiolipin. Although acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) and malonyl-CoA accumulated, fatty acid synthesis continued at a reduced level leading to the intracellular accumulation of unusually long-chain free fatty acids. Conclusions The cessation of new phospholipid synthesis led to an imbalance in membrane compositional homeostasis. PtdGro biosynthesis was not coupled to headgroup turnover leading to the accumulation of pathway intermediates. The synthesis of cardiolipin significantly increased revealing a stress response to liberate glycerol-phosphate for PtdGro synthesis. Acyl-ACP accumulation correlated with a decrease in fatty acid synthesis; however, the coupling was not tight leading to the accumulation of intracellular fatty acids. PMID:24238430

  7. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  8. Metabolic Flexibility of Yarrowia lipolytica Growing on Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Egermeier, Michael; Russmayer, Hannes; Sauer, Michael; Marx, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a fascinating microorganism with an amazing metabolic flexibility. This yeast grows very well on a wide variety of carbon sources from alkanes over lipids, to sugars and glycerol. Y. lipolytica accumulates a wide array of industrially relevant metabolites. It is very tolerant to many environmental factors, above all the pH value. It grows perfectly well over a wide pH range, but it has been described, that the pH has a decisive influence on the metabolite pattern accumulated by this yeast. Here, we set out to characterize the metabolism of different Y. lipolytica strains, isolated from various environments, growing on glycerol at different pH values. The conditions applied for strain characterization are of utmost importance. Shake flask cultures lead to very different results, when compared to controlled conditions in bioreactors regarding pH and aeration. Only one of the tested strains was able to accumulate high amounts of citric acid in shake flask experiments, whereas a group of six strains turned out to accumulate citric acid efficiently under controlled conditions. The present study shows that strains isolated from dairy products predominantly accumulate sugar alcohols at any given pH, when grown on glycerol under nitrogen-limitation. PMID:28174563

  9. Eye preservation tectonic graft using glycerol-preserved donor cornea.

    PubMed

    Lin, H-C; Ong, S J; Chao, A-N

    2012-11-01

    To report the surgical outcome of tectonic graft using glycerol-preserved donor corneas to treat perforated keratitis. The medical records were reviewed of all patients treated for perforated keratitis using glycerol-preserved corneas at a single institution between 1 July 2004 and 31 June 2010. The clinical features, precipitating factors, adjuvant therapies, and therapeutic outcomes were analyzed. Success was defined as re-epithelialization of the ocular surface without evisceration. Fourteen eyes from 14 patients (6 male and 8 female) were included. Age ranged from 58 to 84 years (average, 70.71 ± 8.52 years) and the follow-up time ranged from 7 to 56 months (mean, 25.35 ± 16.84 months). The culture results showed five bacterial infections, five cases of fungal keratitis, and one mixed infection; the culture results were negative for three patients. Satisfactory anatomical integrity was obtained in eight grafts (57.14%) that healed with neovascularization. Six grafts (48.85%) showed delayed re-epithelialization and were repaired with conjunctival flaps to maintain ocular surface integrity. Three patients developed secondary glaucoma and received trans-scleral cyclophotocoagulation. Thirteen patients had satisfactory anatomical integrity without evisceration or exenteration, while one patient received evisceration at 39-month follow-up because of intractable glaucoma. Glycerol-preserved donor corneas combined with anterior vitrectomy with or without conjunctival flaps may be effective substitutes for evisceration surgery in patients with perforated keratitis.

  10. Cryocrystallography in capillaries: critical glycerol concentrations and cooling rates

    PubMed Central

    Warkentin, Matthew; Stanislavskaia, Valentina; Hammes, Katherine; Thorne, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Capillary tubes have many advantages over multi-well plates for macromol­ecular crystal growth and handling, including the possibility of in situ structure determination. To obtain complete high-resolution X-ray data sets, cryopreservation protocols must be developed to prevent crystalline ice formation and preserve macromolecular crystal order. The minimum glycerol concentrations required to vitrify aqueous solutions during plunging into liquid nitrogen and liquid propane have been determined for capillary diameters from 3.3 mm to 150 µm. For the smallest diameter, the required glycerol concentrations are 30%(w/v) in nitrogen and 20%(w/v) in propane, corresponding to cooling rates of ∼800 and ∼7000 K s−1, respectively. These concentrations are much larger than are required in current best practice using crystals in loops or on microfabricated mounts. In additon, the relation between the minimum cooling rate for vitrification and glycerol concentration has been estimated; this relation is of fundamental importance in developing rational cryopreservation protocols. PMID:19529833

  11. Osmotic significance of glycerol accumulation in exponentially growing yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, R H; Chudek, J A; Foster, R; Gadd, G M

    1987-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has shown glycerol to be the major osmotically significant low-molecular-weight solute in exponentially growing, salt-stressed cells of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, and Debaromyces hansenii. Measurement of the intracellular nonosmotic volume (i.e., the fraction of the cell that is osmotically unresponsive) by using the Boyle-van't Hoff relationship (for nonturgid cells, the osmotic volume is directly proportional to the reciprocal of the external osmotic pressure) showed that the nonosmotic volume represented up to 53% of the total cell volume; the highest values were recorded in media with maximum added NaCl. Determinations of intracellular glycerol levels with respect to cell osmotic volumes showed that increases in intracellular glycerol may counterbalance up to 95% of the external osmotic pressure due to added NaCl. The lack of other organic osmotica in 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra indicates that inorganic ions may constitute the remaining component of intracellular osmotic pressure. PMID:3314706

  12. Glycerol production by anaerobic fermentation of molasses on pilot scale

    SciTech Connect

    Virkar, P.D.; Panesar, M.S.

    1987-04-20

    The use of sodium sulphite as a steering agent for enhancing the yield of glycerol during anaerobic ethanol fermentation is well established. Several studies have been reported in the literature using free as well as immobilized cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In these studies it was observed that a relatively high concentration of sulphite in the fermentation broth, typically 40-100 g/l, was required to obtain a commercially significant yield of glycerol on sugar fermented. However, the dosing of large quantities of sulphite generally resulted in reduced viability of the microorganisms and slow fermentations. The glycerol concentration in the fermented broth was generally observed to be in the range 20-40 g/l. The low productivity coupled with the high cost of sulfite rendered the process commercially unattractive. In order to reduce the sulphite requirement, whilst at the same time increasing the productivity, a modified vacuum fermentation was developed in the laboratories. The process was successfully estabilished on a pilot scale and typical data obtained on scaleup are reported below. 8 references.

  13. Enhanced succinate production from glycerol by engineered Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, an engineered strain Escherichia coli MLB (ldhA(-)pflB(-)) was constructed for production of succinate from glycerol. The succinate yield was 0.37mol/mol in anaerobic culture, however, the growth and glycerol consumption rates were very slow, resulting in a low succinate level. Two-stage fermentation was performed in flasks, and the succinate yield reached 0.93mol/mol, but the succinate titer was still low. Hence, overexpression of malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase and PEP carboxykinase (PCK) from E. coli, and pyruvate carboxylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum in MLB was investigated for improving succinate production. Overexpression of PCK resulted in remarkable enhancement of glycerol consumption and succinate production. In flask experiments, the succinate concentration reached 118.1mM, and in a 1.5-L bioreactor the succinate concentration further increased to 360.2mM. The highest succinate yield achieved 0.93mol/mol, which was 93% of the theoretical yield, in the anaerobic stage.

  14. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  15. Analysis of secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Severino, Valeria; Farina, Annarita; Chambery, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Most biological processes including growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis are coordinated by tightly regulated signaling pathways, which also involve secreted proteins acting in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. In addition, extracellular signaling molecules affect local niche biology and influence the cross-talking with the surrounding tissues. The understanding of this molecular language may provide an integrated and broader view of cellular regulatory networks under physiological and pathological conditions. In this context, the profiling at a global level of cell secretomes (i.e., the subpopulations of a proteome secreted from the cell) has become an active area of research. The current interest in secretome research also deals with its high potential for the biomarker discovery and the identification of new targets for therapeutic strategies. Several proteomic and mass spectrometry platforms and methodologies have been applied to secretome profiling of conditioned media of cultured cell lines and primary cells. Nevertheless, the analysis of secreted proteins is still a very challenging task, because of the technical difficulties that may hamper the subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. This chapter describes a typical workflow for the analysis of proteins secreted by cultured cells. Crucial issues related to cell culture conditions for the collection of conditioned media, secretome preparation, and mass spectrometry analysis are discussed. Furthermore, an overview of quantitative LC-MS-based approaches, computational tools for data analysis, and strategies for validation of potential secretome biomarkers is also presented.

  16. Secrets of Successful Homeschooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Parents who homeschool gifted children often find the daily practice of home education very different from what they had imagined. Gifted children are complex in both personality and learning styles. Parents who say that homeschooling works well for their gifted children have learned from others or discovered on their own several secrets that make…

  17. Trade-Secret Dispute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1994-01-01

    A Michigan court has ruled that a Wayne State University (Michigan) chemistry professor appropriated a trade secret from a Massachusetts chemist for whom he was consulting and incorporated it into his own patent application, violating a written agreement. The university contends its pursuit of the patent was not improper. (MSE)

  18. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  19. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  20. Secrets of Successful Homeschooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Parents who homeschool gifted children often find the daily practice of home education very different from what they had imagined. Gifted children are complex in both personality and learning styles. Parents who say that homeschooling works well for their gifted children have learned from others or discovered on their own several secrets that make…

  1. Physiology of bile secretion

    PubMed Central

    Esteller, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment, in different situations, results in the syndrome of cholestasis. The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed. Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation. The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bile-duct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts. The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed. In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled, cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves. A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included. The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology. PMID:18837079

  2. Modulation of glycerol and ethanol yields during alcoholic fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressed or disrupted for GPD1 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Michnick, S; Roustan, J L; Remize, F; Barre, P; Dequin, S

    1997-07-01

    The possibility of the diversion of carbon flux from ethanol towards glycerol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation was investigated. Variations in the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) level and similar trends for alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase and glycerol-3-phosphatase were found when low and high glycerol-forming wine yeast strains were compared. GPDH is thus a limiting enzyme for glycerol production. Wine yeast strains with modulated GPD1 (encoding one of the two GPDH isoenzymes) expression were constructed and characterized during fermentation on glucose-rich medium. Engineered strains fermented glucose with a strongly modified [glycerol] : [ethanol] ratio. gpd1delta mutants exhibited a 50% decrease in glycerol production and increased ethanol yield. Overexpression of GPD1 on synthetic must (200 g/l glucose) resulted in a substantial increase in glycerol production ( x 4) at the expense of ethanol. Acetaldehyde accumulated through the competitive regeneration of NADH via GPDH. Accumulation of by-products such as pyruvate, acetate, acetoin, 2,3 butane-diol and succinate was observed, with a marked increase in acetoin production.

  3. Hygroscopicity of Mixed Glycerol/Mg(NO3)2/Water Droplets Affected by the Interaction between Magnesium Ions and Glycerol Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Ma, Jia-Bi; Zhou, Qiang; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-04-30

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic components, which can influence the hygroscopicities of each other. In this research, we applied confocal Raman technology combined with optical microscopy to investigate the relationship between the hygroscopic behavior and the molecular interactions of mixed glycerol/Mg(NO3)2/water droplets. Raman spectra provide detailed structural information about the interactions between glycerol molecules and Mg(2+) ions, as well as information about the interactions between glycerol and NO3(-) ions through electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. The change of the CH2 stretching band of glycerol molecules in mixed droplets suggests that the backbone structures of glycerol mainly transform from αα to γγ in the dehumidifying process, and the additional Mg(2+) ions strongly influence the structure of glycerol molecules. Because the existence of glycerol suppresses the crystallization of Mg(NO3)2·6H2O in the dehumidifying process, Mg(NO3)2 molecules in mixed droplets form an amorphous state rather than forming crystals of Mg(NO3)2·6H2O when the relative humidity is lower than 17.8%. Moreover, in mixed droplets, the molar ratio of NO3(-) to glycerol is higher in the center than in the outer region.

  4. Measurement of serum total glycerides and free glycerol by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxia; Dong, Jun; Chen, Wenxiang; Wang, Shu; Guo, Hanbang; Man, Yong; Mo, Peisheng; Li, Jianzhai

    2006-09-01

    Serum levels of total glycerides and free glycerol are important indices of lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease risk. Convenient enzymatic methods of measurement have been available, but they are susceptible to interference. Situations exist in both research and clinical laboratories in which more specific and precise methods are needed. We developed HPLC methods for the measurement of serum total glycerides and free glycerol. For total glycerides, serum was mixed with an internal standard (1,2,4-butanetriol) and treated with alcoholic sodium hydroxide to hydrolyze glycerides to glycerol. After deproteinization with tungstic acid, the glycerol was benzoylated with an optimized Schotten-Baumann reaction and analyzed by HPLC. For free glycerol, serum was equilibrated with the internal standard and deproteinized with tungstic acid to remove the glycerides. The glycerol was benzoylated and analyzed as for total glycerol. Various factors were investigated, and no significant sources of interference were detected. The total coefficients of variation ranged from 0.7% to 2.0% for total glycerides and from 1.7% to 3.2% for free glycerol. The analytical recoveries ranged from 98.5% to 101.6%. In conclusion, simple and reliable HPLC methods for serum total glycerides and free glycerol have been developed. The methods may also be used for the analyses of glycerol or glycerides in other biological samples.

  5. Effect of Glycerol Water Binary Mixtures on the Structure and Dynamics of Protein Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Carri, Gustavo A.

    2014-01-01

    We have performed 20ns of fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of Hen Egg-White Lysozyme in 0, 10, 20, 30 and 100% by weight of glycerol in water to better understand the microscopic physics behind the bioprotection offered by glycerol to naturally occuring biological systems. The sovlent exposure of protein surface residues changes when glycerol is introduced. The dynamic behavior of the protein, as quantified by the Incoherent Intermediate Scattering Function, shows a non-monotonic dependence on glycerol content. The fluctuations of the protein residues with respect to each other were found to be similar in all water containing solvents; but different from the pure glycerol case. The increase in the number of protein glycerol hydrogen bonds in glycerol water binary mixtures explains the slowing down of protein dynamics as the glycerol content increases. We also explored the dynamic behavior of the hydration layer. We show that the short-length scale dynamics of this layer are insenstive to glycerol concentration. However, the long-length scale behavior shows a significant dependence on glycerol content. We also provide insights into the behavior of bound and mobile water molecules.

  6. A specific glycerol kinase induces rapid cold hardening of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjin; Kim, Yonggyun

    2014-08-01

    Insects in temperate zones survive low temperatures by migrating or tolerating the cold. The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is a serious insect pest on cabbage and other cruciferous crops worldwide. We showed that P. xylostella became cold-tolerant by expressing rapid cold hardiness (RCH) in response to a brief exposure to moderately low temperature (4°C) for 7h along with glycerol accumulation in hemolymph. Glycerol played a crucial role in the cold-hardening process because exogenously supplying glycerol significantly increased the cold tolerance of P. xylostella larvae without cold acclimation. To determine the genetic factor(s) responsible for RCH and the increase of glycerol, four glycerol kinases (GKs), and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (PxGPDH) were predicted from the whole P. xylostella genome and analyzed for their function associated with glycerol biosynthesis. All predicted genes were expressed, but differed in their expression during different developmental stages and in different tissues. Expression of the predicted genes was individually suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi) using double-stranded RNAs specific to target genes. RNAi of PxGPDH expression significantly suppressed RCH and glycerol accumulation. Only PxGK1 among the four GKs was responsible for RCH and glycerol accumulation. Furthermore, PxGK1 expression was significantly enhanced during RCH. These results indicate that a specific GK, the terminal enzyme to produce glycerol, is specifically inducible during RCH to accumulate the main cryoprotectant.

  7. Is endogenous glycerol a determinant of stratum corneum hydration in humans?

    PubMed

    Choi, Eung Ho; Man, Mao-Qiang; Wang, Fusheng; Zhang, Xinjiang; Brown, Barbara E; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M

    2005-08-01

    Although stratum corneum (SC) hydration has been primarily of concern to the cosmetic industry, it serves an important biosensor function. In murine models, not only deiminated products of filaggrin-derived amino acids ("NMF") but also endogenous glycerol from circulation into the epidermis via aquaporin 3 channel and from triglyceride turnover in sebaceous glands (SG) are important determinants. We assessed here whether endogenous glycerol could also be linked to SC hydration in humans. SG-enriched sites are more hydrated than SG-impoverished sites, and SC hydration correlates with both sebum production and SC glycerol content, but the correlation is more significant for SC glycerol content than for sebum content. Moreover, gender-related differences in sebum content are not associated with altered SC hydration. SC hydration is also linked to SC glycerol content in SG-impoverished sites, suggesting a role for non-SG-derived (? from circulation) glycerol in SC hydration. Finally, short-term water immersion produces a parallel decline in SC hydration and SC glycerol content, with glycerol levels returning to normal over several hours. These results suggest that endogenous glycerol of both circulatory and SG origin comprises an H2O-extractable pool that influences SC hydration in humans. These results also provide a rationale for the development of glycerol-containing therapeutic moisturizers.

  8. Regulation of glycerol metabolism in Enterobacter aerogenes NBRC12010 under electrochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Kouta; Yagishita, Tatsuo

    2009-06-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes NBRC12010 was able to ferment glycerol to ethanol and hydrogen gas. Fermentation of glycerol ceased in the stationary phase of growth, and it was activated by electrochemical reactions using thionine as an electron transfer mediator from bacterial cells to an electrode. Using resting cells of E. aerogenes NBRC12010 in only citrate buffer solution, the cells did not consume glycerol at all, but they could metabolize glucose. These results suggest that the regulation of glycerol metabolism occurred at enzymatic steps before glycolysis. In E. aerogenes NBRC12010, glycerol was metabolized via glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) and then dehydroxyacetone kinase. The GDH-catalyzed reaction mainly depended on the ratio of NAD(+)/NADH. At a NAD(+)/NADH ratio of nearly 1 or less, it was substantially suppressed and glycerol metabolism stopped. When the ratio was higher than 1, GDH was activated and glycerol was metabolized. Thus, the reaction of glycerol metabolism depended on the balance of cellular NAD(+)/NADH. Exogenous NADH was oxidized to NAD(+) by electrochemical reactions with thionine. We proposed the activation mechanism of glycerol metabolism under electrochemical conditions.

  9. Enhanced hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol by fermentation using mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Selembo, Priscilla A; Perez, Joe M; Lloyd, Wallis A; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-12-15

    The conversion of glycerol into high value products, such as hydrogen gas and 1,3-propanediol (PD), was examined using anaerobic fermentation with heat-treated mixed cultures. Glycerol fermentation produced 0.28 mol-H(2)/mol-glycerol (72 mL-H(2)/g-COD) and 0.69 mol-PD/mol-glycerol. Glucose fermentation using the same mixed cultures produced more hydrogen gas (1.06 mol-H(2)/mol-glucose) but no PD. Changing the source of inoculum affected gas production likely due to prior acclimation of bacteria to this type of substrate. Fermentation of the glycerol produced from biodiesel fuel production (70% glycerol content) produced 0.31 mol-H(2)/mol-glycerol (43 mL H(2)/g-COD) and 0.59 mol-PD/mol-glycerol. These are the highest yields yet reported for both hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol production from pure glycerol and the glycerol byproduct from biodiesel fuel production by fermentation using mixed cultures. These results demonstrate that production of biodiesel can be combined with production of hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol for maximum utilization of resources and minimization of waste.

  10. Lipolysis and glycerol gluconeogenesis in simultaneously fasting and lactating northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Houser, Dorian S; Champagne, Cory D; Crocker, Daniel E

    2007-12-01

    Adult female elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) combine long-term fasting with lactation and molting. Glycerol gluconeogenesis has been hypothesized as potentially meeting all of the glucose requirements of the seals during these fasts. To test this hypothesis, a primed constant infusion of [2-(14)C]glycerol was administered to 10 ten adult female elephant seals at 5 and 21-22 days postpartum and to 10 additional adult females immediately after the molt. Glycerol kinetics, rates of lipolysis, and the contribution of glycerol to glucose production were determined for each period. Plasma metabolite levels as well as insulin, glucagon, and cortisol were also measured. Glycerol rate of appearance was not significantly correlated with mass (P = 0.14, r2 = 0.33) but was significantly related to the percentage of glucose derived from glycerol (P < 0.01, r2 = 0.81) during late lactation. The contribution of glycerol to glucose production was <3% during each fasting period, suggesting a lower contribution to gluconeogenesis than is observed in other long-term fasting mammals. Because of a high rate of endogenous glucose production in fasting elephant seals, it is likely that glycerol gluconeogenesis still makes a substantial contribution to the substrate needs of glucose-dependent tissues. The lack of a relationship between glucoregulatory hormones and glycerol kinetics, glycerol gluconeogenesis, and metabolites supports the proposition that fasting elephant seals do not conform to the traditional insulin-glucagon model of substrate metabolism.

  11. Excess wing in glass-forming glycerol and LiCl-glycerol mixtures detected by neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, S.; Arend, N.; Lunkenheimer, P.; ...

    2015-01-22

    The relaxational dynamics in glass-forming glycerol and glycerol mixed with LiCl is investigated using different neutron scattering techniques. The performed neutron spin echo experiments, which extend up to relatively long relaxation time scales of the order of 10 ns, should allow for the detection of contributions from the so-called excess wing. This phenomenon, whose microscopic origin is controversially discussed, arises in a variety of glass formers and, until now, was almost exclusively investigated by dielectric spectroscopy and light scattering. In conclusion, we show here that the relaxational process causing the excess wing can also be detected by neutron scattering, whichmore » directly couples to density fluctuations.« less

  12. Research note: investigation on the metabolism of glycerol in the rumen of bulls.

    PubMed

    Kijora, C; Bergner, H; Götz, K P; Bartelt, J; Szakács, J; Sommer, A

    1998-01-01

    Two bulls, each fitted with rumen and duodenal cannulas, received (in addition to a hay-grain diet) twice daily an infusion of 200 g glycerol into the rumen over a period of six days. During this preliminary in vivo investigation, the influence of a glycerol application on the rumen environment over a six-day adaptation period was examined. Samples of rumen fluid were collected daily, two hours after glycerol infusion. An additional 15N-urea application into the rumen was given on days 1 (without glycerol infusion), 3 and 7 (with glycerol infusion). Extra samples of rumen fluid and blood plasma (from puncture of vena jungularis) were taken through the 12th hour following urea application. Rumen fluid pH was reduced due to glycerol intake from 6.3 (day 1, without glycerol) to 5.4 by day 7. Molar proportion of acetic acid to propionic acid decreased from 3.5 (day 1) to 2.1 (days 6 and 7). Average glycerol disappearance rate from the rumen was 4.7 gl-1 h-1 for the first hour. Only small amounts of glycerol could be detected in the duodenal digesta. Blood plasma glycerol content was significantly higher after glycerol application (0.061 mmol l-1 vs. 0.019 mmol l-1). The incorporation of 15N into the rumen bacteria and the proportion of bacterial N (as percent of TCA-precipitable N in the rumen fluid) were lower after glycerol influsion. These results, coupled with the lower concentration of iso-acids (isobutyric and isovaleric acids) in the rumen fluid, indicate that the high amount of glycerol infusion (10% of DMI) reduced protein metabolism of rumen bacteria throughout the experimental period.

  13. Flavor impacts of glycerol in the processing of yeast fermented beverages: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangdong; Procopio, Susanne; Becker, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Glycerol contributes to the beverage body and fullness. Moreover, it also influences the flavor intensity. As a major byproduct, glycerol not only serves critical roles in yeast osmoregulation and redox balancing, but also acts as the carbon competitor against ethanol in alcoholic fermentation. Therefore, increasing glycerol yield benefits both the flavor and ethanol reduction for the fermented beverages. Glycerol yield has been elevated either by fermentation optimization or by yeast genetic modification. The fermentation optimizations reached maximum 14 g/L glycerol through screening yeast strains and optimizing fermentation parameters. Meanwhile the yeast overexpressing GPD1 (encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) produced up to 6 folds more glycerol for beer and wine. Except for glycerol improvement, the genetically modified yeasts accumulated dramatically undesirable compounds such as acetaldehyde, acetate and acetoin which are detrimental for beverage flavor. In comparison, the natural high glycerol producers showed strain-specific manner on the yeast-derived aroma compounds like volatile acids, fusel alcohols, esters, and aldehydes. Temperature, sugar concentration, nitrogen composition, oxygen and pH-value, which influence glycerol biosynthesis, also obtained various effects on the production of aromatic compounds. In the current review, we firstly deliberate the organoleptic contributions of glycerol for fermented beverages. Furthermore, glycerol optimization strategies are discussed regarding to the yield improvement, the genes expressions, the overall flavor impacts and the feasibilities in beverage applications. Lastly, for improving beverage flavor by glycerol optimization, a high-throughput platform is proposed to increase the screening capacity of yeast strains and parameters in the processing of fermented beverages.

  14. Metabolic engineering of Mortierella alpina for arachidonic acid production with glycerol as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangfei; Chen, Haiqin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2015-12-23

    Although some microorganisms can convert glycerol into valuable products such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, the yields are relative low due primarily to an inefficient assimilation of glycerol. Mortierella alpina is an oleaginous fungus which preferentially uses glucose over glycerol as the carbon source for fatty acid synthesis. In the present study, we metabolically engineered M. alpina to increase the utilization of glycerol. Glycerol kinase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase control the first two steps of glycerol decomposition. GK overexpression increased the total fatty acid content by 35%, whereas G3PD1, G3PD2 and G3PD3 had no significant effect. Overexpression of malic enzyme (ME1) but not glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase or isocitrate dehydrogenase significantly increased fatty acid content when glycerol was used as carbon source. Simultaneous overexpression of GK and ME1 enabled M. alpina to accumulate fatty acids efficiently, with a 44% increase in fatty acid content (% of dry weight), a 57% increase in glycerol to fatty acid yield (g/g glycerol) and an 81% increase in fatty acid production (g/L culture). A repeated batch process was applied to relieve the inhibitory effect of raw glycerol on arachidonic acid synthesis, and under these conditions, the yield reached 52.2 ± 1.9 mg/g. This study suggested that GK is a rate-limiting step in glycerol assimilation in M. alpina. Another restricting factor for fatty acid accumulation was the supply of cytosolic NADPH. We reported a bioengineering strategy by improving the upstream assimilation and NADPH supply, for oleaginous fungi to efficiently accumulate fatty acid with glycerol as carbon source.

  15. Enhancement of glycerol utilization ability of Ralstonia eutropha H16 for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Toshiaki; Mukoyama, Masaharu; Orita, Izumi; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a well-studied bacterium with respect to biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), which has attracted attentions as biodegradable bio-based plastics. However, this strain shows quite poor growth on glycerol of which bulk supply has been increasing as a major by-product of biodiesel industries. This study examined enhancement of glycerol assimilation ability of R. eutropha H16 by introduction of the genes of aquaglyceroporin (glpF) and glycerol kinase (glpK) from Escherichia coli. Although introduction of glpFK Ec into the strain H16 using a multi-copy vector was not successful, a recombinant strain possessing glpFK Ec within the chromosome showed much faster growth on glycerol than H16. Further analyses clarified that weak expression of glpK Ec alone allowed to establish efficient glycerol assimilation pathway, indicating that the poor growth of H16 on glycerol was caused by insufficient kination activity to glycerol, as well as this strain had a potential ability for uptake of extracellular glycerol. The engineered strains expressing glpFK Ec or glpK Ec produced large amounts of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] [P(3HB)] from glycerol with much higher productivity than H16. Unlike other glycerol-utilizable wild strains of R. eutropha, the H16-derived engineered strains accumulated P(3HB) with no significant decrease in molecular weights on glycerol, and the polydispersity index of the glycerol-based P(3HB) synthesized by the strains expressing glpFK Ec was lower than those by the parent strains. The present study demonstrated possibility of R. eutropha H16-based platform for production of useful compounds from inexpensive glycerol.

  16. Possibility of analytical finding of glycerol caused by self-catheterization in doping control.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Kageyama, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol is listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) prohibited list as a masking agent principally because the administration of glycerol increases plasma volume and decreases the concentration of haemoglobin and the value of haematocrit in blood. Glycerol is a naturally occurring substance; therefore, the threshold is set as 1.0 mg/mL in the WADA technical document (WADA TD2013DL). In a WADA-accredited doping control laboratory, three doping control urine specimens collected from impaired athletes were determined to contain a high concentration of glycerol (>1.0 mg/mL); two of these specimens were considered adverse analytical findings (AAFs). Self-catheterization is necessary for athletes with neurological disorders such as neurogenic bladder dysfunction. We conducted a simple simulation of self-catheterization as an experimental test using urethral catheters with an antiseptic agent containing glycerol to confirm the influence of this antiseptic agent on the quantitative value of glycerol in doping control analysis. Some users employ a catheter with glycerol solution (ca. 1 mL) to avoid pain during use. The urine sample passed through such a catheter exhibited a glycerol concentration (4.94 mg/mL) greater than the threshold level. In September 2014, the threshold for glycerol will change from 1.0 to 4.3 mg/mL (WADA TD2014DL); however, a possibility exists for the quantitative value of glycerol in doping control analysis to exceed the threshold because of the use of an antiseptic agent containing glycerol for self-catheterization. The AAF for glycerol for impaired athletes, particularly those who participate in Paralympic sports, should account for the use of a catheter with glycerol.

  17. Impact of impurities in biodiesel-derived crude glycerol on the fermentation by Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013.

    PubMed

    Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Boatman, Judy J; Kurniawan, Yogi; Taconi, Katherine A; Bothun, Geoffrey D; Scholz, Carmen

    2012-02-01

    During the production of biodiesel, crude glycerol is produced as a byproduct at 10% (w/w). Clostridium pasteurianum has the inherent potential to grow on glycerol and produce 1,3-propanediol and butanol as the major products. Growth and product yields on crude glycerol were reported to be slower and lower, respectively, in comparison to the results obtained from pure glycerol. In this study, we analyzed the effect of each impurity present in the biodiesel-derived crude glycerol on the growth and metabolism of glycerol by C. pasteurianum. The crude glycerol contains methanol, salts (in the form of potassium chloride or sulfate), and fatty acids that were not transesterified. Salt and methanol were found to have no negative effects on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria on glycerol. The fatty acid with a higher degree of unsaturation, linoleic acid, was found to have strong inhibitory effect on the utilization of glycerol by the bacteria. The fatty acid with lower or no degrees of unsaturation such as stearic and oleic acid were found to be less detrimental to substrate utilization. The removal of fatty acids from crude glycerol by acid precipitation resulted in a fermentation behavior that is comparable to the one on pure glycerol. These results show that the fatty acids in the crude glycerol have a negative effect by directly affecting the utilization of glycerol as the carbon source, and hence their removal from crude glycerol is an essential step towards the utilization of crude glycerol.

  18. Overcoming the metabolic burden of protein secretion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe--a quantitative approach using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Lange, Sabrina; Wilhelm, Nadine; Bureik, Matthias; Yang, Tae-Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion in yeast is generally associated with a burden to cellular metabolism. To investigate this metabolic burden in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed a set of strains secreting the model protein maltase in different amounts. We quantified the influence of protein secretion on the metabolism applying (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in chemostat cultures. Analysis of the macromolecular biomass composition revealed an increase in cellular lipid content at elevated levels of protein secretion and we observed altered metabolic fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle, and around the pyruvate node including mitochondrial NADPH supply. Supplementing acetate to glucose or glycerol minimal media was found to improve protein secretion, accompanied by an increased cellular lipid content and carbon flux through the TCA cycle as well as increased mitochondrial NADPH production. Thus, systematic metabolic analyses can assist in identifying factors limiting protein secretion and in deriving strategies to overcome these limitations.

  19. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P < 0.05). An extender was developed to freeze ram semen in the absence of glycerol. An increase in post-thaw motility was obtained when semen was extended in TES titrated with Tris to pH 7.0 (TEST) and osmotic pressure of 375-400 mOsm/kg, containing 25-30% (v/v) egg yolk and 10% (v/v) maltose. A special device (boat) for freezing was constructed to insure the same height of the sample above LN _2 and thus the same freezing rate from freeze to freeze. Freezing of semen in 0.25cc straws at 5-10 cm above LN_2 (73.8 to 49.5 ^circC/min) yielded higher post-thaw motility than the rates resulted from freezing at 15 cm above LN_2 or 1 cm above LN _2. Faster Thawing in 37^ circC water for 30 sec. (7.8^ circC/sec.) increased post-thaw motility compared with slower thawing in 5 or 20^circ C water (P < 0.05). A lambing rate of 52.2% was obtained in one fertility trial conducted with ram semen frozen without glycerol and 17.1% in a second trial. One injection (IM) of 15 mg PGF_{2alpha}/ewe for

  20. Methylation and cyclisation of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers as temperature and pH proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaga, C. I.; Reichart, G.-J.; Schouten, S.; Lotter, A.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    2009-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing 0 to 2 cyclopentyl moieties were initially detected in peat deposits [1]. Through the analysis of a global set of soils samples Weijers et al. [2] showed that these GDGTs, probably of bacterial origin, are produced in situ in these soils. Rivers and direct run-off transport these compounds, together with other soil organic matter, to marine [3] and lake sediments [4, 5]. Recently, Weijers et al. [6] defined two indices that are based on branched GDGTs that are distinctively influenced by two environmental factors. The cyclisation ratio of the branched tetraethers (CBT) is related to soil pH and the methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) is related to temperature and soil pH. Lake sediments are often used for reconstructing past climatic changes. The presence of branched GDGTs in lake sediments potentially allows reconstruction of temperature and pH of the lake drainage area. We performed organic geochemical analyses on a series of surface sediments from 82 lakes characterised by variable amounts of soil organic matter and from different geographical locations to establish the application of the MBT/CBT as a continental palaeothermometer. Results show that in all of the 82 lakes substantial amounts of branched GDGTs are present (0.1-28% of total GDGTs). Besides the branched GDGTs crenarchaeol was also found in appreciable amounts (on average 23% of the total GDGTs). In the lakes from the northern hemisphere in fact the dominant GDGT is crenarchaeol (38% of total GDGTs) followed by the pentamethylated branched GDGT. In the southern hemisphere on the other hand we observe the hexamethylated branched GDGT as the dominant GDGT and crenarchaeol is here ten times less abundant then in the north (on average 3% of total GDGTs only). The CBT, as defined by Weijers et al. [6], for the entire data set ranges from values close to 0 (0.14 for Lake Ohrid) to 1.7 (Lake Nyos). The MBT ratio, also as defined

  1. Are Secrets Immoral? The Construction of Secrets in Everyday Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunthner, Susanne; Luckmann, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the communicative treatment of secrets, presenting examples from recorded communicative interactions in a wide range of social milieus and settings in which the participants revealed knowledge of secrets, tried to dig out old secrets without appearing to be doing so, and occasionally, appeared to be hiding some items of knowledge from…

  2. Wrapped up in Covers: Preschoolers' Secrets and Secret Hiding Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Kimberly; Colwell, Malinda J.; Bell, Nancy J.; Trejos-Castillo, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this qualitative study, interviews about children's secret hiding places were conducted with 3-5-year-olds (n?=?17) in a university sponsored preschool programme using art narratives. Since prior studies indicate that children understand the concept of a secret as early as five and that they associate secrets with hiding places, the purpose of…

  3. Wrapped up in Covers: Preschoolers' Secrets and Secret Hiding Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Kimberly; Colwell, Malinda J.; Bell, Nancy J.; Trejos-Castillo, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this qualitative study, interviews about children's secret hiding places were conducted with 3-5-year-olds (n?=?17) in a university sponsored preschool programme using art narratives. Since prior studies indicate that children understand the concept of a secret as early as five and that they associate secrets with hiding places, the purpose of…

  4. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Kasina, A. E-mail: wubbenhorst@fys.kuleuven.be; Putzeys, T.; Wübbenhorst, M. E-mail: wubbenhorst@fys.kuleuven.be

    2015-12-28

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk T{sub g} and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in c{sub p} by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at −75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of “MROL glycerol” to its “normal” (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (∼2%) increase of the glassy c{sub p}, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τ{sub cal} from that of normal “bulk” glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the

  5. Autoregulation of glucose production in men with a glycerol load during rest and exercise.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, J K; Casazza, G A; Horning, M A; Brooks, G A

    2001-04-01

    Related to hepatic autoregulation we evaluated hypotheses that 1) glucose production would be altered as a result of a glycerol load, 2) decreased glucose recycling rate (Rr) would result from increased glycerol uptake, and 3) the absolute rate of gluconeogenesis (GNG) from glycerol would be positively correlated to glycerol rate of disappearance (R(d)) during a glycerol load. For these purposes, glucose and glycerol kinetics were determined in eight men during rest and during 90 min of leg cycle ergometry at 45 and 65% of peak O2 consumption (.VO2 (peak)). Trials were conducted after an overnight fast, with exercise commencing 12 h after the last meal. Subjects received a continuous infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose, [1-(13)C]glucose, and [1,1,2,3,3-(2)H(5)]glycerol without (CON) or with an additional 1,000 mg (rest: 20 mg/min; exercise: 40 mg/min) of [2-(13)C]- or unlabeled glycerol added to the infusate (GLY). Infusion of glycerol dampened glucose Rr, calculated as the difference between [6,6-(2)H(2)]- and [1-(13)C]glucose rates of appearance (R(a)), at rest [0.35 +/- 0.12 (CON) vs. 0.12 +/- 0.10 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) (GLY), P < 0.05] and during exercise at both intensities [45%: 0.63 +/- 0.14 (CON) vs. 0.04 +/- 0.12 (GLY); 65%: 0.73 +/- 0.14 (CON) vs. 0.04 +/- 0.17 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) (GLY), P < 0.05]. Glucose R(a) and oxidation were not affected by glycerol infusion at rest or during exercise. Throughout rest and both exercise intensities, glycerol R(d) was greater in GLY vs. CON conditions (rest: 0.30 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.58 +/- 0.04; 45%: 0.57 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.19 +/- 0.04; 65%: 0.73 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.27 +/- 0.05 mg. kg(-1). min(-1), CON vs. GLY, respectively). Differences in glycerol R(d) (DeltaR(d)) between protocols equaled the unlabeled glycerol infusion rate and correlated with plasma glycerol concentration (r = 0.97). We conclude that infusion of a glycerol load during rest and exercise at 45 and 65% of .VO2(peak) 1) does not affect glucose R(a) or R(d), 2) blocks

  6. Bidirectional roles of the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol in the centrally administered vasopressin-induced adrenomedullary outflow in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2008-03-17

    Previously, we reported that intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered arginine-vasopressin evokes the secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla through the brain phospholipase C- and diacylglycerol-mediated and cyclooxygenase-mediated mechanisms in rats. Diacylglycerol can be hydrolyzed by diacylglycerol lipase to 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol, which may be further degradated by monoacylglycerol lipase to free arachidonic acid, a representative substrate of cyclooxygenase. Recently, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol has been recognized as a major endocannabinoid, which can modulate synaptic transmission in the brain. In the present experiment, therefore, we examined (1) a role of the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol as a precursor of arachidonic acid in the centrally administered vasopressin-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline, and (2) a regulatory role of the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol as an endocannabinoid on the vasopressin-induced response, using urethane-anesthetized rats. The vasopressin (0.2 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of plasma catecholamines was reduced by RHC-80267 (diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor) (1.3 and 2.6 micromol/animal, i.c.v.) and also reduced by MAFP (monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor) (0.7 and 1.4 micromol/animal, i.c.v.). MAFP (1.4 micromol/animal, i.c.v.) also attenuated the 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (0.5 micromol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of plasma catecholamines. AM 251 (cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist) (90 and 180 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) potentiated the vasopressin (0.2 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced response, while AM 630 (cannabinoid CB(2) receptor antagonist) (198 and 793 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) was largely ineffective. In addition, WIN 55212-2 (cannabinoid CB receptor agonist) (188 and 470 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) dose-dependently reduced the vasopressin-induced response. These results suggest that the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol generated from diacylglycerol plays a role

  7. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Rheological properties of purified illite clays in glycerol/water suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenkova, I.; Malers, J.; Berzina-Cimdina, L.

    2015-04-01

    There are many studies about rheological properties of clay-water suspensions, but no published investigations about clay-glycerol suspensions. In this work apparent viscosity of previously purified illite containing clay fraction < 2 μm and glycerol/water suspensions were investigated. Carbonates were removed by dissolution in hydrochloric and citric acids and other non-clay minerals were almost totally removed by centrifugation. All obtained suspensions behaved as shear-thinning fluids with multiple times higher viscosity than pure glycerol/water solutions. Reduction of clay fraction concentration by 5% decreased the apparent viscosity of 50% glycerol/water suspensions approximately 5 times. There was basically no difference in apparent viscosity between all four 50% glycerol/water suspensions, but in 90% glycerol/water suspensions samples from Iecava deposit showed slightly higher apparent viscosity, which could be affected by the particle size distribution.

  9. Bioconversion of glycerol for bioethanol production using isolated Escherichia coli ss1

    PubMed Central

    Suhaimi, Sheril Norliana; Phang, Lai-Yee; Maeda, Toshinari; Abd-Aziz, Suraini; Wakisaka, Minato; Shirai, Yoshihito; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2012-01-01

    Bioconverting glycerol into various valuable products is one of glycerol's promising applications due to its high availability at low cost and the existence of many glycerol-utilizing microorganisms. Bioethanol and biohydrogen, which are types of renewable fuels, are two examples of bioconverted products. The objectives of this study were to evaluate ethanol production from different media by local microorganism isolates and compare the ethanol fermentation profile of the selected strains to use of glucose or glycerol as sole carbon sources. The ethanol fermentations by six isolates were evaluated after a preliminary screening process. Strain named SS1 produced the highest ethanol yield of 1.0 mol: 1.0 mol glycerol and was identified as Escherichia coli SS1 Also, this isolated strain showed a higher affinity to glycerol than glucose for bioethanol production. PMID:24031858

  10. Valorization of glycerol through the production of biopolymers: the PHB case using Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Javier M; Posada, John A; Higuita, Juan C; Cardona, Carlos A

    2013-04-01

    In this work technical and economic analyses were performed to evaluate the glycerol transformation into Polyhydroxybutyrate using Bacillus megaterium. The production of PHB was compared using glycerol or glucose as substrates and similar yields were obtained. The total production costs for PHB generation with both substrates were estimated at an industrial scale. Compared to glucose, glycerol showed a 10% and 20% decrease in the PHB production costs using two different separation schemes respectively. Moreover, a 20% profit margin in the PHB sales price using glycerol as substrate resulted in a 166% valorization of crude glycerol. In this work, the feasibility of glycerol as feedstock for the production of PHB at laboratory (up to 60% PHB accumulation) and industrial (2.6US$/kgPHB) scales is demonstrated.

  11. Supercooling and vitrification of aqueous glycerol solutions at normal and high pressures.

    PubMed

    Miyata, K; Hayakawa, S; Kajiwara, K; Kanno, H

    2012-10-01

    The supercooling and vitrification of aqueous glycerol solutions was studied at high pressures. Homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures (T(H)) were obtained for aqueous glycerol solutions of R=50, 30, 20, 12, and 10 (R: moles of water/moles of glycerol) up to 300MPa. The R=20 glycerol solution formed a glass above 200MPa at a cooling rate of 200°C/min, indicating that pressure enhances glass-formation of aqueous glycerol solutions. The (dT(g)/dP) values were obtained for vitrified aqueous glycerol solutions of R=3, 5, 10, and 20. These data can be used for the development of cryo-preservation liquids for living cells at high pressures.

  12. Natural nanocontainer for the controlled delivery of glycerol as a moisturizing agent.

    PubMed

    Suh, Y J; Kil, D S; Chung, K S; Abdullayev, E; Lvov, Y M; Mongayt, D

    2011-01-01

    Natural halloysite nanotubes with a 15-nm internal lumen and a 50 nm outer diameter were investigated as a nanocontainer for the loading and extended release of glycerol for cosmetic applications. Cytotoxicity testing of the halloysite was conducted on 3T3 and MCF-7 cells, and the tubules showed no toxic effect on the cells for over 48 h. The capability of halloysite for loading glycerol was higher with the USA halloysite than with the New Zealand's, being approximately 20% and 2.3% by weight, respectively. The total elapsed time for releasing glycerol from the nanotubes exceeded 20 h. To further retard the glycerol release rate, the halloysite samples filled with glycerol were coated with several alternate layers of polyethyleneimine and polyacrylic acid. The release rate remained at the same level, however, probably due to the low molecular weight of the polyelectrolytes and the high solubility of glycerol in water.

  13. Engineering an Obligate Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium to Utilize Glycerol for Growth and Chemical Production.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Masahiro; Atsumi, Shota

    2017-01-20

    Cyanobacteria have attracted much attention as a means to directly recycle carbon dioxide into valuable chemicals that are currently produced from petroleum. However, the titers and productivities achieved are still far below the level required in industry. To make a more industrially applicable production scheme, glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel production, can be used as an additional carbon source for photomixotrophic chemical production. Glycerol is an ideal candidate due to its availability and low cost. In this study, we found that a heterologous glycerol respiratory pathway enabled Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to utilize extracellular glycerol. The engineered strain produced 761 mg/L of 2,3-butanediol in 48 h with a 290% increase over the control strain under continuous light conditions. Glycerol supplementation also allowed for continuous cell growth and 2,3-butanediol production in diurnal light conditions. These results highlight the potential of glycerol as an additional carbon source for photomixotrophic chemical production in cyanobacteria.

  14. [Construction and fermentation of a recombinant Candida glycerinogenes strain with high glycerol production].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ailing; Rao, Zhiming; Ma, Zheng; Zhuge, Bin; Fang, Huiying; Zhuge, Jian

    2009-06-01

    Candida glycerinogenes WL2002-5 (C.g) is an important industrial strain for glycerol production. To further improve glycerol production, we reconstructed a binary vector pCAM3300-zeocin-CgGPD1, introduced it to Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 by electroporation, and then transformed the T-DNA harboring the CgGPD1 to Candida glycerinogenes by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT). After 96 h fermentation with glucose as the substrate, we screened a transformant named C.g-G8 with high glycerol production. Compared with the wild strain, the glucose consumption rate of C.g-G8 and the glycerol production were 12.97% and 18.06% higher, respectively. During the fermentation, the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of C.g-G8 was 27.55% higher than that of the wild strain. The recombinant Candida glycerinogenes with high glycerol production was successful constructed by ATMT method.

  15. Value-added processing of crude glycerol into chemicals and polymers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaolan; Ge, Xumeng; Cui, Shaoqing; Li, Yebo

    2016-09-01

    Crude glycerol is a low-value byproduct which is primarily obtained from the biodiesel production process. Its composition is significantly different from that of pure glycerol. Crude glycerol usually contains various impurities, such as water, methanol, soap, fatty acids, and fatty acid methyl esters. Considerable efforts have been devoted to finding applications for converting crude glycerol into high-value products, such as biofuels, chemicals, polymers, and animal feed, to improve the economic viability of the biodiesel industry and overcome environmental challenges associated with crude glycerol disposal. This article reviews recent advances of biological and chemical technologies for value-added processing of crude glycerol into chemicals and polymers, and provides strategies for addressing production challenges.

  16. Electron beam irradiation of maltodextrin and cinnamyl alcohol mixtures: influence of glycerol on cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Khandal, Dhriti; Aggarwal, Manjeet; Suri, Gunjan; Coqueret, Xavier

    2015-03-06

    The influence of glycerol on the electron beam-induced changes in maltodextrins-cinnamyl alcohol (CA) blends is examined with respect to its influence on the degree of chain scission, grafting, and cross-linking. The study is relevant to radiation-induced polysaccharide modification, specifically in the perspective of using blended starch as a thermoplastic material, where glycerol is commonly used as a plasticizer. In the absence of CA, glycerol protects maltodextrin from chromophore formation onto the main chain, but also induces more chain scission. The presence of CA provides efficient radiation-protection against scission. Glycerol is shown to affect the interaction between maltodextrin and CA, most likely in the form of an inclusion complex when glycerol is absent. The global behavior under radiation is therefore governed by the physical interactions between the blend constituents rather than on the role of glycerol role as a plasticizer, or as an OH˙ radical scavenger.

  17. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  18. Generalized quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Srikanth, R.

    2005-01-01

    We explore a generalization of quantum secret sharing (QSS) in which classical shares play a complementary role to quantum shares, exploring further consequences of an idea first studied by Nascimento, Mueller-Quade, and Imai [Phys. Rev. A 64, 042311 (2001)]. We examine three ways, termed inflation, compression, and twin thresholding, by which the proportion of classical shares can be augmented. This has the important application that it reduces quantum (information processing) players by replacing them with their classical counterparts, thereby making quantum secret sharing considerably easier and less expensive to implement in a practical setting. In compression, a QSS scheme is turned into an equivalent scheme with fewer quantum players, compensated for by suitable classical shares. In inflation, a QSS scheme is enlarged by adding only classical shares and players. In a twin-threshold scheme, we invoke two separate thresholds for classical and quantum shares based on the idea of information dilution.

  19. Proactive quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2015-11-01

    A proactive quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the participants can update their key shares periodically. In an updating period, one participant randomly generates the EPR pairs, and the other participants update their key shares and perform the corresponding unitary operations on the particles of the EPR pairs. Then, the participant who generated the EPR pairs performs the Bell-state measurement and updates his key share according to the result of the Bell-state measurement. After an updating period, each participant can change his key share, but the secret is changeless, and the old key shares will be useless even if they have been stolen by the attacker. The proactive property of our scheme is very useful to resist the mobile attacker.

  20. Cell secretion: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jeremic, A

    2008-01-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed ‘porosome’ and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article. PMID:18363838

  1. Secret Key Crypto Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Guido Marco; Melzani, Filippo

    This chapter presents the algorithm selected in 2001 as the Advanced Encryption Standard. This algorithm is the base for implementing security and privacy based on symmetric key solutions in almost all new applications. Secret key algorithms are used in combination with modes of operation to provide different security properties. The most used modes of operation are presented in this chapter. Finally an overview of the different techniques of software and hardware implementations is given.

  2. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  3. Catechin secretion and phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Shail

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that the invasiveness of Centaurea stoebe is attributed to the stronger allelopathic effects on the native North American species than on the related European species, which is one of the unquestionable aspects of the “novel weapons hypothesis (NWH).” Studies originating from controlled to field conditions have shown that C. stoebe utilizes its biochemical potential to exert its invasiveness. The roots of C. stoebe secrete a potent phytotoxin, catechin, which has a detrimental effect on the surrounding plant species. Although, studies on catechin secretion and phytotoxicity represent one of the most well studied systems describing negative plant-plant interactions, it has also sparked controversies lately due to its phytotoxicity dosages and secretion effluxes. Previous reports negate the phytotoxic and pro-oxidant nature of catechin.1–3 In our recent study we have shown that catechin is highly phytotoxic against Arabidopsis thaliana and Festuca idahoensis. We also show that (±) catechin applied to roots of A. thaliana induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) confirming the pro-oxidant nature of catechin. In addition, activation of signature cell death genes such as acd2 and cad1 post catechin treatment in A. thaliana ascertains the phytotoxic nature of catechin. PMID:21057643

  4. Thermal Transitions and Extrusion of Glycerol-Plasticized Whey Protein Mixtures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of glycerol and moisture contents on the thermal transitions of whey protein isolate (WPI) powder-glycerol-water mixtures were studied. Mixtures with ratios of 100:0, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 WPI:glycerol on a dry basis (db) were pre-conditioned to 0.34+/-0.01 (25.4±0.4ºC) and 0.48+/-0.02...

  5. Anaerobic fermentation of glycerol in Paenibacillus macerans: metabolic pathways and environmental determinants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Murarka, Abhishek; Campbell, Paul; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2009-09-01

    Paenibacillus macerans is one of the species with the broadest metabolic capabilities in the genus Paenibacillus, able to ferment hexoses, deoxyhexoses, pentoses, cellulose, and hemicellulose. However, little is known about glycerol metabolism in this organism, and some studies have reported that glycerol is not fermented. Despite these reports, we found that several P. macerans strains are capable of anaerobic fermentation of glycerol. One of these strains, P. macerans N234A, grew fermentatively on glycerol at a maximum specific growth rate of 0.40 h(-1) and was chosen for further characterization. The use of [U-13C]glycerol and further analysis of extracellular metabolites and proteinogenic amino acids via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allowed identification of ethanol, formate, acetate, succinate, and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO) as fermentation products and demonstrated that glycerol is incorporated into cellular components. A medium formulation with low concentrations of potassium and phosphate, cultivation at acidic pH, and the use of a CO2-enriched atmosphere stimulated glycerol fermentation and are proposed to be environmental determinants of this process. The pathways involved in glycerol utilization and synthesis of fermentation products were identified using NMR spectroscopy in combination with enzyme assays. Based on these studies, the synthesis of ethanol and 1,2-PDO is proposed to be a metabolic determinant of glycerol fermentation in P. macerans N234A. Conversion of glycerol to ethanol fulfills energy requirements by generating one molecule of ATP per molecule of ethanol synthesized. Conversion of glycerol to 1,2-PDO results in the consumption of reducing equivalents, thus facilitating redox balance. Given the availability, low price, and high degree of reduction of glycerol, the high metabolic rates exhibited by P. macerans N234A are of paramount importance for the production of fuels and chemicals.

  6. Quantitative analysis of glycerol in dicarboxylic acid-rich cutins provides insights into Arabidopsis cutin structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Pollard, Mike; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Ohlrogge, John

    2016-10-01

    Cutin is an extracellular lipid polymer that contributes to protective cuticle barrier functions against biotic and abiotic stresses in land plants. Glycerol has been reported as a component of cutin, contributing up to 14% by weight of total released monomers. Previous studies using partial hydrolysis of cuticle-enriched preparations established the presence of oligomers with glycerol-aliphatic ester links. Furthermore, glycerol-3-phosphate 2-O-acyltransferases (sn-2-GPATs) are essential for cutin biosynthesis. However, precise roles of glycerol in cutin assembly and structure remain uncertain. Here, a stable isotope-dilution assay was developed for the quantitative analysis of glycerol by GC/MS of triacetin with simultaneous determination of aliphatic monomers. To provide clues about the role of glycerol in dicarboxylic acid (DCA)-rich cutins, this methodology was applied to compare wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis cutin with a series of mutants that are defective in cutin synthesis. The molar ratio of glycerol to total DCAs in WT cutins was 2:1. Even when allowing for a small additional contribution from hydroxy fatty acids, this is a substantially higher glycerol to aliphatic monomer ratio than previously reported for any cutin. Glycerol content was strongly reduced in both stem and leaf cutin from all Arabidopsis mutants analyzed (gpat4/gpat8, att1-2 and lacs2-3). In addition, the molar reduction of glycerol was proportional to the molar reduction of total DCAs. These results suggest "glycerol-DCA-glycerol" may be the dominant motif in DCA-rich cutins. The ramifications and caveats for this hypothesis are presented.

  7. Effects of deletion of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase genes on glycerol and ethanol metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Chin, Young-Wook; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Bioethanol is currently used as an alternative fuel for gasoline worldwide. For economic production of bioethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, formation of a main by-product, glycerol, should be prevented or minimized in order to reduce a separation cost of ethanol from fermentation broth. In this study, S. cerevisiae was engineered to investigate the effects of the sole and double disruption of NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1) and NADPH-requiring glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) on the production of glycerol and ethanol from glucose. Even though sole deletion of GPD1 or GDH1 reduced glycerol production, double deletion of GPD1 and GDH1 resulted in the lowest glycerol concentration of 2.31 g/L, which was 46.4% lower than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the recombinant S. cerevisiae ∆GPD1∆GDH1 strain showed a slight improvement in ethanol yield (0.414 g/g) compared with the wild-type strain (0.406 g/g). Genetic engineering of the glycerol and glutamate metabolic pathways modified NAD(P)H-requiring metabolic pathways and exerted a positive effect on glycerol reduction without affecting ethanol production.

  8. Microbial synthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate from glycerol: gluconeogenesis, molecular weight and material properties of biopolyester.

    PubMed

    Tanadchangsaeng, Nuttapol; Yu, Jian

    2012-11-01

    Glycerol is considered as an ideal feedstock for producing bioplastics via bacterial fermentation due to its ubiquity, low price, and high degree of reduction substrate. In this work, we study the yield and cause of limitation in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) production from glycerol. Compared to glucose-based PHB production, PHB produced by Cupriavidus necator grown on glycerol has a low productivity (0.92 g PHB/L/h) with a comparably low maximum specific growth rate of 0.11 h(-1) . We found that C. necator can synthesize glucose from glycerol and that the lithotrophical utilization of glycerol (non-fermentative substrate) or gluconeogenesis is an essential metabolic pathway for biosynthesis of cellular components. Here, we show that gluconeogenesis affects the reduction of cell mass, the productivity of biopolymer product, and the molecular chain size of intracellular PHB synthesized from glycerol by C. necator. We use NMR spectroscopy to show that the isolated PHB is capped by glycerol. We then characterized the physical properties of the isolated glycerol-based PHB with differential scanning calorimetry and tensile tests. We found that although the final molecular weight of the glycerol-based PHB is lower than those of glucose-based and commercial PHB, the thermal and mechanical properties of the biopolymers are similar.

  9. Determination of glycerol in oils and fats using liquid chromatography chloride attachment electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunfen; Viidanoja, Jyrki

    2017-01-15

    Existing liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry method for the analysis of short chain carboxylic acids was expanded and validated to cover also the measurement of glycerol from oils and fats. The method employs chloride anion attachment and two ions, [glycerol+(35)Cl](-) and [glycerol+(37)Cl](-), as alternative quantifiers for improved selectivity of glycerol measurement. The averaged within run precision, between run precision and accuracy ranged between 0.3-7%, 0.4-6% and 94-99%, respectively, depending on the analyte ion and sample matrix. Selected renewable diesel feedstocks were analyzed with the method.

  10. Engineering of the glycerol decomposition pathway and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast improves ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Tang, Yan; Guo, Zhongpeng; Shi, Guiyang

    2013-10-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of industrial ethanol production and its formation consumes up to 4 % of the sugar substrate. This study modified the glycerol decomposition pathway of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to optimize the consumption of substrate and yield of ethanol. This study is the first to couple glycerol degradation with ethanol formation, to the best of our knowledge. The recombinant strain overexpressing GCY1 and DAK1, encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and dihydroxyacetone kinase, respectively, in glycerol degradation pathway, exhibited a moderate increase in ethanol yield (2.9 %) and decrease in glycerol yield (24.9 %) compared to the wild type with the initial glucose concentration of 15 % under anaerobic conditions. However, when the mhpF gene, encoding acetylating NAD⁺-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli, was co-expressed in the aforementioned recombinant strain, a further increase in ethanol yield by 5.5 % and decrease in glycerol yield by 48 % were observed for the resultant recombinant strain GDMS1 when acetic acid was added into the medium prior to inoculation compared to the wild type. The process outlined in this study which enhances glycerol consumption and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast is a promising metabolic engineering strategy to increase ethanol production by reducing the formation of glycerol.

  11. Enzymatic coproduction of biodiesel and glycerol carbonate from soybean oil in solvent-free system.

    PubMed

    Go, A-Ra; Lee, Youngrak; Kim, Young Hwan; Park, Sehkyu; Choi, Joongso; Lee, Jinwon; Han, Sung Ok; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chulhwan

    2013-08-15

    The enzymatic coproduction of biodiesel and glycerol carbonate by transesterification of soybean oil and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) has been studied in a solvent-free system. The effects on biodiesel and glycerol carbonate conversion of reaction conditions including the kind of enzyme, the amount of enzyme, the molar ratio of DMC to soybean oil, the reaction temperature, and water addition were investigated. The optimal conditions for biodiesel and glycerol carbonate were 20% Novozym 435, 10:1 molar ratio of DMC to soybean oil, and 0.7% water addition. Under these conditions, the conversions of 96.4% biodiesel and 92.1% glycerol carbonate have been achieved after 48h.

  12. Effect of crude glycerol-derived inhibitors on ethanol production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Sung Bong; Kang, Seong Woo; Han, Sung Ok; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2012-01-01

    In this study, ethanol production from pure and crude glycerol using Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 29007 was evaluated under anaerobic culture conditions. Inhibitory effects of substrate concentrations, pH, and salt concentrations were investigated based on crude glycerol components. Ethanol production was performed with pure glycerol concentrations ranging from 5 to 30 g/L to evaluate the effects of substrate concentration and osmotic pressure. The consumed glycerol was 5-14.33 g/L, and the yield of ethanol was higher than 0.75 mol ethanol/mol glycerol after 24 h of cultivation. To evaluate the inhibitory effects of salts (NaCl and KCl), experiments were performed with 0-20 g/L of each salt. Inhibitory effects of salts were strongest at high salt concentrations. The inhibitory effect of pH was performed in the pH range 4-10, and cell growth and ethanol production were highest at pH 5-6. Also, ethanol production was slightly inhibited at low concentration of crude glycerol comparison with pure glycerol. However, significant inhibitory effects were not observed at 1.5 and 2% crude glycerol which showed higher ethanol production compared to pure glycerol.

  13. Non-enzymatic electrochemical detection of glycerol on boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Pop, Aniela; Manea, Florica; Radovan, Ciprian; Dascalu, Dana; Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Schoonman, Joop

    2012-02-07

    A non-enzymatic direct electrochemical glycerol detection method at a commercial boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode in 0.1 M NaOH supporting electrolyte was developed. All the used electrochemical techniques proved useful features for the oxidation and direct amperometric determination of glycerol at a BDD electrode in 0.1 M NaOH aqueous solution. It was found that the direct electrooxidation of glycerol on the BDD electrode requires both adsorbed glycerol and hydroxyls at the electrode surface. Also, the sp(2) carbon did not allow enhancement of the glycerol oxidation process. The electronalytical sensitivity for the determination of glycerol at the BDD electrode ranged from 0.040 to 0.226 μA mM(-1) as a function of the technique used. The highest electroanalytical sensitivity for the determination of glycerol at the BDD electrode was reached in batch system amperometric quantification under stirring conditions. Performed recovery studies indicated that it is possible to determine glycerol in real samples, and the proposed batch system analysis-based methodology can be a valuable tool for practical glycerol analysis.

  14. Effect of glycerol on local and systemic carcinogenicity of topically applied tobacco condensate.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J.; Clapp, M. J.; Conning, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    When glycerol was added to tobacco smoke condensate in acetone solvent, the topical carcinogenicity and the ability to produce epithelial hyperplasia in mice was reduced. Two doses of condensate were applied, combined with 2 concentrations of added glycerol. Age-standardized results show that glycerol reduced the incidence of tumours and malignant tumours and of hyperplasia in animals not developing skin tumours. The relative incidences of malignant tumours, benign tumours, hyperplasia and unaffected skin suggest that there is a sequential relationship (i.e. normal skin to hyperplasia to benign neoplasia to malignant neoplasia) which is impeded by glycerol. There was no systemic effect attributable to the condensate. PMID:698039

  15. Do secretions from the uropygial gland of birds attract biting midges and black flies?

    PubMed

    Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Rivero-de Aguilar, Juan; Del Cerro, Sara; Argüello, Anastasio; Merino, Santiago

    2011-12-01

    Bird susceptibility to attacks by blood-sucking flying insects could be influenced by urogypial gland secretions. To determine the effect of these secretions on biting midges and black flies, we set up a series of tests. First, we placed uropygial gland secretions from blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus broods inside empty nest boxes while empty nest boxes without gland secretions were treated as controls. Blue tit broods, from which we had obtained uropygial secretions, were affected by biting midges and black flies. However, these insects were absent in nest boxes both with and without secretions from nestlings' uropygial glands. We subsequently tested for the effects of uropygial gland secretions from feral pigeons Columba livia monitoring the number of biting midges captured using miniature CDC traps. There was no significant difference in the number of biting midges captured. Overall, our results did not support a potential role of avian uropygial gland secretions in attracting biting midges and black flies.

  16. Self-assembling behavior of glycerol monoundecenoate in water.

    PubMed

    Nyame Mendendy Boussambe, Gildas; Valentin, Romain; Fabre, Jean-François; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric; Gaillard, Cedric; Mouloungui, Zephirin

    2017-03-14

    Self-assembling properties of glycerol esters in water are well known. Still, few data on glyc-erol monoesters of undecylenic acid are available. The aim of this study was to highlight the behavior of the glycerol monoundecenoate (GM-C11:1) in different, diluted and concentrated states. Self-assembling properties in water and upon solid inorganic surfaces were investigated in diluted state with surface tension experiments, AFM and Cryo-TEM studies. In concen-trated state, the gelling properties in presence of water were investigated by polarized light microscopy, DSC and SAXS experiments. GM-C11:1 at 100 mg/L self-assembles at the liq-uid/air interfaces as aggregates of about 20 nm in diameter, organized into concentric forms. These aggregates were spherical globules composed of several molecules of GM-C11:1. At higher concentrations (1000 mg/L and 104 mg/L), GM-C11:1 was able to coat uniformly liq-uid/air and liquid/solid interfaces. In bulk GM-C11:1 form spontaneously aggregates and ves-icles. In more concentrated state, GM-C11:1 assembles into lamellar Lβ and Lα form in water. By cross-referencing SAXS and DSC findings, we were able to distinguish between interla-mellar water molecules strongly bound to GM-C11:1 and other molecules remaining unbound and considered as "mobile" water. The percentage of water strongly bound was proportional to the percentage of GM-C11:1 in the system. In this case, GM-C11:1 appears to be an effec-tive molecule for surface treatments for which water retention is important.

  17. Glycerol effects on protein flexibility: a tryptophan phosphorescence study.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, M.; Strambini, G. B.

    1993-01-01

    In exploring the dynamic properties of protein structure, numerous studies have focussed on the dependence of structural fluctuations on solvent viscosity, but the emerging picture is still not well defined. Exploiting the sensitivity of the phosphorescence lifetime of tryptophan to the viscosity of its environment we have used the delayed emission as an intrinsic probe of protein flexibility and investigated the effects of glycerol as a viscogenic cosolvent. The phosphorescence lifetime of alcohol dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, apoazurin and RNase T1, as a function of glycerol concentration was studied at various temperatures. Flexibility data, which refer to rather rigid sites of the globular structures, point out that, for some concentration ranges glycerol, effects on the rate of structural fluctuations of alcohol dehydrogenase and RNase T1 do not obey Kramers' a power law on solvent viscosity and emphasize that cosolvent-induced structural changes can be important, even for inner cores of the macromolecule. When the data is analyzed in terms of Kramers' model, for the temperature range 0-30 degrees C one derives frictional coefficients that are relatively large (0.6-0.7) for RNase T1, where the probe is in a flexible region near the surface of the macromolecule and much smaller, less than 0.2, for the rigid sites of the other proteins. For the latter sites the frictional coefficient rises sharply between 40 and 60 degrees C, and its value correlates weakly with molecular parameters such as the depth of burial or the rigidity of a particular site. For RNase T1, coupling to solvent viscosity increases at subzero temperatures, with the coefficient becoming as large as 1 at -20 degrees C. Temperature effects were interpreted by proposing that solvent damping of internal protein motions is particularly effective for low frequency, large amplitude, structural fluctuations yielding highly flexible conformers of the macromolecule. PMID:8369422

  18. Pre-exercise glycerol hydration improves cycling endurance time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montner, P.; Stark, D. M.; Riedesel, M. L.; Murata, G.; Robergs, R.; Timms, M.; Chick, T. W.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of glycerol ingestion (GEH) on hydration and subsequent cycle ergometer submaximal load exercise were examined in well conditioned subjects. We hypothesized that GEH would reduce physiologic strain and increase endurance. The purpose of Study I (n = 11) was to determine if pre-exercise GEH (1.2 gm/kg glycerol in 26 ml/kg solution) compared to pre-exercise placebo hydration (PH) (26 ml/kg of aspartame flavored water) lowered heart rate (HR), lowered rectal temperature (Tc), and prolonged endurance time (ET) during submaximal load cycle ergometry. The purpose of Study II (n = 7) was to determine if the same pre-exercise regimen followed by carbohydrate oral replacement solution (ORS) during exercise also lowered HR, Tc, and prolonged ET. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, crossover trials, performed at an ambient temperature of 23.5-24.5 degrees C, and humidity of 25-27%. Mean HR was lower by 2.8 +/- 0.4 beats/min (p = 0.05) after GEH in Study I and by 4.4 +/- 1.1 beats/min (p = 0.01) in Study II. Endurance time was prolonged after GEH in Study I (93.8 +/- 14 min vs. 77.4 +/- 9 min, p = 0.049) and in Study II (123.4 +/- 17 min vs. 99.0 +/- 11 min, p = 0.03). Rectal temperature did not differ between hydration regimens in both Study I and Study II. Thus, pre-exercise glycerol-enhanced hyperhydration lowers HR and prolongs ET even when combined with ORS during exercise. The regimens tested in this study could potentially be adapted for endurance activities.

  19. Pre-exercise glycerol hydration improves cycling endurance time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montner, P.; Stark, D. M.; Riedesel, M. L.; Murata, G.; Robergs, R.; Timms, M.; Chick, T. W.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of glycerol ingestion (GEH) on hydration and subsequent cycle ergometer submaximal load exercise were examined in well conditioned subjects. We hypothesized that GEH would reduce physiologic strain and increase endurance. The purpose of Study I (n = 11) was to determine if pre-exercise GEH (1.2 gm/kg glycerol in 26 ml/kg solution) compared to pre-exercise placebo hydration (PH) (26 ml/kg of aspartame flavored water) lowered heart rate (HR), lowered rectal temperature (Tc), and prolonged endurance time (ET) during submaximal load cycle ergometry. The purpose of Study II (n = 7) was to determine if the same pre-exercise regimen followed by carbohydrate oral replacement solution (ORS) during exercise also lowered HR, Tc, and prolonged ET. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, crossover trials, performed at an ambient temperature of 23.5-24.5 degrees C, and humidity of 25-27%. Mean HR was lower by 2.8 +/- 0.4 beats/min (p = 0.05) after GEH in Study I and by 4.4 +/- 1.1 beats/min (p = 0.01) in Study II. Endurance time was prolonged after GEH in Study I (93.8 +/- 14 min vs. 77.4 +/- 9 min, p = 0.049) and in Study II (123.4 +/- 17 min vs. 99.0 +/- 11 min, p = 0.03). Rectal temperature did not differ between hydration regimens in both Study I and Study II. Thus, pre-exercise glycerol-enhanced hyperhydration lowers HR and prolongs ET even when combined with ORS during exercise. The regimens tested in this study could potentially be adapted for endurance activities.

  20. Dynamic shear modulus of glycerol: Corrections due to instrument compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, K.; Hutcheson, S. A.; Shi, X.; Mandanici, A.; McKenna, G. B.

    2006-12-01

    A recent article by Shi et al. [J. Chem. Phys.123, 174507 (2005)] reports results from mechanical measurements on three simple inorganic glass formers: glycerol, m-toluidine, and sucrose benzoate. The experiments carried out were stress relaxation, aging, and dynamic (all in shear) using a torsional rheometer, an advanced rheometric expansion system (TA Instruments). The original force rebalance transducer (2KFRT) supplied with the system was replaced with a custom-made load cell (Sensotec) that had a capacity of 20000gcm in torque and 5000g in normal force. The replacement of the load cell was done due to the belief that the main source of compliance in this instrument was from the 2KFRT. With this assumption, the authors published their results for the three materials of interest and compared their results with the techniques of Schröter and Donth [J. Chem. Phys.113, 9101 (2000)] for the measurements on glycerol and reported important differences. These differences were disputed by one of the present authors (Schröter), and the present report shows that the results from Schröter and Donth are correct. We show that the reasons have to do with the instrument compliance being greater than originally thought by Shi et al. Here we examine the effects of platen diameter/geometry on the glycerol dynamic moduli, describe a means to correct dynamic data, present a revised comparison of the corrected data with that of Schröter and Donth, and provide a discussion of future work and conclusions.

  1. Scattering of water from the glycerol liquid-vacuum interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, I.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Nathanson, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of the scattering of D2O from the glycerol surface at different collision energies are reported. The results for the trapping probabilities and energy transfer are in good agreement with experiments. The calculations demonstrate that the strong attractive forces between these two strongly hydrogen bonding molecules have only a minor effect on the initial collision dynamics. The trapping probability is influenced to a significant extent by the repulsive hard sphere-like initial encounter with the corrugated surface and, only at a later stage, by the efficiency of energy flow in the multiple interactions between the water and the surface molecules.

  2. Scattering of water from the glycerol liquid-vacuum interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, I.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Nathanson, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of the scattering of D2O from the glycerol surface at different collision energies are reported. The results for the trapping probabilities and energy transfer are in good agreement with experiments. The calculations demonstrate that the strong attractive forces between these two strongly hydrogen bonding molecules have only a minor effect on the initial collision dynamics. The trapping probability is influenced to a significant extent by the repulsive hard sphere-like initial encounter with the corrugated surface and, only at a later stage, by the efficiency of energy flow in the multiple interactions between the water and the surface molecules.

  3. Autotransporter protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Tame, Jeremy R H

    2011-12-01

    Autotransporter proteins are a large family of virulence factors secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a unique mechanism. First described in the 1980s, these proteins have a C-terminal region that folds into a β-barrel in the bacterial outer membrane. The so-called passenger domain attached to this barrel projects away from the cell surface and may be liberated from the cell by self-cleavage or surface proteases. Although the majority of passenger domains have a similar β-helical structure, they carry a variety of sub-domains, allowing them to carry out widely differing functions related to pathogenesis. Considerable biochemical and structural characterisation of the barrel domain has shown that 'autotransporters' in fact require a conserved and essential protein complex in the outer membrane for correct folding. Although the globular domains of this complex projecting into the periplasmic space have also been structurally characterised, the overall secretion pathway of the autotransporters remains highly puzzling. It was presumed for many years that the passenger domain passed through the centre of the barrel domain to reach the cell surface, driven at least in part by folding. This picture is complicated by conflicting data, and there is currently little hard information on the true nature of the secretion intermediates. As well as their medical importance therefore, autotransporters are proving to be an excellent system to study the folding and membrane insertion of outer membrane proteins in general. This review focuses on structural aspects of autotransporters; their many functions in pathogenesis are beyond its scope.

  4. L (+)-lactic acid production by pellet-form Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 395 on biodiesel crude glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given its availability and low price, glycerol derived from biodiesel industry has become an ideal feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. A solution to reduce the negative environmental problems and the cost of biodiesel is to use crude glycerol as carbon source for microbial growth media in order to produce valuable organic chemicals. In the present paper, crude glycerol was used as carbon substrate for production of L (+)-lactic acid using pelletized fungus R. oryzae NRRL 395 on batch fermentation. More, the experiments were conducted on media supplemented with inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. Results Crude and pure glycerols were first used to produce the highest biomass yield of R. oryzae NRRL 395. An enhanced lactic acid production then followed up using fed-batch fermentation with crude glycerol, inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. The optimal crude glycerol concentration for cultivating R. oryzae NRRL 395 was 75 g l-1, which resulted in a fungal biomass yield of 0.72 g g-1 in trial without lucerne green juice addition and 0.83 g g-1 in trial with lucerne green juice. The glycerol consumption rate was 1.04 g l-1 h-1 after 48 h in trial with crude glycerol 75 g l-1 while in trial with crude glycerol 10 g l-1 the lowest rate of 0.12 g l-1 h-1 was registered. The highest L (+)-lactic acid yield (3.72 g g-1) was obtained at the crude glycerol concentration of 75 g l-1 and LGJ 25 g l-1, and the concentration of lactic acid was approximately 48 g l-1. Conclusions This work introduced sustainable opportunities for L (+)-lactic acid production via R. oryzae NRRL 395 fermentation on biodiesel crude glycerol media. The results showed good fungal growth on crude glycerol at 75 g l-1 concentration with lucerne green juice supplementation of 25 g l-1. Lucerne green juice provided a good source of nutrients for crude glycerol fermentation, without needs for supplementation with inorganic nutrients

  5. Palatability, digestibility, and metabolizable energy of dietary glycerol in adult cats.

    PubMed

    Machado, G S; Pezzali, J G; Marx, F R; Kessler, A M; Trevizan, L

    2017-02-01

    Glycerol is a humectant, which reduces water activity when added to the diet. This property seems to offer dietary benefits, specifically in high-moisture diets for cats, where some humectants cannot be used. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, glycerol is generally recognized as sustenance safe (GRAS). It is suggested that cats are able to metabolize glycerol and use it as an energy source without compromising health. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the following characteristics of glycerol in the diet for cats: 1) a preference test, 2) digestibility, ME, and fecal and urinary characteristics, and 3) postprandial plasma glycemia. Twelve healthy adult female cats were randomly distributed among 4 treatments consisting of a basal diet (4,090 kcal ME/kg DM, 32% CP, 11% fat, 2.3% crude fiber, and 7.0% ash) and 3 diets with varying percentages of glycerol, made by replacing the basal diet with 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0% purified glycerol (99.5%). The inclusion of glycerol proportionally reduced ( < 0.05) water activity in the diets. The preference test was conducted by observing the contrast between the basal diet and the 5.0% and 10% glycerol diets. Cats did not show a preference for any diet in particular ( > 0.05). The digestibility assays showed that increasing dietary glycerol levels did not affect food intake or the apparent total tract digestibility of macronutrients and energy ( > 0.05). The inclusion of glycerol in the diets did not alter the stool moisture, fecal score, or urine volume. However, glycerol was detected in urine when it was incorporated into the diet at 10%. Glycemia increased up to 900 min following the first meal after the fasting period with no difference between treatments, even when the means were adjusted for food intake. The blood glucose area under the curve also showed no significant difference between treatments ( > 0.05). Cats accepted glycerol under the conditions of the study, and its nutritional value was

  6. L (+)-lactic acid production by pellet-form Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 395 on biodiesel crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Vodnar, Dan C; Dulf, Francisc V; Pop, Oana L; Socaciu, Carmen

    2013-10-10

    Given its availability and low price, glycerol derived from biodiesel industry has become an ideal feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. A solution to reduce the negative environmental problems and the cost of biodiesel is to use crude glycerol as carbon source for microbial growth media in order to produce valuable organic chemicals. In the present paper, crude glycerol was used as carbon substrate for production of L (+)-lactic acid using pelletized fungus R. oryzae NRRL 395 on batch fermentation. More, the experiments were conducted on media supplemented with inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. Crude and pure glycerols were first used to produce the highest biomass yield of R. oryzae NRRL 395. An enhanced lactic acid production then followed up using fed-batch fermentation with crude glycerol, inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. The optimal crude glycerol concentration for cultivating R. oryzae NRRL 395 was 75 g l(-1), which resulted in a fungal biomass yield of 0.72 g g(-1) in trial without lucerne green juice addition and 0.83 g g(-1) in trial with lucerne green juice. The glycerol consumption rate was 1.04 g l(-1) h(-1) after 48 h in trial with crude glycerol 75 g l(-1) while in trial with crude glycerol 10 g l(-1) the lowest rate of 0.12 g l(-1) h(-1) was registered. The highest L (+)-lactic acid yield (3.72 g g(-1)) was obtained at the crude glycerol concentration of 75 g l(-1) and LGJ 25 g l(-1), and the concentration of lactic acid was approximately 48 g l(-1). This work introduced sustainable opportunities for L (+)-lactic acid production via R. oryzae NRRL 395 fermentation on biodiesel crude glycerol media. The results showed good fungal growth on crude glycerol at 75 g l(-1) concentration with lucerne green juice supplementation of 25 g l(-1). Lucerne green juice provided a good source of nutrients for crude glycerol fermentation, without needs for supplementation with inorganic nutrients. Crude glycerol and lucerne

  7. Improved glycerol utilization by a triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus strain for renewable fuels.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiko; Radek, Andreas; Plassmeier, Jens K; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol generated during renewable fuel production processes is potentially an attractive substrate for the production of value-added materials by fermentation. An engineered strain MITXM-61 of the oleaginous bacterium Rhodococcus opacus produces large amounts of intracellular triacylglycerols (TAGs) for lipid-based biofuels on high concentrations of glucose and xylose. However, on glycerol medium, MITXM-61 does not produce TAGs and grows poorly. The aim of the present work was to construct a TAG-producing R. opacus strain capable of high-cell-density cultivation at high glycerol concentrations. An adaptive evolution strategy was applied to improve the conversion of glycerol to TAGs in R. opacus MITXM-61. An evolved strain, MITGM-173, grown on a defined medium with 16 g L(-1) glycerol, produced 2.3 g L(-1) of TAGs, corresponding to 40.4% of the cell dry weight (CDW) and 0.144 g g(-1) of TAG yield per glycerol consumed. MITGM-173 was able to grow on high concentrations (greater than 150 g L(-1)) of glycerol. Cultivated in a medium containing an initial concentration of 20 g L(-1) glycerol, 40 g L(-1) glucose, and 40 g L(-1) xylose, MITGM-173 was capable of simultaneously consuming the mixed substrates and yielding 13.6 g L(-1) of TAGs, representing 51.2% of the CDM. In addition, when 20 g L(-1) glycerol was pulse-loaded into the culture with 40 g L(-1) glucose and 40 g L(-1) xylose at the stationary growth phase, MITGM-173 produced 14.3 g L(-1) of TAGs corresponding to 51.1% of the CDW although residual glycerol in the culture was observed. The addition of 20 g L(-1) glycerol in the glucose/xylose mix resulted in a TAG yield per glycerol consumed of 0.170 g g(-1) on the initial addition and 0.279 g g(-1) on the pulse addition of glycerol. We have generated a TAG-producing R. opacus MITGM-173 strain that shows significantly improved glycerol utilization in comparison to the parental strain. The present study demonstrates that the

  8. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  9. Use of molecular dynamics to assess the biophysiological role of hydroxyl groups in glycerol dyalkyl glycerol teraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Carme; Costenaro, Lionel; Fietz, Susanne; Daura, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The cell membrane of some Archaea is constituted by lipids that span the whole membrane width and contain two alkyl chains bound by two glycerol groups (glycerol dyalkyl glycerol teraethers or GDGTs). These lipids confer stability to the membrane in mesophile to extremophile environments. Besides the more frequently studied isoprenoid archaeal lipids, both mono- and dihydroxy-GDGTs (OH-GDGT) have been recently reported to occur in marine sediments (1). OH-GDGTs contain up to two cyclopentane moieties and have been identified in both core and intact forms. In 2013, a correlation between OH-GDGTs and temperature was reported, with higher relative OH-GDGT abundances at high latitudes (2,3). The physiological function of the hydroxyl group in a GDGT is not yet known, but given the field results, it could be linked to an adaptation of the membrane to changes in temperature. For hydroxydiether lipid cores in methanogenic bacteria, it has been postulated that the hydroxyl group may alter the cell membrane properties: either extending the polar head group region or creating a hydrophilic pocket (4). It has also been suggested that the hydroxylation of the biphytany (l) moiety may result in enhanced membrane rigidity (1). To improve our understanding of the effect of the hydroxylation on physical properties of membranes, we performed molecular-dynamics simulations of GDGT membranes presenting and lacking these additional OH groups. This is an approach with a great development potential in the archaea lipid field, especially in relation to proxy validation. Our results indicate that the addition of an OH increases the membrane fluidity, thus providing an advantage in cold environments. We also observe a widening of the polar head group area, which could enhance transport. 1. Liu et al. 2012, GCA 2. Huguet et al. 2013, Org. Geochem 3. Fietz et al. 2013 4. Sprott et al. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265, 13735-13740.

  10. Fermentation of glycerol by Anaerobium acetethylicum and its potential use in biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yogita; Junghare, Madan; Müller, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    Growth of biodiesel industries resulted in increased coproduction of crude glycerol which is therefore becoming a waste product instead of a valuable 'coproduct'. Glycerol can be used for the production of valuable chemicals, e.g. biofuels, to reduce glycerol waste disposal. In this study, a novel bacterial strain is described which converts glycerol mainly to ethanol and hydrogen with very little amounts of acetate, formate and 1,2-propanediol as coproducts. The bacterium offers certain advantages over previously studied glycerol-fermenting microorganisms. Anaerobium acetethylicum during growth with glycerol produces very little side products and grows in the presence of maximum glycerol concentrations up to 1500 mM and in the complete absence of complex organic supplements such as yeast extract or tryptone. The highest observed growth rate of 0.116 h(-1) is similar to that of other glycerol degraders, and the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be tolerated was found to be about 60 mM (2.8 g l(-1) ) and further growth was likely inhibited due to ethanol toxicity. Proteome analysis as well as enzyme assays performed in cell-free extracts demonstrated that glycerol is degraded via glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, which is further metabolized through the lower part of glycolysis leading to formation of mainly ethanol and hydrogen. In conclusion, fermentation of glycerol to ethanol and hydrogen by this bacterium represents a remarkable option to add value to the biodiesel industries by utilization of surplus glycerol. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Green tea catechins: inhibitors of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Cheng; Wu, Bo-Tsung; Tsuei, Yi-Wei; Shih, Li-Jane; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2010-05-01

    Green tea catechins, especially (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), are known to regulate obesity and fat accumulation. We performed a kinetic analysis in a cell-free system to determine the mode of inhibition of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH; EC 1.1.1.8) by EGCG. GPDH catalyzes the beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent reduction of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to yield glycerol-3-phosphate, which serves as one of the major precursors of triacylglycerols. We found that EGCG dose-dependently inhibited GPDH activity at a concentration of approximately 20 muM for 50 % inhibition. The IC (50) values of other green tea catechins, such as (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin, were all above 100 microM. This suggests a catechin type-dependent effect. Based on double-reciprocal plots of the kinetic data, EGCG was a noncompetitive inhibitor of the GPDH substrates, NADH and DHAP, with respective inhibition constants (Ki) of 18 and 31 microM. Results of this study possibly support previous studies that EGCG mediates fat content. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.

  12. Stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps: role of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Sagitani, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, fatty acid potassium soaps, glycerol and water are essential ingredients in the production of stable cream soaps. In this study, the behavior of these components in solution was investigated to elucidate the stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps. It was determined that the cream soaps were a dispersion of 1:1 acid soap (1:1 molar ratio of potassium soap/fatty acid) crystals in the lamellar gel phase, which has confirmed from the phase behavior diagrams and small angle X-ray scattering data. Glycerol was crucial ingredient in the formation of the lamellar gel phase. The cleansing process of the cream soaps was also evaluated using the same diagrams. The structure of the continuous phase in cream soaps changed from lamellar gel to a micellar aqueous solution upon the addition of water. This structural change during the washing process is important in producing the foaming activity of acid soaps to wash away dirt or excess fats from the skin surface.

  13. Substrate versatility of polyhydroxyalkanoate producing glycerol grown bacterial enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Moralejo-Gárate, Helena; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; Palmeiro-Sánchez, Tania; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2014-12-01

    Waste-based polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by bacterial enrichments generally follows a three step strategy in which first the wastewater is converted into a volatile fatty acid rich stream that is subsequently used as substrate in a selector and biopolymer production units. In this work, a bacterial community with high biopolymer production capacity was enriched using glycerol, a non-fermented substrate. The substrate versatility and PHA production capacity of this community was studied using glucose, lactate, acetate and xylitol as substrate. Except for xylitol, very high PHA producing capacities were obtained. The PHA accumulation was comparable or even higher than with glycerol as substrate. This is the first study that established a high PHA content (≈70 wt%) with glucose as substrate in a microbial enrichment culture. The results presented in this study support the development of replacing pure culture based PHA production by bacterial enrichment cultures. A process where mixtures of substrates can be easily handled and the acidification step can potentially be avoided is described.

  14. Crystal structure of substrate free form of glycerol dehydratase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Der-Ing; Dotson, Garry; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Reiss, Lisa; Emptage, Mark

    2010-03-08

    Glycerol dehydratase (GDH) and diol dehydratase (DDH) are highly homologous isofunctional enzymes that catalyze the elimination of water from glycerol and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) to the corresponding aldehyde via a coenzyme B{sub 12}-dependent radical mechanism. The crystal structure of substrate free form of GDH in complex with cobalamin and K{sup +} has been determined at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Its overall fold and the subunit assembly closely resemble those of DDH. Comparison of this structure and the DDH structure, available only in substrate bound form, shows the expected change of the coordination of the essential K{sup +} from hexacoordinate to heptacoordinate with the displacement of a single coordinated water by the substrate diol. In addition, there appears to be an increase in the rigidity of the K{sup +} coordination (as measured by lower B values) upon the binding of the substrate. Structural analysis of the locations of conserved residues among various GDH and DDH sequences has aided in identification of residues potentially important for substrate preference or specificity of protein-protein interactions.

  15. Dielectric spectroscopy study of myoglobin in glycerol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soham; Richert, Ranko

    2014-02-01

    Due to the interest in protein dynamics, there are numerous dielectric relaxation studies of proteins in water and in glass-forming aqueous solvents such as glycerol-water mixtures. In the regime of low frequencies, the inevitable dc-conductivity of such systems limits the resolution of dynamics that are slow compared with the solvent relaxation. Solutions of myoglobin in glycerol/water mixtures of various compositions are measured by dielectric spectroscopy in the frequency range from 10mHz to 10MHz. The resolution of low frequency modes is improved by two approaches: electrical 'cleaning' and the analysis of the derivative of the real component of permittivity, which shows no direct signature of dc-conductivity. Effects of internal interfacial polarization are also addressed by measuring the same solvents in confinement as well as mixed with glass beads. We find two processes, the structural relaxation of the solvent and the slower rotational mode of the protein, with no indication at even lower frequencies of a dielectric signature of fluctuations associated with protein dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Protease activation in glycerol-based deep eutectic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2011-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of mixtures of a choline salt (chloride or acetate form) and glycerol are prepared as easily accessible, biodegradable, and inexpensive alternatives to conventional aprotic cation-anion paired ionic liquids. These DES systems display excellent fluidity coupled with thermal stability to nearly 200 °C. In this work, the transesterification activities of cross-linked proteases (subtilisin and α-chymotrypsin), immobilized on chitosan, were individually examined in these novel DESs. In the 1:2 molar ratio mixture of choline chloride/glycerol containing 3% (v/v) water, cross-linked subtilisin exhibited an excellent activity (2.9 μmo l min−1 g−1) in conjunction with a selectivity of 98% in the transesterification reaction of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester with 1-propanol. These highly encouraging results advocate more extensive exploration of DESs in protease-mediated biotransformations of additional polar substrates and use of DESs in biocatalysis more generally. PMID:21909232

  17. Unfolding of the myosin head by purealin in glycerol.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Nonomura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-11

    Purealin is a small bioactive compound obtained from the marine sponge. The compound modulates various types of ATPase activity of myosin from skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and smooth muscle. To elucidate the structural basis of these effects of purealin on myosin ATPases, we examined the effect of purealin on the conformation of skeletal muscle myosin in aqueous solution and in glycerol. Analysis of the circular dichroism spectrum of subfragment 1, a single-headed fragment of myosin, revealed that in 10% glycerol purealin decreased the β-sheet content of S1, but in aqueous solution it had little effect on the secondary structure of S1. A myosin monomer conforms to two pear-like globular heads attached to a long tail. Electron microscopy observations with rotary shadowing revealed that purealin unfolded each globular head to an extended single strand. The tips of the unfolded strand bound each other and formed a ring in one molecule. These results suggest that binding of purealin affects the critical parameters of myosin folding.

  18. Flow injection analysis-based methodology for automatic on-line monitoring and quality control for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Pinzi, S; Priego Capote, F; Ruiz Jiménez, J; Dorado, M P; Luque de Castro, M D

    2009-01-01

    An automated on-line approach based on determination of free and bound glycerol was here proposed to monitor biodiesel production. The method was based on liquid-liquid extraction of glycerol from the biodiesel to an aqueous ethanolic phase in which glycerol is oxidized to formaldehyde with meta periodate with subsequent reaction with acetylacetone. The reaction product was photometrically measured at 410 nm. Free and bound glycerol were differentiated by glycerides hydrolysis with potassium ethylate. The experimental set-up consisted of a flow-injection manifold for liquid-liquid extraction without phase separation and iterative change of the flow direction that enabled: (a) filling the flow manifold with a meta periodate-acetylacetone acceptor phase; (b) sampling of small amounts (microl) from the reactor; (c) determination of free glycerol by extraction from biodiesel to the aqueous phase with simultaneous oxidation-reaction with acetylacetone in the acceptor phase; (d) continuous monitoring of the aqueous phase by passage through a photometric detector; (e) filling the flow manifold with a potassium ethylate-meta periodate-acetylacetone new acceptor phase; (d) repetition of steps b-to-d to determine total glycerol after saponification of the bound glycerol by potassium ethylate; and (f) determination of bound glycerol by difference between the second and first analyses. The results showed that the proposed automated on-line method is a suitable option in routine analysis during biodiesel production.

  19. Effect of crude glycerol on pellet mill production and nursery pig growth performance.

    PubMed

    Groesbeck, C N; McKinney, L J; Derouchey, J M; Tokach, M D; Goodband, R D; Dritz, S S; Nelssen, J L; Duttlinger, A W; Fahrenholz, A C; Behnke, K C

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of diets containing crude glycerol on pellet mill production efficiency and nursery pig growth performance. In a pilot study, increasing crude glycerol (0, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15%) in a corn-soybean meal diet was evaluated for pellet mill production efficiency. All diets were steam conditioned to 65.5 degrees C and pelleted through a pellet mill equipped with a die that had an effective thickness of 31.8 mm and holes 3.96 mm in diameter. Each diet was replicated by manufacturing a new batch of feed 3 times. Increasing crude glycerol increased both the standard (linear and quadratic, P < 0.01) and modified (linear, P < 0.01; quadratic, P glycerol decreased (linear; P < 0.01) production rate (t/h) and production efficiency (kWh/t). In a 26-d growth assay, 182 pigs (initial BW, 11.0 +/- 1.3 kg; 5 or 6 pigs/pen) were fed 1 of 7 corn-soybean meal-based diets with no added soy oil or crude glycerol (control), the control diet with 3 or 6% added soy oil, 3 or 6% added crude glycerol, and 6 or 12% addition of a 50:50 (wt/wt) soy oil/crude glycerol blend with 5 pens/diet. The addition of crude glycerol lowered (P < 0. 01) delta temperature, amperage, motor load, and production efficiency. The addition of crude glycerol improved (P < 0.01) pellet durability compared with soy oil and the soy oil/crude glycerol blend treatments. Pigs fed increasing crude glycerol had increased (linear, P = 0.03) ADG. Average daily gain tended to increase with increasing soy oil (quadratic; P = 0.07) or the soy oil/crude glycerol blend (linear, P = 0.06). Adding crude glycerol to the diet did not affect G:F compared with the control. Gain:feed tended to increase with increasing soy oil (linear, P < 0.01; quadratic, P = 0.06) or the soy oil/crude glycerol blend (linear, P < 0.01; quadratic, P = 0.09). Nitrogen digestibility tended (P = 0

  20. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-28

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ(g). Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χ(g) ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ(g) ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ(g) ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ(g) < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ(g) ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ(g) < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ(g) ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ(g) ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior

  1. Glycerol Production and Transformation: A Critical Review with Particular Emphasis on Glycerol Reforming Reaction for Producing Hydrogen in Conventional and Membrane Reactors.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, Giuseppe; Iulianelli, Adolfo; Sanna, Aimaro; Basile, Angelo

    2017-03-23

    Glycerol represents an emerging renewable bio-derived feedstock, which could be used as a source for producing hydrogen through steam reforming reaction. In this review, the state-of-the-art about glycerol production processes is reviewed, with particular focus on glycerol reforming reactions and on the main catalysts under development. Furthermore, the use of membrane catalytic reactors instead of conventional reactors for steam reforming is discussed. Finally, the review describes the utilization of the Pd-based membrane reactor technology, pointing out the ability of these alternative fuel processors to simultaneously extract high purity hydrogen and enhance the whole performances of the reaction system in terms of glycerol conversion and hydrogen yield.

  2. Glycerol Production and Transformation: A Critical Review with Particular Emphasis on Glycerol Reforming Reaction for Producing Hydrogen in Conventional and Membrane Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Bagnato, Giuseppe; Iulianelli, Adolfo; Sanna, Aimaro; Basile, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Glycerol represents an emerging renewable bio-derived feedstock, which could be used as a source for producing hydrogen through steam reforming reaction. In this review, the state-of-the-art about glycerol production processes is reviewed, with particular focus on glycerol reforming reactions and on the main catalysts under development. Furthermore, the use of membrane catalytic reactors instead of conventional reactors for steam reforming is discussed. Finally, the review describes the utilization of the Pd-based membrane reactor technology, pointing out the ability of these alternative fuel processors to simultaneously extract high purity hydrogen and enhance the whole performances of the reaction system in terms of glycerol conversion and hydrogen yield. PMID:28333121

  3. Effects of acidified aqueous glycerol and glycerol carbonate pretreatment of rice husk on the enzymatic digestibility, structural characteristics, and bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Majid; Villaflores, Oliver B; Ordono, Emma E; Caparanga, Alvin R

    2017-03-01

    Rice husk as an abundant biomass was used in this study, and it contained 30.1% glucan and 13.5% xylan, 22.4% lignin. The pretreated rice husk with glycerol carbonate and acidified aqueous glycerol (10% water) at 90°C and 130°C for 60min had the maximum yield of glucan digestibility which was 78.2% and 69.7% respectively, using cellulase for 72h. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was conducted anaerobically at 37°C with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 5% w/v glucan and 10FPU/g glucan of cellulase. 11.58 and 8.84g/L was the highest ethanol concentration after 3days of incubation form pretreated rice husk with glycerol carbonate and acidified aqueous glycerol respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A multidomain enzyme, with glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, is involved in a chloroplastic pathway for glycerol synthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sánchez, Daniela; Kim, Yeongho; Terng, Ee Leng; Peterson, Laura; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2017-03-08

    Understanding the unique features of algal metabolism may be necessary to realize the full potential of algae as feedstock for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Under nitrogen deprivation, the green alga C. reinhardtii showed substantial triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and up-regulation of a gene, GPD2, encoding a multidomain enzyme with a putative phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) motif fused to glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) domains. Canonical GPD enzymes catalyze the synthesis of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) by reduction of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). G3P forms the backbone of TAGs and membrane glycerolipids and it can be dephosphorylated to yield glycerol, an osmotic stabilizer and compatible solute under hypertonic stress. Recombinant Chlamydomonas GPD2 showed both reductase and phosphatase activities in vitro and it can work as a bifunctional enzyme capable of synthesizing glycerol directly from DHAP. In addition, GPD2 and a gene encoding glycerol kinase were up-regulated in Chlamydomonas cells exposed to high salinity. RNA-mediated silencing of GPD2 revealed that the multidomain enzyme was required for TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation and for glycerol synthesis under high salinity. Moreover, a GPD2-mCherry fusion protein was found to localize to the chloroplast, supporting the existence of a GPD2-dependent plastid pathway for the rapid synthesis of glycerol in response to hyperosmotic stress. We hypothesize that the reductase and phosphatase activities of PSP-GPD multidomain enzymes may be modulated by post-translational modifications/mechanisms, allowing them to synthesize primarily G3P or glycerol depending on environmental conditions and/or metabolic demands in algal species of the core Chlorophytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic Engineering of a Glycerol-Oxidative Pathway in Lactobacillus panis PM1 for Utilization of Bioethanol Thin Stillage: Potential To Produce Platform Chemicals from Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Sun; Korber, Darren R.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus panis PM1 has the ability to produce 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) from thin stillage (TS), which is the major waste material after bioethanol production, and is therefore of significance. However, the fact that L. panis PM1 cannot use glycerol as a sole carbon source presents a considerable problem in terms of utilization of this strain in a wide range of industrial applications. Accordingly, L. panis PM1 was genetically engineered to directly utilize TS as a fermentable substrate for the production of valuable platform chemicals without the need for exogenous nutrient supplementation (e.g., sugars and nitrogen sources). An artificial glycerol-oxidative pathway, comprised of glycerol facilitator, glycerol kinase, glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, and NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase genes of Escherichia coli, was introduced into L. panis PM1 in order to directly utilize glycerol for the production of energy for growth and value-added chemicals. A pH 6.5 culture converted glycerol to mainly lactic acid (85.43 mM), whereas a significant amount of 1,3-propanediol (59.96 mM) was formed at pH 7.5. Regardless of the pH, ethanol (82.16 to 83.22 mM) was produced from TS fermentations, confirming that the artificial pathway metabolized glycerol for energy production and converted it into lactic acid or 1,3-PDO and ethanol in a pH-dependent manner. This study demonstrates the cost-effective conversion of TS to value-added chemicals by the engineered PM1 strain cultured under industrial conditions. Thus, application of this strain or these research findings can contribute to reduced costs of bioethanol production. PMID:25281374

  6. Degree of branching in hyperbranched poly(glycerol-co-diacid)s synthesized in toluene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hyperbranched polymers were synthesized by using a Lewis acid (dibutyltin(IV)oxide) to catalyze the polycondensation of glycerol with either succinic acid (n (aliphatic chain length)=2), glutaric acid (n=3) or azelaic acid (n=7) in toluene. These are the first examples of diacid-glycerol hyperbranc...

  7. Study of combined effects of glycerol and transglutaminase on properties of gelatin films

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gelatin films plasticized with different glycerol contents (0-40%) were cross-linked using transglutaminase (TGase). Unmodified films were prepared as controls. Cross-linking degree of the films decreased linearly with increasing glycerol content, resulting in an increase in water solubility. Glycer...

  8. 21 CFR 172.850 - Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) The additive meets the following specifications: Water insoluble combined lactic acid, 14-18 percent... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.850 Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propylene glycol...

  9. Metabolic impact of the glycerol channels AQP7 and AQP9 in adipose tissue and liver.

    PubMed

    Lebeck, Janne

    2014-04-01

    Obesity and secondary development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) are major health care problems throughout the developed world. Accumulating evidence suggest that glycerol metabolism contributes to the pathophysiology of obesity and T2D. Glycerol is a small molecule that serves as an important intermediate between carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. It is stored primarily in adipose tissue as the backbone of triglyceride (TG) and during states of metabolic stress, such as fasting and diabetes, it is released for metabolism in other tissues. In the liver, glycerol serves as a gluconeogenic precursor and it is used for the esterification of free fatty acid into TGs. Aquaporin 7 (AQP7) in adipose tissue and AQP9 in the liver are transmembrane proteins that belong to the subset of AQPs called aquaglyceroporins. AQP7 facilitates the efflux of glycerol from adipose tissue and AQP7 deficiency has been linked to TG accumulation in adipose tissue and adult onset obesity. On the other hand, AQP9 expressed in liver facilitates the hepatic uptake of glycerol and thereby the availability of glycerol for de novo synthesis of glucose and TG that both are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetes. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the role of the two glycerol channels in controlling glycerol metabolism in adipose tissue and liver.

  10. Synthesis of biodiesel fuel additives from glycerol using green chemistry and supercritical fluids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For every 3 moles of fatty acid esters produced, 1 mole of glycerol remains, ~11% of the biodiesel volume. One new method of glycerol use could be as a biodiesel fuel additive/extender using eco-friendly heterogeneous catalysts and supercritical fluids (SFs). SFs have advantages such as greater diff...

  11. Biodegradable Composites Based on Starch/EVOH/Glycerol Blends and Coconut Fibers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Unripe coconut fibers were used as fillers in a biodegradable polymer matrix of starch/Ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH)/glycerol. The effects of fiber content on the mechanical, thermal and structural properties were evaluated. The addition of coconut fiber into starch/EVOH/glycerol blends reduced the ...

  12. Green synthesis of noble nanometals (Au, Pt, Pd) using glycerol under microwave irradiation conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A newer application of glycerol in the field of nanomaterials synthesis has been developed from both the economic and environmental points of view. Glycerol can act as a reducing agent for the fabrication of noble nanometals, such as Au, Pt, and Pd, under microwave irradiation. T...

  13. Co-digestion of sewage sludge with glycerol to boost biogas production

    SciTech Connect

    Fountoulakis, M.S.; Petousi, I.; Manios, T.

    2010-10-15

    The feasibility of adding crude glycerol from the biodiesel industry to the anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants was studied in both batch and continuous experiments at 35 {sup o}C. Glycerol addition can boost biogas yields, if it does not exceed a limiting 1% (v/v) concentration in the feed. Any further increase of glycerol causes a high imbalance in the anaerobic digestion process. The reactor treating the sewage sludge produced 1106 {+-} 36 ml CH{sub 4}/d before the addition of glycerol and 2353 {+-} 94 ml CH{sub 4}/d after the addition of glycerol (1% v/v in the feed). The extra glycerol-COD added to the feed did not have a negative effect on reactor performance, but seemed to increase the active biomass (volatile solids) concentration in the system. Batch kinetic experiments showed that the maximum specific utilization rate ({mu}{sub max}) and the saturation constant (K{sub S}) of glycerol were 0.149 {+-} 0.015 h{sup -1} and 0.276 {+-} 0.095 g/l, respectively. Comparing the estimated values with the kinetics constants for propionate reported in the literature, it can be concluded that glycerol uptake is not the rate-limiting step during the process.

  14. Co-digestion of sewage sludge with glycerol to boost biogas production.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, M S; Petousi, I; Manios, T

    2010-10-01

    The feasibility of adding crude glycerol from the biodiesel industry to the anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants was studied in both batch and continuous experiments at 35 degrees C. Glycerol addition can boost biogas yields, if it does not exceed a limiting 1% (v/v) concentration in the feed. Any further increase of glycerol causes a high imbalance in the anaerobic digestion process. The reactor treating the sewage sludge produced 1106+/-36 ml CH(4)/d before the addition of glycerol and 2353+/-94 ml CH(4)/d after the addition of glycerol (1% v/v in the feed). The extra glycerol-COD added to the feed did not have a negative effect on reactor performance, but seemed to increase the active biomass (volatile solids) concentration in the system. Batch kinetic experiments showed that the maximum specific utilization rate (mu(max)) and the saturation constant (K(S)) of glycerol were 0.149+/-0.015 h(-1) and 0.276+/-0.095 g/l, respectively. Comparing the estimated values with the kinetics constants for propionate reported in the literature, it can be concluded that glycerol uptake is not the rate-limiting step during the process.

  15. Glycerol Tri-Ester Derivatives as Diluents to Improve Low Temperature Properties of Vegetable Oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Large-scale production of biodiesel has led to a surplus of glycerol, so new commercial uses of this co-product are being sought. Twenty four vegetable oils were screened using glycerol tris (2-ethylhexanoate) [GTEH] as a diluent to improve the low temperature properties. Epoxidized soybean oil (E...

  16. Glycerol Tri-Ester Derivatives as Diluent to Improve Low Temperature Properties of Vegetable Oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Large-scale production of biodiesel has led to a surplus of glycerol, so new commercial uses of this co-product are under development. Increased utilization of glycerol would help biodiesel producers to become more competitive and viable. Lubricants based on vegetable oils generally suffer from po...

  17. Enhancing effect of glycerol on the tensile properties of Bombyx mori cocoon sericin films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiping; Deng, Lianxia; Yang, Mingying; Min, Sijia; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Liangjun

    2011-01-01

    An environmental physical method described herein was developed to improve the tensile properties of Bombyx mori cocoon sericin films, by using the plasticizer of glycerol, which has a nontoxic effect compared with other chemical crosslinkers. The changes in the tensile characteristics and the structure of glycerolated (0-40 wt% of glycerol) sericin films were investigated. Sericin films, both in dry and wet states, showed enhanced tensile properties, which might be regulated by the addition of different concentrations of glycerol. The introduction of glycerol results in the higher amorphous structure in sericin films as evidenced by analysis of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra, thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curves. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation revealed that glycerol was homogeneously blended with sericin molecules when its content was 10 wt%, while a small amount of redundant glycerol emerged on the surface of sericin films when its content was increased to 20 wt% or higher. Our results suggest that the introduction of glycerol is a novel nontoxic strategy which can improve the mechanical features of sericin-based materials and subsequently promote the feasibility of its application in tissue engineering.

  18. Systemic glycerol decreases neonatal rabbit brain and cerebellar growth independent of intraventricular hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Traudt, Christopher M; McPherson, Ron J; Studholme, Colin; Millen, Kathleen J; Juul, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebellar hypoplasia is common problem for preterm infants, and infants that suffer intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). To evaluate the effects of IVH on cerebellar growth and development, we used a neonatal rabbit model of systemic glycerol to produce IVH. Methods New Zealand White rabbit kits were surgically delivered 2 d preterm, and treated with i.p. glycerol (3.25 to 6.5 g/kg). Controls were born at term. IVH was documented by ultrasound. Brain MRI volumes, cerebellar foliation, proliferation (Ki-67) and Purkinje cell density were done at two weeks of life. Tissue glycerol and glutathione concentrations were measured. Results Glycerol increased IVH, subarachnoid hemorrhages and mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Total cerebellar volumes, cerebellar foliation and cerebellar proliferation were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Glycerol accumulated rapidly in blood, brain and liver and was associated with increased glutathione concentration. All of these results were independent of IVH status. Conclusions Cerebellar hypoplasia was induced after glycerol administration in a dose-dependent manner. Given rapid tissue accumulation of glycerol, dose dependent decreased brain growth and lack of IVH effect on measured outcomes we question the validity of this model as glycerol toxicity cannot be ruled out. A more physiologic model of IVH is needed. PMID:24346111

  19. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glycerol by recombinant Pseudomonas denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfang; Catherine, Christy; Rathnasingh, Chelladurai; Somasundar, Ashok; Park, Sunghoon

    2013-12-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) can be produced from glycerol through two sequential enzymatic reactions that are catalyzed by a coenzyme B12 -dependent glycerol dehydratase and an NAD(P)(+) -dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), respectively. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 under aerobic conditions, where NAD(P)(+) is regenerated efficiently. Hence, it is considered an ideal host for the production of 3-HP from glycerol under aerobic conditions. In this study, recombinant strains of P. denitrificans were developed and their potential for the production of 3-HP from glycerol was evaluated. When the enzymes, glycerol dehydratase (DhaB) and glycerol dehydratase reactivase (GdrAB), of Klebsiella pneumoniae were expressed heterologously, P. denitrificans could produce 3-HP at 37.7 mmol/L with 62% (mol/mol) yield on glycerol. Glucose was required as the carbon and energy sources for cell growth. The overexpression of heterologous ALDH was not essential; however, the titer and yield of 3-HP were improved to 54.7 mmol/L and 67% (mol/mol), respectively, when an ALDH gene (puuC) from K. pneumoniae was overexpressed. One serious drawback hindering the use of P. denitrificans as a recombinant host for 3-HP production is that it oxidizes 3-HP to malonate and utilizes 3-HP as a carbon source for growth. This is the first report on the development and use of recombinant P. denitrificans for 3-HP production from glycerol.

  20. Green synthesis of noble nanometals (Au, Pt, Pd) using glycerol under microwave irradiation conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A newer application of glycerol in the field of nanomaterials synthesis has been developed from both the economic and environmental points of view. Glycerol can act as a reducing agent for the fabrication of noble nanometals, such as Au, Pt, and Pd, under microwave irradiation. T...

  1. Synthesis and desulfurization-decarboxylation of cyclic thionocarbonates of glycerol 1-ethers.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Panganamala, R V; Cornwell, D G

    1969-07-01

    A method is described for the synthesis of cyclic thionocarbonates of 1-O-alkyl glycerols in quantitative yield. These derivatives of glycerol ethers can be quantitated by UV absorbance, analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, or quantitatively converted to allyl alkyl ethers for gas-chromatographic analysis.

  2. The Lewis-acid-catalyzed synthesis of hyperbranched poly(glycerol-diacid)s in toluene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The first examples of monomeric glycerol-derived hyperbranched polyesters produced in a non-polar solvent system are reported here. The polymers were made by the Lewis acid (dibutyltin(IV)oxide)-catalyzed polycondensation of glycerol with either succinic acid (n (aliphatic chain length)=2), glutari...

  3. Glycerol, a metabolic end product of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Steinbüchel, A; Müller, M

    1986-07-01

    Glycerol was demonstrated as an end product of anaerobic glucose metabolism in Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus, produced in addition to acetate, H2, CO2, and lactate or succinate. In T. vaginalis strain C-1, glycerol amounted to 16% of the fermentation products and was formed at an average rate of 38 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1. Corresponding figures for T. foetus strain KV1 were 7% and 4.8 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1. The amounts of glycerol detected compensated almost exactly for the deficits in fermentation products recognized earlier, thus complete redox balances can now be provided for both organisms. The metronidazole-resistant T. foetus strain KV1-1MR-100 excreted only negligible amounts of glycerol and carried out an ethanol-CO2 fermentation. Aerobiosis hardly affected glycerol formation in T. vaginalis strains C-1 and NYH 286, but almost completely abolished it in T. foetus strain KV1. An NADP-dependent glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and a Mg2+-dependent glycerol 3-phosphatase were detected in the cytosol of both species. The phosphatase is distinct from the particle-bound nonspecific acid phosphatase. Glycerol kinase activity was not detected in either organism. Enhanced pCO2 did not affect the ratio of fermentation products in T. vaginalis strain C-1, but significantly increased the amount of succinate, and decreased the amounts of acetate, H2, and CO2, formed by T. foetus.

  4. Transport of 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate, an analogue of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Z; Engel, R; Tropp, B E

    1977-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate (DHBP), an analogue of glycerol 3-phosphate, is actively transported by the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli strain 8. The Km for the transport of DHBP is 200 microM. PMID:400804

  5. Periplasmic protein related to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, T J; Hartig-Beecken, I; Boos, W

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of shock fluids of Escherichia coli K-12 revealed the presence of a periplasmic protein related to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport (GLPT) that is under the regulation of glpR, the regulatory gene of the glp regulon. Mutants selected for their resistance to phosphonomycin and found to be defective in sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport either did not produce GLPT or produced it in reduced amounts. Other mutations exhibited no apparent effect of GLPT. Transductions of glpT+ nalA phage P1 into these mutants and selection for growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate revealed a 50% cotransduction frequency to nalA. Reversion of mutants taht did not produce GLPT to growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate resulted in strains that produce GLPT. This suggests a close relationship of GLPT to the glpT gene and to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport. Attempts to demonstrate binding activity of GLPT in crude shock fluid towards sn-glycerol-3-phosphate have failed so far. However, all shock fluids, independent of their GLPT content, exhibited an enzymatic activity that hydrolyzes under the conditions of the binding assay, 30 to 60% of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to glycerol and inorganic orthophosphate. Images PMID:770459

  6. Optimization for microwave-assisted direct liquefaction of bamboo residue in glycerol/methanol mixtures

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Jinqiu Qi; Chungyun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2015-01-01

    Bamboo residues were liquefied in a mixture of glycerol and methanol in the presence of sulfuric acid using microwave energy. We investigated the effects of liquefaction conditions, including glycerol/methanol ratio, liquefaction temperature, and reaction time on the conversion yield. The optimal liquefaction conditions were under the temperature of 120

  7. Cross-evaluation of optimal glycerol concentration to enhance optical tissue clearing efficacy.

    PubMed

    Son, T; Jung, B

    2015-08-01

    The efficacy of light therapeutic and diagnostic applications can be enhanced by employing optical tissue clearing (OTC) agents to minimize light scattering in tissue. This study aimed to investigate the optimal concentration of glycerol, so that it can be efficiently used as an OTC agent in dermatology. Glycerol was topically applied to avoid the possibility of edema that could be caused by dermal injection. The efficacy of glycerol was quantitatively evaluated for various concentrations using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate light scattering and ultrasound imaging modality to evaluate collagen dissociation. The intensity in the OCT images in the deeper regions increased over time after glycerol application owing to enhanced light penetration caused by glycerol permeation into the sample. A comparable decrease over time in the collagen distribution was observed in the ultrasound images after glycerol application. The optimal concentration of glycerol to maximize OTC was found to be 70%. The finding of this study may provide a guideline regarding the use of glycerol for efficient light diagnosis and therapy in dermatology. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Sequential spectrofluorimetric determination of free and total glycerol in biodiesel in a multicommuted flow system.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sidnei G; Morales-Rubio, Angel; de La Guardia, Miguel; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2011-07-01

    A new procedure for spectrofluorimetric determination of free and total glycerol in biodiesel samples is presented. It is based on the oxidation of glycerol by periodate, forming formaldehyde, which reacts with acetylacetone, producing the luminescent 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine. A flow system with solenoid micro-pumps is proposed for solution handling. Free glycerol was extracted off-line from biodiesel samples with water, and total glycerol was converted to free glycerol by saponification with sodium ethylate under sonication. For free glycerol, a linear response was observed from 5 to 70 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.5 mg L(-1), which corresponds to 2 mg kg(-1) in biodiesel. The coefficient of variation was 0.9% (20 mg L(-1), n = 10). For total glycerol, samples were diluted on-line, and the linear response range was 25 to 300 mg L(-1). The detection limit was 1.4 mg L(-1) (2.8 mg kg(-1) in biodiesel) with a coefficient of variation of 1.4% (200 mg L(-1), n = 10). The sampling rate was ca. 35 samples h(-1) and the procedure was applied to determination of free and total glycerol in biodiesel samples from soybean, cottonseed, and castor beans.

  9. Enhancing Effect of Glycerol on the Tensile Properties of Bombyx mori Cocoon Sericin Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiping; Deng, Lianxia; Yang, Mingying; Min, Sijia; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Liangjun

    2011-01-01

    An environmental physical method described herein was developed to improve the tensile properties of Bombyx mori cocoon sericin films, by using the plasticizer of glycerol, which has a nontoxic effect compared with other chemical crosslinkers. The changes in the tensile characteristics and the structure of glycerolated (0–40 wt% of glycerol) sericin films were investigated. Sericin films, both in dry and wet states, showed enhanced tensile properties, which might be regulated by the addition of different concentrations of glycerol. The introduction of glycerol results in the higher amorphous structure in sericin films as evidenced by analysis of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra, thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curves. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation revealed that glycerol was homogeneously blended with sericin molecules when its content was 10 wt%, while a small amount of redundant glycerol emerged on the surface of sericin films when its content was increased to 20 wt% or higher. Our results suggest that the introduction of glycerol is a novel nontoxic strategy which can improve the mechanical features of sericin-based materials and subsequently promote the feasibility of its application in tissue engineering. PMID:21686177

  10. Microstructure and molecular interaction in glycerol plasticized chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) blending films

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/chitosan (CS) blended films plasticized by glycerol were investigated using mechanical testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FTIR spectroscopy, with primary emphasis on the effects of the glycerol content and the molecular weig...

  11. Protecting Trade Secrets in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Courage, Noel; Calzavara, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Patents in the life sciences industries are a key form of intellectual property (IP), particularly for products such as brand-name drugs and medical devices. However, trade secrets can also be a useful tool for many types of innovations. In appropriate cases, trade secrets can offer long-term protection of IP for a lower financial cost than patenting. This type of protection must be approached with caution as there is little room for error when protecting a trade secret. Strong agreements and scrupulous security can help to protect the secret. Once a trade secret is disclosed to the public, it cannot be restored as the owner's property; however, if the information is kept from the public domain, the owner can have a property right of unlimited duration in the information. In some situations patents and trade secrets may be used cooperatively to protect innovation, particularly for manufacturing processes. PMID:25986591

  12. Protecting Trade Secrets in Canada.

    PubMed

    Courage, Noel; Calzavara, Janice

    2015-05-18

    Patents in the life sciences industries are a key form of intellectual property (IP), particularly for products such as brand-name drugs and medical devices. However, trade secrets can also be a useful tool for many types of innovations. In appropriate cases, trade secrets can offer long-term protection of IP for a lower financial cost than patenting. This type of protection must be approached with caution as there is little room for error when protecting a trade secret. Strong agreements and scrupulous security can help to protect the secret. Once a trade secret is disclosed to the public, it cannot be restored as the owner's property; however, if the information is kept from the public domain, the owner can have a property right of unlimited duration in the information. In some situations patents and trade secrets may be used cooperatively to protect innovation, particularly for manufacturing processes.

  13. Glycerol Affects Root Development through Regulation of Multiple Pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Jinfang; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol metabolism has been well studied biochemically. However, the means by which glycerol functions in plant development is not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism underlying the effects of glycerol on root development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Exogenous glycerol inhibited primary root growth and altered lateral root development in wild-type plants. These phenotypes appeared concurrently with increased endogenous glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and H2O2 contents in seedlings, and decreased phosphate levels in roots. Upon glycerol treatment, G3P level and root development did not change in glycerol kinase mutant gli1, but G3P level increased in gpdhc1 and fad-gpdh mutants, which resulted in more severely impaired root development. Overexpression of the FAD-GPDH gene attenuated the alterations in G3P, phosphate and H2O2 levels, leading to increased tolerance to exogenous glycerol, which suggested that FAD-GPDH plays an important role in modulating this response. Free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content increased by 46%, and DR5pro::GUS staining increased in the stele cells of the root meristem under glycerol treatment, suggesting that glycerol likely alters normal auxin distribution. Decreases in PIN1 and PIN7 expression, β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining in plants expressing PIN7pro::GUS and green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence in plants expressing PIN7pro::PIN7-GFP were observed, indicating that polar auxin transport in the root was downregulated under glycerol treatment. Analyses with auxin-related mutants showed that TIR1 and ARF7 were involved in regulating root growth under glycerol treatment. Glycerol-treated plants showed significant reductions in root meristem size and cell number as revealed by CYCB1;1pro::GUS staining. Furthermore, the expression of CDKA and CYCB1 decreased significantly in treated plants compared with control plants, implying possible alterations in cell cycle progression. Our data demonstrated that glycerol

  14. Kinin B2 receptor does not exert renoprotective effects on mice with glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gattai, Pedro Paulo; Mafra, Fernando Francisco Pazello; Wasinski, Frederick; Almeida, Sandro Soares; Cenedeze, Marcos Antônio; Malheiros, Denise Maria Avancini Costa; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; Barros, Carlos Castilho; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Araujo, Ronaldo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a potential protective role of the kinin B2 receptor in a glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis mouse model. METHODS: We separated 28 C57Bl/6 male mice into 4 groups: untreated WT animals, untreated B2 knockout mice, glycerol-treated WT and glycerol-treated B2 knockout mice. Glycerol-treated animals received one intramuscular injections of glycerol solution (50% v/v, 7 mL/kg). After 48 h, urine and blood samples were collected to measure creatinine and urea levels. Additionally, kidney samples were extracted for histological evaluation, and the mRNA expression levels of kinin B1 and B2 receptors and inflammatory mediators were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Serum creatinine and urea levels showed differences between untreated wild-type and glycerol-treated wild-type mice (0.66 ± 0.04 vs 2.61 ± 0.53 mg/dL, P < 0.01; and 33.51 ± 2.08 vs 330.2 ± 77.7 mg/dL, P < 0.005), and between untreated B2 knockout mice and glycerol-treated knockout mice (0.56 ± 0.03 vs 2.23 ± 0.87 mg/dL, P < 0.05; and 42.49 ± 3.2 vs 327.2 ± 58.4 mg/dL, P < 0.01), but there was no difference between the glycerol-treated wild-type and glycerol-treated knockout mice. Glycerol was able to induce a striking increase in kinin B2 receptor expression (> 30 times, 31.34 ± 8.9) in kidney. Animals injected with glycerol had a higher degree of tubular injury than untreated animals. Wild-type and knockout mice treated with glycerol intramuscularly present kidney injury, with impairment in renal function. However, B2 knockout mice treated with glycerol did not show a different phenotype regarding kidney injury markers, when compared to the wild-type glycerol-treated group. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the kinin B2 receptor does not have a protective role in renal injury. PMID:25332899

  15. Kinin B2 receptor does not exert renoprotective effects on mice with glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Gattai, Pedro Paulo; Mafra, Fernando Francisco Pazello; Wasinski, Frederick; Almeida, Sandro Soares; Cenedeze, Marcos Antônio; Malheiros, Denise Maria Avancini Costa; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; Barros, Carlos Castilho; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Araujo, Ronaldo Carvalho

    2014-08-06

    To investigate a potential protective role of the kinin B2 receptor in a glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis mouse model. We separated 28 C57Bl/6 male mice into 4 groups: untreated WT animals, untreated B2 knockout mice, glycerol-treated WT and glycerol-treated B2 knockout mice. Glycerol-treated animals received one intramuscular injections of glycerol solution (50% v/v, 7 mL/kg). After 48 h, urine and blood samples were collected to measure creatinine and urea levels. Additionally, kidney samples were extracted for histological evaluation, and the mRNA expression levels of kinin B1 and B2 receptors and inflammatory mediators were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Serum creatinine and urea levels showed differences between untreated wild-type and glycerol-treated wild-type mice (0.66 ± 0.04 vs 2.61 ± 0.53 mg/dL, P < 0.01; and 33.51 ± 2.08 vs 330.2 ± 77.7 mg/dL, P < 0.005), and between untreated B2 knockout mice and glycerol-treated knockout mice (0.56 ± 0.03 vs 2.23 ± 0.87 mg/dL, P < 0.05; and 42.49 ± 3.2 vs 327.2 ± 58.4 mg/dL, P < 0.01), but there was no difference between the glycerol-treated wild-type and glycerol-treated knockout mice. Glycerol was able to induce a striking increase in kinin B2 receptor expression (> 30 times, 31.34 ± 8.9) in kidney. Animals injected with glycerol had a higher degree of tubular injury than untreated animals. Wild-type and knockout mice treated with glycerol intramuscularly present kidney injury, with impairment in renal function. However, B2 knockout mice treated with glycerol did not show a different phenotype regarding kidney injury markers, when compared to the wild-type glycerol-treated group. We conclude that the kinin B2 receptor does not have a protective role in renal injury.

  16. Nature of hydrogen bonding of water molecules in aqueous solutions of glycerol by attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Yuki; Kitadai, Norio; Hisatomi, Osamu; Nakashima, Satoru

    2011-04-01

    Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy was performed on glycerol/water solutions in order to gain a better understanding of the strong hydrogen bonding of glycerol as a humectant. The OH stretching band after eliminating the contribution of glycerol OH in the glycerol/water solutions was decomposed using three Gaussian components. With increasing glycerol concentrations up to 50 volume %, the decrease of the 3428 cm(-1) component (middle H-bond component) and the increase of the 3562 cm(-1) component (longer H-bond component) suggested the breaking of H bonds among water molecules. On the other hand, the 3242 cm(-1) component (shorter H-bond component) remained unchanged. It was expected that water molecules surrounding glycerol molecules are retained by strong H bonding between H atoms of water and O atoms in C-O of glycerol when aqueous solutions containing glycerol are introduced in human skin. © 2011 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  17. Kinetic analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain adapted for improved growth on glycerol: Implications for the development of yeast bioprocesses on glycerol.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Estopier, A; Lesage, J; Gorret, N; Guillouet, S E

    2011-01-01

    Glycerol is an agro-industrial residue generated in high amounts during the biodiesel production. The growing production of biodiesel is creating a worldwide glycerol surplus. Therefore, replacing sugar-based feedstock in bioprocesses by glycerol could be potentially attractive. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most commonly used microorganisms in the agri-food industry and therefore currently produced in large quantities from sugar-based feedstock. Unfortunately, growth of S. cerevisiae strains on glycerol is very low with reported μmax around 0.01 h(-1). This study demonstrates that successive growth of the S. cerevisiae CBS 8066, CEN.PK 113-7 D and Ethanol Red on glycerol as sole carbon source considerably improved the μmax from 0.01 up to 0.2 h(-1). The "adapted strain" CBS 8066-FL20 was kinetically characterized during aerobic and oxygen-limited cultivation in bioreactor and the results discussed in terms of their implication for developing glycerol-based S. cerevisiae bioprocesses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of glycerol metabolism in Xanthomonas campestris by adaptive evolution to produce a high-transparency and low-viscosity xanthan gum from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Wu, Jianrong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiaobei

    2016-07-01

    Many studies have focused on using crude glycerol from biodiesel to obtain valuable products, but few of these studies have focused on obtaining polysaccharides. A mutant strain of Xanthomonas campestris CCTCC M2015714 that could use glycerol to produce high-transparency and low-viscosity xanthan gum was obtained by adaptive evolution, and the yield of xanthan gum reached 11.0g/L. We found that transcriptional levels of genes related to glycerol metabolism (glpF, glpK, glpD, and fbp) in the mutant strain were all higher than those from the parent strain. Using 5g/L sucrose or glucose as starter substrate, cell growth time decreased from 36h to 24h and xanthan gum yield increased. Moreover, the mutant strain can tolerate high titer glycerol, and its activity was not affected by the impurities in crude glycerol. All these results proved that crude glycerol from biodiesel industries can be used for xanthan gum production.

  19. Switch of metabolic status: redirecting metabolic flux for acetoin production from glycerol by activating a silent glycerol catabolism pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Tao, Fei; Xin, Bo; Liu, Hongyu; Gao, Yanyan; Zhou, Ning-Yi; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The physiological roles of silent genes are still unsolved puzzles and their application potentials are unexplored. Herein, a silent glycerol catabolism pathway encoded by glp system was activated in a Klebsiella pneumoniae mutant, of which the acetoin degradation pathway was blocked. Surprisingly, the activation produced significant effects on cellular metabolism and over 90% of the carbon flux was redirected to acetoin biosynthesis, which was formerly a minor product in this mutant. Transcription analyses suggest that the genes involved in acetoin, 1,3-propanediol and adenosyl-cobalamin biosynthesis were differentially regulated upon the glp system activation, demonstrating the cross-talk between silent and active pathways. Through pathway, cofactor and bioprocess engineering, high-level acetoin production from glycerol (32.2gL(-1), 90.8% of the theoretical value) was achieved. Our findings suggest that some silent genes represent unexplored switches of cellular metabolic status and activating them may be an easy strategy for reprogramming microorganisms into efficient cell factories. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution of Glycerol Diakyl Glycerol Tetraethers in Surface Soil and Crater Lake Sediments from Mount Kenya, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omuombo, C.; Huguet, A.; Olago, D.; Williamson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Glycerol diakyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), a palaeoclimate proxy based on the relative abundance of lipids produced by archaea and bacteria, is gaining wide acceptance for the determination of past temperature and pH conditions. This study looks at the spatial distribution and abundance of GDGTs in soil and sediment samples along an altitudinal transect from 3 crater lakes of Mt. Kenya (Lake Nkunga, Sacred Lake and Lake Rutundu) ranging in elevation from 1700m - 3080m above sea level. GDGTs were extracted with solvents and then analysed using high performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-MS). Mean annual air temperature and pH were estimated based on the relative abundance of the different branched GDGTs, i.e. on the MBT (Methylation index of Branched Tetraethers) and CBT (Cyclization ratio of Branched Tetraethers) indices. Substantial amount of GDGTs were detected in both soil and sediment samples. In addition, branched GDGT distribution was observed to vary with altitude. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the branched GDGTs to understand the environmental parameters controlling the distribution of these lipids. The MBT/CBT proxy is a promising tool to infer palaeotemperatures and characterize the climate events of the past millennia in equatorial east Africa.