Science.gov

Sample records for monitors failed elements

  1. Failed MTR Fuel Element Detect in a Sipping Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Zeituni, C.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; da Silva, J.E.R.

    2004-10-06

    This work describes sipping tests performed on Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to find out which one failed in the core during a routine operation. Radioactive iodine isotopes {sup 131}I and {sup 133}I, employed as failure monitors, were detected in samples corresponding to the failed fuel element. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for {sup 137}Cs. The nuclear fuels U{sub 3}O{sub 8} - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of {sup 137}Cs.

  2. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fail safe monitoring systems. 77.312 Section 77... Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which will safely shut down the system and any related...

  3. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fail safe monitoring systems. 77.312 Section 77... Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which will safely shut down the system and any related...

  4. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fail safe monitoring systems. 77.312 Section 77... Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which will safely shut down the system and any related...

  5. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fail safe monitoring systems. 77.312 Section 77... Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which will safely shut down the system and any related...

  6. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fail safe monitoring systems. 77.312 Section 77... Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which will safely shut down the system and any related...

  7. Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

    2005-07-01

    Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

  8. Restoring Low Sidelobe Antenna Patterns with Failed Elements in a Phased Array Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    combination has zeros at the location of the failed elements. Furthermore since each of these low sidelobe beamformers achieve low sidelobes, we...with or without failed elements, the procedure will fail to achieve low sidelobes if the array manifold errors are too large. Using just the KNOWN...vectors, , to achieve low sidelobes are available. The beams in are spaced by a half beamwidth (i.e., sin / ). The manifold errors, , are modeled

  9. Detecting failed elements on phased array ultrasound transducers using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Scott; Pye, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Aims Imaging faults with ultrasound transducers are common. Failed elements on linear and curvilinear array transducers can usually be detected with a simple image uniformity or ‘paperclip’ test. However, this method is less effective for phased array transducers, commonly used in cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of failed elements could be detected through measurement of the resolution integral (R) using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom. Methods A 128-element paediatric phased array transducer was studied. Failed elements were simulated using layered polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as an attenuator and measurements of resolution integral were carried out for several widths of attenuator. Results All widths of attenuator greater than 0.5 mm resulted in a significant reduction in resolution integral and low contrast penetration measurements compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Conclusions Measurements of resolution integral and low contrast penetration both have the potential to be used as straightforward and inexpensive tests to detect failed elements on phased array transducers. Particularly encouraging is the result for low contrast penetration as this is a quick and simple measurement to make and can be performed with many different test objects, thus enabling ‘in-the-field’ checks. PMID:27482276

  10. Detecting failed elements on phased array ultrasound transducers using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Dan; Inglis, Scott; Pye, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Imaging faults with ultrasound transducers are common. Failed elements on linear and curvilinear array transducers can usually be detected with a simple image uniformity or 'paperclip' test. However, this method is less effective for phased array transducers, commonly used in cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of failed elements could be detected through measurement of the resolution integral (R) using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom. A 128-element paediatric phased array transducer was studied. Failed elements were simulated using layered polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as an attenuator and measurements of resolution integral were carried out for several widths of attenuator. All widths of attenuator greater than 0.5 mm resulted in a significant reduction in resolution integral and low contrast penetration measurements compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Measurements of resolution integral and low contrast penetration both have the potential to be used as straightforward and inexpensive tests to detect failed elements on phased array transducers. Particularly encouraging is the result for low contrast penetration as this is a quick and simple measurement to make and can be performed with many different test objects, thus enabling 'in-the-field' checks.

  11. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Campana, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  12. Method of monitoring stored nuclear fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Borloo, E.; Buergers, W.; Crutzen, S.; Vinche, C.

    1983-05-24

    To monitor a nuclear fuel element or fuel elements located in a store, e.g. a pond in a swimming pool reactor, the store is illuminated ultrasonically using one or more transducers transmitting ultrasonic signals in one or more predetermined directions to obtain an output which, because it depends on the number and relative location of the fuel elements in the store, and the structure of the store itself is distinctive to the fuel elements or elements stored therein. From this distinctive output is derived an identity unique to the stored fuel element or elements and a reference signal indicative of the whole structure when intact, the reference signal and identity being recorded. Subsequent ultrasonic testing of the store and its contents under identical operating conditions produces a signal which is compared to the recorded reference signal and if different therefrom reveals the occurrence of tampering with the store and/or the fuel element or elements.

  13. Preparation of Metal Filter Element for Fail Safety in IGCC Filter Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J-H.; Ahn, I-S.; Bak, Y-C.; Bae, S-Y.; Ha, S-J.; Jang, H-J.

    2002-09-18

    Metal filter elements as the fail safety filter are fabricated by the methods using cold isostatic pressure (compress method) and binder (binder method) to form the filter element and tested in a experimental and bench units. The fail safety filter on the filtration system is mounted additionally in order to intercept the particle leak when the main filter element is broken. So it should have two contrary functions of a high permeability and being plugged easily. The filter element having high porosity and high plugging property was fabricated by the bind method. It has the porosity more than 50%, showed very small pressure drop less than 10mmH2O at the face velocity of 0.15m/s, and plugged within 5 minutes with the inhibition of the particle leak larger than 4 {micro}m. The test result of corrosion tendency in IGCC gas stream at 500 C shows SUS310L material is very reasonable among SUS310, SUS316, Inconel 600, and Hastelloy X.

  14. Checklists and Monitoring in the Cockpit: Why Crucial Defenses Sometimes Fail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. Key; Berman, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Checklists and monitoring are two essential defenses against equipment failures and pilot errors. Problems with checklist use and pilots failures to monitor adequately have a long history in aviation accidents. This study was conducted to explore why checklists and monitoring sometimes fail to catch errors and equipment malfunctions as intended. Flight crew procedures were observed from the cockpit jumpseat during normal airline operations in order to: 1) collect data on monitoring and checklist use in cockpit operations in typical flight conditions; 2) provide a plausible cognitive account of why deviations from formal checklist and monitoring procedures sometimes occur; 3) lay a foundation for identifying ways to reduce vulnerability to inadvertent checklist and monitoring errors; 4) compare checklist and monitoring execution in normal flights with performance issues uncovered in accident investigations; and 5) suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of checklists and monitoring. Cognitive explanations for deviations from prescribed procedures are provided, along with suggestions for countermeasures for vulnerability to error.

  15. 40 CFR 141.561 - What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails? 141.561 Section 141.561 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  16. 40 CFR 141.561 - What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails? 141.561 Section 141.561 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  17. 40 CFR 141.561 - What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails? 141.561 Section 141.561 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  18. 40 CFR 141.561 - What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails? 141.561 Section 141.561 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  19. 40 CFR 141.561 - What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What happens if my system's turbidity monitoring equipment fails? 141.561 Section 141.561 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  20. Metacognitive Monitoring in University Classes: Anticipating a Graded vs. a Pass-Fail Test Affects Monitoring Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barenberg, Jonathan; Dutke, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Three field studies tested the hypothesis that anticipating a graded test as opposed to a pass-fail test enhances metacognitive monitoring. Participants were teacher candidates who completed a mid-term and a final test in psychology courses. Each participant chose whether the result of the final test should be evaluated with one of five grades or…

  1. Experimental research and finite element analysis of bridge piers failed in flexure-shear modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiguo; Si, Bingjun; Wang, Dongsheng; Guo, Xun

    2008-12-01

    In recent earthquakes, a large number of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges were severely damaged due to mixed flexure-shear failure modes of the bridge piers. An integrated experimental and finite element (FE) analysis study is described in this paper to study the seismic performance of the bridge piers that failed in flexure-shear modes. In the first part, a nonlinear cyclic loading test on six RC bridge piers with circular cross sections is carried out experimentally. The damage states, ductility and energy dissipation parameters, stiffness degradation and shear strength of the piers are studied and compared with each other. The experimental results suggest that all the piers exhibit stable flexural response at displacement ductilities up to four before exhibiting brittle shear failure. The ultimate performance of the piers is dominated by shear capacity due to significant shear cracking, and in some cases, rupturing of spiral bars. In the second part, modeling approaches describing the hysteretic behavior of the piers are investigated by using ANSYS software. A set of models with different parameters is selected and evaluated through comparison with experimental results. The influences of the shear retention coefficients between concrete cracks, the Bauschinger effect in longitudinal reinforcement, the bond-slip relationship between the longitudinal reinforcement and the concrete and the concrete failure surface on the simulated hysteretic curves are discussed. Then, a modified analysis model is presented and its accuracy is verified by comparing the simulated results with experimental ones. This research uses models available in commercial FE codes and is intended for researchers and engineers interested in using ANSYS software to predict the hysteretic behavior of reinforced concrete structures.

  2. Failed fuel monitoring and surveillance techniques for liquid metal cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Mikaili, R.; Gross, K.C.; Strain, R.V.; Aoyama, T.; Ukai, S.; Nomura, S.; Nakae, N.

    1995-05-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has been used as a facility for irradiation of LMR fuels and components for thirty years. During this time many tests of experimental fuel were continued to cladding breach in order to study modes of element failure; the methods used to identify such failures are described in a parallel paper. This paper summarizes experience of monitoring the delayed-neutron (DN) and fission-gas (FG) release behavior of a smaller number of elements that continued operation in the run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) mode. The scope of RBCB testing, the methods developed to characterize failures on-line, and examples of DN/FG behavior are described.

  3. Elements of an integrated health monitoring framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Michael; Elgamal, Ahmed; Conte, Joel P.; Masri, Sami; Fountain, Tony; Gupta, Amarnath; Trivedi, Mohan; El Zarki, Magda

    2003-07-01

    Internet technologies are increasingly facilitating real-time monitoring of Bridges and Highways. The advances in wireless communications for instance, are allowing practical deployments for large extended systems. Sensor data, including video signals, can be used for long-term condition assessment, traffic-load regulation, emergency response, and seismic safety applications. Computer-based automated signal-analysis algorithms routinely process the incoming data and determine anomalies based on pre-defined response thresholds and more involved signal analysis techniques. Upon authentication, appropriate action may be authorized for maintenance, early warning, and/or emergency response. In such a strategy, data from thousands of sensors can be analyzed with near real-time and long-term assessment and decision-making implications. Addressing the above, a flexible and scalable (e.g., for an entire Highway system, or portfolio of Networked Civil Infrastructure) software architecture/framework is being developed and implemented. This framework will network and integrate real-time heterogeneous sensor data, database and archiving systems, computer vision, data analysis and interpretation, physics-based numerical simulation of complex structural systems, visualization, reliability & risk analysis, and rational statistical decision-making procedures. Thus, within this framework, data is converted into information, information into knowledge, and knowledge into decision at the end of the pipeline. Such a decision-support system contributes to the vitality of our economy, as rehabilitation, renewal, replacement, and/or maintenance of this infrastructure are estimated to require expenditures in the Trillion-dollar range nationwide, including issues of Homeland security and natural disaster mitigation. A pilot website (http://bridge.ucsd.edu/compositedeck.html) currently depicts some basic elements of the envisioned integrated health monitoring analysis framework.

  4. Patient acceptance and clinical impact of Bravo monitoring in patients with previous failed catheter-based studies.

    PubMed

    Sweis, R; Fox, M; Anggiansah, R; Anggiansah, A; Basavaraju, K; Canavan, R; Wong, T

    2009-03-15

    Standard pH monitoring is performed over 24 h with a naso-oesophageal catheter (C-pH). Limitations include naso-pharyngeal discomfort, nausea and social embarrassment resulting in reduced reflux-provoking activities. Recently a catheter-free pH-monitoring technique has become available. The tolerability and diagnostic yield of this system in patients who failed standard monitoring remain unknown. To examine the tolerability and diagnostic outcome of catheter-free pH-monitoring technique in patients who failed standard monitoring. Patients referred for C-pH and catheter-free pH monitoring completed a tolerability questionnaire. Acid exposure in the distal oesophagus and symptom index (SI) were reviewed. Over 4 years, 883/1751 (50%) of patients with typical reflux symptoms referred for C-pH were diagnosed with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) based on a pathological percentage time acid exposure (%time pH <4);134 (8%) patients failed C-pH and, of these, 129 successfully completed 2-day catheter-free pH monitoring. Ninety-eight (76%) of these patients had a pathological percentage pH <4 on either day compared with 49/102 (49%) of contemporaneous C-pH patients (P < 0.01). There was no difference in SI for heartburn (35% vs. 42%; P = 0.49). The questionnaire demonstrated a preference for catheter-free pH monitoring (96%) with less restriction in activities of daily living, naso-pharyngeal discomfort, dysphagia and chest pain. Tolerance and satisfaction with catheter-free pH monitoring are high in patients who had previously failed C-pH; catheter-free pH monitoring assists the definitive diagnosis of GERD in this group.

  5. Are single mothers in Britain failing to monitor their oral health?

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, C; Yeung, C; Bedi, R

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to identify association between self reported dental attendance patterns and family structure in the UK. Design: A national study involving 666 women with dependent children. Setting: Home interviews were undertaken exploring time and reason for last dental visit. In addition, numerous sociodemographic and service related characteristics were collected. Results: Bivariate analysis identified that family structure was associated with respondents' self reported dental attendance patterns: marital status (p<0.01), number of children (p<0.05), and age of children (p<0.05). When the combined effects of age, family structure, income, educational attainment, working status, and service factors (difficulty obtaining a NHS dentist and time taken to get an appointment) on dental attendance were explored, family structure emerged as a very important predicator of service use. Notably, young (age 16–34) single mothers and those with more than two children were less likely to have attended the dentist within the past year for reasons other than a dental emergency compared with older (age 35 or more), mothers from a two parent family and those with one or two children. Conclusion: Family structure is associated with self reported dental attendance patterns. Young single mothers with more than two children may be failing to monitor their oral health appropriately. PMID:11930026

  6. WHEN NORMS FAIL: NORTH KOREA AND CYBER AS AN ELEMENT OF STATECRAFT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    effectiveness of cyber as a form of statecraft for weaker states and potential deterrence responses by victims of such malign actions. Introduction...Cyberspace has become the medium of choice for social and economic interaction around the world. Most elements of national power touch, or are...influenced by, the cyber domain. A 2017 U.S. Defense Science Board report recognizes the significant economic, social , and military advantages the U.S. gains

  7. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    DOEpatents

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  8. Use of seaweeds for monitoring trace elements in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, R; Rossbach, M

    1996-06-01

    Concentrations of a wide range of trace elements: arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, hafnium, nickel, thorium, uranium, zinc and the rare earth elements, cerium, europium, samarium, terbium and ytterbium were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis in the brown alga,Fucus vesiculosus from Eckwarder Hörne, North Sea and from Rügen, Baltic Sea. Another brown alga,Sargassum filipendula from Sri Lanka, Indian ocean (representing an unpolluted control station) was similarly investigated. Cobalt, chromium and nickel concentrations were highest inF. vesiculosus from the North Sea while zinc was highest in samples from the Baltic Sea, reflecting high levels of these elements in coastal waters of the North and the Baltic sea. Cadmium, cobalt, nickel and zinc levels were lowest inS. filipendula from Sri Lanka, probably demonstrating lower levels of those elements in coastal waters. Concentration levels of hafnium, thorium, uranium, and the rare earth elements were highest inS. filipendula. Two years later in 1994,S. filipendula along withUlva sp. (green alga) was resampled from the same sampling site, and in addition to the above elements, six other trace elements (Ag, Ba, Br, Rb, Se and Sr) were determined.Sargassium filipendula showed a particular affinity for Ag, As, Br and Sr. For the other elements, marginal concentration differences were observed betweenS. filipendula andUlva sp., probably reflecting the regional background levels. Substantially higher concentrations of Hf, Th, U, and the rare earths were found again in the 1994Sargassum andUlva samples, reflecting the effect of a substrate rich in rare earth elements. The brown algae used in this study may be used to monitor trace elements in coastal waters.

  9. Identification of failed fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Fryer, Richard M.; Matlock, Robert G.

    1976-06-22

    A passive fission product gas trap is provided in the upper portion of each fuel subassembly in a nuclear reactor. The gas trap consists of an inverted funnel of less diameter than the subassembly having a valve at the apex thereof. An actuating rod extends upwardly from the valve through the subassembly to a point where it can be contacted by the fuel handling mechanism for the reactor. Interrogation of the subassembly for the presence of fission products is accomplished by lowering the fuel handling machine onto the subassembly to press down on the actuating rod and open the valve.

  10. Auditing and monitoring--elements of HIM compliance.

    PubMed

    Bryant, G

    1999-01-01

    Auditing and monitoring are two important components of a compliance plan. The author answers the most frequently asked questions about audits. In addition, find out how to get started--and what to do with the results.

  11. A summary of fault modelling and predictive health monitoring of rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Thalji, Idriss; Jantunen, Erkki

    2015-08-01

    The rolling element bearing is one of the most critical components that determine the machinery health and its remaining lifetime in modern production machinery. Robust Predictive Health Monitoring tools are needed to guarantee the healthy state of rolling element bearing s during the operation. A Predictive Health Monitoring tool indicates the upcoming failures which provide sufficient lead time for maintenance planning. The Predictive Health Monitoring tool aims to monitor the deterioration i.e. wear evolution rather than just detecting the defects. The Predictive Health Monitoring procedures contain detection, diagnosis and prognosis analysis, which are required to extract the features related to the faulty rolling element bearing and estimate the remaining useful lifetime. The purpose of this study is to review the Predictive Health Monitoring methods and explore their capabilities, advantages and disadvantage in monitoring rolling element bearings. Therefore, the study provides a critical review of the Predictive Health Monitoring methods of the entire defect evolution process i.e. over the whole lifetime and suggests enhancements for rolling element bearing monitoring.

  12. Need for Robust Sensors for Inherently Fail-Safe Gas Turbine Engine Controls, Monitoring, and Prognostics (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    MATERIEL COMMAND AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY WRIGHT- PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7251 i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704...Laboratory, Air Force Materiel Command Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 REPORT NUMBER AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2007-217 9. SPONSORING...Laboratory Air Force Materiel Command Wright- Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7251 11. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER(S) AFRL-PR

  13. Trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Methods and technology were developed to analyze 1000 samples/yr of coal and other pollution-related samples. The complete trace element analysis of 20-24 samples/wk averaged 3-3.5 man-hours/sample. The computerized data reduction scheme could identify and report data on as many as 56 elements. In addition to coal, samples of fly ash, bottom ash, crude oil, fuel oil, residual oil, gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, filtered air particulates, ore, stack scrubber water, clam tissue, crab shells, river sediment and water, and corn were analyzed. Precision of the method was plus or minus 25% based on all elements reported in coal and other sample matrices. Overall accuracy was estimated at 50%.

  14. Trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Methods and technology were developed to analyze 1000 samples/yr of coal and other pollution-related samples. The complete trace element analysis of 20-24 samples/wk averaged 3-3.5 man-hours/sample. The computerized data reduction scheme could identify and report data on as many as 56 elements. In addition to coal, samples of fly ash, bottom ash, crude oil, fuel oil, residual oil, gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, filtered air particulates, ore, stack scrubber water, clam tissue, crab shells, river sediment and water, and corn were analyzed. Precision of the method was plus or minus 25% based on all elements reported in coal and other sample matrices. Overall accuracy was estimated at 50%.

  15. MONITORING CYCLICAL AIR-WATER ELEMENTAL MERCURY EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experimental work has demonstrated that elemental mercury evasion from natural water displays a diel cycle; evasion rates during the day can be two to three times evasion rates observed at night. A study with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) found that diurnal PCB air/wa...

  16. On a Monitoring Network of Territory Elements for Emergency Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramo, A.; Marino, A.; Termini, D.; Teramo, M.; Saccà, C.; Romeo, M.; de Domenico, D.; Lupò, D.

    2010-12-01

    The proposed methodological approach, based on the implementation of innovative monitoring networks of territories falling within high seismicity areas, aims at the arrangement of tools for a reduction of urban and territorial seismic vulnerability through procedures of territorial diagnostics with early warning thresholds. In this preliminary phase of the study, several problems have been analysed and solved related to wireless sensor typology to be used and data to be acquired for the realization of a expert system for a real time check of escape route conditions in case of a catastrophe, and the structural reliability of buildings, also strategic type, for preliminary damage evaluations. Specific analysis tools of acquired data by monitoring networks have been arranged for an analysis in relation to main territorial risk factors of a given area, arranging GIS maps in real time for the reduction of territorial system criticalities also during the emergencies.

  17. Lichen elements as pollution indicators: evaluation of methods for large monitoring programmes

    Treesearch

    Susan Will-Wolf; Sarah Jovan; Michael C. Amacher

    2017-01-01

    Lichen element content is a reliable indicator for relative air pollution load in research and monitoring programmes requiring both efficiency and representation of many sites. We tested the value of costly rigorous field and handling protocols for sample element analysis using five lichen species. No relaxation of rigour was supported; four relaxed protocols generated...

  18. Neural Correlates of Error Monitoring in Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder After Failed Inhibition in an Emotional Go/No-Go Task.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Lívia; Kakuszi, Brigitta; Papp, Szilvia; Tombor, László; Bitter, István; Czobor, Pál

    2017-01-01

    The authors' aim was to investigate the modulation of event-related potentials (ERPs) by the affective content of stimuli in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients during error monitoring. By obtaining ERPs from 26 adult ADHD patients and 14 healthy controls in an emotional go/no-go task, the authors investigated two error-related ERP components, the error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe). In ADHD patients, the ERN amplitude decreased for negative stimuli after failed response inhibition ("no-go response") and Pe amplitude decreased for neutral stimuli compared with the controls. These findings suggest that ADHD patients differ from controls both in the early and in the later stages of error processing.

  19. Dynamic SPR monitoring of yeast nuclear protein binding to a cis-regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2007-11-09

    Gene expression is controlled by protein complexes binding to short specific sequences of DNA, called cis-regulatory elements. Expression of most eukaryotic genes is controlled by dozens of these elements. Comprehensive identification and monitoring of these elements is a major goal of genomics. In pursuit of this goal, we are developing a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay to identify and monitor cis-regulatory elements. To test whether we could reliably monitor protein binding to a regulatory element, we immobilized a 16 bp region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome 5 onto a gold surface. This 16 bp region of DNA is known to bind several proteins and thought to control expression of the gene RNR1, which varies through the cell cycle. We synchronized yeast cell cultures, and then sampled these cultures at a regular interval. These samples were processed to purify nuclear lysate, which was then exposed to the sensor. We found that nuclear protein binds this particular element of DNA at a significantly higher rate (as compared to unsynchronized cells) during G1 phase. Other time points show levels of DNA-nuclear protein binding similar to the unsynchronized control. We also measured the apparent association complex of the binding to be 0.014 s{sup -1}. We conclude that (1) SPR-based assays can monitor DNA-nuclear protein binding and that (2) for this particular cis-regulatory element, maximum DNA-nuclear protein binding occurs during G1 phase.

  20. Rapid detection of delamination areas in laminated structural elements by means of optically monitored strain solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Dreiden, G. V.; Petrov, N. V.; Samsonov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Modern structural elements are often made of laminated polymer materials or composites on the base of polymer matrices. The proper functioning of these elements may be of vital importance especially in automotive and aerospace industries, in gas and oil transportation. The major problem in their performance is a possibility of a sudden and irreversible delamination caused by various factors. We propose and study a NDT approach aimed to detect delamination areas in adhesively bonded layered structural elements made of different materials. The proposed approach is evaluated by use of holographic detection and monitoring of the evolution of bulk strain solitons generated in such structures.

  1. A Synopsis of Technical Issues of Concern for Monitoring Trace Elements in Highway and Urban Runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Granato, Gregory E.

    2000-01-01

    Trace elements, which are regulated for aquatic life protection, are a primary concern in highway- and urban-runoff studies because stormwater runoff may transport these constituents from the land surface to receiving waters. Many of these trace elements are essential for biological activity and become detrimental only when geologic or anthropogenic sources exceed concentrations beyond ranges typical of the natural environment. The Federal Highway Administration and State Transportation Agencies are concerned about the potential effects of highway runoff on the watershed scale and for the management and protection of watersheds. Transportation agencies need information that is documented as valid, current, and scientifically defensible to support planning and management decisions. There are many technical issues of concern for monitoring trace elements; therefore, trace-element data commonly are considered suspect, and the responsibility to provide data-quality information to support the validity of reported results rests with the data-collection agency. Paved surfaces are fundamentally different physically, hydraulically, and chemically from the natural surfaces typical of most freshwater systems that have been the focus of many traceelement- monitoring studies. Existing scientific conceptions of the behavior of trace elements in the environment are based largely upon research on natural systems, rather than on systems typical of pavement runoff. Additionally, the logistics of stormwater sampling are difficult because of the great uncertainty in the occurrence and magnitude of storm events. Therefore, trace-element monitoring programs may be enhanced if monitoring and sampling programs are automated. Automation would standardize the process and provide a continuous record of the variations in flow and water-quality characteristics. Great care is required to collect and process samples in a manner that will minimize potential contamination or attenuation of trace

  2. SEASONAL MONITORING OF ELEMENTS AT THREE CONSTRUCTED TREATMENT WETLANDS: 1999-2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    A suite of major, minor, and trace elements in sediment, pore water, and overlying water were monitored during winter and summer over a three year period at three different types of constructed treatment wetlands to evaluate their efficacy with season. Acid-volatile sulfide (AVS)...

  3. Microreplication of flexible and stretchable polymer grating sensing elements for microstructural monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueming; Zhang, Shaojun; Tian, Weijian

    2009-07-01

    In the application of micro-structural monitoring, one kind of flexible and stretchable sensing elements was urgently demanded to detect the micro-bending and surface distortions, such as micro-bend sensing elements of medical catheter or smart skin sensing unit of micro-robots. Here the sensing element must be stretchable and flexible for free operation, and must be safe enough when used in bio-medical situation. Although the optical fiber grating is very mature and can be used as sensing element in micro-bending situation, it isn't stretchable enough and flexible enough when used in bio-medical science and micro- structural monitoring, and when applied in human body, the fiber grating isn't safe enough for its easily broken character. In this paper a kind of novel flexible and stretchable polymer grating sensing elements was fabricated by micro-replication process which could be used in micro- structural monitoring, and detailed processes was presented and discussed.

  4. Wireless acceleration sensor of moving elements for condition monitoring of mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsin, Vladimir V.; Shestakov, Aleksandr L.

    2017-09-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the angular and linear accelerations of moving elements (shafts, gears) allows an increase in the quality of the condition monitoring of mechanisms. However, existing tools and methods measure either linear or angular acceleration with postprocessing. This paper suggests a new construction design of an angular acceleration sensor for moving elements. The sensor is mounted on a moving element and, among other things, the data transfer and electric power supply are carried out wirelessly. In addition, the authors introduce a method for processing the received information which makes it possible to divide the measured acceleration into the angular and linear components. The design has been validated by the results of laboratory tests of an experimental model of the sensor. The study has shown that this method provides a definite separation of the measured acceleration into linear and angular components, even in noise. This research contributes an advance in the range of methods and tools for condition monitoring of mechanisms.

  5. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  6. Optimal design of river monitoring network in Taizihe River by matter element analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Zhe; Sun, Lina; Luo, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to optimize the river monitoring network in Taizihe River, Northeast China. The situation of the network and water characteristics were studied in this work. During this study, water samples were collected once a month during January 2009 - December 2010 from seventeen sites. Futhermore, the 16 monitoring indexes were analyzed in the field and laboratory. The pH value of surface water sample was found to be in the range of 6.83 to 9.31, and the average concentrations of NH4(+)-N, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile phenol and total phosphorus (TP) were found decreasing significantly. The water quality of the river has been improved from 2009 to 2010. Through the calculation of the data availability and the correlation between adjacent sections, it was found that the present monitoring network was inefficient as well as the optimization was indispensable. In order to improve the situation, the matter element analysis and gravity distance were applied in the optimization of river monitoring network, which were proved to be a useful method to optimize river quality monitoring network. The amount of monitoring sections were cut from 17 to 13 for the monitoring network was more cost-effective after being optimized. The results of this study could be used in developing effective management strategies to improve the environmental quality of Taizihe River. Also, the results show that the proposed model can be effectively used for the optimal design of monitoring networks in river systems.

  7. Trace elements in parenteral nutrition: a practical guide for dosage and monitoring for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Theresa A

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy for hundreds of thousands of people who have severe impairment of gastrointestinal function. Trace elements are a small but very important part of PN that can be overlooked during busy practice. Serious complications can result from trace element deficiencies and toxicities, and this is especially problematic during times of product shortages. Practical information on parenteral trace element use can be gleaned from case reports, some retrospective studies, and very few randomized controlled trials. A general knowledge of trace element metabolism and excretion, deficiency and toxicity symptoms, products, optimal dosages, and strategies for supplementation, restriction, and monitoring will equip practitioners to provide optimal care for their patients who depend on PN.

  8. Mississippi river methods comparison study: Implications for water quality monitoring of dissolved trace elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports have questioned the validity of dissolved trace element concentrations reported by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) as well as by other water-quality monitoring programs. To address these concerns and to evaluate the NASQAN protocols, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook the Mississippi River Methods Comparison Study. We report here the major results and implications of this study. In particular, we confirm the possible inaccuracy of previous NASQAN dissolved trace element data. The results suggest that all steps of the NASQAN protocol (sampling, processing, and analysis) require revision, though the sample filtration step appears to be of particular concern.

  9. Mathematical modeling and remote monitoring of ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tselishchev, I.V.; Elesin, A.A.

    1988-07-01

    A mathematical model and calculational algorithms for the elution curves for ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements (TPE) and the limits of optimal fractionation of the substances being separated, based on indicators of the process (yield, purification), are presented. The calculational programs are part of the programming provision of a small informational-calculational system based on the microcomputer Elektronika DZ-28, intended for remote monitoring of TPE separation. The elaborated programs can be implemented in the preliminary choice of necessary conditions of the TPE separation process, and also during and after the separation process for comparison of calculated results with the results of continuous, on-line remote monitoring and with the results of laboratory sample analysis. The possible application of the programs has been checked in the instance of the separation of curium and americium, and einsteinium and californium, the results of which are in satisfactory agreement with the results of remote and laboratory-analytical monitoring.

  10. Seismic monitoring of heavy oil reservoirs: Rock physics and finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theune, Ulrich

    In the past decades, remote monitoring of subsurface processes has attracted increasing attention in geophysics. With repeated geophysical surveys one attempts to detect changes in the physical properties in the underground without directly accessing the earth. This technique has been proven to be very valuable for monitoring enhanced oil recovery programs. This thesis presents an modelling approach for the feasibility analysis for monitoring of a thermal enhanced oil recovery technique applied to heavy oil reservoirs in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. In order to produce heavy oil from shallow reservoirs thermal oil recovery techniques such as the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are often employed. As these techniques are expensive and technically challenging, early detection of operational problems is without doubt of great value. However, the feasibility of geophysical monitoring depends on many factors such as the changes in the rock physical properties of the target reservoir. In order to access the feasibility of seismic monitoring for heavy oil reservoirs, a fluid-substitutional rock physical study has been carried out to simulate the steam injection. The second modelling approach is based on a modified finite element algorithm to simulate the propagation of elastic waves in the earth, which has been developed independently in the framework of this thesis. The work summarized in this thesis shows a possibility to access the feasibility of seismic monitoring for heavy oil reservoirs through an extensive rock-physical study. Seismic monitoring is a useful tool in reservoir management decision process. However, the work reported here suggests that seismic monitoring of SAGD processes in the heavy oil reservoirs of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin is only feasible in shallow, unconsolidated deposits. For deeper, but otherwise geological similar reservoirs, the SAGD does not create a sufficient change in the rock physical properties to be

  11. A Spectral Element Approach for Modeling of Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Rolf T.; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2010-09-30

    During the last decades, guided waves have shown great potential for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. These waves can be excited and sensed by piezoelectric elements that can be permanently attached onto a structure offering online monitoring capability. As the setup of wave based SHM systems may be very difficult and time consuming there is a growing demand for efficient simulation tools providing the opportunity to design wave based SHM systems in a virtual environment. As usually high frequency waves are used, the associated short wavelength leads to the necessity of a very dense mesh, which makes conventional finite elements not well suited for this purpose. Therefore a flat shell spectral element approach is presented in this contribution. By including electromechanical coupling an SHM system can be simulated entirely from actuator voltage to sensor voltage. The focus of this contribution is the analysis of the effect of delaminations on propagating waves. A forward increment Lagrange multiplier method is used to simulate contact within the delaminated area. A model validation is performed using measured data of an anisotropic CFRP-plate.

  12. A Spectral Element Approach for Modeling of Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Rolf T.; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2010-09-01

    During the last decades, guided waves have shown great potential for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. These waves can be excited and sensed by piezoelectric elements that can be permanently attached onto a structure offering online monitoring capability. As the setup of wave based SHM systems may be very difficult and time consuming there is a growing demand for efficient simulation tools providing the opportunity to design wave based SHM systems in a virtual environment. As usually high frequency waves are used, the associated short wavelength leads to the necessity of a very dense mesh, which makes conventional finite elements not well suited for this purpose. Therefore a flat shell spectral element approach is presented in this contribution. By including electromechanical coupling an SHM system can be simulated entirely from actuator voltage to sensor voltage. The focus of this contribution is the analysis of the effect of delaminations on propagating waves. A forward increment Lagrange multiplier method is used to simulate contact within the delaminated area. A model validation is performed using measured data of an anisotropic CFRP-plate.

  13. Elements needed in design of a ground-water-quality monitoring network in the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takasaki, Kiyoshi J.

    1977-01-01

    The elements needed in the design of a ground-water-quality monitoring network in the Hawaiian Islands are described and summarized. The elements are given by geohydrologie units which represent areas where there are similarities in the occurrence of ground water or in the geology pertinent to the occurrence of ground water. The goal is to establish a network of observation points to inventory and maintain surveillance of existing and potential sources of pollution of ground water. Of principal concern to Hawaii's environment is pollution of the potable ground-water supplies and of the near-shore recreational waters, the latter by the discharge of polluted ground water. Existing monitoring efforts, although intensive in many areas, are not adequate because they are geared more toward (1) the detection and surveillance of pollutants in the conveyances of ground water instead of in the sources of ground water and (2) the monitoring of extensive nonpoint sources of pollution instead of from discrete point sources.

  14. Use of epidermis for the monitoring of tissular trace elements in Mediterranean striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    PubMed

    Borrell, A; Clusa, M; Aguilar, A; Drago, M

    2015-03-01

    Trace elements accumulate in epidermis, liver, kidney and muscle tissues in cetaceans. However, contrarily to internal tissues, epidermis can be sampled using minimally-invasive techniques. We investigate the patterns of trace element tissue concentrations in relation to individual sex and length and the degree of inter-tissue equilibrium between epidermis and the main internal organs of the Mediterranean striped dolphin. With it, we aim to test whether epidermis is a suitable tissue to predict trace element concentrations of internal tissues in cetaceans. We focused on trace elements with high potential toxicity (mercury and cadmium) or biological significance (zinc, copper and selenium). In contrast to what was found for Cu and Zn, the concentrations of Hg, Cd and Se in epidermis were positively correlated with the levels found in the internal tissues sampled probably due to their capacity to bioaccumulate. Thus, we conclude that sampling and analysing epidermis is appropriate to monitor and predict the concentrations of Hg, Cd and Se in internal tissues but not for Cu and Zn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An Overview of the NASA Aviation Safety Program Propulsion Health Monitoring Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) has been initiated with aggressive goals to reduce the civil aviation accident rate, To meet these goals, several technology investment areas have been identified including a sub-element in propulsion health monitoring (PHM). Specific AvSP PHM objectives are to develop and validate propulsion system health monitoring technologies designed to prevent engine malfunctions from occurring in flight, and to mitigate detrimental effects in the event an in-flight malfunction does occur. A review of available propulsion system safety information was conducted to help prioritize PHM areas to focus on under the AvSP. It is noted that when a propulsion malfunction is involved in an aviation accident or incident, it is often a contributing factor rather than the sole cause for the event. Challenging aspects of the development and implementation of PHM technology such as cost, weight, robustness, and reliability are discussed. Specific technology plans are overviewed including vibration diagnostics, model-based controls and diagnostics, advanced instrumentation, and general aviation propulsion system health monitoring technology. Propulsion system health monitoring, in addition to engine design, inspection, maintenance, and pilot training and awareness, is intrinsic to enhancing aviation propulsion system safety.

  16. Danube catchment water chemistry monitoring - elemental pattern determination from source to mouth using ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchaikovsky, Anastassiya; Zitek, Andreas; Irrgeher, Johanna; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring the elemental composition of river water is an important tool to determine the chemical status of a river. However, currently many studies are limited to the analysis of heavy metals included in the EU Water Framework Directive Priority Substances List (Cd, Hg, Ni, Pb). Yet, the assessment of further elements (e.g. Ca, Mg, Si) can give additional relevant information for understanding catchment processes such as soil erosion, weathering, hydrological changes or glacial melting. In addition, site specific "elemental pattern" can be used as tracer for ecological studies, like habitat and migration studies of fish or birds. Elemental information is of particular interest complementary to isotopic data where only little variability in the isotopic signatures can be observed. In this work, we investigated water samples collected from 68 sampling sites along the longitudinal course of the river Danube including the major tributaries during the Joint Danube Survey 3 (JDS3) in 2013. Water samples were obtained as triplicates in the middle of the river and analyzed using Inductively Coupled - Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Method validation was performed using riverine water (NRC SLRS-5) certified reference material as well as in-house prepared quality control standards. Due to the diverse geology and changing natural and anthropogenic factors along the longitudinal course of the Danube, pronounced elemental variations among the water samples were documented. For instance, especially some major elements (Ca, K, Mg, Na) together with some minor elements (Si, Sr) are known to reflect in particular regional geological morphologies. In addition, the variation in Si/Ca ratios can be used as an indicator for weathering conditions, especially in the mountainous areas along the Danube. Elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Pb downstream of some large cities and industrial areas are signs of significant anthropogenic impact. In combination, the chemical

  17. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  18. Risk and monitoring based indicators of receiving water status: alternative or complementary elements in IWRM?

    PubMed

    Völker, J; Richter, S; Borchardt, D; Mohaupt, V

    2013-01-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) was enacted in the year 2000 with a stepwise approach. After legal implementation in the various member states large efforts were undertaken for the initial characterization of water bodies, risk assessment, to implement extensive monitoring schemes and to develop management plans at different aggregation levels by the year 2010. The initial characterization process and risk assessment had to be finalized by 2004 and delineated water bodies including a typological classification and identified the significant pressures and impacts in a screening procedure. In parallel, monitoring programmes and new biological indicator systems were developed in order to proof and refine the results of the risk assessment with an ecological indicator based assessment in a subsequent step which was finalized in 2009. Although the risk assessment for Germany was based on existing data that were originally collected for other purposes and came from a large variety of environmental or economical sectors, the results differ only slightly from the monitoring and indicator based information with respect to classifications of the 'ecological status' and 'chemical status'. From this result we conclude that a risk assessment based on a careful application and intelligent combination of existing data sources with proven quality allows the recognition of trends and the identification of priorities for action of measures already at an early stage of a management process. However, monitoring schemes and advanced sets of ecological indicators are essential in later management steps both for narrowing uncertainties remaining from the risk assessment and to allow for effect controls of implemented measures. Moreover, these monitoring indicators should differentiate the effects of multiple stressors more factor specific and with respect to ecosystem states and functions. In conclusion, we see risk and indicator based assessments as complementary elements

  19. Lichen elemental content bioindicators for air quality in upper Midwest, USA: A model for large-scale monitoring

    Treesearch

    Susan Will-Wolf; Sarah Jovan; Michael C. Amacher

    2017-01-01

    Our development of lichen elemental bioindicators for a United States of America (USA) national monitoring program is a useful model for other large-scale programs. Concentrations of 20 elements were measured, validated, and analyzed for 203 samples of five common lichen species. Collections were made by trained non-specialists near 75 permanent plots and an expert...

  20. Microwave plasma monitoring system for the elemental composition analysis of high temperature process streams

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, high temperature capability refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. The invention may be incorporated into a high temperature process device and implemented in situ for example, such as with a DC graphite electrode plasma arc furnace. The invention further provides a system for the elemental analysis of process streams by removing particulate and/or droplet samples therefrom and entraining such samples in the gas flow which passes through the plasma flame. Introduction of and entraining samples in the gas flow may be facilitated by a suction pump, regulating gas flow, gravity or combinations thereof.

  1. Monitoring Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Expression During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bodak, Maxime; Ciaudo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1) are a class of transposable elements which account for almost 19 % of the mouse genome. This represents around 600,000 L1 fragments, among which it is estimated that 3000 intact copies still remain capable to retrotranspose and to generate deleterious mutation by insertion into genomic coding region. In differentiated cells, full length L1 are transcriptionally repressed by DNA methylation. However at the blastocyst stage, L1 elements are subject to a demethylation wave and able to be expressed and to be inserted into new genomic locations. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Mouse ESCs can be maintained undifferentiated under controlled culture conditions or induced into the three primary germ layers, therefore they represent a suitable model to follow mechanisms involved in L1 repression during the process of differentiation of mESCs. This protocol presents how to maintain culture of undifferentiated mESCs, induce their differentiation, and monitor L1 expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. L1 transcriptional levels are assessed by real-time qRT-PCR performed on total RNA extracts using specific L1 primers and translation levels are measured by Western blot analysis of L1 protein ORF1 using a specific L1 antibody.

  2. Stellar Death by Weak or Failed Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Scott Michael

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) - the violent deaths of massive stars - are among the most luminous events in the Universe and play an important role in galaxy evolution and the production and distribution of the heavy elements necessary for planet formation and life. Despite decades of effort it is still unclear how these SNe explode. While SNe have been identified with close to the maximum theoretically possible energies, the lower bounds on SN energies and luminosities are less well-constrained. There is also no requirement that the core collapse always results in a successful SN explosion. In fact, there are multiple lines of evidence that suggest that 10 - 30% of core collapses might result in failed SNe, forming a black hole without a dramatic external explosion. The primary focus of this dissertation is to explore the lower bounds of the possible explosion energies and luminosities of core-collapse SNe. I discuss three observational strategies to help understand how massive stars die. Due to the development of advanced facilities for the detection of neutrinos and gravitational waves, the next Galactic SN will offer an unprecedented opportunity to study the SN explosion mechanism. To aid preparations for this event, I model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for a Galactic SN, its shock breakout radiation, and progenitor. I also analyze the archetypes of two types of SN "impostors" and show that they may be genuine SNe, but with energies lower than previously observed. I present results from an ambitious survey that has been monitoring a million massive stars for 7 years to search for failed SNe. I follow-up the first identified failed SN candidate and find that the massive stellar progenitor appears to have vanished leaving behind a faint, fading IR source that may be due to fallback accretion onto a newly formed black hole. Finally, I set new constraints on the fraction of core collapses that result in failed SNe.

  3. Continuous haematic pH monitoring in extracorporeal circulation using a disposable florescence sensing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Luca; Rovati, Luigi; Fabbri, Paola; Pilati, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    During extracorporeal circulation (ECC), blood is periodically sampled and analyzed to maintain the blood-gas status of the patient within acceptable limits. This protocol has well-known drawbacks that may be overcome by continuous monitoring. We present the characterization of a new pH sensor for continuous monitoring in ECC. This monitoring device includes a disposable fluorescence-sensing element directly in contact with the blood, whose fluorescence intensity is strictly related to the pH of the blood. In vitro experiments show no significant difference between the blood gas analyzer values and the sensor readings; after proper calibration, it gives a correlation of R>0.9887, and measuring errors were lower than the 3% of the pH range of interest (RoI) with respect to a commercial blood gas analyzer. This performance has been confirmed also by simulating a moderate ipothermia condition, i.e., blood temperature 32°C, frequently used in cardiac surgery. In ex vivo experiments, performed with animal models, the sensor is continuously operated in an extracorporeal undiluted blood stream for a maximum of 11 h. It gives a correlation of R>0.9431, and a measuring error lower than the 3% of the pH RoI with respect to laboratory techniques.

  4. Continuous haematic pH monitoring in extracorporeal circulation using a disposable florescence sensing element.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luca; Rovati, Luigi; Fabbri, Paola; Pilati, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    During extracorporeal circulation (ECC), blood is periodically sampled and analyzed to maintain the blood-gas status of the patient within acceptable limits. This protocol has well-known drawbacks that may be overcome by continuous monitoring. We present the characterization of a new pH sensor for continuous monitoring in ECC. This monitoring device includes a disposable fluorescence-sensing element directly in contact with the blood, whose fluorescence intensity is strictly related to the pH of the blood. In vitro experiments show no significant difference between the blood gas analyzer values and the sensor readings; after proper calibration, it gives a correlation of R>0.9887, and measuring errors were lower than the 3% of the pH range of interest (RoI) with respect to a commercial blood gas analyzer. This performance has been confirmed also by simulating a moderate ipothermia condition, i.e., blood temperature 32°C, frequently used in cardiac surgery. In ex vivo experiments, performed with animal models, the sensor is continuously operated in an extracorporeal undiluted blood stream for a maximum of 11 h. It gives a correlation of R>0.9431, and a measuring error lower than the 3% of the pH RoI with respect to laboratory techniques.

  5. Turbine engine rotor health monitoring evaluation by means of finite element analyses and spin tests data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Clem, Michelle; Baaklini, George Y.

    2014-04-01

    Generally, rotating engine components undergo high centrifugal loading environment which subject them to various types of failure initiation mechanisms. Health monitoring of these components is a necessity and is often challenging to implement. This is primarily due to numerous factors including the presence of scattered loading conditions, flaw sizes, component geometry and materials properties, all which hinder the simplicity of applying health monitoring applications. This paper represents a summary work of combined experimental and analytical modeling that included data collection from a spin test experiment of a rotor disk addressing the aforementioned durability issues. It further covers presentation of results obtained from a finite element modeling study to characterize the structural durability of a cracked rotor as it relates to the experimental findings. The experimental data include blade tip clearance, blade tip timing and shaft displacement measurements. The tests were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Rotordynamics Laboratory, a high precision spin rig. The results are evaluated and examined to determine their significance on the development of a health monitoring system to pre-predict cracks and other anomalies and to assist in initiating a supplemental physics based fault prediction analytical model.

  6. Bridge Deformation Monitoring: Instight From InSAR Time-Series And Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Roghayeh; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Sharifi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the capability of advanced InSAR time-series techniques such as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) for monitoring of civil engineering structures like bridge. Deformation monitoring of bridges are essential to mitigate not only the financial and human losses, but also ecological and environmental-related problems. Assessment of deformation during bridge lifespan can provide invaluable insight for better planning and management. The study area, Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC) in northwest Iran, consists of one bridge and two embankments on both sides of it. The difference between the deformation rate of the embankments on both sides of the bridge may seriously damage the bridge itself, so it is very important to accurately monitor them in space and time in order to assess the state of the bridge concerning deformations. In this study we apply the InSAR time-series technique of SBAS for 58 SAR images including 10 ALOS, 30 Envisat and 18 TerraSAR-X (TSX) to assess deflation of embankments of Urmia bridge during 2003-2013. The InSAR results are used in a 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to assess structural stability of the embankments.

  7. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveform monitoring using two- element ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Seo, Joohyun; Pietrangelo, Sabino J; Lee, Hae-Seung; Sodini, Charles G

    2015-04-01

    This work details noninvasive arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform estimation based on an arterial vessel cross-sectional area measurement combined with an elasticity measurement of the vessel, represented by pulse wave velocity (PWV), using a two-element ultrasound system. The overall ABP waveform estimation is validated in a custom-designed experimental setup mimicking the heart and an arterial vessel segment with two single element transducers, assuming a constant hemodynamic system. The estimation of local PWV using the flow-area method produces unbiased elasticity estimation of the tube in a pressure waveform comparison. The measured PWV using 16 cardiac cycles of data is 8.47 + 0.63 m/s with an associated scaling error of -1.56 + 14.0% in a direct pressure waveform comparison, showing negligible bias error on average. The distension waveform obtained from a complex cross-correlation model estimator (C3M) reliably traces small pressure changes reflected by the diameter change. The excellent agreement of an estimated pressure waveform to the reference pressure waveform suggests the promising potential of a readily available, inexpensive, and portable ABP waveform monitoring device.

  8. Elemental and morphological analyses of filter tape deposits from a beta attenuation monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, John G.; Chow, Judith C.; Chen, L.-W. Antony; Kohl, Steven D.; Casuccio, Gary S.; Lersch, Traci L.; Langston, Rodney

    2012-03-01

    An hourly average PM 10 concentration of 1402 μg m -3 was registered at 1400 Pacific Standard Time (PST), 1/11/2007, on the beta attenuation monitor (BAM) at a North Las Vegas, Nevada sampling site. The high PM 10 concentration at ~ 1245-~1331 PST was a microscale event, limited strictly to the PM 10 sampler; it did not affect the adjacent PM 2.5 concentrations. A method was developed for retrospective compositional analysis of BAM glass-fiber filter tape sample deposits. Sample punches were submitted for optical examination, followed by elemental and morphological analyses with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses, respectively. Geological samples surrounding the sampling site were acquired to establish source profiles and identify source markers. Although blank levels for many elements were high on the glass-fiber filter tape from the BAM, they were consistent enough to allow background subtraction from the deposit concentrations for most chemical components. Chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model source apportionment for the event closely matched the paved road dust sample collected adjacent to the sampling site. It is likely that this high mass event was the result of environmental vandalism. This study demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing BAM filter tape deposits for source attribution, especially for short-duration fugitive dust events. Filter tapes should be time-stamped and immediately retained after an event for future analysis.

  9. How Does a Failing School Stop Failing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Gross, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The author's school had just been labeled a failing school by No Child Left Behind when its new principal arrived in the fall of 2007. In this demoralizing climate, teachers can get frustrated and choose to give up, or they can rise to the challenge, create a plan for improvement, and plunge into uncharted waters. This article discusses how the…

  10. How Does a Failing School Stop Failing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Gross, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The author's school had just been labeled a failing school by No Child Left Behind when its new principal arrived in the fall of 2007. In this demoralizing climate, teachers can get frustrated and choose to give up, or they can rise to the challenge, create a plan for improvement, and plunge into uncharted waters. This article discusses how the…

  11. Spectral-element simulations of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration time-lapse monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Luo, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2009-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2, a green house gas, represents an effort to reduce the large amount of CO2 generated as a by-product of fossil fuels combustion and emitted into the atmosphere. This process of sequestration involves CO2 storage deep underground. There are three main storage options: injection into hydrocarbon reservoirs, injection into methane-bearing coal beds, or injection into deep saline aquifers, that is, highly permeable porous media. The key issues involve accurate monitoring of the CO2, from the injection stage to the prediction & verification of CO2 movement over time for environmental considerations. A natural non-intrusive monitoring technique is referred to as ``4D seismics'', which involves 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. The success of monitoring the CO2 movement is subject to a proper description of the physics of the problem. We propose to realize time-lapse migrations comparing acoustic, elastic, and poroelastic simulations of 4D seismic imaging to characterize the storage zone. This approach highlights the influence of using different physical theories on interpreting seismic data, and, more importantly, on extracting the CO2 signature from the seismic wave field. Our simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, which allows for highly accurate results. Biot's equations are implemented to account for poroelastic effects. Attenuation associated with the anelasticity of the rock frame and frequency-dependent viscous resistance of the pore fluid are accommodated based upon a memory variable approach. The sensitivity of observables to the model parameters is quantified based upon finite-frequency sensitivity kernels calculated using an adjoint method.

  12. Monitoring of jökulhlaups and element fluxes in proglacial Icelandic rivers using osmotic samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Gałeczka, Iwona M.; Gkritzalis-Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Palmer, Martin R.; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Jónsson, Þorsteinn; Gislason, Sigurður R.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of volatile emissions from volcanoes is an integral part of understanding magmatic systems, with the exsolution and extent of volcanic degassing having a large impact on the nature of an eruption. Measurements of volatiles have traditionally focused on gas emissions into the atmosphere, but volatiles can also become dissolved in proximal water bodies en route to the surface. Thus the monitoring of rivers draining active volcanic areas can provide insights to identifying changes in activity. This process is particularly important for sub-glacial volcanoes in Iceland, where much of the volatile release is transported within glacial outbreak floods, termed jökulhlaups. Monitoring and characterising these phenomena is hampered by the dependence on spot sampling of stochastic events under challenging field conditions, which often leads to bias in the collected data. A recent technological advance is the osmotic sampler, an electricity-free pump that continuously collects water that can subsequently be divided into time-averaged samples. This technique allows for continued and unsupervised deployment of a sampler for weeks to months, representing a cost-efficient form of chemical monitoring. In this study we deployed osmotic samplers in two rivers in southern Iceland. Skálm is a proglacial river from Mýrdalsjökull glacier and Katla volcano, while Skaftá is a larger drainage system from the western part of Vatnajökull glacier. Both rivers are prone to jökulhlaups from geothermal and volcanic sources, and a small jökulhlaup of geothermal origin occurred during the second deployment in Skaftá in January 2014. The two deployments show that osmotic samplers are capable of delivering accurate chemical data in turbulent conditions for several key elements. Total dissolved fluxes for the deployment at Skaftá are calculated to be Na = 9.9 tonnes/day, Mg = 10.5 t/d, Si = 34.7 t/d, Cl = 11.0 t/d, Ca = 31.6 t/d, DIC = 50.8 t/d, and SO4 = 28.3 t/d, with

  13. Speed of sound estimation for thermal monitoring using an active ultrasound element during liver ablation therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Audigier, Chloé; Dillow, Austin; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal monitoring for ablation therapy has high demands for preserving healthy tissues while removing malignant ones completely. Various methods have been investigated. However, exposure to radiation, cost-effectiveness, and inconvenience hinder the use of X-ray or MRI methods. Due to the non-invasiveness and real-time capabilities of ultrasound, it is widely used in intraoperative procedures. Ultrasound thermal monitoring methods have been developed for affordable monitoring in real-time. We propose a new method for thermal monitoring using an ultrasound element. By inserting a Lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) element to generate the ultrasound signal in the liver tissues, the single travel time of flight is recorded from the PZT element to the ultrasound transducer. We detect the speed of sound change caused by the increase in temperature during ablation therapy. We performed an ex vivo experiment with liver tissues to verify the feasibility of our speed of sound estimation technique. The time of flight information is used in an optimization method to recover the speed of sound maps during the ablation, which are then converted into temperature maps. The result shows that the trend of temperature changes matches with the temperature measured at a single point. The estimation error can be decreased by using a proper curve linking the speed of sound to the temperature. The average error over time was less than 3 degrees Celsius for a bovine liver. The speed of sound estimation using a single PZT element can be used for thermal monitoring.

  14. Monitoring the production process of selenized yeast by elemental speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Rampler, Evelyn; Rose, Stephan; Wieder, Dominik; Ganner, Anja; Dohnal, Ilse; Dalik, Thomas; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2012-11-01

    Elemental speciation analysis was implemented as an essential tool set addressing optimum fermentation conditions for the production of selenized yeast feed supplements. Accordingly, the study addressed intracellular levels of (1) total selenium and sulfur, (2) seleno methionine (SeMet), (3) cysteine (Cys) and methionine (Met) and (4) selenite and selenate. Dedicated sample preparation- and LC-ICP-MS methods were implemented and validated using the reference material Selm-1. Excellent repeatability precisions <10% (n = 4 biological replicates) could be obtained for all parameters. The study comprised fermentation monitoring over 72 hours (6 different time points) for a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain under different selenite feed conditions. It was observed that for this strain an increase in the selenium concentration in the fermentation feed by 50% did not result in enhanced selenium accumulation. Fermentation monitoring of three different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under the same conditions showed strain specific selenium uptake after 72 hours. The strain with the lowest cell viability of 60% showed the lowest SeMet content. After 47 h of fermentation, all strains reached a critical point, at which seleno methionine accounted for approximately 100% of the total selenium and cell viability started to decrease. This could be explained by sulfur limitation and/or excess of the seleno methionine storage capacity. Strains showing cell viability of approx. 90% after 72 hours of fermentation revealed SeMet concentrations up to 3000 μg g(-1). In the final product, an apparent threshold level for Met/SeMet of approx. 1 was observed for all strains.

  15. Monitoring drip water isotope and element variability: A new device for automatic drip water collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenbach, S. F. M.; Gilbert, M.-J.; Kwiecien, O.; Seifert, R.; Fleitmann, D.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding cave drip water elemental and stable isotope composition (δD and δ18O) are vital for interpreting climate proxy records derived from stalagmites as palaeoclimate archives. Delineating the temporal changes in drip water chemistry to climatic and environmental fluctuations (such as rainfall amount, degassing, bioactivity etc.) is even more important if calibration is attempted between climatic parameters and stalagmite proxy records. Monitoring of remote study sites has often been limited by the ability to regularly and manually collect drip water samples over an extended period of time. One important complication to be considered for stable isotope analysis is that sampling vials must be closed air-tight, in order to avoid post-sampling evaporation of the sampled water. To overcome these limitations we developed an automated and programmable sampling device that can collect 12 ml of drip water at pre-defined time intervals. A total of 49 samples can be collected in a turret over a period of up to one year. The device is powered by widely available C-cell batteries and works in cave environments with positive air temperature. The autosampler has been installed and tested in Waldheim Cave, Switzerland, where we collected water at 24h intervals. We present preliminary data for the winter period December 2011 to March 2012.

  16. Finite Element Method (FEM) Modeling of Freeze-drying: Monitoring Pharmaceutical Product Robustness During Lyophilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Sadineni, Vikram; Maity, Mita; Quan, Yong; Enterline, Matthew; Mantri, Rao V

    2015-12-01

    Lyophilization is an approach commonly undertaken to formulate drugs that are unstable to be commercialized as ready to use (RTU) solutions. One of the important aspects of commercializing a lyophilized product is to transfer the process parameters that are developed in lab scale lyophilizer to commercial scale without a loss in product quality. This process is often accomplished by costly engineering runs or through an iterative process at the commercial scale. Here, we are highlighting a combination of computational and experimental approach to predict commercial process parameters for the primary drying phase of lyophilization. Heat and mass transfer coefficients are determined experimentally either by manometric temperature measurement (MTM) or sublimation tests and used as inputs for the finite element model (FEM)-based software called PASSAGE, which computes various primary drying parameters such as primary drying time and product temperature. The heat and mass transfer coefficients will vary at different lyophilization scales; hence, we present an approach to use appropriate factors while scaling-up from lab scale to commercial scale. As a result, one can predict commercial scale primary drying time based on these parameters. Additionally, the model-based approach presented in this study provides a process to monitor pharmaceutical product robustness and accidental process deviations during Lyophilization to support commercial supply chain continuity. The approach presented here provides a robust lyophilization scale-up strategy; and because of the simple and minimalistic approach, it will also be less capital intensive path with minimal use of expensive drug substance/active material.

  17. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN A COMMUNITY MONITOR AND PERSONAL EXPOSURES TO PM 2.5 MASS AND TRACE ELEMENTS IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between a community monitor and personal exposures to PM2.5 mass and trace elements was investigated for 28 days during the summer of 1998 in a retirement home in Baltimore, Maryland. Daily community, outdoor, and indoor PM2.5 were measured with a URG Versatile...

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN A COMMUNITY MONITOR AND PERSONAL EXPOSURES TO PM 2.5 MASS AND TRACE ELEMENTS IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between a community monitor and personal exposures to PM2.5 mass and trace elements was investigated for 28 days during the summer of 1998 in a retirement home in Baltimore, Maryland. Daily community, outdoor, and indoor PM2.5 were measured with a URG Versatile...

  19. Selection of Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring Sites based on Geographic Parameters Extraction of GIS and Fuzzy Matter-Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfa; Peng, Dahao; Ma, Jianhao; Zhao, Li; Sun, Ce; Ling, Huanzhang

    2015-01-01

    To effectively monitor the atmospheric quality of small-scale areas, it is necessary to optimize the locations of the monitoring sites. This study combined geographic parameters extraction by GIS with fuzzy matter-element analysis. Geographic coordinates were extracted by GIS and transformed into rectangular coordinates. These coordinates were input into the Gaussian plume model to calculate the pollutant concentration at each site. Fuzzy matter-element analysis, which is used to solve incompatible problems, was used to select the locations of sites. The matter element matrices were established according to the concentration parameters. The comprehensive correlation functions KA (xj) and KB (xj), which reflect the degree of correlation among monitoring indices, were solved for each site, and a scatter diagram of the sites was drawn to determine the final positions of the sites based on the functions. The sites could be classified and ultimately selected by the scatter diagram. An actual case was tested, and the results showed that 5 positions can be used for monitoring, and the locations conformed to the technical standard. In the results of this paper, the hierarchical clustering method was used to improve the methods. The sites were classified into 5 types, and 7 locations were selected. Five of the 7 locations were completely identical to the sites determined by fuzzy matter-element analysis. The selections according to these two methods are similar, and these methods can be used in combination. In contrast to traditional methods, this study monitors the isolated point pollutant source within a small range, which can reduce the cost of monitoring. PMID:25923911

  20. Concentrations of Elements in Hellbender Blood and Fish Fillets from the Missouri Department of Conservation Monitoring Programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Mike J.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of contaminant monitoring surveys conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) blood and fish. Catfish (Ictalurus furcatus, Ictalurus punctatus, Pylodictis olivaris), redhorse (Moxostoma anisorum, Moxostoma erythrurum), bass (Micropterus salmoides, Micropterus punctulatus, Micropterus Lacepede, Ambloplites rupestris), walleye (Sander vitreus), and sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) were collected from 17 sites as part of the Department's General Contaminant Monitoring Program. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and other sunfish (Lepomis megalotis, Lepomis cyanellus) were collected from 18 sites as part of the Department's Resource Assessment and Monitoring Program. Blood from hellbenders was collected from seven sites as part of the Department's Hellbender Monitoring Program.

  1. Spatiotemporal distribution of airborne elements monitored with the moss bags technique in the Greater Thriasion Plain, Attica, Greece.

    PubMed

    Saitanis, C J; Frontasyeva, M V; Steinnes, E; Palmer, M W; Ostrovnaya, T M; Gundorina, S F

    2013-01-01

    The well-known moss bags technique was applied in the heavily polluted Thriasion Plain region, Attica, Greece, in order to study the spatiotemporal distribution, in the atmosphere, of the following 32 elements: Na, Al, Cl, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Zn, As, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Sb, I, Ba, La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Dy, Yb, Hf, Ta, Hg, Th, and U. The moss bags were constituted of Sphagnum girgensohnii materials. The bags were exposed to ambient air in a network of 12 monitoring stations scattered throughout the monitoring area. In order to explore the temporal variation of the pollutants, four sets of moss bags were exposed for 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Instrumental neutral activation analysis was used for the determinations of the elements. The data were analyzed using the Pearson correlations, the partial redundancy analysis, and the biplot statistical methods. Some pairs of elements were highly correlated indicating a probable common source of origin. The levels of the measured pollutants were unevenly distributed throughout the area and different pollutants exhibited different spatial patterns. In general, higher loads were observed in the stations close to and within the industrial zone. Most of the measured elements (e.g., Al, Ca, Ni, I, Zn, Cr, and As) exhibited a monotonic accumulation trend over time. Some elements exhibited different dynamics. The elements Mn, Mo, and Hg showed a decreasing trend, probably due to leaching and/or volatilization processes over time. Na and Br initially showed an increasing trend during the winter and early spring periods but decreased drastically during the late warm period. The results further suggest that the moss bags technique would be considered valuable for the majority of elements but should be used with caution in the cases of elements vulnerable to leaching and/or volatilization. It also suggests that the timing and the duration of the exposure of moss materials should be considered in the interpretation of the results.

  2. [Comparison of Monitoring Methods of Organic Carbon and Element Carbon in Atmospheric Fine Particles].

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Ji, Dong-sheng; Liu, Zi-rui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yue-si

    2016-04-15

    Accurate measurement of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in atmospheric fine particulate is an important scientific basis for studying the formation and source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol. The selection of different analysis programs will lead to difference in the OC and EC concentrations, and further result in the misjudgment of the results. The OC and EC concentrations observed using three temperature protocols including RT-Quartz ( R) , NIOSH 5040 (N) and Fast-TC (F) were compared and analyzed in combination with the degree of air pollution in Beijing. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the TC (TC = OC + EC), OC and EC concentrations observed using R, N and F protocols and certain deviation was found among the TC (TC = OC + EC) , OC and EC concentrations. For TC, the results observed using R protocol were 5% lower than those using N protocol; hut 1% higher than those using F protocol. For OC, the results obtained using R were 9% lower than those using N protocol and 1% higher than those using F protocol. For EC, the results obtained using R were 20% higher than those using N protocol and 11% lower than those using F protocol. The variation coefficients for TC, OC and EC obtained based on R protocol were less than the other two temperature protocols under different air quality degrees. The slopes of regression curves of TC, OC and EC between on-line analysis using R protocol and off-line analysis were 1.21,1. 14 and 1.35, respectively. The correlation coefficients of TC, OC and EC were 0.99, 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. In contrast with the Black carbon ( BC) concentrations monitored by multi-angle absorption spectrophotometer (MAAP), the EC concentrations measured by on-line OC/EC analyzer using R protocol were obviously lower. When the BC concentrations were less than or equal to 8 gg*m3, the EC/BC ratio was 0.39. While the EC/BC ratio was 0.88, when the BC concentrations were greater than 8 ggm3. The variation

  3. Microseismic Monitoring and 3D Finite Element Analysis of the Right Bank Slope, Dagangshan Hydropower Station, during Reservoir Impounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingzong; Tang, Chun'an; Li, Lianchong; Lv, Pengfei; Liu, Hongyuan

    2017-07-01

    The right bank slope of Dagangshan hydropower station in China has complex geological conditions and is subjected to high in situ stress. Notably, microseismic activities in the right bank slope occurred during reservoir impounding. This paper describes the microseismic monitoring technology, and three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis is used to explore the microseismic activities and damage mechanisms in the right bank slope during reservoir impounding. Based on data obtained from microseismic monitoring, a progressive microseismic damage model is proposed and implemented for 3D finite element analysis. The safety factor for the right bank slope after reservoir impoundment obtained from the 3D finite element analysis, which included the effects of progressive microseismic damage, was 1.10, indicating that the slope is stable. The microseismic monitoring system is able to capture the slope disturbance during reservoir impounding in real time and is a powerful tool for qualitatively assessing changes in slope stability over time. The proposed progressive microseismic damage model adequately simulates the changes in the slope during the impoundment process and provides a valuable tool for evaluating slope stability.

  4. Incremental motion encoder: a sensor for the integrated condition monitoring of rolling element bearings in machine tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayandokun, Kayode A.; Orton, P. A.; Sherkat, Nasser; Thomas, Peter D.; Poliakoff, Janet F.

    1995-12-01

    Modern industry increasingly demands that machine tools operate continuously as elements within computer integrated manufacturing cells. Accurate monitoring of machine condition is the key to predicting failures that would result in quality defects or costly unplanned production stoppages. This paper presents research into the use of a novel rotary motion sensor for the condition monitoring of rolling element bearings. This sensor, the incremental motion encoder (IME), is based upon a patented development of the optical encoder commonly used in machine tools for sensing angular position and rotational speed. The IME combines these measurements with that of shaft center position in two dimensions. This motion of the shaft center is directly related to the condition of the bearings supporting the shaft. To illustrate the IME principle experimental results showing the ability of the sensor to distinguish between bearing defects and external sources of vibration are presented. Measurement of shaft loading with the sensor is also described. Currently machine tool condition is most often measured by external sensors, such as accelerometers or acoustic emission transducers, which are not parts of the machine itself. The IME is ideally suited to being designed into a machine tool so as to integrate a condition monitoring facility into the computer control of the machine. The paper concludes by describing the current technology which allows sensors based on the IME principle to be integrated directly into rolling element bearings for this purpose.

  5. Hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 elements used to detect inhibitors and monitor the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Nissley, Dwight V.; Boyer, Paul L.; Garfinkel, David J.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Strathern, Jeffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that hybrid retrotransposons composed of the yeast Ty1 element and the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 are active in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The RT activity of these hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 (his3AI/AIDS RT; HART) elements can be monitored by using a simple genetic assay. HART element reverse transcription depends on both the polymerase and RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. Here we demonstrate that the HART assay is sensitive to inhibitors of HIV-1 RT. (−)-(S)-8-Chloro-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione monohydrochloride (8 Cl-TIBO), a well characterized non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) of HIV-1 RT, blocks propagation of HART elements. HART elements that express NNRTI-resistant RT variants of HIV-1 are insensitive to 8 Cl-TIBO, demonstrating the specificity of inhibition in this assay. HART elements carrying NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1 RT can be used to identify compounds that are active against drug-resistant viruses. PMID:9811899

  6. Who Really Failed? Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiuri, Katherine M.; Leon, Raul A.

    2012-01-01

    Scott Jaschik's (2010) article "Who Really Failed?" details the experience of Dominique Homberger, a tenured faculty member at Louisiana State University (LSU) who was removed from teaching her introductory biology course citing student complaints in regards to "the extreme nature" of the grading policy. This removal has…

  7. Design and performance of coded aperture optical elements for the CESR-TA x-ray beam size monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. P.; Chatterjee, A.; Conolly, C.; Edwards, E.; Ehrlichman, M. P.; Flanagan, J. W.; Fontes, E.; Heltsley, B. K.; Lyndaker, A.; Peterson, D. P.; Rider, N. T.; Rubin, D. L.; Seeley, R.; Shanks, J.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the design and performance of optical elements for an x-ray beam size monitor (xBSM), a device measuring e+ and e- beam sizes in the CESR-TA storage ring. The device can measure vertical beam sizes of 10 - 100 μm on a turn-by-turn, bunch-by-bunch basis at e± beam energies of ~ 2 - 5 GeV. x-rays produced by a hard-bend magnet pass through a single- or multiple-slit (coded aperture) optical element onto a detector. The coded aperture slit pattern and thickness of masking material forming that pattern can both be tuned for optimal resolving power. We describe several such optical elements and show how well predictions of simple models track measured performances.

  8. Can Short-Term Use of Electronic Patient Adherence Monitoring Devices Improve Adherence in Patients Failing Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy? Evidence from a Pilot Study in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Evans, Denise; Berhanu, Rebecca; Moyo, Faith; Nguweneza, Arthemon; Long, Lawrence; Fox, Matthew P

    2016-11-01

    High levels of adherence are required to achieve the full benefit of ART. We assess the effectiveness of electronic adherence monitoring devices among patients failing second-line ART, as measured by viral load suppression. Cohort study of Wisepill™ real-time adherence monitoring in addition to intensified adherence counselling over 3 months in adults with a viral load ≥400 copies/ml on second-line ART in Johannesburg, South Africa between August 2013 and January 2014. Patients were sent SMS reminders upon missing a scheduled dose. We compared outcomes to earlier historical cohorts receiving either intensified adherence counselling or adherence counselling alone. Overall, 63 % of the participants (31/49) took >80 % of their prescribed medication; this dropped from 76 to 53 and 49 % at 1, 2 and 3 months post-enrolment respectively. Compared to those with good adherence (>80 %), participants with poor adherence (≤80 %) had a higher risk for a subsequently elevated viral load ≥400 copies/ml (relative risk (RR) 1.47 95 % CI 0.97-2.23). Participants found the intervention "acceptable and useful" but by 6 months after eligibility they were only slightly more likely to be alive, in care and virally suppressed compared to those who received intensified adherence counselling (44.9 vs. 38.5 %; RR 1.19; 95 % CI 0.85-1.67) or adherence counselling alone (44.9 vs. 40.9 %; RR 1.12; 95 % CI 0.81-1.56). In patients with an elevated viral load on second-line ART electronic adherence monitoring was associated with a modest, but not significant, improvement in viral suppression.

  9. Using laser micro mass spectrometry with the LAMMA-1000 instrument for monitoring relative elemental concentrations in vitrinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morelli, J.J.; Hercules, D.M.; Lyons, P.C.; Palmer, C.A.; Fletcher, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The variation in relative elemental concentrations among a series of coal macerals belonging to the vitrinite maceral group was determined using laser micro mass spectrometry (LAMMS). Variations in Ba, Cr, Ga, Sr, Ti, and V concentrations among the coals were determined using the LAMM A-1000 instrument. LAMMS analysis is not limited to these elements; their selection illustrates the application of the technique. Ba, Cr, Ga, Sr, Ti, and V have minimal site-to-site variance in the vitrinite macerals of the studied coals as measured by LAMMS. The LAMMS data were compared with bulk elemental data obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and D. C. arc optical emission spectroscopy (DCAS) in order to determine the reliability of the LAMMS data. The complex nature of the ionization phenomena in LAMMS and the lack of standards characterized on a microscale makes obtaining quantitative elemental data within the ionization microvolume difficult; however, we demonstrate that the relative variation of an element among vitrinites from different coal beds in the eastern United States can be observed using LAMMS in a "bulk" mode by accumulating signal intensities over several microareas of each vitrinite. Our studies indicate gross changes (greater than a factor of 2 to 5 depending on the element) can be monitored when the elemental concentration is significantly above the detection limit. "Bulk" mode analysis was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of future elemental LAMMS microanalyses. The primary advantage of LAMMS is the inherent spatial resolution, ~ 20 ??m for coal. Two different vitrite bands in the Lower Bakerstown coal bed (CLB-1) were analyzed. The analysis did not establish any certain concentration differences in Ba, Cr, Ga, Sr, Ti, and V between the two bands. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Investigation of an 11mm diameter twin screw granulator: Screw element performance and in-line monitoring via image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Ridade; Martinez-Marcos, Laura; Osorio, Juan G; Cruise, Paul; Jones, Ian; Halbert, Gavin W; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Litster, James D

    2015-12-30

    As twin screw granulation (TSG) provides one with many screw element options, characterization of each screw element is crucial in optimizing the screw configuration in order to obtain desired granule attributes. In this study, the performance of two different screw elements - distributive feed screws and kneading elements - was studied in an 11 mm TSG at different liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios. The kneading element configuration was found to break large granules more efficiently, leading to narrower granule size distributions. While pharmaceutical industry shifts toward continuous manufacturing, inline monitoring and process control are gaining importance. Granules from an 11 mm TSG were analysed using the Eyecon™, a real-time high speed direct imaging system, which has been used to capture accurate particle size distribution and particle count. The size parameters and particle count were then assessed in terms of their ability to be a suitable control measure using the Shewhart control charts. d10 and particle count were found to be good indicators of the change in L/S ratio. However, d50 and d90 did not reflect the change, due to their inherent variability even when the process is at steady state.

  11. Failed exstrophy closure.

    PubMed

    Novak, Thomas E

    2011-05-01

    Children with bladder exstrophy present a formidable surgical challenge. Like all major reconstructive surgeries, the best hope for a favorable outcome lies in achieving success in the first operative attempt. Regardless of the surgical approach, however, complications do occur. A failed exstrophy closure is a major complication with significant implications on the long-term surgical outcome and ultimate fate of the urinary tract. Successful repeat exstrophy closure can be accomplished in most cases when performed in conjunction with pelvic osteotomy and proper postoperative immobilization. Modern staged repair of exstrophy, complete primary repair of exstrophy, and immediate continent urinary diversion have been advocated by different groups in the management of a failed exstrophy closure. It is apparent that compared with children who undergo successful primary closure, a failed closure with subsequent successful repeat closure makes the child much less likely to achieve sufficient bladder growth to be considered for bladder neck reconstruction, and furthermore, makes them less likely to have a successful bladder neck reconstruction even when they are an acceptable candidate. Although acceptable dryness rates after repeat closure can ultimately be obtained, they are typically at the expense of a commitment to intermittent catheterization and continent diversion. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Who fails lantern tests?

    PubMed

    Cole, B L; Vingrys, A J

    1983-05-01

    A battery of clinical colour vision tests was given to a group of 100 observers with abnormal colour vision who were also tested on the Farnsworth lantern and the Holmes-Wright lanterns types A and B. It was found that clinical colour vision tests are imperfect predictors of lantern test performance. However, observers classified as having a 'severe' colour vision defect were found to fail the lantern tests but only one half to two-thirds of those who fail the lantern tests can be identified in this way. It is not possible to identify with certainty any of the people likely to pass the lantern tests: about one-third to two-thirds of observers classified as being mildly affected fail the lantern tests. The Farnsworth D-15 and City University tests were found to be the best predictors of lantern test performance but other tests such as the Nagel anomaloscope, the H-16, L'Anthony's desaturated test can also be used. The lack of a strong correlation between clinical tests and the recognition of the small coloured stimuli presented by the lantern tests suggests that clinical tests do not test the same aspect of colour vision that is important to the recognition of signal lights. For this reason lantern tests should be retained for occupational testing of colour vision.

  13. Automated measurement and monitoring of bioprocesses: key elements of the M(3)C strategy.

    PubMed

    Sonnleitner, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The state-of-routine monitoring items established in the bioprocess industry as well as some important state-of-the-art methods are briefly described and the potential pitfalls discussed. Among those are physical and chemical variables such as temperature, pressure, weight, volume, mass and volumetric flow rates, pH, redox potential, gas partial pressures in the liquid and molar fractions in the gas phase, infrared spectral analysis of the liquid phase, and calorimetry over an entire reactor. Classical as well as new optical versions are addressed. Biomass and bio-activity monitoring (as opposed to "measurement") via turbidity, permittivity, in situ microscopy, and fluorescence are critically analyzed. Some new(er) instrumental analytical tools, interfaced to bioprocesses, are explained. Among those are chromatographic methods, mass spectrometry, flow and sequential injection analyses, field flow fractionation, capillary electrophoresis, and flow cytometry. This chapter surveys the principles of monitoring rather than compiling instruments.

  14. Heat transfer monitoring by means of the hot wire technique and finite element analysis software.

    PubMed

    Hernández Wong, J; Suarez, V; Guarachi, J; Calderón, A; Rojas-Trigos, J B; Juárez, A G; Marín, E

    2014-01-01

    It is reported the study of the radial heat transfer in a homogeneous and isotropic substance with a heat linear source in its axial axis. For this purpose, the hot wire characterization technique has been used, in order to obtain the temperature distribution as a function of radial distance from the axial axis and time exposure. Also, the solution of the transient heat transport equation for this problem was obtained under appropriate boundary conditions, by means of finite element technique. A comparison between experimental, conventional theoretical model and numerical simulated results is done to demonstrate the utility of the finite element analysis simulation methodology in the investigation of the thermal response of substances.

  15. Comparative study of the suitability of three lichen species to trace-element air monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cercasov, V; Pantelică, A; Sălăgean, M; Caniglia, G; Scarlat, A

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the suitability of three lichen species (Cetraria islandica, Evernia prunastri, and Ramalina farinacea) as transplants to trace-element air biomonitoring, they were exposed on substratum-free supports, from July 1996 until July 1997, in three European countries with different climates (Germany, Italy, Romania), at six sites with different types of air pollutants (two in each country). After 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of exposure, some portions of thallus were collected, prepared, and measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest and by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDXRFA) at the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart. Fifteen environmentally relevant elements: As, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, V, and Zn were determined. The analytical results were compared statistically. To study the distribution of the trace-elements between the lichens and the lichen throughfall water inside a virtual column, the throughfall water was collected under the lichen transplants during 6 and 12 months. The dried residues were analysed by INAA at Bucharest. The accumulating capacity for all investigated species is evident. For a comparative evaluation, the initial element contents, the "accumulation factors" relative to the bulk deposition, the interspecies "calibration factors", and the "retention efficiencies", defined as ratios of the lichen enrichment to the sum of this enrichment and the content in the lichen throughfall water, were considered. These criteria attest the best suitability for Evernia prunastri, followed by Ramalina farinacea and Cetraria islandica.

  16. Elemental analysis of tree leaves by total reflection X-ray fluorescence: New approaches for air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Dalipi, Rogerta; Zacco, Annalisa; Federici, Stefania; Masperi, Matteo; Leonesio, Paolo; Bontempi, Elza; Depero, Laura E

    2017-07-01

    This work shows that total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a fast, easy and successful tool to determine the presence of potentially toxic elements in atmospheric aerosols precipitations on tree leaves. Leaves are collected in eleven parks of different geographical areas of the Brescia city, Northern Italy, for environmental monitoring purposes. Two sample preparation procedures are considered: microwave acid digestion and the novel SMART STORE method for direct analysis. The latter consists in sandwiching a portion of the leaf between two organic foils, metals free, to save it from contamination and material loss. Mass composition of macro, micro and trace elements is calculated for digested samples, while relative elemental amount are obtained from direct analysis. Washed and unwashed leaves have a different composition in terms of trace elements. Differentiation occurs according to Fe, Pb and Cu contributions, considered as most representative of air depositions, and probably related to anthropogenic sources. Direct analysis is more representative of the composition of air precipitations. Advantages and drawbacks of the presented methods of sample preparation and TXRF analysis are discussed. Results demonstrate that TXRF allows to perform accurate and precise quantitative analysis of digested samples. In addition, direct analysis of leaves may be used as a fast and simple method for screening in the nanograms range.

  17. Analysis of selected biomonitors to evaluate the suitability for their complementary use in monitoring trace element atmospheric deposition.

    PubMed

    Cucu-Man, Simona-Maria; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2013-09-01

    The biomonitoring properties of oak tree bark compared with the epiphytic moss Hypnum cupressiforme and the influence of the tree bark, as its growth substrate, on the content of heavy metals in moss were investigated. Samples of the epiphytic moss H. cupressiforme and oak tree bark (Quercus spp.) were collected in Eastern Romania at a total of 44 sampling sites. Parallel moss and bark samples were collected from the same sides of the trunk circumference. V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd, In, Tl, Sn, Pb, and Bi were determined by ICP-MS. Principal component analysis was used to identify possible sources of metals in bark and moss. Six factors explaining 87 % of the total variance in the data set were chosen. The main factors represent long-range atmospheric transport of elements (Zn, Cd, (Pb), Bi, (Mo), (Tl)), local emissions from industrial sources (As, Cr, Ni, V), road traffic (Pb, Zn) and agricultural activities (Cu, (Zn)). The element concentrations in moss and bark samples are of the same order of magnitude. For almost all the elements, higher concentrations were obtained in moss. Significant correlations between concentrations in moss and bark samples were obtained for 7 of the 13 elements: V, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, In, and Bi, all typical anthropogenic pollutants. The use of tree bark for monitoring purposes might be an alternative in areas where there is a scarcity of mosses.

  18. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, E

    2009-05-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally wrong even though that human being is not being deprived of a "valuable future". So Marquis would be wrong in thinking that what is essential about the wrongness of killing an adult human being is that they are being deprived of a valuable future. This paper shows that whichever way the concept of "valuable future" is interpreted, the proposed counterexamples fail: if it is interpreted as "future like ours", the proposed counterexamples have no bearing on Marquis's argument. If the concept is interpreted as referring to the patient's preferences, it must be either conceded that the patients in Strong's scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims.

  19. Monitoring trace elements in Antarctic penguin chicks from South Shetland Islands, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Jerez, Silvia; Motas, Miguel; Benzal, Jesús; Diaz, Julia; Barbosa, Andrés

    2013-04-15

    The concentration of human activities in the near-shore ecosystems from the northern Antarctic Peninsula area can cause an increasing bioavailability of pollutants for the vulnerable Antarctic biota. Penguin chicks can reflect this potential impact in the rookeries during the breeding season. They also can reflect biomagnification phenomena since they are on the top of the Antarctic food chain. The concentrations of Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb were measured by ICP-MS in samples of liver, kidney, muscle, bone, feather and stomach content of gentoo, chinstrap and Adélie penguin chicks (n=15 individuals) collected opportunistically in the Islands of King George and Deception (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica). The detected levels of some trace elements were not as low as it could be expected in the isolated Antarctic region. Penguin chicks can be useful indicators of trace elements abundance in the study areas. Carcasses of Antarctic penguin chicks were used to evaluate the bioavailability of trace elements in the Islands of King George and Deception. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Geothermal reservoir monitoring based upon spectral-element and adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Templeton, D. C.; Harris, D.; Mellors, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Induced seismicity associated with CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and enhanced geothermal systems is triggered by fracturing during fluid injection. These events range from magnitude -1 (microseismicity) up to 3.5, for induced seismicity on pre-existing faults. In our approach, we are using seismic data collected at the Salton Sea geothermal field, to improve the current structural model (SCEC CVM4.0 including a 10m resolution topography) and to invert for the moment tensor and source location of the microseismic events. The key here is to refine the velocity model to then precisely invert for the location and mechanism (tensile or shear) of fracture openings. This information is crucial for geothermal reservoir assessment, especially in an unconventional setting where hydrofracturing is used to enhance productivity. The location of pre-existing and formed fractures as well as their type of openings are important elements for strategic decisions. Numerical simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, which contrary to finite-element methods (FEM), uses high degree Lagrange polynomials, allowing the technique to not only handle complex geometries, like the FEM, but also to retain the strength of exponential convergence and accuracy due to the use of high degree polynomials. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method.

  1. Monitoring of toxic elements present in sludge of industrial waste using CF-LIBS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Rai, Awadhesh K; Alamelu, Devanathan; Aggarwal, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    Industrial waste is one of the main causes of environmental pollution. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to detect the toxic metals in the sludge of industrial waste water. Sludge on filter paper was obtained after filtering the collected waste water samples from different sections of a water treatment plant situated in an industrial area of Kanpur City. The LIBS spectra of the sludge samples were recorded in the spectral range of 200 to 500 nm by focusing the laser light on sludge. Calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) technique was used for the quantitative measurement of toxic elements such as Cr and Pb present in the sample. We also used the traditional calibration curve approach to quantify these elements. The results obtained from CF-LIBS are in good agreement with the results from the calibration curve approach. Thus, our results demonstrate that CF-LIBS is an appropriate technique for quantitative analysis where reference/standard samples are not available to make the calibration curve. The results of the present experiment are alarming to the people living nearby areas of industrial activities, as the concentrations of toxic elements are quite high compared to the admissible limits of these substances.

  2. Closed-form analytical solutions of the time difference of arrival source location problem for minimal element monitoring arrays.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Steven J

    2010-05-01

    Closed-form analytical solutions are found for the time difference of arrival (TDOA) source location problem. Solutions are found for both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) source location by formulating the TDOA equations in, respectively, polar and spherical coordinate systems, with the radial direction coincident with the assumed geodesic path of signal propagation to a reference sensor. Quadratic equations for TDOA 2D and 3D source location based on the spherical intersection (SX) scheme, in some cases permitting dual physical solutions, are found for three and four sensor element monitoring arrays, respectively. A method of spherical intersection subarrays (SXSAs) is developed to derive from these quadratic equations globally unique closed-form analytical solutions for TDOA 2D and 3D source location, for four and five sensor element monitoring arrays, respectively. Errors in 2D source location for introduced bias in time differences of arrival are shown to have a strong geometrical dependence. The SXSA and SX methods perform well in terms of accuracy and precision at high levels of arrival time bias for both 2D and 3D source location and are much more efficient than nonlinear least-squares schemes. The SXSA scheme may have particular applicability to accurately solving source location problems in demanding real-time situations.

  3. Feasibility Study for Monitoring Actinide Elements in Process Materials Using FO-LIBS at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bo-Young; Choi, Daewoong; Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong; Dae, Dongsun; Whitehouse, Andrew I.

    2015-07-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been developing the design and deployment methodology of Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for safeguards application within the argon hot cell environment at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF), where ACPF is a facility being refurbished for the laboratory-scaled demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process. LIBS is an analysis technology used to measure the emission spectra of excited elements in the local plasma of a target material induced by a laser. The spectra measured by LIBS are analyzed to verify the quality and quantity of the specific element in the target matrix. Recently LIBS has been recognized as a promising technology for safeguards purposes in terms of several advantages including a simple sample preparation and in-situ analysis capability. In particular, a feasibility study of LIBS to remotely monitor the nuclear material in a high radiation environment has been carried out for supporting the IAEA safeguards implementation. Fiber-Optic LIBS (FO-LIBS) deployment was proposed by Applied Photonics Ltd because the use of fiber optics had benefited applications of LIBS by delivering the laser energy to the target and by collecting the plasma light. The design of FO-LIBS instrument for the measurement of actinides in the spent fuel and high temperature molten salt at ACPF had been developed in cooperation with Applied Photonics Ltd. FO-LIBS has some advantages as followings: the detectable plasma light wavelength range is not limited by the optical properties of the thick lead-glass shield window and the potential risk of laser damage to the lead-glass shield window is not considered. The remote LIBS instrument had been installed at ACPF and then the feasibility study for monitoring actinide elements such as uranium, plutonium, and curium in process materials has been carried out. (authors)

  4. Definition, technology readiness, and development cost of the orbit transfer vehicle engine integrated control and health monitoring system elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, I.; Balcer, S.; Cochran, M.; Klop, J.; Peterson, S.

    1991-01-01

    An Integrated Control and Health Monitoring (ICHM) system was conceived for use on a 20 Klb thrust baseline Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) engine. Considered for space used, the ICHM was defined for reusability requirements for an OTV engine service free life of 20 missions, with 100 starts and a total engine operational time of 4 hours. Functions were derived by flowing down requirements from NASA guidelines, previous OTV engine or ICHM documents, and related contracts. The elements of an ICHM were identified and listed, and these elements were described in sufficient detail to allow estimation of their technology readiness levels. These elements were assessed in terms of technology readiness level, and supporting rationale for these assessments presented. The remaining cost for development of a minimal ICHM system to technology readiness level 6 was estimated. The estimates are within an accuracy range of minus/plus 20 percent. The cost estimates cover what is needed to prepare an ICHM system for use on a focussed testbed for an expander cycle engine, excluding support to the actual test firings.

  5. Spatial distribution and potential sources of trace elements in PM10 monitored in urban and rural sites of Piedmont Region.

    PubMed

    Padoan, Elio; Malandrino, Mery; Giacomino, Agnese; Grosa, Mauro M; Lollobrigida, Francesco; Martini, Sara; Abollino, Ornella

    2016-02-01

    The results on elemental composition of aerosol (PM10) sampled during 2011 in Piedmont region (Italy) are interpreted using meteorological data, Enrichment Factors (EF), chemometric processing by Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Factor Analysis (FA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). Daily concentrations of about 30 elements were measured using HR-ICP-MS in five monitoring sites. A clear seasonal pattern, with higher concentrations in autumn and winter, was observed, particularly in the urban sites. Levels of As, Cd, Ni and Pb in most of the samples were within the limits imposed by the European legislation. Spatial differences in PM10 and metal concentrations were significant, with rural and urban sites showing different metal patterns, indicating different sources. K and Ca were used, respectively, as marker of biomass burning and industrial marker (cement plant); EFs showed that Ca was enriched just in one area and K was enriched only in the winter period considered and in some stations. Data analysis through PCA, FA and HCA allowed us to identify correlations among the investigated elements and similarities between sampling sites in order to individuate specific emission sources, such as non-exhaust vehicle emission.

  6. Monitoring of trace elements in honey from the Republic of Macedonia by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stankovska, Elena; Stafilov, Trajce; Sajn, Robert

    2008-07-01

    Contents of Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Cd, Na, K, Ca and Mg in 123 honey samples from different regions of the Republic of Macedonia were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. A microwave digestion system was applied for digestion of the samples. The mean content for the elements determined was found to be: 2.252, 0.696, 1.885, 1.752, 0.004, 29.52, 984.8, 40.11, 18.24 mg kg(-1) for Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Cd, Na, K, Ca and Mg, respectively. Based on a comparison of statistical parameters, the spatial distribution of particular elements in Macedonian honey and the results of factor analysis, two natural and one anthropogenic geochemical associations were identified. The natural geochemical associations (Mg, Mn, Ca, K and Fe, Zn, Ca, -K, -Na) are influenced mainly by lithology. The anthropogenic associations (Cd and -Cu) are mostly a result of metallurgical activities, namely lead production in the town of Veles.

  7. Comparison of trace element concentrations in tissue of common carp and implications for monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, R.M.; DeWeese, L.R.

    1999-01-01

    Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) collected from four sites in the Red River of the North in 1994 were analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), selenium (So), and zinc (Zn). Concentrations differed among liver, muscle, and whole body. Generally, trace element concentrations were the greatest in livers while concentrations in whole bodies were greater than those in muscle for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, and concentrations in muscle were similar to whole body for As and Se. Concentrations of Cr were lower in liver than either muscle or whole body. Correlations between liver and whole body concentrations were stronger than those between liver and muscle concentrations, but the strongest correlations were between muscle and whole body concentrations. Examination of tissue concentrations by collection sites suggested that, for a general survey, the whole body may be the most effective matrix to analyze.

  8. [Failed back surgery syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Miramontes-Martínez, Víctor; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is well known and physicians often fear this outcome. Its definition is difficult to understand because it is multifactorial. However, we analyze its etiology in order to determine if it is from iatrogenic causes. This syndrome can be categorized as follows: mistaken diagnoses, transoperative error, technique error, poor application, poor indication. We undertook a prospective, observational and lineal study in 20 patients, 313 surgeries and 4,500 consultations. Age and gender variables were analyzed, number of prior surgeries, and diagnosis prior to first surgery, as well as predominant symptoms for the last surgery, surgical time, and involved segment. Patients were evaluated with Oswestry preoperative scale and followed up for 2 years. There were 16 females and 4 males with an average age of 53.2 years. Eight patients had 1 prior surgery, 8 patients had 2 prior surgeries, 3 patients had 3 prior surgeries, and 1 patient had 4 prior surgeries. According to the Oswestry preoperative scale, 12 patients had scores higher than 60% and at 2-year follow-up, 11 patients had scores lower than 20%. Despite the persistent symptomatology and complications, in almost all patients the satisfaction index was 100%. According to the evaluation, the main cause was poor indication in three patients, poor indication + technique error in 10, and technique error in 7 patients. The most reported initial etiology was lumbar disc hernia with minimally invasive treatment with questionable surgical indication.

  9. When Fundoplication Fails

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C Daniel; McClusky, David A.; Rajad, Murad Abu; Lederman, Andrew B.; Hunter, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The largest series in the literature dealing with redo fundoplication was presented and published in 1999 and included 100 patients. Herein we update this initial series of 100, with 207 additional patients who have undergone redo fundoplication (n = 307). Summary Background Data: Increasing numbers of patients are failing esophagogastric fundoplication and requiring redo procedures. Data regarding the nature of these failures have been scant. Methods: Data on all patients undergoing foregut surgery are collected prospectively. Between 1991 and 2004, 307 patients underwent redo fundoplication for the management of anatomic complications or recurrent GERD. Statistical analysis was performed with multiple χ2 and Mann-Whitney U analyses, as well as ANOVA. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 1892 patients underwent primary fundoplication for GERD (1734) or paraesophageal hernia (158). Of these, 54 required redo fundoplication (2.8%). The majority of failures (73%) were managed within 2 years of the initial operation (P = 0.0001). The mechanism of failure was transdiaphragmatic wrap herniation in 33 of 54 (61%). In the 231 patients who underwent fundoplication elsewhere, 109 had transdiaphragmatic herniation (47%, P = NS). In this group of 285 patients, 22 (8%) required another redo (P = NS). The majority of the procedures were initiated laparoscopically (240/307, 78%), with 20 converted (8%). Overall mortality was 0.3%. Conclusions: Failure of fundoplication is unusual in experienced hands. Most are managed within 2 years of the initial operation. Wrap herniation has now become the most common mechanism of failure requiring redo. Redo fundoplication was successful in 93% of patients, and most could be safely handled laparoscopically. PMID:15912035

  10. Monitoring trace elements generated by automobiles: air pollutants with possible health impacts.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Khaleeq; Ejaz, Sohail; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Nisar; Javeed, Aqeel

    2013-07-01

    Major transformations in the environmental composition are principally attributable to the combustion of fuels by automobiles. Motorized gasoline-powered two-stroke auto-rickshaws (TSA) and compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered four-stroke auto-rickshaws (FSA) are potential source of air pollution in south Asia and produce toxic amount of particulate matter (PM) to the environment. In this study, we attempted to characterize elemental pollutants from the PM of TSA and FSA using proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The observations of the existing investigation recognized significant increase in Al (P < 0.05), P (P < 0.01), and Zn (P < 0.01) from the PM samples of FSA. In addition, the concentrations of Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na and S were also observed exceeding the recommended National Institute for Environmental Studies limits. On the contrary, increased concentration of Sr and V were observed in the PM samples from TSA. It is generally believed that FSA generates smaller amount of PM but data obtained from FSA are clearly describing that emissions from FSA comprised potentially more toxic substances than TSA. The current research is specific to metropolitan population and has evidently revealed an inconsistent burden of exposure to air pollutants engendered by FSA in urban communities, which could lead to the disruption of several biological activities and may cause severe damage to entire ecological system.

  11. [Core elements of safety monitoring report of medicines(Chinese patent medicines)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Qian; Liao, Xing; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Studies on post-marketing drug surveillance have become increasingly important in recent years. In particular, many researchers for traditional Chinese medicine have paid more attention to the safety of post-marketing Chinese patent medicines. Observational studies, like cohort study, registry study, and intensive hospital monitoring, were conducted to collect data on safety information. How to accurately report and assess these studies and let readers to completely understand relevant published reports and obtain transparent information about its methodology and findings remain unsolved. According to the reporting guidelines made by EQUATOR, our research team drafted a framework based on a four-year study by reference to relevant rules, guidelines and standards all over the world in the field of drug safety evaluation. Besides, we consulted relevant experts in this field and formed a framework on how to report post-marketing safety studies of Chinese patent medicines. There were seven core components, namely drug, population, setting, design, quality, adverse reaction and statistics, which could be abbreviated to DPSDQAS. We introduced the framework here to provide reference for future researchers. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. Comparision of photogrammetric point clouds with BIM building elements for construction progress monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttas, S.; Braun, A.; Borrmann, A.; Stilla, U.

    2014-08-01

    For construction progress monitoring a planned state of the construction at a certain time (as-planed) has to be compared to the actual state (as-built). The as-planed state is derived from a building information model (BIM), which contains the geometry of the building and the construction schedule. In this paper we introduce an approach for the generation of an as-built point cloud by photogrammetry. It is regarded that that images on a construction cannot be taken from everywhere it seems to be necessary. Because of this we use a combination of structure from motion process together with control points to create a scaled point cloud in a consistent coordinate system. Subsequently this point cloud is used for an as-built - as-planed comparison. For that voxels of an octree are marked as occupied, free or unknown by raycasting based on the triangulated points and the camera positions. This allows to identify not existing building parts. For the verification of the existence of building parts a second test based on the points in front and behind the as-planed model planes is performed. The proposed procedure is tested based on an inner city construction site under real conditions.

  13. Monitoring suspended sediment and associated trace element and nutrient fluxes in large river basins in the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    In 1996, the US Geological Survey converted its occurrence and distribution-based National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) to a national, flux-based water-quality monitoring programme. The main objective of the revised programme is to characterize large USA river basins by measuring the fluxes of selected constituents at critical nodes in various basins. Each NASQAN site was instrumented to determine daily discharge, but water and suspended sediment samples are collected no more than 12-15 times per year. Due to the limited sampling programme, annual suspended sediment fluxes were determined from site-specific sediment rating (transport) curves. As no significant relationship could be found between either discharge or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and suspended sediment chemistry, trace element and nutrient fluxes are estimated using site-specific mean or median chemical levels determined from a number of samples collected over a period of years, and under a variety of flow conditions.

  14. [Application of ICP-MS in assessing the pollution of seldom monitored trace elements in city roadside dusts].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shu-Hua; Gao, Bo; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Huai-Dong; Wang, Jian-Kang; Huang, Yong

    2013-12-01

    Seldom monitored trace element concentrations in road dusts colleted from Shihezi City were studied. A total of 32 sampling stations were selected. The concentration of 10 seldom monitored trace elements (B, Be, Bi, Co, Ga, Li, Sb, Sn, T1, V) were determined. Their pollution degree and source identification were analyzed by using Geoaccumulation Index, correlation coefficient and principal factor analysis. The results indicated that the mean concentrations of Li, Be, B, V, Co, Ga, Sn, Sb, T1 and Bi were 24. 91, 1.68, 41. 11, 72. 66, 13. 58, 36. 26, 3.64, 3.37, 0. 42 and 0.52 mgkg-1, respectively. The mean concentrations of Li, T1, Co, Be, B, and V were lower than or similar to the soil background values of Xinjiang province. However, the mean concentrations of Ga, Sn, Sb and Bi were higher than the background values of Xijiang province and world soil. The results of Geoaccumulation Index indicated that the pollution degrees of Li, Be, B, V, Co, Ga and T1 were zero, and belonged to the category of non-pollution. However the pollution of Sb, Bi and Sn were considerably serious, and their pollution grades were 2, 1 and 1 respectively. The source of SMTEs in road dusts of Shihezi City was identified by multivariate statistics (principal component analysis and correlation analysis). The results showed that Sb, Co, T1 and Bi mainly originated from human activities, Li, Be, B, V represented natural sources, while Sn and Ga have the mixed sources of nature and human activities.

  15. Smart RC elements for long-life monitoring of civil infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonta, Daniele; Pozzi, Matteo; Forti, Marco; Bursi, Oreste S.

    2005-05-01

    A research effort has been launched at the University of Trento, aimed at developing an innovative distributed construction system based on smart prefabricated concrete elements allowing for real-time condition assessment of civil infrastructures. So far, two reduced-scale prototypes have been produced, each consisting of a 0.2 by 0.3 by 5.6m RC beam specifically designed for permanent instrumentation with 8 long-gauge Fiber Optics Sensors (FOS) at the lower edge. The sensors employed are Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) -based and can measure finite displacements both in statics and dynamics. The acquisition module uses a single commercial interrogation unit and a software-controlled optical switch, allowing acquisition of dynamic multi-channel signals from FBG-FOS, with a sample frequency of 625 Hz per channel. The performance of the system underwent validation I n the laboratory. The scope of the experiment was to correlate changes in the dynamic response of the beams with different damage scenarios, using a direct modal strain approach. Each specimen was dynamically characterized in the undamaged state and in various damage conditions, simulating different cracking levels and recurrent deterioration scenarios, including concrete cover spalling and partial corrosion of the reinforcement. The location and the extent of damage are evaluated by calculating damage indices which take account of changes in frequency and in strain-mode-shapes. This paper presents in detail the results of the experiment and demonstrates how the damage distribution detected by the system is fully compatible with the damage extent appraised by inspection.

  16. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  17. The spatial distribution, accumulation and potential source of seldom monitored trace elements in sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Huaidong; Xu, Dongyu; Wei, Xin; Gao, Li

    2015-01-01

    The alteration of hydrologic condition of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) after impoundment has caused numerous environmental changes. This study investigated the distribution, accumulation and potential sources of the seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs) in sediments from three tributaries (ZY, MX and CT) and one mainstream (CJ) in TGR during different seasons. The average contents of most SMTEs excluding Sb in the winter were similar to that in the summer. For Sb, its average concentrations in the summer and winter were roughly six and three times higher than its background value, respectively. Contamination factor (CF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) demonstrated that most of the sediments were obviously contaminated by Sb. The enrichment factors (EF) of Ga and Sb were higher than 2.0, revealing the possible anthropogenic inputs; However, the EFs of other SMTEs were lower than 1.5, indicating the natural inputs. Correlation and principal component analysis suggested the most SMTEs were positively correlated with major elements (Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) and clay contents, which implies that SMTEs had the same sources with these major metals, and the fine particles might be a major carrier for transporting SMTEs from the rivers to the TGR. PMID:26538153

  18. Finite element modeling of the dynamic response of a composite reinforced concrete bridge for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjani Zadeh, V.; Patnaik, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) modeling of a composite steel stinger supported reinforced concrete (RC) deck highway bridge subjected to moving truck loads. FE models were validated using test data that were generated elsewhere for structural health monitoring. The FE models were established using a commercial FE analysis package called ABAQUS/standard. The case study bridge was discretized to a combination of shell and solid elements which represent the deck and piers, respectively. Numerous constrain interactions were defined to make the model suitable to obtain accurate results. Moving loads induced by two standard AASHTO trucks were developed through a specific load-time history, applied on 35 nodes on the superstructure. To study the dynamic behavior of the bridge under a moving load, a modal analysis followed by an implicit dynamic analysis was carried out. Acceptable agreement was found between the field measurements and FE simulation. Most concerned dynamic response was strains at different locations in bridge girders and columns, because it is the only critical parameter that can be measured with confidence during SHM at site. The range of strains determined in analysis was reasonably close to the measured strains at the site of the study bridge. Several parameters including damping, truck weight and speed, and material properties were studied. Truck speed had the highest effect on strain response of both girders and columns.

  19. Examination of element concentrations in groundwater by ICP-MS for monitoring of pre-earthquake activities.

    PubMed

    Mehmet, Yaman; Sasmaz, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the results of hydrogeochemical studies carried out in Zeytun thermal springs in Kahramanmaras, located South Middle Anatolia-Turkey. More than 90 thermal water samples were collected on a regular basis from 2006 to 2008 to measure element concentrations as a monitor of earthquake precursors. Water samples were analyzed using ICP-MS. The observed B, Ba, Br and Ge concentrations for 16 months are in ranges of 79-422, 103-167, 28-93 and 0.3-1.2 microg x L(-1), respectively. Chloride concentrations for these periods are in range of 7-21 mg x L(-1). The data identify some element anomalies before earthquakes. These anomalies are characterized by decreases up to 158% in Ba and Cl concentrations. The occurrence of these anomalies can be attributed to stress/strain induced pressure changes in the subsurface water systems. It can be suggested that the thermal springs in the fault line area are ideal sites for precursors of earthquakes.

  20. Biomagnetic monitoring and element content of lichen transplants in a mixed land use area of NE Italy.

    PubMed

    Kodnik, Danijela; Winkler, Aldo; Candotto Carniel, Fabio; Tretiach, Mauro

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether it is possible to discriminate between the different pollution sources present in a mixed land use area of NE Italy on the basis of the magnetic properties and the element content of lichen transplants. Thalli of Pseudevernia furfuracea were collected in a pristine area of the South-Eastern Alps and exposed for 2months in 40 sites located at the knots of a 700m step grid covering ca. 40km(2) of a mosaic of agricultural, forested, industrial and urban areas. In this way, the samples could be analyzed after a defined period of time, and compared to pre-exposure conditions. The post-exposure element content and the magnetic data substantially agreed, revealing a rather modest anthropogenic impact on the territory, mostly limited to an industrial park. Since the magnetic mineralogy was homogeneous throughout the entire set of samples, with magnetite-like minerals as the main magnetic carriers, it was not possible to discriminate between PM originating from the different pollution sources. The contribution given by the industrial park could be confirmed by the multivariate analysis of the element data set. Conversely, it was possible to assess the low environmental impact of the largest local industry, a cement plant, located outside the industrial park. Notwithstanding the relatively short time of the survey, P. furfuracea was proven to be an effective accumulator for biomagnetic monitoring studies, its magnetic properties being excellent proxies for heavy metal pollution even when the anthropogenic impact on the territory is low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of elements of the condition monitoring system of turbo generators of thermal power stations and nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumenko, A. I.; Kostyukov, V. N.; Kuz'minykh, N. Yu.; Boichenko, S. N.; Timin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    The rationale is given for the improvement of the regulatory framework for the use of shaft sensors for the in-service condition monitoring of turbo generators and the development of control systems of shaft surfacing and misalignments of supports. A modern concept and a set of methods are proposed for the condition monitoring of the "shaft line-thrust bearing oil film-turbo generator supports" system elements based on the domestic COMPACS® technology. The system raw data are design, technology, installation, and operating parameters of the turbo generator as well as measured parameters of the absolute vibration of supports and mechanical quantities, relative displacements and relative vibration of the rotor teeth in accordance with GOST R 55263-2012. The precalculated shaft line assembly line in the cold state, the nominal parameters of rotor teeth positions on the dynamic equilibrium curve, the static and dynamic characteristics of the oil film of thrust bearings, and the shaft line stiffness matrix of unit support displacements have been introduced into the system. Using the COMPACS-T system, it is planned to measure positions and oscillations of rotor teeth, to count corresponding static and dynamic characteristics of the oil film, and the static and dynamic loads in the supports in real time. Using the obtained data, the system must determine the misalignments of supports and corrective alignments of rotors of coupling halves, voltages in rotor teeth, welds, and bolts of the coupling halves, and provide automatic conclusion if condition monitoring parameters correspond to standard values. A part of the methodological support for the proposed system is presented, including methods for determining static reactions of supports under load, the method for determining shaft line stiffness matrices, and the method for solving the inverse problem, i.e., the determination of the misalignments of the supports by measurements of rotor teeth relative positions in bearing

  2. Can Failing Schools Be Fixed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) requires states and school districts to act aggressively to turn around failing schools. NCLB lists 31 different interventions of varying degrees of severity that are available to state and local policymakers when faced with schools whose students fail to make sufficient academic progress and sets forth…

  3. Development of a standard protocol for monitoring trace elements in continental waters with moss bags: inter- and intraspecific differences.

    PubMed

    Cesa, Mattia; Bertossi, Alberto; Cherubini, Giovanni; Gava, Emanuele; Mazzilis, Denis; Piccoli, Elisa; Verardo, Pierluigi; Nimis, Pier Luigi

    2015-04-01

    This paper is a contribution for validating a standard method for trace element monitoring based on transplants and analysis of aquatic bryophytes, in the framework of the EC Directive 2000/60. It presents the results of an experiment carried out to assess significant differences in the amount and variability of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in three moss species (Cinclidotus aquaticus, Fontinalis antipyretica, Platyhypnidium riparioides) and two different parts of the moss (whole plant vs apical tips). Mosses were caged in bags made of a plastic net and transplanted for 2 weeks to an irrigation canal impacted by a waste water treatment plant. Trace element concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) before and after exposure to the experimental and control sites in five samples. Enrichment factors >2 were found for Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn in all moss species, lower in C. aquaticus, intermediate in F. antipyretica and higher in P. riparioides (the species we recommend to use). The analysis of apical tips after exposure instead of the whole plant led to (I) lower concentrations of As, Co, Cr, Fe and Zn in C. aquaticus (-7 to -30%) and of Fe and Pb (-13, -18%) in P. riparioides, (II) higher concentrations of Cu, Ni and Zn (+14 to +18%) in P. riparioides, while (III) no significant difference (p > 0.05) in F. antipyretica. Data variability after exposure was generally lower in apical tips, especially in C. aquaticus and in F. antipyretica, less in P. riparioides. In the aim of standardizing the moss-bag technique, the analysis of apical tips is recommended.

  4. Exposure and emissions monitoring during carbon nanofiber production--Part I: elemental carbon and iron-soot aerosols.

    PubMed

    Birch, M Eileen; Ku, Bon-Ki; Evans, Douglas E; Ruda-Eberenz, Toni A

    2011-11-01

    Production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNFs/CNTs) and their composite products is increasing globally. High volume production may increase the exposure risks for workers who handle these materials. Though health effects data for CNFs/CNTs are limited, some studies raise serious health concerns. Given the uncertainty about their potential hazards, there is an immediate need for toxicity data and field studies to assess exposure to CNFs/CNTs. An extensive study was conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes CNFs. Filter, sorbent, cascade impactor, bulk, and microscopy samples, combined with direct-reading instruments, provided complementary information on air contaminants. Samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with EC as a measure of CNFs. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy also was applied. Fine/ultrafine iron-rich soot, PAHs, and carbon monoxide were production byproducts. Direct-reading instrument results were reported previously [Evans DE et al. (Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling. Ann Occup Hyg 2010;54:514-31.)] Results for time-integrated samples are reported as companion papers in this Issue. OC and EC, metals, and microscopy results are reported here, in Part I, while results for PAHs are reported in Part II [Birch ME. (Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production-Part II: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Ann. Occup. Hyg 2011; 55: 1037-47.)]. Respirable EC area concentrations inside the facility were about 6-68 times higher than outdoors, while personal breathing zone samples were up to 170 times higher.

  5. Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production—Part I: Elemental Carbon and Iron–Soot Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Birch, M. Eileen; Ku, Bon-Ki; Evans, Douglas E.; Ruda-Eberenz, Toni A.

    2015-01-01

    Production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNFs/CNTs) and their composite products is increasing globally. High volume production may increase the exposure risks for workers who handle these materials. Though health effects data for CNFs/CNTs are limited, some studies raise serious health concerns. Given the uncertainty about their potential hazards, there is an immediate need for toxicity data and field studies to assess exposure to CNFs/CNTs. An extensive study was conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes CNFs. Filter, sorbent, cascade impactor, bulk, and microscopy samples, combined with direct-reading instruments, provided complementary information on air contaminants. Samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with EC as a measure of CNFs. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy also was applied. Fine/ultrafine iron-rich soot, PAHs, and carbon monoxide were production byproducts. Direct-reading instrument results were reported previously [Evans DE et al. (Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling. Ann Occup Hyg 2010;54:514–31.)] Results for time-integrated samples are reported as companion papers in this Issue. OC and EC, metals, and microscopy results are reported here, in Part I, while results for PAHs are reported in Part II [Birch ME. (Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production—Part II: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Ann. Occup. Hyg 2011; 55: 1037–47.)]. Respirable EC area concentrations inside the facility were about 6–68 times higher than outdoors, while personal breathing zone samples were up to 170 times higher. PMID:21965464

  6. The efficacy of scale sampling for monitoring trace element concentrations and stable isotopes in commercially harvested walleye (Sander vitreus).

    PubMed

    Ofukany, Amy F A; Hobson, Keith A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Bond, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    Commercial and sport fishes are subject to rigorous monitoring for concentrations of elements that could pose threats to human health, with numerous advisories issued by authorities annually for those fisheries with high mercury (Hg) concentrations. In Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, the commercial walleye fishery is valued at more than $20 million/year, but has historically been subject to Hg advisories. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the utility of non-destructive fish-scale sampling to predict As, Mn and Hg concentrations, as well as stable isotope values in walleye muscle by analysing paired samples. Hg concentrations in scales were significantly related to those in muscle (r(2) = 0.75), but the relationships were weaker for As and Mn. The δ(15)N values in scales predicted δ(15)N in muscle reasonably well (r(2) = 0.72), whereas scale δ(13)C and δ(34)S had less predictive power for estimating their respective muscle stable isotope values. For all three isotope values, sex was a marginal predictor, with parameter confidence intervals bounding zero. Analytical constraints currently limit the utility of non-destructively analysing scales for Hg, but hindcasting trophic changes using archived walleye scales may be useful in understanding shifts in nutrients and production, particularly in impacted lake systems.

  7. Pollution Characteristics and Possible Sources of Seldom Monitored Trace Elements in Surface Sediments Collected from Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo; Wei, Xin; Zhou, Huaidong; Lu, Jin; Hao, Hong; Wan, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    A geochemical study of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) sediments was carried out to analyze the concentrations, distribution, accumulation, and potential sources of the seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs). The mean concentrations of Li, B, Be, Bi, V, Co, Ga, Sn, Sb, and Tl were 47.08, 2.47, 59.15, 0.50, 119.20, 17.83, 30.31, 3.25, 4.14, and 0.58 mg/kg, respectively. The concentrations of total SMTEs, together with their spatial distribution, showed that the SMTEs were mainly due to anthropogenic inputs in the region of TGR. The assessment by Geoaccumulation Index indicates that Tl, Be, V, Co, and Fe are at the unpolluted level; Bi, Li, Ga, and Sn were at the “uncontaminated to moderately contaminated” level. However, B was classified as “moderately contaminated” level and Sb was ranked as “strongly contaminated” level. The pollution level of the SMTEs is Sb > B > Bi > Li > Ga > Sn > Tl > Be > V > Co > Fe. The results of Correlation Analysis and Principal Component Analysis indicated Be, V, Co, Ga, Sn, Tl, Bi, and Fe in sediments have a natural source. B and Li were positively correlated with each other and mainly attributed into similar anthropogenic input. In addition, Sb has less relationship with other SMTEs, indicating that Sb has another kind of anthropogenic source. PMID:25136647

  8. Accumulation of airborne trace elements in mosses, lichens and synthetic materials exposed at urban monitoring stations: towards a harmonisation of the moss-bag technique.

    PubMed

    Giordano, S; Adamo, P; Spagnuolo, V; Tretiach, M; Bargagli, R

    2013-01-01

    Mosses, lichens and cellulose filters were exposed for 17 weeks at four urban monitoring stations in Naples (S Italy) to assess the accumulation of airborne Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn. In each site, the element accumulation was significantly higher in the moss Hypnum cupressiforme than in the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. Acid washed mosses accumulated the highest amount of trace elements, but the differences in element concentrations among the moss samples exposed after water washing and different devitalisation treatments (acid washing, oven drying and water boiling) and between the lichen samples exposed with and without the nylon bag were not statistically significant. The cellulose filters showed the lowest accumulation capability. The reciprocal ordination of sites and exposed materials showed an increasing contamination gradient (especially for Pb, Cu and Zn) from the background site to the trafficked city streets; this pattern was undetectable from PM(10) data recorded by the automatic monitoring devices operating in the four exposure sites. The element profile in exposed materials did not change substantially throughout the urban area and particles of polluted urban soils seem the main source of airborne metals in Naples. Through a comprehensive evaluation of the results from this and previous studies, a protocol is suggested for the moss-bag monitoring of trace element deposition in urban environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementation of airborne trace element monitoring with devitalised transplants of Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw.: assessment of temporal trends and element contribution by vehicular traffic in Naples city.

    PubMed

    Adamo, P; Giordano, S; Sforza, A; Bargagli, R

    2011-06-01

    A biomonitoring of airborne trace elements was performed in 2006 in Naples urban area through the exposure of devitalised Hypnum cupressiforme for 10 weeks at 4m height. In one street, the moss was exposed at different heights to assess vertical gradients of element concentrations. Results were compared with those of a 1999 biosurvey. Correlations among Al, Fe and Ti suggested a soil particles contribution to element uptake. Cu, Mo and Fe were related with traffic flows. Long-range transport contributed to Cd, Cu and Mo accumulation in moss at higher heights. As in 1999, the airborne element load was higher in coastal sites, more affected by marine aerosols and traffic. In all sites, contents of Cd, Fe, Pb, Ni and V in moss were remarkably lower than in 1999, indicating a positive effect of actions set up in recent years to reduce the traffic and to improve the city air quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Failed Pediatric Drug Development Trials.

    PubMed

    Momper, J D; Mulugeta, Y; Burckart, G J

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric product development initiatives have stimulated the development of therapies for children, resulting in improved product labeling, increased identification of adverse events, and development of new pediatric formulations. However, 42% of recently completed pediatric trials have failed to establish either safety or efficacy, leading to an inability to label the product for use in children.(1) Characterizing these failed trials, including common contributing factors, is imperative to designing better pediatric trials in the future. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  11. Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  12. Major and trace element distributions around active volcanic vents determined by analyses of grasses: implications for element cycling and bio-monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Day, J. A.; Witt, M. L. I.; Collins, S. J.; Hilton, R. G.

    2010-10-01

    Samples of grass were collected at Masaya Volcano (Nicaragua; Rhynchelytrum repens and Andropogon angustatus) and the Piton de La Fournaise (around the April 2007 eruptive vent, La Réunion; Vetiveria zizanioides) to investigate the controls on major and trace element concentrations in plants around active volcanic vents. Samples were analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for a wide range of elements, and atomic absorption spectroscopy for Hg. At Masaya, As, Cu, Mo, Tl and K concentrations in both grass species showed a simple pattern of variability consistent with exposure to the volcanic plume. Similar variability was found in A. angustatus for Al, Co, Cs, Hg and Mg. At the Piton de La Fournaise, the patterns of variability in V. zizanioides were more complex and related to variable exposures to emissions from both the active vent and lava flow. These results suggest that exposure to volcanic emissions is, for many elements, the main control on compositional variability in vegetation growing on active volcanoes. Thus, vegetation may be an important environmental reservoir for elements emitted by volcanoes and should be considered as part of the global biogeochemical cycles.

  13. Making processing fail-safe

    SciTech Connect

    Freiburghouse, R.

    1982-05-01

    The author describes the Stratus/32 multiprocessor, a fault-tolerant system for commercial applications which supports on-line transaction processing, batch processing, word processing and interactive program development. It uses a combination of hardware and software that provides continuous processing of user programs during computer failure without checkpoint/restart programming at the user or system level. Central to the system's fail-safe operation are processing modules, each of which has redundant logic and communication paths, logic and CPU boards and main and disk memory. Twin components operate in parallel with each other; when one fails, its partner carries on.

  14. Investigation of traumatic brain injuries using the next generation of simulated injury monitor (SIMon) finite element head model.

    PubMed

    Takhounts, Erik G; Ridella, Stephen A; Hasija, Vikas; Tannous, Rabih E; Campbell, J Quinn; Malone, Dan; Danelson, Kerry; Stitzel, Joel; Rowson, Steve; Duma, Stefan

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) using a newly developed, geometrically detailed, finite element head model (FEHM) within the concept of a simulated injury monitor (SIMon). The new FEHM is comprised of several parts: cerebrum, cerebellum, falx, tentorium, combined pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) with cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), ventricles, brainstem, and parasagittal blood vessels. The model's topology was derived from human computer tomography (CT) scans and then uniformly scaled such that the mass of the brain represents the mass of a 50th percentile male's brain (1.5 kg) with the total head mass of 4.5 kg. The topology of the model was then compared to the preliminary data on the average topology derived from Procrustes shape analysis of 59 individuals. Material properties of the various parts were assigned based on the latest experimental data. After rigorous validation of the model using neutral density targets (NDT) and pressure data, the stability of FEHM was tested by loading it simultaneously with translational (up to 400 g) combined with rotational (up to 24,000 rad/s2) acceleration pulses in both sagittal and coronal planes. Injury criteria were established in the manner shown in Takhounts et al. (2003a). After thorough validation and injury criteria establishment (cumulative strain damage measure--CSDM for diffuse axonal injuries (DAI), relative motion damage measure--RMDM for acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), and dilatational damage measure--DDM for contusions and focal lesions), the model was used in investigation of mild TBI cases in living humans based on a set of head impact data taken from American football players at the collegiate level. It was found that CSDM and especially RMDM correlated well with angular acceleration and angular velocity. DDM was close to zero for most impacts due to their mild severity implying that cavitational pressure anywhere in the brain was not reached. Maximum

  15. Comprehensive assessment of seldom monitored trace elements pollution in the riparian soils of the Miyun Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Yang; Xu, Dongyu; Gao, Li; Yu, Hui; Wang, Shiyan

    2016-10-01

    The South-to-North Water Diversion Project has aroused widespread concerns about the potential ecological risks posed by the project, especially for the Miyun Reservoir (MYR). The potential release risk of metals from the flooded riparian soils into MYR after water impoundment is one of key scientific problems. In this study, riparian soil samples were collected considering three vertical heights (130, 140, and 145 m) and four types of land uses in the MYR areas, namely, forestland, grassland, wasteland, and recreational land. We analyzed soils texture, the content and chemical fractionations of seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs): Li, Be, B, V, Co, Ni, Ga, Sn, Sb, Tl, and Bi). Results showed that the four types of soils in MYR had the similar textures, while recreational land showed significantly higher contents of Ni and V. Additionally, there were no significant differences found for most SMTEs (except for V) at different vertical heights in each soil type, while the concentrations of V at 140 and 145 m in forestland and recreational land were significantly higher than those at 130 m. However, a comprehensive evaluation of potential ecological risk (contamination factor (CF), modified degree of contamination (mCd), and geoaccumulation factor (I geo)) consistently indicated the insignificant contaminations of all SMTEs in MYR soils before water impoundment. The Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction results showed that the chemical fractionations of SMTEs were independent of land use patterns and vertical heights. Co in reducible fractions and Ni were identified as the candidates which had potential to release into MYR when the lands were submerged. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) results suggested that a portion of V, Co, and Ni may originate from anthropogenic activities, and the coal combustion was possibly the main anthropogenic source. The findings of this work would provide valuable information on the

  16. Abortion: why the arguments fail.

    PubMed

    Hauerwas, S

    1980-01-01

    Christians have so far failed to show why abortion is an affront to Christian convictions. Rather than arguing when life begins, Christians must show that Christianity as a way of life which recognizes God as Lord of life makes abortion unthinkable.

  17. Quantitative real-time monitoring of multi-elements in airborne particulates by direct introduction into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshinari; Sato, Hikaru; Hiyoshi, Katsuhiro; Furuta, Naoki

    2012-10-01

    A new calibration system for real-time determination of trace elements in airborne particulates was developed. Airborne particulates were directly introduced into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, and the concentrations of 15 trace elements were determined by means of an external calibration method. External standard solutions were nebulized by an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) coupled with a desolvation system, and the resulting aerosol was introduced into the plasma. The efficiency of sample introduction via the USN was calculated by two methods: (1) the introduction of a Cr standard solution via the USN was compared with introduction of a Cr(CO)6 standard gas via a standard gas generator and (2) the aerosol generated by the USN was trapped on filters and then analyzed. The Cr introduction efficiencies obtained by the two methods were the same, and the introduction efficiencies of the other elements were equal to the introduction efficiency of Cr. Our results indicated that our calibration method for introduction efficiency worked well for the 15 elements (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Sn, Sb, Ba, Tl and Pb). The real-time data and the filter-collection data agreed well for elements with low-melting oxides (V, Co, As, Mo, Sb, Tl, and Pb). In contrast, the real-time data were smaller than the filter-collection data for elements with high-melting oxides (Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Ba). This result implies that the oxides of these 8 elements were not completely fused, vaporized, atomized, and ionized in the initial radiation zone of the inductively coupled plasma. However, quantitative real-time monitoring can be realized after correction for the element recoveries which can be calculated from the ratio of real-time data/filter-collection data.

  18. Metals and trace element concentrations in breast milk of first time healthy mothers: a biological monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Karin Ljung; Vahter, Marie; Palm, Brita; Grandér, Margaretha; Lignell, Sanna; Berglund, Marika

    2012-12-14

    Breast milk is the best source of nutrition for the newborn infant. However, since all infants cannot be breast-fed, there is a need for background data for setting adequate daily intakes. Previously, concentration data on major essential elements and some toxic elements in breast milk, based on different analytical techniques, have been published. There is no recent study on a large number of metals and trace elements in breast milk, using a sensitive analytical method for determination of low element concentrations. Breast milk concentrations of 32 metals and elements in early lactation (days 14-21) were determined in a random sample of first time Swedish mothers (n = 60) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). There were small inter-individual concentration variations in the macroelements Ca, K, Mg, P and S, and striking similarities across studies and over time, supporting a tight regulation of these elements in breast milk. Large inter-individual and over time differences were detected for Na concentrations, which may reflect an increase in salt consumption in Swedish women. Large inter-individual differences were also detected for the microelements Co, Cr, Mn and Mo, and the toxic metals As, Cd, Pb, Sb and V. Arsenic and B were positively correlated with fish consumption, indicating influence of maternal intake on breast milk concentrations. Observed differences in breast milk element concentrations across studies and over time could be attributed to the timing of sampling and a general decline over time of lactation (Cu, Fe, Mo, Zn), a possible lack of regulation of certain elements in breast milk (As, B, Co, Mn, Se) and time trends in environmental exposure (Pb), or in some cases to differences in analytical performance (Cr, Fe). This study provides reliable updated information on a number of metals and elements in breast milk, of which some have not previously been reported.

  19. Metals and trace element concentrations in breast milk of first time healthy mothers: a biological monitoring study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast milk is the best source of nutrition for the newborn infant. However, since all infants cannot be breast-fed, there is a need for background data for setting adequate daily intakes. Previously, concentration data on major essential elements and some toxic elements in breast milk, based on different analytical techniques, have been published. There is no recent study on a large number of metals and trace elements in breast milk, using a sensitive analytical method for determination of low element concentrations. Methods Breast milk concentrations of 32 metals and elements in early lactation (days 14-21) were determined in a random sample of first time Swedish mothers (n = 60) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Results There were small inter-individual concentration variations in the macroelements Ca, K, Mg, P and S, and striking similarities across studies and over time, supporting a tight regulation of these elements in breast milk. Large inter-individual and over time differences were detected for Na concentrations, which may reflect an increase in salt consumption in Swedish women. Large inter-individual differences were also detected for the microelements Co, Cr, Mn and Mo, and the toxic metals As, Cd, Pb, Sb and V. Arsenic and B were positively correlated with fish consumption, indicating influence of maternal intake on breast milk concentrations. Observed differences in breast milk element concentrations across studies and over time could be attributed to the timing of sampling and a general decline over time of lactation (Cu, Fe, Mo, Zn), a possible lack of regulation of certain elements in breast milk (As, B, Co, Mn, Se) and time trends in environmental exposure (Pb), or in some cases to differences in analytical performance (Cr, Fe). Conclusions This study provides reliable updated information on a number of metals and elements in breast milk, of which some have not previously been reported. PMID:23241426

  20. In Situ Optimal Reshading of Arrays with Failed Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    1982). 2. I. Barrodale and C. Philips, 11 Solution of Overdetermined Systems of linear Equations in the Chebyshev Norm, .. Algorithm 495, ACM Trans...Equations in the l~ Norm With Constraints on the Unknowns, .. Algorithm 635, ACM Trans. on Math. Software, Vol. 11, No. 3, 242-249, (1985). 5. J. T. Lewis

  1. Segmented Coil Fails In Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, Ronald S.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil degrades in steps when faults occur, continues to operate at reduced level instead of failing catastrophically. Made in segments connected in series and separated by electrically insulating barriers. Fault does not damage adjacent components or create hazard. Used to control valves in such critical applications as cooling systems of power generators and chemical process equipment, where flammable liquids or gases handled. Also adapts to electrical control of motors.

  2. Identifying the origin of atmospheric inputs of trace elements in the Prades Mountains (Catalonia) with bryophytes, lichens, and soil monitoring.

    PubMed

    Achotegui-Castells, Ander; Sardans, Jordi; Ribas, Àngela; Peñuelas, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The biomonitors Hypnum cupressiforme and Xanthoria parietina were used to assess the deposition of trace elements and their possible origin in the Prades Mountains, a protected Mediterranean forest area of NE Spain with several pollution sources nearby. Al, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, Sb, Ti, V, and Zn were determined in 16 locations within this protected area. Soil trace element concentrations were also ascertained to calculate enrichment factors (EF) and use them to distinguish airborne from soilborne trace element inputs. In addition, lichen richness was measured to further assess atmospheric pollution. EF demonstrated to be useful not only for the moss but also for the lichen. Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn presented values higher than three in both biomonitors. These trace elements were also the main ones emitted by the potential sources of pollutants. The distance between sampling locations and potential pollution sources was correlated with the concentrations of Cu, Sb, and Zn in the moss and with Cr, Ni, and Sb in the lichen. Lichen richness was negatively correlated with lichen Cu, Pb, and V concentrations on dry weight basis. The study reflected the remarkable influence that the pollution sources have on the presence of trace elements and on lichen species community composition in this natural area. The study highlights the value of combining the use of biomonitors, enrichment factors, and lichen diversity for pollution assessment to reach a better overview of both trace elements' impact and the localization of their sources.

  3. Development of an element-selective monitoring system for adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) with plasma emission spectrometric detection for quasi-continuous waste-water analysis.

    PubMed

    Twiehaus, T; Evers, S; Buscher, W; Cammann, K

    2001-11-01

    An automated quasi-continuously-operating monitor has been developed for element-selective analysis of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in water. After extensive optimization the automatic method was applied to the analysis of standard solutions and real waste water samples to prove its analytical applicability. The new instrument is based on the element-selective analysis of halogens by means of a spectroscopic detection system consisting of a microwave-induced helium plasma excitation source (TM010-type; developed in this laboratory) and the plasma emission detector (PED) which operates with oscillating narrow-band interference filters. After enriching the organic components on activated charcoal and pyrolysis in an oxygen stream at 950 degrees C, in accordance with DIN/EN 38409,H14/1485, interfering CO2 and H2O gas generated during combustion is removed from the analytes in the so-called ELSA-system (element-selective AOX-analyzer). For focused injection into the plasma excitation source the analytes (hydrogen halides) are trapped in a deactivated fused silica capillary at -180 degrees C; this is followed by identification and quantification on the basis of element-specific emission of radiation in the VIS and NIR-region (chlorine 837.6 nm, fluorine 685.6 nm). Bromine and iodine could not be detected with satisfactory inter-element selectivity, because of spectral interferences caused by matrix elements, and so results from the respective single-element investigations for determination of AOBr and AOI are not presented. The procedure has been validated and the analytical performance has been examined by calibration with p-chlorophenol and p-fluorophenol. The limit of detection was 1.1 microg (absolute) for chlorine and 6.6 microg (absolute) for fluorine.

  4. Use of the lichen Xanthoria mandschurica in monitoring atmospheric elemental deposition in the Taihang Mountains, Hebei, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Jie; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Fang, Shi-Bo; Liu, Si-Wa; Hu, Jian-Sen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Xiao-Di; Wu, Qing-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a major concern in China. Lichens are a useful biomonitor for atmospheric elemental deposition but have rarely been used in North China. The aim of this study was to investigate the atmospheric depositions of 30 trace elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Tb, Th, Ti, Tl, V and Zn) in a region of the Taihang Mountains, Hebei Province, China using lichens as biomonitors. Epilithic foliose lichen Xanthoria mandschurica was sampled from 21 sites and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results show that 1) eight elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, P, Pb, Sb and Zn) are of atmospheric origin and are highly influenced by the atmospheric transportation from the North China Plain, as well as local mining activities, while 2) the remaining 22 elements are primarily of crustal origin, the concentration of which has been enhanced by local mining and quarrying activities. These results clearly validate the applicability of lichens in biomonitoring of atmospheric elemental deposition and demonstrate the spatial pattern for air pollution in the region. PMID:27089945

  5. Use of the lichen Xanthoria mandschurica in monitoring atmospheric elemental deposition in the Taihang Mountains, Hebei, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua-Jie; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Fang, Shi-Bo; Liu, Si-Wa; Hu, Jian-Sen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Xiao-Di; Wu, Qing-Feng

    2016-04-19

    Air pollution is a major concern in China. Lichens are a useful biomonitor for atmospheric elemental deposition but have rarely been used in North China. The aim of this study was to investigate the atmospheric depositions of 30 trace elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Tb, Th, Ti, Tl, V and Zn) in a region of the Taihang Mountains, Hebei Province, China using lichens as biomonitors. Epilithic foliose lichen Xanthoria mandschurica was sampled from 21 sites and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results show that 1) eight elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, P, Pb, Sb and Zn) are of atmospheric origin and are highly influenced by the atmospheric transportation from the North China Plain, as well as local mining activities, while 2) the remaining 22 elements are primarily of crustal origin, the concentration of which has been enhanced by local mining and quarrying activities. These results clearly validate the applicability of lichens in biomonitoring of atmospheric elemental deposition and demonstrate the spatial pattern for air pollution in the region.

  6. Use of the lichen Xanthoria mandschurica in monitoring atmospheric elemental deposition in the Taihang Mountains, Hebei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Jie; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Fang, Shi-Bo; Liu, Si-Wa; Hu, Jian-Sen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Xiao-Di; Wu, Qing-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution is a major concern in China. Lichens are a useful biomonitor for atmospheric elemental deposition but have rarely been used in North China. The aim of this study was to investigate the atmospheric depositions of 30 trace elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Tb, Th, Ti, Tl, V and Zn) in a region of the Taihang Mountains, Hebei Province, China using lichens as biomonitors. Epilithic foliose lichen Xanthoria mandschurica was sampled from 21 sites and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results show that 1) eight elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, P, Pb, Sb and Zn) are of atmospheric origin and are highly influenced by the atmospheric transportation from the North China Plain, as well as local mining activities, while 2) the remaining 22 elements are primarily of crustal origin, the concentration of which has been enhanced by local mining and quarrying activities. These results clearly validate the applicability of lichens in biomonitoring of atmospheric elemental deposition and demonstrate the spatial pattern for air pollution in the region.

  7. Multivariate analysis of the spatial patterns of 8 trace elements using the French soil monitoring network data.

    PubMed

    Saby, N P A; Thioulouse, J; Jolivet, C C; Ratié, C; Boulonne, L; Bispo, A; Arrouays, D

    2009-10-15

    Geostatistical and spatially constrained multivariate analysis methods (MULTISPATI-PCA) have been applied at the scale of France to differentiate the influence of natural background from the pollution due to human activities on the content of 8 trace elements in the topsoil. The results of MULTISPATI-PCA evidence strong spatial structures attributed to different natural and artificial processes. The first axis can be interpreted as an axis of global richness in trace elements. Axis 2 reflects geochemical anomalies in Tl and Pb. Axis 3 exhibits on one hand natural pedogeogenic anomalies and on the other hand, it shows high values attributable to anthropogenic contamination. Finally, axis 4 is driven by anthropogenic copper contamination. At the French territory scale, we show that the main factors controlling trace elements distribution in the topsoil are soil texture, variations in parent material geology and weathering, and various anthropogenic sources.

  8. [MONITORING OF THE CONTENT OF HEAVY METALS AND ELEMENTS IN THE SNOW COVER IN AGRICULTURAL SOILS AT THE TERRITORY OF THE MOSCOW REGION].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A A; Karpova, E A; Malysheva, A G; Mikhaylova, R I; Ryzhova, I N

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of snow cover pollution by heavy metals and elements (zinc, copper, lead, cadmium, arsenic, nickel, chromium, strontium, manganese, fluorine, lithium) was performed in 20 districts of the Moscow region in 2009, 2012 and 2013. The assessment of the levels of contamination by heavy metals and elements was given by means of comparison of them with the average values in the snow cover near Moscow in the end of the last century and in some areas of the world, that no exposed to technological environmental impact. 7 districts of Moscow region were characterized by a high content of lead and cadmium in the snow water. It requires the control of water, soil and agricultural products pollution.

  9. Concentration of elements in whole-body fish, fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and fish eggs from the 2008 Missouri Department of Conservation General Contaminant Monitoring Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in whole-body fish, fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and fish eggs. Whole-body, fillet, or egg samples of catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, Ictalurus furcatus, Pylodictis olivaris), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), walleye (Sander vitreus), crappie (Pomoxis annularis, Pomoxis nigromaculatus), shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus), northern hog sucker (Hypentelium nigricans), and Missouri saddled darter (Etheostoma tetrazonum) were collected from 23 sites as part of the Missouri Department of Conservation's Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Fish dorsal muscle plugs also were collected from walleye (Sander vitreus) at one of the sites.

  10. Concentrations of elements in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish from the 2007 Missouri Department of Conservation General Contaminant Monitoring Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish. Fillets of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), bass (Micropterus salmoides, Micropterus dolomieu, Morone chrysops), walleye (Sander vitreus), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), northern hog sucker (Hypentelium nigricans), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were collected from 21 sites as part of the Department's Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Long-pincered crayfish (Orconectes longidigitus) were collected from one site to assess trophic transfer of metals to fish. Fish muscle plugs were collected from smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) at two different locations from one site.

  11. Comprehensive monitoring program, historical background and development of the surface water element, water year 1975 to water year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-24

    This report documents the chronology and development of the surface water monitoring program at RMA between 1975 and 1987, including the first two years of the CMP (fiscal years 1988 and 1989). This document will complement the FY90 surface water data assessment report and future annual reports.

  12. Human placenta as a 'dual' biomarker for monitoring fetal and maternal environment with special reference to potentially toxic trace elements. Part 1: physiology, function and sampling of placenta for elemental characterisation.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, G V; Rapp, A

    2001-12-03

    Choice of specimen from human subjects for monitoring pollutants proven to be detrimental to human health depends on the criteria chosen, namely real-time monitoring (RTM) or long-term monitoring (LTM). Specimens such as whole blood, urine, saliva and breast milk are commonly used from living subjects for RTM of toxic metals. However, sampling blood requires an invasive procedure. On the other hand, hair (with some limitations), bone (especially for the assessment of bone seeking elements), adipose tissue (mainly for organic pollutants) and liver (for both organic and inorganic toxicants) are used as specimens for LTM. With the exception of hair, generally these specimens are obtained at post-mortem. In context of health-related biomonitoring, placenta as a specimen has not received as much attention as it deserves. It is a unique sample requiring no invasive procedure, and offers possibilities for RTM, in particular as a dual purpose specimen for evaluating the pollutant burden exerted on the mother as well as on the fetus. Obtaining representative samples of placenta for elemental composition studies is a difficult task, because of heterogeneous mix of placental cells and decidual matter tainted with maternal and fetal blood. Therefore, the present sampling practices for placental tissue, and guidelines to safeguard the validity of the sampled material have been reviewed in part 1 with the following conclusions: medico-legal and ethical matters should be properly addressed before collecting the placenta; it is advisable to collect the entire placenta even if it includes the umbilical cord; further preparatory work is to be carried out in a clean laboratory and depends upon the purpose of the investigation; homogenising the entire sample may prove to be technically challenging but this step is crucial to obtain representative samples, handling the entire sample may be unavoidable; and an alternative method of procuring representative samples would require random

  13. Use of UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy to monitor label-free interaction between molecular recognition elements and erythropoietin on a gold-coated polycarbonate platform.

    PubMed

    Citartan, Marimuthu; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tominaga, Junji; Chen, Yeng; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2014-08-01

    Label-free-based detection is pivotal for real-time monitoring of biomolecular interactions and to eliminate the need for labeling with tags that can occupy important binding sites of biomolecules. One simplest form of label-free-based detection is ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy, which measure changes in reflectivity as a means to monitor immobilization and interaction of biomolecules with their corresponding partners. In biosensor development, the platform used for the biomolecular interaction should be suitable for different molecular recognition elements. In this study, gold (Au)-coated polycarbonate was used as a platform and as a proof-of-concept, erythropoietin (EPO), a doping substance widely abused by the athletes was used as the target. The interaction of EPO with its corresponding molecular recognition elements (anti-EPO monoclonal antibody and anti-EPO DNA aptamer) is monitored by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Prior to this, to show that UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy is a suitable method for measuring biomolecular interaction, the interaction between biotin and streptavidin was demonstrated via this strategy and reflectivity of this interaction decreased by 25%. Subsequent to this, interaction of the EPO with anti-EPO monoclonal antibody and anti-EPO DNA aptamer resulted in the decrease of reflectivity by 5% and 10%, respectively. The results indicated that Au-coated polycarbonate could be an ideal biosensor platform for monitoring biomolecular interactions using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. A smaller version of the Au-coated polycarbonate substrates can be derived from the recent set-up, to be applied towards detecting EPO abuse among atheletes.

  14. Elemental metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Georgiou, Constantinos A; Brusic, Vladimir

    2017-01-10

    Elemental metabolomics is quantification and characterization of total concentration of chemical elements in biological samples and monitoring of their changes. Recent advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry have enabled simultaneous measurement of concentrations of > 70 elements in biological samples. In living organisms, elements interact and compete with each other for absorption and molecular interactions. They also interact with proteins and nucleotide sequences. These interactions modulate enzymatic activities and are critical for many molecular and cellular functions. Testing for concentration of > 40 elements in blood, other bodily fluids and tissues is now in routine use in advanced medical laboratories. In this article, we define the basic concepts of elemental metabolomics, summarize standards and workflows, and propose minimum information for reporting the results of an elemental metabolomics experiment. Major statistical and informatics tools for elemental metabolomics are reviewed, and examples of applications are discussed. Elemental metabolomics is emerging as an important new technology with applications in medical diagnostics, nutrition, agriculture, food science, environmental science and multiplicity of other areas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Multivariate predictors of failed prehospital endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Henry E; Kupas, Douglas F; Paris, Paul M; Bates, Robyn R; Costantino, Joseph P; Yealy, Donald M

    2003-07-01

    Conventionally trained out-of-hospital rescuers (such as paramedics) often fail to accomplish endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients requiring invasive airway management. Previous studies have identified univariate variables associated with failed out-of-hospital ETI but have not examined the interaction between the numerous factors impacting ETI success. This study sought to use multivariate logistic regression to identify a set of factors associated with failed adult out-of-hospital ETI. The authors obtained clinical and demographic data from the Prehospital Airway Collaborative Evaluation, a prospective, multicentered observational study involving advanced life support (ALS) emergency medical services (EMS) systems in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Providers used standard forms to report details of attempted ETI, including system and patient demographics, methods used, difficulties encountered, and initial outcomes. The authors excluded data from sedation-facilitated and neuromuscular blockade-assisted intubations. The main outcome measure was ETI failure, defined as failure to successfully place an endotracheal tube on the last out-of-hospital laryngoscopy attempt. Logistic regression was performed to develop a multivariate model identifying factors associated with failed ETI. Data were used from 45 ALS systems on 663 adult ETIs attempted during the period June 1, 2001, to November 30, 2001. There were 89 cases of failed ETI (failure rate 13.4%). Of 61 factors potentially related to ETI failure, multivariate logistic regression revealed the following significant covariates associated with ETI failure (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval; likelihood ratio p-value): presence of clenched jaw/trismus (9.718; 95% CI = 4.594 to 20.558; p < 0.0001); inability to pass the endotracheal tube through the vocal cords (7.653; 95% CI = 3.561 to 16.447; p < 0.0001); inability to visualize the vocal cords (7.638; 95% CI = 3.966 to 14.707; p < 0.0001); intact gag reflex

  16. Fate of trace elements in a 2000-MW coal-fired power station: PISCES Site 131 field chemical emissions monitoring program emissions report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, F.; Price, H.J.

    1996-04-01

    As part of the Field Chemical Emissions Monitoring (FCEM) program, PowerGen and EPRI have sponsored research to determine the fate of trace element emissions from Site 131--a 2000-MW pulverized-coal-fired-power plant. Three plant configurations were investigated on units employing (1) low-NOx burners, (2) conventional burners, and (3) conventional burners with an improved electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a new wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The majority of fractional closures were good for most trace elements and were within the project goals of being able to account for 70--130% of the inlet feed in the emission streams. Comparison between the analyses of the precipitator outlet dusts shows little variation, other than that attributable to the original coal composition. As expected, the improved precipitators and new FGD along with a consequent reduction in dust burden, markedly decreased the mass emission of metals in the solid phase. Removal efficiencies of 65--95% were achieved across the FGD system for the vapor phase trace elements (mercury, selenium, chlorine, and fluorine). Moreover, the use of a new FGD system reduced the final stack emissions, with the majority of species concentrating in the sludge phase. Finally, organic emissions measured, including dioxins and furans, were very low and in most cases near the method detection limit. The results from Site 131 would be most applicable for utilities burning the same type of fuel at a power plant with a similar ESP and a wet FGD control system.

  17. Why Waveform Correlation Sometimes Fails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, J.

    2015-12-01

    Waveform correlation detectors used in explosion monitoring scan noisy geophysical data to test two competing hypotheses: either (1) an amplitude-scaled version of a template waveform is present, or, (2) no signal is present at all. In reality, geophysical wavefields that are monitored for explosion signatures include waveforms produced by non-target sources that are partially correlated with the waveform template. Such signals can falsely trigger correlation detectors, particularly at low thresholds required to monitor for smaller target explosions. This challenge is particularly formidable when monitoring known test sites for seismic disturbances, since uncatalogued natural seismicity is (generally) more prevalent at lower magnitudes, and could be mistaken for small explosions. To address these challenges, we identify real examples in which correlation detectors targeting explosions falsely trigger on both site-proximal earthquakes (Figure 1, below) and microseismic "noise". Motivated by these examples, we quantify performance loss when applying these detectors, and re-evaluate the correlation-detector's hypothesis test. We thereby derive new detectors from more general hypotheses that admit unknown background seismicity, and apply these to real data. From our treatment, we derive "rules of thumb'' for proper template and threshold selection in heavily cluttered signal environments. Last, we answer the question "what is the probability of falsely detecting an earthquake collocated at a test site?", using correlation detectors that include explosion-triggered templates. Figure Top: An eight-channel data stream (black) recorded from an earthquake near a mine. Red markers indicate a detection. Middle: The correlation statistic computed by scanning the template against the data stream at top. The red line indicates the threshold for event declaration, determined by a false-alarm on noise probability constraint, as computed from the signal-absent distribution using

  18. How Do "You" Define a Failing School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    Although the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act refers to "low performing" schools as "in need of improvement," no one outside of the U.S. Department of Education uses that phrase. The term most commonly used is "failing." NCLB offers a single, explicit definition of a failing school: one that fails to make adequate…

  19. We Must Teach Students to Fail Well

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Leah Blatt

    2009-01-01

    In the author's role as an academic dean, she frequently meets with students on probation who have not yet learned how to fail and are consequently paralyzed academically. One of the most pivotal skills for a student who wishes to succeed in the academic arena is the ability to fail well. "Good failing" requires the strength to make use of a…

  20. What is a failed labor induction?

    PubMed

    Lin, Monique G; Rouse, Dwight J

    2006-09-01

    Criteria for failed labor induction have not been standardized. The increasing prevalence of labor induction and the lack of a definition for failed induction contribute to unnecessary abdominal deliveries. Labor duration, cervical dilation, and uterine activity necessary to attain the active phase are reviewed. A practical definition of failed induction of labor is suggested.

  1. Monitoring and source apportionment of trace elements in PM2.5: Implications for local air quality management.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueyan; Chang, Miao; Ding, Shanshan; Wang, Shiwen; Ni, Dun; Hu, Hongtao

    2017-03-08

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were collected simultaneously every hour in Beijing between April 2014 and April 2015 at five sites. Thirteen trace elements (TEs) in PM2.5 were analyzed by online X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The annual average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 76.8 to 102.7 μg m(-3). TEs accounted for 5.9%-8.7% of the total PM2.5 mass with Cl, S, K, and Si as the most dominant elements. Spearman correlation coefficients of PM2.5 or TE concentrations between the background site and other sites showed that PM2.5 and some element loadings were affected by regional and local sources, whereas Cr, Si, and Ni were attributed to substantial local emissions. Temporal variations of TEs in PM2.5 were significant and provided information on source profiles. The PM2.5 concentrations were highest in autumn and lowest in summer. Mn and Cr showed similar variation. Fe, Ca, Si, and Ti tended to show higher concentrations in spring, whereas concentrations of S peaked in summer. Concentrations of Cl, K, Pb, Zn, Cu, and Ni peaked in winter. PM2.5 and TE median concentrations were higher on Saturdays than on weekdays. The diurnal pattern of PM2.5 and TE median concentrations yielded similar bimodal patterns. Five dominant sources of PM2.5 mass were identified via positive matrix factorization (PMF). These sources included the regional and local secondary aerosols, traffic, coal burning, soil dust, and metal processing. Air quality management strategies, including regional environmental coordination and collaboration, reduction in secondary aerosol precursors, restrictive vehicle emission standards, promotion of public transport, and adoption of clean energy, should be strictly implemented. High time-resolution measurements of TEs provided detailed source profiles, which can greatly improve precision in interpreting source apportionment calculations; the PMF analysis of online XRF data is a powerful tool for local air quality management.

  2. Spectrally formulated user-defined element in Abaqus for wave motion analysis and health monitoring of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Ashkan

    Wave propagation analysis in 1-D and 2-D composite structures is performed efficiently and accurately through the formulation of a User-Defined Element (UEL) based on the wavelet spectral finite element (WSFE) method. The WSFE method is based on the first order shear deformation theory which yields accurate results for wave motion at high frequencies. The wave equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations using Daubechies compactly supported, orthonormal, wavelet scaling functions for approximations in time and one spatial dimension. The 1-D and 2-D WSFE models are highly efficient computationally and provide a direct relationship between system input and output in the frequency domain. The UEL is formulated and implemented in Abaqus for wave propagation analysis in composite structures with complexities. Frequency domain formulation of WSFE leads to complex valued parameters, which are decoupled into real and imaginary parts and presented to Abaqus as real values. The final solution is obtained by forming a complex value using the real number solutions given by Abaqus. Several numerical examples are presented here for 1-D and 2-D composite waveguides. Wave motions predicted by the developed UEL correlate very well with Abaqus simulations using shear flexible elements. The results also show that the UEL largely retains computational efficiency of the WSFE method and extends its ability to model complex features. An enhanced cross-correlation method (ECCM) is developed in order to accurately predict damage location in plates. Three major modifications are proposed to the widely used cross-correlation method (CCM) to improve damage localization capabilities, namely actuator-sensor configuration, signal pre-processing method, and signal post-processing method. The ECCM is investigated numerically (FEM simulation) and experimentally. Experimental investigations for damage detection employ a PZT transducer as actuator and laser Doppler vibrometer as sensor

  3. Pathophysiology of the failing heart.

    PubMed

    McElroy, P A; Shroff, S G; Weber, K T

    1989-02-01

    Cardiac (or myocardial) failure of acute onset or of chronic duration is the result of a structural and/or biochemical remodeling of the myocardium. This, in turn, compromises the contractile performance of the myocardium. The hypertrophic growth of myocytes and the architectural transformation of ventricular chamber size and shape--while initially useful compensatory responses--do not prevent the inevitable appearance of pump failure where oxygen delivery to the metabolizing tissues becomes inadequate. Indeed, the severity of cardiac failure can be judged from the level of oxygen consumption that elicits this state of impaired oxygen supply and demand. A better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the ventricular chamber, including its elastic and resistive properties, together with recent advances in our ability to measure instantaneous ventricular pressure and volume, may prove useful in identifying pathologic features of hypertrophy and dilatation in individual patients. In grading the severity of failure and comparing groups of patients, a normalization of the mechanical parameters by differences in chamber size, shape, and mass is necessary. Symptomatic cardiac failure, based invariably on inadequate oxygen delivery and/or pulmonary congestion, is more commonly the result of ventricular systolic dysfunction. Abnormalities in diastolic function, including ventricular relaxation and filling, while less common and often associated with preserved systolic pump function, do occur. Finally, it must be recognized that the failing ventricle carries an additional hydraulic load that arises from the arterial circulation to which it is coupled.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. [Monitoring and assessment contamination of toxic elements food in Tatarstan monitoring and evaluation of contamination by toxic elements of food products in the territory of the Republic of Tatarstan].

    PubMed

    Frolova, O A; Karpova, M V; Makhmutova, I P; Musin, R A

    2014-01-01

    Actual consumption of toxic elements in the body of an adult human in the Republic of Tatarstan (during the period of the study of the production in 2008-2012) amounts for lead: 0.68 mg/week for cadmium: 0.18 mg/day, arsenic: 0.68 mg/day, mercury: 0.21 mg/week (per 1 kg body weight) or respectively: 22.81%, 18.0%, 13.69%, 4.27% of the allowable levels of the chemical load. We have performed calculations with account of the balance of food resources per capita per year in the Republic of Tatarstan. This analysis showed that the main dietary sources of income for cadmium there are milk and dairy products (48.32%), bakery products (16.07%), meat and meat products (13.22%); for lead there are bakely products (26.85%), potatoes (24.36%), milk and dairy products (23.94%), meat and meat products (7.55%); for mercury there are milk and dairy products (53.72%), meat and meat products (16.82%), potatoes (10.92%); fish and fish products (4.74%); for arsenic there are milk and dairy products (72.51%), meat and meat products (12.8%), bakery products (3.05% ,); fish and fish products (2.23%). It is important to know not only what products are the most contaminated, but what place in the structure of the nutrition they take.

  5. Role of sediment-trace element chemistry in water-quality monitoring and the need for standard analytical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.

    1991-01-01

    Multiple linear regression models calculated from readily obtainable chemical and physical parameters can explain a high percentage (70% or greater) of observed sediment trace-element variance for Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co, As, Sb, Se, and Hg. Almost all the factors used in the various models fall into the category of operational definitions (e.g., grain size, surface area, and geochemical substrates such as amorphous iron and manganese oxides). Thus, the concentrations and distributions used in the various models are operationally defined, and are subject to substantial change depending on the method used to determine them. Without standardized procedures, data from different sources are not comparable, and the utility and applicability of the various models would be questionable.

  6. Finite element modelling of non-bonded piezo sensors for biomedical health monitoring of bones based on EMI technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Shashank; Bhalla, Suresh; Madan, Alok; Gupta, Ashok

    2016-04-01

    Extensive research is currently underway across the world for employing piezo sensors for biomedical health monitoring in view of their obvious advantages such as low cost,fast dynamics response and bio-compatibility.However,one of the limitations of the piezo sensor in bonded mode based on the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique is that it can cause harmful effects to the humans in terms of irritation ,bone and skin disease. This paper which is in continuation of the recent demonstration of non-bonded configuration is a step towards simulating and analyzing the non-bonded configuration of the piezo sensor for gauging its effectiveness using FEA software. It has been noted that the conductance signatures obtained in non-bonded mode are significantly close to the conventional bonded configuration, thus giving a positive indication of its field use.

  7. Results of space environment measurement carried out by the Roscosmos monitoring system elements and their correlation with different space weather characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopopov, Grigory; Anashin, Vasily; Elushov, Ilya; Kozyukova, Olga

    The Monitoring System of space radiation exposure on electronic components is developed by the Institute of Space Device Engineering by order Roscosmos. The key targets of the Monitoring System are space environment measurements, space model correction, space weather characteristics forecast, improvement of radiation hardness technical requirements and etc. The Monitoring System includes two parts: the ground-based and the space-born segments. The ground-based segment includes the forecast station, the analytic complex and the data output system. The space-born segment base elements are TID sensors operating by MNOSFET dosimetry principle. Sensor temperature stabilization is achieved by choosing of operational point according to the minimal change of sensor current-voltage curve. The set of 38 TID sensors is placed on 19 spacecrafts currently. The spacecrafts operate in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) (approximately 20 000 km with inclination of 65(°) ). The flight data obtained perfectly correlate with total dose flight data registered using MOSFET placed on Van Allen Probe spacecraft functioning in high elliptical orbit (apogee is 37 000 km, perigee is 650 km, inclination is 10(°) ). Also coincidence with the dose data from GIOVE-B spacecraft (circular orbit 23200 km, inclination of 56(°) ) of Galileo system is observed. We have observed several abrupt dose rate increases from April, 2010. The flight data are compared with other monitoring system data and ground measurements. The comparison results show that high energy electrons (> 1 MeV) give general contribution in accumulated dose and anomalous dose rate increases. These results are in agreement with shielding stopping power calculation results. The high electron fluxes rise significantly in MEO as a result of Van Allen belts shifting during geomagnetic storms. The flight data were compared with calculation results obtained using different space models. The comparison shows that for some long-term interval the

  8. Ballooning osteolysis in 71 failed total ankle arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurpal; Reichard, Theresa; Hameister, Rita; Awiszus, Friedemann; Schenk, Katja; Feuerstein, Bernd; Roessner, Albert; Lohmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Aseptic loosening is a major cause of failure in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). In contrast to other total joint replacements, large periarticular cysts (ballooning osteolysis) have frequently been observed in this context. We investigated periprosthetic tissue responses in failed TAA, and performed an element analysis of retrieved tissues in failed TAA. Patients and methods The study cohort consisted of 71 patients undergoing revision surgery for failed TAA, all with hydroxyapatite-coated implants. In addition, 5 patients undergoing primary TAA served as a control group. Radiologically, patients were classified into those with ballooning osteolysis and those without, according to defined criteria. Histomorphometric, immunohistochemical, and elemental analysis of tissues was performed. Von Kossa staining and digital microscopy was performed on all tissue samples. Results Patients without ballooning osteolysis showed a generally higher expression of lymphocytes, and CD3+, CD11c+, CD20+, and CD68+ cells in a perivascular distribution, compared to diffuse expression. The odds of having ballooning osteolysis was 300 times higher in patients with calcium content >0.5 mg/g in periprosthetic tissue than in patients with calcium content ≤0.5 mg/g (p < 0.001). Interpretation There have been very few studies investigating the pathomechanisms of failed TAA and the cause-effect nature of ballooning osteolysis in this context. Our data suggest that the hydroxyapatite coating of the implant may be a contributory factor. PMID:27196532

  9. Review of Trace-Element Field-Blank Data Collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program, May 2004-January 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Trace-element quality-control samples (for example, source-solution blanks, field blanks, and field replicates) were collected as part of a statewide investigation of groundwater quality in California, known as the Priority Basins Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basins Project is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Trace-element field blanks were collected to evaluate potential bias in the corresponding environmental data. Bias in the environmental data could result from contamination in the field during sample collection, from the groundwater coming into contact with contaminants on equipment surfaces or from other sources, or from processing, shipping, or analyzing the samples. Bias affects the interpretation of environmental data, particularly if any constituents are present solely as a result of extrinsic contamination that would have otherwise been absent from the groundwater that was sampled. Field blanks were collected, analyzed, and reviewed to identify and quantify extrinsic contamination bias. Data derived from source-solution blanks and laboratory quality-control samples also were considered in evaluating potential contamination bias. Eighty-six field-blank samples collected from May 2004 to January 2008 were analyzed for the concentrations of 25 trace elements. Results from these field blanks were used to interpret the data for the 816 samples of untreated groundwater collected over the same period. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum

  10. In-situ monitoring of actinides and rare earth elements by electrothermal hollow cathode discharge spectrometry. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Edelson, M.C.

    1992-12-01

    This report describes an Electrothermal Hollow Cathode Discharge Spectrometry (ET-HCDS) source being constructed for the analytical determination of actinides and rare earth elements. This work was initiated with the support of the Office of Safeguards and Security; the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration began funding work in this area in mid-FY1992 and the work is continuing into FY1993 with funds from both sources. Special features of this instrument should permit it to be used for the determination of individual isotopic species, which is important for safeguard`s materials control and accountancy. ET-HCDS can be achieved using compact instrumentation suitable for use in field laboratories. The technique is capable of determining a suite of environmentally-important species, such as the actinides and the heavy metals, in a variety of physical forms (e.g., in solution, as found on air particulates, or in soils). ET-HCDS should be capable of very sensitive analyses and should require very small samples (e.g., microgram). Since ET-HCDS is possible in an air atmosphere (at reduced pressures), it may be useful for the real-time determination of hazardous materials, both radioactive and non radioactive, contained in dusts released during waste retrieval operations; ET-HCDS should also be useful for the rapid and sensitive analysis of metals in soils.

  11. Why Have So Many Intravascular Glucose Monitoring Devices Failed?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John L.; Rice, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary to the inherent limitations of both point-of-care and central laboratory glucose technologies, continuous glucose measurement has recently enjoyed a high level of investment. Because of the perceived advantages by some of measuring in the intravascular space compared to the subcutaneous tissue, a number of technologies have been developed. In this review, we evaluate nine systems that have shown promise, although only one of these has been cleared for sale in the United States. The detection methodology, regulatory status, technical issues, and company circumstance surrounding each technology are examined. PMID:26129733

  12. The neurology of acutely failing respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2017-04-01

    Forces involved in breathing-which effectively pull in air-are the diaphragmatic, intercostal, spine, and neck muscles. Equally important is the bulbar musculature maintaining the architecture of a patent airway conduit and abdominal wall and internal intercostal muscles providing cough. Acute injury along a neural trajectory from brainstem to muscle will impair the coordinated interaction between these muscle groups. Acutely failing respiratory mechanics can be caused by central and peripheral lesions. In central lesions, the key lesion is in the nucleus ambiguus innervating the dilator muscles of the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx, but abnormal respiratory mechanics rarely coincide with abnormalities of the respiratory pattern generator. In peripheral lesions, diaphragmatic weakness is a main element, but in many neuromuscular disorders mechanical upper airway obstruction from oropharyngeal weakness contributes equally to an increased respiratory load. The neurology of breathing involves changes in respiratory drive, rhythm, mechanics, and dynamics. This review focuses on the fundamentals of abnormal respiratory mechanics in acute neurologic conditions, bedside judgment, interpretation of additional laboratory tests, and initial stabilization, with practical solutions provided. Many of these respiratory signs are relevant to neurologists, who in acute situations may see these patients first. Ann Neurol 2017;81:485-494. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  13. Rescuing failed oral implants via Wnt activation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xing; Li, Jingtao; Chen, Tao; Mouraret, Sylvain; Dhamdhere, Girija; Brunski, John B.; Zou, Shujuan; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Implant osseointegration is not always guaranteed and once fibrous encapsulation occurs clinicians have few options other than implant removal. Our goal was to test whether a WNT protein therapeutic could rescue such failed implants. Material and Methods Titanium implants were placed in over-sized murine oral osteotomies. A lack of primary stability was verified by mechanical testing. Interfacial strains were estimated by finite element modelling and histology coupled with histomorphometry confirmed the lack of peri-implant bone. After fibrous encapsulation was established peri-implant injections of a liposomal formulation of WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) or liposomal PBS (L-PBS) were then initiated. Quantitative assays were employed to analyse the effects of L-WNT3A treatment. Results Implants in gap-type interfaces exhibited high interfacial strains and no primary stability. After verification of implant failure, L-WNT3A or L-PBS injections were initiated. L-WNT3A induced a rapid, significant increase in Wnt responsiveness in the peri-implant environment, cell proliferation and osteogenic protein expression. The amount of peri-implant bone and bone in contact with the implant were significantly higher in L-WNT3A cases. Conclusions These data demonstrate L-WNT3A can induce peri-implant bone formation even in cases where fibrous encapsulation predominates. PMID:26718012

  14. [Monitoring of contamination of foodstuffs with elements noxious to human health. Part I. Wheat cereal products, vegetable products, confectionery and products for infants and children (2004 year)].

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska-Mazurek, Maria; Starska, Krystyna; Brulińska-Ostrowska, Elzbieta; Plewa, Monika; Biernat, Urszula; Karłowski, Kazimierz

    2008-01-01

    The testing of products of wheat cereal (310 samples), vegetable (418 samples), confectionery (439 samples) and 952 samples of products for infants and children has initiated the 5-years cycle of monitoring investigations on food contamination with elements noxious to human health planned to perform in 2004-2008. The parties involved in testing were: laboratories of State Sanitary Inspection collecting samples on all over the territory of Poland, both from retail market (of domestic origin as well as imported) and directly from producers; the national reference laboratory of the Department of Food and Consumer Articles Research of National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene responsible for elaboration of official food control and monitoring plans to be approved by Chief Sanitary Inspectorate and for the substantive supervising of tests performance. The reported metals contents were not of health concern and generally below the levels set forth in food legislation. The health hazard assessment was performed taking into account the mean contamination obtained and average domestic consumption of these food products groups in Poland. The highest intake expressed as the percentage of provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) was obtained for cadmium, which has reached 9.4% PTWI for cereal based products and 4.7% PTWI for vegetables. The cadmium content in chocolate and derived products due to contamination of cocoa beans and the levels of this element in products for infants and children originated from contamination of cereal and soybeans row materials should not be ignored. The decrease of lead contamination comparing to those reported in 1990 studies was observed.

  15. Updated study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element data collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project, October 2009-March 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater samples have been collected in California as part of statewide investigations of groundwater quality conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP is being conducted in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Quality-control samples (source-solution blanks, equipment blanks, and field blanks) were collected in order to ensure the quality of the groundwater sample results. Olsen and others (2010) previously determined study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element results based primarily on field blanks collected in California from May 2004 through January 2008. SRLs are raised reporting levels used to reduce the likelihood of reporting false detections attributable to contamination bias. The purpose of this report is to identify any changes in the frequency and concentrations of detections in field blanks since the last evaluation and update the SRLs for more recent data accordingly. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), strontium (Sr), thallium (Tl), tungsten (W), uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). Data from 179 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from March 2006 through March 2013 by the GAMA-PBP indicated that for trace elements that had a change in detection frequency and concentration since the previous review, the shift occurred near October 2009, in conjunction with a change in the capsule filters used by the study. Results for 89 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from October 2009 through March 2013 were

  16. [Monitoring of contamination of foodstuffs with elements noxious to human health. Part II. Mineral waters, soft drinks, fruits, nuts, rice, soybeans, fish and seafood].

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska-Mazurek, Maria; Starska, Krystyna; Mania, Monika; Brulińska-Ostrowska, Elzbieta; Biernat, Urszula; Karłowski, Kazimierz

    2010-01-01

    Results of the 5-years cycle (2004-2008) monitoring investigations on food contamination with elements noxious to human health, involving testing of mineral waters and soft drinks (226 samples), fruits (467 samples), rice (234 samples), soybeans (236 samples), nuts and peanuts (237 samples), fish and seafood (237 samples) are discussed. The parties involved in testing were: laboratories of State Sanitary Inspection and the national reference laboratory of the Department of Food and Consumer Articles Research of National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene. The reported metals contents did not give rise to health concerns, remaining generally below the levels set forth in food legislation and being comparable with contamination levels reported in other European countries; and for cadmium--often lower. Health hazard assessment was performed taking into account the mean contamination levels obtained and average domestic consumption of these food products groups in Poland. The highest intake expressed as the percentage of provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) was obtained for mercury in fish, which has reached mean 3.2% PTWI. Controlled fish consumption recommendations should be adhered to by prospective mothers, pregnant women, breast-feeding women and young children. Lead and arsenic intake with mineral waters and soft drinks comprises approx. 15% of total intake of these elements with food.

  17. The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-ATF response elements-luciferase mouse model, an innovative tool to monitor the integrated stress response pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    The article highlights the recent development of an ATF4 (activating transcription factor) inducible luciferase (LUC) mouse model to monitor the integrated stress response pathway (ISR) in vivo. The ISR pathway plays a key role in cellular adaptation to stress and is dysregulated in numerous diseases. The core event in this pathway is the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 α, which leads to the recruitment of the transcription factor ATF4 to specific CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-ATF response elements (CAREs) located in the promoters of target genes. To monitor the modulation of this pathway in the whole animal and at tissue and cellular levels, we generated a CARE-driven LUC mouse model. We validated the relevance of this model to study stress-related pathologies and recently observed the correlation between the ISR pathway induction in muscle and the occurrence of stress-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. The CARE-LUC mouse model represents an innovative tool for investigating the role of the ISR pathway in physiology and disease and opens new avenues for the development of drugs that could modify this important pathway in stress-related human diseases.

  18. Concentrations of elements in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish from the 2011 Missouri Department of Conservation general contaminant monitoring program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish. Fillet samples of yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis), golden redhorse (Moxostoma erythrurum), longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were collected from six sites as part of the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Fish dorsal muscle plugs were collected from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) at eight of the sites, and crayfish from two sites. Following preparation and analysis of the samples, highlights of the data were as follows: cadmium and lead residues were most elevated in crayfish tissue samples from the Big River at Cherokee Landing, with 1 to 8 micrograms per gram dry weight and 22 to 45 micrograms per gram dry weight, respectively. Some dorsal muscle plugs from largemouth bass collected from Clearwater Lake, Lake St. Louis, Noblett Lake, Hazel Creek Lake, and Harrison County Lake contained mercury residues (1.7 to 4.7 micrograms per gram dry weight) that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Water Quality Criterion of 1.5 micrograms per gram dry weight of fish tissue (equivalent to 0.30 micrograms per gram wet weight).

  19. Monitoring urban impacts on suspended sediment, trace element, and nutrient fluxes within the City of Atlanta, Georgia, USA: Program design, methodological considerations, and initial results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Atlanta, Georgia (City of Atlanta, COA), is one of the most rapidly growing urban areas in the US. Beginning in 2003, the US Geological Survey established a long-term water-quantity/quality monitoring network for the COA. The results obtained during the first 2 years have provided insights into the requirements needed to determine the extent of urban impacts on water quality, especially in terms of estimating the annual fluxes of suspended sediment, trace/major elements, and nutrients. During 2004/2005, suspended sediment fluxes from the City of Atlanta (COA) amounted to about 150 000 t year-1; ??? 94% of the transport occurred in conjunction with storm-flow, which also accounted for ??? 65% of the annual discharge. Typically, storm-flow averaged ??? 20% of theyear. Normally, annual suspended sediment fluxes are determined by summing daily loads based on a single calculation step using mean-daily discharge and a single rating curve-derived suspended sediment concentration. Due to the small and 'flashy' nature of the COAs streams, this approach could produce underestimates ranging from 25% to 64%. Accurate estimates (?? 15%) require calculation time-steps as short as every 2-3 h. Based on annual median base-flow/storm-flow chemical concentrations, the annual fluxes of ??? 75% of trace elements (e.g. Cu, Pb, Zn), major elements (e.g. Fe, Al), and total P occur in association with suspended sediment; in turn, ??? 90% of the transport of these constituents occur in conjunction with storm-flow. As such, base-flow sediment-associated and dissolved contributions represent relatively insignificant portions of the total annual load. An exception is total N, whose sediment-associated fluxes range from 50% to 60%; even so, storm-related transport typically exceeds 80%. Hence, in urban environments, non-point-source appear to be the dominant contributors to the fluxes of these constituents.

  20. Comparison of effectiveness between cork-screw and peg-screw electrodes for transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring using the finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Tomio, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Takenori; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring of motor evoked potentials by transcranial electric stimulation is popular in neurosurgery for monitoring motor function preservation. Some authors have reported that the peg-screw electrodes screwed into the skull can more effectively conduct current to the brain compared to subdermal cork-screw electrodes screwed into the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of electrode design on transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring. We estimated differences in effectiveness between the cork-screw electrode, peg-screw electrode, and cortical electrode to produce electric fields in the brain. Methods: We used the finite element method to visualize electric fields in the brain generated by transcranial electric stimulation using realistic three-dimensional head models developed from T1-weighted images. Surfaces from five layers of the head were separated as accurately as possible. We created the “cork-screws model,” “1 peg-screw model,” “peg-screws model,” and “cortical electrode model”. Results: Electric fields in the brain radially diffused from the brain surface at a maximum just below the electrodes in coronal sections. The coronal sections and surface views of the brain showed higher electric field distributions under the peg-screw compared to the cork-screw. An extremely high electric field was observed under cortical electrodes. Conclusion: Our main finding was that the intensity of electric fields in the brain are higher in the peg-screw model than the cork-screw model. PMID:27920938

  1. Coping Styles of Failing Brunei Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundia, Lawrence; Salleh, Sallimah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of two types of underachieving students (n = 246) (active failing (AF) and passive failing (PF)) in Brunei vocational and technical education (VTE) institutions and their patterns of coping. Design/methodology/approach: The field survey method was used to directly reach many…

  2. A fail-safe CMOS logic gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobin, V.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to make Complex CMOS Gates fail-safe for a class of faults. Two classes of faults are defined. The fail-safe design presented has limited fault-tolerance capability. Multiple faults are also covered.

  3. Is journalism failing on climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    How can we build a reliable and affordable energy supply based on renewables? How rapidly do we need to cut greenhouse gas emissions to keep climate change within manageable bounds? What does it take to maintain a stable common currency of different nations? These are just a few examples of questions that are critical for our future and that require an understanding of complex systems—the energy system, the climate system, the financial system. Finding sound answers to these questions requires sophisticated scientific analysis and expert knowledge; a lay person's intuition will clearly not suffice. Yet, decisions in a democracy are (and should be!) taken by politicians and the voting public who are not usually scientific experts. Hence the well-being of our societies—and even more so the living conditions of future generations, which are defined by the decisions we take today—depends on the wider public being well informed about the state of scientific knowledge and discourse. The media are the most important means by which lay people obtain their information about science. Good science journalism is therefore a decisive factor for the long-term success of modern society. Good science journalism clearly must be critical journalism, and it requires journalists who know what is what, who can put things into a perspective, and who are able to make well-informed judgements. After all, the role of science journalism is not simply to act as a 'translator' who conveys the findings of scientists in a language understandable to lay people. Rather, good science journalism will provide the public with a realistic impression of what is well established in science and what are current 'hot topics', uncertainties and controversies. It will also discuss the methods and social context of the scientific endeavour. There is ample evidence that in the area of climate science, journalism too often is failing to deliver this realistic picture to its audience, despite many good

  4. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages

  5. Long-term monitoring of arsenic, copper, selenium, and other elements in Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA) surface water, brine shrimp, and brine flies.

    PubMed

    Adams, William J; DeForest, David K; Tear, Lucinda M; Payne, Kelly; Brix, Kevin V

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents long-term monitoring data for 19 elements with a focus on arsenic (As), copper (Cu), and selenium (Se), in surface water (2002-2011), brine shrimp (2001-2011), and brine flies (1995-1996) collected from Great Salt Lake (GSL, Utah, USA). In open surface waters, mean (±standard deviation [SD]; range; n) As concentrations were 112 (±22.1; 54.0-169; 47) and 112 μg/L (±35.6; 5.1-175; 68) in filtered and unfiltered surface water samples, respectively, and 16.3 μg/g (±5.6; 5.1-35.2; 62) dry weight (dw) in brine shrimp. Mean (±SD; range; n) Cu concentrations were 4.2 (±2.1; 1.3-12.5; 47) and 6.9 μg/L (±6.6; 1.9-38.1; 68) in filtered and unfiltered surface water samples, respectively, and 20.6 μg/g (±18.4; 5.4-126; 62) dw in brine shrimp. Finally, mean (±SD; range; n) dissolved and total recoverable Se concentrations were 0.6 (±0.1; 0.4-1.2; 61) and 0.9 μg/L (±0.7; 0.5-3.6; 89), respectively, and 3.6 μg/g (±2.2; 1.1-14.9; 98) dw in brine shrimp. Thus, Se in open lake surface waters was most often in the range of 0.5-1 μg/L, and concentrations in both surface water and brine shrimp were comparable to concentrations measured in other monitoring programs for the GSL. Temporally, the statistical significance of differences in mean dissolved or total recoverable As, Cu, and Se concentrations between years was highly variable depending which test statistic was used, and there was no clear evidence of increasing or decreasing trends. In brine shrimp, significant differences in annual mean concentrations of As, Cu, and Se were observed using both parametric and nonparametric statistical approaches, but, as for water, there did not appear to be a consistent increase or decrease in concentrations of these elements over time.

  6. Establishing baseline levels of trace elements in blood and skin of bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida: implications for non-invasive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Colleen E; Christopher, Steven J; Balmer, Brian C; Wells, Randall S

    2007-12-15

    Several major unusual mortality events occurring in recent years have increased the level of concern for the health of bottlenose dolphin populations along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Trace element concentrations were examined in a population of free-ranging dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida, in order to develop a benchmark for future comparisons within and between populations. Whole blood (n=51) and skin (n=40) samples were collected through capture and release health assessment events during 2002-2004. Samples were analyzed for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, and Pb by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and Hg via atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Trace element concentrations (wet mass) in skin were 2 to 45 times greater than blood, except Cu was approximately 1.5 times higher in blood. Statistically strong correlations (p<0.05) were found for V, As, Se, Rb, Sr, and Hg between blood and skin demonstrating that these tissues can be used as effective non-lethal monitoring tools. The strongest correlation was established for Hg (r=0.9689) and concentrations in both blood and skin were above the threshold at which detrimental effects are observed in other vertebrate species. Female dolphins had significantly greater Hg concentrations in blood and skin and Pb concentrations in skin, relative to males. Calves exhibited significantly lower V, As, and Hg concentrations in blood and V and Hg concentrations in skin, relative to other age classes. Rubidium and Cu concentrations in skin were greatest in subadults and calves, respectively. In blood, V, Zn, and As concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Rb and Sr concentrations. In skin, Cu and Zn concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Mn, Rb, Cd, and Pb concentrations. The baseline concentrations and trends

  7. The search for failed supernovae with the Large Binocular Telescope: constraints from 7 yr of data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, S. M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Gerke, J. R.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2017-08-01

    We report updated results for the first 7 yr of our programme to monitor 27 galaxies within 10 Mpc using the Large Binocular Telescope to search for failed supernovae (SNe) - core collapses of massive stars that form black holes without luminous SNe. In the new data, we identify no new compelling candidates and confirm the existing candidate. Given the six successful core-collapse SNe in the sample and one likely failed SN, the implied fraction of core collapses that result in failed SNe is f=0.14^{+0.33}_{-0.10} at 90 per cent confidence. If the current candidate is a failed SN, the fraction of failed SN naturally explains the missing high-mass red supergiants SN progenitors and the black hole mass function. If the current candidate is ultimately rejected, the data imply a 90 per cent confidence upper limit on the failed SN fraction of f < 0.35.

  8. Free-floating Failed Star Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-05

    This artist concept portrays a free-floating brown dwarf, or failed star. A new study using data from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows that several of these objects are warmer than previously thought.

  9. A non-contacting approach for full field dynamic strain monitoring of rotating structures using the photogrammetry, finite element, and modal expansion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad

    Health monitoring of rotating structures such as wind turbines and helicopter rotors is generally performed using conventional sensors that provide a limited set of data at discrete locations near or on the hub. These sensors usually provide no data on the blades or interior locations where failures may occur. Within this work, an unique expansion algorithm was extended and combined with finite element (FE) modeling and an optical measurement technique to identify the dynamic strain in rotating structures. The merit of the approach is shown by using the approach to predict the dynamic strain on a small non-rotating and rotating wind turbine. A three-bladed wind turbine having 2.3-meter long blades was placed in a semi-built-in boundary condition using a hub, a machining chuck, and a steel block. A finite element model of the three wind turbine blades assembled to the hub was created and used to extract resonant frequencies and mode shapes. The FE model was validated and updated using experimental modal tests. For the non-rotating optical test, the turbine was excited using a sinusoidal excitation, a pluck test, arbitrary impacts on three blades, and random force excitations with a mechanical shaker. The response of the structure to the excitations was measured using three-dimensional point tracking. A pair of high-speed cameras was used to measure the displacement of optical targets on the structure when the blades were vibrating. The measured displacements at discrete locations were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the structure to extract the full-field dynamic strain. The results of the work show an excellent correlation between the strain predicted using the proposed approach and the strain measured with strain-gages for all of the three loading conditions. Similar to the non-rotating case, optical measurements were also preformed on a rotating wind turbine. The point tracking technique measured both rigid body displacement and flexible

  10. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  11. Functional analysis of a metal response element in the regulatory region of flounder cytochrome P450 1A and implications for environmental monitoring of pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nick A; Williams, Tim D; Chipman, James K

    2006-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP 1A) is a member of a multigene family of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. CYP 1A is highly inducible by numerous environmental contaminants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and is widely used in biomonitoring studies. Therefore, understanding the regulation of this gene is important for accurate interpretation of biomarker data. We describe here the functional role of a metal response element (MRE) in the European flounder CYP 1A promoter region. To help elucidate the potential role of this MRE, reporter gene constructs, with or without site-directed mutagenesis, were used in conjunction with a dual-luciferase assay. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was also used to investigate potential protein binding at this MRE site. Treatment with the prototypical PAH 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) (1.0 microM) produced a dose-dependent response at the CYP 1A promoter, whereas treatment with cadmium (0-1.0 microM) produced little transcriptional activity at either the wild-type or mutated promoter. Cotreatment with cadmium (1.0 microM) and 3MC (1.0 microM) reduced induction at this promoter to 1.83-fold compared to 3MC treatment alone (4.0-fold induction). Mutation of the MRE site resulted in abolishment of this cadmium-related loss of 3MC-dependent activity. Furthermore, a retarded band was observed in the EMSA when the MRE was used as a probe and incubated with liver nuclear protein from flounder treated with cadmium. The results not only add to knowledge of the diversity in vertebrate CYP 1A regulation but also raise the complexity of interpretation of CYP 1A induction in monitoring studies that involve mixtures of PAHs and metals.

  12. Rhodopsin mutants that bind but fail to activate transducin

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, R.R.; Sakmar, T.P.; Khorana, H.G. ); Koenig, B.; Hofmann, K.P. )

    1990-10-05

    Rhodopsin is a member of a family of receptors that contain seven transmembrane helices and are coupled to G proteins. The nature of the interactions between rhodopsin mutants and the G protein, transducin (G{sub t}), was investigated by flash photolysis in order to monitor directly G{sub t} binding and dissociation. Three mutant opsins with alterations in their cytoplasmic loops bound 11-cis-retinal to yield pigments with native rhodopsin absorption spectra, but they failed to stimulate the guanosine triphosphatase activity of G{sub t}. The opsin mutations included reversal of a charged pair conserved in all G protein-coupled receptors at the cytoplasmic border to the third transmembrane helix (mutant CD1), replacement of 13 amino acids in the second cytoplasmic loop (mutant CD2), and deletion of 13 amino acids from the third cytoplasmic loop (mutant EF1). Whereas mutant CD1 failed to bind G{sub t}, mutants CD2 and EF1 showed normal G{sub t} binding but failed to release G{sub t} in the presence of guanosine triphosphate. Therefore, it appears that at least the second and third cytoplasmic loops of rhodopsin are required for activation of bound G{sub t}.

  13. A serach for 'failed clusters' of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, W. H.; Tananbaum, H.; Remillard, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a search for a new type of object - large clouds of hot gas with no visible galaxies - which we call failed clusters of galaxies. We calculate the expected X-ray luminosity, temperature, and angular diameter of such objects as a function of total cloud mass and convert the results to expected X-ray fluxes from failed clusters at different redshifts. Using the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) database, we establish a strategy to search for candidate failed clusters. From this initial screening of 1435 IPC fields, 17 candidates are selected for more detailed analysis, which indicates that 10 of these are very probably extended X-ray sources. Optical follow-up on the 10 prime candidates finds eight clusters of galaxies (including six reproted for the first time in this paper), one stellar identification, and one without an obvious optical counterpart (the candidate with the weakest evidence for X-ray extent). Investigation of several candidates with less evidence for X-ray extent yields two additional new clusters of galaxies. A conservative comparison of our results with the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey demonstrates that failed clusters are a relatively unimportant contributor to the mass density of the universe. Our inability to find failed clusters is consistent with the hierarchical clustering scenario for the formation of galaxies and clusters.

  14. Fail-safe fire detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloam, E. T.

    1974-01-01

    Fire detection control system continually monitors its own integrity, automatically signals any malfunction, and separately signals fire in any zone being monitored. Should be of interest in fields of chemical and petroleum processing, power generation, equipment testing, and building protection.

  15. Failing underperforming students: the role of grading in practice assessment.

    PubMed

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Scammell, Janet M E

    2012-03-01

    Nursing is essentially a practice discipline, informed by a theoretical base. It is crucial that students have a rigorous preparation in both theoretical and practical elements during their pre-registration programme. The aim of educationalists is to produce students fit for purpose and practice, but concerns have been raised internationally regarding students competence at the point of registration. There is evidence that some practice based assessors experience difficulties in failing incompetent students. Assessment of practice is often judged on a pass/fail rather than a graded basis in a number of health professional programmes. It could be argued that pass or fail provides limited feedback to students concerning exactly how well or poorly they have performed. This paper will explore these issues through focusing on selected findings from a service evaluation of a practice assessment tool incorporating grading of practice of pre-registration nursing students from one university in the United Kingdom (UK). Using convenience sampling, a questionnaire survey was completed by 107 adult, mental health and child health nursing students (51% response) and 112 mentors (practice-based assessors) (86% response) from all nursing fields. Amongst other issues, the evaluation identified that whilst mentors valued the opportunity to grade practice and perceived that the tool enabled them to be more discerning in the allocation of pass grades, some lacked confidence in failing students. The findings are discussed in the context of the wider debate around clinical competence in new nurse registrants and it is concluded that whilst assessing 'borderline' students will always be a testing experience, grading systems may help the assessor to be more discriminatory.

  16. Space Radiation Program Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenek, Sam

    2008-01-01

    This poster presentation shows the various elements of the Space Radiation Program. It reviews the program requirements: develop and validate standards, quantify space radiation human health risks, mitigate risks through countermeasures and technologies, and treat and monitor unmitigated risks.

  17. Diffuse neutrino flux from failed supernovae.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2009-06-12

    I study the diffuse flux of electron antineutrinos from stellar collapses with direct black hole formation (failed supernovae). This flux is more energetic than that from successful supernovae, and therefore it might contribute substantially to the total diffuse flux above realistic detection thresholds. The total flux might be considerably higher than previously thought, and approach the sensitivity of Super-Kamiokande. For more conservative values of the parameters, the flux from failed supernovae dominates for antineutrino energies above 30-45 MeV, with potential to give an observable spectral distortion at megaton detectors.

  18. Modern state of cycle chemistry monitoring systems at thermal power stations according to the experience gained at the moscow power engineering institute and Element research and production center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egoshina, O. V.; Voronov, V. N.; Nazarenko, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    Information about the development history of cycle chemistry monitoring systems is presented. The first pilot monitoring system at the Ryazan district power station is briefly described including the characteristics of the analyzers used in the system. The main principles for constructing monitoring systems are formulated. The characteristics of the monitoring systems that were designed and put in operation in the period from 2008 to 2011 are given together with a list of instruments and sample preparation devices used in them. The main advantages of modern analyzers used for chemical monitoring purposes are pointed out. Some problems affecting the operation of monitoring system equipment in the startup and transient operating modes of main power-generating equipment are specially mentioned.

  19. Rotordynamic Influence on Rolling ELement Bearing Selection and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.; Fleming, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Three case studies are presented that illustrate the importance of dynamic considerations in the design of machinery supported by rolling element bearings. The first case concerns a milling spindle that experienced internal rubs and high bearing loads, and required retrofit of an additional . damped bearing. The second case deals with a small high-speed generator that suffered high vibration due to flexible mounting. The third case is a propulsion fan simulator rig whose bearings failed catastrophically due to improper bearing installation (which resulted in inadequate dynamic bearing stiffness) and lack of health monitoring instrumentation.

  20. Understanding Why Terrorist Operations Succeed or Fail

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Operations Succeed or Fail della Porta , Donatella , “Left-Wing Terrorism in Italy,” in Martha Crenshaw, ed., Terrorism in Context, University Park, Pa...recognized for some time. For example, see discussion in della Porta , 1995 and Strinkowski, 1985, pp. 94–99, that explains the limits of hierarchical control

  1. Examination of a Failed Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Rachel L.; Penny, G. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Schools are using various forms of professional learning communities (PLCs) in order to increase student achievement and improve educational practices through enhanced communication and collaboration among teachers. This study examined a PLC that had too narrow a focus and failed therefore to affect student achievement. A critical shortcoming of…

  2. How to Make Innovations Succeed or Fail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Maurice R.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Maurice Ahrens, having interviewed teachers, principals, and supervisors presents a discussion of why some innovative changes in education failed and others succeeded. The purpose was to identify and discuss the reasons. [Excerpts from this article are reprinted from "Childhood Education" v49 n4 1973 in celebration of…

  3. Fail-safe bidirectional valve driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, H.

    1974-01-01

    Cross-coupled diodes are added to commonly used bidirectional valve driver circuit to protect circuit and power supply. Circuit may be used in systems requiring fail-safe bidirectional valve operation, particularly in chemical- and petroleum-processing control systems and computer-controlled hydraulic or pneumatic systems.

  4. Contested Spaces of a "Failing" Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawai, Roi; Serriere, Stephanie; Mitra, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Amid the recent proliferation of teacher-led movements resisting high-stakes testing across the United States, the authors identify how a "failing" elementary school reclaimed local discourse by taking political action against top-down measures. Framed as competing modes of school reform, the authors offer the sociocultural framework of…

  5. The Art of Saving a Failing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Les

    2012-01-01

    While the debate continues over whether to close failing schools or attempt fixing them, the author asserts that the solution most often lies in assigning strong leaders to them who will take definite and immediate action. Reviewing his own success turning around schools, he says creating a sense of urgency, unloading poor performing staff, and…

  6. The Art of Saving a Failing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Les

    2012-01-01

    While the debate continues over whether to close failing schools or attempt fixing them, the author asserts that the solution most often lies in assigning strong leaders to them who will take definite and immediate action. Reviewing his own success turning around schools, he says creating a sense of urgency, unloading poor performing staff, and…

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  8. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  10. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  11. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  12. Structural Health Monitoring of Repairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    monitoring, the monitoring system consists of several design elements with defined interfaces. The raw monitoring signals are generated by a sensor with...is directly connected or integrated in the structure or repair. In Figure 2.3-1, the design element 1 is showing a surface mounted sensor. The...aircraft bus system. The monitoring data from the bus system are transferred to the next design element (element 4), where an onboard processing

  13. Nonpoint Source Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Water quality monitoring for nonpoint sources of pollution includes the important element of relating the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of receiving waters to land use characteristics.

  14. Risk externalities and too big to fail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleb, Nassim N.; Tapiero, Charles S.

    2010-09-01

    This paper establishes the case for a fallacy of economies of scale in large aggregate institutions and the effects of scale risks. The problem of rogue trading and excessive risk taking is taken as a case example. Assuming (conservatively) that a firm exposure and losses are limited to its capital while external losses are unbounded, we establish a condition for a firm not to be allowed to be too big to fail. In such a case, the expected external losses second derivative with respect to the firm capital at risk is positive. Examples and analytical results are obtained based on simplifying assumptions and focusing exclusively on the risk externalities that firms too big to fail can have.

  15. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  16. Failed back surgery syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Baber, Zafeer; Erdek, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) can be equally challenging to surgeons, pain specialists, and primary care providers alike. The onset of FBSS occurs when surgery fails to treat the patient’s lumbar spinal pain. Minimizing the likelihood of FBSS is dependent on determining a clear etiology of the patient’s pain, recognizing those who are at high risk, and exhausting conservative measures before deciding to go into a revision surgery. The workup of FBSS includes a thorough history and physical examination, diagnostic imaging, and procedures. After determining the cause of FBSS, a multidisciplinary approach is preferred. This includes pharmacologic management of pain, physical therapy, and behavioral modification and may include therapeutic procedures such as injections, radiofrequency ablation, lysis of adhesions, spinal cord stimulation, and even reoperations. PMID:27853391

  17. When Chinese semantics meets failed syntax.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Zhang, Yaxu

    2008-05-07

    Previous event-related potential studies in Indo-European languages reported a surprising finding that failed syntactic category processing appears to block lexical-semantic integration, suggesting a functional primacy of syntax over semantics. An event-related potential experiment was conducted to test whether there is such primacy in Chinese sentence reading, using sentences containing either semantic only violations, combined syntactic category and semantic violations, or no violations. Semantic only violations elicited a centro-parietal negativity and combined violations a broadly distributed, but centro-parietally focused negativity, both in the 300-500 ms window and followed by a P600, suggesting that semantic integration proceeds even when syntactic category processing fails. Thus, there is no functional primacy of syntactic category over semantic processes during Chinese sentence reading.

  18. Trace elements in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Filler, Guido; Felder, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    In end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), pediatric nephrologists must consider the homeostasis of the multiple water-soluble ions that are influenced by renal replacement therapy (RRT). While certain ions such as potassium and calcium are closely monitored, little is known about the handling of trace elements in pediatric dialysis. RRT may lead to accumulation of toxic trace elements, either due to insufficient elimination or due to contamination, or to excessive removal of essential trace elements. However, trace elements are not routinely monitored in dialysis patients and no mechanism for these deficits or toxicities has been established. This review summarizes the handling of trace elements, with particular attention to pediatric data. The best data describe lead and indicate that there is a higher prevalence of elevated lead (Pb, atomic number 82) levels in children on RRT when compared to adults. Lead is particularly toxic in neurodevelopment and lead levels should therefore be monitored. Monitoring of zinc (Zn, atomic number 30) and selenium (Se, atomic number 34) may be indicated in the monitoring of all pediatric dialysis patients to reduce morbidity from deficiency. Prospective studies evaluating the impact of abnormal trace elements and the possible therapeutic value of intervention are required.

  19. Pass-Fail: How Is It Working?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Clinton I.; And Others

    This study investigates the pass/fail (P/F) grading system. A sample of 154 Indiana University students was interviewed. Half of the group, 77 students, had not taken any P/F courses. Of the remaining 77 students, 42% had taken only one P/F course and most of the rest from two to five courses. Results of the student interview questionnaire…

  20. Neurolysis for failed tarsal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Yalcinkaya, Merter; Ozer, Utku Erdem; Yalcin, M Burak; Bagatur, A Erdem

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the causes of failure after tarsal tunnel release and the operative findings in the secondary interventions and the outcomes. The data from 8 patients who had undergone revision surgery for failed tarsal tunnel release at least 12 months earlier were evaluated retrospectively. Only the patients with idiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome were included, and all had unilateral symptoms. Neurophysiologic tests confirmed the clinical diagnosis of failed tarsal tunnel release in all patients. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed varicose veins within the tarsal tunnel in 1 patient (12.5%) and tenosynovitis in another (12.5%). Open tarsal tunnel release was performed in all patients, and the tibialis posterior nerve, medial and lateral plantar nerves (including the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve), and medial calcaneal nerve were released in their respective tunnels, and the septum between the tunnels was resected. The outcomes were assessed according to subjective patient satisfaction as excellent, good, fair, or poor. During revision surgery, insufficient release of the tarsal tunnel, especially distally, was observed in all the patients, and fibrosis of the tibialis posterior nerve was present in 1 (12.5%). The outcomes according to subjective patient satisfaction were excellent in 5 (62.5%), good in 2 (25%), and fair in 1 (12.5%). The fair outcome was obtained in the patient with fibrosis of the nerve. Insufficient release of the tarsal tunnel was the main cause of failed tarsal tunnel release. Releasing the 4 distinct tunnels and permitting immediate mobilization provided satisfactory results in patients with failed tarsal tunnel release.

  1. Pass-Fail: How Is It Working?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Clinton I.; And Others

    This study investigates the pass/fail (P/F) grading system. A sample of 154 Indiana University students was interviewed. Half of the group, 77 students, had not taken any P/F courses. Of the remaining 77 students, 42% had taken only one P/F course and most of the rest from two to five courses. Results of the student interview questionnaire…

  2. Ion Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2003-11-18

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  3. 48 CFR 342.7002 - Procedures to be followed when a contractor fails to perform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures to be followed when a contractor fails to perform. 342.7002 Section 342.7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION Contract Monitoring...

  4. Revision of failed arthroscopic bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Domenick J

    2007-04-01

    The results following open revision surgery following a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure are not well documented. To evaluate the results of patients with a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair treated with a traditional, open Bankart repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients (28 male and 2 female) who had a mean age of 24 years (range 15-36) at the time of operation were evaluated. The mean interval from the time of the operation to the final follow-up was 46 months (range 24-55). The rating systems of Rowe and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) were recorded preoperatively and at the time of the final evaluation. After open repair, mean modified Rowe scores improved from 25 preoperatively to 84.2 points. The results were excellent in 2 (6.7%), good in 24 (80%), and fair in 4 (13.3%); there were no poor results. The UCLA shoulder score improved from a mean of 17 points preoperatively to 29 points (P = .001 for all comparisons). Twenty-six patients (87%) did not have an anchor placement inferior to the 4-o'clock position for a right shoulder or the 8-o'clock position for the left shoulder after the index arthroscopic repair. There were no rotator interval closures performed at the index arthroscopic Bankart repair, and 10 patients (33%) required an interval closure at the open revision procedure. Twenty-five patients (83%) immobilized the operated arm in a sling for less than 2 weeks following the index arthroscopic repair. Patients with failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs can be successfully treated with a revision, open Bankart repair. Inadequate postoperative immobilization, large rotator intervals, and improper anchor placement are possible risk factors that may increase the incidence of failure of an arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  5. Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis for failed keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Hager, Jonathan L; Phillips, David L; Goins, Kenneth M; Kitzmann, Anna S; Greiner, Mark A; Cohen, Alex W; Welder, Jeffrey D; Wagoner, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (Kpro-1) in eyes with failed keratoplasty. A retrospective review was performed of every patient treated with a Kpro-1 at a tertiary eye care center between January 1, 2008 and July 1, 2013. Eyes with a failed keratoplasty originally performed for corneal edema, trauma, or keratoconus were included in the statistical analysis. The main outcome measures were visual outcome, prosthesis retention, and postoperative complications. Twenty-four eyes met the inclusion criteria, including 13 eyes with corneal edema, 8 eyes with trauma, and 3 eyes with keratoconus. After a mean follow-up period of 28.9 months (range 7-63 months), the median best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/125. The BCVA was ≥ 20/40 in 4 (16.7 %) eyes, ≥ 20/70 in 9 (37.5 %) eyes, and ≥ 20/200 in 14 (58.3 %) eyes. Overall, the postoperative BCVA improved in 17 (70.9 %) eyes, was unchanged in 3 (12.5 %) eyes, and was worse in 4 (16.7 %) eyes. The initial Kpro-1 was retained in 22 (91.7 %) eyes, and was successfully repeated in the other 2 eyes. One or more serious prosthesis- or sight-threatening complications occurred in 8 (33.3 %) eyes. These included 1 case of wound dehiscence leading to prosthesis extrusion, 1 case of fungal keratitis leading to prosthesis extrusion, 4 cases of endophthalmitis, and 5 retinal detachments. The Boston Kpro-1 is associated with an excellent prognosis for prosthesis retention and satisfactory visual improvement in eyes with previous failed keratoplasty.

  6. Utilization of laser-assisted analytical methods for monitoring of lead and nutrition elements distribution in fresh and dried Capsicum annuum l. leaves.

    PubMed

    Galiová, Michaela; Kaiser, Jozef; Novotný, Karel; Hartl, Martin; Kizek, Rene; Babula, Petr

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) have been applied for high-resolution mapping of accumulation and distribution of heavy metal (lead) and nutrition elements (potassium, manganese) in leaves of Capsicum annuum L. samples. Lead was added in a form of Pb(NO₃)₂ at concentration up to 10 mmol L⁻¹ into the vessels that contained tap water and where the 2-months old Capsicum annuum L. plants were grown another seven days. Two dimensional maps of the elements are presented for both laser-assisted analytical methods. Elemental mapping performed on fresh (frozen) and dried Capsicum annuum L. leaves are compared. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Computer Programming: Fail Fast to Learn Sooner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Miguel A.; de Sá-Soares, Filipe

    Computer programming is not only to know about the languages or the processes, it is essentially to know how to do it. This involves a constructivist approach in learning. For a newbie in computer programming it is hard to understand the difference between know-about disciplines and the know-how-to-do-it ones. This leads to failure because when they understand they aren't able to solve a programming problem it is usually too late to catch all the time meanwhile lost. Our solution is to get them to fail soon enough. This way they still have time to recover from an eventually bad start.

  8. Al Qaeda Refining a Failing Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    ndupress .ndu.edu issue 51, 4th quarter 2008 / JFQ 117 Al Qaeda Refining a Failing Strategy By M a r t i n J . H a r t Martin J. Hart is an...weak efforts to organize Damage to Pentagon after September 11 attack 1s t C om ba t C am er a S qu ad ro n (C ed ric H . R ud is ill) Report...defeatism.7 Al Qaeda believes such violence can radicalize the Muslim population in a way that simple proselytizing cannot. Naji , for example, calls

  9. The evaluation of the failed shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Brett P; Moravek, James E; Wiater, J Michael

    2014-05-01

    As the incidence of shoulder arthroplasty continues to rise, the orthopedic shoulder surgeon will be increasingly faced with the difficult problem of evaluating a failed shoulder arthroplasty. The patient is usually dissatisfied with the outcome of the previous arthroplasty as a result of pain, but may complain of poor function due to limited range of motion or instability. A thorough and systematic approach is necessary so that the most appropriate treatment pathway can be initiated. A comprehensive history and physical examination are the first steps in the evaluation. Diagnostic studies are numerous and include laboratory values, plain radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound imaging, joint aspiration, nuclear scans, and electromyography. Common causes of early pain after shoulder arthroplasty include technical issues related to the surgery, such as malposition or improper sizing of the prosthesis, periprosthetic infection, neurologic injury, and complex regional pain syndrome. Pain presenting after a symptom-free interval may be related to chronic periprosthetic infection, component wear and loosening, glenoid erosion, rotator cuff degeneration, and fracture. Poor range of motion may result from inadequate postoperative rehabilitation, implant-related factors, and heterotopic ossification. Instability is generally caused by rotator cuff deficiency and implant-related factors. Unfortunately, determining the cause of a failed shoulder arthroplasty can be difficult, and in many situations, the source of pain and disability is multifactorial.

  10. Failed internal fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik; Opsahl, Jan-Henrik; Stiris, Morten; Paulsrud, Øyvind; Strømsøe, Knut

    2012-06-12

    There are two types of surgical treatment for fractures of the femoral neck; internal fixation and arthroplasty. Internal fixation is associated with a higher risk of complications such as secondary displacement, non-union and avascular necrosis. To improve treatment results of internal fixation, we have tried to identify procedure related risk-factors associated with fixation failure. A retrospective study was conducted based on the medical records and X-ray images of 337 patients sustaining intracapsular fractures of the hip during the period 1999-2000. The patients were treated with closed reduction and internal fixation at Oslo University Hospital, Aker. The reduction of the fracture and the placement of the fixation implants were evaluated and scored (six points representing best achievable result). Fixation failed in 23 (18,3 %) out of 126 patients with displaced fractures awarded six points for the reduction. In contrast, fixation failed in five (50 %) out of ten patients given a score of three points or less (p = 0.017). The risk of non-union increased when patients were treated more than 48 hours after the initial injury. In this group, 5 (25 %) out of 20 patients developed non-union compared to 16 (8 %) out of 200 patients treated within 48 hours (p = 0.014). Our findings emphasize the importance of achieving anatomical reduction of displaced femoral neck fractures, and to perform surgery within 48 hours unless an acute medical condition needs to be stabilized.

  11. Triacylglycerol turnover in the failing heart.

    PubMed

    Carley, Andrew N; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2016-10-01

    No longer regarded as physiologically inert the endogenous triacylglyceride (TAG) pool within the cardiomyocyte is now recognized to play a dynamic role in metabolic regulation. Beyond static measures of content, the relative rates of interconversion among acyl intermediates are more closely linked to dynamic processes of physiological function in normal and diseased hearts, with the potential for both adaptive and maladaptive contributions. Indeed, multiple inefficiencies in cardiac metabolism have been identified in the decompensated, hypertrophied and failing heart. Among the intracellular responses to physiological, metabolic and pathological stresses, TAG plays a central role in the balance of lipid handling and signaling mechanisms. TAG dynamics are profoundly altered from normal in both diabetic and pathologically stressed hearts. More than just expansion or contraction of the stored lipid pool, the turnover rates of TAG are sensitive to and compete against other enzymatic pathways, anabolic and catabolic, for reactive acyl-CoA units. The rates of TAG synthesis and lipolysis thusly affect multiple components of cardiomyocyte function, including energy metabolism, cell signaling, and enzyme activation, as well as the regulation of gene expression in both normal and diseased states. This review examines the multiple etiologies and metabolic consequences of the failing heart and the central role of lipid storage dynamics in the pathogenic process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation in the failing heart

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie L.; Martin, Ola J.; Lai, Ling; Richards, Alicia L.; Vega, Rick B.; Leone, Teresa C.; Pagliarini, David J.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Bedi, Kenneth C.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fuel and energy metabolic derangements contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. Recent evidence implicates posttranslational mechanisms in the energy metabolic disturbances that contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. We hypothesized that accumulation of metabolite intermediates of fuel oxidation pathways drives posttranslational modifications of mitochondrial proteins during the development of heart failure. Myocardial acetylproteomics demonstrated extensive mitochondrial protein lysine hyperacetylation in the early stages of heart failure in well-defined mouse models and the in end-stage failing human heart. To determine the functional impact of increased mitochondrial protein acetylation, we focused on succinate dehydrogenase A (SDHA), a critical component of both the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and respiratory complex II. An acetyl-mimetic mutation targeting an SDHA lysine residue shown to be hyperacetylated in the failing human heart reduced catalytic function and reduced complex II–driven respiration. These results identify alterations in mitochondrial acetyl-CoA homeostasis as a potential driver of the development of energy metabolic derangements that contribute to heart failure. PMID:26998524

  13. Removal of failed crown and bridge

    PubMed Central

    Rahul, G R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Crown and bridge have life span of many years but they fail for a number of reasons. Over the years, many devices have been designed to remove crowns and bridges from abutment teeth. While the removal of temporary crowns and bridges is usually very straightforward, the removal of a definitive cast crown with unknown cement is more challenging. Removal is often by destructive means. There are a number of circumstances, however, in which conservative disassembly would aid the practitioner in completing restorative/endodontic procedures. There are different mechanisms available to remove a failed crown or bridge. But there is no information published about the classification of available systems for crown and bridge removal. So it is logical to classify these systems into different groups which can help a clinician in choosing a particular type of system depending upon the clinical situation. The aim of this article is to provide a classification for various crown and bridge removal systems; describe how a number of systems work; and when and why they might be used. A PubMed search of English literature was conducted up to January 2010 using the terms: Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure. Additionally, the bibliographies of 3 previous reviews, their cross references as well as articles published in various journals like International Endodontic Journal, Journal of Endodontics and were manually searched. Key words:Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure. PMID:24558549

  14. Removal of failed crown and bridge.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G R; Poduval, Soorya T; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-07-01

    Crown and bridge have life span of many years but they fail for a number of reasons. Over the years, many devices have been designed to remove crowns and bridges from abutment teeth. While the removal of temporary crowns and bridges is usually very straightforward, the removal of a definitive cast crown with unknown cement is more challenging. Removal is often by destructive means. There are a number of circumstances, however, in which conservative disassembly would aid the practitioner in completing restorative/endodontic procedures. There are different mechanisms available to remove a failed crown or bridge. But there is no information published about the classification of available systems for crown and bridge removal. So it is logical to classify these systems into different groups which can help a clinician in choosing a particular type of system depending upon the clinical situation. The aim of this article is to provide a classification for various crown and bridge removal systems; describe how a number of systems work; and when and why they might be used. A PubMed search of English literature was conducted up to January 2010 using the terms: Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure. Additionally, the bibliographies of 3 previous reviews, their cross references as well as articles published in various journals like International Endodontic Journal, Journal of Endodontics and were manually searched. Key words:Crown and bridge removal, Crown and bridge disassembly, Crown and bridge failure.

  15. APPLICATION OF A DUAL FINE PARTICLE SEQUENTIAL SAMPLER, A TAPERED ELEMENT OSCILLATING MICROBALANCE, AND OTHER AIR MONITORING METHODS TO ASSESS TRANSBOUNDARY INFLUENCE OF PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transboundary influences of paniculate matter less than or equal to 2.5 um in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5,) have been investigated in a U.S.-Mexican border region using a dual fine particle sequential sampler (DFPSS) and tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). Daily me...

  16. APPLICATION OF A DUAL FINE PARTICLE SEQUENTIAL SAMPLER, A TAPERED ELEMENT OSCILLATING MICROBALANCE, AND OTHER AIR MONITORING METHODS TO ASSESS TRANSBOUNDARY INFLUENCE OF PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transboundary influences of paniculate matter less than or equal to 2.5 um in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5,) have been investigated in a U.S.-Mexican border region using a dual fine particle sequential sampler (DFPSS) and tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). Daily me...

  17. What do we do after an implant fails? A review of treatment alternatives for failed implants.

    PubMed

    Machtei, Eli E

    2013-01-01

    The problem of failed implants cannot be overlooked. The purpose of this paper is to explore treatment alternatives for failed implants and their strengths and shortcomings. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed and a manual search. Only five studies were identified that explored treatment in sites where implants had failed. In all five studies, the treatment alternative tested was the placement of a new implant in the failed site. The overall survival rate for such implants ranged from 71% to 92.3%. Four other alternatives are also discussed in light of data derived from other studies on the survival of various treatment strategies. These include: a continuation of the original plan using the remaining implants, modification of treatment to a tooth-supported fixed partial denture (FPD) or to a hybrid tooth-implant? supported FPD, or modification to a removable prosthesis. The selection of an appropriate alternative for failed implants is complex and involves biologic, mechanical, and psychologic considerations along with financial aspects. This should be a team decision with the patient's opinion included.

  18. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    DOEpatents

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  19. A simplified soil extraction sequence to monitor the main and trace element speciation in soil after compost and mineral fertilizer additions upon the composition of wheat grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Manfred; Erhart, Eva

    2016-04-01

    High quality biological waste treatment aims at producing compost in order to maintain a clean environment and to sustain soil organic carbon levels. Fertilization with compost as a source of organic carbon, nutrients, and accessory elements, as well as fertilization with mineral N- and PK fertilizer have been tested in a field experiment on a calcaric Fluvisol in the Danube wetlands, at 4 levels each. Yields of wheat were recorded, and grains and soils were sampled from each treatment, and analyzed for main and trace element composition. The corresponding soils were characterized by mobile phases, obtained by leaching with 0,16M acetic acid to cover exchangeables plus carbonates, and subsequently by 0,1M oxalate buffer pH 3 to dissolve the pedogenic oxides. Total amounts were obtained from digests with perchloric- nitric-hydrofluoric acid. For quasi-total amounts, aqua regia was replaced by pressure decomposition with KClO3 in dilute nitric acid. The proposed extraction sequence permits to analyze and interpret soil for main elements, trace elements, nutrients and anions simultaneously. Factor analyses of soil extracts obtained from dilute acetic acid revealed Ba-Be-Cd-Cu-Li-S (traces), Ca-Mg-Mn (main carbonates), Al-Fe-B, Y, and P-K (nutrients) as chemically feasible principal components. Subsequent soil extracts from oxalate contained Al-B-Co-K-Na-Pb-Si-V-S (maybe acid silicate weathering), Cr-Li-Ni-Sr-Ti (maybe basic silicate weathering), Be-Cu-Fe-P, Co-Mg-Mn-Zn (Mn-oxides) and Ba-Sc as principal components. Factor analyses of total element data distinguished the principal components Ce-La-Li-Sc-Y-P (rare earths), Al-Ca-Fe-K-Mg-Na-P (main elements), Cd-Co-Cr-Cu-Ni-Zn (trace elements), As-Pb (contaminants), Ba-Mn-Sr, and Ti, which looks chemically feasible also. Factor analyses of those soil fractions which presumably form the main fractions of exchangeables, carbonates, pedogenic oxides and silicates, showed no cross connections, except for P. Oxalate

  20. A Solution to ``Too Big to Fail''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-10-01

    Its a tricky business to reconcile simulations of our galaxys formation with our current observations of the Milky Way and its satellites. In a recent study, scientists have addressed one discrepancy between simulations and observations: the so-called to big to fail problem.From Missing Satellites to Too Big to FailThe favored model of the universe is the lambda-cold-dark-matter (CDM) cosmological model. This model does a great job of correctly predicting the large-scale structure of the universe, but there are still a few problems with it on smaller scales.Hubble image of UGC 5497, a dwarf galaxy associated with Messier 81. In the missing satellite problem, simulations of galaxy formation predict that there should be more such satellite galaxies than we observe. [ESA/NASA]The first is the missing satellites problem: CDM cosmology predicts that galaxies like the Milky Way should have significantly more satellite galaxies than we observe. A proposed solution to this problem is the argument that there may exist many more satellites than weve observed, but these dwarf galaxies have had their stars stripped from them during tidal interactions which prevents us from being able to see them.This solution creates a new problem, though: the too big to fail problem. This problem states that many of the satellites predicted by CDM cosmology are simply so massive that theres no way they couldnt have visible stars. Another way of looking at it: the observed satellites of the Milky Way are not massive enough to be consistent with predictions from CDM.Artists illustration of a supernova, a type of stellar feedback that can modify the dark-matter distribution of a satellite galaxy. [NASA/CXC/M. Weiss]Density Profiles and Tidal StirringLed by Mihai Tomozeiu (University of Zurich), a team of scientists has published a study in which they propose a solution to the too big to fail problem. By running detailed cosmological zoom simulations of our galaxys formation, Tomozeiu and

  1. Why does informed consent fail? A discourse analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Ness, David E; Kiesling, Scott F; Lidz, Charles W

    2009-01-01

    Informed consent often fails to meet the intended goals that a prospective subject should understand fully and choose autonomously to participate in research. The current study is an attempt to understand such failures by applying linguistic methods of discourse analysis to the transcripts of informed consent interviews. Elements of conversation and of the frame of discourse were analyzed to understand how the participants shaped their spoken interaction during the interview. We looked at the degree to which the subject appeared to be fully informed, at the problem of therapeutic misconception, and at the degree to which the subject was helped to explore concerns relevant to the choice at hand. We found that lapses or miscommunications could be understood specifically in terms of conversational elements and framing. This kind of detailed, language-based analysis is an alternative to approaches that are more abstract and inferential, such as those that are based upon the attitudes or the cognitive performance of speakers. We discuss possible educational and research implications of this approach.

  2. Metasomatic Reaction Zones as Monitors of Trace Element Transfer at the Slab-Mantle Interface: the Case of the Hochwart Peridotite (Ulten Zone, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchi, M.; Hermann, J.; Bargossi, G. M.; Mair, V.; Morten, L.

    2006-12-01

    Ultramafic blocks belonging to the Hochwart peridotite outcrop (Ulten Zone, Italian Alps) preserve a series of metasomatic mineral zones generated by infiltration of Si-rich hydrous fluids which occurred at the gneiss- peridotite interface. The age of the high pressure metamorphism for the Hochwart complex has been constrained at 330 Ma (Tumiati et al., 2003, EPSL, 210, 509-526). The country rocks are stromatic gneisses consisting mainly of quartz, K-feldspar, garnet, kyanite, biotite and muscovite. The ultramafic body consists of strongly serpentinized metaperidotites which are exposed as a hectometre-size lens along a steep gully, associated to monomineralic zones that developed at the contact between the peridotite body and the garnet gneiss country rocks. The composition of the metasomatic zones has been investigated in detail and records an order of metasomatic zoning formed by phlogopite-rich to tremolite-anthophyllite-rich rocks going from the host gneiss towards the peridotite. In some cases, the ultramafics fade into the gneisses developing serpentine and talc which has replaced, presumably at lower temperatures, the serpentine matrix and occurs in association with chlorite. Phlogopite aggregates (phlogopitite) with accessory minerals (quartz + zircon + apatite) and metabasic pods (phlogopite and hornblende) also occur. Black tourmaline (schorl-dravite solid solution) has been found for the first time in the contact near the phlogopite zone, suggesting an external addition of elements (boron and fluorine) to the system at high temperature. The formation of the metasomatic zones composed exclusively of hydrous phases must have involved extensive H2O-metasomatism as already documented for the Ulten peridotites. The source for these fluids can be a system of trondhjemitic-pegmatitic dikes cutting the peridotite that would have channelled aqueous fluids into the ultramafic rocks. Whole-rock geochemistry and trace element (LA ICP-MS) composition of hydrous

  3. The best argument against kidney sales fails.

    PubMed

    Semrau, Luke

    2015-06-01

    Simon Rippon has recently argued against kidney markets on the grounds that introducing the option to vend will result in many people, especially the poor, being subject to harmful pressure to vend. Though compelling, Rippon's argument fails. What he takes to be a single phenomenon-social and legal pressure to vend-is actually two. Only one of these forms of pressure is, by Rippon's own account, harmful. Further, an empirically informed view of the regulated market suggests that this harmful pressure is easily avoided. Thus, the harm that is the lynchpin of Rippon's opposition is neither a necessary feature of the market nor is it likely to play a significant role in its operation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Fail-over file transfer process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semancik, Susan K. (Inventor); Conger, Annette M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides a fail-over file transfer process to handle data file transfer when the transfer is unsuccessful in order to avoid unnecessary network congestion and enhance reliability in an automated data file transfer system. If a file cannot be delivered after attempting to send the file to a receiver up to a preset number of times, and the receiver has indicated the availability of other backup receiving locations, then the file delivery is automatically attempted to one of the backup receiving locations up to the preset number of times. Failure of the file transfer to one of the backup receiving locations results in a failure notification being sent to the receiver, and the receiver may retrieve the file from the location indicated in the failure notification when ready.

  5. Future technologies to address the failed endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Deaton, David H

    2009-06-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has transformed therapy for aortic aneurysms and introduced an era of widespread use for endovascular procedures in a variety of vascular beds. While dramatic improvements in acute outcomes drove the early enthusiasm for EVAR, a realization that the integrity of the endoprostheses used for EVAR was significantly inferior to results obtained with open surgical reconstruction dampened enthusiasm for their use in low-risk patients and mandated long-term follow-up for EVAR patients. The future of EVAR as a primary approach to aortic aneurysm repair rests on development of technologies and techniques that can reproduce the foundations and, therefore, the results of open surgical reconstruction. Many of these technologies will be used initially to address the failing endoprostheses, but will have a larger role in their application as a primary component of EVAR.

  6. Terrestrial-passage theory: failing a test.

    PubMed

    Reed, Charles F; Krupinski, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    Terrestrial-passage theory proposes that the 'moon' and 'sky' illusions occur because observers learn to expect an elevation-dependent transformation of visual angle. The transformation accompanies daily movement through ordinary environments of fixed-altitude objects. Celestial objects display the same visual angle at all elevations, and hence are necessarily non-conforming with the ordinary transformation. On hypothesis, observers should target angular sizes to appear greater at elevation than at horizon. However, in a sample of forty-eight observers there was no significant difference between the perceived angular size of a constellation of stars at horizon and that predicted for a specific elevation. Occurrence of the illusion was not restricted to those observers who expected angular expansion. These findings fail to support the terrestrial-passage theory of the illusion.

  7. When continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) fails

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is increasingly prevalent, particularly in the context of the obesity epidemic, and is associated with a significant social, health and economic impact. The gold standard of treatment for moderate to severe OSA is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However compliance rates can be low. Methodology to improve patient tolerance to CPAP alongside with alternative, non-surgical and surgical, management strategies are discussed. All patients that fail CPAP therapy would benefit from formal upper airway evaluation by the otolaryngologist to identify any obvious causes and consider site-specific surgical therapies. Patient selection is integral to ensuring successful outcomes. A multidisciplinary team is needed to manage these patients. PMID:27867577

  8. New anticoagulants – promising and failed developments

    PubMed Central

    Harenberg, Job; Marx, Svetlana; Krejczy, Martin; Wehling, Martin

    2012-01-01

    New direct and indirect acting factor Xa (FXa) and thrombin inhibitors are being developed to overcome the downsides of the conventional anticoagulants – unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins and vitamin K antagonists. Ximelagatran and idraparinux failed to demonstrate an acceptable safety profile. Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are approved for the post-operative prevention of thromboembolic complications after elective hip or knee replacement surgery; dabigatran is approved for the prevention of embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation in an increasing number of countries. Several novel indirect antithrombin-dependent anticoagulants as well as antithrombin-independent oral direct FXa and thrombin inhibitors are investigated in multiple indications for the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism and the prophylaxis of arterial thrombotic disorders. Quality-adjusted life years costs and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios are relatively high at present, but may decrease after approval of more new anticoagulants for additional indications. PMID:21740405

  9. Mercury (II) sensor based on monitoring dissociation rate of the trans-acting factor MerR from cis-element by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masaki; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2015-05-15

    Transcriptional switches regulate gene expression in response to environmental changes surrounding cell. Many studies have focused on two fundamentally different models of transcriptional control by bacterial metalloregulatory protein. Distortion of the DNA fragment including cis-element, to which the trans-acting factor MerR binds, is accepted as the mechanism of gene expression regulation by Hg (II) while, in cases of the other trans-acting factors ArsR and CadC, events of association to and dissociation from cis-element are known to control transcription in response to As (III) and Cd (II), respectively. In this study, interactions between green-fluorescent-protein-tagged trans-acting factor and immobilized cis-element were analyzed on solid surface. Fluorescent measurements and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) responses revealed that although the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) was much lower in MerR than in ArsR and CadC, the dissociation rate of MerR from DNA increased in response to Hg (II) at concentrations of 5-10(4) µg l(-1). These results firstly demonstrate an increase of KD between MerR and its recognition site in DNA by Hg (II), and possibility of rapid Hg (II) quantification with the low detection limit (5 µg l(-1)) and the high dynamic range (10(1)-10(4) µg l(-1)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Revision of Failed Artroscopic Bankart Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, José María Silberberg; Gimenez, Martín Alejandro; Salvucci, Mauro Gabriel Maroa; Ferro, Diego; Rullan, Ramón Muiña

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To present our functional outcomes from patients treated arthroscopically for a failed Bankart repair, using suture anchors and capsulolabral tissue only. Methods: Series of 22 patients presented with a recurrence of instability after a previous stabilization surgery (3 Latarjet, Bankart 19). We treated them by a an all-arthroscopic procedure, avoiding bone grafts, when glenoid track was found to be enough to proceed. The failure was associated with trauma in 11 patients, a non-anatomic repair in 6 patients, capsular laxity in 4 patients and a non-union of the coracoid graft in 1 patient. Revision surgery included: Bankart repair with anchors in 17 cases, a posterior-inferior capsulo-labral plication in one case, and 5 remplissages. In 4 cases subscapularis augmentation was used because of poor capsular quality. Screw removal was necessary when treating the non-union case. Patients were followed-up by a minimum of 23 months (range 23-26), and evaluated by the UCLA Test, SS test and Rowe score. Results: Thirteen patients had an excellent result, 6 good, 2 satisfactory and one bad result, according to UCLA score. The mean Rowe score was 90.4, at final follow up. The Simple Shoulder Test went from an 8 preoperative to an 11 postoperative, mean scores. 19 of 22 patients returned to the same level of activity prior to the injury. Complications: recurrence in 2 cases, subluxation in 2 and one shoulder stiffness that required an arthrolysis. Conclusion: An arthroscopic revision surgery, after a failed Bankart repair, presents satisfactory results in selected patients. Arthroscopic vision allows a correct diagnosis of injuries as possible causes of failure and subsequent treatment.

  11. Autonomous Component Health Management with Failed Component Detection, Identification, and Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert N.; Polites, Michael E.; Trevino, Luis C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a novel scheme for autonomous component health management (ACHM) with failed actuator detection and failed sensor detection, identification, and avoidance. This new scheme has features that far exceed the performance of systems with triple-redundant sensing and voting, yet requires fewer sensors and could be applied to any system with redundant sensing. Relevant background to the ACHM scheme is provided, and the simulation results for the application of that scheme to a single-axis spacecraft attitude control system with a 3rd order plant and dual-redundant measurement of system states are presented. ACHM fulfills key functions needed by an integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) system. It is: autonomous; adaptive; works in realtime; provides optimal state estimation; identifies failed components; avoids failed components; reconfigures for multiple failures; reconfigures for intermittent failures; works for hard-over, soft, and zero-output failures; and works for both open- and closed-loop systems. The ACHM scheme combines a prefilter that generates preliminary state estimates, detects and identifies failed sensors and actuators, and avoids the use of failed sensors in state estimation with a fixed-gain Kalman filter that generates optimal state estimates and provides model-based state estimates that comprise an integral part of the failure detection logic. The results show that ACHM successfully isolates multiple persistent and intermittent hard-over, soft, and zero-output failures. It is now ready to be tested on a computer model of an actual system.

  12. Autonomous Component Health Management with Failed Component Detection, Identification, and Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert N.; Polites, Michael E.; Trevino, Luis C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a novel scheme for autonomous component health management (ACHM) with failed actuator detection and failed sensor detection, identification, and avoidance. This new scheme has features that far exceed the performance of systems with triple-redundant sensing and voting, yet requires fewer sensors and could be applied to any system with redundant sensing. Relevant background to the ACHM scheme is provided, and the simulation results for the application of that scheme to a single-axis spacecraft attitude control system with a 3rd order plant and dual-redundant measurement of system states are presented. ACHM fulfills key functions needed by an integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) system. It is: autonomous; adaptive; works in realtime; provides optimal state estimation; identifies failed components; avoids failed components; reconfigures for multiple failures; reconfigures for intermittent failures; works for hard-over, soft, and zero-output failures; and works for both open- and closed-loop systems. The ACHM scheme combines a prefilter that generates preliminary state estimates, detects and identifies failed sensors and actuators, and avoids the use of failed sensors in state estimation with a fixed-gain Kalman filter that generates optimal state estimates and provides model-based state estimates that comprise an integral part of the failure detection logic. The results show that ACHM successfully isolates multiple persistent and intermittent hard-over, soft, and zero-output failures. It is now ready to be tested on a computer model of an actual system.

  13. Classification between Failed Nodes and Left Nodes in Mobile Asset Tracking Systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Jin, Jae-Yeon; Jin, Seong-Il

    2016-02-18

    Medical asset tracking systems track a medical device with a mobile node and determine its status as either in or out, because it can leave a monitoring area. Due to a failed node, this system may decide that a mobile asset is outside the area, even though it is within the area. In this paper, an efficient classification method is proposed to separate mobile nodes disconnected from a wireless sensor network between nodes with faults and a node that actually has left the monitoring region. The proposed scheme uses two trends extracted from the neighboring nodes of a disconnected mobile node. First is the trend in a series of the neighbor counts; the second is that of the ratios of the boundary nodes included in the neighbors. Based on such trends, the proposed method separates failed nodes from mobile nodes that are disconnected from a wireless sensor network without failures. The proposed method is evaluated using both real data generated from a medical asset tracking system and also using simulations with the network simulator (ns-2). The experimental results show that the proposed method correctly differentiates between failed nodes and nodes that are no longer in the monitoring region, including the cases that the conventional methods fail to detect.

  14. Classification between Failed Nodes and Left Nodes in Mobile Asset Tracking Systems †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Jin, Jae-Yeon; Jin, Seong-il

    2016-01-01

    Medical asset tracking systems track a medical device with a mobile node and determine its status as either in or out, because it can leave a monitoring area. Due to a failed node, this system may decide that a mobile asset is outside the area, even though it is within the area. In this paper, an efficient classification method is proposed to separate mobile nodes disconnected from a wireless sensor network between nodes with faults and a node that actually has left the monitoring region. The proposed scheme uses two trends extracted from the neighboring nodes of a disconnected mobile node. First is the trend in a series of the neighbor counts; the second is that of the ratios of the boundary nodes included in the neighbors. Based on such trends, the proposed method separates failed nodes from mobile nodes that are disconnected from a wireless sensor network without failures. The proposed method is evaluated using both real data generated from a medical asset tracking system and also using simulations with the network simulator (ns-2). The experimental results show that the proposed method correctly differentiates between failed nodes and nodes that are no longer in the monitoring region, including the cases that the conventional methods fail to detect. PMID:26901200

  15. Student Discontinuations: Is the System Failing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSherry, Wilfred; Marland, Glenn R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses factors associated with fairness and equity in relation to student discontinuation in nursing education. Shows how discontinuation is an integral part of higher education quality reviews. Promotes pre-exit counseling, monitoring of attrition, and review of academic and professional standards. (SK)

  16. Proteomic analysis of membrane microdomains derived from both failing and non-failing human hearts.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Cristina; Brioschi, Maura; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Fratto, Pasquale; Polvani, Gianluca; Vitali, Ettore; Parolari, Alessandro; Mussoni, Luciana; Tremoli, Elena

    2006-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells plasma membranes are organized into microdomains of specialized function such as lipid rafts and caveolae, with a specific lipid composition highly enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. In addition to their role in regulating signal transduction, multiple functions have been proposed, such as anchorage of receptors, trafficking of cholesterol, and regulation of permeability. However, an extensive understanding of their protein composition in human heart, both in failing and non-failing conditions, is not yet available. Membrane microdomains were isolated from left ventricular tissue of both failing (n = 15) and non-failing (n = 15) human hearts. Protein composition and differential protein expression was explored by comparing series of 2-D maps and subsequent identification by LC-MS/MS analysis. Data indicated that heart membrane microdomains are enriched in chaperones, cytoskeletal-associated proteins, enzymes and protein involved in signal transduction pathway. In addition, differential protein expression profile revealed that 30 proteins were specifically up- or down-regulated in human heart failure membrane microdomains. This study resulted in the identification of human heart membrane microdomain protein composition, which was not previously available. Moreover, it allowed the identification of multiple proteins whose expression is altered in heart failure, thus opening new perspectives to determine which role they may play in this disease.

  17. Are "Failing" Schools Really Failing? Using Seasonal Comparison to Evaluate School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Douglas B.; von Hippel, Paul T.; Hughes, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    To many, it seems obvious which schools are failing--schools whose students perform poorly on achievement tests. But since evaluating schools on achievement mixes the effects of school and nonschool influences, achievement-based evaluation likely underestimates the effectiveness of schools that serve disadvantaged populations. In this article, the…

  18. Automated information-analytical system for thunderstorm monitoring and early warning alarms using modern physical sensors and information technologies with elements of artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyreff, Anton S.; Bespalov, Dmitry A.; Adzhiev, Anatoly Kh.

    2017-05-01

    Methods of artificial intelligence are a good solution for weather phenomena forecasting. They allow to process a large amount of diverse data. Recirculation Neural Networks is implemented in the paper for the system of thunderstorm events prediction. Large amounts of experimental data from lightning sensors and electric field mills networks are received and analyzed. The average recognition accuracy of sensor signals is calculated. It is shown that Recirculation Neural Networks is a promising solution in the forecasting of thunderstorms and weather phenomena, characterized by the high efficiency of the recognition elements of the sensor signals, allows to compress images and highlight their characteristic features for subsequent recognition.

  19. Unrecognized failed airway management using a supraglottic airway device.

    PubMed

    Vithalani, Veer D; Vlk, Sabrina; Davis, Steven Q; Richmond, Neal J

    2017-10-01

    911 Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems utilize supraglottic devices for either primary advanced airway management, or for airway rescue following failed attempts at direct laryngoscopy endotracheal intubation. There is, however, limited data on objective confirmation of supraglottic airway placement in the prehospital environment. Furthermore, the ability of EMS field providers to recognize a misplaced airway is unknown. Retrospective review of patients who underwent airway management using the King LTS-D supraglottic airway in a large urban EMS system, between 3/1/15-9/30/2015. Subjective success was defined as documentation of successful airway placement by the EMS provider. Objective success was confirmed by review of waveform capnography, with the presence of a 4-phase waveform greater than 5mmHg. Sensitivity and specificity of the field provider's assessment of success were then calculated. A total of 344 supraglottic airway attempts were reviewed. No patients met obvious death criteria. 269 attempts (85.1%) met criteria for both subjective and objective success. 19 attempts (5.6%) were recognized failures by the EMS provider. 47 (13.8%) airways were misplaced but unrecognized by the EMS provider. 4 attempts (1.2%) were correctly placed but misidentified as failures, leading to the unnecessary removal and replacement of the airway. Sensitivity of the provider's assessment was 98.5%; specificity was 28.7%. The use of supraglottic airway devices results in unrecognized failed placement. Appropriate utilization and review of waveform capnography may remedy a potential blind-spot in patient safety, and systemic monitoring/feedback processes may therefore be used to prevent unrecognized misplaced airways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [On the application of elements of data mining (the detection of useful knowledge in databases) in hygienic research and social-hygiene monitoring].

    PubMed

    Gudinova, Zh V

    2012-01-01

    In article necessity and possibility of application of Data Mining methods (detection of useful knowledge in databases) in modern hygienic researches and during the decision of practical problems of socially-hygienic monitoring is proved. As illustration for applications of Data Mining technologies for development of administrative decisions in sphere of sanitary-and-epidemiologic well-being of the population of region results of the cluster analysis of a database about medium and population health in districts of the Omsk region are presented.

  1. A proposal of monitoring and forecasting system for crustal activity in and around Japan using a large-scale high-fidelity finite element simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, T.; Ichimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Here we propose a system for monitoring and forecasting of crustal activity, especially great interplate earthquake generation and its preparation processes in subduction zone. Basically, we model great earthquake generation as frictional instability on the subjecting plate boundary. So, spatio-temporal variation in slip velocity on the plate interface should be monitored and forecasted. Although, we can obtain continuous dense surface deformation data on land and partly at the sea bottom, the data obtained are not fully utilized for monitoring and forecasting. It is necessary to develop a physics-based data analysis system including (1) a structural model with the 3D geometry of the plate interface and the material property such as elasticity and viscosity, (2) calculation code for crustal deformation and seismic wave propagation using (1), (3) inverse analysis or data assimilation code both for structure and fault slip using (1)&(2). To accomplish this, it is at least necessary to develop highly reliable large-scale simulation code to calculate crustal deformation and seismic wave propagation for 3D heterogeneous structure. Actually, Ichimura et al. (2014, SC14) has developed unstructured FE non-linear seismic wave simulation code, which achieved physics-based urban earthquake simulation enhanced by 10.7 BlnDOF x 30 K time-step. Ichimura et al. (2013, GJI) has developed high fidelity FEM simulation code with mesh generator to calculate crustal deformation in and around Japan with complicated surface topography and subducting plate geometry for 1km mesh. Further, for inverse analyses, Errol et al. (2012, BSSA) has developed waveform inversion code for modeling 3D crustal structure, and Agata et al. (2015, this meeting) has improved the high fidelity FEM code to apply an adjoint method for estimating fault slip and asthenosphere viscosity. Hence, we have large-scale simulation and analysis tools for monitoring. Furthermore, we are developing the methods for

  2. Determination of elemental baseline using peltigeralean lichens from Northeastern Canada (Québec): Initial data collection for long term monitoring of the impact of global climate change on boreal and subarctic area in Canada.

    PubMed

    Darnajoux, Romain; Lutzoni, François; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2015-11-15

    Northeastern Canada is mostly free of anthropogenic activities. The extent to which this territory has been impacted by anthropogenic atmospheric depositions remains to be studied. The main goal of our study was to establish background levels for metals in boreal muscicolous/terricolous macrolichens over non-urbanized areas of northeastern Canada (Québec). Concentrations of 18 elements (Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb) were determined for three species of the genus Peltigera (Peltigera aphthosa (L.) Willd. s.l., Peltigera neopolydactyla (Gyeln.) Gyeln. s.l., Peltigera scabrosa Th. Fr. s.l.), and Nephroma arcticum (L.) Torss., along a 1080 km south-north transect and along a of 730 km west-east transect. We report that elemental contents in the sampled lichen thalli are very low and similar to background levels found in other studies performed in pristine places (high elevation or remote ecosystems) throughout the world. Overall, our results demonstrate that most of the boreal and subarctic zone of Québec (northeastern Canada) is still pristine. The elemental baseline established in these lichen populations will contribute to monitor metal pollution in boreal and sub-polar ecosystems due to global climate change and future industrial expansion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 40 CFR 58.60 - Federal monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Federal Monitoring § 58.60 Federal monitoring. The Administrator may locate and operate an ambient air monitoring site if the State or local agency fails to locate, or schedule to be... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal monitoring. 58.60 Section...

  4. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Each lot of substandard pistachios may be reworked to meet aflatoxin or quality requirements. The... reporting. If a lot fails to meet the aflatoxin and/or the quality requirements of this part, a failed lot.... This form must be completed and submitted to the committee each time a lot fails either aflatoxin or...

  5. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each lot of substandard pistachios may be reworked to meet aflatoxin or quality requirements. The... reporting. If a lot fails to meet the aflatoxin and/or the quality requirements of this part, a failed lot.... This form must be completed and submitted to the committee each time a lot fails either aflatoxin...

  6. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each lot of substandard pistachios may be reworked to meet aflatoxin or quality requirements. The... reporting. If a lot fails to meet the aflatoxin and/or the quality requirements of this part, a failed lot.... This form must be completed and submitted to the committee each time a lot fails either aflatoxin...

  7. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each lot of substandard pistachios may be reworked to meet aflatoxin or quality requirements. The... reporting. If a lot fails to meet the aflatoxin and/or the quality requirements of this part, a failed lot.... This form must be completed and submitted to the committee each time a lot fails either aflatoxin...

  8. Capital disadvantage: America's failing capital investment system.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. system of allocating investment capital is failing, putting American companies at a serious disadvantage and threatening the long-term growth of the nation's economy. The problem, says Michael Porter, goes beyond the usual formulation of the issue: accusations of "short-termism" by U.S. managers, ineffective corporate governance by directors, or a high cost of capital. The problem involves the external capital allocation system by which capital is provided to companies, as well as the system by which companies allocate capital internally. America's system is marked by fluid capital and a financial focus. Other countries--notably Japan and Germany--have systems with dedicated capital and a focus on corporate position. In global competition, where investment increasingly determines a company's capacity to upgrade and innovate, the U.S. system does not measure up. These conclusions come out of a two-year research project sponsored by the Harvard Business School and the Council on Competitiveness. Porter recommends five far-reaching reforms to make the U.S. system superior to Japan's and Germany's: 1. Improve the present macroeconomic environment. 2. Expand true ownership throughout the system so that directors, managers, employees, and even customers and suppliers hold positions as owners. 3. Align the goals of capital providers, corporations, directors, managers, employees, customers, suppliers, and society. 4. Improve the information used in decision making. 5. Foster more productive modes of interaction and influence among capital providers, corporations, and business units.

  9. Cognitive emotion regulation fails the stress test

    PubMed Central

    Raio, Candace M.; Orederu, Temidayo A.; Palazzolo, Laura; Shurick, Ashley A.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive emotion regulation has been widely shown in the laboratory to be an effective way to alter the nature of emotional responses. Despite its success in experimental contexts, however, we often fail to use these strategies in everyday life where stress is pervasive. The successful execution of cognitive regulation relies on intact executive functioning and engagement of the prefrontal cortex, both of which are rapidly impaired by the deleterious effects of stress. Because it is specifically under stressful conditions that we may benefit most from such deliberate forms of emotion regulation, we tested the efficacy of cognitive regulation after stress exposure. Participants first underwent fear-conditioning, where they learned that one stimulus (CS+) predicted an aversive outcome but another predicted a neutral outcome (CS−). Cognitive regulation training directly followed where participants were taught to regulate fear responses to the aversive stimulus. The next day, participants underwent an acute stress induction or a control task before repeating the fear-conditioning task using these newly acquired regulation skills. Skin conductance served as an index of fear arousal, and salivary α-amylase and cortisol concentrations were assayed as neuroendocrine markers of stress response. Although groups showed no differences in fear arousal during initial fear learning, nonstressed participants demonstrated robust fear reduction following regulation training, whereas stressed participants showed no such reduction. Our results suggest that stress markedly impairs the cognitive regulation of emotion and highlights critical limitations of this technique to control affective responses under stress. PMID:23980142

  10. Difficult paediatric intubation when fibreoptic laryngoscopy fails.

    PubMed

    Ng, Agnes; Vas, Lakshmi; Goel, Sunita

    2002-11-01

    We report an unusual problem with fibreoptic bronchoscopy in an 8-year-old girl with Negar syndrome. She had a history of difficult airway since birth, and had undergone mandibular distraction for severe obstructive sleep apnoea when she was aged 2 years. Nagar syndrome is a Treacher-Collins like syndrome with normal intelligence, conductive bone deafness and problems with articulation. The patients have malar hypoplasia with down slanting palpebral fissures, high nasal bridge, micrognathia, absence of lower eyelashes, low set posteriorly rotated ears, preauricular tags, atresia of external ear canal, cleft palate, hypoplasia of thumb, with or without radius, and limited elbow extension. Protracted attempts with a fibreoptic bronchoscope failed to visualize the glottis, and this was only possible when the tube was guided to the larynx by blind nasal intubation. Apparently, the healing of the wounds for the mandibular distraction in the mandibular space on the inside of the rami of the mandible had caused differential fibrosis on either side of the hyoid, leading to a triplane distortion of the larynx with a left shift, clockwise rotation to a 2-8 o'clock direction and a slight tilt towards the left pharyngeal wall. The large epiglottis overlying this had precluded a view of the larynx. Finally, the older technique of breathguided intubation facilitated fibreoptic bronchoscopy to achieve tracheal intubation.

  11. A proposal of monitoring and forecasting system for crustal activity in and around Japan using a large-scale high-fidelity finite element simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takane; Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Narumi

    2017-04-01

    Here we propose a system for monitoring and forecasting of crustal activity, such as spatio-temporal variation in slip velocity on the plate interface including earthquakes, seismic wave propagation, and crustal deformation. Although, we can obtain continuous dense surface deformation data on land and partly on the sea floor, the obtained data are not fully utilized for monitoring and forecasting. It is necessary to develop a physics-based data analysis system including (1) a structural model with the 3D geometry of the plate interface and the material property such as elasticity and viscosity, (2) calculation code for crustal deformation and seismic wave propagation using (1), (3) inverse analysis or data assimilation code both for structure and fault slip using (1) & (2). To accomplish this, it is at least necessary to develop highly reliable large-scale simulation code to calculate crustal deformation and seismic wave propagation for 3D heterogeneous structure. Actually, Ichimura et al. (2015, SC15) has developed unstructured FE non-linear seismic wave simulation code, which achieved physics-based urban earthquake simulation enhanced by 1.08 T DOF x 6.6 K time-step. Ichimura et al. (2013, GJI) has developed high fidelity FEM simulation code with mesh generator to calculate crustal deformation in and around Japan with complicated surface topography and subducting plate geometry for 1km mesh. Fujita et al. (2016, SC16) has improved the code for crustal deformation and achieved 2.05 T-DOF with 45m resolution on the plate interface. This high-resolution analysis enables computation of change of stress acting on the plate interface. Further, for inverse analyses, Errol et al. (2012, BSSA) has developed waveform inversion code for modeling 3D crustal structure, and Agata et al. (2015, AGU Fall Meeting) has improved the high-fidelity FEM code to apply an adjoint method for estimating fault slip and asthenosphere viscosity. Hence, we have large-scale simulation and

  12. Use of the Filter-Sandwich carriers in continuous effectiveness monitoring of slurry treatment methods as an element improving biosafety in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Halina; Paluszak, Piotr; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga; Bauza-Kaszewska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    Slurry, due to high microbiological contamination, requires hygienization before spreading. The agricultural usage of treated slurry has to guarantee biosafety. Therefore, constant monitoring of the slurry treatment process should be conducted. The use of Filter-Sandwich carriers seems to be a prospective solution. The aim of the research was to test whether Filter-Sandwich carriers influence the survivability of microorganisms during the slurry hygienization process and hence, whether they are safe for the environment. Raw cattle and swine slurry with different dry matter content was the research material. Salmonella Senftenberg W775 rods were introduced directly into the slurry and into the carriers placed in the liquid excrements stored at 4 and 20ºC, and underwent anaerobic digestion at 35ºC. The number of tested bacteria obtained from the slurry and carriers was determined using the MPN method with proper microbiological media. The values of physicochemical parameters of the raw and treated slurry were determined, both for the carriers and for slurry only. Biosafety control was also conducted for the carriers in slurry containers. The differences in the theoretical survivability between Salmonella Senftenberg W775 re-isolated from the slurry and the carriers, and in the values of the selected physicochemical parameters obtained at the end of the process, were not statistically significant. The re-contamination of the sterile slurry caused by the bacteria in the carrier was not observed after placement of the carrier with inoculated material. The conducted research proves the usefulness of Filter-Sandwich carriers for continuous hygienization monitoring of the slurry treatment process. This refers not only to the semi-technical scale, but also to the full-scale process.

  13. Why Lumbar Artificial Disk Replacements (LADRs) Fail.

    PubMed

    Pettine, Kenneth; Ryu, Robert; Techy, Fernando

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. To determine why artificial disk replacements (ADRs) fail by examining results of 91 patients in FDA studies performed at a single investigational device exemption (IDE) site with minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients following lumbar ADR generally achieve their 24-month follow-up results at 3 months postoperatively. Every patient undergoing ADR at 1 IDE site by 2 surgeons was evaluated for clinical success. Failure was defined as <50% improvement in ODI and VAS or any additional surgery at index or adjacent spine motion segment. Three ADRs were evaluated: Maverick, 25 patients; Charité, 31 patients; and Kineflex, 35 patients. All procedures were 1-level operations performed at L4-L5 or L5-S1. Demographics and inclusion/exclusion criteria were similar and will be discussed. Overall clinical failure occurred in 26% (24 of 91 patients) at 2-year follow-up. Clinical failure occurred in: 28% (Maverick) (7 of 25 patients), 39% (Charité) (12 of 31 patients), and 14% (Kineflex) (5 of 35 patients). Causes of failure included facet pathology, 50% of failure patients (12 of 24). Implant complications occurred in 5% of total patients and 21% of failure patients (5 of 24). Only 5 patients went from a success to failure after 3 months. Only 1 patient went from a failure to success after a facet rhizotomy 1 year after ADR. Seventy-four percent of patients after ADR met strict clinical success after 2-year follow-up. The clinical success versus failure rate did not change from their 3-month follow-up in 85 of the 91 patients (93%). Overall clinical success may be improved most by patient selection and implant type.

  14. Myocardial regeneration of the failing heart.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Alexander T; Marín-García, José

    2013-11-01

    Human heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, heart transplantation and implantation of mechanical devices represent the only available treatments for advanced HF. Two alternative strategies have emerged to treat patients with HF. One approach relies on transplantation of exogenous stem cells (SCs) of non-cardiac or cardiac origin to induce cardiac regeneration and improve ventricular function. Another complementary strategy relies on stimulation of the endogenous regenerative capacity of uninjured cardiac progenitor cells to rebuild cardiac muscle and restore ventricular function. Various SC types and delivery strategies have been examined in the experimental and clinical settings; however, neither the ideal cell type nor the cell delivery method for cardiac cell therapy has yet emerged. Although the use of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells, most frequently exploited in clinical trials, appears to be safe, the results are controversial. Two recent randomized trials have failed to document any beneficial effects of intracardiac delivery of autologous BM mononuclear cells on cardiac function of patients with HF. The remarkable discovery that various populations of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are present in the adult human heart and that it possesses limited regeneration capacity has opened a new era in cardiac repair. Importantly, unlike BM-derived SCs, autologous CPCs from myocardial biopsies cultured and subsequently delivered by coronary injection to patients have given positive results. Although these data are promising, a better understanding of how to control proliferation and differentiation of CPCs, to enhance their recruitment and survival, is required before CPCs become clinically applicable therapeutics.

  15. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N.; Simone, Juan P.; Cofield, Robert H.; Sperling, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes of a consecutive series of patients who underwent revision surgery after humeral head resurfacing (HHR). Our joint registry was queried for all patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for failed HHR at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Eleven consecutive patients (average age 54 years; range 38-69 years) that underwent revision of 11 resurfacing arthroplasties were identified. The primary indication for resurfacing had been osteoarthritis in six, glenoid dysplasia in two, a chondral lesion in two, and postinstability arthropathy in one patient. The indication for revision was pain in 10 and infection in one patient. Seven patients had undergone an average of 1.9 surgeries prior to resurfacing (range 1-3). Materials and Methods: All patients were revised to stemmed arthroplasties, including one hemiarthroplasty, two reverse, and eight anatomic total shoulder arthroplasties at a mean 33 months after primary resurfacing (range 10-131 months). A deltopectoral approach was used in seven patients; four patients required an anteromedial approach due to severe scarring. Subscapularis attenuation was found in four cases, two of which required reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Bone grafting was required in one glenoid and three humeri. Results: At a mean follow-up of 3.5 years (range 1.6-6.9 years), modified Neer score was rated as satisfactory in five patients and unsatisfactory in six. Abduction and external rotation improved from 73° to 88° (P = 0.32) and from 23° to 32° (P = 0.28) respectively. Reoperation was required in two patients, including one hematoma and one revision for instability. Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made. PMID:26980986

  16. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  17. Asymmetric Type Ia Supernovae from Detonating Failed Deflagrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, T.; Kasen, D.; Brown, E. F.

    2005-05-01

    Despite four decades of vigorous research and substantial progress made in studying thermonuclear supernovae, the origins and nature of these objects remain a mystery. From a modeler's point of view, Type Ia supernovae are one of the most demanding and complex supercomputer applications. The final stages of their lives involve the slow evolution under conditions close to a hydrostatic equilibrium followed by a strongly dynamical phase with the possible transition from a subsonic to supersonic mode of thermonuclear combustion. The explosion dynamics involve instabilities on scales from centimeters to hundreds of kilometers, and are accompanied by thermonuclear reactions releasing sufficient energy to unbind the white dwarf. Numerical models of thermonuclear supernovae must also include realistic initial conditions, an element that may prove crucial in our quest to explain the nature of those fascinating objects. We are presently studying the incineration of a massive white dwarf following the mild ignition of a thermonuclear flame close to the stellar center. In this scenario, the initial off-center deflagration only consumes a small amount of the stellar fuel and fails to unbind the star. This deflagration does, however, expand the stellar material and accelerates the outer layers of the white dwarf. These flows interact and then trigger a detonation. The overall evolution resembles that of the previously discussed gravitationally confined detonation model and shares many of its properties. The present numerical model features a revised energy delivery scheme resulting in a weaker deflagration, longer evolutionary timescales, and stronger preexpansion of the stellar material.

  18. Experimenting `learn by doing' and `learn by failing'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Rossella; Noè, Carlo; Rossi, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    According to the literature, in recent years, developing experiential learning has fulfilled the requirement of a deep understanding of lean philosophy by engineering students, demonstrating the advantages and disadvantages of some of the key principles of lean manufacturing. On the other hand, the literature evidences how some kinds of game-based experiential learning overlook daily difficulties, which play a central role in manufacturing systems. To fill the need of a game overcoming such lack of vision, an innovative game direct in-field, named Kart Factory, has been developed. Actual production shifts are simulated, while keeping all the elements peculiar to a real production set (i.e. complexity, effort, safety). The working environment is a real pedal car assembly department, the products to be assembled have relevant size and weight (i.e. up to 35 kg approximately), and the provided tools are real production equipment (e.g. keys, screwdrivers, trans-pallets, etc.). Due to the need to maximise the impact on students, a labour-intensive process characterises the production department. The whole training process is based on three educational principles: Experience Value Principle, Error Value Principle, and Team Value Principle. As the 'learn by doing' and 'learn by failing' are favoured, the theory follows the practice, while crating the willingness to 'do' instead of just designing or planning. The gathered data prove the Kart Factory's effectiveness in reaching a good knowledge of lean concepts, notwithstanding the students' initial knowledge level.

  19. Monitoring of the environmental pollution by trace element analysis in tree-rings using synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito; Moreira, Silvana; Brienza, Sandra Maria Boscolo; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel Silva; Filho, Mário Tomazello; Zucchi, Orghêda Luíza Araújo Domingues; Filho, Virgílio Franco do Nascimento

    2006-11-01

    This paper aims to study the environmental pollution in the tree development, in order to evaluate its use as bioindicator in urban and country sides. The sample collection was carried out in Piracicaba city, São Paulo State, which presents high level of environmental contamination in water, soil and air, due to industrial activities, vehicles combustion, sugar-cane leaves burning in the harvesting, etc. The species Caesalpinia peltophoroides ("Sibipiruna") was selected because it is widely used in urban forestation. Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence technique (SR-TXRF) was employed to identify and quantify the elements and metals of nutritional and toxicological importance in the wood samples. The analysis was performed in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory, using a white beam for excitation and a Si(Li) detector for X-ray detection. In several samples, P, K, Ca, Ti, Fe, Sr, Ba and Pb were quantified. The K/Ca, K/P and Pb/Ca ratios were found to decrease towards the bark.

  20. Hepatic changes in the failing Fontan circulation

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Christoph H; Sheron, Nick; Vettukattill, Joseph J; Hacking, Nigel; Stedman, Brian; Millward‐Sadler, Harry; Haw, Marcus; Cope, Richard; Salmon, Anthony P; Sivaprakasam, Muthukumaran C; Kendall, Tim; Keeton, Barry R; Iredale, John P; Veldtman, Gruschen R

    2007-01-01

    Background The failing Fontan circulation is associated with hepatic impairment. The nature of this liver injury is poorly defined. Objective To establish the gross and histological liver changes of patients with Fontan circulation relative to clinical, biochemical and haemodynamic findings. Methods Patients were retrospectively assessed for extracardiac Fontan conversion between September 2003 and June 2005, according to an established clinical protocol. Twelve patients, mean age 24.6 (range 15.8–43.4) years were identified. The mean duration since the initial Fontan procedure was 14.1 (range 6.9–26.4) years. Results Zonal enhancement of the liver (4/12) on CT was more common in patients with lower hepatic vein pressures (p = 0.007), and in those with absent cardiac cirrhosis on histological examination (p = 0.033). Gastro‐oesophageal varices (4/12) were more common in patients with higher hepatic vein pressure (21 (6.3) vs 12.2 (2.2) mm Hg, p = 0.013) and associated with more advanced cirrhosis (p = 0.037). The extent of cirrhosis (7/12) was positively correlated with the hepatic vein pressure (r = 0.83, p = 0.003). A significant positive correlation was found between the Fontan duration and the degree of hepatic fibrosis (r = 0.75, p = 0.013), as well as presence of broad scars (r = 0.71, p = 0.021). Protein‐losing enteropathy (5/12) occurred more frequently in patients with longer Fontan duration (11.7 (3.2) vs 17.9 (6.1) years, p = 0.038). Conclusions Liver injury, which can be extensive in this patient group, is related to Fontan duration and hepatic vein pressures. CT scan assists non‐invasive assessment. Cardiac cirrhosis with the risk of developing gastro‐oesophageal varices and regenerative liver nodules, a precursor to hepatocellular carcinoma, is common in this patient group. PMID:17005713

  1. [Monitoring of heavy metals and trace elements in the air, fruits and vegetables and soil in the province of Catania (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Margherita; Fiore, Maria; Ledda, Caterina; Cicciù, Francesca; Alonzo, Elena; Fallico, Roberto; Platania, Francesco; Di Mauro, Rosario; Valenti, Lina; Sciacca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of fruits and vegetables with heavy metals can result from anthropogenic events (car or factory emissions, poor management of sewage and industrial waste) or from natural events (volcanic activity and geological soil matrix). The chemical and toxicological characteristics of heavy metals can have an impact on human health through several mechanisms. Other metals, on the other hand, are essential for maintenance of physiological and biochemical human processes, are protective against many diseases and must be present in the diet because they cannot be synthesized by the human body. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of heavy metals and trace elements both in fruit and vegetable products widely consumed in the province of Catania (Sicily, Italy) and in various environmental matrices (air, water and land), and to investigate possible sources of contamination. Fruit and vegetable products (tomatoes, lettuce, spinach, eggplants, potatoes, zucchini, grapes, apples and pears) were sampled (n = 60) from the towns of Adrano, Biancavilla and Mazzarrone. These locations were selected for their geomorphology, climate and cultivation characteristics. Levels of lead, cadmium, nickel, copper, zinc, vanadium and selenium in fruit, vegetables, air and water samples were determined using atomic absorption spectrometer with graphite furnace Perkin-Elmer AAnalyst 800 while soil samples were evaluated by the atomic emission spectrometer Optima 2000 DV Perkin-Elmer. The presence of mercury was evaluated by atomic absorption spectrometry with cold vapor technique. Study results revealed widespread contamination of fruit and vegetables and mainly due to use of fertilizers and to volcanic activity. A strategy targeting the entire food chain is essential for ensuring food safety and consumer protection and maintaining contaminants at levels which are not hazardous to health.

  2. Assessment of trace element status.

    PubMed

    Delves, H T

    1985-08-01

    Biochemical and clinical investigations involving trace elements are made for the diagnosis of inherited or acquired deficiencies of essential trace elements and their treatment, to monitor the efficacy of the therapeutic administration of non-essential trace elements in order to achieve maximum clinical response with minimum toxicity, and for the early detection of excessive ingestion of non-essential toxic trace elements. The wide range of tests used to assess trace element status in these three areas of clinical importance is discussed with examples of essential and of toxic trace elements since therapeutic use of trace elements is discussed elsewhere in this issue. Particular attention is given to zinc, copper, selenium, lead and cadmium because the various tests used to assess the status of these elements encompass the principles of all currently available tests. Although trace element analysis of body fluids and tissues is the most useful and most commonly used method of assessment of trace element status, this is of limited value and no single test may be considered as ideal for any element. The provision of more detailed information from elemental analysis of cellular and subcellular fractions and of protein fractions from plasma leads inexorably to measurements of element-dependent enzymes, metalloproteins and of low molecular weight element-binding ligands. Even at this level of discrimination the choice of body tissue or tissue fluid for investigation is determined by the trace element and its principal metabolic targets.

  3. Needle revision of failing and failed trabeculectomy blebs with adjunctive 5-fluorouracil: survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Broadway, David C; Bloom, Philip A; Bunce, Catey; Thiagarajan, Manickam; Khaw, Peng T

    2004-04-01

    To report the outcome of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-augmented bleb needling revision of failed and failing filtration blebs and to identify risk factors for failure, indicators for success, and any complications of the procedure. Prospective, observational, noncomparative, interventional case series with survival analysis. The results of 101 bleb needling procedures augmented with subconjunctival 5-FU injection were determined after a minimum follow-up of 9 months. Kaplan-Meier plots were constructed and a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to assess the association between study factors and time to failure. Reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) by 2 criteria (<22 mmHg, >30%), glaucoma medications, complications, and factors associated with outcome. At the time of their last follow-up visit, 60 eyes had an IOP <22 mmHg, mean IOP being reduced from 26.5 mmHg to 15 mmHg [corrected] after a median of 1 needling procedure (mean, 1.6). The median interval between the "index" filtration surgery and the first (or only) needling procedure was 3.1 months, with a range of 10 days to 11 years. There was a reduction in mean number of topical antiglaucoma agents from 0.7 to 0.2 per successful eye and a median follow-up duration of 18.7 months (range, 9.3-52.8 months [corrected]). Thus, the overall cross-sectional success rate of the procedure at the time of the last visit was 59.4%. Strong evidence was found for an association between the immediate attainment of a low IOP (<11 mmHg) and longer survival times. None of the other proposed factors that may have affected outcome were identified as having a statistically significant effect; however, this may have been the result of the low statistical power for some of the factors in this study. These data suggest that bleb needling augmented with 5-FU is a safe and effective method by which a significant number of failed or failing filtration blebs can be rescued from failure. Attaining an immediate reduction in

  4. Interior's Climate Science Centers: Focus or Fail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udall, B.

    2012-12-01

    After a whirlwind two years of impressive and critical infrastructure building, the Department of Interior's Climate Science Centers are now in a position to either succeed or fail. The CSCs have a number of difficult structural problems including too many constituencies relative to the available resources, an uneasy relationship among many of the constituencies including the DOI agencies themselves, a need to do science in a new, difficult and non-traditional way, and a short timeframe to produce useful products. The CSCs have built a broad and impressive network of scientists and stakeholders. These entities include science providers of the universities and the USGS, and decision makers from the states, tribes, DOI land managers and other federal agencies and NGOs. Rather than try to support all of these constituencies the CSCs would be better served by refocusing on a core mission of supporting DOI climate related decision making. The CSCs were designed to service the climate science needs of DOI agencies, many of which lost their scientific capabilities in the 1990s due to a well-intentioned but ultimately harmful re-organization at DOI involving the now defunct National Biological Survey. Many of these agencies would like to have their own scientists, have an uneasy relationship with the nominal DOI science provider, the USGS, and don't communicate effectively among themselves. The CSCs must not succumb to pursuing science in either the traditional mode of the USGS or in the traditional mode of the universities, or worse, both of them. These scientific partners will need to be flexible, learn how to collaborate and should expect to see fewer resources. Useful CSC processes and outputs should start with the recommendations of the 2009 NRC Report Informing Decisions in a Changing Climate: (1) begin with users' needs; (2) give priority to process over products; (3) link information producers and users; (4) build connections across disciplines and organizations

  5. Dacryoendoscopic findings in the lacrimal passage in failed dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yasuhisa; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2013-01-01

    To examine the appearance of the lacrimal passage using dacryoendoscopy in failed dacryocystorhinostomies, examining the relationship between the remnant lacrimal sac mucosa and the obstruction tissue, and to detect canalicular obstruction. Twenty failed dacryocystorhinostomies (4 right and 16 left) in 19 Japanese patients (8 males and 11 females) aged 36 to 81 years (average, 69.5 years) were reviewed. Dacryoendoscopy was used to examine the lacrimal passage of the failed dacryocystorhinostomies. An occluded space was found with no adhesion between the remnant lacrimal sac mucosa and the fibrous obstruction tissue in every failed dacryocystorhinostomy. None of the lacrimal canaliculi or the common internal ostia was obstructed. A space without adhesion between the remnant lacrimal sac mucosa and the obstruction tissue was visualized in all the failed dacryocystorhinostomies. No canalicular stenosis was seen, including the common internal ostium, in this cases. Based on these results, endoscopic revision for failed dacryocystorhinostomies is a safe procedure, performed without orbital fat prolapse.

  6. Monitoring in microvascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Furnas, H; Rosen, J M

    1991-03-01

    The importance of monitoring in microvascular surgery is underscored by the high reported salvage rates of failing free flaps and replants. In this overview, we begin by defining the physiology of ischemic tissue with emphasis given to the no-reflow phenomenon and the secondary critical ischemia times. Based on the physiological changes accompanying ischemia, several variables are defined that can be monitored to reflect the vascular state of a free flap or replant. Multifarious monitoring systems are then reviewed, including clinical observation, temperature, isotope clearance, ultrasonic Doppler, laser Doppler, transcutaneous oxygen tension, reflection plethysmography, dermofluorometry, pH, electromagnetic flowmetry, serial hematocrits, interstitial fluid pressure, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Import Bans as an Element of Nigerian Trade Policy, a Failed Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    cement importers conspire to keep imports at low levels and prices artificially high. The resulting oligopoly manipulates the system with the end...decrease and many Nigerians would feel the effect of gaining real income. The artificial barrier of trade import bans is hampering growth and...Fruit juice in retail packs 8. Waters, including mineral waters and aerated waters containing added sugar or sweetening matter or flavored, ice snow

  8. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  9. Erika's Stories: Literacy Solutions for a Failing Middle School Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma'ayan, Hadar Dubowsky

    2010-01-01

    Erika was a failing student at a large urban public middle school. She was poor, Hispanic, bilingual, and had repeated fourth grade. She scored low on her standardized tests and was failing several subject areas. In class, Erika was a student who sat silently with her head on her desk, and rarely turned in any of her assignments. She was a…

  10. Erika's Stories: Literacy Solutions for a Failing Middle School Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma'ayan, Hadar Dubowsky

    2010-01-01

    Erika was a failing student at a large urban public middle school. She was poor, Hispanic, bilingual, and had repeated fourth grade. She scored low on her standardized tests and was failing several subject areas. In class, Erika was a student who sat silently with her head on her desk, and rarely turned in any of her assignments. She was a…

  11. Using Keystroke Analytics to Improve Pass-Fail Classifiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Learning analytics offers insights into student behaviour and the potential to detect poor performers before they fail exams. If the activity is primarily online (for example computer programming), a wealth of low-level data can be made available that allows unprecedented accuracy in predicting which students will pass or fail. In this paper, we…

  12. 7 CFR 996.50 - Reconditioning failing quality peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. 996.50 Section... QUALITY AND HANDLING STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Quality and Handling Standards § 996.50 Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. (a) Lots of peanuts which have not...

  13. 7 CFR 996.50 - Reconditioning failing quality peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. 996.50 Section... QUALITY AND HANDLING STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Quality and Handling Standards § 996.50 Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. (a) Lots of peanuts which have not...

  14. 7 CFR 996.50 - Reconditioning failing quality peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. 996.50 Section... QUALITY AND HANDLING STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Quality and Handling Standards § 996.50 Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. (a) Lots of peanuts which have not...

  15. 75 FR 12981 - Eligibility for Commercial Flats Failing Deflection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Eligibility for Commercial Flats Failing Deflection AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Postal Service published a proposed rule regarding eligibility for commercial flats failing...

  16. 7 CFR 718.103 - Prevented planted and failed acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prevented planted and failed acreage. 718.103 Section... APPLICABLE TO MULTIPLE PROGRAMS Determination of Acreage and Compliance § 718.103 Prevented planted and failed acreage. (a) Prevented planting is the inability to plant an eligible crop with proper...

  17. 21 CFR 1.241 - What are the consequences of failing to register, update, or cancel your registration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., update, or cancel your registration? 1.241 Section 1.241 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Facilities Additional Provisions § 1.241 What are the consequences of failing to register, update, or cancel... foreign facility to register its facility, to update required elements of it's facility's registration,...

  18. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  19. Morbidity associated with failed vaginal birth after cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Oboro, Victor; Adewunmi, Adeniyi; Ande, Anibaba; Olagbuji, Biodun; Ezeanochie, Michael; Oyeniran, Ayodeji

    2010-09-01

    We investigated morbidity and factors associated with failed vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC). In a retrospective cohort study maternal and neonatal outcomes of women who underwent VBAC in three Nigerian University Teaching Hospitals were reviewed. Univariate, followed by multivariate analyses, were conducted. VBAC was successful in 683 of 1,013 women (67.4%), whereas 330 (32.6%) had failed VBAC. Failed VBAC was associated with higher incidence of chorioamnionitis, postpartum hemorrhage, blood transfusion, uterine rupture, hysterectomy, and composite major neonatal morbidities. Younger age, lack of previous vaginal delivery, induction of labor and fetal weight >4,000 g were risk factors for failed VBAC. A majority of women who try VBAC achieve a vaginal delivery. Failed VBAC is associated with increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and is somewhat predictable.

  20. Stress mapping of undamaged, strained, and failed regions of bone using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kathryn A.; McCormack, Jordan; Fyhrie, David P.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Stress differences via spectral shifts that arise among failed, strained, and undamaged regions of bone can be determined using Raman spectroscopy and double-notch specimens. A double-notch specimen is a model in which the early stages of fracture can be examined. Upon four-point bending, fracture occurs at one of the notches. Tissue near each notch is representative of bone in a state either directly before or after bone failure. Raman images were acquired among three regions: control, strained (root of unbroken notch), and failed (root of fractured notch). The center of gravities (CGs), a way to monitor wavenumber shifts, of the phosphate ν1 band were calculated. A PO4−3 ν1 band shift most likely corresponded to a change in spacing between phosphate cations and anions. This spectral shift was converted into stress values using the dν/dP coefficient, determined by applying known pressures/stresses and measuring the change in position of the PO4−3 ν1 band. In comparison to control regions, the residual stress in strained and failed regions was significantly higher (p=0.0425 and p=0.0169, respectively). In strained regions, residual stress was concentrated near the corners of the unbroken notch, whereas in failed regions the high stresses were confined near the edge of the fracture. PMID:19725729

  1. Stress mapping of undamaged, strained, and failed regions of bone using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Kathryn A.; McCormack, Jordan; Fyhrie, David P.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-07-01

    Stress differences via spectral shifts that arise among failed, strained, and undamaged regions of bone can be determined using Raman spectroscopy and double-notch specimens. A double-notch specimen is a model in which the early stages of fracture can be examined. At four-point bending, fracture occurs at one of the notches. Tissue near each notch is representative of bone in a state either directly before or after bone failure. Raman images are acquired among three regions: control, strained (root of unbroken notch), and failed (root of fractured notch). The center of gravities (CGs), a way to monitor wavenumber shifts, of the phosphate v1 band are calculated. A PO4-3 v1 band shift most likely corresponds to a change in spacing between phosphate cations and anions. This spectral shift is converted into stress values using the dv/dP coefficient, determined by applying known pressures/stresses and measuring the change in position of the PO4-3 v1 band. In comparison to control regions, the residual stress in strained and failed regions is significantly higher (p=0.0425 and p=0.0169, respectively). In strained regions, residual stress is concentrated near the corners of the unbroken notch, whereas in failed regions the high stresses are confined near the edge of the fracture.

  2. Non-destructive monitoring of curing process in precast concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, S.; Ranz, J.; Fernández, R.; Albert, V.; Fuente, J. V.; Hernández, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, the use of precast concrete elements has gained importance because it offers many advantages over site-cast concrete. A disadvantage of site-cast concrete is that its properties vary according to the manufacturing method, the environment and even the operator who carried out the mixing, pouring and implementation of the concrete. Precast concrete elements are manufactured in a controlled environment (typically referred to as a precast plant) and this reduces the shrinkage and creep. One of the key properties of precast concrete is the capability to gain compressive strength rapidly under the appropriate conditions. The compressive strength determines if the precast can be stripped from the form or manipulated. This parameter is measured using destructive testing over cylindrical or cubic samples. The quality control of precast is derived from the fracture suffered by these elements, resulting in a "pass or fail" evaluation. In most cases, the solution to this problem is to allow the material to cure for a few hours until it acquires sufficient strength to handle the precast element. The focus of this paper is the description of the research project "CUREND". This project aims to design a non-destructive methodology to monitor the curing process in precast concrete. The monitoring will be performed using wireless sensor networks.

  3. Real-time monitoring of inflammation status in 3T3-L1 adipocytes possessing a secretory Gaussia luciferase gene under the control of nuclear factor-kappa B response element

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaki, Haruka; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Aoki, Naohito

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation status in adipocytes can be monitored by the new assay system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only an aliquot of conditioned medium is required without cell lysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation-attenuating compounds can be screened more conveniently. -- Abstract: We have established 3T3-L1 cells possessing a secretory Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) gene under the control of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) response element. The 3T3-L1 cells named 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc could differentiate into adipocyte as comparably as parental 3T3-L1 cells. Inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-1{beta} induced GLuc secretion of 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. GLuc secretion of 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes was also induced when cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages and was dramatically enhanced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. An NF-{kappa}B activation inhibitor BAY-11-7085 and an antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine significantly suppressed GLuc secretion induced by macrophages. Finally, we found that rosemary-derived carnosic acid strongly suppressed GLuc secretion induced by macrophages and on the contrary up-regulated adiponectin secretion. Collectively, by using 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes, inflammation status can be monitored in real time and inflammation-attenuating compounds can be screened more conveniently.

  4. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  5. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  6. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  7. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  8. Element 117

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-08

    An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

  9. Element 117

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-09-30

    An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

  10. The Experience of Failed Humor: Implications for Interpersonal Affect Regulation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michele; Emich, Kyle J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate failed interpersonal affect regulation through the lens of humor. We investigated individual differences that influenced people's affective and cognitive responses to failed humor and their willingness to persist in the interpersonal regulation of positive affect after a failed attempt. Using well-established autobiographical narrative methods and surveys, we collected data at two time points. All participants (n = 127) received identical surveys at time 1. At time 2, they were randomly assigned to complete a narrative about either successful or failed humor as well as a second survey. Using moderated regression analyses and SEM, we found significant differences between our failed and successful humor conditions. Specifically, individual differences, including gender, affective perspective taking, and humor self-efficacy, were associated with negative reactions to failed humor and the willingness of individuals to persist in the interpersonal regulation of positive affect. Moreover, affective perspective taking moderated the effect of gender in both the failed and successful humor conditions. Our results suggest that failed humor is no laughing matter. Understanding individuals' willingness to continue in attempts to regulate the affect of others contributes to the comprehension of an understudied phenomenon that has implications for interpersonal behavior in organizations such as helping, group decision making, and intragroup conflict. Studies of interpersonal affect regulation often focus on people's ability to successfully regulate others' emotions. In contrast, this is the first quantitative study to explore factors that influence individual's willingness to persist in interpersonal affect regulation after failure, and to investigate how individual differences influence the personal outcomes associated with failed attempts.

  11. Earthquake recurrence models fail when earthquakes fail to reset the stress field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Parkfield's regularly occurring M6 mainshocks, about every 25 years, have over two decades stoked seismologists' hopes to successfully predict an earthquake of significant size. However, with the longest known inter-event time of 38 years, the latest M6 in the series (28 Sep 2004) did not conform to any of the applied forecast models, questioning once more the predictability of earthquakes in general. Our study investigates the spatial pattern of b-values along the Parkfield segment through the seismic cycle and documents a stably stressed structure. The forecasted rate of M6 earthquakes based on Parkfield's microseismicity b-values corresponds well to observed rates. We interpret the observed b-value stability in terms of the evolution of the stress field in that area: the M6 Parkfield earthquakes do not fully unload the stress on the fault, explaining why time recurrent models fail. We present the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake as counter example, which did release a significant portion of the stress along its fault segment and yields a substantial change in b-values.

  12. Fail-Safe Magnetic Bearing Controller Demonstrated Successfully

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch has successfully demonstrated a fail-safe controller for the Fault-Tolerant Magnetic Bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The rotor is supported by two 8-pole redundant radial bearings, and coil failing situations are simulated by manually shutting down their control current commands from the controller cockpit. The effectiveness of the controller was demonstrated when only two active coils from each radial bearing could be used (that is, 14 coils failed). These remaining two coils still levitated the rotor and spun it without losing stability or desired position up to the maximum allowable speed of 20,000 rpm.

  13. US Intervention in Failed States: Bad Assumptions=Poor Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIVERSITY NATIONAL WAR COLLEGE STRATEGIC LOGIC ESSAY US INTERVENTION IN FAILED STATES: BAD ASSUMPTIONS = POOR ...2002 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2002 to 00-00-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US Intervention in Failed States: Bad Assumptions= Poor ...country remains in the grip of poverty , natural disasters, and stagnation. Rwanda Rwanda, another small African country, is populated principally

  14. Laser explantation of a failing endosseous dental implant.

    PubMed

    Smith, L P; Rose, T

    2010-06-01

    Explantation of failed dental implants has traditionally been performed by mechanical bone removal techniques. The advent of intraoral laser surgery has seen increasing numbers of applications in oral implantology. The technique demonstrates safe and efficient explantation of a failed dental implant using Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Laser assisted explantation of dental implants is a minimally invasive technique providing an alternative to conventional mechanical explantation techniques.

  15. Revision External Dacryocystorhinostomy Results After a Failed Dacryocystorhinostomy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Akcay, Emine; Yuksel, Nilay; Ozen, Umut

    2016-06-01

    To report revision external dacryocystorhinostomy (rE-DCR) results following failed dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery. A retrospective review of patients who underwent rE-DCR between June 2006 and June 2015 at Yıldırım Beyazıt University Ankara Ataturk Training and Research Hospital Department of Ophthalmology. Data were collected on the primary surgery technique and patient demographics. Forty-one rE-DCRs were performed on 40 patients after various failed DCR techniques. Two patients had failed DCR twice, and 38 patients had failed DCR once. Six of these previous failed DCRs were multidiode laser DCR, two of them were endoscopic DCR, and 33 were external dacryocystorhinostomy (E-DCR). In all rE-DCR procedures, silicone tube intubation was performed, and the tube was removed at least 6 months after surgery. We used mitomycin C on 16 patients (40%). At the last examination, six patients still had epiphora (15%), and their nasolacrimal passage was obstructed. Thirty-four patients had no complaints, and their passages were open (85%). The rE-DCR procedure has high success rates for failed DCR surgeries, whichever procedure was performed.

  16. [Predictors of failed trial of labor in obese nulliparous].

    PubMed

    Carassou-Maillan, A; Mulliez, A; Curinier, S; Houlle, C; Canis, M; Lemery, D; Gallot, D

    2014-11-01

    To identify predictors of failed trial of labour (TOL) in obese nulliparous at term. Retrospective study about 213 nulliparous with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30kg/m(2) who delivered a vertex singleton after 37 weeks of gestation (WG). Planned caesarean sections were excluded. Maternal, sonographic, per-partum and neonatal characteristics were analyzed according to the mode of entry into labor and delivery route. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed. The cesarean delivery rate was 28%. Induction of labor (aOR=4.3 [1.8-10.7]), prolonged pregnancy (aOR=10.8 [1.7-67.6]), macrosomia (aOR=5.6 [1.1-27.3]), meconium-stained amniotic fluid (aOR: 2.57 [1.03-6.42]), use of trinitrine (aOR=5.5 [1.39-21.6]) and neonatal head circumference greater than 35cm (aOR=3.1 [1.2-8.0]) were predictors of failed TOL. There was no significant correlation between failed TOL and preconceptional BMI. Univariate analysis revealed an association between excessive weight gain and failed TOL. Predictors of failed TOL are the same in obese and non-obese women. Preconceptional BMI does not predict failed TOL in this nulliparous obese population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  18. Commentary on Predictors of Failed Primary Abdominal Closure in the Trauma Patient with an Open Abdomen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    initial TAC after index laparotomy, nutrition sup- port in patients with an open abdomen , methods for ongoing TAC to include fascial-based and negative...trauma patient with an open abdomen " 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Lundy J. B., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Z39-18 Commentary on ‘‘Predictors of Failed Primary Abdominal Closure in the Trauma Patient with an Open Abdomen ’’ Jonathan B. Lundy, MD Damage

  19. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  20. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  1. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  2. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  3. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  4. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  5. Remotely Monitored Sealing Array Software

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-12

    The Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA) utilizes the Secure Sensor Platform (SSP) framework to establish the fundamental operating capabilities for communication, security, power management, and cryptography. In addition to the SSP framework the RMSA software has unique capabilities to support monitoring a fiber optic seal. Fiber monitoring includes open and closed as well as parametric monitoring to detect tampering attacks. The fiber monitoring techniques, using the SSP power management processes, allow the seals to last for years while maintaining the security requirements of the monitoring application. The seal is enclosed in a tamper resistant housing with software to support active tamper monitoring. New features include LED notification of fiber closure, the ability to retrieve the entire fiber optic history via translator command, separate memory storage for fiber optic events, and a more robust method for tracking and resending failed messages.

  6. Failed supernovae explain the compact remnant mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2014-04-10

    One explanation for the absence of higher mass red supergiants (16.5 M {sub ☉} ≲ M ≲ 25 M {sub ☉}) as the progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) is that they die in failed SNe creating black holes. Simulations show that such failed SNe still eject their hydrogen envelopes in a weak transient, leaving a black hole with the mass of the star's helium core (5-8 M {sub ☉}). Here we show that this naturally explains the typical masses of observed black holes and the gap between neutron star and black hole masses without any fine-tuning of stellar mass loss, binary mass transfer, or the SN mechanism, beyond having it fail in a mass range where many progenitor models have density structures that make the explosions more likely to fail. There is no difficulty including this ∼20% population of failed SNe in any accounting of SN types over the progenitor mass function. And, other than patience, there is no observational barrier to either detecting these black hole formation events or limiting their rates to be well below this prediction.

  7. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  8. Scalable and fail-safe deployment of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system Rucio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassnig, M.; Vigne, R.; Beermann, T.; Barisits, M.; Garonne, V.; Serfon, C.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution details the deployment of Rucio, the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The main complication is that Rucio interacts with a wide variety of external services, and connects globally distributed data centres under different technological and administrative control, at an unprecedented data volume. It is therefore not possible to create a duplicate instance of Rucio for testing or integration. Every software upgrade or configuration change is thus potentially disruptive and requires fail-safe software and automatic error recovery. Rucio uses a three-layer scaling and mitigation strategy based on quasi-realtime monitoring. This strategy mainly employs independent stateless services, automatic failover, and service migration. The technologies used for deployment and mitigation include OpenStack, Puppet, Graphite, HAProxy and Apache. In this contribution, the interplay between these components, their deployment, software mitigation, and the monitoring strategy are discussed.

  9. [Healthcare marketing elements].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Marketing puts its foundation on a few key concepts: need-demand, product-service, satisfaction, exchange, market, or business structure manufacturing / supply. The combination of these elements allows you to build an effective marketing strategy. Crucial in this respect is to remember the Porter matrix, which shows that for a correct analysis of the relevant market is necessary to refer to the "five forces at play", ie: customers, competitors, new entrants and substitutes threat. Another key lever for proper marketing oriented approach is the continuous and constant monitoring of the application, anticipating their dissatisfactions.

  10. Failed Pavlik harness treatment for DDH as a risk factor for avascular necrosis.

    PubMed

    Tiruveedhula, Madhu; Reading, Isabel C; Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2015-03-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is an irreversible complication seen in the treatment of developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH) with the Pavlik harness. Its incidence is reported to be low after successful reduction of the hip but high if the hip is not concentrically relocated. We aim to investigate its incidence after failed Pavlik harness treatment. We prospectively followed up a group of children who failed Pavlik harness treatment for DDH treated at our institution by the senior author between 1988 and 2001 and compared their rates of AVN with a group of children who presented late and hence were treated surgically. AVN was graded as described by Kalamchi and MacEwen and only grade 2 to 4 AVN was considered significant and included in the analysis. Thirty-seven hips were included in the failed Pavlik group (group 1) and 86 hips in the no Pavlik group (group 2). Ten hips in group 1 developed AVN (27%), whereas only 7 hips in group 2 (8%) developed AVN; the odds of developing AVN after failed Pavlik treatment was 4.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-14.1) (P=0.009) with a relative risk of 3.32 (range, 1.37 to 8.05). There was no statistically significant association observed with duration of splintage and severity of AVN (Spearman's correlation, -0.46; P=0.18). However, there was a positive correlation noted with age at presentation and severity of AVN. Therefore, we advise close monitoring of hips in the Pavlik harness and discontinue its use if the hips are not reduced within 3 weeks. Level III.

  11. Elevated Cytosolic Na+ Increases Mitochondrial Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Failing Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Liu, Ting; Knopp, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Ong, Mei Fang; Böhm, Michael; O'Rourke, Brian; Maack, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Background —Oxidative stress is causally linked to the progression of heart failure, and mitochondria are critical sources of reactive oxygen species in failing myocardium. We previously observed that in heart failure, elevated cytosolic Na+ ([Na+]i) reduces mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) by accelerating Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Because the regeneration of antioxidative enzymes requires NADPH, which is indirectly regenerated by the Krebs cycle, and Krebs cycle dehydrogenases are activated by [Ca2+]m, we speculated that in failing myocytes, elevated [Na+]i promotes oxidative stress. Methods and Results —We used a patch-clamp–based approach to simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ and, alternatively, mitochondrial H2O2 together with NAD(P)H in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Cells were depolarized in a voltage-clamp mode (3 Hz), and a transition of workload was induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. During this transition, NAD(P)H initially oxidized but recovered when [Ca2+]m increased. The transient oxidation of NAD(P)H was closely associated with an increase in mitochondrial H2O2 formation. This reactive oxygen species formation was potentiated when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was blocked (by Ru360) or Ca2+ efflux was accelerated (by elevation of [Na+]i). In failing myocytes, H2O2 formation was increased, which was prevented by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Conclusions —Besides matching energy supply and demand, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake critically regulates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. In heart failure, elevated [Na+]i promotes reactive oxygen species formation by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. This novel mechanism, by which defects in ion homeostasis induce oxidative stress, represents a potential drug target to reduce reactive oxygen species production in the failing heart. PMID:20351235

  12. Trace elements and bone health.

    PubMed

    Zofková, Ivana; Nemcikova, Petra; Matucha, Petr

    2013-08-01

    The importance of nutrition factors such as calcium, vitamin D and vitamin K for the integrity of the skeleton is well known. Moreover, bone health is positively influenced by certain elements (e.g., zinc, copper, fluorine, manganese, magnesium, iron and boron). Deficiency of these elements slows down the increase of bone mass in childhood and/or in adolescence and accelerates bone loss after menopause or in old age. Deterioration of bone quality increases the risk of fractures. Monitoring of homeostasis of the trace elements together with the measurement of bone density and biochemical markers of bone metabolism should be used to identify and treat patients at risk of non-traumatic fractures. Factors determining the effectivity of supplementation include dose, duration of treatment, serum concentrations, as well as interactions among individual elements. Here, we review the effect of the most important trace elements on the skeleton and evaluate their clinical importance.

  13. Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    The Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System is a robotic device that will load and weld top end plugs onto nuclear fuel elements in a highly radioactive and inert gas environment. The system was developed at Argonne National Laboratory-West as part of the Fuel Cycle Demonstration. The welding system performs four main functions, it (1) injects a small amount of a xenon/krypton gas mixture into specific fuel elements, and (2) loads tiny end plugs into the tops of fuel element jackets, and (3) welds the end plugs to the element jackets, and (4) performs a dimensional inspection of the pre- and post-welded fuel elements. The system components are modular to facilitate remote replacement of failed parts. The entire system can be operated remotely in manual, semi-automatic, or fully automatic modes using a computer control system. The welding system is currently undergoing software testing and functional checkout.

  14. Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System is a robotic device that will load and weld top end plugs onto nuclear fuel elements in a highly radioactive and inert gas environment. The system was developed at Argonne National Laboratory-West as part of the Fuel Cycle Demonstration. The welding system performs four main functions, it (1) injects a small amount of a xenon/krypton gas mixture into specific fuel elements, and (2) loads tiny end plugs into the tops of fuel element jackets, and (3) welds the end plugs to the element jackets, and (4) performs a dimensional inspection of the pre- and post-welded fuel elements. The system components are modular to facilitate remote replacement of failed parts. The entire system can be operated remotely in manual, semi-automatic, or fully automatic modes using a computer control system. The welding system is currently undergoing software testing and functional checkout.

  15. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  16. Element material experiment by EFFU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Yoshihiro; Ichikawa, Masaaki; Takei, Mitsuru; Torii, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazuo

    1995-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of JAPAN (NASDA) is planning to perform Element Material Exposure Experiment using Exposed Facility Flyer Unit (EFFU). Several materials which will be used on JEM (Japanese Experiment Module for the space station) will be exposed. Space environment monitoring is also planned in this experiment. Several ground based tests are now being performed and getting useful data.

  17. 9 CFR 442.5 - Handling of failed product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Handling of failed product. 442.5 Section 442.5 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION ACT AND THE POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT...

  18. Plasma Brightenings in a Failed Solar Filament Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.

    2017-03-01

    Failed filament eruptions are solar eruptions that are not associated with coronal mass ejections. In a failed filament eruption, the filament materials usually show some ascending and falling motions as well as generating bright EUV emissions. Here we report a failed filament eruption (SOL2016-07-22) that occurred in a quiet-Sun region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In this event, the filament spreads out but gets confined by the surrounding magnetic field. When interacting with the ambient magnetic field, the filament material brightens up and flows along the magnetic field lines through the corona to the chromosphere. We find that some materials slide down along the lifting magnetic structure containing the filament and impact the chromosphere, and through kinetic energy dissipation, cause two ribbon-like brightenings in a wide temperature range. There is evidence suggesting that magnetic reconnection occurs between the filament magnetic structure and the surrounding magnetic fields where filament plasma is heated to coronal temperatures. In addition, thread-like brightenings show up on top of the erupting magnetic fields at low temperatures, which might be produced by an energy imbalance from a fast drop of radiative cooling due to plasma rarefaction. Thus, this single event of a failed filament eruption shows the existence of a variety of plasma brightenings that may be caused by completely different heating mechanisms.

  19. When Anaphor Resolution Fails: Partial Encoding of Anaphoric Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klin, Celia M.; Guzman, Alexandria E.; Weingartner, Kristin M.; Ralano, Angela S.

    2006-01-01

    Klin et al., 2004 and Levine et al., 2000 concluded that readers fail to resolve noun phrase anaphors when the antecedent is difficult to retrieve from memory and the inference is not necessary for comprehension. In four experiments we investigated the hypothesis that these inferences were actually partially encoded. Although the results of a…

  20. Majority-voted logic fail-sense circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Fail-sense circuit has majority-voted logic component which receives three error voltage signals that are sensed at single point by three error amplifiers. If transistor shorts, only one signal is required to operate; if transistor opens, two signals are required.

  1. 9 CFR 442.5 - Handling of failed product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Handling of failed product. 442.5 Section 442.5 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... upon testing in accordance with the methods prescribed in § 442.2 of this subchapter shall be handled...

  2. 9 CFR 442.5 - Handling of failed product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Handling of failed product. 442.5 Section 442.5 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... upon testing in accordance with the methods prescribed in § 442.2 of this subchapter shall be handled...

  3. What is the optimal rate of failed extubation?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Failed extubation (FE), defined as reintubation 48 or 72 hours after planned extubation, occurs in a significant percentage of patients and is associated with a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality. This commentary reviews the literature describing FE rates and the clinical consequences of FE and proposes an 'optimal' rate of FE as well as avenues for future research. PMID:22356725

  4. A "Fresh Start" for a "Failing School"? A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines "Fresh Start," a New Labour flagship initiative to raise education "standards" in a radical and innovative way. Drawing on a qualitative study of a comprehensive school in England, I argue that the initiative added to the problems faced by the "failing school" and promoted rather traditional ways…

  5. Failing Boys! Beyond Crisis, Moral Panic and Limiting Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    For some time now, school boards, Ministries of Education, and the popular media have been expressing concerns about failing boys and how best to meet their needs, framing these concerns in terms of a crisis in which boys are the "new disadvantaged". This perspective does not provide an accurate representation of the problem and, in fact, detracts…

  6. 78 FR 54373 - Records of Failed Insured Depository Institutions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    .../individual/failed/pls/ ; www.fdic.gov/regulations/compliance/manual/pdf/II-8.1.pdf . The ``reasonably... instances where the FDIC issues a final rule as defined by the APA (5 U.S.C. 551 et seq.). Because the FDIC is issuing a final rule as defined by the APA, the FDIC will file the reports required by the SBREFA...

  7. "It's All Human Error!": When a School Science Experiment Fails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viechnicki, Gail Brendel; Kuipers, Joel

    2006-01-01

    This paper traces the sophisticated negotiations to re-inscribe the authority of Nature when a school science experiment fails during the enactment of a highly rated science curriculum unit. Drawing on transcriptions from classroom videotapes, we identify and describe four primary patterns of interaction that characterize this process, arguing…

  8. What to do after a failed attempt of vacuum delivery?

    PubMed

    Sadan, Oscar; Ginath, Shimon; Gomel, Andrei; Abramov, Dora; Rotmensch, Sigi; Boaz, Mona; Glezerman, Marek

    2003-04-25

    To determine whether there is a difference in maternal and neonatal outcomes if a sequential operative vaginal or cesarean delivery follows failed vacuum delivery. A cross sectional study. We have analyzed maternal and neonatal outcomes of 215 vacuum extractions (group 1), 106 forceps assisted deliveries (group 2), 28 deliveries in which failed vacuum extraction were followed by forceps delivery (group 3) and 22 deliveries in which failed vacuum extraction were followed by cesarean delivery (group 4). Compared to other groups, patients in group 4 had significantly more post partum anemia, meconium stained amniotic fluid and hospital stay (both maternal and neonatal) as well as lower pH. Apgar scores were similar in groups 3 and 4. Incidence of respiratory distress syndrome, cephalhematoma and jaundice were similar in neonates of all groups. If an attempted vacuum delivery has failed, the risk of adverse neonatal outcome is increased with either subsequent forceps or cesarean delivery. It should remain in the judgment of the attending obstetrician to choose the method most suitable under the given circumstances. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  9. 7 CFR 983.152 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Failed lots/rework procedure. 983.152 Section 983.152 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  10. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Failed lots/rework procedure. 983.52 Section 983.52 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  11. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  12. When Consensus Decision-Making Fails: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Grant T.

    Habermas's theory of dialogue was used to evaluate the process of decision making that occurred in a labor-management committee's meeting to discuss flextime. The study attempted to determine why, at that meeting, the committee's consensus process of decision making failed. W.R. Bion's theory of unconscious group motives was also used to…

  13. A Preparation Mystery: Why Some Succeed and Others Fail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyle, John R.

    2007-01-01

    If leadership education programs are improving, then why do some American graduates fail in leading schools and districts even as others succeed? As one way to answer this question, this study explores the preparation, careers, and success or failure of two superintendents prepared in top tier university leadership preparation doctoral programs.…

  14. Counselor Liability for Failing to Report Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Samuel

    1983-01-01

    Describes the laws regarding counselor liability for failure to report child abuse and state laws designating mandated reporters of suspected child abuse. Notes how the law protects mandated reporters. Discusses criminal penalties for those who fail to report suspected abuse. (RC)

  15. 7 CFR 983.152 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... procedure for aflatoxin. If inshell rework is selected as a remedy to meet the aflatoxin regulations of this... product shall be reported to the committee. The reworked lot shall be sampled and tested for aflatoxin as... the lot has been reworked and tested, it fails the aflatoxin test for a second time, the lot may be...

  16. Super-Earths as Failed Cores in Orbital Migration Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    I explore whether close-in super-Earths were formed as rocky bodies that failed to grow fast enough to become the cores of gas giants before the natal protostellar disk dispersed. I model the failed cores’ inward orbital migration in the low-mass or type I regime to stopping points at distances where the tidal interaction with the protostellar disk applies zero net torque. The three kinds of migration traps considered are those due to the dead zone's outer edge, the ice line, and the transition from accretion to starlight as the disk's main heat source. As the disk disperses, the traps move toward final positions near or just outside 1 au. Planets at this location exceeding about 3 M ⊕ open a gap, decouple from their host traps, and migrate inward in the high-mass or type II regime to reach the vicinity of the star. I synthesize the population of planets that formed in this scenario, finding that a fraction of the observed super-Earths could have been failed cores. Most super-Earths that formed this way have more than 4 M ⊕, so their orbits when the disks dispersed were governed by type II migration. These planets have solid cores surrounded by gaseous envelopes. Their subsequent photoevaporative mass loss is most effective for masses originally below about 6 M ⊕. The failed core scenario suggests a division of the observed super-Earth mass-radius diagram into five zones according to the inferred formation history.

  17. Motorcyclists' speed and "looked-but-failed-to-see" accidents.

    PubMed

    Clabaux, Nicolas; Brenac, Thierry; Perrin, Christophe; Magnin, Joël; Canu, Bastien; Van Elslande, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Previous research on motorcycle crashes has shown the frequency and severity of accidents in which a non-priority road user failed to give way to an approaching motorcyclist without seeing him/her, even though the road user had looked in the approaching motorcycle's direction and the motorcycle was visible. These accidents are usually called "looked-but-failed-to-see" (LBFS) accidents. This article deals with the effects that the motorcyclist's speed has in these accidents. It is based on the in-depth study and precise kinematic reconstruction of 44 accident cases involving a motorcyclist and another road user, all occurring in intersections. The results show that, in urban environments, the initial speeds of motorcyclists involved in "looked-but-failed-to-see" accidents are significantly higher than in other accidents at intersections. In rural environments, the difference in speed between LBFS accidents and other accidents is not significant, but further investigations would be necessary to draw any conclusions. These results suggest that speed management, through road design or by other means, could contribute to preventing "looked-but-failed-to-see" motorcycle accidents, at least in urban environments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Why Young People Fail To Get and Hold Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Labor, Albany.

    This booklet provides advice to young people seeking their first jobs on how to avoid the pitfalls that have caused others to lose jobs or fail to be hired. Topics discussed in short, one-page sections include appearance, attitude and behavior, ignorance of labor market facts, misrepresentation, sensitivity about a physical defect, unrealistic…

  19. 7 CFR 718.103 - Prevented planted and failed acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... failed acreage. (a) Prevented planting is the inability to plant an eligible crop with proper equipment... the crop; (2) Occurred before the final planting date for the crop in the applicable crop year or, in... the producer's intent to plant the crop acreage and possession of, or access to, resources to plant...

  20. "It's All Human Error!": When a School Science Experiment Fails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viechnicki, Gail Brendel; Kuipers, Joel

    2006-01-01

    This paper traces the sophisticated negotiations to re-inscribe the authority of Nature when a school science experiment fails during the enactment of a highly rated science curriculum unit. Drawing on transcriptions from classroom videotapes, we identify and describe four primary patterns of interaction that characterize this process, arguing…

  1. Improving Charter School Accountability: The Challenge of Closing Failing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, David

    2012-01-01

    Today some 5,600 charter schools are in operation, with more than two million students. Some critics persist in a fruitless argument that these schools have failed, despite a mountain of evidence to the contrary. But regardless of your opinion about them, charter schools are here to stay. Those concerned about public education should quit debating…

  2. Solutions for Failing High Schools: Converging Visions and Promising Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legters, Nettie; Balfanz, Robert; McPartland, James

    Promising solutions to the failings of traditional comprehensive high schools were reviewed to identify basic principles and strategies for improving high schools nationwide. Selected research studies, policy documents, and promising high school programs were reviewed. The review revealed the following principles for helping high schools better…

  3. Why the Merit Pay System Failed in the Federal Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Buddy Robert S.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the implementation of the merit pay system in the federal government and the ten unsurmountable problems that caused it to fail; i.e., unintended statutory provisions, open-ended regulations, novice technical assistance, drifting implementation policies, administrative errors, complicated systems, inconsistent employee treatment,…

  4. Majority-voted logic fail-sense circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Fail-sense circuit has majority-voted logic component which receives three error voltage signals that are sensed at single point by three error amplifiers. If transistor shorts, only one signal is required to operate; if transistor opens, two signals are required.

  5. Remember John Holt and "How Children Fail?" A Book Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Kevin C.

    2006-01-01

    In the book, "How Children Fail", John Holt simply but honestly records classroom interactions in a refreshing, realistic and humorous style of delivery. Many of Holt's real stories have to do with teachers often falling into the trap of asking students questions and looking only for "right answers." Holt's main thrust is child failure in a…

  6. "Badminton Player-Coach" Interactions between Failing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascret, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical education teachers often use the player-coach dyad in individual opposition sports so that students can obtain information on their actions and then better regulate them. This type of work also develops methodological and social skills. However, the task of observing a partner often poses problems for failing students, who…

  7. "Badminton Player-Coach" Interactions between Failing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascret, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical education teachers often use the player-coach dyad in individual opposition sports so that students can obtain information on their actions and then better regulate them. This type of work also develops methodological and social skills. However, the task of observing a partner often poses problems for failing students, who…

  8. Management of adults with prior failed hypospadias surgery

    PubMed Central

    Craig, James R.; Wallis, Chad; Brant, William O.; Hotaling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypospadias is one of the most prevalent anomalies of the male genitalia. Contemporary hypospadias repair is very successful, but patients that have the surgery fail often require multiple surgeries throughout their life. Complications from failed hypospadias repairs have a significant impact on patients both psychologically and physically. Failed hypospadias repair encompasses a spectrum of problems that include hypospadias recurrence with an ectopic meatus, urethral fistula, urethral stricture, and ventral penile curvature. Repairs of hypospadias complications can be challenging due to the poor quality of surrounding tissue from disruption of normal vasculature in the re-operative field associated with the underlying disorder. One of the most challenging issues is dealing with urethral strictures. There have been multiple methods described at repairs of these in both a single stage and multiple staged procedures. Particular attention has been directed towards applications of grafts due to worse outcomes with flaps. Buccal mucosa has emerged as the leading graft material in staged repairs. When counseling patients with failed hypospadias it is important to discuss the expected outcome as repairs directed towards a terminally positioned meatus with a straight phallus may require multiple surgeries due to post-operative complications as well as the necessity of proceeding in a staged approach. PMID:26816767

  9. Civil Liability for Failing to Report Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Neil J.

    1977-01-01

    The article examines the Landeros decision (which ruled that a doctor who fails to report a child abuse victim can be held liable for subsequent injuries inflicted on the child) and discusses three theories of proving civil liability for the failure to report child abuse victims. Addressed are the following topics: the problem of child abuse and…

  10. Failing Boys! Beyond Crisis, Moral Panic and Limiting Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    For some time now, school boards, Ministries of Education, and the popular media have been expressing concerns about failing boys and how best to meet their needs, framing these concerns in terms of a crisis in which boys are the "new disadvantaged". This perspective does not provide an accurate representation of the problem and, in fact, detracts…

  11. 7 CFR 983.152 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... procedure for aflatoxin. If inshell rework is selected as a remedy to meet the aflatoxin regulations of this... product shall be reported to the committee. The reworked lot shall be sampled and tested for aflatoxin as... the lot has been reworked and tested, it fails the aflatoxin test for a second time, the lot may...

  12. 7 CFR 983.152 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... procedure for aflatoxin. If inshell rework is selected as a remedy to meet the aflatoxin regulations of this... product shall be reported to the committee. The reworked lot shall be sampled and tested for aflatoxin as... the lot has been reworked and tested, it fails the aflatoxin test for a second time, the lot may...

  13. 7 CFR 983.152 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... procedure for aflatoxin. If inshell rework is selected as a remedy to meet the aflatoxin regulations of this... product shall be reported to the committee. The reworked lot shall be sampled and tested for aflatoxin as... the lot has been reworked and tested, it fails the aflatoxin test for a second time, the lot may...

  14. Understanding and Working with "Failed Communication" in Telecollaborative Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dowd, Robert; Ritter, Markus

    2006-01-01

    It is by now well established that telecollaborative exchanges frequently end in "failed communication" and do not automatically bring about successful negotiation of meaning between the learners. Instead, the intended pedagogic and linguistic aims of online interaction are repeatedly missed, and projects may end in low levels of participation,…

  15. Failed dental implants: diagnosis, removal and survival of reimplantations.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Gary; Cavallaro, John

    2014-08-01

    Over time, the percentage of dental implants that fail increases because of biological and technical issues. Inevitably, clinicians will dedicate more time to dealing with ailing and failing dental implants. The authors searched the literature for articles that addressed diagnostic manifestations of failed implants and reasons for their demise, as well as survival rates of dental implant reimplantations. The authors found that there is no precise cut point (besides 100 percent) with regard to the amount of bone loss in the absence of mobility that indicates an implant has failed. The decision to treat or explant an ailing implant is a judgment call by the treating clinician. Survival rates found in the literature after first and second reimplantations ranged from 71 percent to 100 percent and 50 percent to 100 percent, respectively. The 100 percent findings were based on small groups of implants, and there were scant data addressing implant survival after second reimplantations. The decision to remove an implant needs to be based on clinical assessments, radiographic evaluations or both. If the implant is deemed hopeless, there are devices that facilitate their removal. Furthermore, reimplantations can be performed successfully, but their survival rate appears to be lower than that of implants placed at sites from which they were not lost formerly. Ailing dental implants should not be condemned prematurely, because patients often respond to treatment of peri-implantitis. Many patients desire reimplantations in sites in which implants have failed. This procedure is valuable, especially if it makes possible the fabrication of an implant-supported fixed or removable prosthesis.

  16. Epiconjunctival mitomycin-C application for early failing filtering blebs.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aparna; Chatterjee, Sushanta

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of epiconjunctival Mitomycin-C (MMC) application in early failing filtering blebs. Interventional case series. Patients with failing blebs and raised intraocular pressure (IOP) in the early (two weeks to one month) postoperative period following glaucoma filtering surgery. A retrospective analysis of records of failed blebs was done for the period of April 2011-March 2012. Patients who were subjected to three applications of MMC (0.04%) applied over the conjunctiva directly over the bleb at baseline (visit1), one week (visit 2) and at one month (visit 3) were included. Bleb characteristics were graded in a blinded fashion by one independent ophthalmologist, while IOP during follow-up visits were analyzed. Intraocular pressure, need for additional measure, or medications and bleb characteristics as graded by Indiana classification. Ten eyes of nine patients with failing blebs received topical MMC, including included eight males and one female with a mean age of 52 ± 18 years (trabeculectomy:combined surgery = 5:5). Complete success was seen in eight of 10 eyes with a final mean IOP of 14 ± 2.9 mm Hg at three months. Excluding the two eyes that required medications, IOP reduction of 9%-42% was seen at visit 2, 16-57% IOP reduction at visit 3, and 16-56% at three months' follow-up. Of eight eyes, all eyes showed decrease in vascularity of the blebs, p < 0.001. While the height of the blebs did not show significant increase, all had increase in the avascular area of the bleb. One eye developed spontaneously resolving adenoviral conjunctivitis without any sequelae. Three applications of epiconjunctival MMC may be a safe alternative for salvaging failing blebs in the early postoperative period. This may help maximize anti-fibrotic effect of MMC while minimizing complications by limiting the area of contact.

  17. Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty after failed penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jangi, Anisha A; Ritterband, David C; Wu, Elaine I; Mehta, Veeral V; Koplin, Richard S; Seedor, John A

    2012-10-01

    To report the rate of graft dislocation, surgical anatomic success, and postsurgical complications associated with Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) after previous primary failed penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Institutional review board-approved, single-center, retrospective chart review study of 30 eyes of 30 patients with prior failed PK who underwent DSAEK with a minimum of 3 months follow-up. Primary outcomes measured included rates of anatomic success and failure, postoperative complications, lenticle size, visual acuity, intraocular pressure change, and a report of external factors that may affect success. Thirty eyes of 30 patients were identified. The primary dislocation rate was 16.7%. Five primary DSAEKs detached; 1 was successfully rebubbled in the office, 2 had repeat successful DSAEKs, and 2 failed on a second attempt and had a subsequent PK. Despite successful anatomic attachment, 1 eye had primary graft failure, 3 that cleared initially failed within 6 months, and 1 that successfully cleared had subsequent graft rejection resulting in failure at 6 months. The 2 eyes requiring PK were excluded from the visual outcomes analysis, leaving 28 eyes with successfully attached lenticles. At 3 months postoperatively, of the 28 eyes, 19 showed an improvement in visual acuity, 6 had no change in vision from preoperative data, and 1 had worsening of vision (anatomic attachment but endothelial failure). Two of the 28 eyes had no data at that time point. DSAEK eyes after failed PK demonstrated improved vision with a low complication rate in a majority of patients. The graft dislocation rate and postoperative complications rates are comparable with the primary DSAEK dislocation rates in our own published series and in the literature.

  18. Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Honekamp, John R.; Fryer, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

  19. MCO Monitoring activity description

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-11-09

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

  20. Failed surrogate conceptions: social and ethical aspects of preconception disruptions during commercial surrogacy in India.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sayani; Schicktanz, Silke

    2016-09-19

    During a commercial surrogacy arrangement, the event of embryo transfer can be seen as the formal starting point of the arrangement. However, it is common for surrogates to undergo a failed attempt at pregnancy conception or missed conception after an embryo transfer. This paper attempts to argue that such failed attempts can be understood as a loss. It aims to reconstruct the experiences of loss and grief of the surrogates and the intended parents as a consequence of their collective failure to conceive a surrogate pregnancy. Drawing on a qualitative study conducted over a period of eight months between 2014 and 2015 at two fertility clinics in Delhi and two in Kolkata, India, this paper examines the experiences of the surrogates and the intended parents when faced with missed conceptions or failed conceptions during a surrogacy arrangement. We argue that while the surrogate grieves the non-arrival of a 'good news' as an uncertain loss, the intended parents experience yet another, failure in addition to the losses they might have incurred during their previous fertility treatments. The body of the surrogate becomes a site of 'a lost opportunity'. The surrogate embodies a loss in her quest to achieve social mobility and the intended parents experience a disembodied pregnancy loss. This very emotional experience stands in stark contrast to the conceptualisation of such failed attempts as non-events within the discourse of the surrogacy industry. The experience of loss of the intended parents is recognised but their grief is given no space. We argue that such ambiguity around the nature of losses resulting out of a missed or failed conception during surrogacy is an outcome of lack of interpersonal relationship between the surrogate and the intended parents. Since commercial surrogacy is a relational process, the only way in which the experiences of losses and failures of the actors at the preconception stage can be better addressed is through developing close

  1. Fail-safe transcription termination: Because one is never enough

    PubMed Central

    Lemay, Jean-François; Bachand, François

    2015-01-01

    Termination of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription is a fundamental step of gene expression that involves the release of the nascent transcript and dissociation of RNAPII from the DNA template. As transcription termination is intimately linked to RNA 3′ end processing, termination pathways have a key decisive influence on the fate of the transcribed RNA. Quite remarkably, when reaching the 3′ end of genes, a substantial fraction of RNAPII fail to terminate transcription, requiring the contribution of alternative or “fail-safe” mechanisms of termination to release the polymerase. This point of view covers redundant mechanisms of transcription termination and how they relate to conventional termination models. In particular, we expand on recent findings that propose a reverse torpedo model of termination, in which the 3′5′ exonucleolytic activity of the RNA exosome targets transcription events associated with paused and backtracked RNAPII. PMID:26273910

  2. Reorganized PKA-AKAP associations in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thin-Thin; Soni, Siddarth; van Veen, Toon A B; van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Cappadona, Salvatore; Varro, Andras; de Weger, Roel A; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Vos, Marc A; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2012-02-01

    Here we reveal that the characterization of large-scale re-arrangements of signaling scaffolds induced by heart failure can serve as a novel concept to identify more specific therapeutic targets. In the mammalian heart, the cAMP pathway, with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in a central role, acts directly downstream of adrenergic receptors to mediate cardiac contractility and rhythm. Heart failure, characterized by severe alterations in adrenergic stimulation is, amongst other interventions, often treated with β-blockers. Contrasting results, however, have shown both beneficial and detrimental effects of decreased cAMP levels in failing hearts. We hypothesize that the origin of this behavior lies in the complex spatiotemporal organization of the regulatory subunit of PKA (PKA-R), which associates tightly with various A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) to specifically localize PKA's activity. Using chemical proteomics directly applied to human patient and control heart tissue we demonstrate that the association profile of PKA-R with several AKAPs is severely altered in the failing heart, for instance effecting the interaction between PKA and the novel AKAP SPHKAP was 6-fold upregulated upon failing heart conditions. Also a significant increase in captured cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) was observed. The observed altered profiles can already explain many aspects of the aberrant cAMP-response in the failing human heart, validating that this dataset may provide a resource for several novel, more specific, treatment options. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes".

  3. Fail-safe designs for large capacity battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Gi-Heon; Smith, Kandler; Ireland, John; Pesaran, Ahmad A.; Neubauer, Jeremy

    2016-05-17

    Fail-safe systems and design methodologies for large capacity battery systems are disclosed. The disclosed systems and methodologies serve to locate a faulty cell in a large capacity battery, such as a cell having an internal short circuit, determine whether the fault is evolving, and electrically isolate the faulty cell from the rest of the battery, preventing further electrical energy from feeding into the fault.

  4. Paying for innovation. Failed strategies add to hospitals' reimbursement losses.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    Hospitals across the country are struggling to balance revenue shortfalls and cost increases as the lid on government and private-payer payments closes tighter. They're also grappling with losses on failed physician and HMO investments, the expense of new medical technologies and larger-than-planned costs related to "millennium bug" cures. This is the second part of a two-part series on financial turmoil in healthcare.

  5. Results of Trabectome Surgery Following Failed Glaucoma Tube Shunt Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mosaed, Sameh; Chak, Garrick; Haider, Asghar; Lin, Ken Y.; Minckler, Don S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Trabectome after failed tube shunt surgery. Twenty patients with prior failed tube shunt surgery who underwent Trabectome alone were included. All patients had at least 3 months of follow-up. Outcomes measured included intraocular pressure (IOP), glaucoma medications, and secondary glaucoma surgeries. The success for Kaplan–Meier survival analysis is defined as IOP ≤21 mm Hg, IOP reduced by at least 20% from preoperative IOP, and no secondary glaucoma surgery. Mean preoperative IOP was 23.7 ± 6.4 mm Hg and mean number of glaucoma medications was 3.2 ± 1.5. At 12 months, IOP was reduced to 15.5 ± 3.2 mm Hg (P = 0.05) and number of medications was reduced to 2.4 ± 1.5 (P = 0.44). Survival rate at 12 months was 84% and 3 patients required additional glaucoma surgery with 15 patients reaching 12 months follow-up. Other than failure of IOP control and transient hypotony (IOP < 3 mm Hg) day 1 in 2 cases, there were no adverse events. Trabecular bypass procedures have traditionally been considered an approach appropriate for early-to-moderate glaucoma; however, our study indicates benefit in refractory glaucoma as well. Eyes that are prone to conjunctival scarring and hypertrophic wound healing, such as those who have failed tube shunt surgery, may benefit from procedures that avoid conjunctival incision such as Trabectome. This study indicates potential benefits in this patient population. Trabectome was safe and effective in reducing IOP at 1-year follow-up in patients with prior failed tube shunt surgery, but not effective in reducing medication reliance in these patients. PMID:26222842

  6. The Failings of the Law of Definite Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suchow, Lawrence

    1975-01-01

    Indicates that the concept of definite proportions or constant composition should be introduced with qualification. Presents arguments against the Law of Definite Proportions and cites examples in the areas of solid solutions, compounds of the transition and inner transition elements, and in some compounds of the representative elements. (GS)

  7. The Failings of the Law of Definite Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suchow, Lawrence

    1975-01-01

    Indicates that the concept of definite proportions or constant composition should be introduced with qualification. Presents arguments against the Law of Definite Proportions and cites examples in the areas of solid solutions, compounds of the transition and inner transition elements, and in some compounds of the representative elements. (GS)

  8. Monitoring materials

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  9. Rescue of failed filtering blebs with ab interno trephination.

    PubMed

    Shihadeh, Wisam A; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ab interno automated trephination as a technique for rescuing failed mature filtering blebs. A retrospective chart review of 40 failed blebs of 38 patients who had a posttrephination follow-up period of at least 3 months was done. With success defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) <21 mm Hg and at least a 20% reduction from baseline on the same or fewer number of pretrephination medications, 30/40 eyes (75%) fit these criteria over the entire course of follow-up. Among all 40 eyes, there was a significant reduction of IOP from pretrephination to 3 months (P<.001). The percentage of patients requiring 2 or more medications declined from 90% pretrephination to 21% at 3 months (P<.0001), and was stable thereafter. Some patients were able to eliminate all medications. Patients who did not meet the criteria of success regained successful IOP control with other modalities of management. Complications were few. We believe that ab interno trephination is an excellent option for rescuing selected failed filtering blebs.

  10. Revision of failed gastric banding to mini-gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Robert

    2006-04-01

    Although laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) has been found to be a generally successful weight loss operation, there are reports of occasional LAGB failure. The results of rescue procedures for these patients are important. The mini-gastric bypass (MGB) is a safe and effective alternative to other bariatric surgical procedures. We report the results of conversion of 3 failed LAGB procedures to MGB. In a series of 2,595 patients who underwent MGB, 3 had previously undergone an LAGB that failed to sustain weight loss. Average operative time was 54 minutes in LAGB conversions to MGB (compared to 37.5 minutes in primary MGB), and length of stay was 1 day. There were no complications in the patients converted MGB. The weight loss in converted MGB patients was similar to the weight loss in primary MGB patients, with a mean weight loss at 1 year of 60 kg (79% of excess weight) Conversion of failed LAGB to MGB was a safe procedure that added approximately 20 minutes to the short MGB operating time. Patient satisfaction was high, recovery was rapid, and weight loss was very good.

  11. The Automated Logistics Element Planning System (ALEPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaab, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    The design and functions of ALEPS (Automated Logistics Element Planning System) is a computer system that will automate planning and decision support for Space Station Freedom Logistical Elements (LEs) resupply and return operations. ALEPS provides data management, planning, analysis, monitoring, interfacing, and flight certification for support of LE flight load planning activities. The prototype ALEPS algorithm development is described.

  12. Failing securely: The processes and support which underpin English nurse mentors' assessment decisions regarding under-performing students.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Louise A; McGee, Paula; Gutteridge, Robin; Hughes, Malcolm

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken in response to concerns that mentors who assessed practical competence were reluctant to fail student nurses which generated doubts about the fitness to practise of some registered nurses. Limited evidence was available about the experiences of mentors who had failed underperforming students and what had helped them to do this. To investigate what enabled some mentors to fail underperforming students when it was recognised that many were hesitant to do so. An ethically approved, grounded theory approach was used to explore thirty-one nurses' experiences of failing student nurses in practical assessments in England. Participants were recruited using theoretical sampling techniques. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. Analysis was undertaken using iterative, constant comparative techniques and reflexive processes. The theoretical framework which emerged had strong resonance with professionals. Five categories emerged from the findings: (1) Braving the assessment vortex; (2) Identifying the 'gist' of underperformance; (3) Tempering Reproach; (4) Standing up to scrutiny; and (5) Drawing on an interpersonal network. These categories together revealed that mentors needed to feel secure to fail a student nurse in a practical assessment and that they used a three stage decision making process to ascertain if this was the case. Many of the components which helped mentors to feel secure were informal in nature and functioned on goodwill and local arrangements rather than on timely, formal, organisational systems. The mentor's partner/spouse and practice education facilitator or link lecturer were identified as the key people who provided essential emotional support during this challenging experience. This study contributes to understanding of the combined supportive elements required for robust practical assessment. It presents a new explanatory framework about how mentors formulate the decision to fail a student nurse and the supportive

  13. Monitoring conservation success in a large oak woodland landscape

    Treesearch

    Rich Reiner; Emma Underwood; John-O Niles

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring is essential in understanding the success or failure of a conservation project and provides the information needed to conduct adaptive management. Although there is a large body of literature on monitoring design, it fails to provide sufficient information to practitioners on how to organize and apply monitoring when implementing landscape-scale conservation...

  14. Examination of failed retrieved temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implants.

    PubMed

    Kerwell, S; Alfaro, M; Pourzal, R; Lundberg, H J; Liao, Y; Sukotjo, C; Mercuri, L G; Mathew, M T

    2016-03-01

    In the management of end-stage temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), surgeons must often resort to alloplastic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) total joint replacement (TJR) to increase mandibular function and form, as well as reduce pain. Understanding wear and failure mechanisms of TMJ TJR implants is important to their in vivo longevity. However, compared to orthopedic TJR devices, functional wear of failed TMJ TJR implants has not been examined. Not only do wear and corrosion influence TJR implant in vivo longevity, but so does reactivity of peri-implant tissue to these two events. The aim of this study was to examine and report on the wear of retrieved, failed metal-on-metal (MoM), metal-on-polymer (MoP), and titanium-nitride coated (TiN Coated) TMJ TJR implant components. A total cohort of 31 TMJ TJR devices were studied of which 28 were failed, retrieved TMJ TJRs, 3 were never implanted devices that served as controls. The mean time from implantation to removal was 7.24 years (range 3-15), SD 3.01. Optical microscopy, White Light Interferometry (WLI), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the surfaces of the devices. Data was acquired and evaluated by analyzing alloy microstructure. Substantial surface damage was observed between the articulating areas of the condylar head and the glenoid fossa components. Damage included pitting corrosion, evidence of deposited corrosion products, specific wear patterns, hard phases, surface depressions, and bi-directional scratches. Electrochemical analysis was performed on the MoM Control, retrieved, failed MoM, and TiN Coated devices. Electrochemical tests consisted of open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests conducted using the condylar head of the retrieved failed devices. EIS confirmed material properties as well as corrosion kinetics in vivo help to mitigate corrosion as reflected by the Raman spectroscopy results. In

  15. Badger macrophages fail to produce nitric oxide, a key anti-mycobacterial effector molecule

    PubMed Central

    Bilham, Kirstin; Boyd, Amy C.; Preston, Stephen G.; Buesching, Christina D.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Smith, Adrian L.

    2017-01-01

    The European badger is recognised as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB); the control of which is complex, costly and controversial. Despite the importance of badgers in bTB and the well-documented role for macrophages as anti-mycobacterial effector cells, badger macrophage (bdMφ) responses remain uncharacterised. Here, we demonstrate that bdMφ fail to produce nitric oxide (NO) or upregulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA following Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist treatment. BdMφ also failed to make NO after stimulation with recombinant badger interferon gamma (bdIFNγ) or a combination of bdIFNγ and lipopolysaccharide. Exposure of bdMφ to TLR agonists and/or bdIFNγ resulted in upregulated cytokine (IL1β, IL6, IL12 and TNFα) mRNA levels indicating that these critical pathways were otherwise intact. Although stimulation with most TLR agonists resulted in strong cytokine mRNA responses, weaker responses were evident after exposure to TLR9 agonists, potentially due to very low expression of TLR9 in bdMφ. Both NO and TLR9 are important elements of innate immunity to mycobacteria, and these features of bdMφ biology would impair their capacity to resist bTB infection. These findings have significant implications for the development of bTB management strategies, and support the use of vaccination to reduce bTB infection in badgers. PMID:28382943

  16. Badger macrophages fail to produce nitric oxide, a key anti-mycobacterial effector molecule.

    PubMed

    Bilham, Kirstin; Boyd, Amy C; Preston, Stephen G; Buesching, Christina D; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W; Smith, Adrian L

    2017-04-06

    The European badger is recognised as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB); the control of which is complex, costly and controversial. Despite the importance of badgers in bTB and the well-documented role for macrophages as anti-mycobacterial effector cells, badger macrophage (bdMφ) responses remain uncharacterised. Here, we demonstrate that bdMφ fail to produce nitric oxide (NO) or upregulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA following Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist treatment. BdMφ also failed to make NO after stimulation with recombinant badger interferon gamma (bdIFNγ) or a combination of bdIFNγ and lipopolysaccharide. Exposure of bdMφ to TLR agonists and/or bdIFNγ resulted in upregulated cytokine (IL1β, IL6, IL12 and TNFα) mRNA levels indicating that these critical pathways were otherwise intact. Although stimulation with most TLR agonists resulted in strong cytokine mRNA responses, weaker responses were evident after exposure to TLR9 agonists, potentially due to very low expression of TLR9 in bdMφ. Both NO and TLR9 are important elements of innate immunity to mycobacteria, and these features of bdMφ biology would impair their capacity to resist bTB infection. These findings have significant implications for the development of bTB management strategies, and support the use of vaccination to reduce bTB infection in badgers.

  17. Acceptance of failed SNF (spent nuclear fuel) assemblies by the Federal Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: failed fuel; consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; non-fuel-assembly hardware; fuel in metal storage casks; fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; inspection and testing requirements for wastes; canister criteria; spent fuel selection for delivery; and defense and commercial high-level waste packages. This document discusses acceptance of failed spent fuel assemblies by the Federal Waste Management System. 18 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. An Apparatus for Monitoring the Health of Electrical Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Devdas M.; Tatum, Paul; Pace, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    As with most elements of infrastructure, electrical wiring is innocuous; usually hidden away and unnoticed until it fails. Failure of infrastructure, however, sometimes leads to serious health and safety hazards. Electrical wiring fails when the polymeric (usually rubber) insulation material that sheathes the conductor gets embrittled with age from exposure to pressure, temperature or radiation cycling or when the insulation gets removed by the chafing of wires against each other. Miles of such wiring can be found in typical aircraft, with significant lengths of the wiring immersed in aviation fuel - a recipe for an explosion if a spark were to occur. Diagnosing the health of wiring is thus an important aspect of monitoring the health of aging aircraft. Stress wave propagation through wiring affords a quick and non-invasive method for health monitoring. The extent to which a stress wave propagating through the cable core gets attenuated depends on the condition of the surrounding insulation. When the insulation is in good condition - supple and pliable, there is more damping or attenuation of the waveform. As the insulation gets embrittled and cracked, the attenuation is likely to reduce and the waveform of the propagating stress wave is likely to change. The monitoring of these changes provides a potential tool to evaluate wiring or cabling in service that is not accessible for visual inspection. This experiment has been designed for use in an introductory mechanical or materials engineering instrumentation lab. Initial setup (after procuring all the materials) should take the lab instructor about 4 hours. A single measurement can be initiated and saved to disk in less than 3 minutes, allowing for all the students in a typical lab section to take their own data rather than share a single set of data for the entire class.

  19. 40 CFR 1068.420 - How do I know when my engine family fails an SEA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fails an SEA? 1068.420 Section 1068.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Auditing § 1068.420 How do I know when my engine family fails an SEA? (a) A failed engine or piece of... pollutants or a fail decision for one pollutant. (c) You reach a pass decision for the SEA requirements when...

  20. Microbial water quality before and after the repair of a failing onsite wastewater treatment system adjacent to coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, K.E.; Habteselassie, M.Y.; Denene, Blackwood A.; Noble, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The objective was to assess the impacts of repairing a failing onsite wastewater treatment system (OWTS, i.e., septic system) as related to coastal microbial water quality. Methods and Results: Wastewater, groundwater and surface water were monitored for environmental parameters, faecal indicator bacteria (total coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci) and the viral tracer MS2 before and after repairing a failing OWTS. MS2 results using plaque enumeration and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) often agreed, but inhibition limited the qRT-PCR assay sensitivity. Prerepair, MS2 persisted in groundwater and was detected in the nearby creek; postrepair, it was not detected. In groundwater, total coliform concentrations were lower and E.??coli was not detected, while enterococci concentrations were similar to prerepair levels. E.??coli and enterococci surface water concentrations were elevated both before and after the repair. Conclusions: Repairing the failing OWTS improved groundwater microbial water quality, although persistence of bacteria in surface water suggests that the OWTS was not the singular faecal contributor to adjacent coastal waters. A suite of tracers is needed to fully assess OWTS performance in treating microbial contaminants and related impacts on receiving waters. Molecular methods like qRT-PCR have potential but require optimization. Significance and Impact of Study: This is the first before and after study of a failing OWTS and provides guidance on selection of microbial tracers and methods. ?? 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology ?? 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  3. In Search of Black Swans: Identifying Students at Risk of Failing Licensing Examinations.

    PubMed

    Barber, Cassandra; Hammond, Robert; Gula, Lorne; Tithecott, Gary; Chahine, Saad

    2017-09-26

    To determine which admissions variables and curricular outcomes are predictive of being at risk of failing the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part 1 (MCCQE1), how quickly student risk of failure can be predicted, and to what extent predictive modeling is possible and accurate in estimating future student risk. Data from five graduating cohorts (2011-2015), Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, were collected and analyzed using hierarchical generalized linear models (HGLMs). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the accuracy of predictive models and determine whether they could be used to predict future risk, using the 2016 graduating cohort. Four predictive models were developed to predict student risk of failure at admissions, year 1, year 2, and pre-MCCQE1. The HGLM analyses identified gender, MCAT verbal reasoning score, two preclerkship course mean grades, and the year 4 summative objective structured clinical examination score as significant predictors of student risk. The predictive accuracy of the models varied. The pre-MCCQE1 model was the most accurate at predicting a student's risk of failing (AUC 0.66-0.93), while the admissions model was not predictive (AUC 0.25-0.47). Key variables predictive of students at risk were found. The predictive models developed suggest, while it is not possible to identify student risk at admission, we can begin to identify and monitor students within the first year. Using such models, programs may be able to identify and monitor students at risk quantitatively and develop tailored intervention strategies.

  4. Beneficial effects of SR33805 in failing myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Ait Mou, Younss; Toth, Attila; Cassan, Cécile; Czuriga, Daniel; de Tombe, Pieter P.; Papp, Zoltan; Lacampagne, Alain; Cazorla, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Aims SR33805, a potent Ca2+ channel blocker, increases cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in healthy rat cardiomyocytes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of SR33805 on contractile properties in ischaemic failing hearts after myocardial infarction (MI) in vivo and in vitro at the cellular level. Methods and results The effect of SR33805 (10 µM) was tested on the excitation–contraction coupling of cardiomyocytes isolated from rat with end-stage heart failure. Cell shortening and Ca2+ transients were measured in intact cardiomyocytes, while contractile properties were determined in Triton X-100 permeabilized myocytes. Acute treatment with SR33805 restored the MI-altered cell shortening without affecting the Ca2+ transient amplitude, suggesting an increase of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in MI myocytes. Indeed, a SR33805-induced sensitization of myofilament activation was found to be associated with a slight increase in myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation and a more significant decrease on troponin I (TnI) phosphorylation. Decreased TnI phosphorylation was related to inhibition of protein kinase A activity by SR33805. Finally, administration of a single intra-peritoneal bolus of SR33805 (20 mg/kg) improved end-systolic strain and fractional shortening of MI hearts. Conclusion The present study indicates that treatment with SR33805 improved contractility of ischaemic failing hearts after MI in the rat by selectively modulating the phosphorylation status of sarcomeric regulatory proteins, which then sensitized the myofilaments to Ca2+. Our results gave a proof of concept that manipulation of the Ca2+ sensitivity of sarcomeric regulatory proteins can be used to improve contractility of a failing heart. PMID:21467075

  5. Failed endoscopic third ventriculostomy in children: management options.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Aaron; Vasudev, M K; Sampath, S; Radhesh, S; Sastry Kolluri, V R

    2002-12-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for obstructive hydrocephalus has a failure rate of 20-50% in various series. The present study analyzes ETV failures in 72 patients over a 2-year period and attempts to outline a management plan. Of the 72 patients who underwent ETV, it failed in 13. Seven of these failures occurred within 1 month, and in 5 others, ETV failed after 1-2 months. Another patient had a delayed failure 2 years after the initial surgery. Upon clinical failure, MRI scans were performed in all patients using either T2 fast spin echo or two-dimensional phase contrast MRI techniques. Of these, no flow could be demonstrated in 12 patients, whereas in 1 patient, good flow was observed. Endoscopic exploration was undertaken in the 12 patients in whom flow could not be demonstrated. Of the 12 who underwent endoscopic exploration, a patent stoma was observed in 7, necessitating insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS). In the other 5, the stoma had closed by gliosis and a repeat ETV was performed. In 3 of these patients, in addition to the ETV, a VPS was also inserted in accordance with the family's wishes. VPS insertion was carried out in the patient with suggestion of good flow through the stoma. In failed ETV, MRI with flow studies is essential to identify the possible cause of failure. Endoscopic exploration is indicated for patients with no evidence of flow. A repeat ETV is indicated in patients with a closed stoma. Patients with a patent stoma could require insertion of a cerebrospinal fluid shunt. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Failed magmatic eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Newhall, C.; Roman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    When a volcano becomes restless, a primary question is whether the unrest will lead to an eruption. Here we recognize four possible outcomes of a magmatic intrusion: "deep intrusion", "shallow intrusion", "sluggish/viscous magmatic eruption", and "rapid, often explosive magmatic eruption". We define "failed eruptions" as instances in which magma reaches but does not pass the "shallow intrusion" stage, i. e., when magma gets close to, but does not reach, the surface. Competing factors act to promote or hinder the eventual eruption of a magma intrusion. Fresh intrusion from depth, high magma gas content, rapid ascent rates that leave little time for enroute degassing, opening of pathways, and sudden decompression near the surface all act to promote eruption, whereas decreased magma supply from depth, slow ascent, significant enroute degassing and associated increases in viscosity, and impingement on structural barriers all act to hinder eruption. All of these factors interact in complex ways with variable results, but often cause magma to stall at some depth before reaching the surface. Although certain precursory phenomena, such as rapidly escalating seismic swarms or rates of degassing or deformation, are good indicators that an eruption is likely, such phenomena have also been observed in association with intrusions that have ultimately failed to erupt. A perpetual difficulty with quantifying the probability of eruption is a lack of data, particularly on instances of failed eruptions. This difficulty is being addressed in part through the WOVOdat database. Papers in this volume will be an additional resource for scientists grappling with the issue of whether or not an episode of unrest will lead to a magmatic eruption.

  7. Improved Quick Disconnect (QD) Interface Through Fail Safe Parts Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanch-Payne, Evelyn

    2001-01-01

    An extensive review of existing Quick Disconnects (QDs) mating and demating operations was performed to determine which shuttle part interface identifications and procedures contribute to human factor errors. The research methods used consisted of interviews with engineers and technicians, examination of incident reports, critiques of video and audio tapes of QD operations, and attendance of a Hyper QD operational course. The data strongly suggests that there are inherit human factor errors involved in QD operations. To promote fail-safe operations, QD interface problem areas and recommendations were outlined and reviewed. It is suggested that dialogue, investigations and recommendations continue.

  8. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  9. Complete tracheal rupture after a failed suicide attempt.

    PubMed

    Costache, Victor S; Renaud, Claire; Brouchet, Laurent; Toma, Tudor; Le Balle, François; Berjaud, Jean; Dahan, Marcel

    2004-04-01

    Tracheal rupture is life-threatening and its management poses a considerable challenge to both anesthesiologists and surgeons. We report the case of a 44-year-old patient with a complete tracheal rupture after a failed suicide attempt by hanging. A rare bilateral injury of the laryngeal nerves was associated. An original tracheal intubation was performed using the video unit for thoracoscopy. The severity of the lesions required the placement of a tracheostomy cannula after the tracheal repair. The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the 12th day, with a remaining moderate dysphonia.

  10. Fired worker fails to meet ADA's 'regarded as' test.

    PubMed

    1998-08-07

    [Name removed], a waiter at a Long Island [name removed], claimed that he was fired based on the misconception that because he was gay, he was HIV-positive. [Name removed] sued under the Federal Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, because there is not a law in NY that protects people from discrimination based on sexual orientation. The court rejected his claim by saying that he failed to provide a factual basis for his allegations. The employers stated that they fired [name removed] for using profanity toward a coworker, while on the job.

  11. Sjögren Syndrome: Why Do Clinical Trials Fail?

    PubMed

    Fox, Robert I; Fox, Carla M

    2016-08-01

    Sjögren syndrome (SS) comprises glandular and extraglandular manifestations. Double-blind prospective trials of traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics have failed because they have not improved benign symptoms, the major cause of lowered quality of life. Rituximab has proven effective in SS patients with associated mixed cryoglobulinemia, parotid gland swelling, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, thrombocytopenia, and other manifestations. There were few of these SS patients in the trials required for FDA approval. Most patients had benign symptoms and did not show benefit, leading to failure of the study. This article examines the reasons for these failures and proposes future directions.

  12. Fail-safe storage rack for irradiated fuel rod assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    A fail-safe storage rack is provided for interim storage of spent but radioactive nuclear fuel rod assemblies. The rack consists of a checkerboard array of substantially square, elongate receiving tubes fully enclosed by a double walled container, the outer wall of which is imperforate for liquid containment and the inner wall of which is provided with perforations for admitting moderator liquid flow to the elongate receiving tubes, the liquid serving to take up waste heat from the stored nuclear assemblies and dissipate same to the ambient liquid reservoir. A perforated cover sealing the rack facilitates cooling liquid entry and dissipation.

  13. Fail-safe storage rack for irradiated fuel rod assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, D.R.

    1993-03-23

    A fail-safe storage rack is provided for interim storage of spent but radioactive nuclear fuel rod assemblies. The rack consists of a checkerboard array of substantially square, elongate receiving tubes fully enclosed by a double walled container, the outer wall of which is imperforate for liquid containment and the inner wall of which is provided with perforations for admitting moderator liquid flow to the elongate receiving tubes, the liquid serving to take up waste heat from the stored nuclear assemblies and dissipate same to the ambient liquid reservoir. A perforated cover sealing the rack facilitates cooling liquid entry and dissipation.

  14. Surgical management of vestibular schwannomas after failed radiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Watanabe, Kentaro; Friedman, Allan H; Cunningham, Calhoun D; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2016-04-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) have been treated with focused-beam stereotactic radiation treatment (SRT) including Gamma knife, CyberKnife, X-knife, Novalis, or proton beam therapy. The purpose of this study was to document the incidence of tumor regrowth or symptoms that worsened or first developed following SRT and to discuss surgical strategies for patients who have failed SRT for VS. A consecutive series of 39 patients with SRT failed VS were surgically treated. Clinical symptoms, tumor regrowth at follow-up, intraoperative findings, and surgical outcome were evaluated. There were 15 males and 24 females with a mean age of 51.8 years. Thirty-six patients (92.3%) demonstrated steady tumor growth after SRT. Two (5.1%) patients with slight increase of the mass underwent surgical resection because of development of unbearable facial pain. Symptoms that worsened or newly developed following SRT in this series were deafness (41%), dizziness (35.9%), facial numbness (25.6%), tinnitus (20.5%), facial nerve palsy (7.7%), and facial pain (7.7%). Intraoperative findings demonstrated fibrous changes of the tumor mass, cyst formation, and brownish-yellow or purple discoloration of the tumor capsule. Severe adhesions between the tumor capsule and cranial nerves, vessels, and the brainstem were observed in 69.2%. Additionally, the facial nerve was more fragile and irritable in all cases. Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 33.3% of patients, near-total resection (NTR) in 35.9%, and subtotal resection (STR) in 30.8% of patients. New facial nerve palsy was seen in seven patients (19.4%) postoperatively. Our findings suggest that patients with VS who fail SRT with either tumor progression or worsening of clinical symptoms will have an increased rate of adhesions to the neurovascular structures and may have radiation-influenced neuromalacia. Salvage surgery of radiation-failed tumors is more difficult and will have a higher risk of

  15. Atopic profile of patients failing medical therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bruce K; Zirkle, Whitney; Chandra, Rakesh K; Lin, David; Conley, David B; Peters, Anju T; Grammer, Leslie C; Schleimer, Robert P; Kern, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory condition of the nasal airway and paranasal sinuses that can broadly be classified into CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). The relationship between CRS and atopy to inhalant allergens remains unclear. We sought to examine the presence of atopy in patients failing medical therapy for both types of CRS. The objective of this research was to analyze the frequency and distribution of allergen sensitivity in patients failing medical therapy for CRSwNP and CRSsNP in comparison to rhinitis patients without CRS and the general population. A prospectively collected database of 334 consecutive CRS patients who had surgery after failing maximal medical therapy was queried to identify those who met inclusion criteria: a sinus computed tomography (CT), an endoscopy consistent with CRS, and skin-prick testing with 24 common inhalant allergens in 8 classes at our institution (n = 125). Additionally, data from these CRS patients were compared to a group of 50 patients diagnosed with rhinitis who had similar symptoms but radiologically normal CT scans, as well as published normative population skin-prick testing data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study III (NHANES III). The relationship between atopy, as assessed by the frequency of skin test positivity, and radiological disease severity, was assessed for several allergen classes in CRSwNP, CRSsNP and rhinitis patients. One or more positive skin results were observed in 103 of 125 (82.4%) CRS patients who underwent surgery--a prevalence significantly higher than that found in the NHANES III study (p < 0.05) but not different from the rhinitis control group (36/50, 72.0%). The most prevalent positive skin test results were to dust mites and ragweed in CRSwNP, CRSsNP, and rhinitis patients. Comparing these 3 patient groups, there were no significant differences in the rates of positive skin-test results to any single

  16. Fail-safe storage rack for fuel rod assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.R.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses a fail-safe storage rack which is provided for interim storage of spent but radioactive nuclear fuel rod assemblies. The rack consists of a checkerboard array of substantially square, elongate receiving tubes fully enclosed by a double walled container, the outer wall of which is imperforate for liquid containment and the inner wall of which is provided with perforations for admitting moderator liquid flow to the elongate receiving tubes, the liquid serving to take up waste heat from the stored nuclear assemblies and dissipate same to the ambient liquid reservoir. A perforated cover sealing the rack facilitates cooling liquid entry and dissipation.

  17. Fact Sheets about the Fourth Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR 4)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact Sheets explaining the program, contaminants for monitoring, water systems applicable, timeframe & monitoring frequency, monitoring locations, critical requirements, data elements and where to find additional information on monitoring data.

  18. Monitoring System for the GRID Monte Carlo Mass Production in the H1 Experiment at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritskaya, Elena; Fomenko, Alexander; Gogitidze, Nelly; Lobodzinski, Bogdan

    2014-06-01

    The H1 Virtual Organization (VO), as one of the small VOs, employs most components of the EMI or gLite Middleware. In this framework, a monitoring system is designed for the H1 Experiment to identify and recognize within the GRID the best suitable resources for execution of CPU-time consuming Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tasks (jobs). Monitored resources are Computer Elements (CEs), Storage Elements (SEs), WMS-servers (WMSs), CernVM File System (CVMFS) available to the VO HONE and local GRID User Interfaces (UIs). The general principle of monitoring GRID elements is based on the execution of short test jobs on different CE queues using submission through various WMSs and directly to the CREAM-CEs as well. Real H1 MC Production jobs with a small number of events are used to perform the tests. Test jobs are periodically submitted into GRID queues, the status of these jobs is checked, output files of completed jobs are retrieved, the result of each job is analyzed and the waiting time and run time are derived. Using this information, the status of the GRID elements is estimated and the most suitable ones are included in the automatically generated configuration files for use in the H1 MC production. The monitoring system allows for identification of problems in the GRID sites and promptly reacts on it (for example by sending GGUS (Global Grid User Support) trouble tickets). The system can easily be adapted to identify the optimal resources for tasks other than MC production, simply by changing to the relevant test jobs. The monitoring system is written mostly in Python and Perl with insertion of a few shell scripts. In addition to the test monitoring system we use information from real production jobs to monitor the availability and quality of the GRID resources. The monitoring tools register the number of job resubmissions, the percentage of failed and finished jobs relative to all jobs on the CEs and determine the average values of waiting and running time for the

  19. VME system monitor board

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Much of the machinery throughout the APS will be controlled by VME based computers. In order to increase the reliability of the system, it is necessary to be able to monitor the status of each VME crate. In order to do this, a VME System Monitor was created. In addition to being able to monitor and report the status (watchdog timer, temperature, CPU (Motorola MVME 167) state (status, run, fail), and the power supply), it includes provisions to remotely reset the CPU and VME crate, digital I/O, and parts of the transition module (serial port and ethernet connector) so that the Motorla MVME 712 is not needed. The standard VME interface was modified on the System Monitor so that in conjunction with the Motorola MVME 167 a message based VXI interrupt handler could is implemented. The System Monitor is a single VME card (6U). It utilizes both the front panel and the P2 connector for I/O. The front panel contains a temperature monitor, watchdog status LED, 4 general status LEDs, input for a TTL interrupt, 8 binary inputs (24 volt, 5 volt, and dry contact sense), 4 binary outputs (dry contact, TTL, and 100 mA), serial port (electrical RS-232 or fiber optic), ethernet transceiver (10 BASE-FO or AUI), and a status link to neighbor crates. The P2 connector is used to provide the serial port and ethernet to the processor. In order to abort and read the status of the CPU, a jumper cable must be connected between the CPU and the System Monitor.

  20. Monitoring: The missing piece

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorkland, Ronald

    2013-11-15

    The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 heralded in an era of more robust attention to environmental impacts resulting from larger scale federal projects. The number of other countries that have adopted NEPA's framework is evidence of the appeal of this type of environmental legislation. Mandates to review environmental impacts, identify alternatives, and provide mitigation plans before commencement of the project are at the heart of NEPA. Such project reviews have resulted in the development of a vast number of reports and large volumes of project-specific data that potentially can be used to better understand the components and processes of the natural environment and provide guidance for improved and efficient environmental protection. However, the environmental assessment (EA) or the more robust and intensive environmental impact statement (EIS) that are required for most major projects more frequently than not are developed to satisfy the procedural aspects of the NEPA legislation while they fail to provide the needed guidance for improved decision-making. While NEPA legislation recommends monitoring of project activities, this activity is not mandated, and in those situations where it has been incorporated, the monitoring showed that the EIS was inaccurate in direction and/or magnitude of the impact. Many reviews of NEPA have suggested that monitoring all project phases, from the design through the decommissioning, should be incorporated. Information gathered though a well-developed monitoring program can be managed in databases and benefit not only the specific project but would provide guidance how to better design and implement future activities designed to protect and enhance the natural environment. -- Highlights: • NEPA statutes created profound environmental protection legislative framework. • Contrary to intent, NEPA does not provide for definitive project monitoring. • Robust project monitoring is essential for enhanced

  1. Cost considerations for long-term ecological monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caughlan, L.; Oakley, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    -effectiveness, of each program element can be evaluated. Moving into the implementation phase without careful evaluation of costs and benefits is risky because if costs are later found to exceed benefits, the program will fail. The costs of development, which can be quite high, will have been largely wasted. Realistic expectations of costs and benefits will help ensure that monitoring programs survive the early, turbulent stages of development and the challenges posed by fluctuating budgets during implementation.

  2. In situ repair of a failed compression fitting

    DOEpatents

    Wolbert, R.R.; Jandrasits, W.G.

    1985-08-05

    A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitting is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

  3. In situ repair of a failed compression fitting

    DOEpatents

    Wolbert, Ronald R.; Jandrasits, Walter G.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitg is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

  4. Combination therapy for salvaging a failing, experimental skin flap.

    PubMed

    Shah, D K; Zhang, W X; Forman, D L; Prabhat, A; Urken, M L; Weinberg, H

    1996-08-01

    The failing free flap remains a major problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Many and varied pharmacologic agents have been utilized to reverse the effects of ischemia in these flaps. Treatments have been aimed at inhibiting presumed causative factors in the no-reflow phenomenon. Therapy has generally been single in nature and designed to affect only one of these presumed factors. In this study, several pharmacologic agents were utilized individually or in combination therapy as postischemic washouts, in an effort to attack the multiple causative factors in the no-reflow phenomenon and to improve flap survival in a rat abdominal skin flap model. The treatment agents included lactated Ringer's, superoxide dismutase, and urokinase, with each used independently as a postischemic perfusion washout. Combination therapy utilized an initial postischemic perfusion with urokinase, followed by a second perfusion washout with superoxide dismutase. After 18 hr of primary ischemia, there was increased flap survival in the animals undergoing perfusion washout with either superoxide dismutase alone or with combined urokinase and superoxide dismutase washouts, compared to all other treatments (p < 0.001). It was found that flaps undergoing combined urokinase and superoxide dismutase postischemic perfusion washouts demonstrated significantly improved survival after 20 hr of primary ischemia, compared to all other therapies (p < 0.05). By demonstrating improved survival when a thrombolytic agent is used in conjunction with an oxygen free radical scavenger, these findings may have implications in the treatment of clinically failing free flaps.

  5. Recapitulating maladaptive, multiscale remodeling of failing myocardium on a chip.

    PubMed

    McCain, Megan L; Sheehy, Sean P; Grosberg, Anna; Goss, Josue A; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2013-06-11

    The lack of a robust pipeline of medical therapeutic agents for the treatment of heart disease may be partially attributed to the lack of in vitro models that recapitulate the essential structure-function relationships of healthy and diseased myocardium. We designed and built a system to mimic mechanical overload in vitro by applying cyclic stretch to engineered laminar ventricular tissue on a stretchable chip. To test our model, we quantified changes in gene expression, myocyte architecture, calcium handling, and contractile function and compared our results vs. several decades of animal studies and clinical observations. Cyclic stretch activated gene expression profiles characteristic of pathological remodeling, including decreased α- to β-myosin heavy chain ratios, and induced maladaptive changes to myocyte shape and sarcomere alignment. In stretched tissues, calcium transients resembled those reported in failing myocytes and peak systolic stress was significantly reduced. Our results suggest that failing myocardium, as defined genetically, structurally, and functionally, can be replicated in an in vitro microsystem by faithfully recapitulating the structural and mechanical microenvironment of the diseased heart.

  6. Resection Interposition Arthroplasty for Failed Distal Ulna Resections

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K.; Rubright, James H.; Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Sotereanos, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  7. Intranasal Oxytocin Failed to Affect Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) Social Behavior.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Darby; Calcutt, Sarah E; Burke, Kimberly; de Waal, Frans B M

    2016-08-01

    Oxytocin has been suggested as a treatment to promote positive social interactions in people with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). However, it is difficult to test this effect outside of the laboratory in realistic social situations. One way to resolve this issue is to study behavioral changes in closely related species with complex social relationships, such as chimpanzees. Here, we use captive, socially housed chimpanzees to evaluate the effects of oxytocin in a socially complex environment. After administering intranasal oxytocin or a placebo to an individual chimpanzee (total n = 8), she was returned to her social group. An experimenter blind to the condition measured the subject's social behavior. We failed to find a behavioral difference between conditions. As one of the goals for oxytocin administration as a treatment for ASD is increasing prosocial behaviors during 'real world' encounters, it is problematic that we failed to detect behavioral changes in our closest living relatives. However, our null findings may be related to methodological challenges such as determining an effective dose of oxytocin for chimpanzees and how long oxytocin takes to cross the blood-brain barrier. Thus, more research on intranasal oxytocin dosing and uptake are needed to continue exploring whether oxytocin changes social behavior in naturalistic settings and as a treatment for ASD.

  8. A PKM2 signature in the failing heart

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Meredith L.; Subramaniam, Janani; Li, Yuanteng; Hamilton, Dale J.; Frazier, O. Howard; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    A salient feature of the failing heart is metabolic remodeling towards predominant glucose metabolism and activation of the fetal gene program. Sunitinib is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used for the treatment of highly vascularized tumors. In diabetic patients, sunitinib significantly decreases blood glucose. However, a considerable proportion of sunitinib-treated patients develop cardiac dysfunction or failure. We asked whether sunitinib treatment results in shift towards glycolysis in the heart. Glucose uptake by the heart was increased fivefold in mice treated with sunitinib. Transcript analysis by qPCR revealed an induction of genes associated with glycolysis and reactivation of the fetal gene program. Additionally, we observed a shift in the enzyme pyruvate kinase from the adult M1 (PKM1) isoform to the fetal M2 (PKM2) isoform, a hallmark of the Warburg Effect. This novel observation led us to examine whether a similar shift occurs in human heart failure. Examination of tissue from patients with heart failure similarly displayed an induction of PKM2. Moreover, this phenomenon was partially reversed following mechanical unloading. We propose that pyruvate kinase isoform switching represents a novel feature of the fetal gene program in the failing heart. PMID:25735978

  9. Predictors of failed enema reduction in childhood intussusception.

    PubMed

    Fike, Frankie B; Mortellaro, Vincent E; Holcomb, George W; St Peter, Shawn D

    2012-05-01

    Initial management of intussusception is enema reduction. Data are scarce on predicting which patients are unlikely to have a successful reduction. Therefore, we reviewed our experience to identify factors predictive of enema failure. A retrospective review of all episodes of intussusception over the past 10 years was conducted. Demographics, presentation variables, colonic extent of intussusceptions, and hospital course were collected. Extent of intussusception was classified as right, transverse, descending, and rectosigmoid. Episodes were grouped as success or failure of enema reduction and compared using the Student t test for continuous variables and χ(2) test for dichotomous variables. Significance was P less than .05. We identified 405 episodes of intussusception and 371 attempts at enema reduction. There were 285 successful enema reductions. There was no difference between groups in age; sex; or the presence of emesis, fever, or abdominal mass. The failed enema group was more likely to have had symptoms over 24 hours before presentation (P = .006), bloody diarrhea (P < .001), and lethargy (P < .001). The chance of success diminished with colonic extent (right, 88%; transverse, 73%; left, 43%; colorectal, 29%; P < .001). Predictors of failed enema reduction of intussusception include presence of symptoms over 24 hours, diarrhea, lethargy, and distal extent of intussusception. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Untrained Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) Fail to Imitate Novel Actions

    PubMed Central

    Tennie, Claudio; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Social learning research in apes has focused on social learning in the technical (problem solving) domain - an approach that confounds action and physical information. Successful subjects in such studies may have been able to perform target actions not as a result of imitation learning but because they had learnt some technical aspect, for example, copying the movements of an apparatus (i.e., different forms of emulation learning). Methods Here we present data on action copying by non-enculturated and untrained chimpanzees when physical information is removed from demonstrations. To date, only one such study (on gesture copying in a begging context) has been conducted – with negative results. Here we have improved this methodology and have also added non-begging test situations (a possible confound of the earlier study). Both familiar and novel actions were used as targets. Prior to testing, a trained conspecific demonstrator was rewarded for performing target actions in view of observers. All but one of the tested chimpanzees already failed to copy familiar actions. When retested with a novel target action, also the previously successful subject failed to copy – and he did so across several contexts. Conclusion Chimpanzees do not seem to copy novel actions, and only some ever copy familiar ones. Due to our having tested only non-enculturated and untrained chimpanzees, the performance of our test subjects speak more than most other studies of the general (dis-)ability of chimpanzees to copy actions, and especially novel actions. PMID:22905102

  11. Arthrogryposis (multiple congenital contractures) associated with failed termination of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith G

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether an increase in failed termination of pregnancy is observed among individuals with arthrogryposis (multiple congenital contractures). A total of 2,500 unselected patients with arthrogryposis collected by the author over a 35-year period were reviewed. The cases included referrals, consultations, personal examinations, and correspondence. They were reviewed for clinical features, pregnancy complications, family history, and a history of attempted terminations of the pregnancy. Eleven cases of failed terminations of pregnancy in which the individuals were subsequently born with arthrogryposis were identified. We conclude that infants who survive attempted termination of pregnancy (both surgical and medical) may be at an increased risk to be born with multiple congenital contractures. Careful examination of the tissue and a post-procedure ultrasound will help to assure that the termination has been successful. Those infants surviving attempted termination of pregnancy who have arthrogryposis are also at >50% risk for intellectual disability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A brief overview of channel monitoring in land management: Five case studies. Case study #1

    Treesearch

    Leslie Reid

    1999-01-01

    Yesterday we heard about some successful monitoring programs,but today I would like to share some findings from a study I did, which was basically a post-mortem of failed monitoring programs.There were about 30 projects,and I wanted to know why did they fail,and were there patterns of why they failed.The projects ranged from university studies,land management,and...

  13. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  14. Non-destructive monitoring of trace element levels in short-tailed albatrosses (Phoebastria albatrus) and black-footed albatrosses (Phoebastria nigripes) from Torishima Island, Japan using eggs and blood.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Kunito, Takashi; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Tsurumi, Miyako; Sato, Fumio; Oka, Nariko

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of 18 trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl and Pb) were determined in abandoned eggs of short-tailed albatrosses and abandoned eggs and blood of black-footed albatrosses from Torishima Island, Japan in 2002. Mercury concentration was highest among the toxic elements in egg content of both the two species. In some egg contents of black-footed albatrosses, Hg concentrations were higher than the threshold level that may cause decreased hatchability and aberrant nesting behavior in some avian species. Concentrations of Cd in egg content and Ba in egg content and shell increased with an increase in egg breadth/length ratio, whereas Hg in egg content showed an opposite trend in black-footed albatrosses. Since egg breadth/length ratio is known to increase with the age of mother bird, this result may imply that concentrations of these elements in eggs vary with age of mother bird. In blood of black-footed albatross chicks, concentration of Hg was highest among the toxic elements and the Hg concentration showed an increase in the later growth stages. In contrast, concentration of Sr in blood decreased with growth stage. Since the behaviour of Sr is similar to that of Ca in animals, it is conceivable that Sr was used along with Ca for the formation of bone.

  15. Defining fish community structure in Lake Winnipeg using stable isotopes (δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(34)S): implications for monitoring ecological responses and trophodynamics of mercury & other trace elements.

    PubMed

    Ofukany, Amy F A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Bond, Alexander L; Hobson, Keith A

    2014-11-01

    The ecological integrity of freshwater lakes is influenced by atmospheric and riverine deposition of contaminants, shoreline development, eutrophication, and the introduction of non-native species. Changes to the trophic structure of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, and consequently, the concentrations of contaminants and trace elements measured in tissues of native fishes, are likely attributed to agricultural runoff from the 977,800 km(2) watershed and the arrival of non-native zooplankters and fishes. We measured δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(34)S along with concentrations of 15 trace elements in 17 native fishes from the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg in 2009 and 2010. After adjusting for differences in isotopic baseline values between the two basins, fishes in the south basin had consistently higher δ(13)C and δ(34)S, and lower δ(15)N. We found little evidence of biomagnification of trace elements at the community level, but walleye (Sander vitreus) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) had higher mercury and selenium concentrations with increased trophic position, coincident with increased piscivory. There was evidence of growth dilution of cobalt, copper, manganese, molybdenum, thallium, and vanadium, and bioaccumulation of mercury, which could be explained by increases in algal (and consequently, lake and fish) productivity. We conclude that the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg represent very different communities with different trophic structures and trace element concentrations.

  16. Rack protection monitor

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Stanley G.

    2000-01-01

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  17. Bolt Stress Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In photo, an engineer is using a new Ultrasonic Bolt Stress Monitor developed by NASA's Langley Research Center to determine whether a bolt is properly tightened. A highly accurate device, the monitor is an important tool in construction of such structures as pressure vessels, bridges and power plants, wherein precise measurement of the stress on a tightened bolt is critical. Overtightened or undertightened bolts can fail and cause serious industrial accidents or costly equipment break-downs. There are a number of methods for measuring bolt stress. Most widely used and least costly is the torque wrench, which is inherently inaccurate; it does not take into account the friction between nut and bolt, which has an influence on stress. At the other end of the spectrum, there are accurate stress-measuring systems, but they are expensive and not portable. The battery-powered Langley monitor fills a need; it is inexpensive, lightweight, portable and extremely accurate because it is not subject to friction error. Sound waves are transmitted to the bolt and a return signal is received. As the bolt is tightened, it undergoes changes in resonance due to stress, in the manner that a violin string changes tone when it is tightened. The monitor measures the changes in resonance and provides a reading of real stress on the bolt. The device, patented by NASA, has aroused wide interest and a number of firms have applied for licenses to produce it for the commercial market.

  18. Rack Protection Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Stanley G.

    1998-10-21

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  19. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  20. Crane hoisting monitoring using smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Jiao, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Gao, Shunde; Yu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, smart phone develops very fast, and it has been the most popular tool in daily life of the public. Smart phones, with powerful operating systems, data storage and processing function, varieties of high-performance sensors and easily data transmission when connected to network, are the good choice for structures status monitoring in some occasion. One kind of hoisting monitoring method was proposed in this paper based on smartphone and Monitoring App developed. Firstly, one monitoring App was designed and developed, which can monitor the acceleration and inclination information using MEMS sensors embedded in smartphone. Secondly, typical operation status model of crane hoisting was studied. Then one validation test of hoisting was designed and conducted to monitor the acceleration and inclination of different elements during the operation procedure of one crane. The test results show the feasibility of the crane hoisting safety monitoring method using smartphone.

  1. Disks around Failed Stars - a Question of Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    First Ground-Based Mid-Infrared Observations of Brown Dwarfs [1] Summary A team of European astronomers [2] have observed eight Brown Dwarfs, i.e., small and faint objects also known as "failed stars", with the TIMMI2 infrared sensitive instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on La Silla. From two of these, mid-infrared radiation is detected - for the first time ever from such objects with a ground-based telescope . While the younger Brown Dwarf, aged a few million years, is found to be surrounded by a dusty disk, no warm dust is present around the older ones. The new observations support the following formation hypothesis for Brown Dwarfs: they are born in the same way as "real" stars, by contraction in interstellar clouds of gas and dust . During the later stages of this process, the infalling material is transferred onto the star via a gas and dust disk . This disk - in which planets may possibly form - then disperses with time. PR Photo 17a/02 : Image of Brown Dwarf LP 944-20 PR Photo 17b/02 : Models of the disk around Brown Dwarf Cha HA 2 Brown Dwarfs are faint and cool objects Astronomical objects known as "Brown Dwarfs" are "failed stars" . Their comparatively small mass, less than about 7% of that of our Sun (or about 75 times the mass of planet Jupiter), is too small to achieve sufficiently high pressure and temperature at their centre to ignite energy-producing nuclear processes. Some astronomers also refer to Brown Dwarfs as a "missing link" between planets and stars, being neither one nor the other, yet with similarities to both. They do not burn hydrogen to helium as "real" stars do, but continue to emit faint light as they slowly contract and cool during millions of years. They end their inglorious life with a whimper and finally fade into eternal insignificance. Although Brown Dwarfs were theoretically predicted already in 1963, astronomers had to wait until 1995 for the first one to be discovered. This was mainly due to their extreme faintness as

  2. Failed back surgery syndrome: a suggested algorithm of care

    PubMed Central

    Ganty, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a complex condition which can be very difficult to treat. In this article, we propose a pragmatic algorithm for the management of the syndrome. The management of this condition should include a comprehensive initial assessment to rule out treatable cause, pharmacological optimisation, psychological techniques and neuromodulation. There is good evidence to support early application of conventional spinal cord stimulation for FBSS patients suffering from predominant buttock and leg pain. Emerging techniques in neuromodulation such as high-frequency spinal cord stimulation, peripheral nerve field stimulation and dorsal root ganglion stimulation hold promise for the future, but long-term outcome regarding efficacy and safety is not yet established. Intrathecal drug delivery systems should also be considered in those who are unsuitable or unresponsive to neuromodulation and still warrant further treatment. However, the long-term outcome may not be as good as with other treatments mentioned above. PMID:26516487

  3. Surgical revisions and mechanical support of the failing Fontan.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Despite its many anatomic modifications, Fontan failure remains prevalent in adult patients living with single-ventricle physiology. Although the Fontan operation has created a generation of survivors of complex single-ventricle disease, recognition of the limitation of this circulation is increasing. Most commonly, survivors suffer from ventricular dysfunction, protein-losing enteropathy, plastic bronchitis and arrhythmias. Although several medical therapies exist to palliate these long-term complications, surgical treatments are becoming increasingly useful, including the introduction of mechanical devices and cardiac transplantation. Currently, there are a variety of options available for mechanical support of the failing Fontan. Further developments in mechanical support technology will be required to tailor-make specific devices for this unique population. Owing to the fact that availability of donor hearts for transplantation is limited, mechanical support will play an increasingly important role in the management of complications of the Fontan circulation.

  4. Optimised to Fail: Card Readers for Online Banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drimer, Saar; Murdoch, Steven J.; Anderson, Ross

    The Chip Authentication Programme (CAP) has been introduced by banks in Europe to deal with the soaring losses due to online banking fraud. A handheld reader is used together with the customer’s debit card to generate one-time codes for both login and transaction authentication. The CAP protocol is not public, and was rolled out without any public scrutiny. We reverse engineered the UK variant of card readers and smart cards and here provide the first public description of the protocol. We found numerous weaknesses that are due to design errors such as reusing authentication tokens, overloading data semantics, and failing to ensure freshness of responses. The overall strategic error was excessive optimisation. There are also policy implications. The move from signature to PIN for authorising point-of-sale transactions shifted liability from banks to customers; CAP introduces the same problem for online banking. It may also expose customers to physical harm.

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) treatment for a failing facial flap.

    PubMed

    McCrary, Brian F

    2007-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is an approved treatment for 13 pathological entities. One of these indications--a failing facial flap--is presented in this case report of a traumatic wound to the face and right axilla after an unprovoked pit bull attack on a 4 year old girl. Surgical repair was started acutely but the facial flap became congested and ischaemic, indicating deterioration of the blood supply. HBO2 treatments were initiated twice a day, resulting in remarkably decreased swelling and discomfort after the first treatment. Leeching was also used to assist with reduction of venous congestion in the flap. The patient was discharged 5 days later with a well perfused, mostly intact, incision with minimal tenderness. Surgical repair was required for a small area of wound dehiscence. Photographs documenting the patient's progress with HBO2 are presented. A discussion of the mechanisms of action of HBO2 and its beneficial effects is provided in this case.

  6. A Novel Endoscopic Technique for Failed Nasogastric Tube Placement.

    PubMed

    Boston, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Direct visualization of the nasopharynx gives the otolaryngologist a unique advantage for addressing difficult nasopharyngeal anatomy. One common situation is being consulted to assist when the blind placement of a nasogastric tube has failed. A novel technique for managing a patient with a nasogastric tube embedded in the adenoid remnant is described with illustrations. The atraumatic method is easily employed by a resident armed with a portable nasolaryngoscope and plain suture. By using a repeated pull-through technique, the nasogastric tube can be guided past difficult nasopharyngeal anatomy and into a position from where it can be advanced into the patient's esophagus. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. Helical motion during a failed eruption of a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Solar magnetized "tornadoes" in different scales with varying lifetime have been widely reported and discussed recently. They are found to be possibly related to the formation of prominences and coronal heating. However, the physical details of the tornadoes still remain unclear, though lots of work including observational analysis in varies wavelengths and numerical simulations have been done. Here, we report a failed eruption of a filament on 2012 July 8, during which rotating motion of the filament materials can be clearly recognized. Based on the multi-wavelength and multi-viewpoints observations from SDO and STEREO spacecraft, we tentatively think that the highly twist magnetic field lines in the filament probably lead to the helical motion of the ejected plasma. A detailed analysis will give us more information.

  8. Recanalization of failed autogenous conduit utilizing laser revascularization.

    PubMed

    Chander, Rajiv K; Oza, Parind; Patel, Mayank; Balar, Nilesh

    2011-10-01

    The traditional approach for the treatment of restenosis of autogenous vein bypass has been revision of bypass with vein patch angioplasty, interposition jump graft, or thrombectomy procedures for those patients with extensive occlusive disease and limb-threatening ischemia. Endovascular intervention traditionally involves angioplasty of the graft; however, vessels with diffuse disease or extensive longitudinal lesions are generally difficult to revascularize utilizing this technique. Surgical revision of a threatened autogenous vein graft may carry a morbidity rate as high as 13.6%. We present a series of cases in which excimer laser atherectomy (LA) was used to recanalize an occluded autogenous saphenous vein bypass. Of the occluded vein bypasses failed angioplasty and were successfully atherectomized with LA measuring lengths of 35 and 30 cm, respectively. The infrainguinal has a 6-month follow-up, while the infragencular has a follow-up of 1 year, with resolution of presenting symptoms.

  9. Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

  10. Setting the Clock for Fail-Safe Early Embryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickentscher, Rolf; Struntz, Philipp; Weiss, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    The embryogenesis of the small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a remarkably robust self-organization phenomenon. Cell migration trajectories in the early embryo, for example, are well explained by mechanical cues that push cells into positions where they experience the least repulsive forces. Yet, how this mechanically guided progress in development is properly timed has remained elusive so far. Here, we show that cell volumes and division times are strongly anticorrelated during the early embryogenesis of C. elegans with significant differences between somatic cells and precursors of the germline. Our experimental findings are explained by a simple model that in conjunction with mechanical guidance can account for the fail-safe early embryogenesis of C. elegans.

  11. Quadruple zygomatic implants supported rehabilitation in failed maxillary bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; D'Agostino, Antonio; Zanette, Giovanni; Favero, Vittorio; Procacci, Pasquale

    2016-09-01

    Extreme atrophy of the jaws constitutes a challenge for maxillofacial surgeons. The technique involving Le Fort I osteotomy, bone grafting, and endosseous implants remains the gold standard treatment for class V and class VI atrophy of the maxilla. As severe maxillary atrophy is associated to impaired microvascularization of overlying soft tissues, reconstruction using vascularized free fibula flaps together with endosseous implants is one of the possible treatment plans. When this approach fails, however, retreating these patients using traditional techniques often proves unsatisfactory. This study outlines our clinical experience with full-arch zygoma implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation to treat severe atrophic maxilla following failure of strategies including multiple Le Fort I procedures or vascularized free fibular flaps.

  12. Behavior of Puerto Rican parrots during failed nesting attempts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.A.; Wilson, M.H.; Field, R.

    1997-01-01

    We compared patterns of nesting behavior of four pairs of Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) that experienced failed nesting attempts to behavior of four pairs of parrots that experienced no substantial nest problems and successfully fledged young without management intervention. Only changes in female parrots' behavior were clearly associated with nest failure. During incubation, decreases in nest attendance, increases in duration of recesses, and increases in frequency of nest entries by female parrots were associated with imminent abandonment of nests. During early chick rearing, similar behavior was associated with the loss of broods. Low nest attendance and long recesses by female parrots during incubation were also associated with successful hatching of eggs followed by death of young several days later. The behavior patterns and changes in Puerto Rican Parrot nesting behavior described in this paper may alert biologists to nest problems that might be mitigated by management intervention.

  13. Why did ISO 9001:2008 system fail to deliver?

    PubMed

    Langford, Melvyn

    2014-02-01

    This article is based on an actual investigation undertaken, and summarises the subsequent report's findings and observations. It has been anonymised for obvious reasons. In May 2013 an analysis was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team that compared an NHS Trust estates department's managerial systems against the NHS national recommendations. The conclusions stated that: 'There was a systemic failure across a large number of topics generating intolerable/substantial risks to the organisation, its staff, and patients; this despite the department's managerial systems being accredited to the International Standard ISO 9001:2008'. The natural question raised when presented with this demonstrable and auditable evidence was: 'Why did the ISO 9001:2008 system fail?'

  14. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo E; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical indication or inappropriate surgical technique/patient selection; (2) a technical error; and (3) an incorrect assessment of the concomitant risk factors for instability. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the MPFL and cautiousness with the imaging techniques while favoring clinical over radiological findings and the use of common sense to determine the adequate surgical technique for each particular case, are critical to minimizing MPFL surgery failure. Additionally, our approach to dealing with failure after primary MPFL reconstruction is also presented. PMID:28251062

  15. [Multimodal therapy concepts for failed back surgery syndrome].

    PubMed

    Casser, Hans-Raimund

    2016-09-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a frequent complication (15-40 %) of lumbar disc surgery and is rarely successfully treated by surgery with the exception of a re-prolapse associated with radicular pain. Multimodal pain treatment, however, is indicated by a lack of pathoanatomical correlates, unclear cause and psychosocial risk factors.This review describes a standardized non-operative treatment starting with broad interdisciplinary clarification by medical, psychological and physiotherapeutic means (assessment).If the conditions for multimodal pain therapy are met, the OPS 8‑918-procedure can be applied to avoid chronic developing pain. In doing so, the already issued quality standards and guidelines for documentation should be respected.

  16. Alone in the Crowd: I Failed the ABGC Certification Exam.

    PubMed

    Colón, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC) certification examination (often referred to as "the board exam") has become a milestone within the field of genetic counseling. For many, it is the final standardized test taken and indicates the examinee has met "the standards of minimal competence to practice as a genetic counselor" (Bulletin 2015). Although voluntary, certification is strongly encouraged, and in some employment situations, required. Although recent statistics indicate the majority of those who take the test pass, each year there are those who sit for the test unsuccessfully. Despite this fact, exam failure and tools for dealing with this experience are not often broached in the literature. This essay recalls my experiences with a failed exam attempt and the subsequent emotional turmoil. It also aims to start the conversation regarding the difficulty of coping with the "secret" shame of public, professional failure, and suggests there is room for further discussion and resource development in this area.

  17. Unaware person recognition from the body when face identification fails.

    PubMed

    Rice, Allyson; Phillips, P Jonathon; Natu, Vaidehi; An, Xiaobo; O'Toole, Alice J

    2013-11-01

    How does one recognize a person when face identification fails? Here, we show that people rely on the body but are unaware of doing so. State-of-the-art face-recognition algorithms were used to select images of people with almost no useful identity information in the face. Recognition of the face alone in these cases was near chance level, but recognition of the person was accurate. Accuracy in identifying the person without the face was identical to that in identifying the whole person. Paradoxically, people reported relying heavily on facial features over noninternal face and body features in making their identity decisions. Eye movements indicated otherwise, with gaze duration and fixations shifting adaptively toward the body and away from the face when the body was a better indicator of identity than the face. This shift occurred with no cost to accuracy or response time. Human identity processing may be partially inaccessible to conscious awareness.

  18. Monitoring does not always count.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Madden, Eve; Baxter, Peter W J; Fuller, Richard A; Martin, Tara G; Game, Edward T; Montambault, Jensen; Possingham, Hugh P

    2010-10-01

    The gross under-resourcing of conservation endeavours has placed an increasing emphasis on spending accountability. Increased accountability has led to monitoring forming a central element of conservation programs. Although there is little doubt that information obtained from monitoring can improve management of biodiversity, the cost (in time and/or money) of gaining this knowledge is rarely considered when making decisions about allocation of resources to monitoring. We present a simple framework allowing managers and policy advisors to make decisions about when to invest in monitoring to improve management. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radio-Frequency Strain Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Rogowski, Robert S.; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) strain monitor developed to measure lengths of objects. RF waveguide or cable bonded to structure monitored. Propagation of RF signal along waveguide results in phase shift proportional to length of path traveled. Impedance mismatches placed in RF cable at nodes of structure. Records mismatches and detects overall length of line and lengths of intervals between nodes. Used to detect changes in elements of large structure with single cable. Monitor has potential for many applications, including monitoring stability of such large structures as aircraft, bridges, and buildings in Earthquake zones.

  20. Open Latarjet procedure for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Flinkkilä, T; Sirniö, K

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study assessed the functional results of open Latarjet operation for recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a consecutive series of patients. Fifty two patients (mean age 28.4 [range 17-62] years, 45 men) were operated on using open Latarjet operation after one (n=46) or two (n=6) failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs. The indication for revision surgery was recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Fifty patients had a Hill-Sachs lesion and 32 patients had glenoid bone lesions on plain radiographs. No attempt was made to grade the severity of bony pathology. Functional outcome and stability of 49 shoulders were assessed after an average follow-up of 38 (range 24-85) months using Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) score, Oxford shoulder instability score, and subjective shoulder value (SSV). Forty-two patients had a stable shoulder at follow-up. Seven of 49 (14%) had symptoms of instability; one patient had recurrent dislocation, and six patients had subluxations. Mean WOSI, Oxford, and SSV scores were 83.9, 19.9, and 84.9, respectively. All scores were significantly better in patients who had a stable shoulder compared with those who had an unstable shoulder (WOSI 86.8 vs. 64.3; Oxford 18.2 vs. 30.8; and SSV 88.3 vs. 61.7; P<0.01). One patient needed a reoperation. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Open Latarjet operation is a good option for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair. The instability recurrence rate is acceptable and the reoperation rate was low. Level IV, retrospective case series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation and Management of Failed Shoulder Instability Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cartucho, António; Moura, Nuno; Sarmento, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background: Failed shoulder instability surgery is mostly considered to be the recurrence of shoulder dislocation but subluxation, painful or non-reliable shoulder are also reasons for patient dissatisfaction and should be considered in the notion. Methods: The authors performed a revision of the literature and online contents on evaluation and management of failed shoulder instability surgery. Results: When we look at the reasons for failure of shoulder instability surgery we point the finger at poor patient selection, technical error and an additional traumatic event. More than 80% of surgical failures, for shoulder instability, are associated with bone loss. Quantification of glenoid bone loss and investigation of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion are determining facts. Adequate imaging studies are determinant to assess labrum and capsular lesions and to rule out associated pathology as rotator cuff tears. CT-scan is the method of choice to diagnose and quantify bone loss. Arthroscopic soft tissue procedures are indicated in patients with minimal bone loss and no contact sports. Open soft tissue procedures should be performed in patients with small bone defects, with hiperlaxity and practicing contact sports. Soft tissue techniques, as postero-inferior capsular plication and remplissage, may be used in patients with less than 25% of glenoid bone loss and Hill-Sachs lesions. Bone block procedures should be used for glenoid larger bone defects in the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion or in the presence of poor soft tissue quality. A tricortical iliac crest graft may be used as a primary procedure or as a salvage procedure after failure of a Bristow or a Latarjet procedure. Less frequently, the surgeon has to address the Hill-Sachs lesion. When a 30% loss of humeral head circumference is present a filling graft should be used. Conclusion: Reasons for failure are multifactorial. In order to address this entity, surgeons must correctly identify the causes and

  2. Outcome After Salvage Arthrodesis for Failed Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Kamrad, Ilka; Henricson, Anders; Magnusson, Håkan; Carlsson, Åke; Rosengren, Björn E

    2016-03-01

    In cases with total ankle replacement (TAR) failure, a decision between revision TAR and salvage arthrodesis (SA) must be made. In a previous study, we analyzed revision TAR and found low functional outcome and satisfaction. The aims of the current study were to analyze SA concerning failure rate and patient-related outcome measures (PROMs). Until September 2014, a total of 1110 primary TARs were recorded in the Swedish Ankle Registry. Of the 188 failures, 118 were revised with SA (and 70 with revision TAR). Patient- and implant-specific data for SA cases were analyzed as well as arthrodesis techniques. Failure of SA was defined as repeat arthrodesis or amputation. Generic and region-specific PROMs of 68 patients alive with a solid unilateral SA performed more than 1 year before were analyzed. The first-attempt solid arthrodesis rate of SA was 90%. Overall, 25 of 53 (47%) patients were very satisfied or satisfied. Mean Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) was 22 (95% confidence interval 20-24), Euro Qol-5 Dimensions 0.57 (0.49-0.65), Euro Qol-Visual Analogue Scale 59 (53-64), Short Form-36 physical 34 (31-37) and mental 50 (46-54). The scores and satisfaction were similar to those after revision TAR but the reoperation rate was significantly lower in SA (P < .05). Salvage arthrodesis after failed TAR had a solid arthrodesis rate of 90% at first attempt, but similar to revision TAR, less than 50% of the patients were satisfied and the functional scores were low. Until studies show true benefit of revision TAR over SA, we favor SA for failed TAR. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Impaired ATP Kinetics in Failing in vivo Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, Vadappuram P.; Schär, Michael; Akki, Ashwin; Weiss, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypothesis that the failing heart may be energy starved is supported, in part, by observations of reduced rates of ATP synthesis through the creatine kinase (CK) reaction, the primary myocardial energy reservoir, in heart failure (HF) patients. Although murine models have been used to probe HF pathophysiology, it has not been possible to non-invasively measure the rate of ATP synthesis through CK in the in vivo mouse heart. The purpose of this work was to exploit non-invasive spatially-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques to measure ATP flux through CK in in vivo mouse hearts and determine the extent of any reductions in murine HF. Methods and Results The Triple Repetition Time Saturation Transfer (TRiST) MRS method of measuring ATP kinetics was first validated in skeletal muscle, rendering similar results to conventional saturation transfer MRS. In normal mouse hearts the in vivo CK pseudo-first-order-rate constant, kf, was 0.32±0.03 s−1 (mean±SD) and the rate of ATP synthesis through CK was 3.16±0.47 µmol/g/s. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) reduced kf by 31% (0.23±0.03 s−1, p<0.0001) and ATP synthesis through CK by 51% (1.54±0.25 µmol/g/s, p<0.0001), analogous values to those in failing human hearts. Conclusions Despite the small size and high murine heart rate, the ATP synthesis rate through CK is similar in vivo in murine and human hearts and comparably reduced in HF. Because murine TAC shares fundamental energetic similarities with human HF, this model and new MRS approach promise a powerful means to non-invasively probe altered energetics in HF. PMID:20926788

  4. SOF Contributions to Strengthening Weak or Failing States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    doctrine also discusses application of thirteen facets of the operational art . The facets of operational art provide an outline for developing military...limit the number of military personnel supporting Colombian counterdrug efforts to eight hundred personnel. Figure 1. Facets of Operational Art ...The facets of operational art are important elements of effective operational planning. When applied to operations designed

  5. When School Management Companies Fail: Righting Educational Wrongs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Reviews public school system of education; describes school management companies (nonprofit, for profit) and their fiduciary duties; discusses monitoring the performance of school management companies; describes legal mechanisms and remedies (tort, contract, agency, and constitutional law) for holding school management companies accountable.…

  6. When School Management Companies Fail: Righting Educational Wrongs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Reviews public school system of education; describes school management companies (nonprofit, for profit) and their fiduciary duties; discusses monitoring the performance of school management companies; describes legal mechanisms and remedies (tort, contract, agency, and constitutional law) for holding school management companies accountable.…

  7. Lindenmayer DB and Likens GE (eds): Effective ecological monitoring [book review

    Treesearch

    Charles T. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Long-term ecological monitoring is becoming increasingly important but more challenging to fund. Lindenmayer and Likens describe the common characteristics of successful monitoring programs and of those that fail. They draw upon their monitoring experiences together, independently, and from a variety of other long-term monitoring programs around the world. They then...

  8. Guanylyl cyclase (GC)-A and GC-B activities in ventricles and cardiomyocytes from failed and non-failed human hearts: GC-A is inactive in the failed cardiomyocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Dries, Daniel L.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes release atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide to stimulate processes that compensate for the failing heart by activating guanylyl cyclase (GC)-A. C-type natriuretic peptide is also elevated in the failing heart and inhibits cardiac remodeling by activating the homologous receptor, GC-B. We previously reported that GC-A is the most active membrane GC in normal mouse ventricles while GC-B is the most active membrane GC in failing ventricles due to increased GC-B and decreased GC-A activities. Here, we examined ANP and CNP-specific GC activity in membranes obtained from non-failing and failing human left ventricles and in membranes from matched cardiomyocyte-enriched pellet preparations. Similar to our findings in the murine study, we found that CNP-dependent GC activity was about half of the ANP-dependent GC activity in the non-failing ventricular and was increased in the failing ventricle. ANP and CNP increased GC activity 9- and 5-fold in non-failing ventricles, respectively. In contrast to the mouse study, in failing human ventricles, ANP-dependent activity was unchanged compared to non-failing values whereas CNP-dependent activity increased 35% (p=0.005). Compared with ventricular membranes, basal GC activity was reduced an order of magnitude in membranes derived from myocyte-enriched pellets from non-failing ventricles. ANP increased GC activity 2.4-fold but CNP only increased GC activity 1.3-fold. In contrast, neither ANP nor CNP increased GC activity in equivalent preparations from failing ventricles. We conclude that: 1) GC-B activity is increased in non-myocytes from failing human ventricles, possibly as a result of increased fibrosis, 2) human ventricular cardiomyocytes express low levels of GC-A and much lower levels or possibly no GC-B, and 3) GC-A in cardiomyocytes from failing human hearts is refractory to ANP stimulation. PMID:22133375

  9. PPARα Association With Sirt1 Suppresses Cardiac Fatty Acid Metabolism in the Failing Heart

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Shin-ichi; Zhai, Peiyong; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Ikeda, Yoshiyuki; Byun, Jaemin; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by changes in cardiac metabolism characterized by reduced fatty acid (FA) utilization. However, the underlying mechanism and its causative involvement in the progression of HF are poorly understood. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimer promotes transcription of genes involved in FA metabolism through binding to the PPAR response element, called direct repeat 1 (DR1). Silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) is a histone deacetylase which interacts with PPARα. Methods and Results To investigate the role of PPARα in the impaired FA utilization observed during HF, genetically altered mice were subjected to pressure overload (PO). The DNA binding of PPARα, RXRα and Sirt1 to DR1 was evaluated with oligonucleotide pull-down and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Although the binding of PPARα to DR1 was enhanced in response to PO, that of RXRα was attenuated. Sirt1 competes with RXRα to dimerize with PPARα, thereby suppressing FA utilization in the failing heart. DR1 sequence analysis indicated that the typical DR1 sequence favors PPARα/RXRα heterodimerization, whereas the switch from RXRα to Sirt1 takes place on degenerate DR1s. Sirt1 bound to PPARα through a region homologous to the PPARα binding domain in RXRα. A short peptide corresponding to the RXRα domain not only inhibited the interaction between PPARα and Sirt1 but also improved FA metabolism and ameliorated cardiac dysfunction. Conclusions A change in the heterodimeric partner of PPARα from RXRα to Sirt1 is responsible for the impaired FA metabolism and cardiac dysfunction in the failing heart. PMID:26443578

  10. Exploring the issue of failure to fail in a nursing program.

    PubMed

    Larocque, Sylvie; Luhanga, Florence Loyce

    2013-05-18

    A study using a qualitative descriptive design was undertaken to explore the issue of "failure to fail" in a nursing program. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with nursing university faculty members, preceptors, and faculty advisors (n=13). Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results indicate that: (a) failing a student is a difficult process; (b) both academic and emotional support are required for students and preceptors and faculty advisors; (c) there are consequences for programs, faculty, and students when a student has failed a placement; (d) at times, personal, professional, and structural reasons exist for failing to fail a student; and (e) the reputation of the professional program can be diminished as a result of failing to fail a student. Recommendations for improving assessment, evaluation, and intervention with a failing student include documentation, communication, and support. These findings have implications for improving the quality of clinical experiences.

  11. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  12. Clinical prediction rules for failed nonoperative reduction of intussusception.

    PubMed

    Khorana, Jiraporn; Patumanond, Jayanton; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Laohapensang, Mongkol; Visrutaratna, Pannee; Singhavejsakul, Jesda

    2016-01-01

    The nonoperative reduction of intussusception in children can be performed safely if there are no contraindications. Many risk factors associated with failed reduction were defined. The aim of this study was to develop a scoring system for predicting the failure of nonoperative reduction using various determinants. The data were collected from Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital from January 2006 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients with intussusception aged 0-15 years with no contraindications for nonoperative reduction. The clinical prediction rules were developed using significant risk factors from the multivariable analysis. A total of 170 patients with intussusception were included in the study. In the final analysis model, 154 patients were used for identifying the significant risk factors of failure of reduction. Ten factors clustering by the age of 3 years were identified and used for developing the clinical prediction rules, and the factors were as follows: body weight <12 kg (relative risk [RR] =1.48, P=0.004), duration of symptoms >48 hours (RR =1.26, P<0.001), vomiting (RR =1.63, P<0.001), rectal bleeding (RR =1.50, P<0.001), abdominal distension (RR =1.60, P=0.003), temperature >37.8°C (RR =1.51, P<0.001), palpable mass (RR =1.26, P<0.001), location of mass (left over right side RR =1.48, P<0.001), ultrasound showed poor prognostic signs (RR =1.35, P<0.001), and the method of reduction (hydrostatic over pneumatic, RR =1.34, P=0.023). Prediction scores ranged from 0 to 16. A high-risk group (scores 12-16) predicted a greater chance of reduction failure (likelihood ratio of positive [LR+] =18.22, P<0.001). A low-risk group (score 0-11) predicted a lower chance of reduction failure (LR+ =0.79, P<0.001). The performance of the scoring model was 80.68% (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve). This scoring guideline was used to predict the results of nonoperative reduction and forecast the prognosis of

  13. 40 CFR 1068.420 - How do I know when my engine family fails an SEA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fails an SEA? 1068.420 Section 1068.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing § 1068.420 How do I know when my engine family fails an SEA? (a) A... for the SEA requirements when the number of failed engines/equipment is less than or equal to the pass...

  14. 29 CFR 37.69 - What happens if a recipient fails to show cause?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What happens if a recipient fails to show cause? 37.69 Section 37.69 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL... happens if a recipient fails to show cause? If the recipient fails to show cause why...

  15. 43 CFR 30.222 - What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? 30.222 Section 30.222 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Conference § 30.222 What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? (a) If a party fails to...

  16. 43 CFR 30.222 - What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? 30.222 Section 30.222 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Conference § 30.222 What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? (a) If a party fails to...

  17. 49 CFR 199.103 - Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.103 Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. (a) An operator may not knowingly use as an employee any person who— (1) Fails a drug test required by... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. 199...

  18. 49 CFR 199.103 - Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.103 Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. (a) An operator may not knowingly use as an employee any person who— (1) Fails a drug test required by... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. 199...

  19. 49 CFR 199.103 - Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.103 Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. (a) An operator may not knowingly use as an employee any person who— (1) Fails a drug test required by... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. 199...

  20. 49 CFR 199.103 - Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.103 Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. (a) An operator may not knowingly use as an employee any person who— (1) Fails a drug test required by... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. 199...

  1. 49 CFR 199.103 - Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.103 Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. (a) An operator may not knowingly use as an employee any person who— (1) Fails a drug test required by... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of persons who fail or refuse a drug test. 199...

  2. 49 CFR 26.47 - Can recipients be penalized for failing to meet overall goals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Can recipients be penalized for failing to meet... Goals, Good Faith Efforts, and Counting § 26.47 Can recipients be penalized for failing to meet overall... rule, because your DBE participation falls short of your overall goal, unless you have failed to...

  3. 29 CFR 37.69 - What happens if a recipient fails to show cause?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What happens if a recipient fails to show cause? 37.69 Section 37.69 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL... happens if a recipient fails to show cause? If the recipient fails to show cause why enforcement...

  4. 43 CFR 30.222 - What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? 30.222 Section 30.222 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Conference § 30.222 What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? (a) If a party fails to respond...

  5. 43 CFR 30.222 - What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? 30.222 Section 30.222 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Conference § 30.222 What happens if a party fails to comply with discovery? (a) If a party fails to...

  6. Establishment of design criteria for acceptable failure modes and fail safe considerations for the space shuttle structural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westrup, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations of fatigue life, and safe-life and fail-safe design concepts as applied to space shuttle structure are summarized. The results are evaluated to select recommended structural design criteria to provide assurance that premature failure due to propagation of undetected crack-like defects will not occur during shuttle operational service. The space shuttle booster, GDC configuration B-9U, is selected as the reference vehicle. Structural elements used as basis of detail analyses include wing spar caps, vertical stabilizer skins, crew compartment skin, orbiter support frame, and propellant tank shell structure. Fatigue life analyses of structural elements are performed to define potential problem areas and establish upper limits of operating stresses. Flaw growth analyses are summarized in parametric form over a range of initial flaw types and sizes, operating stresses and service life requirements. Service life of 100 to 500 missions is considered.

  7. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  8. Owl: Next Generation System Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M; White, B S; McKee, S A; Lee, H S; Jeitner, J

    2005-02-16

    As microarchitectural and system complexity grows, comprehending system behavior becomes increasingly difficult, and often requires obtaining and sifting through voluminous event traces or coordinating results from multiple, non-localized sources. Owl is a proposed framework that overcomes limitations faced by traditional performance counters and monitoring facilities in dealing with such complexity by pervasively deploying programmable monitoring elements throughout a system. The design exploits reconfigurable or programmable logic to realize hardware monitors located at event sources, such as memory buses. These monitors run and writeback results autonomously with respect to the CPU, mitigating the system impact of interrupt-driven monitoring or the need to communicate irrelevant events to higher levels of the system. The monitors are designed to snoop any kind of system transaction, e.g., within the core, on a bus, across the wire, or within I/O devices.

  9. BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN FAILING CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2011-04-01

    We present results of a systematic study of failing core-collapse supernovae and the formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). Using our open-source general-relativistic 1.5D code GR1D equipped with a three-species neutrino leakage/heating scheme and over 100 presupernova models, we study the effects of the choice of nuclear equation of state (EOS), zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass and metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss prescription on BH formation. We find that the outcome, for a given EOS, can be estimated, to first order, by a single parameter, the compactness of the stellar core at bounce. By comparing protoneutron star (PNS) structure at the onset of gravitational instability with solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkof equations, we find that thermal pressure support in the outer PNS core is responsible for raising the maximum PNS mass by up to 25% above the cold NS value. By artificially increasing neutrino heating, we find the critical neutrino heating efficiency required for exploding a given progenitor structure and connect these findings with ZAMS conditions, establishing, albeit approximately, for the first time based on actual collapse simulations, the mapping between ZAMS parameters and the outcome of core collapse. We also study the effect of progenitor rotation and find that the dimensionless spin of nascent BHs may be robustly limited below a* = Jc/GM{sup 2} = 1 by the appearance of nonaxisymmetric rotational instabilities.

  10. What to do if an initial antidepressant fails?

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Roger S.; Müller, Aleksandra; Mancini, Deborah A.; Silver, Eric S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with practical ways of managing depressed patients responding insufficiently to initial antidepressant treatment. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A search of MEDLINE and relevant bibliographies showed most studies could be categorized as level III evidence. Few well controlled studies (eg, level I evidence) specify treatment of next choice in rigorously defined treatment-refractory depression (TRD). MAIN MESSAGE: Failure to achieve and sustain full symptom remission affects relatively few treated depressed patients. Most chronically depressed people are not absolutely resistant but are relatively resistant to treatment; they fail to achieve the goals of treatment because of improper diagnosis or insufficient treatment application. The literature on TRD has largely focused on medication strategies; fewer studies investigated psychosocial approaches. The best established augmentation strategies are lithium salts and triidothyronine (T3). Combination antidepressants have become clinical psychiatrists' preferred treatment, despite limited evidence. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains a feasible option for TRD, but response rates are poor among people with TRD. High relapse rates after ECT remain a serious and common clinical dilemma. CONCLUSION: Family physicians should familiarize themselves with some new strategies to modify inadequate response to initial antidepressant treatment. PMID:12729241

  11. Requirements: Towards an understanding on why software projects fail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.

    2016-08-01

    Requirement engineering is at the foundation of every successful software project. There are many reasons for software project failures; however, poorly engineered requirements process contributes immensely to the reason why software projects fail. Software project failure is usually costly and risky and could also be life threatening. Projects that undermine requirements engineering suffer or are likely to suffer from failures, challenges and other attending risks. The cost of project failures and overruns when estimated is very huge. Furthermore, software project failures or overruns pose a challenge in today's competitive market environment. It affects the company's image, goodwill, and revenue drive and decreases the perceived satisfaction of customers and clients. In this paper, requirements engineering was discussed. Its role in software projects success was elaborated. The place of software requirements process in relation to software project failure was explored and examined. Also, project success and failure factors were also discussed with emphasis placed on requirements factors as they play a major role in software projects' challenges, successes and failures. The paper relied on secondary data and empirical statistics to explore and examine factors responsible for the successes, challenges and failures of software projects in large, medium and small scaled software companies.

  12. Social mind representation: where does it fail in frontotemporal dementia?

    PubMed

    Ruby, Perrine; Schmidt, Christina; Hogge, Michaël; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Collette, Fabienne; Salmon, Eric

    2007-04-01

    We aimed at investigating social disability and its cerebral correlates in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To do so, we contrasted answers of patients with early-stage FTD and of their relatives on personality trait judgment and on behavior prediction in social and emotional situations. Such contrasts were compared to control contrasts calculated with answers of matched controls tested with their relatives. In addition, brain metabolism was measured in patients with positron emission tomography and the [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose method. Patients turned out to be as accurate as controls in describing their relative's personality, but they failed to predict their relative's behavior in social and emotional circumstances. Concerning the self, patients were impaired both in current personality assessment and in prediction of their own behavior. Those two self-evaluation measures did not correlate. Only patients' anosognosia for social behavioral disability was found to be related to decreased metabolic activity in the left temporal pole. Such results suggest that anosognosia for social disability in FTD originates in impaired processing of emotional autobiographical information, leading to a self-representation that does not match current behavior. Moreover, we propose that perspective-taking disability participates in anosognosia, preventing patients from correcting their inaccurate self-representation based on their relative's perspective.

  13. Ouachita trough: Part of a Cambrian failed rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Donald R.

    1985-11-01

    Pre-flysch (Cambrian-Mississippian) strata of the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma include two main sandstone lithofacies: (1) a craton-derived lithofacies made up largely of mature medium- to coarse-grained quartzose and carbonate detritus and, in some units, sediment eroded from exposed basement rocks and (2) an orogen-derived facies made up mainly of fine-grained quartzose sedimentary and metasedimentary debris and possibly, in lower units, a volcaniclastic component. Paleocurrent and distribution patterns indicate that detritus of facies I in the Benton uplift was derived from north and detritus of facies II throughout the Ouachitas was derived from south and east of the depositional basin. Overall sedimentological results suggest that the Ouachita trough was a relatively narrow, two-sided basin throughout most and probably all of its existence and never formed the southern margin of the North American craton. Regional comparisons suggest that it was one of several basins, including the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, Reelfoot Rift, Illinois Basin, and Rome trough, that formed as a Cambrian failed rift system 150 to 250 m.y. after initial rifting along the Appalachian margin of the North American craton.

  14. Management of failed angioplasty with laser balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Ronald D.; Spears, J. Richard

    1990-07-01

    Laser balloon angioplasty (LBA) is a technique for improving the post angioplasty result by the radial diffusion of continuous wave Neodymium:YAG laser energy to the arterial wall during the final inflation of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Potential mechanisms of luminal improvement include sealing of dissections, reduction of arterial recoil, desiccation of thrombus, and reduction of thrombogenicity of tissues at the luminal surface. These effects are helpful in the management of failed PTCA as defined by the presence of a greater than 50% stenosis after conventional PTCA. Preliminary data suggest that LBA may be safe and effective for the treatment of abrupt closure, with a majority of patients successfully avoiding emergency coronary artery bypass surgery. Similarly, a cohort in which the residual post-PTCA luminal diameter was less than 50% of reference diameter (n=13) was subsequently treated with LBA and demonstrated uniform success in improving luminal diameter, with a mean increment of 0.9mm. Data on the long-term clinical outcome of this cohort is encouraging.

  15. Atypical embryonic synapses fail to regenerate in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kloos, Anne D; Muller, Kenneth J; Modney, Barbara K

    2007-12-01

    Functional recovery following central nervous system (CNS) injury in adult animals may depend on the reestablishment of the precise pattern of connections made during development. When the nervous system is injured during embryonic development, functional recovery may involve the formation of atypical connections. Can such atypical synapses regenerate in adults, particularly in a nervous system known for its capacity for repair? When the S interneuron in one segmental ganglion of the leech Hirudo is killed during development, two neighboring S cells extend their axons into the ganglion and restore function by making electrical synapses with the usual synaptic targets of the killed S cell. Although adult S-cell axons reliably regenerated their usual synaptic connections, the novel synapses induced following embryonic injury failed to regenerate in adults. In these preparations severed S-cell axons did not reach the denervated ganglion but grew close to it, independent of the distance required to grow. Thus, the developmental changes that permit aberrant but functional connections in embryos do not lead to a similar change in the capacity for axon growth and subsequent synapse regeneration in adults. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Failed back surgery syndrome: review and new hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a term used to define an unsatisfactory outcome of a patient who underwent spinal surgery, irrespective of type or intervention area, with persistent pain in the lumbosacral region with or without it radiating to the leg. The possible reasons and risk factors that would lead to FBSS can be found in distinct phases: in problems already present in the patient before a surgical approach, such as spinal instability, during surgery (for example, from a mistake by the surgeon), or in the postintervention phase in relation to infections or biomechanical alterations. This article reviews the current literature on FBSS and tries to give a new hypothesis to understand the reasons for this clinical problem. The dysfunction of the diaphragm muscle is a component that is not taken into account when trying to understand the reasons for this syndrome, as there is no existing literature on the subject. The diaphragm is involved in chronic lower back and sacroiliac pain and plays an important role in the management of pain perception. PMID:26834497

  17. Outcome of neurolysis for failed tarsal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Barker, Allison R; Rosson, Gedge D; Dellon, A Lee

    2008-02-01

    Revision tarsal tunnel surgery was performed on 44 patients (two bilaterally). The surgical procedure included a neurolysis of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel, the medial plantar, lateral plantar, and calcaneal nerves in their respective tunnels, excision of the intertunnel septum, and neuroma resection as indicated. A painful tarsal tunnel scar or painful heel was treated, respectively, by resection of the distal saphenous nerve or a calcaneal nerve branch. Postoperative, immediate ambulation was permitted. Outcomes were assessed with a numerical grading scale that included neurosensory measurements. Outcomes were also assessed by patient satisfaction and their own estimate of residual pain and/or numbness. Mean follow-up time was 2.2 years. Outcomes in terms of patient satisfaction were 54% excellent, 24% good, 13% fair, and 9% poor results. The mean preoperative numerical score was 6.0 and the mean postoperative score was 2.7. There was a significant improvement seen, based on the median difference between scores (P<0.001). Prognostic indicators of poor results in our patient group were coexisting lumbosacral disc disease and/or neuropathy. An approach related to resecting painful cutaneous nerves and neurolysis of all tibial nerve branches at the ankle offers hope for relief of pain and recovery of sensation for the majority of patients with failed previous tarsal tunnel surgery.

  18. Atherosclerosis as a disease of failed endogenous repair

    PubMed Central

    Zenovich, Andrey G.; Taylor, Doris A.

    2009-01-01

    As coronary artery disease (CAD) continues to be the primary cause of mortality, a more in-depth understanding of pathophysiology and novel treatments are being sought. The past two decades have established inflammation as a driving force behind CAD – from endothelial dysfunction to heart failure. Recent advances in stem/progenitor cell biology have led to initial applications of progenitor cells in CAD continuum and have revealed that atherosclerosis is, at least in part, a disease of failed endogenous vascular repair. Several key progenitor cell populations including endothelial progenitor cells (AC133+/CD34+ population), vascular progenitors (CD31+/CD45low population), KDR+ cells and other bone marrow subtypes are mobilized for vascular repair. However, age and risk factors negatively impact these cells even prior to clinical CAD. Sex-based differences in progenitor cell capacity for repair have emerged as a new research focus that may offer mechanistic insights into clinical CAD discrepancies between men and women. Quantifying injury and cell-based repair and better defining their interactions should enable us to halt or even prevent CAD by enhancing the repair side of the repair/injury equation. PMID:18508460

  19. NEUROMODULATION OF THE FAILING HEART: LOST IN TRANSLATION?

    PubMed Central

    Byku, Mirnela; Mann, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sympathovagal imbalance contributes to progressive worsening of HF (HF) and is associated with untoward clinical outcomes. Based on compelling pre-clinical studies which supported the role of autonomic modulation in HF models, a series of clinical studies were initiated using spinal cord stimulation (SCS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and baroreceptor activation therapy (BAT) in patients with HF with a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). While the phase II studies with BAT remain encouraging, the larger clinical studies with SCS and VNS have yielded disappointing results. Here we will focus on the pre-clinical studies that supported the role of neuromodulation in the failing heart, as well provide a critical review of the recent clinical trials that have sought to modulate autonomic tone in HF patients. This review will conclude with an analysis of some of the difficulties in translating device-based modulation of the autonomic nervous from pre-clinical models into successful clinical trials, as well as provide suggestions for how to move the field of neuromodulation forward PMID:27525317

  20. Fracture Surface Analysis of Clinically Failed Fixed Partial Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Taskonak, B.; Mecholsky, J.J.; Anusavice, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic systems have limited long-term fracture resistance, especially when they are used in posterior areas or for fixed partial dentures. The objective of this study was to determine the site of crack initiation and the causes of fracture of clinically failed ceramic fixed partial dentures. Six Empress 2® lithia-disilicate (Li2O·2SiO2)-based veneered bridges and 7 experimental lithia-disilicate-based non-veneered ceramic bridges were retrieved and analyzed. Fractography and fracture mechanics methods were used to estimate the stresses at failure in 6 bridges (50%) whose fracture initiated from the occlusal surface of the connectors. Fracture of 1 non-veneered bridge (8%) initiated within the gingival surface of the connector. Three veneered bridges fractured within the veneer layers. Failure stresses of the all-core fixed partial dentures ranged from 107 to 161 MPa. Failure stresses of the veneered fixed partial dentures ranged from 19 to 68 MPa. We conclude that fracture initiation sites are controlled primarily by contact damage. PMID:16498078