Sample records for monochromatic x-ray beam

  1. Analysis of monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources in imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Orban, Christopher; Pradhan, Anil

    2017-04-01

    We studied biomedical imaging and therapeutic applications of recently developed quasi-monochromatic and monochromatic X-ray sources. Using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4, we found that the quasi-monochromatic 65 keV Gaussian X-ray spectrum created by inverse Compton scattering with relatavistic electron beams were capable of producing better image contrast with less radiation compared to conventional 120 kV broadband CT scans. We also explored possible experimental detection of theoretically predicted K α resonance fluorescence in high-Z elements using the European Synchrotron Research Facility with a tungsten (Z = 74) target. In addition, we studied a newly developed quasi-monochromatic source generated by converting broadband X-rays to monochromatic K α and β X-rays with a zirconium target (Z = 40). We will further study how these K α and K β dominated spectra can be implemented in conjunction with nanoparticles for targeted therapy. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  2. Monochromatic-beam-based dynamic X-ray microtomography based on OSEM-TV algorithm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Chen, Rongchang; Yang, Yiming; Deng, Biao; Du, Guohao; Xie, Honglan; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2017-01-01

    Monochromatic-beam-based dynamic X-ray computed microtomography (CT) was developed to observe evolution of microstructure inside samples. However, the low flux density results in low efficiency in data collection. To increase efficiency, reducing the number of projections should be a practical solution. However, it has disadvantages of low image reconstruction quality using the traditional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. In this study, an iterative reconstruction method using an ordered subset expectation maximization-total variation (OSEM-TV) algorithm was employed to address and solve this problem. The simulated results demonstrated that normalized mean square error of the image slices reconstructed by the OSEM-TV algorithm was about 1/4 of that by FBP. Experimental results also demonstrated that the density resolution of OSEM-TV was high enough to resolve different materials with the number of projections less than 100. As a result, with the introduction of OSEM-TV, the monochromatic-beam-based dynamic X-ray microtomography is potentially practicable for the quantitative and non-destructive analysis to the evolution of microstructure with acceptable efficiency in data collection and reconstructed image quality.

  3. An experimental evaluation of monochromatic x-ray beam position monitors at diamond light source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bloomer, Chris, E-mail: chris.bloomer@diamond.ac.uk; Rehm, Guenther; Dolbnya, Igor P.

    Maintaining the stability of the X-ray beam relative to the sample point is of paramount importance for beamlines and users wanting to perform cutting-edge experiments. The ability to detect, and subsequently compensate for, variations in X-ray beam position with effective diagnostics has multiple benefits: a reduction in commissioning and start-up time, less ‘down-time’, and an improvement in the quality of acquired data. At Diamond Light Source a methodical evaluation of a selection of monochromatic X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPMs), using a range of position detection techniques, and from a range of suppliers, was carried out. The results of these experimentsmore » are presented, showing the measured RMS noise on the position measurement of each device for a given flux, energy, beam size, and bandwidth. A discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of each of the various devices and techniques is also included.« less

  4. Three-dimensional monochromatic x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tsuneo; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Tokumori, Kenji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Nishimura, Ktsuyuki; Uyama, Chikao

    1995-08-01

    In this paper, we describe a 3D computed tomography (3D CT) using monochromatic x-rays generated by synchrotron radiation, which performs a direct reconstruction of 3D volume image of an object from its cone-beam projections. For the develpment of 3D CT, scanning orbit of x-ray source to obtain complete 3D information about an object and corresponding 3D image reconstruction algorithm are considered. Computer simulation studies demonstrate the validities of proposed scanning method and reconstruction algorithm. A prototype experimental system of 3D CT was constructed. Basic phantom examinations and specific material CT image by energy subtraction obtained in this experimental system are shown.

  5. Three-dimensional monochromatic x-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tsuneo; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Tokumori, Kenji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Uyama, Chikao

    1998-08-01

    We describe a technique of 3D computed tomography (3D CT) using monochromatic x rays generated by synchrotron radiation, which performs a direct reconstruction of a 3D volume image of an object from its cone-beam projections. For the development, we propose a practical scanning orbit of the x-ray source to obtain complete 3D information on an object, and its corresponding 3D image reconstruction algorithm. The validity and usefulness of the proposed scanning orbit and reconstruction algorithm were confirmed by computer simulation studies. Based on these investigations, we have developed a prototype 3D monochromatic x-ray CT using synchrotron radiation, which provides exact 3D reconstruction and material-selective imaging by using the K-edge energy subtraction technique.

  6. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane

    Purpose: This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC{sup Registered-Sign} EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} polymethylmethacrylate phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol wasmore » applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Results: The sensitivity (NOD per unit dose) of EBT film at 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays was 0.73 and 0.76 for doses 50 and 100 cGy, respectively. The sensitivity of EBT2 film at 25, 30, and 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays varied from 1.09-1.07, 1.23-1.17, and 1.27-1.19 for doses 50-200 cGy, respectively. For EBT3 film the relative sensitivity was within 3% of unity for all three monochromatic x-ray beams. Conclusions: EBT and EBT2 film sensitivity showed strong energy dependence over an energy range of 25 keV-4 MV, although this dependence becomes weaker for larger doses. EBT3 film shows weak energy dependence, indicating that it would be a better dosimeter for kV x-ray beams where beam hardening effects can result in large changes in the effective energy.« less

  7. Monochromatic X-ray sources based on a mechanism of real and virtual photon diffraction in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A. R.; Kuznetsov, S. I.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Razin, S. V.; Uglov, S. R.; Zabaev, V. N.

    2008-09-01

    A source of monochromatic X-ray radiation is wanted in industry, science, medicine and so on. Many ways of making such a source are known. The present work describes two mechanisms for the creation of a monochromatic X-ray beam, which are parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) and bremsstrahlung diffraction (DBS). Both the experiments were carried out using an electron beam at a microtron. During the first experiment, the DBS process was investigated as a scattering of the Bremsstrahlung (BS) beam on the crystallographic surfaces of tungsten and pyrolytic graphite crystals. The second experiment consisted in the registration of the PXR and DBS yield during the passage of the electrons through the same crystals as in the first experiment. The spectral and orientation radiation characteristics and simulation results obtained for the DBS and PXR processes are presented. It is shown that the usage of mosaic crystalline targets is rather useful in order to obtain a monochromatic X-ray source based on bremsstrahlung diffraction from moderately relativistic electrons.

  8. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jin, Gye-Hwan; Kim, Sung Youb; Jeon, Insu

    2014-09-01

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  9. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J. L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-01

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, "novel" x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic "structure" of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR).

  10. Energy dependent calibration of XR-QA2 radiochromic film with monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Di Lillo, F.; Mettivier, G., E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it; Sarno, A.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the energy response and dose-response curve determinations for XR-QA2 radiochromic film dosimetry system used for synchrotron radiation work and for quality assurance in diagnostic radiology, in the range of effective energies 18–46.5 keV. Methods: Pieces of XR-QA2 films were irradiated, in a plane transverse to the beam axis, with a monochromatic beam of energy in the range 18–40 keV at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) and with a polychromatic beam from a laboratory x-ray tube operated at 80, 100, and 120 kV. The film calibration curve was expressed as air kerma (measured free-in-air withmore » an ionization chamber) versus the net optical reflectance change (netΔR) derived from the red channel of the RGB scanned film image. Four functional relationships (rational, linear exponential, power, and logarithm) were tested to evaluate the best curve for fitting the calibration data. The adequacy of the various fitting functions was tested by using the uncertainty analysis and by assessing the average of the absolute air kerma error calculated as the difference between calculated and delivered air kerma. The sensitivity of the film was evaluated as the ratio of the change in net reflectance to the corresponding air kerma. Results: The sensitivity of XR-QA2 films increased in the energy range 18–39 keV, with a maximum variation of about 170%, and decreased in the energy range 38–46.5 keV. The present results confirmed and extended previous findings by this and other groups, as regards the dose response of the radiochromic film XR-QA2 to monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams, respectively. Conclusions: The XR-QA2 radiochromic film response showed a strong dependence on beam energy for both monochromatic and polychromatic beams in the range of half value layer values from 0.55 to 6.1 mm Al and corresponding effective energies from 18 to 46.5 keV. In this range, the film response varied by 170

  11. Curved crystal x-ray optics for monochromatic imaging with a clinical source.

    PubMed

    Bingölbali, Ayhan; MacDonald, C A

    2009-04-01

    Monochromatic x-ray imaging has been shown to increase contrast and reduce dose relative to conventional broadband imaging. However, clinical sources with very narrow energy bandwidth tend to have limited intensity and field of view. In this study, focused fan beam monochromatic radiation was obtained using doubly curved monochromator crystals. While these optics have been in use for microanalysis at synchrotron facilities for some time, this work is the first investigation of the potential application of curved crystal optics to clinical sources for medical imaging. The optics could be used with a variety of clinical sources for monochromatic slot scan imaging. The intensity was assessed and the resolution of the focused beam was measured using a knife-edge technique. A simulation model was developed and comparisons to the measured resolution were performed to verify the accuracy of the simulation to predict resolution for different conventional sources. A simple geometrical calculation was also developed. The measured, simulated, and calculated resolutions agreed well. Adequate resolution and intensity for mammography were predicted for appropriate source/optic combinations.

  12. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Spence, John C. H.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Li, Chufeng

    2014-01-01

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. PMID:24914153

  13. High resolution, monochromatic x-ray topography capability at CHESS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Finkelstein, K. D., E-mail: kdf1@cornell.edu; Pauling, A.; Brown, Z.

    2016-07-27

    CHESS has a monochromatic x-ray topography capability serving continually expanding user interest. The setup consists of a beam expanding monochromator, 6-circle diffactometer, and CHESS designed CMOS camera with real time sample-alignment capability. This provides rocking curve mapping with angle resolution as small as 2 µradians, spatial resolution to 3 microns, and field of view up to 7mm. Thus far the capability has been applied for: improving CVD-diamond growth, evaluating perfection of ultra-thin diamond membranes, correlating performance of diamond-based electronics with crystal defect structure, and defect analysis of single crystal silicon carbide. This paper describes our topography system, explains its capabilities,more » and presents experimental results from several applications.« less

  14. Energy distribution measurement of narrow-band ultrashort x-ray beams via K-edge filters subtraction

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cardarelli, Paolo; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Marziani, Michele

    2012-10-01

    The characterization of novel x-ray sources includes the measurement of the photon flux and the energy distribution of the produced beam. The aim of BEATS2 experiment at the SPARC-LAB facility of the INFN National Laboratories of Frascati (Rome, Italy) is to investigate possible medical applications of an x-ray source based on Thomson relativistic back-scattering. This source is expected to produce a pulsed quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam with an instantaneous flux of 10{sup 20} ph/s in pulses 10 ps long and with an average energy of about 20 keV. A direct measurement of energy distribution of this beam is very difficult withmore » traditional detectors because of the extremely high photon flux. In this paper, we present a method for the evaluation of the energy distribution of quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams based on beam filtration with K-edge absorbing foils in the energy range of interest (16-22 keV). The technique was tested measuring the energy distribution of an x-ray beam having a spectrum similar to the expected one (SPARC-LAB Thomson source) by using a tungsten anode x-ray tube properly filtered and powered. The energy distribution obtained has been compared with the one measured with a HPGe detector showing very good agreement.« less

  15. Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy with quasi-monochromatic computed tomography

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Jost, Gregor; Mensing, Tristan; Golfier, Sven

    2009-06-15

    Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy is a bimodal therapy, consisting of the administration of highly radiation-absorbing substances into the tumor area and localized regional irradiation with orthovoltage x-rays. Irradiation can be performed by a modified computed tomography (CT) unit equipped with an additional x-ray optical module which converts the polychromatic, fan-shaped CT beam into a monochromatized and focused beam for energy-tuned photoelectric-enhanced radiotherapy. A dedicated x-ray optical module designed for spatial collimation, focusing, and monochromatization was mounted at the exit of the x-ray tube of a clinical CT unit. Spectrally resolved measurements of the resulting beam were performed using an energy-dispersive detectionmore » system calibrated by synchrotron radiation. The spatial photon fluence was determined by film dosimetry. Depth-dose measurements were performed and compared to the polychromatic CT and a therapeutic 6 MV beam. The spatial dose distribution in phantoms using a rotating radiation source (quasi-monochromatic CT and 6 MV, respectively) was investigated by gel dosimetry. The photoelectric dose enhancement for an iodine fraction of 1% in tissue was calculated and verified experimentally. The x-ray optical module selectively filters the energy of the tungsten K{alpha} emission line with an FWHM of 5 keV. The relative photon fluence distribution demonstrates the focusing characteristic of the x-ray optical module. A beam width of about 3 mm was determined at the isocenter of the CT gantry. The depth-dose measurements resulted in a half-depth value of approximately 36 mm for the CT beams (quasi-monochromatic, polychromatic) compared to 154 mm for the 6 MV beam. The rotation of the radiation source leads to a steep dose gradient at the center of rotation; the gel dosimetry yields an entrance-to-peak dose ratio of 1:10.8 for the quasi-monochromatic CT and 1:37.3 for a 6 MV beam of the same size. The photoelectric dose

  16. High-resolution monochromatic x-ray imaging system based on spherically bent crystals.

    PubMed

    Aglitskiy, Y; Lehecka, T; Obenschain, S; Bodner, S; Pawley, C; Gerber, K; Sethian, J; Brown, C M; Seely, J; Feldman, U; Holland, G

    1998-08-01

    We have developed an improved x-ray imaging system based on spherically curved crystals. It is designed and used for diagnostics of targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser. A spherically curved quartz crystal (d = .?, R = mm) has been used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. The spatial resolution of the x-ray optical system is 1.7 mum in selected places and 2-3 mum over a larger area. Time-resolved backlit monochromatic images of polystyrene planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with a spatial resolution of 2.5 mum in selected places and 5 mum over the focal spot of the Nike laser.

  17. Energy-angle correlation correction algorithm for monochromatic computed tomography based on Thomson scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhijun; Du, Yingchao; Huang, Wenhui; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2017-12-01

    The necessity for compact and relatively low cost x-ray sources with monochromaticity, continuous tunability of x-ray energy, high spatial coherence, straightforward polarization control, and high brightness has led to the rapid development of Thomson scattering x-ray sources. To meet the requirement of in-situ monochromatic computed tomography (CT) for large-scale and/or high-attenuation materials based on this type of x-ray source, there is an increasing demand for effective algorithms to correct the energy-angle correlation. In this paper, we take advantage of the parametrization of the x-ray attenuation coefficient to resolve this problem. The linear attenuation coefficient of a material can be decomposed into a linear combination of the energy-dependent photoelectric and Compton cross-sections in the keV energy regime without K-edge discontinuities, and the line integrals of the decomposition coefficients of the above two parts can be determined by performing two spectrally different measurements. After that, the line integral of the linear attenuation coefficient of an imaging object at a certain interested energy can be derived through the above parametrization formula, and monochromatic CT can be reconstructed at this energy using traditional reconstruction methods, e.g., filtered back projection or algebraic reconstruction technique. Not only can monochromatic CT be realized, but also the distributions of the effective atomic number and electron density of the imaging object can be retrieved at the expense of dual-energy CT scan. Simulation results validate our proposal and will be shown in this paper. Our results will further expand the scope of application for Thomson scattering x-ray sources.

  18. Use of capillary optics as a beam intensifier for a Compton x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, P A; Abreu, C C; Carroll, F E; Xiao, Q F; MacDonald, C A

    1994-11-01

    The use of Kumakhov capillary optics will significantly enhance the performance of near-monochromatic, Compton backscattered x-ray programs. The Vanderbilt University Medical Free-Electron Laser Center is developing the capability to create these tunable x rays for medical imaging. The present transport has only reflection optics, and the beam is quite large in diameter at the laboratory. Low loss collimation of this beam would allow higher x-ray intensities after transport. This article describes experimental and computer simulation results which predict the expected performance for a multifiber Kumakhov collimator for use in the x-ray beam transport. Estimates from our research are that a multifiber optic formed of individual polycapillary fibers could be used to capture the full 7 mrad of the Vanderbilt x-ray beam and collimate it to a 1-2 mrad divergence with approximately 40%-50% transmission efficiency. This optic should increase the x-ray intensity at the laboratory level by a factor of > or = 5 by decreasing the beam divergence and subsequent spot size. Additionally, analysis of monolithic optics of fused multicapillary fibers predicts an increase in the intensity of the x rays at the laboratory by a factor of 55. These optics can have tapered channels that greatly decrease their exit divergence. This will greatly enhance the capabilities of this unique x-ray source. This article reports the initial results from a collaboration between Vanderbilt, The Center for X-Ray Optics at University at Albany, SUNY, and X-Ray Optical Systems in Albany, NY.

  19. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; ...

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable,more » for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.« less

  20. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifying in situ chamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  1. A Bragg beam splitter for hard x-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Taito; Yabashi, Makina; Sano, Yasuhisa; Tono, Kensuke; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2013-02-11

    We report a Bragg beam splitter developed for utilization of hard x-ray free-electron lasers. The splitter is based on an ultrathin silicon crystal operating in the symmetric Bragg geometry to provide high reflectivity and transmissivity simultaneously. We fabricated frame-shaped Si(511) and (110) crystals with thicknesses below 10 μm by a reactive dry etching method using atmospheric-pressure plasma. The thickness variation over an illuminated area is less than 300 nm peak-to-valley. High crystalline perfection was verified by topographic and diffractometric measurements. The crystal thickness was evaluated from the period of the Pendellösung beats measured with a highly monochromatic and collimated x-ray probe. The crystals provide two replica pulses with uniform wavefront [(<1/50)λ] and low spatial intensity variation (<5%). These Bragg beam splitters will play an important role in innovating XFEL applications.

  2. Incoherent-scatter computed tomography with monochromatic synchrotron x ray: feasibility of multi-CT imaging system for simultaneous measurement-of fluorescent and incoherent scatter x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, T.; Akiba, M.; Takeda, T.; Kazama, M.; Hoshino, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Akatsuka, T.; Itai, Y.

    1997-10-01

    We describe a new system of incoherent scatter computed tomography (ISCT) using monochromatic synchrotron X rays, and we discuss its potential to be used in in vivo imaging for medical use. The system operates on the basis of computed tomography (CT) of the first generation. The reconstruction method for ISCT uses the least squares method with singular value decomposition. The research was carried out at the BLNE-5A bending magnet beam line of the Tristan Accumulation Ring in KEK, Japan. An acrylic cylindrical phantom of 20-mm diameter containing a cross-shaped channel was imaged. The channel was filled with a diluted iodine solution with a concentration of 200 /spl mu/gI/ml. Spectra obtained with the system's high purity germanium (HPGe) detector separated the incoherent X-ray line from the other notable peaks, i.e., the iK/sub /spl alpha// and K/sub /spl beta/1/ X-ray fluorescent lines and the coherent scattering peak. CT images were reconstructed from projections generated by integrating the counts In the energy window centering around the incoherent scattering peak and whose width was approximately 2 keV. The reconstruction routine employed an X-ray attenuation correction algorithm. The resulting image showed more homogeneity than one without the attenuation correction.

  3. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Kroll, Thomas; Kern, Jan; Kubin, Markus; ...

    2016-09-19

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. But, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatization is needed. We compare L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of a prototypical transition metal system based on monochromatizing the SASE radiation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) with a new technique based onmore » self-seeding of LCLS. We demonstrate how L-edge XAS can be performed using the self-seeding scheme without the need of an additional beam line monochromator. Lastly, we show how the spectral shape and pulse energy depend on the undulator setup and how this affects the x-ray spectroscopy measurements.« less

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Thomas; Kern, Jan; Kubin, Markus; Ratner, Daniel; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D.; Löchel, Heike; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Ding, Yuantao; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Turner, Joshua J.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis L.; Rehanek, Jens; Weniger, Christian; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hill, Ethan; Borovik, Andrew; Erko, Alexei; Föhlisch, Alexander; Mitzner, Rolf; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Wernet, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. However, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatization is needed. Here we compare L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of a prototypical transition metal system based on monochromatizing the SASE radiation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) with a new technique based on self-seeding of LCLS. We demonstrate how L-edge XAS can be performed using the self-seeding scheme without the need of an additional beam line monochromator. We show how the spectral shape and pulse energy depend on the undulator setup and how this affects the x-ray spectroscopy measurements. PMID:27828320

  6. Observation of Intravascular Changes of Superabsorbent Polymer Microsphere (SAP-MS) with Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tanimoto, Daigo, E-mail: daigoro@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Akira

    2010-10-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the intravascular transformation behavior of superabsorbent polymer microsphere (SAP-MS) in vivo macroscopically by using monochromatic X-ray imaging and to quantitatively compare the expansion rate of SAP-MS among different kinds of mixtures. Fifteen rabbits were used for our study and transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) was performed for their auricular arteries using monochromatic X-ray imaging. We used three kinds of SAP-MS (particle diameter 100-150 {mu}m) mixture as embolic spherical particles: SAP-MS(H) absorbed with sodium meglumine ioxaglate (Hexabrix 320), SAP-MS(V) absorbed with isosmolar contrast medium (Visipaque 270), and SAP-MS(S) absorbed with 0.9% sodium saline. The initial volumemore » of SAP-MS particles just after TAE and its final volume 10 minutes after TAE in the vessel were measured to calculate the expansion rate (ER) (n = 30). Intravascular behavior of SAP-MS particles was clearly observed in real time at monochromatic X-ray imaging. Averaged initial volumes of SAP-MS (H) (1.24 x 10{sup 7} {mu}m{sup 3}) were significantly smaller (p < 0.001) than those of SAP-MS (V) (5.99 x 10{sup 7} {mu}m{sup 3}) and SAP-MS (S) (5.85 x 10{sup 7} {mu}m{sup 3}). Averaged final volumes of SAP-MS (H) were significantly larger than averaged initial volumes (4.41 x 10{sup 7} {mu}m{sup 3} vs. 1.24 x 10{sup 7} {mu}m{sup 3}; p < 0.0001, ER = 3.55). There were no significant difference between averaged final volumes and averaged initial volumes of SAP-MS (V) and SAP-MS (S). SAP-MS (H), which first travels distally, reaches to small arteries, and then expands to adapt to the vessel lumen, is an effective particle as an embolic agent, causing effective embolization.« less

  7. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  8. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm S.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1997-01-01

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  9. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  10. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for minitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency.

  11. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  12. Beam Damage of HS (CH2)15 COOH Terminated Self Assembled Monolayer (SAM) as Observed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Baer, Donald R.

    2011-10-25

    XPS spectra of HS(CH{sub 2}){sub 15} COOH terminated a self assembled monolayer (SAM)sample was collected over a period of 242 minutes to determine specimen damage during long exposures to monochromatic Al Ka x-rays. For this COOH terminated SAM we measured the loss of oxygen as a function of time by rastering a focused 100 W, 100 um diameter x-ray beam over a 1.4 mm x 0.2 mm area of the sample.

  13. X-ray luminescence computed tomography using a focused x-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Lun, Michael C; Nguyen, Alex Anh-Tu; Li, Changqing

    2017-11-01

    Due to the low x-ray photon utilization efficiency and low measurement sensitivity of the electron multiplying charge coupled device camera setup, the collimator-based narrow beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) usually requires a long measurement time. We, for the first time, report a focused x-ray beam-based XLCT imaging system with measurements by a single optical fiber bundle and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). An x-ray tube with a polycapillary lens was used to generate a focused x-ray beam whose x-ray photon density is 1200 times larger than a collimated x-ray beam. An optical fiber bundle was employed to collect and deliver the emitted photons on the phantom surface to the PMT. The total measurement time was reduced to 12.5 min. For numerical simulations of both single and six fiber bundle cases, we were able to reconstruct six targets successfully. For the phantom experiment, two targets with an edge-to-edge distance of 0.4 mm and a center-to-center distance of 0.8 mm were successfully reconstructed by the measurement setup with a single fiber bundle and a PMT. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  14. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Inubushi, Yuichi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 μm and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  15. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Armon; Mills, Dennis M.

    2002-01-01

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  16. Thickness determination of thin solid films by angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using monochromatized synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, W.; Drotbohm, P.; Rothe, J.; Hormes, J.; Ottermann, C. R.; Bange, K.

    1995-05-01

    Thickness measurements by the method of angle-resolved, self-ratio X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (AR/SR/XFS) have been carried out on thin solid films using monochromatized synchrotron radiation at the Bonn storage ring ELSA. Synchrotron radiation was monochromatized by means of a double-crystal monochromator and fluorescence radiation was detected by a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The results for sample systems consisting of Au on Si, Cr on SiO2 and TiO2 on alkali-free glass are very satisfactory and agree well with results obtained by other methods.

  17. Gain measurements and spatial coherence in neon-like x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, J.; Cairns, C.; Dwivedi, L.; Holden, M.; Key, M. H.; Lewis, C. L. S.; MacPhee, A.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P. A.; Pert, G. J.; Ramsden, S. A.; Smith, C. G.; Tallents, G. J.; Zhang, J.

    1995-05-01

    Many of the applications with x-ray lasers require high quality output radiation with properties such as short wavelength and a high degree of coherence (longitudinal and spatial). Ne-like Yttrium (Z=39) is potentially a bright and monochromatic XUV lasing medium. The output at 15.5 nm is monochromatic due to the overlap of the J=2-1 and J=0-1 lines. A gain coefficient of 3±1 was obtained at 15.5 nm by irradiating 100 μm wide yttrium stripes at 6×1013 W/cm2 with 1.06 μm, 650 ps pulses from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory VULCAN laser. We have investigated improving x-ray laser spatial coherence utilizing a series of amplifiers instead of the standard double target configuration. An ``injector-amplifier'' scheme was successfully demonstrated with the Ne-like Ge x-ray laser. A spatially small and coherent part of the 23 nm beam from the standard double target geometry has been relayed using a W/Si multilayer mirror onto a single or double target configuration situated at a distance of ˜1.5 m from the mirror and pumped by two 150 mm diameter beams of VULCAN laser. A beam ``foot-print monitor'' was employed with a flat mirror to relay 23 nm output onto a film pack to record the spatial variation of the x-ray laser beam. Analyzing the fringes obtained through a cross-wire placed in front of the beam shows that an increase in spatial coherence was achieved by adding amplifiers to the x-ray laser beam line.

  18. New x-ray parallel beam facility XPBF 2.0 for the characterization of silicon pore optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumrey, Michael; Müller, Peter; Cibik, Levent; Collon, Max; Barrière, Nicolas; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric

    2016-07-01

    A new X-ray parallel beam facility (XPBF 2.0) has been installed in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin to characterize silicon pore optics (SPOs) for the future X-ray observatory ATHENA. As the existing XPBF which is operated since 2005, the new beamline provides a pencil beam of very low divergence, a vacuum chamber with a hexapod system for accurate positioning of the SPO to be investigated, and a vertically movable CCD-based camera system to register the direct and the reflected beam. In contrast to the existing beamline, a multilayer-coated toroidal mirror is used for beam monochromatization at 1.6 keV and collimation, enabling the use of beam sizes between about 100 μm and at least 5 mm. Thus the quality of individual pores as well as the focusing properties of large groups of pores can be investigated. The new beamline also features increased travel ranges for the hexapod to cope with larger SPOs and a sample to detector distance of 12 m corresponding to the envisaged focal length of ATHENA.

  19. Dose comparison between conventional and quasi-monochromatic systems for diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldelli, P.; Taibi, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Gambaccini, M.

    2004-09-01

    Several techniques have been introduced in the last year to reduce the dose to the patient by minimizing the risk of tumour induced by radiation. In this work the radiological potential of dose reduction in quasi-monochromatic spectra produced via mosaic crystal Bragg diffraction has been evaluated, and a comparison with conventional spectra has been performed for four standard examinations: head, chest, abdomen and lumbar sacral spine. We have simulated quasi-monochromatic x-rays with the Shadow code, and conventional spectra with the Spectrum Processor. By means of the PCXMC software, we have simulated four examinations according to parameters established by the European Guidelines, and calculated absorbed dose for principal organs and the effective dose. Simulations of quasi-monochromatic laminar beams have been performed without anti-scatter grid, because of their inherent scatter geometry, and compared with simulations with conventional beams with anti-scatter grids. Results have shown that the dose reduction due to the introduction of quasi-monochromatic x-rays depends on different parameters related to the quality of the beam, the organ composition and the anti-scatter grid. With parameters chosen in this study a significant dose reduction can be achieved for two out of four kinds of examination.

  20. All-diamond optical assemblies for a beam-multiplexing X-ray monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Stoupin, S.; Terentyev, S. A.; Blank, V. D.; Shvyd’ko, Yu. V.; Goetze, K.; Assoufid, L.; Polyakov, S. N.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Kornilov, N. V.; Katsoudas, J.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Chollet, M.; Feng, Y.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Zhu, D.

    2014-01-01

    A double-crystal diamond (111) monochromator recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) enables splitting of the primary X-ray beam into a pink (transmitted) and a monochromatic (reflected) branch. The first monochromator crystal, with a thickness of ∼100 µm, provides sufficient X-ray transmittance to enable simultaneous operation of two beamlines. This article reports the design, fabrication and X-ray characterization of the first and second (300 µm-thick) crystals utilized in the monochromator and the optical assemblies holding these crystals. Each crystal plate has a region of about 5 × 2 mm with low defect concentration, sufficient for use in X-ray optics at the LCLS. The optical assemblies holding the crystals were designed to provide mounting on a rigid substrate and to minimize mounting-induced crystal strain. The induced strain was evaluated using double-crystal X-ray topography and was found to be small over the 5 × 2 mm working regions of the crystals. PMID:25242912

  1. Microfocus/Polycapillary-Optic Crystallographic X-Ray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    A system that generates an intense, nearly collimated, nearly monochromatic, small-diameter x-ray beam has been developed for use in macromolecular crystallography. A conventional x-ray system for macromolecular crystallography includes a rotating-anode x-ray source, which is massive (.500 kg), large (approximately 2 by 2 by 1 m), and power-hungry (between 2 and 18 kW). In contrast, the present system generates a beam of the required brightness from a microfocus source, which is small and light enough to be mounted on a laboratory bench, and operates at a power level of only tens of watts. The figure schematically depicts the system as configured for observing x-ray diffraction from a macromolecular crystal. In addition to the microfocus x-ray source, the system includes a polycapillary optic . a monolithic block (typically a bundle of fused glass tubes) that contains thousands of straight or gently curved capillary channels, along which x-rays propagate with multiple reflections. This particular polycapillary optic is configured to act as a collimator; the x-ray beam that emerges from its output face consists of quasi-parallel subbeams with a small angular divergence and a diameter comparable to the size of a crystal to be studied. The gap between the microfocus x-ray source and the input face of the polycapillary optic is chosen consistently with the focal length of the polycapillary optic and the need to maximize the solid angle subtended by the optic in order to maximize the collimated x-ray flux. The spectrum from the source contains a significant component of Cu K (photon energy is 8.08 keV) radiation. The beam is monochromatized (for Cu K ) by a nickel filter 10 m thick. In a test, this system was operated at a power of 40 W (current of 897 A at an accelerating potential of 45 kV), with an anode x-ray spot size of 41+/-2 microns. Also tested, in order to provide a standard for comparison, was a commercial rotating-anode x-ray crystallographic system with a

  2. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  3. Combined synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a fluorescing metal foil.

    PubMed

    Kappen, P; Arhatari, B D; Luu, M B; Balaur, E; Caradoc-Davies, T

    2013-06-01

    This study realizes the concept of simultaneous micro-X-ray computed tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a synchrotron beamline. A thin zinc metal foil was placed in the primary, monochromatic synchrotron beam to generate a divergent wave to propagate through the samples of interest onto a CCD detector for tomographic imaging, thus removing the need for large beam illumination and high spatial resolution detection. Both low density materials (kapton tubing and a piece of plant) and higher density materials (Egyptian faience) were investigated, and elemental contrast was explored for the example of Cu and Ni meshes. The viability of parallel powder diffraction using the direct beam transmitted through the foil was demonstrated. The outcomes of this study enable further development of the technique towards in situ tomography∕diffraction studies combining micrometer and crystallographic length scales, and towards elemental contrast imaging and reconstruction methods using well defined fluorescence outputs from combinations of known fluorescence targets (elements).

  4. X-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis of a human ex vivo breast slice with an inverse Compton x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggl, E.; Schleede, S.; Bech, M.; Achterhold, K.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Mayr, D.; Loewen, R.; Ruth, R. D.; Reiser, M. F.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2016-12-01

    While the performance of conventional x-ray tube sources often suffers from the broad polychromatic spectrum, synchrotrons that could provide highly brilliant x-rays are restricted to large research facilities and impose high investment and maintenance costs. Lately, a new type of compact synchrotron sources has been investigated. These compact light sources (CLS) based on inverse Compton scattering provide quasi-monochromatic hard x-rays. The flux and brilliance yielded by a CLS currently lie between x-ray tube sources and third-generation synchrotrons. The relatively large partially coherent x-ray beam is well suited for the investigation of preclinical applications of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field imaging. Here we present the first grating-based multimodal tomosynthesis images of a human breast slice acquired at a CLS to investigate the possibilities of improved breast cancer diagnostics.

  5. 21 CFR 892.1610 - Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. 892.1610... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1610 Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device is a device such as a collimator, a...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1610 - Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. 892.1610... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1610 Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device is a device such as a collimator, a...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1610 - Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. 892.1610... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1610 Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device is a device such as a collimator, a...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1610 - Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. 892.1610... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1610 Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device is a device such as a collimator, a...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1610 - Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. 892.1610... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1610 Diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray beam-limiting device is a device such as a collimator, a...

  10. Development of a fluorescent x-ray source for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyofuku, F.; Tokumori, K.; Nishimura, K.; Saito, T.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M.; Endo, M.; Naito, H.; Uyama, C.

    1995-02-01

    A fluorescent x-ray source for medical imaging, such as K-edge subtraction angiography and monochromatic x-ray CT, has been developed. Using a 6.5 GeV accumulation ring in Tsukuba, fluorescent x rays, which range from about 30 to 70 keV are generated by irradiating several target materials. Measurements have been made of output intensities and energy spectra for different target angles and extraction angles. The intensities of fluorescent x rays at a 30 mA beam current are on the order of 1-3×106 photons/mm2/s at 30 cm from the local spot where the incident beam is collimated to 1 mm2. A phantom which contains three different contrast media (iodine, barium, gadolinium) was used for the K-edge energy subtraction, and element selective CT images were obtained.

  11. Relative efficiency calibration between two silicon drift detectors performed with a monochromatized X-ray generator over the 0.1-1.5 keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, S.; Boubault, F.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we present the first X-ray calibration performed over the 0.1-1.5 keV spectral range by means of a soft X-ray Manson source and the monochromator SYMPAX. This monochromator, based on a classical Rowland geometry, presents the novelty to be able to board simultaneously two detectors and move them under vacuum in front of the exit slit of the monochromatizing stage. This provides the great advantage to perform radiometric measurements of the monochromatic X-ray photon flux with one reference detector while calibrating another X-ray detector. To achieve this, at least one secondary standard must be operated with SYMPAX. This paper presents thereby an efficiency transfer experiment between a secondary standard silicon drift detector (SDD), previously calibrated on BESSY II synchrotron Facility, and another one ("unknown" SDD), devoted to be used permanently with SYMPAX. The associated calibration process is described as well as corresponding results. Comparison with calibrated measurements performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Radiometric Laboratory shows a very good agreement between the secondary standard and the unknown SDD.

  12. X-ray beam method for displacement measurement in hostile environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Eric H.; Pease, D. M.; Canistraro, H.; Brew, Dale

    1989-01-01

    A new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was devised, and the results of current testing reveal it to be highly feasible. This technique has been shown to provide a non-contacting system that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments, that plague currently available optical methods. This advantage is a result of the non-refracting penetrating nature of X-rays. The method is based on X-ray-induced X-ray fluorescence of targets, which subsequently serve as fudicial markers. Some target materials have melting points over 1600 degrees C which will facilitate measurement at extremely high temperatures. A highly focused intense X-ray beam, which is produced using a Johansen 'bent crystal', is then scanned across the target, which responds by fluorescing X-rays when stimulated by the incident beam. This secondary radiation is monitored using a detector. By carefully measuring beam orientation, change in target edge position can be determined. Many variations on this basic theme are now possible such as two targets demarcating a gage length, or a beam shadowing method using opaque targets.

  13. Micromirror-based manipulation of synchrotron x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, D. A.; Chen, Pice; Jung, I. W.; Lopez, D.; Schwartz, C. P.; Shenoy, G. K.; Wang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    Synchrotron beamlines typically use macroscopic, quasi-static optics to manipulate x-ray beams. We present the use of dynamic microelectromechanical systems-based optics (MEMS) to temporally modulate synchrotron x-ray beams. We demonstrate this concept using single-crystal torsional MEMS micromirrors oscillating at frequencies of 75 kHz. Such a MEMS micromirror, with lateral dimensions of a few hundred micrometers, can interact with x rays by operating in grazing-incidence reflection geometry; x rays are deflected only when an x-ray pulse is incident on the rotating micromirror under appropriate conditions, i.e., at an angle less than the critical angle for reflectivity. The time window for such deflections depends on the frequency and amplitude of the MEMS rotation. We demonstrate that reflection geometry can produce a time window of a few microseconds. We further demonstrate that MEMS optics can isolate x rays from a selected synchrotron bunch or group of bunches. With ray-trace simulations we explain the currently achievable time windows and suggest a path toward improvements.

  14. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60-100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ∼ 1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ∼ 30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5-15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10(-2) to 90 W mm(-2). Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%).

  15. X-ray rocking curve measurements of bent crystals. [used in High Resolution Spectrometer in Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, M. B.; Muney, W. S.; Fowler, W. B.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-crystal laboratory X-ray spectrometer is used to measure the Bragg reflection from concave cylindrically curved crystals to be used in the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The first two crystals, in the dispersive (1.1) arrangement, select a narrow collimated monochromatic beam in the Cu K-alpha(1) line at 1.5 A (8.1 keV), which illuminates the test crystal. The angular centroids of rocking curves measured along the surface provide a measure of the conformity of the crystal to the desired radius of curvature. Individual and combined rocking-curve widths and areas provide a measure of the resolution and efficiency at 1.54 A. The crystals analyzed included LiF(200), PET, and acid phthalates such as TAP.

  16. Feasibility Studies of Parametric X-rays Use in a Medical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sones, Bryndol; Danon, Yaron; Blain, Ezekiel

    2009-03-01

    Parametric X-rays (PXR) are produced from the interaction of relativistic electrons with the periodic structure of crystal materials. Smooth X-ray energy tunability is achieved by rotating the crystal with respects to the electron beam direction. Experiments at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 60-MeV LINAC produce quasi-monochromatic X-rays (6-35 keV) from various target crystals to include highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), LiF, Si, Ge, Cu, and W using electron beam currents up to 6 uA. These experiments demonstrate the first PXR images and some of the merits of thin metallic crystals. Recent experiments with a 100-μm thick Cu crystal improve the Cu PXR (with energy ˜12 keV) to Cu fluorescence ratio by a factor of 20 compared to a 1 mm-thick Cu crystal. This study uses Monte Carlo techniques to investigate (1) PXR dose compared to emissions from simulated Mo, Rh, and W anodes for mammography applications and (2) electron scattering effects when considering LiF111, Si111, and Cu111 PXR production using electron beams with energies of 20-30 MeV. Advantages in using monochromatic PXR compared to X-rays from Mo and Rh anodes in mammography applications result in a dose per incident photon reduction by a factor of 2. Using 20 MeV electrons, the thinner Cu111 crystal for 15 keV PXR production results in an electron scattering angle of 30.7+/-0.2 mrad offering the best potential for PXR from lower energy electrons.

  17. Pink-beam serial crystallography

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Meents, A.; Wiedorn, M. O.; Srajer, V.

    Serial X-ray crystallography allows macromolecular structure determination at both X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and, more recently, synchrotron sources. The time resolution for serial synchrotron crystallography experiments has been limited to millisecond timescales with monochromatic beams. The polychromatic, “pink”, beam provides a more than two orders of magnitude increased photon flux and hence allows accessing much shorter timescales in diffraction experiments at synchrotron sources. Here we report the structure determination of two different protein samples by merging pink-beam diffraction patterns from many crystals, each collected with a single 100 ps X-ray pulse exposure per crystal using a setup optimized formore » very low scattering background. In contrast to experiments with monochromatic radiation, data from only 50 crystals were required to obtain complete datasets. The high quality of the diffraction data highlights the potential of this method for studying irreversible reactions at sub-microsecond timescales using high-brightness X-ray facilities.« less

  18. Pink-beam serial crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Meents, A.; Wiedorn, M. O.; Srajer, V.; ...

    2017-11-03

    Serial X-ray crystallography allows macromolecular structure determination at both X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and, more recently, synchrotron sources. The time resolution for serial synchrotron crystallography experiments has been limited to millisecond timescales with monochromatic beams. The polychromatic, “pink”, beam provides a more than two orders of magnitude increased photon flux and hence allows accessing much shorter timescales in diffraction experiments at synchrotron sources. Here we report the structure determination of two different protein samples by merging pink-beam diffraction patterns from many crystals, each collected with a single 100 ps X-ray pulse exposure per crystal using a setup optimized formore » very low scattering background. In contrast to experiments with monochromatic radiation, data from only 50 crystals were required to obtain complete datasets. The high quality of the diffraction data highlights the potential of this method for studying irreversible reactions at sub-microsecond timescales using high-brightness X-ray facilities.« less

  19. An all-diamond X-ray position and flux monitor using nitrogen-incorporated ultra-nanocrystalline diamond contacts

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zou, Mengnan; Gaowei, Mengjia; Zhou, Tianyi

    Diamond X-ray detectors with conducting nitrogen-incorporated ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) films as electrodes were fabricated to measure X-ray beam flux and position. Structural characterization and functionality tests were performed for these devices. The N-UNCD films grown on unseeded diamond substrates were compared with N-UNCD films grown on a seeded silicon substrate. The feasibility of the N-UNCD films acting as electrodes for X-ray detectors was confirmed by the stable performance in a monochromatic X-ray beam. The fabrication process is able to change the surface status which may influence the signal uniformity under low bias, but this effect can be neglected under fullmore » collection bias.« less

  20. Accelerators for E-beam and X-ray processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auslender, V. L.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Faktorovich, B. L.; Gorbunov, V. A.; Kokin, E. N.; Korobeinikov, M. V.; Krainov, G. S.; Lukin, A. N.; Maximov, S. A.; Nekhaev, V. E.; Panfilov, A. D.; Radchenko, V. N.; Tkachenko, V. O.; Tuvik, A. A.; Voronin, L. A.

    2002-03-01

    During last years the demand for pasteurization and desinsection of various food products (meat, chicken, sea products, vegetables, fruits, etc.) had increased. The treatment of these products in industrial scale requires the usage of powerful electron accelerators with energy 5-10 MeV and beam power at least 50 kW or more. The report describes the ILU accelerators with energy range up to 10 MeV and beam power up to 150 kW.The different irradiation schemes in electron beam and X-ray modes for various products are described. The design of the X-ray converter and 90° beam bending system are also given.

  1. Two-dimensional ultrahigh-density X-ray optical memory.

    PubMed

    Bezirganyan, Hakob P; Bezirganyan, Siranush E; Bezirganyan, Hayk H; Bezirganyan, Petros H

    2007-01-01

    Most important aspect of nanotechnology applications in the information ultrahigh storage is the miniaturization of data carrier elements of the storage media with emphasis on the long-term stability. Proposed two-dimensional ultrahigh-density X-ray optical memory, named X-ROM, with long-term stability is an information carrier basically destined for digital data archiving. X-ROM is a semiconductor wafer, in which the high-reflectivity nanosized X-ray mirrors are embedded. Data are encoded due to certain positions of the mirrors. Ultrahigh-density data recording procedure can e.g., be performed via mask-less zone-plate-array lithography (ZPAL), spatial-phase-locked electron-beam lithography (SPLEBL), or focused ion-beam lithography (FIB). X-ROM manufactured by nanolithography technique is a write-once memory useful for terabit-scale memory applications, if the surface area of the smallest recording pits is less than 100 nm2. In this case the X-ROM surface-storage capacity of a square centimetre becomes by two orders of magnitude higher than the volumetric data density really achieved for three-dimensional optical data storage medium. Digital data read-out procedure from proposed X-ROM can e.g., be performed via glancing-angle incident X-ray micro beam (GIX) using the well-developed X-ray reflectometry technique. In presented theoretical paper the crystal-analyser operating like an image magnifier is added to the set-up of X-ROM data handling system for the purpose analogous to case of application the higher numerical aperture objective in optical data read-out system. We also propose the set-up of the X-ROM readout system based on more the one incident X-ray micro beam. Presented scheme of two-beam data handling system, which operates on two mutually perpendicular well-collimated monochromatic incident X-ray micro beams, essentially increases the reliability of the digital information read-out procedure. According the graphs of characteristic functions presented in

  2. Cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Yi, Huangjian; Zhang, Xianghan; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2013-03-01

    The appearance of x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging by x ray. In the previous XLCT system, the sample was irradiated by a sequence of narrow x-ray beams and the x-ray luminescence was measured by a highly sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) camera. This resulted in a relatively long sampling time and relatively low utilization of the x-ray beam. In this paper, a novel cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography strategy is proposed, which can fully utilize the x-ray dose and shorten the scanning time. The imaging model and reconstruction method are described. The validity of the imaging strategy has been studied in this paper. In the cone beam XLCT system, the cone beam x ray was adopted to illuminate the sample and a highly sensitive CCD camera was utilized to acquire luminescent photons emitted from the sample. Photons scattering in biological tissues makes it an ill-posed problem to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the x-ray luminescent sample in the cone beam XLCT. In order to overcome this issue, the authors used the diffusion approximation model to describe the photon propagation in tissues, and employed the sparse regularization method for reconstruction. An incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method and permissible region strategy were used for reconstruction. Meanwhile, traditional x-ray CT imaging could also be performed in this system. The x-ray attenuation effect has been considered in their imaging model, which is helpful in improving the reconstruction accuracy. First, simulation experiments with cylinder phantoms were carried out to illustrate the validity of the proposed compensated method. The experimental results showed that the location error of the compensated algorithm was smaller than that of the uncompensated method. The permissible region strategy was applied and reduced the reconstruction error to less than 2 mm. The robustness and stability were then

  3. Diamond X-ray Photodiode for White and Monochromatic SR beams

    PubMed Central

    Keister, Jeffrey W.; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik M.; Bohon, Jen; Héroux, Annie

    2011-01-01

    High purity, single crystal CVD diamond plates are screened for quality and instrumented into a sensor assembly for quantitative characterization of flux and position sensitivity. Initial investigations have yielded encouraging results and have led to further development. Several limiting complications are observed and discussed, as well as mitigations thereof. For example, diamond quality requirements for x-ray diodes include low nitrogen impurity and crystallographic defectivity. Thin electrode windows and electronic readout performance are ultimately also critical to device performance. Promising features observed so far from prototype devices include calculable responsivity, flux linearity, position sensitivity and timing performance. Recent results from testing in high flux and high speed applications are described. PMID:21822344

  4. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60–100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ∼1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ∼30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5–15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10−2 to 90 W mm−2. Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%). PMID:26524304

  5. X-ray echo spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, was recently introduced [1] to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-meV and 0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power > 10^8) with broadband 5-13 meV dispersing systems will be presented featuring more than 1000-fold signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. [1.] Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, accepted (2016), arXiv:1511.01526.

  6. Investigations in x-radiation stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, K. D.

    1982-03-01

    The objective is to invent a crystal x-ray laser. Investigations in the Radiation Research Lab. at Texas Tech University have established in a very straightforward way the line narrowing associated with a threshold pumping and a nonlinear rise in intensity. Recent work on x-ray Borrmann channeling via monocrystals has demonstrated the existence of a monochromatic x-ray beam without any vertical divergence. This would allow the transport of x-ray energy in space for thousands of miles without any loss of power. Preliminary experiments with a monocrystal excited by pulsed x-rays at Air Force Weapons Laboratory, KAFB, Albuquerque, seem to indicate a gain in intensity of the nondivergent hot spot with a concomitant fading of the regular Laue pattern. Current investigations in this line indicates that with proper doping of the monocrystal the nondivergent beam could be increased in intensity using a flash x-ray tube to pump the doped monocrystal. A concial target double beam flash x-ray line source instrument has been constructed to obtain a beam of nondivergent, stimulated, coherent, and monochromatic x-rays from doped monocrystals. A generation of stimulated x-rays using bunched electrons from pulsed high power klystron striking a monocrystal has been conceived.

  7. X-ray Radiography Measurements of Shear Coaxial Rocket Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-07

    injector EPL profiles have elliptical shape expected from a solid liquid jet  EPL decreases as liquid core is atomized and droplets are...study diesel, swirl, gas-centered swirl-coaxial, impingers, and aerated liquid jet injectors  Use a monochromatic beam of x-rays at a synchrotron...Shear coaxial jets can be found in a number of combustion devices – Turbofan engine exhaust, air blast furnaces, and liquid rocket engines

  8. An adjustable short-focal length, high-gradient PMQ electron-beam final-focus system for the PLEIADES ultra-fast x-ray Thomson source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Ku

    In the span of a 100 year since the discovery of first x-rays by Roentgen that won him the first Nobel prize in physics, several types of radiation sources have been developed. Currently, radiations at extremely short wavelengths have only been accessed at synchrotron radiation sources. However, the current 3rd generation synchrotron sources can only produce x-rays of energy up to 60 keV and pulse lengths of several picoseconds long. But needs for shorter wavelength and shorter pulse duration radiations demanded by scientists to understand the nature of matter at atomic/molecular scale initiated the new scientific research for the production of sub-picosecond, hard x-rays. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a Thomson x-ray source in the backscattering mode---a head-on collision between a high intensity Ti:Sapphire Chirped Pulse Amplification laser and a relativistic electron beam---called the PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamical Evaluation of Structures) laboratory has been developed. Early works demonstrated the production of quasi-monochromatic, femto-second long, hard x-rays. Initially reported x-ray flux was in the low range of 105--10 6 photons per shot. During the early stage of PLEIADES experiments, 15 T/m electromagnet final focusing quadrupoles (in a triplet lattice configuration) were employed to focus the beam to a 40-50 mum spot-size. A larger focal spot-size beam has a low-density of electron particles available at the interaction with incident photons, which leads to a low scattering probability. The current dissertation shows that by employing a 560 T/m PMQ (Permanent-Magnet Quadrupole) final focus system, an electron beam as small as 10-20 mum can be achieved. The implementation of this final focus system demonstrated the improvement of the total x-ray flux by two orders of magnitude. The PMQ final focus system also produced small electron beams consistently over 30-100 MeV electron beam energy, which

  9. Monolithic focused reference beam X-ray holography

    PubMed Central

    Geilhufe, J.; Pfau, B.; Schneider, M.; Büttner, F.; Günther, C. M.; Werner, S.; Schaffert, S.; Guehrs, E.; Frömmel, S.; Kläui, M.; Eisebitt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform holography is a highly efficient and robust imaging method, suitable for single-shot imaging at coherent X-ray sources. In its common implementation, the image contrast is limited by the reference signal generated by a small pinhole aperture. Increased pinhole diameters improve the signal, whereas the resolution is diminished. Here we report a new concept to decouple the spatial resolution from the image contrast by employing a Fresnel zone plate to provide the reference beam. Superimposed on-axis images of distinct foci are separated with a novel algorithm. Our method is insensitive to mechanical drift or vibrations and allows for long integration times common at low-flux facilities like high harmonic generation sources. The application of monolithic focused reference beams improves the efficiency of high-resolution X-ray Fourier transform holography beyond all present approaches and paves the path towards sub-10 nm single-shot X-ray imaging. PMID:24394675

  10. X-ray phase contrast imaging at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghazaly, M.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Kube, G.; Kunz, P.; Sharafutdinov, A.; Weber, T.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments have been performed to explore the potential of the low emittance 855MeV electron beam of the Mainz Microtron MAMI for imaging with coherent X-rays. Transition radiation from a micro-focused electron beam traversing a foil stack served as X-ray source with good transverse coherence. Refraction contrast radiographs of low absorbing materials, in particular polymer strings with diameters between 30 and 450μm, were taken with a polychromatic transition radiation X-ray source with a spectral distribution in the energy range between 8 and about 40keV. The electron beam spot size had standard deviation σh = (8.6±0.1)μm in the horizontal and σv = (7.5±0.1)μm in the vertical direction. X-ray films were used as detectors. The source-to-detector distance amounted to 11.4m. The objects were placed in a distance of up to 6m from the X-ray film. Holograms of strings were taken with a beam spot size σv = (0.50±0.05)μm in vertical direction, and a monochromatic X-ray beam of 6keV energy. A good longitudinal coherence has been obtained by the (111) reflection of a flat silicon single crystal in Bragg geometry. It has been demonstrated that a direct exposure CCD chip with a pixel size of 13×13μm^2 provides a highly efficient on-line detector. Contrast images can easily be generated with a complete elimination of all parasitic background. The on-line capability allows a minimization of the beam spot size by observing the smallest visible interference fringe spacings or the number of visible fringes. It has been demonstrated that X-ray films are also very useful detectors. The main advantage in comparison with the direct exposure CCD chip is the resolution. For the Structurix D3 (Agfa) X-ray film the standard deviation of the resolution was measured to be σf = (1.2±0.4)μm, which is about a factor of 6 better than for the direct exposure CCD chip. With the small effective X-ray spot size in vertical direction of σv = (1.2±0.3)μm and a geometrical

  11. Complementary use of monochromatic and white-beam X-ray micro-diffraction for the investigation of ancient materials

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dejoie, Catherine; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin

    Archaeological artefacts are often heterogeneous materials where several phases coexist in a wide grain size distribution. Most of the time, retrieving structure information at the micrometre scale is of great importance for these materials. Particularly, the organization of different phases at the micrometre scale is closely related to optical or mechanical properties, manufacturing processes, functionalities in ancient times and long-term conservation. Between classic X-ray powder diffraction with a millimetre beam and transmission electron microscopy, a gap exists and structure and phase information at the micrometre scale are missing. Using a micrometre-size synchrotron X-ray beam, a hybrid approach combining both monochromaticmore » powder micro-diffraction and Laue single-crystal micro-diffraction was deployed to obtain information from nanometre- and micrometre-size phases, respectively. Therefore providing a way to bridge the aforementioned gap, this unique methodology was applied to three different types of ancient materials that all show a strong heterogeneity. In Roman terra sigillata, the specific distribution of nanocrystalline hematite is mainly responsible for the deep-red tone of the slip, while the distribution of micrometre-size quartz in ceramic bodies reflects the change of manufacturing process between pre-sigillata and high-quality sigillata periods. In the second example, we investigated the modifications occurring in Neolithic and geological flints after a heating process. By separating the diffracted signal coming from the nano- and the micrometre scale, we observed a domain size increase for nanocrystalline quartz in geological flints and a relaxation of the residual strain in larger detritic quartz. In conclusion, through the study of a Roman iron nail, we showed that the carburation process to strengthen the steel was mainly a surface process that formed 10–20 µm size domains of single–crystal ferrite and nanocrystalline cementite.« less

  12. Complementary use of monochromatic and white-beam X-ray micro-diffraction for the investigation of ancient materials

    DOE PAGES

    Dejoie, Catherine; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; ...

    2015-09-20

    Archaeological artefacts are often heterogeneous materials where several phases coexist in a wide grain size distribution. Most of the time, retrieving structure information at the micrometre scale is of great importance for these materials. Particularly, the organization of different phases at the micrometre scale is closely related to optical or mechanical properties, manufacturing processes, functionalities in ancient times and long-term conservation. Between classic X-ray powder diffraction with a millimetre beam and transmission electron microscopy, a gap exists and structure and phase information at the micrometre scale are missing. Using a micrometre-size synchrotron X-ray beam, a hybrid approach combining both monochromaticmore » powder micro-diffraction and Laue single-crystal micro-diffraction was deployed to obtain information from nanometre- and micrometre-size phases, respectively. Therefore providing a way to bridge the aforementioned gap, this unique methodology was applied to three different types of ancient materials that all show a strong heterogeneity. In Roman terra sigillata, the specific distribution of nanocrystalline hematite is mainly responsible for the deep-red tone of the slip, while the distribution of micrometre-size quartz in ceramic bodies reflects the change of manufacturing process between pre-sigillata and high-quality sigillata periods. In the second example, we investigated the modifications occurring in Neolithic and geological flints after a heating process. By separating the diffracted signal coming from the nano- and the micrometre scale, we observed a domain size increase for nanocrystalline quartz in geological flints and a relaxation of the residual strain in larger detritic quartz. In conclusion, through the study of a Roman iron nail, we showed that the carburation process to strengthen the steel was mainly a surface process that formed 10–20 µm size domains of single–crystal ferrite and nanocrystalline cementite.« less

  13. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the breast using radiochromic film in a dedicated CT mammotomography system employing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Dominic J; Brady, Samuel L; Jackson, D'Vone C; Toncheva, Greta I; Anderson, Colin E; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Tornai, Martin P

    2011-06-01

    A dual modality SPECT-CT prototype system dedicated to uncompressed breast imaging (mammotomography) has been developed. The computed tomography subsystem incorporates an ultrathick K-edge filtration technique producing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray cone beam that optimizes the dose efficiency of the system for lesion imaging in an uncompressed breast. Here, the absorbed dose in various geometric phantoms and in an uncompressed and pendant cadaveric breast using a normal tomographic cone beam imaging protocol is characterized using both thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements and ionization chamber-calibrated radiochromic film. Initially, two geometric phantoms and an anthropomorphic breast phantom are filled in turn with oil and water to simulate the dose to objects that mimic various breast shapes having effective density bounds of 100% fatty and glandular breast compositions, respectively. Ultimately, an excised human cadaver breast is tomographically scanned using the normal tomographic imaging protocol, and the dose to the breast tissue is evaluated and compared to the earlier phantom-based measurements. Measured trends in dose distribution across all breast geometric and anthropomorphic phantom volumes indicate lower doses in the medial breast and more proximal to the chest wall, with consequently higher doses near the lateral peripheries and nipple regions. Measured doses to the oil-filled phantoms are consistently lower across all volume shapes due to the reduced mass energy-absorption coefficient of oil relative to water. The mean measured dose to the breast cadaver, composed of adipose and glandular tissues, was measured to be 4.2 mGy compared to a mean whole-breast dose of 3.8 and 4.5 mGy for the oil- and water-filled anthropomorphic breast phantoms, respectively. Assuming rotational symmetry due to the tomographic acquisition exposures, these results characterize the 3D dose distributions in an uncompressed human breast tissue volume for this

  14. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the breast using radiochromic film in a dedicated CT mammotomography system employing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Dominic J.; Brady, Samuel L.; Jackson, D’Vone C.; Toncheva, Greta I.; Anderson, Colin E.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A dual modality SPECT-CT prototype system dedicated to uncompressed breast imaging (mammotomography) has been developed. The computed tomography subsystem incorporates an ultrathick K-edge filtration technique producing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray cone beam that optimizes the dose efficiency of the system for lesion imaging in an uncompressed breast. Here, the absorbed dose in various geometric phantoms and in an uncompressed and pendant cadaveric breast using a normal tomographic cone beam imaging protocol is characterized using both thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements and ionization chamber-calibrated radiochromic film. Methods: Initially, two geometric phantoms and an anthropomorphic breast phantom are filled in turn with oil and water to simulate the dose to objects that mimic various breast shapes having effective density bounds of 100% fatty and glandular breast compositions, respectively. Ultimately, an excised human cadaver breast is tomographically scanned using the normal tomographic imaging protocol, and the dose to the breast tissue is evaluated and compared to the earlier phantom-based measurements. Results: Measured trends in dose distribution across all breast geometric and anthropomorphic phantom volumes indicate lower doses in the medial breast and more proximal to the chest wall, with consequently higher doses near the lateral peripheries and nipple regions. Measured doses to the oil-filled phantoms are consistently lower across all volume shapes due to the reduced mass energy-absorption coefficient of oil relative to water. The mean measured dose to the breast cadaver, composed of adipose and glandular tissues, was measured to be 4.2 mGy compared to a mean whole-breast dose of 3.8 and 4.5 mGy for the oil- and water-filled anthropomorphic breast phantoms, respectively. Conclusions: Assuming rotational symmetry due to the tomographic acquisition exposures, these results characterize the 3D dose distributions in an uncompressed

  15. X-ray topography using the forward transmitted beam under multiple-beam diffraction conditions

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tsusaka, Y., E-mail: tsusaka@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Takano, H.; Takeda, S.

    2016-02-15

    X-ray topographs are taken for a sapphire wafer with the [0001] surface normal, as an example, by forward transmitted synchrotron x-ray beams combined with two-dimensional electronic arrays in the x-ray detector having a spatial resolution of 1 μm. They exhibit no shape deformation and no position shift of the dislocation lines on the topographs. Since the topography is performed under multiple-beam diffraction conditions, the topographic images of a single diffraction (two-wave approximation condition) or plural diffractions (six-wave approximation condition) can be recorded without large specimen position changes. As usual Lang topographs, it is possible to determine the Burgers vector ofmore » each dislocation line. Because of high parallelism of the incoming x-rays and linear sensitivity of the electronic arrays to the incident x-rays, the present technique can be used to visualize individual dislocations in single crystals of the dislocation density as high as 1 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup −2}.« less

  16. X-Ray Topography of Tetragonal Lysozyme Grown by the Temperature-Controlled Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, V.; Siddons, D. P.; Monaco, Lisa A.; Vekilov, Peter; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Growth-induced defects in lysozyme crystals were observed by white-beam and monochromatic X-ray topography at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The topographic methods were non-destructive to the extent that traditional diffraction data collection could be performed to high resolution after topography. It was found that changes in growth parameters, defect concentration as detected by X-ray topography, and the diffraction quality obtainable from the crystals were all strongly correlated. In addition, crystals with fewer defects showed lower mosaicity and higher diffraction resolution as expected.

  17. THE X-RAY DETECTABILITY OF ELECTRON BEAMS ESCAPING FROM THE SUN

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Krucker, Saem; Christe, Steven

    2009-05-01

    We study the detectability and characterization of electron beams as they leave their acceleration site in the low corona toward interplanetary space through their nonthermal X-ray bremsstrahlung emission. We demonstrate that the largest interplanetary electron beams ({approx}>10{sup 35} electrons above 10 keV) can be detected in X-rays with current and future instrumentation, such as RHESSI or the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) onboard Hinode. We make a list of optimal observing conditions and beam characteristics. Amongst others, good imaging (as opposed to mere localization or detection in spatially integrated data) is required for proper characterization, putting the requirement on the number ofmore » escaping electrons (above 10 keV) to {approx}>3 x 10{sup 36} for RHESSI, {approx}>3 x 10{sup 35} for Hinode/XRT, and {approx}>10{sup 33} electrons for the FOXSI sounding rocket scheduled to fly in 2011. Moreover, we have found that simple modeling hints at the possibility that coronal soft X-ray jets could be the result of local heating by propagating electron beams.« less

  18. Energy discriminating x-ray camera utilizing a cadmium telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Purkhet, Abderyim; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Wantanabe, Manabu; Nagao, Jiro; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Hitomi, Keitaro; Tanaka, Etsuro; Kawai, Toshiaki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-07-01

    An energy-discriminating x-ray camera is useful for performing monochromatic radiography using polychromatic x rays. This x-ray camera was developed to carry out K-edge radiography using iodine-based contrast media. In this camera, objects are exposed by a cone beam from a cerium x-ray generator, and penetrating x-ray photons are detected by a cadmium telluride detector with an amplifier unit. The optimal x-ray photon energy and the energy width are selected out using a multichannel analyzer, and the photon number is counted by a counter card. Radiography was performed by the detector scanning using an x-y stage driven by a two-stage controller, and radiograms obtained by energy discriminating are shown on a personal computer monitor. In radiography, the tube voltage and current were 60 kV and 36 μA, respectively, and the x-ray intensity was 4.7 μGy/s. Cerium K-series characteristic x rays are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast media, and iodine K-edge radiography was performed using x rays with energies just beyond iodine K-edge energy 33.2 keV.

  19. Generation of the Submicron Soft X-Ray Beam Using a Fresnel Zone Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikino, M.; Kawazome, H.; Tanaka, M.; Kishimoto, M.; Hasegawa, N.; Ochi, Y.; Kawachi, T.; Sukegawa, K.; Yamatani, H.; Nagashima, K.; Kato, Y.

    We have developed a fully coherent x-ray laser at 13.9 nm and the application research has been started. The generation of submicron x-ray beam is important for the application of high intensity x-ray beam, such as the non-linear optics, the material science, and the biology. The submicron x-ray bee am is generated by the soft x-ray laser with using a Fresnel zone plate. The spot diameter is estimated about 680 nm (290 nm at FWHM) by the theoretical calculation. In this experiment, the diameter of the x-ray beam is measured by the knife-edge scan. The diameter and the intensity are estimated 730 nm (310 nm at FWHM) and 3x1011 W/cm2, respectively.

  20. The X-ray Detectability of Electron Beams Escaping from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Krucker, Säm; Christe, Steven; Lin, Robert P.

    2009-05-01

    We study the detectability and characterization of electron beams as they leave their acceleration site in the low corona toward interplanetary space through their nonthermal X-ray bremsstrahlung emission. We demonstrate that the largest interplanetary electron beams (gsim1035 electrons above 10 keV) can be detected in X-rays with current and future instrumentation, such as RHESSI or the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) onboard Hinode. We make a list of optimal observing conditions and beam characteristics. Amongst others, good imaging (as opposed to mere localization or detection in spatially integrated data) is required for proper characterization, putting the requirement on the number of escaping electrons (above 10 keV) to gsim3 × 1036 for RHESSI, gsim3 × 1035 for Hinode/XRT, and gsim1033 electrons for the FOXSI sounding rocket scheduled to fly in 2011. Moreover, we have found that simple modeling hints at the possibility that coronal soft X-ray jets could be the result of local heating by propagating electron beams.

  1. Cone-beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography based on x-ray absorption dosage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianshuai; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Wenlei; Zhang, Yuanke; Lu, Hongbing

    2018-02-01

    With the advances of x-ray excitable nanophosphors, x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) has become a promising hybrid imaging modality. In particular, a cone-beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) system has demonstrated its potential in in vivo imaging with the advantage of fast imaging speed over other XLCT systems. Currently, the imaging models of most XLCT systems assume that nanophosphors emit light based on the intensity distribution of x-ray within the object, not completely reflecting the nature of the x-ray excitation process. To improve the imaging quality of CB-XLCT, an imaging model that adopts an excitation model of nanophosphors based on x-ray absorption dosage is proposed in this study. To solve the ill-posed inverse problem, a reconstruction algorithm that combines the adaptive Tikhonov regularization method with the imaging model is implemented for CB-XLCT reconstruction. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments indicate that compared with the traditional forward model based on x-ray intensity, the proposed dose-based model could improve the image quality of CB-XLCT significantly in terms of target shape, localization accuracy, and image contrast. In addition, the proposed model behaves better in distinguishing closer targets, demonstrating its advantage in improving spatial resolution.

  2. Cone-beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography based on x-ray absorption dosage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshuai; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Wenlei; Zhang, Yuanke; Lu, Hongbing

    2018-02-01

    With the advances of x-ray excitable nanophosphors, x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) has become a promising hybrid imaging modality. In particular, a cone-beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) system has demonstrated its potential in in vivo imaging with the advantage of fast imaging speed over other XLCT systems. Currently, the imaging models of most XLCT systems assume that nanophosphors emit light based on the intensity distribution of x-ray within the object, not completely reflecting the nature of the x-ray excitation process. To improve the imaging quality of CB-XLCT, an imaging model that adopts an excitation model of nanophosphors based on x-ray absorption dosage is proposed in this study. To solve the ill-posed inverse problem, a reconstruction algorithm that combines the adaptive Tikhonov regularization method with the imaging model is implemented for CB-XLCT reconstruction. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments indicate that compared with the traditional forward model based on x-ray intensity, the proposed dose-based model could improve the image quality of CB-XLCT significantly in terms of target shape, localization accuracy, and image contrast. In addition, the proposed model behaves better in distinguishing closer targets, demonstrating its advantage in improving spatial resolution. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  3. An MCNP-based model of a medical linear accelerator x-ray photon beam.

    PubMed

    Ajaj, F A; Ghassal, N M

    2003-09-01

    The major components in the x-ray photon beam path of the treatment head of the VARIAN Clinac 2300 EX medical linear accelerator were modeled and simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP). Simulated components include x-ray target, primary conical collimator, x-ray beam flattening filter and secondary collimators. X-ray photon energy spectra and angular distributions were calculated using the model. The x-ray beam emerging from the secondary collimators were scored by considering the total x-ray spectra from the target as the source of x-rays at the target position. The depth dose distribution and dose profiles at different depths and field sizes have been calculated at a nominal operating potential of 6 MV and found to be within acceptable limits. It is concluded that accurate specification of the component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential gives a good assessment of the x-ray energy spectra.

  4. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-12-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year.

  5. Diffraction of real and virtual photons in a pyrolytic graphite crystal as source of intensive quasimonochromatic X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomazova, E. A.; Kalinin, B. N.; Naumenko, G. A.; Padalko, D. V.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Sharafutdinov, A. F.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2003-01-01

    A series of experiments on the parametric X-rays radiation (PXR) generation and radiation soft component diffraction of relativistic electrons in pyrolytic graphite (PG) crystals have been carried out at the Tomsk synchrotron. It is shown that the experimental results with PG crystals are explained by the kinematic PXR theory if we take into account a contribution of the real photons diffraction (transition radiation, bremsstrahlung and PXR photons as well). The measurements of the emission spectrum of channeled electrons in the photon energy range much smaller than the characteristic energy of channeling radiation have been performed with a crystal-diffraction spectrometer. For electrons incident along the <1 1 0> axis of a silicon crystal, the radiation intensity in the energy range 30⩽ ω⩽360 keV exceeds the bremsstrahlung one almost by an order of magnitude. Different possibilities to create an effective source of the monochromatic X-ray beam based on the real and virtual photons diffraction in the PG crystals have been considered.

  6. Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object using multi-beam imaging from an X-ray beam having a polychromatic distribution

    DOEpatents

    Parham, Christopher A; Zhong, Zhong; Pisano, Etta; Connor, Jr., Dean M

    2015-03-03

    Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object using a multi-beam imaging system from an x-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution are disclosed. According to one aspect, a method can include generating a first X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution. Further, the method can include positioning a plurality of monochromator crystals in a predetermined position to directly intercept the first X-ray beam such that a plurality of second X-ray beams having predetermined energy levels are produced. Further, an object can be positioned in the path of the second X-ray beams for transmission of the second X-ray beams through the object and emission from the object as transmitted X-ray beams. The transmitted X-ray beams can each be directed at an angle of incidence upon one or more crystal analyzers. Further, an image of the object can be detected from the beams diffracted from the analyzer crystals.

  7. Doubly curved mica diffractors and their applications to x-ray microprobe fluorescence and microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zewu

    This thesis describes the experimental work in the fabrication of doubly-curved mica diffractors and their applications in monochromatic microprobe x-ray fluorescence analysis and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Three-dimension focusing of x-rays can be achieved by diffraction from a doubly-curved diffractor. A Johann point-focusing mica diffractor was fabricated for focusing the Cu Kα1 radiation and characterized by using a microfocus x-ray source. The intensity of the focused beam was measured to be 1.01 × 108 photons/s at the focal spot. The spot size of the focused beam was measured by the knife edge scan method. A Cu Kα1 focal spot of 43 μm x 68 μm has been obtained. Monochromatic microprobe x-ray fluorescence (MMXRF) analysis was performed by using the focused Cu Kα1 radiation. The microfocus x-ray source was operated at 30 kV and 0.1 mA. MMXRF spectra of bulk specimens of GaAs, Si, ZnSe, Mg and 40 μm thick Muscovite were recorded with a Si(Li) energy dispersive detector. Exceptional high signal-to-background ratios were observed. Due to the low background, detection limits as low as 1.6 ppm were predicted for a measurement time of 500 s for bulk specimens. The detector background was determined by recording a spectrum from an Fe55 source and was found to be a significant contribution to the total observed background. A wavelength dispersive spectrometer was designed and constructed for the use in a JEOL transmission electron microscope. A logarithmic spiral of revolution diffractor was fabricated and used explored for measurement of Ca concentration in the TEM. Bench tests were carried out by using the microfocus x-ray source. Preliminary data of tests in the TEM indicated that the spectrometer may give better performance than EDS systems previously used.

  8. Crystallographic Characterization of Extraterrestrial Materials by Energy-Scanning X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagiya, Kenji; Mikouchi, Takashi; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Hirata, Arashi; Kurokawa, Ayaka; Zolensky, Michael E. (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    We have continued our long-term project using X-ray diffraction to characterize a wide range of extraterrestrial samples. The stationary sample method with polychromatic X-rays is advantageous because the irradiated area of the sample is always same and fixed, meaning that all diffraction spots occur from the same area of the sample, however, unit cell parameters cannot be directly obtained by this method though they are very important for identification of mineral and for determination of crystal structures. In order to obtain the cell parameters even in the case of the sample stationary method, we apply energy scanning of a micro-beam of monochromatic SR at SPring-8.

  9. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kayser, Y., E-mail: yves.kayser@psi.ch; Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI; Błachucki, W.

    2014-04-15

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-raymore » tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers.« less

  10. Influence of scatter reduction method and monochromatic beams on image quality and dose in mammography.

    PubMed

    Moeckli, Raphaël; Verdun, Francis R; Fiedler, Stefan; Pachoud, Marc; Bulling, Shelley; Schnyder, Pierre; Valley, Jean-François

    2003-12-01

    In mammography, the image contrast and dose delivered to the patient are determined by the x-ray spectrum and the scatter to primary ratio S/P. Thus the quality of the mammographic procedure is highly dependent on the choice of anode and filter material and on the method used to reduce the amount of scattered radiation reaching the detector. Synchrotron radiation is a useful tool to study the effect of beam energy on the optimization of the mammographic process because it delivers a high flux of monochromatic photons. Moreover, because the beam is naturally flat collimated in one direction, a slot can be used instead of a grid for scatter reduction. We have measured the ratio S/P and the transmission factors for grids and slots for monoenergetic synchrotron radiation. In this way the effect of beam energy and scatter rejection method were separated, and their respective importance for image quality and dose analyzed. Our results show that conventional mammographic spectra are not far from optimum and that the use of a slot instead of a grid has an important effect on the optimization of the mammographic process. We propose a simple numerical model to quantify this effect.

  11. BEaTriX, expanded x-ray beam facility for testing modular elements of telescope optics: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliciari, C.; Spiga, D.; Bonnini, E.; Buffagni, E.; Ferrari, C.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2015-09-01

    We present in this paper an update on the design of BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility), an X-ray apparatus to be realized at INAF/OAB and that will generate an expanded, uniform and parallel beam of soft X-rays. BEaTriX will be used to perform the functional tests of X-ray focusing modules of large X-ray optics such as those for the ATHENA X-ray observatory, using the Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) as a baseline technology, and Slumped Glass Optics (SGO) as a possible alternative. Performing the tests in X-rays provides the advantage of an in-situ, at-wavelength quality control of the optical modules produced in series by the industry, performing a selection of the modules with the best angular resolution, and, in the case of SPOs, there is also the interesting possibility to align the parabolic and the hyperbolic stacks directly under X-rays, to minimize the aberrations. However, a parallel beam with divergence below 2 arcsec is necessary in order to measure mirror elements that are expected to reach an angular resolution of about 4 arcsec, since the ATHENA requirement for the entire telescope is 5 arcsec. Such a low divergence over the typical aperture of modular optics would require an X-ray source to be located in a several kilometers long vacuum tube. In contrast, BEaTriX will be compact enough (5 m x 14 m) to be housed in a small laboratory, will produce an expanded X-ray beam 60 mm x 200 mm broad, characterized by a very low divergence (1.5 arcsec HEW), strong polarization, high uniformity, and X-ray energy selectable between 1.5 keV and 4.5 keV. In this work we describe the BEaTriX layout and show a performance simulation for the X-ray energy of 4.5 keV.

  12. X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging via multiple intensity weighted narrow beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce and study a novel x-ray beam irradiation pattern for X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography (XLCT), termed multiple intensity-weighted narrow-beam irradiation. The proposed XLCT imaging method is studied through simulations of x-ray and diffuse lights propagation. The emitted optical photons from X-ray excitable nanophosphors were collected by optical fiber bundles from the right-side surface of the phantom. The implementation of image reconstruction is based on the simulated measurements from 6 or 12 angular projections in terms of 3 or 5 x-ray beams scanning mode. The proposed XLCT imaging method is compared against the constant intensity weighted narrow-beam XLCT. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity and quantitative ratio of targets have a certain degree of improvement. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can offer simultaneously high image quality and fast image acquisition.

  13. SUT-NANOTEC-SLRI beamline for X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Klysubun, Wantana; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Tarawarakarn, Pongjakr

    2017-04-04

    The SUT-NANOTEC-SLRI beamline was constructed in 2012 as the flagship of the SUT-NANOTEC-SLRI Joint Research Facility for Synchrotron Utilization, co-established by Suranaree University of Technology (SUT), National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) and Synchrotron Light Research Institute (SLRI). It is an intermediate-energy X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamline at SLRI. The beamline delivers an unfocused monochromatic X-ray beam of tunable photon energy (1.25–10 keV). The maximum normal incident beam size is 13 mm (width) × 1 mm (height) with a photon flux of 3 × 10 8to 2 × 10 10 photons s -1(100 mA) -1varying across photon energies. Details of the beamlinemore » and XAS instrumentation are described. To demonstrate the beamline performance,K-edge XANES spectra of MgO, Al 2O 3, S 8, FeS, FeSO 4, Cu, Cu 2O and CuO, and EXAFS spectra of Cu and CuO are presented.« less

  14. Cone Beam X-Ray Luminescence Tomography Imaging Based on KA-FEM Method for Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Fanzhen; Zhao, Fengjun; Xu, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography can realize fast X-ray luminescence tomography imaging with relatively low scanning time compared with narrow beam X-ray luminescence tomography. However, cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography suffers from an ill-posed reconstruction problem. First, the feasibility of experiments with different penetration and multispectra in small animal has been tested using nanophosphor material. Then, the hybrid reconstruction algorithm with KA-FEM method has been applied in cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography for small animals to overcome the ill-posed reconstruction problem, whose advantage and property have been demonstrated in fluorescence tomography imaging. The in vivo mouse experiment proved the feasibility of the proposed method.

  15. X-ray beam equalization for digital fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloi, Sabee Y.; Tang, Jerry; Marcin, Martin R.; Zhou, Yifang; Anvar, Behzad

    1996-04-01

    The concept of radiographic equalization has previously been investigated. However, a suitable technique for digital fluoroscopic applications has not been developed. The previously reported scanning equalization techniques cannot be applied to fluoroscopic applications due to their exposure time limitations. On the other hand, area beam equalization techniques are more suited for digital fluoroscopic applications. The purpose of this study is to develop an x- ray beam equalization technique for digital fluoroscopic applications that will produce an equalized radiograph with minimal image artifacts and tube loading. Preliminary unequalized images of a humanoid chest phantom were acquired using a digital fluoroscopic system. Using this preliminary image as a guide, an 8 by 8 array of square pistons were used to generate masks in a mold with CeO2. The CeO2 attenuator thicknesses were calculated using the gray level information from the unequalized image. The generated mask was positioned close to the focal spot (magnification of 8.0) in order to minimize edge artifacts from the mask. The masks were generated manually in order to investigate the piston and matrix size requirements. The development of an automated version of mask generation and positioning is in progress. The results of manual mask generation and positioning show that it is possible to generate equalized radiographs with minimal perceptible artifacts. The equalization of x-ray transmission across the field exiting from the object significantly improved the image quality by preserving local contrast throughout the image. Furthermore, the reduction in dynamic range significantly reduced the effect of x-ray scatter and veiling glare from high transmission to low transmission areas. Also, the x-ray tube loading due to the mask assembly itself was negligible. In conclusion it is possible to produce area beam compensation that will be compatible with digital fluoroscopy with minimal compensation artifacts

  16. Food Irradiation Using Electron Beams and X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bruce

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the technology of food irradiation using electron accelerators. Food irradiation has generally come to describe the use of ionizing radiation to decrease the population of, or prevent the growth of, undesirable biological organisms in food. The many beneficial applications include insect disinfestation, sprouting inhibition, delayed ripening, and the enhanced safety and sterilization of fresh and frozen meat products, seafood, and eggs. With special regard to food safety, bacteria such as Salmonella enteridis, Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 are the primary causes of food poisoning in industrialized countries. Ionizing doses in the range of only 1-5 kilogray (kGy) can virtually eliminate these organisms from food, without affecting the food's sensory and nutritional qualities, and without inducing radioactivity. The key elements of an accelerator-based irradiation facility include the accelerator system, a scanning system, and a material handling system that moves the product through the beam in a precisely controlled manner. Extensive radiation shielding is necessary to reduce the external dose to acceptable levels, and a safety system is necessary to prevent accidental exposure of personnel during accelerator operation. Parameters that affect the dose distribution must be continuously monitored and controlled with process control software. The choice of electron beam vs x-ray depends on the areal density (density times thickness) of the product and the anticipated mass throughput. To eliminate nuclear activation concerns, the maximum kinetic energy of the accelerator is limited by regulation to 10 MeV for electron beams, and 5 MeV for x-rays. From penetration considerations, the largest areal density that can be treated by double-sided electron irradiation at 10 MeV is about 8.8 g/cm2. Products having greater areal densities must be processed using more penetrating x-rays. The

  17. Remote analysis of planetary soils: X-ray diffractometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    A system is described suitable for remote low power mineralogical analysis of lunar, planetary, or asteroid soils. It includes an X-ray diffractometer, fluorescence spectrometer, and sample preparation system. A one Curie Fe-55 source provides a monochromatic X-ray beam of 5.9 keV. Seeman-Bohlin or focusing geometry is employed in the camera, allowing peak detection to proceed simultaneously at all angles and obviating the need for moving parts. The detector system is an array of 500-600 proportional counters with a wire-spacing of 1 mm. An electronics unit comprising preamplifier, postamplifier, window discriminators, and storage flipflops requiring only 3.5 milliwatts was designed and tested. Total instrument power is less than 5 watts. Powder diffraction patterns using a flat breadboard multiwire counter were recorded.

  18. Motorized Beam Alignment of a Commercial X-ray Diffractometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zandt, Noah R.; Myers, James F.; Rogers, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful analysis method that allows researchers to noninvasively probe the crystalline structure of a material. This includes the ability to determine the crystalline phases present, quantify surface residual stresses, and measure the distribution of crystallographic orientations. The Structures and Materials Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) heavily uses the on-site XRD lab to characterize advanced metal alloys, ceramics, and polymers. One of the x-ray diffractometers in the XRD lab (Bruker D8 Discover) uses three different x-ray tubes (Cu, Cr, and Mn) for optimal performance over numerous material types and various experimental techniques. This requires that the tubes be switched out and aligned between experiments. This alignment maximizes the x-ray tube s output through an iterative process involving four set screws. However, the output of the x-ray tube cannot be monitored during the adjustment process due to standard radiation safety engineering controls that prevent exposure to the x-ray beam when the diffractometer doors are open. Therefore, the adjustment process is a very tedious series of blind adjustments, each followed by measurement of the output beam using a PIN diode after the enclosure doors are shut. This process can take up to 4 hr to perform. This technical memorandum documents an in-house project to motorize this alignment process. Unlike a human, motors are not harmed by x-ray radiation of the energy range used in this instrument. Therefore, using motors to adjust the set screws will allow the researcher to monitor the x-ray tube s output while making interactive adjustments from outside the diffractometer. The motorized alignment system consists of four motors, a motor controller, and a hand-held user interface module. Our goal was to reduce the alignment time to less than 30 min. The time available was the 10-week span of the Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Project (LERCIP

  19. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1997-03-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO2 laser may be used for prototype LSS demonstration. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 Å) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ˜1019photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 1022 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO2 laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact "table-top" LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  20. X-ray Raman spectroscopic study of benzene at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Grubor-Urosevic, Ognjen; Hu, Michael; Chow, Paul; Yulga, Brian; Liermann, Peter

    2007-10-11

    We have used X-ray Raman spectroscopy (XRS) to study benzene up to approximately 20 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature. The experiments were performed at the High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team's 16 ID-D undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Scanned monochromatic X-rays near 10 keV were used to probe the carbon X-ray edge near 284 eV via inelastic scattering. The diamond cell axis was oriented perpendicular to the X-ray beam axis to prevent carbon signal contamination from the diamonds. Beryllium gaskets confined the sample because of their high transmission throughput in this geometry. Spectral alterations with pressure indicate bonding changes that occur with pressure because of phase changes (liquid: phase I, II, III, and III') and possibly due to changes in the hybridization of the bonds. Changes in the XRS spectra were especially evident in the data taken when the sample was in phase III', which may be related to a rate process observed in earlier shock wave studies.

  1. Medical imaging by fluorescent x-ray CT: its preliminary clinical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Wu, Jin; Yu, Quanwen; Lwin, Thet T.; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Rao, Donepudi V.; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Yashiro, Toru; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescent x-ray CT (FXCT) with synchrotron radiation (SR) is being developed to detect the very low concentration of specific elements. The endogenous iodine of the human thyroid and the non-radioactive iodine labeled BMIPP in myocardium were imaged by FXCT. FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) double crystal monochromator, an x-ray slit, a scanning table for object positioning, a fluorescent x-ray detector, and a transmission x-ray detector. Monochromatic x-ray with 37 keV energy was collimated into a pencil beam (from 1 mm to 0.025 mm). FXCT clearly imaged endogenous iodine of thyroid and iodine labeled BMIPP in myocardium, whereas transmission x-ray CT could not demonstrate iodine. The distribution of iodine was heterogeneous within thyroid cancer, and its concentration was lower than that of normal thyroid. Distribution of BMIPP in normal rat myocardium was almost homogeneous; however, reduced uptake was slightly shown in ischemic region. FXCT is a highly sensitive imaging modality to detect very low concentration of specific element and will be applied to reveal endogenous iodine distribution in thyroid and to use tracer study with various kinds of labeled material.

  2. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X-ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivero, P.; Manfredotti, C.; Vittone, E.; Fizzotti, F.; Paolini, C.; Lo Giudice, A.; Barrett, R.; Tucoulou, R.

    2004-10-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the large hadron collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitative study of the inhomogeneity of the charge transport parameter defined as the product of mobility and lifetime for both electron and holes. XBIL represents a technique complementary to ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL), which has already been used by our group, since X-ray energy loss profile in the material is different from that of MeV ions. X-ray induced luminescence maps have been performed simultaneously with induced photocurrent maps, to correlate charge transport and induced luminescence properties of diamond. Simultaneous XBICC and XBIL maps exhibit features of partial complementarity that have been interpreted on the basis of considerations on radiative and non-radiative recombination processes which compete with charge transport efficiency.

  3. Multi-species beam hardening calibration device for x-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evershed, Anthony N. Z.; Mills, David; Davis, Graham

    2012-10-01

    Impact-source X-ray microtomography (XMT) is a widely-used benchtop alternative to synchrotron radiation microtomography. Since X-rays from a tube are polychromatic, however, greyscale `beam hardening' artefacts are produced by the preferential absorption of low-energy photons in the beam path. A multi-material `carousel' test piece was developed to offer a wider range of X-ray attenuations from well-characterised filters than single-material step wedges can produce practically, and optimization software was developed to produce a beam hardening correction by use of the Nelder-Mead optimization method, tuned for specimens composed of other materials (such as hydroxyapatite [HA] or barium for dental applications.) The carousel test piece produced calibration polynomials reliably and with a significantly smaller discrepancy between the calculated and measured attenuations than the calibration step wedge previously in use. An immersion tank was constructed and used to simplify multi-material samples in order to negate the beam hardening effect of low atomic number materials within the specimen when measuring mineral concentration of higher-Z regions. When scanned in water at an acceleration voltage of 90 kV a Scanco AG hydroxyapatite / poly(methyl methacrylate) calibration phantom closely approximates a single-material system, producing accurate hydroxyapatite concentration measurements. This system can then be corrected for beam hardening for the material of interest.

  4. Note: A novel method for in situ loading of gases via x-ray induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Park, Changyong; Liu, Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan

    2011-10-01

    We have developed and demonstrated a novel method to load oxygen in a sealed diamond anvil cell via the x-ray induced decomposition of potassium chlorate. By irradiating a pressurized sample of an oxidizer (KClO3) with either monochromatic or white beam x-rays from the Advanced Photon Source at ambient temperature and variable pressure, we succeeded in creating a localized region of molecular oxygen surrounded by unreacted sample which was confirmed via Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate that this technique will be useful in loading even more challenging, difficult-to-load gases such as hydrogen and also to load multiple gases.

  5. Note: A novel method for in situ loading of gases via x-ray induced chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Park, Changyong; Liu, Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan

    2011-10-01

    We have developed and demonstrated a novel method to load oxygen in a sealed diamond anvil cell via the x-ray induced decomposition of potassium chlorate. By irradiating a pressurized sample of an oxidizer (KClO(3)) with either monochromatic or white beam x-rays from the Advanced Photon Source at ambient temperature and variable pressure, we succeeded in creating a localized region of molecular oxygen surrounded by unreacted sample which was confirmed via Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate that this technique will be useful in loading even more challenging, difficult-to-load gases such as hydrogen and also to load multiple gases.

  6. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Bai, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods.

  7. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Bai, Jing

    2017-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods. PMID:27576245

  8. Anomalous X-Ray Reflectivity Characterization of Ion Distribution at Biomimetic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaknin, David; Krüger, Peter; Lösche, Mathias

    2003-05-01

    Anomalous x-ray reflectivity measurements provides detailed information on ion binding to biomembrane surfaces. Using a monochromatic beam tuned to various x-ray energies at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source and utilizing a newly commissioned x-ray liquid surfaces reflectometer, measurements at and away from ion absorption edges allow determination of the distribution of these ions as they accumulate near lipid membranes. As a model, the interaction of Ba2+ ions with DMPA- (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid) monolayers at the aqueous surface is studied. We find an unexpectedly large concentration of barium at the interface, ≈1.5 per DMPA-, forming a Stern layer of bound ions and a cloud of less densely bound ions near the lipid headgroups. This result can be understood only if one assumes that bound cations are partially speciated, e.g., as BaOH+.

  9. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction Study of Acoustoelectrically Amplified Phonons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Leroy Dean

    X-rays diffracted by nearly perfect crystals of n-type InSb have been investigated in the presence of intense acoustoelectrically (A.E.) amplified phonons. The fact that these phonons are nearly monochromatic and have a well defined propagation and polarization direction presents an excellent opportunity to investigate the nature of x -ray photon-phonon scattering in a diffracting crystal. The Debye-Waller factor which accounts for the attenuation of diffracted x-ray intensities due to thermal phonons is reflection dependent owing to its sin (theta)/(lamda) dependence. We have performed experiments comparing the (004) and (008) anomalously transmitted intensities as a function of A.E. amplified flux. The attenuation of both reflections due to the amplified phonons was the same in direct contradiction to an expected sin (theta)/(lamda) dependence. Some possible reasons for this failure are discussed. In a Bragg reflection scattering geometry, the intense monochromatic amplified phonons give rise to satellite peaks symmetrically located about the central elastic Brag peak in a rocking profile. We report in this thesis on the first observation of satellites in a thin crystal Laue transmission geometry. We have theoretically simulated the rocking profiles with some success. The A.E. amplification process in InSb is strongly favored for {110} propagation fast transverse (FT) phonons. In earlier experiments it was found that non-{110} FT phonons were also produced during the amplification process. We have developed a time resolved x-ray counting system which, in conjunction with a spatially resolved x-ray beam and a localized, traveling A.E. phonon distribution, allow the time evolution of the amplified distribution to be followed. We report on time resolved measurements for both the symmetric Bragg and Laue geometries from which we can determine when and where non-{110 } FT flux is generated and restrict the possible mechanisms for its generation.

  10. Beam Measurement of 11.424 GHz X-Band Linac for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsui, Takuya; Mori, Azusa; Masuda, Hirotoshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Fumito

    2010-11-01

    An inverse Compton scattering X-ray source for medical applications, consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) linac and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, is currently being developed at the University of Tokyo. This system uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun for electron beam generation. We can obtain a multi-bunch electron beam with this gun. The beam is accelerated to 30 MeV by a traveling-wave accelerating tube. So far, we have verified stable beam generation (around 2.3 MeV) by using the newly designed RF gun and we have succeeded in beam transportation to a beam dump.

  11. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  12. RF Phase Stability and Electron Beam Characterization for the PLEIADES Thomson X-Ray Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V; Tremaine, A M

    2002-10-16

    We report on the performance of an S-band RF photocathode electron gun and accelerator for operation with the PLEIADES Thomson x-ray source at LLNL. To produce picosecond, high brightness x-ray pulses, picosecond timing, terahertz bandwidth diagnostics, and RF phase control are required. Planned optical, RF, x-ray and electron beam measurements to characterize the dependence of electron beam parameters and synchronization on RF phase stability are presented.

  13. Theory and optical design of x-ray echo spectrometers

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a space-domain counterpart of neutron spin echo, is a recently proposed inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique. X-ray echo spectroscopy relies on imaging IXS spectra and does not require x-ray monochromatization. Due to this, the echo-type IXS spectrometers are broadband, and thus have a potential to simultaneously provide dramatically increased signal strength, reduced measurement times, and higher resolution compared to the traditional narrow-band scanning-type IXS spectrometers. The theory of x-ray echo spectrometers presented earlier [Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 080801 (2016)] is developed here further with a focus on questions of practical importance, which could facilitate opticalmore » design and assessment of the feasibility and performance of the echo spectrometers. Among others, the following questions are addressed: spectral resolution, refocusing condition, echo spectrometer tolerances, refocusing condition adjustment, effective beam size on the sample, spectral window of imaging and scanning range, impact of the secondary source size on the spectral resolution, angular dispersive optics, focusing and collimating optics, and detector's spatial resolution. In conclusion, examples of optical designs and characteristics of echo spectrometers with 1-meV and 0.1-meV resolutions are presented.« less

  14. Theory and optical design of x-ray echo spectrometers

    DOE PAGES

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2017-08-02

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a space-domain counterpart of neutron spin echo, is a recently proposed inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique. X-ray echo spectroscopy relies on imaging IXS spectra and does not require x-ray monochromatization. Due to this, the echo-type IXS spectrometers are broadband, and thus have a potential to simultaneously provide dramatically increased signal strength, reduced measurement times, and higher resolution compared to the traditional narrow-band scanning-type IXS spectrometers. The theory of x-ray echo spectrometers presented earlier [Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 080801 (2016)] is developed here further with a focus on questions of practical importance, which could facilitate opticalmore » design and assessment of the feasibility and performance of the echo spectrometers. Among others, the following questions are addressed: spectral resolution, refocusing condition, echo spectrometer tolerances, refocusing condition adjustment, effective beam size on the sample, spectral window of imaging and scanning range, impact of the secondary source size on the spectral resolution, angular dispersive optics, focusing and collimating optics, and detector's spatial resolution. In conclusion, examples of optical designs and characteristics of echo spectrometers with 1-meV and 0.1-meV resolutions are presented.« less

  15. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  16. Impact of large x-ray beam collimation on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, Damien; Ba, Alexandre; Ott, Julien G.; Bochud, François O.; Verdun, Francis R.

    2016-03-01

    Large X-ray beam collimation in computed tomography (CT) opens the way to new image acquisition techniques and improves patient management for several clinical indications. The systems that offer large X-ray beam collimation enable, in particular, a whole region of interest to be investigated with an excellent temporal resolution. However, one of the potential drawbacks of this option might be a noticeable difference in image quality along the z-axis when compared with the standard helical acquisition mode using more restricted X-ray beam collimations. The aim of this project is to investigate the impact of the use of large X-ray beam collimation and new iterative reconstruction on noise properties, spatial resolution and low contrast detectability (LCD). An anthropomorphic phantom and a custom made phantom were scanned on a GE Revolution CT. The images were reconstructed respectively with ASIR-V at 0% and 50%. Noise power spectra, to evaluate the noise properties, and Target Transfer Functions, to evaluate the spatial resolution, were computed. Then, a Channelized Hotelling Observer with Gabor and Dense Difference of Gaussian channels was used to evaluate the LCD using the Percentage correct as a figure of merit. Noticeable differences of 3D noise power spectra and MTF have been recorded; however no significant difference appeared when dealing with the LCD criteria. As expected the use of iterative reconstruction, for a given CTDIvol level, allowed a significant gain in LCD in comparison to ASIR-V 0%. In addition, the outcomes of the NPS and TTF metrics led to results that would contradict the outcomes of CHO model observers if used for a NPWE model observer (Non- Prewhitening With Eye filter). The unit investigated provides major advantages for cardiac diagnosis without impairing the image quality level of standard chest or abdominal acquisitions.

  17. Virtual monochromatic spectral imaging with fast kilovoltage switching: reduction of metal artifacts at CT.

    PubMed

    Pessis, Eric; Campagna, Raphaël; Sverzut, Jean-Michel; Bach, Fabienne; Rodallec, Mathieu; Guerini, Henri; Feydy, Antoine; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    With arthroplasty being increasingly used to relieve joint pain, imaging of patients with metal implants can represent a significant part of the clinical work load in the radiologist's daily practice. Computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the postoperative evaluation of patients who are suspected of having metal prosthesis-related problems such as aseptic loosening, bone resorption or osteolysis, infection, dislocation, metal hardware failure, or periprosthetic bone fracture. Despite advances in detector technology and computer software, artifacts from metal implants can seriously degrade the quality of CT images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. Several factors may help reduce the number and severity of artifacts at multidetector CT, including decreasing the detector collimation and pitch, increasing the kilovolt peak and tube charge, and using appropriate reconstruction algorithms and section thickness. More recently, dual-energy CT has been proposed as a means of reducing beam-hardening artifacts. The use of dual-energy CT scanners allows the synthesis of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images. Monochromatic images depict how the imaged object would look if the x-ray source produced x-ray photons at only a single energy level. For this reason, VMS imaging is expected to provide improved image quality by reducing beam-hardening artifacts.

  18. Pump–probe spectrometer for measuring x-ray induced strain

    DOE PAGES

    Loether, A.; Adams, B. W.; DiCharia, A.; ...

    2016-04-20

    A hard x-ray pump–probe spectrometer using a multi-crystal Bragg reflector is demonstrated at a third generation synchrotron source. This device derives both broadband pump and monochromatic probe pulses directly from a single intense, broadband x-ray pulse centered at 8.767 keV. In conclusion, we present a proof-of-concept experiment which directly measures x-ray induced crystalline lattice strain.

  19. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  20. Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecturea

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan Neculaes, V.; Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient. PMID:24826066

  1. Spectral structure of a polycapillary lens shaped X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogolev, A. S.; Filatov, N. A.; Uglov, S. R.; Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.

    2018-04-01

    Polycapillary X-ray optics is widely used in X-ray analysis techniques to create a small secondary source, for instance, or to deliver X-rays to the point of interest with minimum intensity losses [1]. The main characteristics of the analytical devices on its base are the size and divergence of the focused or translated beam. In this work, we used the photon-counting pixel detector ModuPIX to study the parameters for polycapillary focused X-ray tube radiation as well as the energy and spatial dependences of radiation at the focus. We have characterized the high-speed spectral camera ModuPIX, which is a single Timepix device with a fast parallel readout allowing up to 850 frames per second with 256 × 256 pixels and a 55 μm pitch defined by the frame frequency. By means of the silicon monochromator the energy response function is measured in clustering mode by the energy scan over total X-ray tube spectrum.

  2. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    This editorial serves as the preface to a special issue of New Journal of Physics, which collects together solicited papers on a common subject, x-ray beams with high coherence. We summarize the issue's content, and explain why there is so much current interest both in the sources themselves and in the applications to the study of the structure of matter and its fluctuations (both spontaneous and driven). As this collection demonstrates, the field brings together accelerator physics in the design of new sources, particle physics in the design of detectors, and chemical and materials scientists who make use of the coherent beams produced. Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence Contents Femtosecond pulse x-ray imaging with a large field of view B Pfau, C M Günther, S Schaffert, R Mitzner, B Siemer, S Roling, H Zacharias, O Kutz, I Rudolph, R Treusch and S Eisebitt The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent x-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system and applications E Allaria, C Callegari, D Cocco, W M Fawley, M Kiskinova, C Masciovecchio and F Parmigiani Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Anders Madsen, Robert L Leheny, Hongyu Guo, Michael Sprung and Orsolya Czakkel The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Sébastien Boutet and Garth J Williams Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Andrei Fluerasu, Pawel Kwasniewski, Chiara Caronna, Fanny Destremaut, Jean-Baptiste Salmon and Anders Madsen Exploration of crystal strains using coherent x-ray diffraction Wonsuk Cha, Sanghoon Song, Nak Cheon Jeong, Ross Harder, Kyung Byung Yoon, Ian K Robinson and Hyunjung Kim Coherence properties of the European XFEL G Geloni, E Saldin, L Samoylova, E Schneidmiller, H Sinn, Th Tschentscher and M Yurkov Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging: treatment and analysis of data G J

  3. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: A Monte Carlo study

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Nivedh; Jones, Bernard L.; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Methods: A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Results: Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the

  4. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Nivedh; Jones, Bernard L; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-10-01

    To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the investigated range of 81-100 ke

  5. Kilovoltage radiotherapy for companion animals: dosimetric comparison of 300 kV, 450 kV, and 6 MV X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jaehyeon; Son, Jaeman; Cho, Yeona; Park, Nohwon; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Jinsung; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2018-04-12

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer in companion animals is currently administered using megavoltage X-ray machines. Because these machines are expensive, most animal hospitals do not perform radiotherapy. This study evaluated the ability of relatively inexpensive kilovoltage X-ray machines to treat companion animals. A simulation study based on a treatment planning system was performed for tumors of the brain (non-infectious meningoencephalitis), nasal cavity (malignant nasal tumors), forefoot (malignant muscular tumors), and abdomen (malignant intestinal tumors). The results of kilovoltage (300 kV and 450 kV) and megavoltage (6 MV) X-ray beams were compared. Whereas 300 kV and 6 MV X-ray beams provided optimal radiation dose homogeneity and conformity, respectively, for brain tumors, 6 MV X-rays provided optimal homogeneity and radiation conformity for nasal cavity, forefoot and abdominal tumors. Although megavoltage X-ray beams provided better radiation dose distribution in most treated animals, the differences between megavoltage and kilovoltage X-ray beams were relatively small. The similar therapeutic effects of kilovoltage and 6 MV X-ray beams suggest that kilovoltage X-ray beams may be effective alternatives to megavoltage X-ray beams in treating cancers in companion animals.

  6. X-ray characterization of short-pulse laser illuminated hydrogen storage alloys having very high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa; Shimomura, Takuya; Tokuhira, Shinnosuke; Takenaka, Yusuke; Furuyama, Takehiro; Nishimura, Akihiko; Uchida, Hirohisa; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen storage alloys become more and more important in the fields of electric energy production and stage and automobiles such as Ni-MH batteries. The vacancies introduced in hydrogen absorption alloy by charged particle beams were found to be positive effect on the increase in the initial hydrogen absorption reaction rate in the previous study. The initial reaction rates of hydrogen absorption and desorption of the alloy are one of the important performances to be improved. Here, we report on the characterization of the hydrogen absorption reaction rate directly illuminated by a femtosecond and nanosecond lasers instead of particle beam machines. A laser illuminates the whole surface sequentially on a tip of a few cm square LaNi4.6Al0.4 alloy resulting in significant improvement in the hydrogen absorption reaction rate. For characterization of the surface layer, we perform an x-ray diffraction experiment using a monochromatized intense x-ray beam from SPring-8 synchrotoron machine.

  7. BioCARS: a synchrotron resource for time-resolved X-ray science

    PubMed Central

    Graber, T.; Anderson, S.; Brewer, H.; Chen, Y.-S.; Cho, H. S.; Dashdorj, N.; Henning, R. W.; Kosheleva, I.; Macha, G.; Meron, M.; Pahl, R.; Ren, Z.; Ruan, S.; Schotte, F.; Šrajer, V.; Viccaro, P. J.; Westferro, F.; Anfinrud, P.; Moffat, K.

    2011-01-01

    BioCARS, a NIH-supported national user facility for macromolecular time-resolved X-ray crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), has recently completed commissioning of an upgraded undulator-based beamline optimized for single-shot laser-pump X-ray-probe measurements with time resolution as short as 100 ps. The source consists of two in-line undulators with periods of 23 and 27 mm that together provide high-flux pink-beam capability at 12 keV as well as first-harmonic coverage from 6.8 to 19 keV. A high-heat-load chopper reduces the average power load on downstream components, thereby preserving the surface figure of a Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system capable of focusing the X-ray beam to a spot size of 90 µm horizontal by 20 µm vertical. A high-speed chopper isolates single X-ray pulses at 1 kHz in both hybrid and 24-bunch modes of the APS storage ring. In hybrid mode each isolated X-ray pulse delivers up to ∼4 × 1010 photons to the sample, thereby achieving a time-averaged flux approaching that of fourth-generation X-FEL sources. A new high-power picosecond laser system delivers pulses tunable over the wavelength range 450–2000 nm. These pulses are synchronized to the storage-ring RF clock with long-term stability better than 10 ps RMS. Monochromatic experimental capability with Biosafety Level 3 certification has been retained. PMID:21685684

  8. Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object by use of an X-ray beam having a polychromatic distribution

    DOEpatents

    Parham, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong; Pisano, Etta; Connor, Dean; Chapman, Leroy D.

    2010-06-22

    Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object using an X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution are disclosed. According to one aspect, a method can include detecting an image of an object. The method can include generating a first X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution. Further, the method can include positioning a single monochromator crystal in a predetermined position to directly intercept the first X-ray beam such that a second X-ray beam having a predetermined energy level is produced. Further, an object can be positioned in the path of the second X-ray beam for transmission of the second X-ray beam through the object and emission from the object as a transmitted X-ray beam. The transmitted X-ray beam can be directed at an angle of incidence upon a crystal analyzer. Further, an image of the object can be detected from a beam diffracted from the analyzer crystal.

  9. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  10. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  11. Multi-mounted X-ray cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Wang, Jingzheng; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng

    2018-04-01

    As a powerful nondestructive inspection technique, X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) has been widely applied to clinical diagnosis, industrial production and cutting-edge research. Imaging efficiency is currently one of the major obstacles for the applications of X-CT. In this paper, a multi-mounted three dimensional cone-beam X-CT (MM-CBCT) method is reported. It consists of a novel multi-mounted cone-beam scanning geometry and the corresponding three dimensional statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The scanning geometry is the most iconic design and significantly different from the current CBCT systems. Permitting the cone-beam scanning of multiple objects simultaneously, the proposed approach has the potential to achieve an imaging efficiency orders of magnitude greater than the conventional methods. Although multiple objects can be also bundled together and scanned simultaneously by the conventional CBCT methods, it will lead to the increased penetration thickness and signal crosstalk. In contrast, MM-CBCT avoids substantially these problems. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed MM-CBCT prototype system. This technique will provide a possible solution for the CT inspection in a large scale.

  12. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  13. Experimental results of use of triple-energy X-ray beam with K-edge filter in multi-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Lee, S.; Jeon, P.-H.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-energy imaging is useful for contrast enhancement of lesions, quantitative analysis of specific materials and material separation in the human body. Generally, dual-energy methods are applied to discriminating two materials, but this method cannot discriminate more than two materials. Photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polyenergetic X-rays using multiple energy bins. In this work, we developed triple-energy X-ray beams using a filter with K-edge energy and applied them experimentally. The energy spectra of triple-energy X-ray beams were assessed by using a spectrometer. The designed triple-energy X-ray beams were validated by measuring quantitative evaluations with mean energy ratio (MER), contrast variation ratio (CVR) and exposure efficiency (EE). Then, triple-energy X-ray beams were used to extract density map of three materials, iodine (I), aluminum (Al) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The results of the thickness density maps obtained with the developed triple-energy X-ray beams were compared to those acquired using the photon-counting method. As a result, it was found experimentally that the proposed triple-energy X-ray beam technique can separate the three materials as well as the photon-counting method.

  14. A dedicated superbend x-ray microdiffraction beamline for materials, geo-, and environmental sciences at the advanced light source.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; MacDowell, Alastair A; Celestre, Richard S; Church, Matthew M; Fakra, Sirine; Domning, Edward E; Glossinger, James M; Kirschman, Jonathan L; Morrison, Gregory Y; Plate, Dave W; Smith, Brian V; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Padmore, Howard A; Ustundag, Ersan

    2009-03-01

    A new facility for microdiffraction strain measurements and microfluorescence mapping has been built on beamline 12.3.2 at the advanced light source of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This beamline benefits from the hard x-radiation generated by a 6 T superconducting bending magnet (superbend). This provides a hard x-ray spectrum from 5 to 22 keV and a flux within a 1 microm spot of approximately 5x10(9) photons/s (0.1% bandwidth at 8 keV). The radiation is relayed from the superbend source to a focus in the experimental hutch by a toroidal mirror. The focus spot is tailored by two pairs of adjustable slits, which serve as secondary source point. Inside the lead hutch, a pair of Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors placed in a vacuum tank refocuses the secondary slit source onto the sample position. A new KB-bending mechanism with active temperature stabilization allows for more reproducible and stable mirror bending and thus mirror focusing. Focus spots around 1 microm are routinely achieved and allow a variety of experiments, which have in common the need of spatial resolution. The effective spatial resolution (approximately 0.2 microm) is limited by a convolution of beam size, scan-stage resolution, and stage stability. A four-bounce monochromator consisting of two channel-cut Si(111) crystals placed between the secondary source and KB-mirrors allows for easy changes between white-beam and monochromatic experiments while maintaining a fixed beam position. High resolution stage scans are performed while recording a fluorescence emission signal or an x-ray diffraction signal coming from either a monochromatic or a white focused beam. The former allows for elemental mapping, whereas the latter is used to produce two-dimensional maps of crystal-phases, -orientation, -texture, and -strain/stress. Typically achieved strain resolution is in the order of 5x10(-5) strain units. Accurate sample positioning in the x-ray focus spot is achieved with a commercial laser

  15. X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging of Ancient Artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Robert; Geil, Ethan; Hudson, Kathryn; Crowther, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Many archaeological artifacts feature inscribed and/or painted text or figures which, through erosion and aging, have become difficult or impossible to read with conventional methods. Often, however, the pigments in paints contain metallic elements, and traces may remain even after visible markings are gone. A promising non-destructive technique for revealing these remnants is X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging, in which a tightly focused beam of monochromatic synchrotron radiation is raster scanned across a sample. At each pixel, an energy-dispersive detector records a fluorescence spectrum, which is then analyzed to determine element concentrations. In this way, a map of various elements is made across a region of interest. We have succesfully XRF imaged ancient Greek, Roman, and Mayan artifacts, and in many cases, the element maps have revealed significant new information, including previously invisible painted lines and traces of iron from tools used to carve stone tablets. X-ray imaging can be used to determine an object's provenance, including the region where it was produced and whether it is authentic or a copy.

  16. Ultrafast X-ray Imaging of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Detailed analysis of fuel sprays has been well recognized as an important step for optimizing the operation of internal combustion engines to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. Ultrafast radiographic and tomographic techniques have been developed for probing the fuel distribution close to the nozzles of direct-injection diesel and gasoline injectors. The measurement was made using x-ray absorption of monochromatic synchrotron-generated radiation, allowing quantitative determination of the fuel distribution in this optically impenetrable region with a time resolution on the order of 1 μs. Furthermore, an accurate 3-dimensional fuel-density distribution, in the form of fuel volume fraction, was obtained by the time-resolved computed tomography. These quantitative measurements constitute the most detailed near-nozzle study of a fuel spray to date. With high-energy and high-brilliance x-ray beams available at the Advanced Photon Source, propagation-based phase-enhanced imaging was developed as a unique metrology technique to visualize the interior of an injection nozzle through a 3-mm-thick steel with a 10-μs temporal resolution, which is virtually impossible by any other means.

  17. An X-ray beam position monitor based on the photoluminescence of helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revesz, Peter; White, Jeffrey A.

    2005-03-01

    A new method for white beam position monitoring for both bend magnet and wiggler synchrotron X-ray radiation has been developed. This method utilizes visible light luminescence generated as a result of ionization by the intense X-ray flux. In video beam position monitors (VBPMs), the luminescence of helium gas at atmospheric pressure is observed through a view port using a CCD camera next to the beam line. The beam position, profile, integrated intensity and FWHM are calculated from the distribution of luminescence intensity in each captured image by custom software. Misalignment of upstream apertures changes the image profile making VBPMs helpful for initial alignment of upstream beam line components. VBPMs can thus provide more information about the X-ray beam than most beam position monitors (BPMs). A beam position calibration procedure, employing a tilted plane-parallel glass plate placed in front of the camera lens, has also been developed. The accuracy of the VBPM system was measured during a bench-top experiment to be better than 1 μm. The He-luminescence-based VBPM system has been operative on three CHESS beam lines (F hard-bend and wiggler, A-line wiggler and G-line wiggler) for about a year. The beam positions are converted to analog voltages and used as feedback signals for beam stabilization. In our paper we discuss details of VBPM construction and describe further results of its performance.

  18. Bulk vertical micromachining of single-crystal sapphire using inductively coupled plasma etching for x-ray resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.-C.; Lin, P.-T.; Mikolas, D. G.; Tsai, Y.-W.; Wang, Y.-L.; Fu, C.-C.; Chang, S.-L.

    2015-01-01

    To provide coherent x-ray sources for probing the dynamic structures of solid or liquid biological substances on the picosecond timescale, a high-aspect-ratio x-ray resonator cavity etched from a single crystal substrate with a nearly vertical sidewall structure is required. Although high-aspect-ratio resonator cavities have been produced in silicon, they suffer from unwanted multiple beam effects. However, this problem can be avoided by using the reduced symmetry of single-crystal sapphire in which x-ray cavities may produce a highly monochromatic transmitted x-ray beam. In this study, we performed nominal 100 µm deep etching and vertical sidewall profiles in single crystal sapphire using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching. The large depth is required to intercept a useful fraction of a stopped-down x-ray beam, as well as for beam clearance. An electroplated Ni hard mask was patterned using KMPR 1050 photoresist and contact lithography. The quality and performance of the x-ray cavity depended upon the uniformity of the cavity gap and therefore verticality of the fabricated vertical sidewall. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such deep, vertical etching of single-crystal sapphire. A gas mixture of Cl2/BCl3/Ar was used to etch the sapphire with process variables including BCl3 flow ratio and bias power. By etching for 540 min under optimal conditions, we obtained an x-ray resonant cavity with a depth of 95 µm, width of ~30 µm, gap of ~115 µm and sidewall profile internal angle of 89.5°. The results show that the etching parameters affected the quality of the vertical sidewall, which is essential for good x-ray resonant cavities.

  19. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.; Fuoss, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  20. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hruszkewycz, S O; Harder, R; Xiao, X; Fuoss, P H

    2010-12-01

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  1. Real time observation of mouse fetal skeleton using a high resolution X-ray synchrotron

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dong Woo; Kim, Bora; Shin, Jae Hoon; Yun, Young Min; Je, Jung Ho; Hwu, Yeu kuang; Yoon, Jung Hee

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray synchrotron is quite different from conventional radiation sources. This technique may expand the capabilities of conventional radiology and be applied in novel manners for special cases. To evaluate the usefulness of X-ray synchrotron radiation systems for real time observations, mouse fetal skeleton development was monitored with a high resolution X-ray synchrotron. A non-monochromatized X-ray synchrotron (white beam, 5C1 beamline) was employed to observe the skeleton of mice under anesthesia at embryonic day (E)12, E14, E15, and E18. At the same time, conventional radiography and mammography were used to compare with X-ray synchrotron. After synchrotron radiation, each mouse was sacrificed and stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue to observe bony structures. Synchrotron radiation enabled us to view the mouse fetal skeleton beginning at gestation. Synchrotron radiation systems facilitate real time observations of the fetal skeleton with greater accuracy and magnification compared to mammography and conventional radiography. Our results show that X-ray synchrotron systems can be used to observe the fine structures of internal organs at high magnification. PMID:21586868

  2. Segmented-spectrum detection mechanism for medical x-ray in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zaifeng; Meng, Qingzhen; Cao, Qingjie; Yao, Suying

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a segmented X-ray spectrum detection method based on a layered X-ray detector in Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) substrate. We describe the three-dimensional structure of proposed detector pixel and investigate the matched spectrum-resolving method. Polychromatic X-ray beam enter the CdTe substrate edge on and will be absorbed completely in different thickness varying with photon energy. Discrete potential wells are formed under external controlling voltage to collect the photo-electrons generated in different layers, and segmented X-ray spectrum can be deduced from the quantity of photo-electrons. In this work, we verify the feasibility of the segmented-spectrum detection mechanism by simulating the absorption of monochromatic X-ray in a CdTe substrate. Experiments in simulation show that the number of photo-electrons grow exponentially with the increase of incident thickness, and photons with different energy will be absorbed in various thickness. The charges generated in different layers are collected into adjacent potential wells, and collection efficiency is estimated to be about 87% for different incident intensity under the 40000V/cm electric field. Errors caused by charge sharing between neighboring layers are also analyzed, and it can be considered negligible by setting appropriate size of electrodes.

  3. An investigation on some of the tumor treatment cases using x-rays and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Burcu; Yigitoglu, Ibrahim; Arslan Kabalay, Ipek; Altiparmak, Duygu; Kilicaslan, Sinem

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we discussed some of the applications which X-rays and electron beam used in radiotherapy for tumor treatments. This study has been performed at Radiation Oncology Department, Medicine Faculty in Gaziosmanpasa University by using the VARIAN CLINICA DHX linear accelerator which is operated in the range of 6 MeV - 15 MeV. Processes for the treatments that X-rays used for pancreas, bladder and prostate tumors and the processes that the electron beam used for some of the derm tumors are studied. Effects of X-rays and electron beams to treatments process are examined and the obtained results are presented comparatively.

  4. Interpretation of Core Length in Shear Coaxial Rocket Injectors from X-ray Radiography Measurements (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. • Near-injector EPL profiles have elliptical shape expected from a solid liquid jet ...the shear between an outer lower-density high-velocity annulus and a higher-density low-velocity inner jet to atomize and mix a liquid and a gas...Used to study diesel, swirl, gas-centered swirl-coaxial, impingers, and aerated liquid jet injectors • Use a monochromatic beam of X-rays

  5. X-ray beam transfer between hollow fibers for long-distance transport

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tanaka, Yoshihito, E-mail: tanaka@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Matsushita, Ryuki; Shiraishi, Ryutaro

    2016-07-27

    Fiber optics for controlling the x-ray beam trajectory has been examined at the synchrotron facility of SPring-8. Up to now, we have achieved beam deflection by several tens of milli-radian and axis shift of around 75 mm with a 1.5 m-long flexible hollow glass capillary. The achievable beam deflecting angle, axis shift, and timing delay are, in principle, proportional to the length, the square of length and the cube of length, respectively. Thus, for further applications, requiring larger beam shift and pulse delay, longer fibers are indispensable. In order to achieve long-distance transport using the fiber, we thus examined themore » connection transferring x-rays between fibers in an experimental hutch. The acceptance angle at the input end and the throughput efficiency of the second fiber is consistent with the consideration of the output beam divergence of the first fiber. The enhancement of the transfer efficiency is also discussed for the cases of a closer joint and the use of a refractive lens as a coupler.« less

  6. LabVIEW control software for scanning micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Pawel; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Furman, Leszek; Kolasinski, Krzysztof; Lankosz, Marek; Mrenca, Alina; Samek, Lucyna; Wegrzynek, Dariusz

    2012-05-15

    Confocal micro-beam X-ray fluorescence microscope was constructed. The system was assembled from commercially available components - a low power X-ray tube source, polycapillary X-ray optics and silicon drift detector - controlled by an in-house developed LabVIEW software. A video camera coupled to optical microscope was utilized to display the area excited by X-ray beam. The camera image calibration and scan area definition software were also based entirely on LabVIEW code. Presently, the main area of application of the newly constructed spectrometer is 2-dimensional mapping of element distribution in environmental, biological and geological samples with micrometer spatial resolution. The hardware and the developed software can already handle volumetric 3-D confocal scans. In this work, a front panel graphical user interface as well as communication protocols between hardware components were described. Two applications of the spectrometer, to homogeneity testing of titanium layers and to imaging of various types of grains in air particulate matter collected on membrane filters, were presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-04-19

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  8. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; ...

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  9. High Intensity e-beam Diode Development for Flash X-ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Bryan

    2007-11-01

    A variety of electron beam diodes are being used and developed for the purpose of creating high-brightness, flash x-ray radiography sources. In these diodes, high energy (multi MeV), high current (multi kA), small spot (multi mm) electron beams are generated and stopped in high atomic number anode-targets (typically Ta or W). Beam stopping in the target creates copious amounts of bremsstrahlung radiation. In addition, beam heating of the target liberates material, either in the form of low density (˜10^12-10^14 cm-3) ion emission or higher density (> 10^15 cm-3) plasma. In all cases, beam/target collective effects dominate the diode and beam characteristics, affecting the radiation properties (dose and spot-size). Recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated diodes capable of producing > 350 rad@m with 1.7mm FWHM x-ray source distributions. A review of our present theoretical understanding of the diode (s) operation and our experimental and simulation methods to investigate them will be presented. Emphasis will be given to e- beam sources used on state-of-the-art Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) pulsed-power accelerators. In particular, the physics of magnetically pinched diodes (e.g. the rod-pinch [1,2]), gas-cell focusing diodes [3] and the magnetically immersed [4] diode will be discussed. Various proposed methods to optimize the x-ray intensity and the direction of future diode research will be discussed. [1] G. Cooperstein, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4618 (2001).[2] B.V. Oliver et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 3976 (2004)[3] B.V. Oliver, et al., IEEE Trans. on Plasma Science 33, 704 (2005).[4] M.G. Mazarakis, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 832 (1997)

  10. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse. PMID:26798786

  11. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF,more » in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.« less

  12. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF,more » in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.« less

  13. Effect of exit beam phase aberrations on coherent x-ray reconstructions of Au nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruszkewycz, Stephan; Harder, Ross; Fuoss, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Current studies in coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) are focusing on in-situ imaging under a variety of environmental conditions. Such studies often involve environmental sample chambers through which the x-ray beam must pass before and after interacting with the sample: i.e. cryostats or high pressure cells. Such sample chambers usually contain polycrystalline x-ray windows with structural imperfections that can in turn interact with the diffracted beam. A phase object in the near field that interacts with the beam exiting the sample can introduce distortions at the detector plane that may affect coherent reconstructions. We investigate the effects of a thin beryllium membrane on the coherent exit beam of a gold nanoparticle. We compare three dimensional reconstructions from experimental diffraction patterns measured with and without a 380 micron thick Be dome and find that the reconstructions are reproducible within experimental errors. Simulated near-field distortions of the exit beam consistent with micron sized voids in Be establish a ``worst case scenario'' where distorted diffraction patterns inhibit accurate inversions.

  14. Method for beam hardening correction in quantitative computed X-ray tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Chye Hwang (Inventor); Whalen, Robert T. (Inventor); Napel, Sandy (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Each voxel is assumed to contain exactly two distinct materials, with the volume fraction of each material being iteratively calculated. According to the method, the spectrum of the X-ray beam must be known, and the attenuation spectra of the materials in the object must be known, and be monotonically decreasing with increasing X-ray photon energy. Then, a volume fraction is estimated for the voxel, and the spectrum is iteratively calculated.

  15. Characterization of ion beam sputtered deposited W/Si multilayers by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity technique

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dhawan, Rajnish, E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, Sanjay

    2016-05-23

    W/Si multilayers four samples have been deposited on silicon substrate using ion beam sputtering system. Thickness of tungsten (W) varies from around 10 Å to 40 Å while the silicon (Si) thickness remains constant at around 30 Å in multilayers [W-Si]{sub x4}. The samples have been characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and X-ray reflectivity technique (XRR). GIXRD study shows the crystalline behaviour of W/Si multilayer by varying W thickness and it is found that above 20 Å the W film transform from amorphous to crystalline phase and X-ray reflectivity data shows that the roughnesses of W increases onmore » increasing the W thicknesses in W/Si multilayers.« less

  16. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S.-H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  17. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Tung, I C; Chang, S-H; Bhattacharya, A; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  18. A new high quality X-ray source for Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Philippe; Variola, Alessandro; Zomer, Fabian; Jaquet, Marie; Loulergue, Alexandre

    2009-09-01

    Compton based photon sources have generated much interest since the rapid advance in laser and accelerator technologies has allowed envisaging their utilisation for ultra-compact radiation sources. These should provide X-ray short pulses with a relatively high average flux. Moreover, the univocal dependence between the scattered photon energy and its angle gives the possibility of obtaining a quasi-monochromatic beam with a simple diaphragm system. For the most ambitious projects the expected performance takes into account a rate of 10-10 photons/s, with an angular divergence of few mrad, an X-ray energy cut-off of few tens of keV and a bandwidth ΔE/E˜1-10%. Even if the integrated rate cannot compete with synchrotron radiation sources, the cost and the compactness of these Compton based machines make them attractive for a wide spectrum of applications. We explore here the interest of these systems for Cultural Heritage preservation. To cite this article: P. Walter et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  19. Soft X-ray holographic grating beam splitter including a double frequency grating for interferometer pre-alignment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Tan, Xin; Liu, Zhengkun; Xu, Xiangdong; Hong, Yilin; Fu, Shaojun

    2008-09-15

    Grating beam splitters have been fabricated for soft X-ray Mach- Zehnder interferometer using holographic interference lithography. The grating beam splitter consists of two gratings, one works at X-ray laser wavelength of 13.9 nm with the spatial frequency of 1000 lines/mm as the operation grating, the other works at visible wavelength of 632.8 nm for pre-aligning the X-ray interferometer with the spatial frequency of 22 lines/mm as the pre-alignment grating. The two gratings lie vertically on the same substrate. The main feature of the beam splitter is the use of low-spatial- frequency beat grating of a holographic double frequency grating as the pre-alignment grating of the X-ray interferometer. The grating line parallelism between the two gratings can be judged by observing the diffraction patterns of the pre-alignment grating directly.

  20. Wavefront aberrations of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams.

    PubMed

    Liao, Keliang; Hong, Youli; Sheng, Weifan

    2014-10-01

    The effects of dynamical diffraction in x-ray diffractive optics with large numerical aperture render the wavefront aberrations difficult to describe using the aberration polynomials, yet knowledge of them plays an important role in a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from optical testing to adaptive optics. Although the diffraction theory of optical aberrations was established decades ago, its application in the area of x-ray dynamical diffraction theory (DDT) is still lacking. Here, we conduct a theoretical study on the aberration properties of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams. By treating the modulus of the complex envelope as the amplitude weight function in the orthogonalization procedure, we generalize the nonrecursive matrix method for the determination of orthonormal aberration polynomials, wherein Zernike DDT and Legendre DDT polynomials are proposed. As an example, we investigate the aberration evolution inside a tilted multilayer Laue lens. The corresponding Legendre DDT polynomials are obtained numerically, which represent balanced aberrations yielding minimum variance of the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical system. The balancing of classical aberrations and their standard deviations are discussed. We also present the Strehl ratio of the primary and secondary balanced aberrations.

  1. Characterization of linear accelerator X-ray source size using a laminated beam-spot camera.

    PubMed

    Yeboah, Collins

    2011-05-10

    A laminated beam-spot camera of length 20 cm and effective cross-sectional area 2.5 cm × 3 cm was designed and constructed for the measurement of X-ray beam-spot sizes on different models of Siemens accelerators. With the accelerator gantry at 180° and camera positioned on an accessory tray holder, an XV film placed in contact with the camera at the distal end of it detected those X-rays that were transmitted through the camera. The FWHM of the detected X-ray intensity profile in the gun-target (G-T) direction or the orthogonal A-B direction was used as a measure of the beam-spot size in that direction. Siemens Mevatron MXEs exhibited a beam-spot size of 1.7 ± 0.2 mm in both the in-plane and cross-plane directions for 6 MV photon beams. The beam-spot size observed for a Mevatron MDX-2 was larger by up to 1 mm, and also was different for the in-plane and cross-plane directions. For Siemens PRIMUS accelerators, the beam-spot size in the in-plane direction was found to fall in the range 2.0-2.2 ± 0.2 mm, whereas the beam-spot size in the cross-plane direction fell within 1.7-1.9 ± 0.2 mm for 6, 10, and 18 MV photon beams. Assessment of long-term stability of the beam-spot size shows the spot size remains fairly stable over time.

  2. X-ray tube thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadella, Naresh; Khounsary, Ali M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the various stationary anode X-ray tube designs and the thermal management challenges of the anode target that limit the intensity of the generated X-ray beams. Several options to further increase X-ray beam intensity are discussed.

  3. X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging based on X-ray distribution model and adaptively split Bregman method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Liang, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) has become a promising imaging technology for biological application based on phosphor nanoparticles. There are mainly three kinds of XLCT imaging systems: pencil beam XLCT, narrow beam XLCT and cone beam XLCT. Narrow beam XLCT can be regarded as a balance between the pencil beam mode and the cone-beam mode in terms of imaging efficiency and image quality. The collimated X-ray beams are assumed to be parallel ones in the traditional narrow beam XLCT. However, we observe that the cone beam X-rays are collimated into X-ray beams with fan-shaped broadening instead of parallel ones in our prototype narrow beam XLCT. Hence we incorporate the distribution of the X-ray beams in the physical model and collected the optical data from only two perpendicular directions to further speed up the scanning time. Meanwhile we propose a depth related adaptive regularized split Bregman (DARSB) method in reconstruction. The simulation experiments show that the proposed physical model and method can achieve better results in the location error, dice coefficient, mean square error and the intensity error than the traditional split Bregman method and validate the feasibility of method. The phantom experiment can obtain the location error less than 1.1 mm and validate that the incorporation of fan-shaped X-ray beams in our model can achieve better results than the parallel X-rays. PMID:26203388

  4. New beamline optics of the x-ray undulator BW1 at DORIS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hahn, U.; Frahm, R.; Guertler, P.

    1996-12-31

    The X-ray undulator BW1 at the storage ring DORIS is a high brightness source for the spectral range from 2 to 20 keV. The undulator beam is used by three experiments with different distances to the source. The new optical elements allow the adaptation of the focal lengths to the needs of the experimental set-ups. The optical concept consists of a premirror with different optical surfaces, a double crystal monochromator and a focusing second mirror. Sagittal focusing is achieved either by using the cylindrical part of the premirror or by a bend crystal for a monochromatic beam, meridional focusing ismore » done with a pneumatic driven mirror bender for the second mirror.« less

  5. Diffraction based Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry at a hard x-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Gorobtsov, O. Yu.; Mukharamova, N.; Lazarev, S.; ...

    2018-02-02

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) provide extremely bright and highly spatially coherent x-ray radiation with femtosecond pulse duration. Currently, they are widely used in biology and material science. Knowledge of the XFEL statistical properties during an experiment may be vitally important for the accurate interpretation of the results. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) interferometry performed in diffraction mode at an XFEL source. It allowed us to determine the XFEL statistical properties directly from the Bragg peaks originating from colloidal crystals. This approach is different from the traditional one when HBT interferometry is performed inmore » the direct beam without a sample. Our analysis has demonstrated nearly full (80%) global spatial coherence of the XFEL pulses and an average pulse duration on the order of ten femtoseconds for the monochromatized beam, which is significantly shorter than expected from the electron bunch measurements.« less

  6. Diffraction based Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry at a hard x-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gorobtsov, O. Yu.; Mukharamova, N.; Lazarev, S.

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) provide extremely bright and highly spatially coherent x-ray radiation with femtosecond pulse duration. Currently, they are widely used in biology and material science. Knowledge of the XFEL statistical properties during an experiment may be vitally important for the accurate interpretation of the results. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) interferometry performed in diffraction mode at an XFEL source. It allowed us to determine the XFEL statistical properties directly from the Bragg peaks originating from colloidal crystals. This approach is different from the traditional one when HBT interferometry is performed inmore » the direct beam without a sample. Our analysis has demonstrated nearly full (80%) global spatial coherence of the XFEL pulses and an average pulse duration on the order of ten femtoseconds for the monochromatized beam, which is significantly shorter than expected from the electron bunch measurements.« less

  7. Measurement and simulation for a complementary imaging with the neutron and X-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kaoru Y.; Sato, Hirotaka; Kamiyama, Takashi; Shinohara, Takenao

    2017-09-01

    By using a composite source system, we measured radiographs of the thermal neutron and keV X-ray in the 45-MeV electron linear accelerator facility at Hokkaido University. The source system provides the alternative beam of neutron and X-ray by switching the production target onto the electron beam axis. In the measurement to demonstrate a complementary imaging, the detector based on a vacuum-tube type neutron color image intensifier was applied to the both beams for dual-purpose. On the other hand, for reducing background in a neutron transmission spectrum, test measurements using a gadolinium-type neutron grid were performed with a cold neutron source at Hokkaido University. In addition, the simulations of the neutron and X-ray transmissions for various substances were performed using the PHITS code. A data analysis procedure for estimating the substance of sample was investigated through the simulations.

  8. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  9. X-Ray Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-31

    Reflection in Relativistic Electron Beam Channel Radiation Systems, IEEE Trans. on Plasma Science 16(5), 548 (1988). 3. M. Strauss, P. Amendt, N...Reduced Radiation Losses in a Channeled-Beam X-Ray Laser by Bragg Reflection Coupling, Phys. Rev. A 39(11), 5791 (1989). 6. M. Strauss and N. Rostoker... Radiation Guiding in Channeling Beam X-Ray Laser by Bragg Reflection Coupling, Phys. Rev. A 40(12), 7097 (1989). 91-00870111 llllltl

  10. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  11. Simulations of Beam Optics and Bremsstrahlung for High Intensity and Brightness Channeling Radiation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hyun, J.; Piot, P.; Sen, T.

    2018-04-12

    This paper presents X-ray spectra of channeling radiation expected at the FAST (Fermi Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. Our purpose is to produce high brightness quasi-monochromatic X-rays in an energy range from 40 keV to 110 keV. We will use a diamond crystal and low emittance electrons with an energy of around 43 MeV. The quality of emitted X-rays depends on parameters of the electron beam at the crystal. We present simulations of the beam optics for high brightness and high yield operations for a range of bunch charges. We estimate the X-ray spectra including bremsstrahlung background. Wemore » discuss how the electron beam distributions after the diamond crystal are affected by channeling. We discuss an X-ray detector system to avoid pile-up effects during high charge operations.« less

  12. High-pressure pair distribution function (PDF) measurement using high-energy focused x-ray beam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hong, Xinguo, E-mail: xhong@bnl.gov; Weidner, Donald J.; Ehm, Lars

    In this paper, we report recent development of the high-pressure pair distribution function (HP-PDF) measurement technique using a focused high-energy X-ray beam coupled with a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The focusing optics consist of a sagittally bent Laue monochromator and Kirkpatrick-Baez (K–B) mirrors. This combination provides a clean high-energy X-ray beam suitable for HP-PDF research. Demonstration of the HP-PDF technique for nanocrystalline platinum under quasi-hydrostatic condition above 30 GPa is presented.

  13. Framework for three-dimensional coherent diffraction imaging by focused beam x-ray Bragg ptychography.

    PubMed

    Hruszkewycz, Stephan O; Holt, Martin V; Tripathi, Ash; Maser, Jörg; Fuoss, Paul H

    2011-06-15

    We present the framework for convergent beam Bragg ptychography, and, using simulations, we demonstrate that nanocrystals can be ptychographically reconstructed from highly convergent x-ray Bragg diffraction. The ptychographic iterative engine is extended to three dimensions and shown to successfully reconstruct a simulated nanocrystal using overlapping raster scans with a defocused curved beam, the diameter of which matches the crystal size. This object reconstruction strategy can serve as the basis for coherent diffraction imaging experiments at coherent scanning nanoprobe x-ray sources.

  14. BioCARS: a synchrotron resource for time-resolved X-ray science

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Graber, T.; Anderson, S.; Brewer, H.

    2011-08-16

    BioCARS, a NIH-supported national user facility for macromolecular time-resolved X-ray crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), has recently completed commissioning of an upgraded undulator-based beamline optimized for single-shot laser-pump X-ray-probe measurements with time resolution as short as 100 ps. The source consists of two in-line undulators with periods of 23 and 27 mm that together provide high-flux pink-beam capability at 12 keV as well as first-harmonic coverage from 6.8 to 19 keV. A high-heat-load chopper reduces the average power load on downstream components, thereby preserving the surface figure of a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system capable of focusing the X-ray beammore » to a spot size of 90 {micro}m horizontal by 20 {micro}m vertical. A high-speed chopper isolates single X-ray pulses at 1 kHz in both hybrid and 24-bunch modes of the APS storage ring. In hybrid mode each isolated X-ray pulse delivers up to {approx}4 x 10{sup 10} photons to the sample, thereby achieving a time-averaged flux approaching that of fourth-generation X-FEL sources. A new high-power picosecond laser system delivers pulses tunable over the wavelength range 450-2000 nm. These pulses are synchronized to the storage-ring RF clock with long-term stability better than 10 ps RMS. Monochromatic experimental capability with Biosafety Level 3 certification has been retained.« less

  15. High-speed, two-dimensional synchrotron white-beam x-ray radiography of spray breakup and atomization

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Radke, Christopher D.; Reuter, Benjamin J.

    High-speed, two-dimensional synchrotron x-ray radiography and phase-contrast imaging are demonstrated in propulsion sprays. Measurements are performed at the 7-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source user facility at Argonne National Laboratory using a recently developed broadband x-ray white beam. This novel enhancement allows for high speed, high fidelity x-ray imaging for the community at large. Quantitative path-integrated liquid distributions and spatio-temporal dynamics of the sprays were imaged with a LuAG:Ce scintillator optically coupled to a high-speed CMOS camera. Images are collected with a microscope objective at frame rates of 20 kHz and with a macro lens at 120 kHz, achievingmore » spatial resolutions of 12 μm and 65 μm, respectively. Imaging with and without potassium iodide (KI) as a contrast-enhancing agent is compared, and the effects of broadband attenuation and spatial beam characteristics are determined through modeling and experimental calibration. In addition, phase contrast is used to differentiate liquid streams with varying concentrations of KI. The experimental approach is applied to different spray conditions, including quantitative measurements of mass distribution during primary atomization and qualitative visualization of turbulent binary fluid mixing. High-speed, two-dimensional synchrotron white-beam x-ray radiography of spray breakup and atomization. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312567827_High-speed_two-dimensional_synchrotron_white-beam_x-ray_radiography_of_spray_breakup_and_atomization [accessed Aug 31, 2017].« less

  16. The monochromatic imaging mode of a RITA-type neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahl, C. R. H.; Andersen, P.; Klausen, S. N.; Lefmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    The imaging monochromatic mode of a neutron spectrometer with a multi-bladed RITA analyser system is so far unexplored. We present analytical calculations that define the mode. It is shown that the mode can be realised for PG (0 0 2) analyser crystals, from incident energies of about 3.2 meV and up, allowing the important cases of 3.7, 5.0 and 13.7 meV. Due to beam divergence, the neutron rays from neighbouring analyser blades are found to overlap slightly. Hence, the optimal use of the monochromatic imaging mode would be found by employing an adjustable radial collimator to limit the spread of the ray from each analyser blade.

  17. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; Skinner, Charles H.; Rosser, Roy

    1993-01-01

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  18. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  19. Determination of electron energy, spectral width, and beam divergence at the exit window for clinical megavoltage x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Sawkey, D L; Faddegon, B A

    2009-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray beams typically take parameters of the electron beam in the accelerating waveguide to be free parameters. In this paper, a methodology is proposed and implemented to determine the energy, spectral width, and beam divergence of the electron source. All treatment head components were removed from the beam path, leaving only the exit window. With the x-ray target and flattener out of the beam, uncertainties in physical characteristics and relative position of the target and flattening filter, and in spot size, did not contribute to uncertainty in the energy. Beam current was lowered to reduce recombination effects. The measured dose distributions were compared with Monte Carlo simulation of the electron beam through the treatment head to extract the electron source characteristics. For the nominal 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams, the energies were 6.51 +/- 0.15 and 13.9 +/- 0.2 MeV, respectively, with the uncertainties resulting from uncertainties in the detector position in the measurement and in the stopping power in the simulations. Gaussian spectral distributions were used, with full widths at half maximum ranging from 20 +/- 4% at 6 MV to 13 +/- 4% at 18 MV required to match the fall-off portion of the percent-depth ionization curve. Profiles at the depth of maximum dose from simulations that used the manufacturer-specified exit window geometry and no beam divergence were 2-3 cm narrower than measured profiles. Two simulation configurations yielding the measured profile width were the manufacturer-specified exit window thickness with electron source divergences of 3.3 degrees at 6 MV and 1.8 degrees at 18 MV and an exit window 40% thicker than the manufacturer's specification with no beam divergence. With the x-ray target in place (and no flattener), comparison of measured to simulated profiles sets upper limits on the electron source divergences of 0.2 degrees at 6 MV and 0.1 degrees at 18 MV. A method of determining source

  20. White Beam Slits and Pink Beam Slits for the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Powers, T.

    2007-01-19

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a cleanmore » cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam.The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits' accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.« less

  1. White beam slits and pink beam slits for the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Maser, J.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a cleanmore » cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam. The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.« less

  2. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; ...

    2016-01-05

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-raymore » and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Finally, additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.« less

  3. Nondestructive X-ray diffraction measurement of warpage in silicon dies embedded in integrated circuit packages.

    PubMed

    Tanner, B K; Danilewsky, A N; Vijayaraghavan, R K; Cowley, A; McNally, P J

    2017-04-01

    Transmission X-ray diffraction imaging in both monochromatic and white beam section mode has been used to measure quantitatively the displacement and warpage stress in encapsulated silicon devices. The displacement dependence with position on the die was found to agree well with that predicted from a simple model of warpage stress. For uQFN microcontrollers, glued only at the corners, the measured misorientation contours are consistent with those predicted using finite element analysis. The absolute displacement, measured along a line through the die centre, was comparable to that reported independently by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and optical interferometry of similar samples. It is demonstrated that the precision is greater than the spread of values found in randomly selected batches of commercial devices, making the techniques viable for industrial inspection purposes.

  4. The Development of a Scanning Soft X-Ray Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rarback, Harvey Miles

    We have developed a scanning soft X-ray microscope, which can be used to image natural biological specimens at high resolution and with less damage than electron microscopy. The microscope focuses a monochromatic beam of synchrotron radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot with the aid of a high resolution Fresnel zone plate, specially fabricated for us at the IBM Watson Research Center. The specimen at one atmosphere is mechanically scanned through the spot and the transmitted radiation is efficiently detected with a flow proportional counter. A computer forms a realtime transmission image of the specimen which is displayed on a color monitor. Our first generation optics have produced images of natural wet specimens at a resolution of 300 nm.

  5. Synchrotron X-ray topographic study on nature of threading mixed dislocations in 4H–SiC crystals grown by PVT method

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Guo, Jianqiu; Yang, Yu; Wu, Fangzhen

    Synchrotron X-ray Topography is a powerful technique to study defects structures particularly dislocation configurations in single crystals. Complementing this technique with geometrical and contrast analysis can enhance the efficiency of quantitatively characterizing defects. In this study, the use of Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWBXT) to determine the line directions of threading dislocations in 4H–SiC axial slices (sample cut parallel to the growth axis from the boule) is demonstrated. This technique is based on the fact that the projected line directions of dislocations on different reflections are different. Another technique also discussed is the determination of the absolute Burgers vectorsmore » of threading mixed dislocations (TMDs) using Synchrotron Monochromatic Beam X-ray Topography (SMBXT). This technique utilizes the fact that the contrast from TMDs varies on SMBXT images as their Burgers vectors change. By comparing observed contrast with the contrast from threading dislocations provided by Ray Tracing Simulations, the Burgers vectors can be determined. Thereafter the distribution of TMDs with different Burgers vectors across the wafer is mapped and investigated.« less

  6. Nanosecond time resolved x-ray diagnostics of relativistic electron beam initiated events

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kuswa, Glenn W.; Chang, James

    The dynamic behavior of a test sample during aid shortly after it has teen irradiated by an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) is of great interest to the study of team energy deposition. Since the sample densities are far beyond the cutoff in the optical region, flash x-radiography techniques have been developed to diagnose the evolution of the samples. The conventional approach of analyzing the dynamic behavior of solid densities utilizes one or more short x-ray bursts to record images on photographic emulsion. This technique is not useful in the presence of the intense x-rays from the REB interacting withmore » the sample. We report two techniques for isolating the film package from the REB x-ray pulse.« less

  7. Compact X-ray sources: X-rays from self-reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangles, Stuart P. D.

    2012-05-01

    Laser-based particle acceleration offers a way to reduce the size of hard-X-ray sources. Scientists have now developed a simple scheme that produces a bright flash of hard X-rays by using a single laser pulse both to generate and to scatter an electron beam.

  8. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A [Livermore, CA

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  9. Simulations of Beam Optics and Bremsstrahlung for High Intensity and Brightness Channeling Radiation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hyun, J.; Piot, P.; Sen, T.

    This paper presents X-ray spectra of channeling radiation expected at the FAST (Fermi Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. Our purpose is to produce high brightness quasi-monochromatic X-rays in an energy range from 40 keV to 110 keV. We will use a diamond crystal and low emittance electrons with an energy of around 43 MeV. The quality of emitted X-rays depends on parameters of the electron beam at the crystal. We present simulations of the beam optics for high brightness and high yield operations for a range of bunch charges. We estimate the X-ray spectra including bremsstrahlung background. Wemore » discuss how the electron beam distributions after the diamond crystal are affected by channeling. Here, we discuss an X-ray detector system to avoid pile-up effects during high charge operations.« less

  10. Simulations of Beam Optics and Bremsstrahlung for High Intensity and Brightness Channeling Radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Hyun, J.; Piot, P.; Sen, T.

    2018-06-14

    This paper presents X-ray spectra of channeling radiation expected at the FAST (Fermi Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. Our purpose is to produce high brightness quasi-monochromatic X-rays in an energy range from 40 keV to 110 keV. We will use a diamond crystal and low emittance electrons with an energy of around 43 MeV. The quality of emitted X-rays depends on parameters of the electron beam at the crystal. We present simulations of the beam optics for high brightness and high yield operations for a range of bunch charges. We estimate the X-ray spectra including bremsstrahlung background. Wemore » discuss how the electron beam distributions after the diamond crystal are affected by channeling. Here, we discuss an X-ray detector system to avoid pile-up effects during high charge operations.« less

  11. Mapping of electrical potential distribution with charged particle beams. [using an X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Potentials were measured using a beam of soft X-rays in air at 2 x 10 to the -5 power Torr. Ions were detected by a continuous-dynode electron multiplier after they passed through a retarding field. Ultimate resolution depends upon the diameter of the X-ray beam which was 3 mm. When the fields in the region of interest were such to disperse the ions, only a small fraction were detected and the method of measurement was not very reliable. Yet reasonable data could be collected if the ions traveled in parallel paths toward the detector. Development should concentrate on increasing the aperture of the detector from the pinhole which was used to something measured in centimeters. Also increasing the strength of the source would provide a stronger signal and more reliable data. Measurements were made at an estimated ion current to 10 to the -15 power A from a 10 cm length of the X-ray beam, this current being several orders of magnitude below what would have a perturbing effect on the region to be measured. Consequently, the source strength can be increased and prospects for this method of measurement are good.

  12. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zdora, Marie-Christine, E-mail: marie-christine.zdora@diamond.ac.uk; Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE; Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT

    2015-09-21

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by specklemore » tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.« less

  13. Electron intensity modulation for mixed-beam radiation therapy with an x-ray multi-leaf collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Rebecca

    The current standard treatment for head and neck cancer at our institution uses intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMRT), which improves target coverage and sparing of critical structures by delivering complex fluence patterns from a variety of beam directions to conform dose distributions to the shape of the target volume. The standard treatment for breast patients is field-in-field forward-planned IMRT, with initial tangential fields and additional reduced-weight tangents with blocking to minimize hot spots. For these treatment sites, the addition of electrons has the potential of improving target coverage and sparing of critical structures due to rapid dose falloff with depth and reduced exit dose. In this work, the use of mixed-beam therapy (MBT), i.e., combined intensity-modulated electron and x-ray beams using the x-ray multi-leaf collimator (MLC), was explored. The hypothesis of this study was that addition of intensity-modulated electron beams to existing clinical IMRT plans would produce MBT plans that were superior to the original IMRT plans for at least 50% of selected head and neck and 50% of breast cases. Dose calculations for electron beams collimated by the MLC were performed with Monte Carlo methods. An automation system was created to facilitate communication between the dose calculation engine and the treatment planning system. Energy and intensity modulation of the electron beams was accomplished by dividing the electron beams into 2x2-cm2 beamlets, which were then beam-weight optimized along with intensity-modulated x-ray beams. Treatment plans were optimized to obtain equivalent target dose coverage, and then compared with the original treatment plans. MBT treatment plans were evaluated by participating physicians with respect to target coverage, normal structure dose, and overall plan quality in comparison with original clinical plans. The physician evaluations did not support the hypothesis for either site, with MBT selected as superior in 1

  14. On the stability of the zinc x-ray laser beam quality using a half cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prag, A. R.; Mocek, T.; Kozlova, M.; Rus, B.

    2002-11-01

    At the Prague Asterix Laser System Center (PALS) the Asterix laser delivering up to 700 J in 0.5 ns is used as a pump source for x-ray laser experiments and applications. The prepulse technique was applied which is known to improve the neon-like x-ray laser at the J = 0 - 1 transition dramatically. Since Zn slab targets were used the output wavelength was 21.2 nm. A prepulse having up to 20 J precedes the main pulse by 10 ns. The main beam and the prepulse beam are focussed by two different optical systems separately and their foci are superimposed at the target surface. By implementing a half-cavity for double-pass amplification using a Mo/Si multilayer mirror - which can be used for 100 shots - the x-ray laser output was more than 10 times stronger than at the single pass in a 3 cm long plasma. Double-pass amplification was observed to be most efficient when the pump pulse was at least 150 ps longer than the round trip time (approximately 260 ps) in the half-cavity. Under this fundamental condition the x-ray laser reached saturation in the double-pass regime containing approx4mJ energy which was proved to be enough for applications. In this contribution, the x-ray laser features like divergence in two dimensions, the beam quality (symmetry), and the pointing angle are investigated over 110 shots. To characterize the stability of the x-ray laser the shot distribution, the mean value and the standard deviation for these parameters are evaluated. For 18 shots of a one-day-series these values are given, and a statistical analysis carrying out a chi-squared test characterize the Zn x-ray laser as a robust tool suitable for future applications.

  15. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  16. Detector, collimator and real-time reconstructor for a new scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) prototype.

    PubMed

    Speidel, Michael A; Tomkowiak, Michael T; Raval, Amish N; Dunkerley, David A P; Slagowski, Jordan M; Kahn, Paul; Ku, Jamie; Funk, Tobias

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system for low dose cardiac imaging. The use of a narrow scanned x-ray beam in SBDX reduces detected x-ray scatter and improves dose efficiency, however the tight beam collimation also limits the maximum achievable x-ray fluence. To increase the fluence available for imaging, we have constructed a new SBDX prototype with a wider x-ray beam, larger-area detector, and new real-time image reconstructor. Imaging is performed with a scanning source that generates 40,328 narrow overlapping projections from 71 × 71 focal spot positions for every 1/15 s scan period. A high speed 2-mm thick CdTe photon counting detector was constructed with 320×160 elements and 10.6 cm × 5.3 cm area (full readout every 1.28 μs), providing an 86% increase in area over the previous SBDX prototype. A matching multihole collimator was fabricated from layers of tungsten, brass, and lead, and a multi-GPU reconstructor was assembled to reconstruct the stream of captured detector images into full field-of-view images in real time. Thirty-two tomosynthetic planes spaced by 5 mm plus a multiplane composite image are produced for each scan frame. Noise equivalent quanta on the new SBDX prototype measured 63%-71% higher than the previous prototype. X-ray scatter fraction was 3.9-7.8% when imaging 23.3-32.6 cm acrylic phantoms, versus 2.3-4.2% with the previous prototype. Coronary angiographic imaging at 15 frame/s was successfully performed on the new SBDX prototype, with live display of either a multiplane composite or single plane image.

  17. A versatile indirect detector design for hard X-ray microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douissard, P.-A.; Cecilia, A.; Rochet, X.; Chapel, X.; Martin, T.; van de Kamp, T.; Helfen, L.; Baumbach, T.; Luquot, L.; Xiao, X.; Meinhardt, J.; Rack, A.

    2012-09-01

    Indirect X-ray detectors are of outstanding importance for high resolution imaging, especially at synchrotron light sources: while consisting mostly of components which are widely commercially available, they allow for a broad range of applications in terms of the X-ray energy employed, radiation dose to the detector, data acquisition rate and spatial resolving power. Frequently, an indirect detector consists of a thin-film single crystal scintillator and a high-resolution visible light microscope as well as a camera. In this article, a novel modular-based indirect design is introduced, which offers several advantages: it can be adapted for different cameras, i.e. different sensor sizes, and can be trimmed to work either with (quasi-)monochromatic illumination and the correspondingly lower absorbed dose or with intense white beam irradiation. In addition, it allows for a motorized quick exchange between different magnifications / spatial resolutions. Developed within the European project SCINTAX, it is now commercially available. The characteristics of the detector in its different configurations (i.e. for low dose or for high dose irradiation) as measured within the SCINTAX project will be outlined. Together with selected applications from materials research, non-destructive evaluation and life sciences they underline the potential of this design to make high resolution X-ray imaging widely available.

  18. Development of a Method to Assess the Precision Of the z-axis X-ray Beam Collimation in a CT Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Min

    2018-05-01

    Generally X-ray equipment specifies the beam collimator for the accuracy measurement as a quality control item, but the computed tomography (CT) scanner with high dose has no collimator accuracy measurement item. If the radiation dose is to be reduced, an important step is to check if the beam precisely collimates at the body part for CT scan. However, few ways are available to assess how precisely the X-ray beam is collimated. In this regard, this paper provides a way to assess the precision of z-axis X-ray beam collimation in a CT scanner. After the image plate cassette had been exposed to the X-ray beam, the exposed width was automatically detected by using a computer program developed by the research team to calculate the difference between the exposed width and the imaged width (at isocenter). The result for the precision of z-axis X-ray beam collimation showed that the exposed width was 3.8 mm and the overexposure was high at 304% when a narrow beam of a 1.25 mm imaged width was used. In this study, the precision of the beam collimation of the CT scanner, which is frequently used for medical services, was measured in a convenient way by using the image plate (IP) cassette.

  19. BEAM OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR AN X-RAY FEL OSCILLATOR AT THE LCLS-II

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Qin, Weilun; Huang, S.; Liu, K.X.

    2016-06-01

    The 4 GeV LCLS-II superconducting linac with high repetition beam rate enables the possibility to drive an X-Ray FEL oscillator at harmonic frequencies *. Compared to the regular LCLS-II machine setup, the oscillator mode requires a much longer bunch length with a relatively lower current. Also a flat longitudinal phase space distribution is critical to maintain the FEL gain since the X-ray cavity has extremely narrow bandwidth. In this paper, we study the longitudinal phase space optimization including shaping the initial beam from the injector and optimizing the bunch compressor and dechirper parameters. We obtain a bunch with a flatmore » energy chirp over 400 fs in the core part with current above 100 A. The optimization was based on LiTrack and Elegant simulations using LCLS-II beam parameters.« less

  20. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  1. Performance Test of the Next Generation X-Ray Beam Position Monitor System for The APS Upgrade

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yang, B.; Lee, S.; Westferro, F.

    The Advanced Photon Source is developing its next major upgrade (APS-U) based on the multi-bend achromat lattice. Improved beam stability is critical for the upgrade and will require keeping short-time beam angle change below 0.25 µrad and long-term angle drift below 0.6 µrad. A reliable white x-ray beam diagnostic system in the front end will be a key part of the planned beam stabilization system. This system includes an x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) based on x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from two specially designed GlidCop A-15 absorbers, a second XBPM using XRF photons from the Exit Mask, and two white beammore » intensity monitors using XRF from the photon shutter and Compton-scattered photons from the front end beryllium window or a retractable diamond film in windowless front ends. We present orbit stability data for the first XBPM used in the feedback control during user operations, as well as test data from the second XBPM and the intensity monitors. They demonstrate that the XBPM system meets APS-U beam stability requirements.« less

  2. 2D beam hardening correction for micro-CT of immersed hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Graham; Mills, David

    2016-10-01

    Beam hardening artefacts arise in tomography and microtomography with polychromatic sources. Typically, specimens appear to be less dense in the center of reconstructions because as the path length through the specimen increases, so the X-ray spectrum is shifted towards higher energies due to the preferential absorption of low energy photons. Various approaches have been taken to reduce or correct for these artefacts. Pre-filtering the X-ray beam with a thin metal sheet will reduce soft energy X-rays and thus narrow the spectrum. Correction curves can be applied to the projections prior to reconstruction which transform measured attenuation with polychromatic radiation to predicted attenuation with monochromatic radiation. These correction curves can be manually selected, iteratively derived from reconstructions (this generally works where density is assumed to be constant) or derived from a priori information about the X-ray spectrum and specimen composition. For hard tissue specimens, the latter approach works well if the composition is reasonably homogeneous. In the case of an immersed or embedded specimen (e.g., tooth or bone) the relative proportions of mineral and "organic" (including medium and plastic container) species varies considerably for different ray paths and simple beam hardening correction does not give accurate results. By performing an initial reconstruction, the total path length through the container can be determined. By modelling the X-ray properties of the specimen, a 2D correction transform can then be created such that the predicted monochromatic attenuation can be derived as a function of both the measured polychromatic attenuation and the container path length.

  3. Accelerated x-ray scatter projection imaging using multiple continuously moving pencil beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dydula, Christopher; Belev, George; Johns, Paul C.

    2017-03-01

    Coherent x-ray scatter varies with angle and photon energy in a manner dependent on the chemical composition of the scattering material, even for amorphous materials. Therefore, images generated from scattered photons can have much higher contrast than conventional projection radiographs. We are developing a scatter projection imaging prototype at the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility of the Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron in Saskatoon, Canada. The best images are obtained using step-and-shoot scanning with a single pencil beam and area detector to capture sequentially the scatter pattern for each primary beam location on the sample. Primary x-ray transmission is recorded simultaneously using photodiodes. The technological challenge is to acquire the scatter data in a reasonable time. Using multiple pencil beams producing partially-overlapping scatter patterns reduces acquisition time but increases complexity due to the need for a disentangling algorithm to extract the data. Continuous sample motion, rather than step-and-shoot, also reduces acquisition time at the expense of introducing motion blur. With a five-beam (33.2 keV, 3.5 mm2 beam area) continuous sample motion configuration, a rectangular array of 12 x 100 pixels with 1 mm sampling width has been acquired in 0.4 minutes (3000 pixels per minute). The acquisition speed is 38 times the speed for single beam step-and-shoot. A system model has been developed to calculate detected scatter patterns given the material composition of the object to be imaged. Our prototype development, image acquisition of a plastic phantom and modelling are described.

  4. Development of a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy deposition system for in situ surface x-ray studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Tassie K.; Cook, Seyoung; Benda, Erika; Hong, Hawoong; Marks, Laurence D.; Fong, Dillon D.

    2018-03-01

    A portable metalorganic gas delivery system designed and constructed to interface with an existing molecular beam epitaxy chamber at beamline 33-ID-E of the Advanced Photon Source is described. This system offers the ability to perform in situ X-ray measurements of complex oxide growth via hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. The performance of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system while delivering metalorganic source materials is described. The high-energy X-ray scattering capabilities of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system are demonstrated both on oxide films grown solely from the metalorganic source and ABO3 oxide perovskites containing elements from both the metalorganic source and a traditional effusion cell.

  5. Vertical beam size measurement in the CESR-TA e+e- storage ring using x-rays from synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. P.; Chatterjee, A.; Conolly, C.; Edwards, E.; Ehrlichman, M. P.; Fontes, E.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hopkins, W.; Lyndaker, A.; Peterson, D. P.; Rider, N. T.; Rubin, D. L.; Savino, J.; Seeley, R.; Shanks, J.; Flanagan, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of an X-ray beam size monitor (xBSM), a device measuring e+ and e- beam sizes in the CESR-TA storage ring using synchrotron radiation. The device can measure vertical beam sizes of 10-100μm on a turn-by-turn, bunch-by-bunch basis at e± beam energies of ~2GeV. At such beam energies the xBSM images X-rays of ɛ≈1-10keV (λ≈0.1-1nm) that emerge from a hard-bend magnet through a single- or multiple-slit (coded aperture) optical element onto an array of 32 InGaAs photodiodes with 50μm pitch. Beamlines and detectors are entirely in-vacuum, enabling single-shot beam size measurement down to below 0.1 mA (2.5×109 particles) per bunch and inter-bunch spacing of as little as 4 ns. At Eb=2.1GeV, systematic precision of ~1μm is achieved for a beam size of ~12μm; this is expected to scale as ∝1/σb and ∝1/Eb. Achieving this precision requires comprehensive alignment and calibration of the detector, optical elements, and X-ray beam. Data from the xBSM have been used to extract characteristics of beam oscillations on long and short timescales, and to make detailed studies of low-emittance tuning, intra-beam scattering, electron cloud effects, and multi-bunch instabilities.

  6. Impact of rare earth element added filters on the X-ray beam spectra: a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Eskandarlou, Amir; Jafari, Amir Abbas; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Faghihi, Reza; Shokri, Abbas; Pourolajal, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of added filters including conventional and rare earth materials for dental radiography tasks was investigated using a simulation approach. Current study focuses on the combination of a range of various filters to investigate the reduction of radiation absorbed dose and improving the quality of a radiography image. To simulate the X-ray beam spectrum, a MCNP5 code was applied. Relative intensity, beam quality, and mean energy were investigated for a typical dental radiography machine. The impact of different rare-earth materials with different thicknesses and tube voltages on the X-ray spectrum was investigated. For Aluminum as a conventional filter, the modeled X-ray spectra and HVL values were in a good agreement with those reported by IPEM. The results showed that for a 70 kVp voltage, with an increase of the thickness and atomic number of a given added filters, an increase of HVL values were observed. However, with the increase of the attenuator thickness, X-ray beam intensity decreases. For mean energy, different results were observed. It was also found that rare earth made filters reduce high energy X-ray radiation due to k-edge absorption. This leads to an ideal beam for intra-oral radiography tasks. However, as a disadvantage of rare earth added filters, the reduction of the tube output levels should also be considered.

  7. a High-Density Electron Beam and Quad-Scan Measurements at Pleiades Thomson X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. K.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S. G.; Tremaine, A. M.

    2007-09-01

    A recent development of the photo-cathode injector technology has greatly enhanced the beam quality necessary for the creation of high density/high brightness electron beam sources. In the Thomson backscattering x-ray experiment, there is an immense need for under 20 micron electron beam spot at the interaction point with a high-intensity laser in order to produce a large x-ray flux. This has been demonstrated successfully at PLEIADES in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. For this Thomson backscattering experiment, we employed an asymmetric triplet, high remanence permanent-magnet quads to produce smaller electron beams. Utilizing highly efficient optical transition radiation (OTR) beam spot imaging technique and varying electron focal spot sizes enabled a quadrupole scan at the interaction zone. Comparisons between Twiss parameters obtained upstream to those parameter values deduced from PMQ scan will be presented in this report.

  8. a High-Density Electron Beam and Quad-Scan Measurements at Pleiades Thomson X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. K.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S. G.; Tremaine, A. M.

    A recent development of the photo-cathode injector technology has greatly enhanced the beam quality necessary for the creation of high density/high brightness electron beam sources. In the Thomson backscattering x-ray experiment, there is an immense need for under 20 micron electron beam spot at the interaction point with a high-intensity laser in order to produce a large x-ray flux. This has been demonstrated successfully at PLEIADES in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. For this Thomson backscattering experiment, we employed an asymmetric triplet, high remanence permanent-magnet quads to produce smaller electron beams. Utilizing highly efficient optical transition radiation (OTR) beam spot imaging technique and varying electron focal spot sizes enabled a quadrupole scan at the interaction zone. Comparisons between Twiss parameters obtained upstream to those parameter values deduced from PMQ scan will be presented in this report.

  9. X-ray diffraction diagnostic design for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Maryum F.; House, Allen; Smith, R. F.; Ayers, Jay; Lamb, Zachary S.; Swift, David W.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the design considerations for Target Diffraction In-Situ (TARDIS), an x-ray diffraction diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility. A crystal sample is ramp-compressed to peak pressures between 10 and 30 Mbar and, during a pressure hold period, is probed with quasi-monochromatic x-rays emanating from a backlighter source foil. The crystal spectrography diffraction lines are recorded onto image plates. The crystal sample, filter, and image plates are packaged into one assembly, allowing for accurate and repeatable target to image plate registration. Unconverted laser light impinges upon the device, generating debris, the effects of which have been mitigated. Dimpled blast shields, high strength steel alloy, and high-z tungsten are used to shield and protect the image plates. A tapered opening was designed to provide adequate thickness of shielding materials without blocking the drive beams or x-ray source from reaching the crystal target. The high strength steel unit serves as a mount for the crystal target and x-ray source foil. A tungsten body contains the imaging components. Inside this sub-assembly, there are three image plates: a 160 degree field of view curved plate directly opposite the target opening and two flat plates for the top and bottom. A polycarbonate frame, coated with the appropriate filter material and embedded with registration features for image plate location, is inserted into the diagnostic body. The target assembly is metrologized and then the diagnostic assembly is attached.

  10. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  11. Development of X-ray CCD camera based X-ray micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Partha S.; Ray, N. K.; Pal, Manoj K.; Baribaddala, Ravi; Agrawal, Ashish; Kashyap, Y.; Sinha, A.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2017-02-01

    Availability of microfocus X-ray sources and high resolution X-ray area detectors has made it possible for high resolution microtomography studies to be performed outside the purview of synchrotron. In this paper, we present the work towards the use of an external shutter on a high resolution microtomography system using X-ray CCD camera as a detector. During micro computed tomography experiments, the X-ray source is continuously ON and owing to the readout mechanism of the CCD detector electronics, the detector registers photons reaching it during the read-out period too. This introduces a shadow like pattern in the image known as smear whose direction is defined by the vertical shift register. To resolve this issue, the developed system has been incorporated with a synchronized shutter just in front of the X-ray source. This is positioned in the X-ray beam path during the image readout period and out of the beam path during the image acquisition period. This technique has resulted in improved data quality and hence the same is reflected in the reconstructed images.

  12. Shielding requirements for constant-potential diagnostic x-ray beams determined by a Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Simpkin, D J

    1989-02-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation has been performed to determine the transmission of broad constant-potential x-ray beams through Pb, concrete, gypsum wallboard, steel and plate glass. The EGS4 code system was used with a simple broad-beam geometric model to generate exposure transmission curves for published 70, 100, 120 and 140-kVcp x-ray spectra. These curves are compared to measured three-phase generated x-ray transmission data in the literature and found to be reasonable. For calculation ease the data are fit to an equation previously shown to describe such curves quite well. These calculated transmission data are then used to create three-phase shielding tables for Pb and concrete, as well as other materials not available in Report No. 49 of the NCRP.

  13. Synchrotron radiation microbeam X-ray fluorescence analysis of zinc concentration in remineralized enamel in situ.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Tsunenori; Ishizaki, Hidetaka; Tanabe, Shuji; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2009-05-01

    Remineralization is an indispensable phenomenon during the natural healing process of enamel decay. The incorporation of zinc (Zn) into enamel crystal could accelerate this remineralization. The present study was designed to investigate the concentration and distribution of Zn in remineralized enamel after gum chewing. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory. Synchrotron radiation was monochromatized and X-rays were focused into a small beam spot. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) from the sample was detected with a silicon (Si) (lithium (Li)) detector. X-ray beam energy was tuned to detect Zn. The examined samples were small enamel fragments remineralized after chewing calcium phosphate-containing gum in situ. The incorporation of Zn atom into hydroxyapatite (OHAP), the main component of enamel, was measured using Zn K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) with fluorescence mode at the SPring-8. A high concentration of Zn was detected in a superficial area 10-microm deep of the sectioned enamel after gum chewing. This concentration increased over that in the intact enamel. The atomic distance between Zn and O in the enamel was calculated using the EXAFS data. The analyzed atomic distances between Zn and O in two sections were 0.237 and 0.240 nm. The present experiments suggest that Zn is effectively incorporated into remineralized enamel through the physiological processes of mineral deposition in the oral cavity through gum-chewing and that Zn substitution probably occurred at the calcium position in enamel hydroxyapatite.

  14. Soft X-ray radiation damage in EM-CCDs used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, D.; Soman, M.; Holland, A.; Keelan, J.; Hall, D.; Holland, K.; Colebrook, D.

    2018-02-01

    Advancement in synchrotron and free electron laser facilities means that X-ray beams with higher intensity than ever before are being created. The high brilliance of the X-ray beam, as well as the ability to use a range of X-ray energies, means that they can be used in a wide range of applications. One such application is Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). RIXS uses the intense and tuneable X-ray beams in order to investigate the electronic structure of materials. The photons are focused onto a sample material and the scattered X-ray beam is diffracted off a high resolution grating to disperse the X-ray energies onto a position sensitive detector. Whilst several factors affect the total system energy resolution, the performance of RIXS experiments can be limited by the spatial resolution of the detector used. Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EM-CCDs) at high gain in combination with centroiding of the photon charge cloud across several detector pixels can lead to sub-pixel spatial resolution of 2-3 μm. X-ray radiation can cause damage to CCDs through ionisation damage resulting in increases in dark current and/or a shift in flat band voltage. Understanding the effect of radiation damage on EM-CCDs is important in order to predict lifetime as well as the change in performance over time. Two CCD-97s were taken to PTB at BESSY II and irradiated with large doses of soft X-rays in order to probe the front and back surfaces of the device. The dark current was shown to decay over time with two different exponential components to it. This paper will discuss the use of EM-CCDs for readout of RIXS spectrometers, and limitations on spatial resolution, together with any limitations on instrument use which may arise from X-ray-induced radiation damage.

  15. Nanomodulated electron beams via electron diffraction and emittance exchange for coherent x-ray generation

    DOE PAGES

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.; Moncton, D. E.

    2018-01-19

    We present a new method for generation of relativistic electron beams with current modulation on the nanometer scale and below. The current modulation is produced by diffracting relativistic electrons in single crystal Si, accelerating the diffracted beam and imaging the crystal structure, then transferring the image into the temporal dimension via emittance exchange. The modulation period can be tuned by adjusting electron optics after diffraction. This tunable longitudinal modulation can have a period as short as a few angstroms, enabling production of coherent hard x-rays from a source based on inverse Compton scattering with total accelerator length of approximately tenmore » meters. Electron beam simulations from cathode emission through diffraction, acceleration, and image formation with variable magnification are presented along with estimates of the coherent x-ray output properties.« less

  16. Nanomodulated electron beams via electron diffraction and emittance exchange for coherent x-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.; Moncton, D. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new method for generation of relativistic electron beams with current modulation on the nanometer scale and below. The current modulation is produced by diffracting relativistic electrons in single crystal Si, accelerating the diffracted beam and imaging the crystal structure, then transferring the image into the temporal dimension via emittance exchange. The modulation period can be tuned by adjusting electron optics after diffraction. This tunable longitudinal modulation can have a period as short as a few angstroms, enabling production of coherent hard x-rays from a source based on inverse Compton scattering with total accelerator length of approximately ten meters. Electron beam simulations from cathode emission through diffraction, acceleration, and image formation with variable magnification are presented along with estimates of the coherent x-ray output properties.

  17. Nanomodulated electron beams via electron diffraction and emittance exchange for coherent x-ray generation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.; Moncton, D. E.

    We present a new method for generation of relativistic electron beams with current modulation on the nanometer scale and below. The current modulation is produced by diffracting relativistic electrons in single crystal Si, accelerating the diffracted beam and imaging the crystal structure, then transferring the image into the temporal dimension via emittance exchange. The modulation period can be tuned by adjusting electron optics after diffraction. This tunable longitudinal modulation can have a period as short as a few angstroms, enabling production of coherent hard x-rays from a source based on inverse Compton scattering with total accelerator length of approximately tenmore » meters. Electron beam simulations from cathode emission through diffraction, acceleration, and image formation with variable magnification are presented along with estimates of the coherent x-ray output properties.« less

  18. Development of a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy deposition system for in situ surface x-ray studies

    DOE PAGES

    Andersen, Tassie K.; Cook, Seyoung; Benda, Erika; ...

    2018-03-08

    A portable metalorganic gas delivery system designed and constructed to interface with an existing molecular beam epitaxy chamber at beamline 33-ID-E of the Advanced Photon Source is described. This system offers the ability to perform in situ X-ray measurements of complex oxide growth via hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. The performance of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system while delivering metalorganic source materials is described. In conclusion, the high-energy X-ray scattering capabilities of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system are demonstrated both on oxide films grown solely from the metalorganic source and ABO 3 oxide perovskites containing elements from both themore » metalorganic source and a traditional effusion cell.« less

  19. Development of a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy deposition system for in situ surface x-ray studies

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Andersen, Tassie K.; Cook, Seyoung; Benda, Erika

    A portable metalorganic gas delivery system designed and constructed to interface with an existing molecular beam epitaxy chamber at beamline 33-ID-E of the Advanced Photon Source is described. This system offers the ability to perform in situ X-ray measurements of complex oxide growth via hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. The performance of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system while delivering metalorganic source materials is described. In conclusion, the high-energy X-ray scattering capabilities of the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy system are demonstrated both on oxide films grown solely from the metalorganic source and ABO 3 oxide perovskites containing elements from both themore » metalorganic source and a traditional effusion cell.« less

  20. Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction: Applications for Laser-Irradiated Materials

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wark, Justin S.

    2009-09-10

    Over the past few years short pulse x-ray diffraction at the nanosecond and picosecond level has become an established technique in many high-power laser laboratories for interrogating the lattice response of laser-perturbed and shocked matter, and is now finding applications in diagnosing the state of crystalline materials subject to quasi-isentropic compression. We review some of the previous results obtained in this area, for example the direct observation of coherent phonons, the first direct confirmation of the alpha-epsilon transition in shocked iron, and recent measurements indicating that the strength of matter can be measured at shock pressures exceeding a Mbar. Themore » majority of sources used to date have been laser-plasma based, with some work being performed using 3{sup rd} generation synchrotron sources. However, the development of 4{sup th} generation x-ray free-electron lasers, such as LCLS, afford many new opportunities, with pulse lengths in the femtosecond regime. The extremely low divergence and monochromatic nature of the LCLS beam make it well suited to study compressed polycrystalline matter, especially samples with small grain sizes. At extremely short pulse lengths, such that the pulse is shorter than an x-ray extinction depth traversal time, the diffraction process itself becomes time-dependent, and in certain cases the full wave-field solution will be required, particularly if the matter itself is being rapidly perturbed, as will occur if the intense x-ray radiation is used to create warm dense matter, as in recent experiments on FLASH at DESY.« less

  1. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0).

  2. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    DOEpatents

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  3. T-REX: Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays Moving X-Ray Science into the ''Nuclear'' Applications Space with Thompson Scattered Photons

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Barty, C P; Hartemann, F V

    2004-09-21

    The scattering of laser photons from relativistic electrons (Thomson scattering) has been demonstrated to be a viable method for the production of ultrashort-duration pulses of tunable radiation in the 10-keV to 100-keV range. Photons in this range are capable of exciting or ionizing even the most tightly bound of atomic electrons. A wide variety of atomistic scale applications are possible. For example, Thomson x-ray sources have been constructed at LLNL (PLEIADES) and LBL as picosecond, stroboscopic probes of atomic-scale dynamics and at Vanderbilt University as element-specific tools for medical radiography and radiology. While these sources have demonstrated an attractive abilitymore » to simultaneously probe on an atomic spatial and temporal scale, they do not necessarily exploit the full potential of the Thomson scattering process to produce high-brightness, high-energy photons. In this white paper, we suggest that the peak brightness of Thomson sources can scale as fast as the 4th power of electron beam energy and that production via Thomson scattering of quasi-monochromatic, tunable radiation in the ''nuclear-range'' between 100-keV and several MeV is potentially a much more attractive application space for this process. Traditional sources in this regime are inherently ultra-broadband and decline rapidly in brightness as a function of photon energy. The output from dedicated, national-laboratory-scale, synchrotron facilities, e.g. APS, SPring8, ESRF etc., declines by more than 10 orders from 100 keV to 1 MeV. At 1 MeV, we conservatively estimate that Thomson-source, peak brightness can exceed that of APS (the best machine in the DOE complex) by more than 15 orders of magnitude. In much the same way that tunable lasers revolutionized atomic spectroscopy, this ''Peta-step'' advance in tunable, narrow-bandwidth, capability should enable entirely new fields of study and new, programmatically-interesting, applications such as: micrometer

  4. Design and performance of coded aperture optical elements for the CESR-TA x-ray beam size monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. P.; Chatterjee, A.; Conolly, C.; Edwards, E.; Ehrlichman, M. P.; Flanagan, J. W.; Fontes, E.; Heltsley, B. K.; Lyndaker, A.; Peterson, D. P.; Rider, N. T.; Rubin, D. L.; Seeley, R.; Shanks, J.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the design and performance of optical elements for an x-ray beam size monitor (xBSM), a device measuring e+ and e- beam sizes in the CESR-TA storage ring. The device can measure vertical beam sizes of 10 - 100 μm on a turn-by-turn, bunch-by-bunch basis at e± beam energies of 2 - 5 GeV. x-rays produced by a hard-bend magnet pass through a single- or multiple-slit (coded aperture) optical element onto a detector. The coded aperture slit pattern and thickness of masking material forming that pattern can both be tuned for optimal resolving power. We describe several such optical elements and show how well predictions of simple models track measured performances.

  5. Generation of High Brightness X-rays with the PLEIADES Thomson X-ray Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J

    2003-05-28

    The use of short laser pulses to generate high peak intensity, ultra-short x-ray pulses enables exciting new experimental capabilities, such as femtosecond pump-probe experiments used to temporally resolve material structural dynamics on atomic time scales. PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron InterAction for Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) is a next generation Thomson scattering x-ray source being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Ultra-fast picosecond x-rays (10-200 keV) are generated by colliding an energetic electron beam (20-100 MeV) with a high intensity, sub-ps, 800 nm laser pulse. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm2/mrad2. Simulationsmore » of the electron beam production, transport, and final focus are presented. Electron beam measurements, including emittance and final focus spot size are also presented and compared to simulation results. Measurements of x-ray production are also reported and compared to theoretical calculations.« less

  6. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  7. Vacancy cascades in small molecules following x-ray inner shell photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D.; Dunford, R. W.; Southworth, S. H.; Kanter, E. P.; Doumy, G.; Gao, Y.; Ho, P. J.; Picon, A.

    2014-05-01

    We are investigating molecular effects in vacancy cascades of small molecules containing heavy atoms - IBr, Br2 and CH2BrI - following K-shell ionization. In addition to fundamental interest in the physics of such decay processes, there are practical applications such as medical treatments that use energetic fragmentation of iodinated compounds with high energy x-rays to selectively treat tumorous cells. Other biological applications are also promising. We utilize the tunable monochromatic x-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source to trigger K-shell photoionization of Br and I, and measure charge distributions and the kinetic energies released to the fragment ions. A newly designed detection device allows us to do multi-fold coincidence measurements involving momentum imaging of all the ion fragments with very high detection efficiency in coincidence with x-ray fluorescence detection. By comparing the molecular fragmentation probabilities and the kinetic energies released in Br2, IBr and CH2BrI we aim to gain understanding of the fragmentation mechanism as a function of the bond distance between I and Br. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Dept of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Performance of the PRAXyS X-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakiri, W. B.; Black, J. K.; Cole, R.; Enoto, T.; Hayato, A.; Hill, J. E.; Jahoda, Keith M.; Kaaret, P.; Kitaguchi, T.; Kubota, M.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) polarimeter for the Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) Small Explorer was evaluated using polarized and unpolarized X-ray sources. The PRAXyS mission will enable exploration of the universe through X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV energy band. We carried out performance tests of the polarimeter at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (BNL-NSLS) and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The polarimeter was tested with linearly polarized, monochromatic X-rays at 11 different energies between 2.5 and 8.0 keV. At maximum sensitivity, the measured modulation factors at 2.7, 4.5 and 8.0 keV are 27%, 43% and 59%, respectively and the measured angle of polarization is consistent with the expected value at all energies. Measurements with a broadband, unpolarized X-ray source placed a limit of less than 1% on false polarization in the PRAXyS polarimeter.

  9. Performance of the PRAXyS X-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakiri, W. B.; Black, J. K.; Cole, R.; Enoto, T.; Hayato, A.; Hill, J. E.; Jahoda, K.; Kaaret, P.; Kitaguchi, T.; Kubota, M.; Marlowe, H.; McCurdy, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tamagawa, T.

    2016-12-01

    The performance of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) polarimeter for the Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) Small Explorer was evaluated using polarized and unpolarized X-ray sources. The PRAXyS mission will enable exploration of the universe through X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV energy band. We carried out performance tests of the polarimeter at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (BNL-NSLS) and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The polarimeter was tested with linearly polarized, monochromatic X-rays at 11 different energies between 2.5 and 8.0 keV. At maximum sensitivity, the measured modulation factors at 2.7, 4.5 and 8.0 keV are 27%, 43% and 59%, respectively and the measured angle of polarization is consistent with the expected value at all energies. Measurements with a broadband, unpolarized X-ray source placed a limit of less than 1% on false polarization in the PRAXyS polarimeter.

  10. Measured and calculated K-fluorescence effects on the MTF of an amorphous-selenium based CCD x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David M; Belev, George; Kasap, Safa; Yaffe, Martin J

    2012-02-01

    Theoretical reasoning suggests that direct conversion digital x-ray detectors based upon photoconductive amorphous-selenium (a-Se) could attain very high values of the MTF (modulation transfer function) at spatial frequencies well beyond 20 cycles mm(-1). One of the fundamental factors affecting resolution loss, particularly at x-ray energies just above the K-edge of selenium (12.66 keV), is the K-fluorescence reabsorption mechanism, wherein energy can be deposited in the detector at locations laterally displaced from the initial x-ray interaction site. This paper compares measured MTF changes above and below the Se K-edge of a CCD based a-Se x-ray detector with theoretical expectations. A prototype 25 μm sampling pitch (Nyquist frequency = 20 cycles mm(-1), 200 μm thick a-Se layer based x-ray detector, utilizing a specialized CCD readout device (200 × 400 area array), was used to make edge images with monochromatic x-rays above and below the K-edge of Se. A vacuum double crystal monochromator, exposed to polychromatic x-rays from a synchrotron, formed the monochromatic x-ray source. The monochromaticity of the x-rays was 99% or better. The presampling MTF was determined using the slanted edge method. The theory modeling the MTF performance of the detector includes the basic x-ray interaction physics in the a-Se layer as well as effects related to the operation of the CCD and charge trapping at a blocking layer present at the CCD/a-Se interface. The MTF performance of the prototype a-Se CCD was reduced from the theoretical value prescribed by the basic Se x-ray interaction physics, principally by the presence of a blocking layer. Nevertheless, the K-fluorescence reduction in the MTF was observed, approximately as predicted by theory. For the CCD prototype detector, at five cycles mm(-1), there was a 14% reduction of the MTF, from a value of 0.7 below the K-edge of Se, to 0.6 just above the K-edge. The MTF of an a-Se x-ray detector has been measured using

  11. Fiber-optic detector for real time dosimetry of a micro-planar x-ray beam

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Stanton, Ian N.; Hadsell, Mike; Ger, Rachel; Langloss, Brian W.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha X.; Therien, Michael J.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Here, the authors describe a dosimetry measurement technique for microbeam radiation therapy using a nanoparticle-terminated fiber-optic dosimeter (nano-FOD). Methods: The nano-FOD was placed in the center of a 2 cm diameter mouse phantom to measure the deep tissue dose and lateral beam profile of a planar x-ray microbeam. Results: The continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak measured with the nano-FOD was 1.91 ± 0.06 cGy s−1, a value 2.7% higher than that determined via radiochromic film measurements (1.86 ± 0.15 cGy s−1). The nano-FOD-determined lateral beam full-width half max value of 420 μm exceeded that measured using radiochromic film (320 μm). Due to the 8° angle of the collimated microbeam and resulting volumetric effects within the scintillator, the profile measurements reported here are estimated to achieve a resolution of ∼0.1 mm; however, for a beam angle of 0°, the theoretical resolution would approach the thickness of the scintillator (∼0.01 mm). Conclusions: This work provides proof-of-concept data and demonstrates that the novel nano-FOD device can be used to perform real-time dosimetry in microbeam radiation therapy to measure the continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak as well as the lateral beam shape. PMID:25832087

  12. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, Donald [Ann Arbor, MI; He, Fei [Ann Arbor, MI; Lau, Yue-Ying [Potomac, MD

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  13. The effect of beam-driven return current instability on solar hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, D.; Mcquillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of electrostatic wave generation by a return current driven by a small area electron beam during solar hard X-ray bursts is discussed. The marginal stability method is used to solve numerically the electron and ion heating equations for a prescribed beam current evolution. When ion-acoustic waves are considered, the method appears satisfactory and, following an initial phase of Coulomb resistivity in which T sub e/T sub i rise, predicts a rapid heating of substantial plasma volumes by anomalous ohmic dissipation. This hot plasma emits so much thermal bremsstrahlung that, contrary to previous expectations, the unstable beam-plasma system actually emits more hard X-rays than does the beam in the purely collisional thick target regime relevant to larger injection areas. Inclusion of ion-cyclotron waves results in ion-acoustic wave onset at lower T sub e/T sub i and a marginal stability treatment yields unphysical results.

  14. The Imaging and Medical Beam Line at the Australian Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausermann, Daniel; Hall, Chris; Maksimenko, Anton; Campbell, Colin

    2010-07-01

    As a result of the enthusiastic support from the Australian biomedical, medical and clinical communities, the Australian Synchrotron is constructing a world-class facility for medical research, the `Imaging and Medical Beamline'. The IMBL began phased commissioning in late 2008 and is scheduled to commence the first clinical research programs with patients in 2011. It will provide unrivalled x-ray facilities for imaging and radiotherapy for a wide range of research applications in diseases, treatments and understanding of physiological processes. The main clinical research drivers are currently high resolution and sensitivity cardiac and breast imaging, cell tracking applied to regenerative and stem cell medicine and cancer therapies. The beam line has a maximum source to sample distance of 136 m and will deliver a 60 cm by 4 cm x-ray beam1—monochromatic and white—to a three storey satellite building fully equipped for pre-clinical and clinical research. Currently operating with a 1.4 Tesla multi-pole wiggler, it will upgrade to a 4.2 Tesla device which requires the ability to handle up to 21 kW of x-ray power at any point along the beam line. The applications envisaged for this facility include imaging thick objects encompassing materials, humans and animals. Imaging can be performed in the range 15-150 keV. Radiotherapy research typically requires energies between 30 and 120 keV, for both monochromatic and broad beam.

  15. The Imaging and Medical Beam Line at the Australian Synchrotron

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hausermann, Daniel; Hall, Chris; Maksimenko, Anton

    2010-07-23

    As a result of the enthusiastic support from the Australian biomedical, medical and clinical communities, the Australian Synchrotron is constructing a world-class facility for medical research, the 'Imaging and Medical Beamline'. The IMBL began phased commissioning in late 2008 and is scheduled to commence the first clinical research programs with patients in 2011. It will provide unrivalled x-ray facilities for imaging and radiotherapy for a wide range of research applications in diseases, treatments and understanding of physiological processes. The main clinical research drivers are currently high resolution and sensitivity cardiac and breast imaging, cell tracking applied to regenerative and stemmore » cell medicine and cancer therapies. The beam line has a maximum source to sample distance of 136 m and will deliver a 60 cm by 4 cm x-ray beam1 - monochromatic and white - to a three storey satellite building fully equipped for pre-clinical and clinical research. Currently operating with a 1.4 Tesla multi-pole wiggler, it will upgrade to a 4.2 Tesla device which requires the ability to handle up to 21 kW of x-ray power at any point along the beam line. The applications envisaged for this facility include imaging thick objects encompassing materials, humans and animals. Imaging can be performed in the range 15-150 keV. Radiotherapy research typically requires energies between 30 and 120 keV, for both monochromatic and broad beam.« less

  16. X-ray Interferometry with Transmissive Beam Combiners for Ultra-High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, G. K.; Krismanic, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interferometry provides one of the possible routes to ultra-high angular resolution for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Sub-micro-arc-second angular resolution, necessary to achieve objectives such as imaging the regions around the event horizon of a super-massive black hole at the center of an active galaxy, can be achieved if beams from parts of the incoming wavefront separated by 100s of meters can be stably and accurately brought together at small angles. One way of achieving this is by using grazing incidence mirrors. We here investigate an alternative approach in which the beams are recombined by optical elements working in transmission. It is shown that the use of diffractive elements is a particularly attractive option. We report experimental results from a simple 2-beam interferometer using a low-cost commercially available profiled film as the diffractive elements. A rotationally symmetric filled (or mostly filled) aperture variant of such an interferometer, equivalent to an X-ray axicon, is shown to offer a much wider bandpass than either a Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) or a PFL with a refractive lens in an achromatic pair. Simulations of an example system are presented.

  17. Observation of divergent-beam X-ray diffraction from a crystal of diamond using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A M; Collins, S P; Zekria, D; Liu, J; Golshan, M

    2004-03-01

    In 1947 Kathleen Lonsdale conducted a series of experiments on X-ray diffraction using a divergent beam external to a crystal sample. Unlike the Kossel technique, where divergent X-rays are excited by the presence of fluorescing atoms within the crystal, the use of an external divergent source made it possible to study non-fluorescing crystals. The resulting photographs not only illustrated the complexity of X-ray diffraction from crystals in a truly beautiful way, but also demonstrated unprecedented experimental precision. This long-forgotten work is repeated here using a synchrotron radiation source and, once again, considerable merit is found in Lonsdale's technique. The results of this experiment suggest that, through the use of modern 'third-generation' synchrotron sources, divergent-beam diffraction could soon enjoy a renaissance for high-precision lattice-parameter determination and the study of crystal perfection.

  18. Projection x-ray topography system at 1-BM x-ray optics test beamline at the advanced photon source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Liu, Zunping; Trakhtenberg, Emil

    2016-07-27

    Projection X-ray topography of single crystals is a classic technique for the evaluation of intrinsic crystal quality of large crystals. In this technique a crystal sample and an area detector (e.g., X-ray film) collecting intensity of a chosen crystallographic reflection are translated simultaneously across an X-ray beam collimated in the diffraction scattering plane (e.g., [1, 2]). A bending magnet beamline of a third-generation synchrotron source delivering x-ray beam with a large horizontal divergence, and therefore, a large horizontal beam size at a crystal sample position offers an opportunity to obtain X-ray topographs of large crystalline samples (e.g., 6-inch wafers) inmore » just a few exposures. Here we report projection X-ray topography system implemented recently at 1-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. A selected X-ray topograph of a 6-inch wafer of 4H-SiC illustrates capabilities and limitations of the technique.« less

  19. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. Methods: A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. Inmore » this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO{sub 4} scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. Results: The focal spots were measured at about 1 x 2 mm{sup 2} using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. Conclusions: A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.« less

  20. Research and development of an electron beam focusing system for a high-brightness X-ray generator.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Noriyoshi; Sugimura, Takashi; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator, where an electron beam of up to 60 keV irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped Cu anticathode, has achieved a beam brilliance of 130 kW mm(-2) (at 2.3 kW). A higher-flux electron beam is expected from simulation by optimizing the geometry of a combined-function-type magnet instead of the fringing field of the bending magnet. In order to minimize the size of the X-ray source the electron beam has been focused over a short distance by a new combined-function bending magnet, whose geometrical shape was determined by simulation using the Opera-3D, General Particle Tracer and CST-STUDIO codes. The result of the simulation clearly shows that the role of combined functions in both the bending and the steering magnets is important for focusing the beam to a small size. FWHM sizes of the beam are predicted by simulation to be 0.45 mm (horizontal) and 0.05 mm (vertical) for a 120 keV/75 mA beam, of which the effective brilliance is about 500 kW mm(-2) on the supposition of a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. High-power tests have begun using a high-voltage 120 kV/75 mA power supply for the X-ray generator instead of 60 kV/100 mA. The beam focus size on the target will be verified in the experiments.

  1. Pin-photodiode array for the measurement of fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of X-ray CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Aoyama, Takahiko; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao; Kameyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Patient dose estimation in X-ray computed tomography (CT) is generally performed by Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions within anthropomorphic or cylindrical phantoms. An accurate Monte Carlo simulation requires an understanding of the effects of the bow-tie filter equipped in a CT scanner, i.e. the change of X-ray energy and air kerma along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. To measure the effective energy and air kerma distributions, we devised a pin-photodiode array utilizing eight channels of X-ray sensors arranged at regular intervals along the fan-beam arc of the CT scanner. Each X-ray sensor consisted of two plate type of pin silicon photodiodes in tandem - front and rear photodiodes - and of a lead collimator, which only allowed X-rays to impinge vertically to the silicon surface of the photodiodes. The effective energy of the X-rays was calculated from the ratio of the output voltages of the photodiodes and the dose was calculated from the output voltage of the front photodiode using the energy and dose calibration curves respectively. The pin-photodiode array allowed the calculation of X-ray effective energies and relative doses, at eight points simultaneously along the fan-beam arc of a CT scanner during a single rotation of the scanner. The fan-beam energy and air kerma distributions of CT scanners can be effectively measured using this pin-photodiode array. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of X-Ray Diffraction System with a Microfocus X-Ray Source and a Polycapillary Optic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Marshall, Joy K.; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor

    2000-01-01

    We present here an optimized microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary optic system designed for diffraction of small protein crystals. The x-ray beam is formed by a 5.5mm focal length capillary collimator coupled with a 40 micron x-ray source operating at 46Watts. Measurements of the x-ray flux, the divergence and the spectral characteristics of the beam are presented, This optimized system provides a seven fold greater flux than our recently reported configuration [M. Gubarev, et al., J. of Applied Crystallography (2000) 33, in press]. We now make a comparison with a 5kWatts rotating anode generator (Rigaku) coupled with confocal multilayer focusing mirrors (Osmic, CMF12- 38Cu6). The microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary collimator system delivers 60% of the x-ray flux from the rotating anode system. Additional ways to improve our microfocus x-ray system, and thus increase the x-ray flux will be discussed.

  3. Development of high-resolution x-ray CT system using parallel beam geometry

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yoneyama, Akio, E-mail: akio.yoneyama.bu@hitachi.com; Baba, Rika; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-28

    For fine three-dimensional observations of large biomedical and organic material samples, we developed a high-resolution X-ray CT system. The system consists of a sample positioner, a 5-μm scintillator, microscopy lenses, and a water-cooled sCMOS detector. Parallel beam geometry was adopted to attain a field of view of a few mm square. A fine three-dimensional image of birch branch was obtained using a 9-keV X-ray at BL16XU of SPring-8 in Japan. The spatial resolution estimated from the line profile of a sectional image was about 3 μm.

  4. Development of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Attenkofer, Klaus; Bond, Justin L.; Craven, Christopher A.; Cremer, Till; O'Mahony, Aileen; Minot, Michael J.; Popecki, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    Bundles of hollow glass capillaries can be tapered to produce quasi-focusing x-ray optics. These optics are known as Kumakhov lenses. These optics are interesting for lab-based sources because they can be used to collimate and concentrate x-rays originating from a point, such as a laser focus or an electron-beam focus in a microtube.

  5. Experimental investigation of a HOPG crystal fan for x-ray fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosentreter, Tanja; Müller, Bernhard; Schlattl, Helmut; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    Imaging x-ray fluorescence generally generates a conflict between the best image quality or highest sensitivity and lowest possible radiation dose. Consequently many experimental studies investigating the feasibility of this molecular imaging method, deal with either monochromatic x-ray sources that are not practical in clinical environment or accept high x-ray doses in order to maintain the advantage of high sensitivity and producing high quality images. In this work we present a x-ray fluorescence imaging setup using a HOPG crystal fan construction consisting of a Bragg reflecting analyzer array together with a scatter reducing radial collimator. This method allows for the use of polychromatic x-ray tubes that are in general easily accessible in contrast to monochromatic x-ray sources such as synchrotron facilities. Moreover this energy-selecting device minimizes the amount of Compton scattered photons while simultaneously increasing the fluorescence signal yield, thus significantly reducing the signal to noise ratio. The aim is to show the feasibility of this approach by measuring the Bragg reflected Kα fluorescence signal of an object containing an iodine solution using a large area detector with moderate energy resolution. Contemplating the anisotropic energy distribution of background scattered x-rays we compare the detection sensitivity, applying two different detector angular configurations. Our results show that even for large area detectors with limited energy resolution, iodine concentrations of 0.12 % can be detected. However, the potentially large scan times and therefore high radiation dose need to be decreased in further investigations.

  6. An optical storage cavity-based, Compton-backscatter x-ray source using the MKV free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadmack, Michael R.

    A compact, high-brightness x-ray source is presently under development at the University of Hawai`i Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This source utilizes Compton backscattering of an infrared laser from a relativistic electron beam to produce a narrow beam of monochromatic x-rays. The scattering efficiency is greatly increased by tightly focusing the two beams at an interaction point within a near-concentric optical storage cavity, designed with high finesse to coherently stack the incident laser pulses and greatly enhance the number of photons available for scattering with the electron beam. This dissertation describes the effort and progress to integrate and characterize the most important and challenging aspects of the design of this system. A low-power, near-concentric, visible-light storage cavity has been constructed as a tool for the exploration of the performance, alignment procedures, and diagnostics required for the operation of a high power infrared storage cavity. The use of off-axis reflective focussing elements is essential to the design of the optical storage cavity, but requires exquisite alignment to minimize astigmatism and other optical aberrations. Experiments using a stabilized HeNe laser have revealed important performance characteristics, and allowed the development of critical alignment and calibration procedures, which can be directly applied to the high power infrared storage cavity. Integration of the optical and electron beams is similarly challenging. A scanning-wire beam profiler has been constructed and tested, which allows for high resolution measurement of the size and position of the laser and electron beams at the interaction point. This apparatus has demonstrated that the electron and laser beams can be co-aligned with a precision of less than 10 microm, as required to maximize the x-ray production rate. Equally important is the stabilization of the phase of the GHz repetition rate electron pulses arriving at the interaction point

  7. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. L.

    2006-10-01

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si (Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3keV (˜50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.

  8. Controlling X-ray beam trajectory with a flexible hollow glass fibre.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakatani, Takashi; Onitsuka, Rena; Sawada, Kei; Takahashi, Isao

    2014-01-01

    A metre-length flexible hollow glass fibre with 20 µm-bore and 1.5 mm-cladding diameters for transporting a synchrotron X-ray beam and controlling the trajectory has been examined. The large cladding diameter maintains a moderate curvature to satisfy the shallow glancing angle of total reflection. The observed transmission efficiency was more than 20% at 12.4 keV. As a demonstration, a wide-area scan of a synchrotron radiation beam was performed to identify the elements for a fixed metal film through its absorption spectra.

  9. Controlling X-ray beam trajectory with a flexible hollow glass fibre

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakatani, Takashi; Onitsuka, Rena; Sawada, Kei; Takahashi, Isao

    2014-01-01

    A metre-length flexible hollow glass fibre with 20 µm-bore and 1.5 mm-cladding diameters for transporting a synchrotron X-ray beam and controlling the trajectory has been examined. The large cladding diameter maintains a moderate curvature to satisfy the shallow glancing angle of total reflection. The observed transmission efficiency was more than 20% at 12.4 keV. As a demonstration, a wide-area scan of a synchrotron radiation beam was performed to identify the elements for a fixed metal film through its absorption spectra. PMID:24365917

  10. Fiber-optic detector for real time dosimetry of a micro-planar x-ray beam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Belley, Matthew D.; Stanton, Ian N.; Langloss, Brian W.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Here, the authors describe a dosimetry measurement technique for microbeam radiation therapy using a nanoparticle-terminated fiber-optic dosimeter (nano-FOD). Methods: The nano-FOD was placed in the center of a 2 cm diameter mouse phantom to measure the deep tissue dose and lateral beam profile of a planar x-ray microbeam. Results: The continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak measured with the nano-FOD was 1.91 ± 0.06 cGy s{sup −1}, a value 2.7% higher than that determined via radiochromic film measurements (1.86 ± 0.15 cGy s{sup −1}). The nano-FOD-determined lateral beam full-width half max value of 420 μm exceeded thatmore » measured using radiochromic film (320 μm). Due to the 8° angle of the collimated microbeam and resulting volumetric effects within the scintillator, the profile measurements reported here are estimated to achieve a resolution of ∼0.1 mm; however, for a beam angle of 0°, the theoretical resolution would approach the thickness of the scintillator (∼0.01 mm). Conclusions: This work provides proof-of-concept data and demonstrates that the novel nano-FOD device can be used to perform real-time dosimetry in microbeam radiation therapy to measure the continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak as well as the lateral beam shape.« less

  11. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  12. X-ray induced chemical reaction revealed by in-situ X-ray diffraction and scanning X-ray microscopy in 15 nm resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingyuan; Liu, Wenjun; Bock, David; De Andrade, Vincent; Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Marschilok, Amy; Takeuchi, Esther; Xin, Huolin; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-09-01

    The detection sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray techniques has been largely improved due to the ever increasing source brightness, which have significantly advanced ex-situ and in-situ research for energy materials, such as lithium-ion batteries. However, the strong beam-matter interaction arisen from the high beam flux can significantly modify the material structure. The parasitic beam-induced effect inevitably interferes with the intrinsic material property, which brings difficulties in interpreting experimental results, and therefore requires comprehensive evaluation. Here we present a quantitative in-situ study of the beam-effect on one electrode material Ag2VO2PO4 using four different X-ray probes with different radiation dose rate. The material system we reported exhibits interesting and reversible radiation-induced thermal and chemical reactions, which was further evaluated under electron microscopy to illustrate the underlying mechanism. The work we presented here will provide a guideline in using synchrotron X-rays to distinguish the materials' intrinsic behavior from extrinsic structure changed induced by X-rays, especially in the case of in-situ and operando study where the materials are under external field of either temperature or electric field.

  13. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO(4) scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. The focal spots were measured at about 1 × 2 mm(2) using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.

  14. Generation of first hard X-ray pulse at Tsinghua Thomson Scattering X-ray Source.

    PubMed

    Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Hua, Jianfei; Du, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Renkai; Qian, Houjun; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Huaibi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2013-05-01

    Tsinghua Thomson Scattering X-ray Source (TTX) is the first-of-its-kind dedicated hard X-ray source in China based on the Thomson scattering between a terawatt ultrashort laser and relativistic electron beams. In this paper, we report the experimental generation and characterization of the first hard X-ray pulses (51.7 keV) via head-on collision of an 800 nm laser and 46.7 MeV electron beams. The measured yield is 1.0 × 10(6) per pulse with an electron bunch charge of 200 pC and laser pulse energy of 300 mJ. The angular intensity distribution and energy spectra of the X-ray pulse are measured with an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device using a CsI scintillator and silicon attenuators. These measurements agree well with theoretical and simulation predictions. An imaging test using the X-ray pulse at the TTX is also presented.

  15. Absolute x-ray energy calibration and monitoring using a diffraction-based method

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hong, Xinguo, E-mail: xhong@bnl.gov; Weidner, Donald J.; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2016-07-27

    In this paper, we report some recent developments of the diffraction-based absolute X-ray energy calibration method. In this calibration method, high spatial resolution of the measured detector offset is essential. To this end, a remotely controlled long-translation motorized stage was employed instead of the less convenient gauge blocks. It is found that the precision of absolute X-ray energy calibration (ΔE/E) is readily achieved down to the level of 10{sup −4} for high-energy monochromatic X-rays (e.g. 80 keV). Examples of applications to pair distribution function (PDF) measurements and energy monitoring for high-energy X-rays are presented.

  16. A study on the suitability of the PTW microDiamond detector for kilovoltage x-ray beam dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Damodar, Joshita; Odgers, David; Pope, Dane; Hill, Robin

    2018-05-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are widely used in treating skin cancers and in biological irradiators. In this work, we have evaluated four dosimeters (ionization chambers and solid state detectors) in their suitability for relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams in the energy range of 50 - 280kVp. The solid state detectors, which have not been investigated with low energy x-rays, were the PTW 60019 microDiamond synthetic diamond detector and the PTW 60012 diode. The two ionization chambers used were the PTW Advanced Markus parallel plate chamber and the PTW PinPoint small volume chamber. For each of the dosimeters, percentage depth doses were measured in water over the full range of x-ray beams and for field sizes ranging from 2cm diameter to 12 × 12cm. In addition, depth doses were measured for a narrow aperture (7mm diameter) using the PTW microDiamond detector. For comparison, the measured data was compared with Monte Carlo calculated doses using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package. The depth dose results indicate that the Advanced Markus parallel plate and PinPoint ionization chambers were suitable for depth dose measurements in the beam quality range with an uncertainty of less than 3%, including in the regions closer to the surface of the water as compared with Monte Carlo depth dose data for all six energy beams. The response of the PTW Diode E detector was accurate to within 4% for all field sizes in the energy range of 50-125kVp but showed larger variations for higher energies of up to 12% with the 12 × 12cm field size. In comparison, the microDiamond detector had good agreement over all energies for both smaller and larger field sizes generally within 1% as compared to the Advanced Markus chamber field and Monte Carlo calculations. The only exceptions were in measuring the dose at the surface of the water phantom where larger differences were found. For the 7mm diameter field, the agreement between the microDiamond detector and Monte Carlo calculations was

  17. Electrodynamics of relativistic electron beam x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknejadi, Pardis

    Probing matter at atomic scales provides invaluable information about its structure; as a result interest in sources of x-rays and gamma-rays with high spectral resolution, low angular divergence and small source size has been on the rise. Explorations in this domain require x-ray or gamma-ray sources with high brightness. In the past decade, relativistic electron sources such as synchrotron rings and free electron lasers have proven to be the best technology available for the production of such beams. We1 start with an introduction to the physics of radiation and provide a summary of the theoretical grounds this work is based on. This dissertation is dedicated to different aspects of both fundamental processes of radiation in relativistic electron sources, and critical control and diagnostics that are required for the operation of these sources. Therefore this work is broken into two main parts. In the first part, the electron source that is currently set up at University of Hawai`i at Manoa will be introduced in detail. This source has unique capabilities as it is an inverse-Compton scattering (ICS) source that uses a free electron laser (FEL) with pulses of picosecond duration at ˜ 3 GHz rate for production of a coherent/semi-coherent x-ray beam by means of an optical cavity. After introducing the essential elements of the system and what was achieved prior to this work, we will focus on the requirements for achieving an optimum electron beam matched for the operation of the system which is the main focus of part I of this dissertation. The transport beam line of our system is unique and complex. For this reason, a simulation module has been developed for the study and delivery of an optimal beam. We will discuss the capabilities of this system and its compatibility with other elements that were already installed on the beam line. Finally, we will present results and experimental data as well as guidelines for future operation of the system when the microwave

  18. Achromatic nested Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror optics for hard X-ray nanofocusing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Liu, Chian; Shi, Bing; Khachatryan, Ruben; Qian, Jun; Zschack, Paul; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Choi, J.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    The first test of nanoscale-focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) mirrors in the nested (or Montel) configuration used at a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline is reported. The two mirrors are both 40 mm long and coated with Pt to produce a focal length of 60 mm at 3 mrad incident angle, and collect up to a 120 µm by 120 µm incident X-ray beam with maximum angular acceptance of 2 mrad and a broad bandwidth of energies up to 30 keV. In an initial test a focal spot of about 150 nm in both horizontal and vertical directions was achieved with either polychromatic or monochromatic beam. The nested mirror geometry, with two mirrors mounted side-by-side and perpendicular to each other, is significantly more compact and provides higher demagnification than the traditional sequential KB mirror arrangement. Ultimately, nested mirrors can focus larger divergence to improve the diffraction limit of achromatic optics. A major challenge with the fabrication of the required mirrors is the need for near-perfect mirror surfaces near the edge of at least one of the mirrors. Special polishing procedures and surface profile coating were used to preserve the mirror surface quality at the reflecting edge. Further developments aimed at achieving diffraction-limited focusing below 50 nm are underway. PMID:21685674

  19. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2017-11-21

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  20. PSICHE: a new beamline dedicated to X-ray diffraction and tomography at high pressure at synchrotron SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignot, N.; Itié, J.; Zerbino, P.; Delmotte, A.; Moreno, T.

    2013-12-01

    The PSICHE beamline (for 'Pressure, Structure and Imaging by Contrast at High Energy') is a new facility opened for high pressure experiments at synchrotron SOLEIL (St-Aubin, France). With its source, optics, detectors and 3 experimental stations, it can handle a large variety of experimental setups. High energy photons are produced with an in-vacuum wiggler. The white beam obtained, with photons energy ranging continuously from 15 to 80 keV (from a 2.75 GeV machine), is used on the first experimental station for energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX) measurements using different pressure cells. The main setup is a 1200 tons load capacity multi-anvil press featuring a (100) DIA compression module with a 15° horizontal aperture, allowing measurements up to 30° in 2theta by rotating the press. Other setups are a Paris-Edinburgh (PE) large volume press and diamond anvil cells (DACs). On the detection side we have a rotating Ge detector, based on the CAESAR design described by Wang et al. (2004) (combination of EDX and angular dispersive X-ray diffraction, ADX). One of the difficulties when building such setups is the rotation mechanism which cannot be physically attached to the rotation axis, potentially leading to large circle of confusions on the horizontal position of this axis. Thanks to translation corrections done at each angle step, the circle of confusion is minimized to 3x6 μm2 along the 35° travel, making possible measurements on very small objects. Combining EDX and ADX has a lot of advantages and we will present our first results obtained using this setup. The PSICHE focusing optics and monochromator are also used to focus monochromatic beams (up to 52 keV) on 2 different experimental stations. The first focal point at 31 m gives a beam size of 100x50 μm2 (HxV) and is useful for low pressure experiments and experiments done with the PE press associated with Soller slits. A PerkinElmer flatpanel detector can be precisely scanned in 3 directions

  1. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E [Manteca, CA

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  2. Imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution x-ray measurements on electron beam ion traps and tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Hell, N.; ...

    2016-09-09

    Here, we describe a crystal spectrometer implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps that employ two spherically bent quartz crystals and a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector to measure x rays with a nominal resolving power of λ/Δλ ≥ 10 000. Its focusing properties allow us to record x rays either with the plane of dispersion perpendicular or parallel to the electron beam and, thus, to preferentially select one of the two linear x-ray polarization components. Moreover, by choice of dispersion plane and focussing conditions, we use the instrument either to image the distribution of the ions withinmore » the 2 cm long trap region, or to concentrate x rays of a given energy to a point on the detector, which optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio. We demonstrate the operation and utility of the new instrument by presenting spectra of Mo 34+, which prepares the instrument for use as a core impurity diagnostic on the NSTX-U spherical torus and other magnetic fusion devices that employ molybdenum as plasma facing components.« less

  3. X-ray cone-beam computed tomography: principles, applications, challenges and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noo, Frederic

    2010-03-01

    In the nineties, x-ray computed tomography, commonly referred to as CT, seemed to be on the track to become old technology, bound to be replaced by more sophisticated techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging, due in particular to the harmful effects of x-ray radiation exposure. Yet, the new century brought with it new technology that allowed a complete change in trends and re-affirmed CT as an essential tool in radiology. For instance, the popularity of CT in 2007 was such that approximately 68.7 million CT examinations were performed in the United States, which was nearly 2.5 times the number of magnetic resonance (MRI) examinations. More than that, CT has expanded beyond its conventional diagnostic role; CT is now used routinely in interventional radiology and also in radiation therapy treatment. The technology advances that allowed the revival of CT are those that made fast, accurate cone-beam data acquisition possible. Nowadays, cone-beam data acquisition allows scanning large volumes with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution in a very fast time, which can be as short as 500ms for cardiac imaging. The principles of cone-beam imaging will be first reviewed. Then a discussion of its applications will be given. Old and new challenges will be presented along the way with current solutions.

  4. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectricmore » actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.« less

  5. Application of focused-beam flat-sample method to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction with anomalous scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Katsuya, Y.; Matsushita, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM), which is a method for high-resolution and rapid synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements by combination of beam focusing optics, a flat shape sample and an area detector, was applied for diffraction experiments with anomalous scattering effect. The advantages of FFM for anomalous diffraction were absorption correction without approximation, rapid data collection by an area detector and good signal-to-noise ratio data by focusing optics. In the X-ray diffraction experiments of CoFe2O4 and Fe3O4 (By FFM) using X-rays near the Fe K absorption edge, the anomalous scattering effect between Fe/Co or Fe2+/Fe3+ can be clearly detected, due to the change of diffraction intensity. The change of observed diffraction intensity as the incident X-ray energy was consistent with the calculation. The FFM is expected to be a method for anomalous powder diffraction.

  6. Excitation-resolved cone-beam x-ray luminescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Liao, Qimei; Wang, Hongkai; Yan, Zhuangzhi

    2015-07-01

    Cone-beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography (CB-XLCT), as an emerging imaging technique, plays an important role in in vivo small animal imaging studies. However, CB-XLCT suffers from low-spatial resolution due to the ill-posed nature of reconstruction. We improve the imaging performance of CB-XLCT by using a multiband excitation-resolved imaging scheme combined with principal component analysis. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the physical phantom experiment is performed with a custom-made XLCT/XCT imaging system. The experimental results validate the feasibility of the method, where two adjacent nanophosphors (with an edge-to-edge distance of 2.4 mm) can be located.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation for Polychromatic X-Ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography with Sheet-Beam Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shanghai

    2017-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) based on sheet beam can save a huge amount of time to obtain a whole set of projections using synchrotron. However, it is clearly unpractical for most biomedical research laboratories. In this paper, polychromatic X-ray fluorescence computed tomography with sheet-beam geometry is tested by Monte Carlo simulation. First, two phantoms (A and B) filled with PMMA are used to simulate imaging process through GEANT 4. Phantom A contains several GNP-loaded regions with the same size (10 mm) in height and diameter but different Au weight concentration ranging from 0.3% to 1.8%. Phantom B contains twelve GNP-loaded regions with the same Au weight concentration (1.6%) but different diameter ranging from 1 mm to 9 mm. Second, discretized presentation of imaging model is established to reconstruct more accurate XFCT images. Third, XFCT images of phantoms A and B are reconstructed by filter back-projection (FBP) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) with and without correction, respectively. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is calculated to evaluate all the reconstructed images. Our results show that it is feasible for sheet-beam XFCT system based on polychromatic X-ray source and the discretized imaging model can be used to reconstruct more accurate images. PMID:28567054

  8. Spot size characterization of focused non-Gaussian X-ray laser beams.

    PubMed

    Chalupský, J; Krzywinski, J; Juha, L; Hájková, V; Cihelka, J; Burian, T; Vysín, L; Gaudin, J; Gleeson, A; Jurek, M; Khorsand, A R; Klinger, D; Wabnitz, H; Sobierajski, R; Störmer, M; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S

    2010-12-20

    We present a new technique for the characterization of non-Gaussian laser beams which cannot be described by an analytical formula. As a generalization of the beam spot area we apply and refine the definition of so called effective area (A(eff)) [1] in order to avoid using the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) parameter which is inappropriate for non-Gaussian beams. Furthermore, we demonstrate a practical utilization of our technique for a femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser. The ablative imprints in poly(methyl methacrylate) - PMMA and amorphous carbon (a-C) are used to characterize the spatial beam profile and to determine the effective area. Two procedures of the effective area determination are presented in this work. An F-scan method, newly developed in this paper, appears to be a good candidate for the spatial beam diagnostics applicable to lasers of various kinds.

  9. CT with monochromatic synchrotron x rays and its potential in clinical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Wu, Xiaoye; Ren, Baorui; Button, Terry M.; Chapman, L. D.; Dobbs, John M.; Huang, Xiaoling; Nickoloff, Edward L.; Parsons, Edward C., Jr.; Petersen, Michael J.; Thomlinson, William C.; Zhong, Zhong

    1997-10-01

    A monochromatic CT for imaging the human head and neck is being developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source. We compared the performance of this system, multiple energy computed tomography (MECT), with that of a conventional CT (CCT) using phantoms. The advantage in image contrast of MECT, with its beam energy tuned just above the K-edge of contrast element, over CCT carried out at 120 kVp, was approximately equal to 3.2-fold for iodine and approximately equal to 2.2 fold for gadolinium. Image noise was compared by simulations because this comparison requires matching the spatial resolutions of the two systems. Simulations at a 3- rad dose and 3-mm slice height on an 18-cm-diameter acrylic phantom, with MECT operating at 60.5 keV, showed that image noise for MECT was 1.4 HU vs. 1.8 HU for CCT. Simulations in the dual-energy quantitative CT mode showed a two-fold advantage for MECT in image noise, as well as its superior quantification. MECT operated in the planar mode revealed fatty tissue in the body of a rat using xenon K-edge subtraction. Our initial pan for clinical application of the system is to image the composition of carotid artery plaques non-invasively, separating the plaques' main constituents: the fatty, fibrous, and calcified tissues.

  10. SU-F-I-75: Half-Value Layer Thicknesses and Homogeneity Coefficients for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Spectra Incorporating Spectral Filtration

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wunderle, K; Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI; Godley, A

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to quantify various first half-value-layers (HVLs), second HVLs and homogeneity coefficients (HCs) for a state-of-the-art fluoroscope utilizing spectral (copper) filtration. Methods: A Radcal (Monrovia, Ca) AccuPro dosimeter with a 10×6-6 calibrated ionization chamber was used to measure air kerma for radiographic x-ray exposures made on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope operated in the service mode. The ionization chamber was centered in the x-ray beam at 72 cm from the focal spot with a source-to-image-distance of 120 cm. The collimators were introduced to limit the x-ray field to approximately 5 cm ×more » 5 cm at the ionization chamber plane. Type-1100 aluminum filters, in 0.5 mm increments, were used to determine the HVL. Two HVL calculation methods were used, log-linear interpolation and Lambert-W interpolation as described by Mathieu [Med Phys, 38(8), 4546 (2011)]. Multiple measurements were made at 60, 80, 100, 120 kVp at spectral filtration thicknesses of 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mm. Results: First HVL, second HVL, and HCs are presented for the fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra indicated above, with nearly identical results from the two interpolation methods. Accuracy of the set kVp was also determined and deviated less than 2%. First HVLs for fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra without spectral filtration determined in our study were 7%–16% greater than previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)]. However, the FDA minimum HVL requirements changed since that publication, requiring larger HVLs as of 2006. Additionally, x-ray tube and generator architecture have substantially changed over the last 15 years providing different beam spectra. Conclusion: X-ray beam quality characteristics for state-of-the-art fluoroscopes with spectral filtration have not been published. This study provides reference data which will be useful for defining beam qualities encountered on

  11. Calculation of x-ray scattering patterns from nanocrystals at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Malik Muhammad; Jurek, Zoltan; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We present a generalized method to describe the x-ray scattering intensity of the Bragg spots in a diffraction pattern from nanocrystals exposed to intense x-ray pulses. Our method involves the subdivision of a crystal into smaller units. In order to calculate the dynamics within every unit, we employ a Monte-Carlo-molecular dynamics-ab-initio hybrid framework using real space periodic boundary conditions. By combining all the units, we simulate the diffraction pattern of a crystal larger than the transverse x-ray beam profile, a situation commonly encountered in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments with focused x-ray free-electron laser radiation. Radiation damage is not spatially uniform and depends on the fluence associated with each specific region inside the crystal. To investigate the effects of uniform and non-uniform fluence distribution, we have used two different spatial beam profiles, Gaussian and flattop. PMID:27478859

  12. Anomalous refraction of a low divergence monochromatic light beam in a transparent slab.

    PubMed

    Lequime, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2018-04-01

    An exact formulation for the propagation of a monochromatic wave packet impinging on a transparent, homogeneous, isotropic, and parallel slab at oblique incidence is given. Approximate formulas are derived for low divergence light beams. These formulas show the presence of anomalous refraction phenomena at any slab thickness, including negative refraction and flat lensing effects, induced by reflection at the rear face.

  13. Template For Aiming An X-Ray Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morphet, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive template helps in aligning x-ray machine with phenolic ring to be inspected for flaws. Phenolic ring in original application part of rocket nozzle. Concept also applicable to x-ray inspection of other rings. Template contains alignment holes for adjusting orientation, plus target spot for adjusting lateral position, of laser spotting beam. (Laser spotting beam coincides with the x-ray beam, turned on later, after alignment completed.) Use of template decreases positioning time and error, providing consistent sensitivity for detection of flaws.

  14. Synchrotron-based coherent scatter x-ray projection imaging using an array of monoenergetic pencil beams.

    PubMed

    Landheer, Karl; Johns, Paul C

    2012-09-01

    Traditional projection x-ray imaging utilizes only the information from the primary photons. Low-angle coherent scatter images can be acquired simultaneous to the primary images and provide additional information. In medical applications scatter imaging can improve x-ray contrast or reduce dose using information that is currently discarded in radiological images to augment the transmitted radiation information. Other applications include non-destructive testing and security. A system at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron was configured which utilizes multiple pencil beams (up to five) to create both primary and coherent scatter projection images, simultaneously. The sample was scanned through the beams using an automated step-and-shoot setup. Pixels were acquired in a hexagonal lattice to maximize packing efficiency. The typical pitch was between 1.0 and 1.6 mm. A Maximum Likelihood-Expectation Maximization-based iterative method was used to disentangle the overlapping information from the flat panel digital x-ray detector. The pixel value of the coherent scatter image was generated by integrating the radial profile (scatter intensity versus scattering angle) over an angular range. Different angular ranges maximize the contrast between different materials of interest. A five-beam primary and scatter image set (which had a pixel beam time of 990 ms and total scan time of 56 min) of a porcine phantom is included. For comparison a single-beam coherent scatter image of the same phantom is included. The muscle-fat contrast was 0.10 ± 0.01 and 1.16 ± 0.03 for the five-beam primary and scatter images, respectively. The air kerma was measured free in air using aluminum oxide optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters. The total area-averaged air kerma for the scan was measured to be 7.2 ± 0.4 cGy although due to difficulties in small-beam dosimetry this number could be inaccurate.

  15. Superficial dosimetry imaging based on Čerenkov emission for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Fox, Colleen J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Čerenkov radiation emission occurs in all tissue, when charged particles (either primary or secondary) travel at velocity above the threshold for the Čerenkov effect (about 220 KeV in tissue for electrons). This study presents the first examination of optical Čerenkov emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose for MV x-ray beams. Methods: In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of flat and curved surfaces were studied to analyze the energy spectra of charged particles produced in different regions near the surfaces when irradiated by MV x-ray beams. Čerenkov emission intensity and radiation dose were directly simulated in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms. The sampling region of superficial dosimetry based on Čerenkov radiation was simulated in layered skin models. Angular distributions of optical emission from the surfaces were investigated. Tissue mimicking phantoms with flat and curved surfaces were imaged with a time domain gating system. The beam field sizes (50 × 50–200 × 200 mm2), incident angles (0°–70°) and imaging regions were all varied. Results: The entrance or exit region of the tissue has nearly homogeneous energy spectra across the beam, such that their Čerenkov emission is proportional to dose. Directly simulated local intensity of Čerenkov and radiation dose in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms further validate that this signal is proportional to radiation dose with absolute average discrepancy within 2%, and the largest within 5% typically at the beam edges. The effective sampling depth could be tuned from near 0 up to 6 mm by spectral filtering. The angular profiles near the theoretical Lambertian emission distribution for a perfect diffusive medium, suggesting that angular correction of Čerenkov images may not be required even for curved surface. The acquisition speed and signal to noise ratio of the time domain gating system were investigated for different acquisition procedures, and the

  16. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  17. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT. PMID:27446686

  18. Towards a Table-Top Laser Driven XUV/X-Ray Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    irradiated with intense ultra-short laser pulses. Bright monochromatic x- rays and broadband XUV emissions...as   evidenced  in  nature  by  the  sun,  stars,  and   gamma   ray  bursters.  In  laboratory  conditions,   bright...N.   Nerush,   I.   Yu.   Kostyukov,   B.   F.   Shen,   and   K.   U.   Akli;   "Energy partition,   gamma   ray

  19. Characterization of morphology and hydration products of high-volume fly ash paste by monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (μ-SXRD)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bae, Sungchul; Meral, Cagla; Department of Civil Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara

    2014-05-01

    The present study focuses on identification and micro-structural characterization of the hydration products formed in high-volume fly ash (HVFA)/portland cement (PC) systems using monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (μ-SXRD) and SEM-EDS. Pastes with up to 80% fly ash replacement were studied. Phase maps for HVFA samples using μ-SXRD patterns prove that μ-SXRD is an effective method to identify and visualize the distribution of phases in the matrix. μ-SXRD and SEM-EDS analysis shows that the C-S-H formed in HVFA system containing 50% or more of fly ash has a similar structure as C-S-H(I) with comparatively lower Ca/Si ratio than the one producedmore » in PC system. Moreover, coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite is observed in the system containing 80% of fly ash, confirming that the amount of alumina and silicate phases provided by the fly ash is a major factor for the formation of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in HVFA system. - Highlights: • High-volume fly ash (HVFA) paste was studied by scanning x-ray micro-diffraction. • Coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in the HVFA system is clearly shown. • The distribution of minor phases in the HVFA system is shown. • Differences between inner and outer products of fly ash are observed by SEM-EDS.« less

  20. Analysis of a Novel Diffractive Scanning Wire Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for Discriminative Profiling of Electron Vs. X Ray Beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-01

    Recent numerical studies of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime indicate a large sensitivity of the gain to the degree of transverse overlap (and associated phase coherence) between the electron and photon beams traveling down the insertion device. Simulations of actual systems imply that accurate detection and correction for this relative loss of overlap, rather than correction for the absolute departure of the electron beam from a fixed axis, is the preferred function of an FEL amplifier's Beam Position Monitor (BPM) and corrector systems. In this note we propose a novel diffractive BPMmore » with the capability of simultaneously detecting and resolving the absolute (and relative) transverse positions and profiles of electron and x-ray beams co-propagating through an undulator. We derive the equations governing the performance of the BPM and examine its predicted performance for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), viz., for profiling multi-GeV electron bunches co-propagating with one-to-several-hundred keV x-ray beams. Selected research and development (r&d) tasks for fabricating and testing the proposed BPM are discussed.« less

  1. Study of the stability of beam characteristics of the neon-like Zn X-ray laser using a half cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Präg, A. R.; Mocek, T.; Kozlová, M.; Rus, B.; Jamelot, G.; Ros, D.

    2003-01-01

    At the Prague Asterix Laser System Center (PALS) the Asterix iodine laser delivering up to 700 J/0.5 ns is used as a pump source for X-ray laser experiments and applications. The prepulse technique was applied which is known to improve the neon-like X-ray laser output at the J = 0 {-} 1 transition dramatically. Since Zn slab targets were used the operating wavelength was 21.2 nm. A prepulse having up to 20 J precedes the main pulse by 10 ns. The main beam and the prepulse beam are focussed by two different optical systems separately and their foci are superimposed at the target surface. By implementing a half-cavity set-up for double-pass amplification using a Mo/Si multilayer mirror which can be used for more than 100 shots the X-ray laser output was more than 10 times stronger than at the single pass in a 30 mm long plasma. Double-pass amplification was observed to be most efficient when the pump pulse duration was at least 150 ps longer than the round trip time (≈ 260 ps) in the half-cavity. Under this fundamental condition the X-ray laser reached saturation in the double-pass regime containing approx. 4 mJ energy which has been proved to be enough for future applications. In this contribution, the X-ray laser features like divergence in two dimensions, the beam quality (symmetry), the pointing angle and the integrated intensity giving an estimation of the output energy are investigated over 110 shots. To characterize the stability of the X-ray laser the shot distribution, the mean value and the standard deviation for these parameters are evaluated. For 18 shots in a series what was achievable during one day the corresponding values are given, and a statistical analysis carrying out a chi-squared test characterize the Zn X-ray laser as a robust tool suitable for applications. In the future it is planned to allocate X-ray laser beam time to external research groups.

  2. Saw-tooth refractive lens for high energy x-ray focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antimonov, Mikhail A.; Khounsary, Ali M.

    2014-09-01

    Saw-tooth refractive lens (SRL) provides a comparatively attractive option for X-ray focusing. An SRL assembly consists of two parts, each with an array of triangular structures (prisms), set tilted symmetrically with respect to the incoming beam. Its main advantage is a simple, continuous tunability in energy and focal length. SRLs can be used for both long and short focal length focusing. Long focal distance focusing of an SRL can accurately be predicted using simple analytical relations. However, the focus size at short focal distances focusing may deviate appreciably from the expected demagnified source size when: (1) the length of the SRL is comparable with the focusing distance, (2) the incident beam is not monochromatic, and (3) and the distance between adjacent prism tips, the tip step, is large . The first factor was considered in a previous work while the other two are addressed is this paper. This preliminary work is aimed at a better understanding of the SRL lenses for focusing an undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS).

  3. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  4. X-ray diffraction-based electronic structure calculations and experimental x-ray analysis for medical and materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahato, Dip Narayan

    This thesis includes x-ray experiments for medical and materials applications and the use of x-ray diffraction data in a first-principles study of electronic structures and hyperfine properties of chemical and biological systems. Polycapillary focusing lenses were used to collect divergent x rays emitted from conventional x-ray tubes and redirect them to form an intense focused beam. These lenses are routinely used in microbeam x-ray fluorescence analysis. In this thesis, their potential application to powder diffraction and focused beam orthovoltage cancer therapy has been investigated. In conventional x-ray therapy, very high energy (˜ MeV) beams are used, partly to reduce the skin dose. For any divergent beam, the dose is necessarily highest at the entry point, and decays exponentially into the tissue. To reduce the skin dose, high energy beams, which have long absorption lengths, are employed, and rotated about the patient to enter from different angles. This necessitates large expensive specialized equipment. A focused beam could concentrate the dose within the patient. Since this is inherently skin dose sparing, lower energy photons could be employed. A primary concern in applying focused beams to therapy is whether the focus would be maintained despite Compton scattering within the tissue. To investigate this, transmission and focal spot sizes as a function of photon energy of two polycapillary focusing lenses were measured. The effects of tissue-equivalent phantoms of different thicknesses on the focal spot size were studied. Scatter fraction and depth dose were calculated. For powder diffraction, the polycapillary optics provide clean Gaussian peaks, which result in angular resolution that is much smaller than the peak width due to the beam convergence. Powder diffraction (also called coherent scatter) without optics can also be used to distinguish between tissue types that, because they have different nanoscale structures, scatter at different angles

  5. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 1018 cm−3). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron–photon source can be ideal for pump–probe applications with femtosecond time resolution. PMID:24711405

  6. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    M. J. Haugh and M. B. Schneider

    2008-10-31

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 μm square pixels, and 15 μm thick. Amore » multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE≈10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.« less

  7. Confocal total reflection X-ray fluorescence technology based on an elliptical monocapillary and a parallel polycapillary X-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yabing; Sun, Tianxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Liu, Zhiguo; Li, Yufei; Zhang, Fengshou

    2018-07-01

    A total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer based on an elliptical monocapillary X-ray lens (MXRL) and a parallel polycapillary X-ray lens (PPXRL) was designed. This TXRF instrument has micro focal spot, low divergence and high intensity of incident X-ray beam. The diameter of the focal spot of MXRL was 16.5 µm, and the divergence of the incident X-ray beam was 3.4 mrad. We applied this TXRF instrument to the micro analysis of a single-layer film containing Ni deposited on a Si substrate by metal vapor vacuum arc ion source. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography to visualize specific material distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Atsunori; Akiba, Masahiro; Uchida, Akira; Kazama, Masahiro; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Akatsuka, Takao; Itai, Yuji

    1997-10-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT systems consists of a silicon channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. At 37 keV Monte Carlo simulation showed almost complete separation between Compton scattering and the K(alpha) line. Actual experiments revealed small contamination of Compton scattering on the K(alpha) line. A clear FXCT image of a phantom was obtained. Using this system the minimal detectable dose of iodine was 30 ng in a volume of 1 mm3, and a linear relationship was demonstrated between photon counts of fluorescent x-rays and the concentration of iodine contrast material. The use of high incident x-ray energy allows an increase in the signal to noise ratio by reducing the Compton scattering on the K(alpha) line.

  9. Explosive vessel for coupling dynamic experiments to the X-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Charles; Sanchez, Nathaniel; Sorensen, Christian; Jensen, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Recent experiments at the Advanced Photon Source have been successful in coupling gun systems to the synchrotron to take advantage of the advanced X-ray diagnostics available including X-ray diffraction and X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) to examine matter at extreme conditions. There are many experiments that require explosive loading capabilities, e.g. detonator and initiator dynamics, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), ejecta formation, and explosively driven flyer experiments. The current work highlights a new explosive vessel that was designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility with requirements to confine up to 15 grams of explosives (TNT equivalent), couple the vessel to the X-ray beam line, and reliably position samples remotely. A description of the system and capability will be provided along with the results from qualification testing to bring the system into service (LA-UR-17-21381).

  10. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Seibert, M Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Westphal, Daniel; Almeida, F Nunes; Odic, Dusko; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H; Larsson, Daniel S D; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Duane Loh, Ne-Te; Chapman, Henry N; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2015-02-11

    There exists a conspicuous gap of knowledge about the organization of life at mesoscopic levels. Ultra-fast coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers can probe structures at the relevant length scales and may reach sub-nanometer resolution on micron-sized living cells. Here we show that we can introduce a beam of aerosolised cyanobacteria into the focus of the Linac Coherent Light Source and record diffraction patterns from individual living cells at very low noise levels and at high hit ratios. We obtain two-dimensional projection images directly from the diffraction patterns, and present the results as synthetic X-ray Nomarski images calculated from the complex-valued reconstructions. We further demonstrate that it is possible to record diffraction data to nanometer resolution on live cells with X-ray lasers. Extension to sub-nanometer resolution is within reach, although improvements in pulse parameters and X-ray area detectors will be necessary to unlock this potential.

  11. X-ray micro-Tomography at the Advanced Light Source

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A...

  12. Output Beam Polarisation of X-ray Lasers with Transient Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janulewicz, K. A.; Kim, C. M.; Matouš, B.; Stiel, H.; Nishikino, M.; Hasegawa, N.; Kawachi, T.

    It is commonly accepted that X-ray lasers, as the devices based on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), did not show any specific polarization in the output beam. The theoretical analysis within the uniform (single-mode) approximation suggested that the output radiation should show some defined polarization feature, but randomly changing from shot-to-shot. This hypothesis has been verified by experiment using traditional double-pulse scheme of transient inversion. Membrane beam-splitter was used as a polarization selector. It was found that the output radiation has a significant component of p-polarisation in each shot. To explain the effect and place it in the line with available, but scarce data, propagation and kinetic effects in the non-uniform plasma have been analysed.

  13. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.

    2006-10-15

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si(Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this techniquemore » to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3 keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3 keV ({approx}50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.« less

  14. X-ray lines and self-interacting dark matter.

    PubMed

    Mambrini, Yann; Toma, Takashi

    We study the correlation between a monochromatic signal from annihilating dark matter and its self-interacting cross section. We apply our argument to a complex scalar dark sector, where the pseudo-scalar plays the role of a warm dark matter candidate while the scalar mediates its interaction with the Standard Model. We combine the recent observation of the cluster Abell 3827 for self-interacting dark matter and the constraints on the annihilation cross section for monochromatic X-ray lines. We also confront our model to a set of recent experimental analyses and find that such an extension can naturally produce a monochromatic keV signal corresponding to recent observations of Perseus or Andromeda, while in the meantime it predicts a self-interacting cross section of the order of [Formula: see text], as recently claimed in the observation of the cluster Abell 3827. We also propose a way to distinguish such models by future direct detection techniques.

  15. Evaluation of some selected vaccines and other biological products irradiated by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J. C.; Rey, L.; Lee, Chi-Jen

    2002-03-01

    Molecular sizing potency results are presented for irradiated samples of one lot of Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal polysaccharide type 6B and typhoid vi polysaccharide vaccine. The samples were irradiated (25 kGy) by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays. IgG and IgM antibody response in mice test results (ELISA) are given for the Hib conjugate vaccine irradiated at 0°C or frozen in liquid nitrogen.

  16. The high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments at ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32.

    PubMed

    Kummer, K; Fondacaro, A; Jimenez, E; Velez-Fort, E; Amorese, A; Aspbury, M; Yakhou-Harris, F; van der Linden, P; Brookes, N B

    2016-03-01

    A new high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments has been installed and commissioned at the ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32. The magnet consists of two split-pairs of superconducting coils which can generate up to 9 T along the beam and up to 4 T orthogonal to the beam. It is connected to a cluster of ultra-high-vacuum chambers that offer a comprehensive set of surface preparation and characterization techniques. The endstation and the beam properties have been designed to provide optimum experimental conditions for X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism experiments in the soft X-ray range between 400 and 1600 eV photon energy. User operation started in November 2014.

  17. Model-based inspection of multipackage food products using a twin-beam x-ray system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stephen C.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    1998-10-01

    A twin-orthogonal-fanbeam x-ray system has been built as part of a six-partner project funded by the Commission of the European Union. The images created by this system represent plan and side views of the object to be inspected. Using such a system, it is possible to locate a point-like feature that creates a significant shadow in both beams, in a 3D space. However, the real value of such a system lies in the fact that it is often possible to see a foreign body, such as a small piece of loose glass, within a jar using one beam, when the same contaminant is invisible to the other beam. Such a situation typically arises when the foreign body is obscured by the x-ray shadow of the neck-shoulder region of a jar. The x-ray system built by our colleagues in this consortium is being used to examine, simultaneously, six jars of semi-fluid savory sauce, held together by shrink-wrapping on a cardboard tray. The inspection algorithm consists of fitting multi-part models of the image intensity function to both the plan and side-view images. Once a model has been fitted, it is possible to use image comparison, in order to highlight any foreign bodies. The pre-processed plan and side-view images are analyzed and correlated together, so that in many cases, a foreign body whose view is obscured in one image can be detected in the other.

  18. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    DOE PAGES

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; ...

    2016-09-28

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. In this paper, we present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source.more » We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4–6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10 -5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. Finally, these quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.« less

  19. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  20. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  1. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  2. An empirical model of diagnostic x-ray attenuation under narrow-beam geometry.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Kelsey B; Kappadath, S Cheenu; White, R Allen; Atkinson, E Neely; Cody, Dianna D

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe narrow-beam attenuation of kilovoltage x-ray beams for the intended applications of half-value layer (HVL) and quarter-value layer (QVL) estimations, patient organ shielding, and computer modeling. An empirical model, which uses the Lambert W function and represents a generalized Lambert-Beer law, was developed. To validate this model, transmission of diagnostic energy x-ray beams was measured over a wide range of attenuator thicknesses [0.49-33.03 mm Al on a computed tomography (CT) scanner, 0.09-1.93 mm Al on two mammography systems, and 0.1-0.45 mm Cu and 0.49-14.87 mm Al using general radiography]. Exposure measurements were acquired under narrow-beam geometry using standard methods, including the appropriate ionization chamber, for each radiographic system. Nonlinear regression was used to find the best-fit curve of the proposed Lambert W model to each measured transmission versus attenuator thickness data set. In addition to validating the Lambert W model, we also assessed the performance of two-point Lambert W interpolation compared to traditional methods for estimating the HVL and QVL [i.e., semi-logarithmic (exponential) and linear interpolation]. The Lambert W model was validated for modeling attenuation versus attenuator thickness with respect to the data collected in this study (R2 > 0.99). Furthermore, Lambert W interpolation was more accurate and less sensitive to the choice of interpolation points used to estimate the HVL and/or QVL than the traditional methods of semilogarithmic and linear interpolation. The proposed Lambert W model accurately describes attenuation of both monoenergetic radiation and (kilovoltage) polyenergetic beams (under narrow-beam geometry).

  3. An empirical model of diagnostic x-ray attenuation under narrow-beam geometry

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; White, R. Allen; Atkinson, E. Neely; Cody, Dianna D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe narrow-beam attenuation of kilovoltage x-ray beams for the intended applications of half-value layer (HVL) and quarter-value layer (QVL) estimations, patient organ shielding, and computer modeling. Methods: An empirical model, which uses the Lambert W function and represents a generalized Lambert-Beer law, was developed. To validate this model, transmission of diagnostic energy x-ray beams was measured over a wide range of attenuator thicknesses [0.49–33.03 mm Al on a computed tomography (CT) scanner, 0.09–1.93 mm Al on two mammography systems, and 0.1–0.45 mm Cu and 0.49–14.87 mm Al using general radiography]. Exposure measurements were acquired under narrow-beam geometry using standard methods, including the appropriate ionization chamber, for each radiographic system. Nonlinear regression was used to find the best-fit curve of the proposed Lambert W model to each measured transmission versus attenuator thickness data set. In addition to validating the Lambert W model, we also assessed the performance of two-point Lambert W interpolation compared to traditional methods for estimating the HVL and QVL [i.e., semilogarithmic (exponential) and linear interpolation]. Results: The Lambert W model was validated for modeling attenuation versus attenuator thickness with respect to the data collected in this study (R2 > 0.99). Furthermore, Lambert W interpolation was more accurate and less sensitive to the choice of interpolation points used to estimate the HVL and∕or QVL than the traditional methods of semilogarithmic and linear interpolation. Conclusions: The proposed Lambert W model accurately describes attenuation of both monoenergetic radiation and (kilovoltage) polyenergetic beams (under narrow-beam geometry). PMID:21928626

  4. An empirical model of diagnostic x-ray attenuation under narrow-beam geometry

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; White, R. Allen

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe narrow-beam attenuation of kilovoltage x-ray beams for the intended applications of half-value layer (HVL) and quarter-value layer (QVL) estimations, patient organ shielding, and computer modeling. Methods: An empirical model, which uses the Lambert W function and represents a generalized Lambert-Beer law, was developed. To validate this model, transmission of diagnostic energy x-ray beams was measured over a wide range of attenuator thicknesses [0.49-33.03 mm Al on a computed tomography (CT) scanner, 0.09-1.93 mm Al on two mammography systems, and 0.1-0.45 mm Cu and 0.49-14.87more » mm Al using general radiography]. Exposure measurements were acquired under narrow-beam geometry using standard methods, including the appropriate ionization chamber, for each radiographic system. Nonlinear regression was used to find the best-fit curve of the proposed Lambert W model to each measured transmission versus attenuator thickness data set. In addition to validating the Lambert W model, we also assessed the performance of two-point Lambert W interpolation compared to traditional methods for estimating the HVL and QVL [i.e., semilogarithmic (exponential) and linear interpolation]. Results: The Lambert W model was validated for modeling attenuation versus attenuator thickness with respect to the data collected in this study (R{sup 2} > 0.99). Furthermore, Lambert W interpolation was more accurate and less sensitive to the choice of interpolation points used to estimate the HVL and/or QVL than the traditional methods of semilogarithmic and linear interpolation. Conclusions: The proposed Lambert W model accurately describes attenuation of both monoenergetic radiation and (kilovoltage) polyenergetic beams (under narrow-beam geometry).« less

  5. Apparatus for obtaining an X-ray image

    DOEpatents

    Watanabe, Eiji

    1979-01-01

    A computed tomography apparatus in which a fan-shaped X-ray beam is caused to pass through a section of an object, enabling absorption detection on the opposite side of the object by a detector comprising a plurality of discrete detector elements. An electron beam generating the X-ray beam by impacting upon a target is caused to rotate over the target.

  6. X-ray bubble lens and x-ray hollow plastic ball lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohmura, Yoshiki; Awaji, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    1998-11-01

    Recent development of anew refractive x-ray lens at SPring-8 is reported. This is the first refractive x-ray lens with a string of spherical lens in-spite of the string of cylindrical holes. Two types of the lends were developed which consists of a string of bubbles formed in a viscous liquid and a string of hollow plastic balls on pure water. They are sealed inside a container made from an acrylic resin. The x-ray focusing properties were investigated with the monochromated beam at an undulator beam line BL47 in SPring-8. Demagnified images of the source for these tow types of lens were observed at the energy of 19.0-24.5 keV with the focal length of approximately 5m. For the bubble lens, a gain of about 12 was observed. The observed vertical image size, 48 micrometers , was 6 times larger than the expected size. The method to improve the focusing capability is discussed.

  7. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials thatmore » are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.« less

  8. Dual-energy x-ray image decomposition by independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yifeng; Jiang, Dazong; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Dengfu; Lin, Gang

    2001-09-01

    The spatial distributions of bone and soft tissue in human body are separated by independent component analysis (ICA) of dual-energy x-ray images. It is because of the dual energy imaging modelí-s conformity to the ICA model that we can apply this method: (1) the absorption in body is mainly caused by photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering; (2) they take place simultaneously but are mutually independent; and (3) for monochromatic x-ray sources the total attenuation is achieved by linear combination of these two absorption. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed one needs no priori information about the accurate x-ray energy magnitude for imaging, while the results of the separation agree well with the conventional one.

  9. Electron Beam Production and Characterization for the PLEIADES Thomson X-ray Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V; Tremaine, A M

    2002-10-14

    We report on the performance of an S-band RF photocathode electron gun and accelerator for operation with the PLEIADES Thomson x-ray source at LLNL. Simulations of beam production, transport, and focus are presented. It is shown that a 1 ps, 500 pC electron bunch with a normalized emittance of less than 5 {pi}mm-mrad can be delivered to the interaction point. Initial electron measurements are presented. Calculations of expected x-ray flux are also performed, demonstrating an expected peak spectral brightness of 10{sup 20} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Effects of RF phase jitter are also presented, and planned phase measurements and controlmore » methods are discussed.« less

  10. The fundamental parameter method applied to X-ray fluorescence analysis with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantenburg, F. J.; Beier, T.; Hennrich, F.; Mommsen, H.

    1992-05-01

    Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis applying the fundamental parameter method is usually restricted to monochromatic excitation sources. It is shown here, that such analyses can be performed as well with a white synchrotron radiation spectrum. To determine absolute elemental concentration values it is necessary to know the spectral distribution of this spectrum. A newly designed and tested experimental setup, which uses the synchrotron radiation emitted from electrons in a bending magnet of ELSA (electron stretcher accelerator of the university of Bonn) is presented. The determination of the exciting spectrum, described by the given electron beam parameters, is limited due to uncertainties in the vertical electron beam size and divergence. We describe a method which allows us to determine the relative and absolute spectral distributions needed for accurate analysis. First test measurements of different alloys and standards of known composition demonstrate that it is possible to determine exact concentration values in bulk and trace element analysis.

  11. Progress on the Development of the Next Generation X-ray Beam Position Monitors at the Advanced Photon Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lee, S.H.; Yang, B.X.; Decker, G.

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are ke y elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The next generat ion XBPMs for high heat load front ends (HHL FEs) have been designed to meet these requirements by utilizing Cu K-edge x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from a pair of copper absorbers and have been installed at the front ends (FEs) of the APS. Com missioning data showed a significant performance improvement over the existing photoemission-based XBPMs. While a similar design concept can be applied for the canted undulator front ends, where two undulatormore » beams are separated by 1.0-mrad, the lower beam power (< 10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scat tering from the diamond blades placed edge-on to the x- ray beam. A prototype of the Compton scattering XBPM system was i nstalled at 24-ID-A in May 2015. In this report, the design and test results for XRF-based XBPM and Compton scattering based XBPM are presented. Ongoing research related to the development of the next generation XBPMs on thermal contac t resistance of a joint between two solid bodies is also discussed« less

  12. Progress on the development of the next generation x-ray beam position monitors at the advanced photon source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lee, S. H., E-mail: shlee@aps.anl.gov; Yang, B. X., E-mail: bxyang@aps.anl.gov; Decker, G., E-mail: decker@aps.anl.gov

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The next generation XBPMs for high heat load front ends (HHL FEs) have been designed to meet these requirements by utilizing Cu K-edge x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from a pair of copper absorbers and have been installed at the front ends (FEs) of the APS. Commissioning data showed a significant performance improvement over the existing photoemission-based XBPMs. While a similar design concept can be applied for the canted undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separatedmore » by 1.0-mrad, the lower beam power (< 10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scattering from the diamond blades placed edge-on to the x-ray beam. A prototype of the Compton scattering XBPM system was installed at 24-ID-A in May 2015. In this report, the design and test results for XRF-based XBPM and Compton scattering based XBPM are presented. Ongoing research related to the development of the next generation XBPMs on thermal contact resistance of a joint between two solid bodies is also discussed.« less

  13. Indus-2 X-ray lithography beamline for X-ray optics and material science applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dhamgaye, V. P., E-mail: vishal@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: vishal@rrcat.gov.in

    2014-04-24

    X-ray lithography is an ideal technique by which high aspect ratio and high spatial resolution micro/nano structures are fabricated using X-rays from synchrotron radiation source. The technique has been used for fabricating optics (X-ray, visible and infrared), sensors and actuators, fluidics and photonics. A beamline for X-ray lithography is operational on Indus-2. The beamline offers wide lithographic window from 1-40keV photon energy and wide beam for producing microstructures in polymers upto size ∼100mm × 100mm. X-ray exposures are possible in air, vacuum and He gas environment. The air based exposures enables the X-ray irradiation of resist for lithography and alsomore » irradiation of biological and liquid samples.« less

  14. Reduce beam hardening artifacts of polychromatic X-ray computed tomography by an iterative approximation approach.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongli; Yang, Zhi; Luo, Shuqian

    2017-01-01

    The beam hardening artifact is one of most important modalities of metal artifact for polychromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT), which can impair the image quality seriously. An iterative approach is proposed to reduce beam hardening artifact caused by metallic components in polychromatic X-ray CT. According to Lambert-Beer law, the (detected) projections can be expressed as monotonic nonlinear functions of element geometry projections, which are the theoretical projections produced only by the pixel intensities (image grayscale) of certain element (component). With help of a prior knowledge on spectrum distribution of X-ray beam source and energy-dependent attenuation coefficients, the functions have explicit expressions. Newton-Raphson algorithm is employed to solve the functions. The solutions are named as the synthetical geometry projections, which are the nearly linear weighted sum of element geometry projections with respect to mean of each attenuation coefficient. In this process, the attenuation coefficients are modified to make Newton-Raphson iterative functions satisfy the convergence conditions of fixed pointed iteration(FPI) so that the solutions will approach the true synthetical geometry projections stably. The underlying images are obtained using the projections by general reconstruction algorithms such as the filtered back projection (FBP). The image gray values are adjusted according to the attenuation coefficient means to obtain proper CT numbers. Several examples demonstrate the proposed approach is efficient in reducing beam hardening artifacts and has satisfactory performance in the term of some general criteria. In a simulation example, the normalized root mean square difference (NRMSD) can be reduced 17.52% compared to a newest algorithm. Since the element geometry projections are free from the effect of beam hardening, the nearly linear weighted sum of them, the synthetical geometry projections, are almost free from the effect of beam

  15. Characterization of short-pulse laser-produced x-rays for diagnosing magnetically driven cylindrical isentropic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Daykin, Tyler; Bauer, Bruno; Beg, Farhat

    2017-10-01

    We have developed an experimental platform to study material properties of magnetically compressed cylinder using a 1 MA pulsed power generator Zebra and a 50 TW subpicosecond short-pulse laser Leopard at the UNR's Nevada Terawatt Facility. According to a MHD simulation, strong magnetic fields generated by 100 ns rise time Zebra current can quasi-isentropically compress a material to the strongly coupled plasma regime. Taking advantage of the cylindrical geometry, a metal rod can be brought to higher pressures than that in the planar geometry. To diagnose the compressed rod with high precision x-ray measurements, an initial laser-only experiment was carried out to characterize laser-produced x-rays. Interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with solids produces broadband and monochromatic x-rays with photon energies high enough to probe dense metal rods. Bremsstrahlung was measured with Imaging plate-based filter stack spectrometers and monochromatic 8.0 keV Cu K-alpha was recorded with an absolutely calibrated Bragg crystal spectrometer. The broadband x-ray source was applied to radiography of thick metal objects and different filter materials were tested. The experimental results and a design of a coupled experiment will be presented.

  16. Hard X-ray and Particle Beams Research on 1.7 MA Z-pinch and Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Ishor; Kantsyrev, Victor; Safronova, Alla; Esaulov, Andrey; Nishio, Mineyuki; Shlyaptseva, Veronica; Keim, Steven; Weller, Michael; Stafford, Austin; Petkov, Emil; Schultz, Kimberly; Cooper, Matthew; PPDL Team

    2013-10-01

    Studies of hard x-ray (HXR) emission, electron and ion beam generation in z-pinch and laser plasmas are important for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and development of HXR sources from K-shell and L-shell radiation. The characteristics of HXR and particle beams produced by implosions of planar wire arrays, nested and single cylindrical wire arrays, and X-pinches were analyzed on 100 ns UNR Zebra generator with current up to 1.7 MA. In addition, the comparison of characteristics of HXR and electron beams on Zebra and 350 fs UNR Leopard laser experiments with foils has been performed. The diagnostics include Faraday cups, HXR diodes, different x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems, and ion mass spectrometer using the technique of Thomson parabola. Future work on HXRs and particle beams in HED plasmas is discussed. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. This work was also supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno.

  17. Flat field anomalies in an x-ray charge coupled device camera measured using a Manson x-ray source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Haugh, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.

    2008-10-15

    The static x-ray imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the x rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The charge coupled device (CCD) chip is an x-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2kx2k), 24 {mu}m square pixels, and 15 {mu}mmore » thick. A multianode Manson x-ray source, operating up to 10 kV and 10 W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/{delta}E{approx_equal}10. The x-ray beam intensity was measured using an x-ray photodiode that has an accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The x-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within {+-}1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at ten energy bands ranging from 930 to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an x-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.« less

  18. X-ray radiation generated by a beam of relativistic electrons in composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Noskov, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    The dynamic theory of coherent X-ray radiation generated by a beam of relativistic electrons in the three-layer structure consisting of an amorphous layer, a vacuum (air) layer and a single crystal has been developed. The phenomenon description is based on two main radiation mechanisms, namely, parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) and diffracted transition radiation (DTR). The possibility to increase the spectral-angular density of DTR under the condition of constructive interference of the transition radiation waves from different boundaries of such a structure has been demonstrated. It is shown that little changes in the layers thicknesses should not cause a considerable change in the interference picture, for example, the transition of constructive interference into destructive one. It means that in the considered process the conditions of constructive interference are enough stable to use them for increasing the intensity of X-ray source that can be created based on the interaction of relativistic electrons with such a structure.

  19. Behavior of characteristic X-rays from a partial-transmission-type X-ray target.

    PubMed

    Raza, Hamid Saeed; Kim, Hyun Jin; Ha, Jun Mok; Cho, Sung Oh

    2013-10-01

    The angular distribution of characteristic X-rays using a partial-transmission tungsten target was analyzed. Twenty four tallies were modeled to cover a 360° envelope around the target. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation results revealed that the characteristic X-ray flux is not always isotropic around the target. Rather, the flux mainly depends on the target thickness and the energy of the incident electron beam. A multi-energy photon generator is proposed to emit high-energy characteristic X-rays, where the target acts as a filter for the low-energy characteristic X-rays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a Hard X-ray Beam Position Monitor for Insertion Device Beams at the APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Glenn; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Singh, Om

    2006-11-01

    Long-term pointing stability requirements at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are very stringent, at the level of 500 nanoradians peak-to-peak or better over a one-week time frame. Conventional rf beam position monitors (BPMs) close to the insertion device source points are incapable of assuring this level of stability, owing to mechanical, thermal, and electronic stability limitations. Insertion device gap-dependent systematic errors associated with the present ultraviolet photon beam position monitors similarly limit their ability to control long-term pointing stability. We report on the development of a new BPM design sensitive only to hard x-rays. Early experimental results will be presented.

  1. SU-E-I-42: Measurement of X-Ray Beam Width and Geometric Efficiency in MDCT Using Radiochromic Films.

    PubMed

    Liillau, T; Liebmann, M; von Boetticher, H; Poppe, B

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to measure the x-ray beam width and geometric efficiency (GE) of a multi detector computed tomography scanner (MDCT) for different beam collimations using radiochromic films. In MDCT, the primary beam width extends the nominal beam collimation to irradiate the active detector elements uniformly (called 'over-beaming') which contributes to increased radiation dose to the patient compared to single detector CT. Therefore, the precise determination of the primary beam width and GE is of value for any CT dose calculation using Monte Carlo or analytical methods. Single axial dose profiles free in air were measured for 6 different beam collimations nT for a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64 Scanner with Gafchromic XR-QA2 films. The films were calibrated relative to the measured charge of a PTW semiflex ionization chamber (type: 31010) for a single rotation in the CT scanner at the largest available beam collimation of 28.8 mm. The beam energy for all measurements in this work was set to 120 kVp. For every measured dose profile and beam collimation the GEin-air and the full-width-at-half- maximum value (FWHM) as a value for the x-ray beam width was determined. Over-beaming factors FWHM / nT were calculated accordingly. For MDCT beam collimations from 7.2 (12×0.6 mm) to 28.8 (24×1.2 mm) the geometric efficiency was between 58 and 85 %. The over- beaming factor ranged from 1.43 to 1.11. For beam collimations of 1×5 mm and 1×10 mm the GE was 77 % and 84 % respectively. The over-beaming factors were close to 1, as expected. This work has shown that radiochromic films can be used for accurate x-ray beam width and geometric efficiency measurements due to their high spatial resolution. The measured free-in-air geometric efficiency and the over-beaming factor depend strongly on beam collimation. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. SU-D-209-02: Percent Depth Dose Curves for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Qualities Incorporating Copper Filtration

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wunderle, K; Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI; Godley, A

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to quantify percent depth dose (PDD) curves for fluoroscopic x-ray beam qualities incorporating added copper filtration. Methods: A PTW (Freiburg, Germany) MP3 water tank was used with a Standard Imaging (Middleton, WI) Exradin Model 11 Spokas Chamber to measure PDD curves for 60, 80, 100 and 120 kVp x-ray beams with copper filtration ranging from 0.0–0.9 mm at 22cm and 42cm fields of view from 0 to 150 mm of water. A free-in-air monitor chamber was used to normalize the water tank data to fluctuations in output from the fluoroscope. The measurements weremore » acquired on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope. The fluoroscope was inverted from the typical orientation providing an x-ray beam originating from above the water tank. The water tank was positioned so that the water level was located at 60cm from the focal spot; which also represents the focal spot to interventional reference plane distance for that fluoroscope. Results: PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with 0 mm of copper filtration compared well to previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)] for those beam qualities given differences in fluoroscopes, geometric orientation, type of ionization chamber, and the water tank used for data collection. PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with copper filtration were obtained and are presented, which have not been previously investigated and published. Conclusion: The equipment and processes used to acquire the reported data were sound and compared well with previously published data for PDDs without copper filtration. PDD data for the fluoroscopic x-ray beams incorporating copper filtration can be used as reference data for estimating organ or soft tissue dose at depth involving similar beam qualities or for comparison with mathematical models.« less

  3. Preliminary designs for X-ray source modifications for the Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray calibration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop preliminary designs for modifications to the X-ray source of the MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Recommendations are made regarding: (1) the production of an unpolarized X-ray beam, (2) modification of the source to provide characteristic X-rays with energies up to 40 keV, and (3) addition of the capability to calibrate instruments in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region.

  4. Optimization for Single-Spike X-Ray FELs at LCLS with a Low Charge Beam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, L.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.

    2011-12-14

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron radiation sources. At the low charge operation mode (20 pC), the x-ray pulse length can be <10 fs. In this paper we report our numerical optimization and simulations to produce even shorter x-ray pulses by optimizing the machine and undulator setup at 20 pC charge. In the soft x-ray regime, with combination of slotted-foil or undulator taper, a single spike x-ray pulse is achievablemore » with peak FEL power of a few 10s GW. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray Free electron laser (FEL), has started operation since 2009. With nominal operation charge of 250 pC, the generated x-ray pulse length is from 70 fs to a few hundred fs. This marks the beginning of a new era of ultrashort x-ray sciences. In addition, a low charge (20pC) operation mode has also been established. Since the collective effects are reduced at the low charge mode, we can increase the compression factor and still achieve a few kA peak current. The expected electron beam and x-ray pulses are less than 10 fs. There are growing interests in even shorter x-ray pulses, such as fs to sub-fs regime. One of the simple solutions is going to even lower charge. As discussed, single-spike x-ray pulses can be generated using 1 pC charge. However, this charge level is out of the present LCLS diagnostic range. 20 pC is a reasonable operation charge at LCLS, based on the present diagnostic system. At 20 pC in the soft x-ray wavelength regime, we have experimentally demonstrated that FEL can work at undercompression or over-compression mode, such as 1 degree off the full-compression; at full-compression, however, there is almost no lasing. In hard x-ray wavelength regime, we observed that there are reasonable photons generated even at

  5. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mascali, David, E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and themore » beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.« less

  6. Quantification of 2D elemental distribution maps of intermediate-thick biological sections by low energy synchrotron μ-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kump, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.

    2018-05-01

    Two fundamental-parameter (FP) based models for quantification of 2D elemental distribution maps of intermediate-thick biological samples by synchrotron low energy μ-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-μ-XRF) are presented and applied to the elemental analysis in experiments with monochromatic focused photon beam excitation at two low energy X-ray fluorescence beamlines—TwinMic, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy, and ID21, ESRF, Grenoble, France. The models assume intermediate-thick biological samples composed of measured elements, the sources of the measurable spectral lines, and by the residual matrix, which affects the measured intensities through absorption. In the first model a fixed residual matrix of the sample is assumed, while in the second model the residual matrix is obtained by the iteration refinement of elemental concentrations and an adjusted residual matrix. The absorption of the incident focused beam in the biological sample at each scanned pixel position, determined from the output of a photodiode or a CCD camera, is applied as a control in the iteration procedure of quantification.

  7. Azimuthal-angle dependence of L x-ray intensity following photoionization of Pb, Au, and W atoms by a linearly polarized photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namito, Y.; Ban, S.; Hirayama, H.

    2008-09-01

    We measured the L x-ray intensities of Pb, Au, and W for several different azimuthal angles and partially polarized photon beams by using high-purity low-energy Ge detectors. We utilized a monochromatized synchrotron beam as the source. It had an energy of 10.88 40keV , and its degree of linear polarization P ranged from 0.84 to 0.89. The scattering polar angle (θ) was 90°, and the azimuthal angle (ϕ1) was 0° or 90°, relative to the polarization direction. We obtained the x-ray intensity ratio R[=I(ϕ1=0°)/I(ϕ1=90°)] . We observed that the Ll intensities depended on the azimuthal scattering angle ϕ1 , i.e., R=0.92 0.94 , 0.91 0.94, and 0.90 0.93 for Pb, Au, and W, respectively. On the other hand, the dependence of Lα on the azimuthal scattering angle was not clear due to experimental uncertainty. The anisotropy of Lγ was not observed. These results agreed with the theoretical calculations based on Scofield’s theory.

  8. Photon activated therapy (PAT) using monochromatic Synchrotron x-rays and iron oxide nanoparticles in a mouse tumor model: feasibility study of PAT for the treatment of superficial malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background X-rays are known to interact with metallic nanoparticles, producing photoelectric species as radiosensitizing effects, and have been exploited in vivo mainly with gold nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of sensitizing effect of iron oxide nanoparticles for photon activated therapy. Methods X-rays photon activated therapy (PAT) was studied by treating CT26 tumor cells and CT26 tumor-bearing mice loaded with 13-nm diameter FeO NP, and irradiating them at 7.1 keV near the Fe K-edge using synchrotron x-rays radiation. Survival of cells was determined by MTT assay, and tumor regression assay was performed for in vivo model experiment. The results of PAT treated groups were compared with x-rays alone control groups. Results A more significant reduction in viability and damage was observed in the FeO NP-treated irradiated cells, compared to the radiation alone group (p < 0.04). Injection of FeO NP (100 mg/kg) 30 min prior to irradiation elevated the tumor concentration of magnetite to 40 μg of Fe/g tissue, with a tumor-to-muscle ratio of 17.4. The group receiving FeO NP and radiation of 10 Gy showed 80% complete tumor regression (CTR) after 15–35 days and relapse-free survival for up to 6 months, compared to the control group, which showed growth retardation, resulting in 80% fatality. The group receiving radiation of 40 Gy showed 100% CTR in all cases irrespective of the presence of FeO NP, but CTR was achieved earlier in the PAT-treated group compared with the radiation alone group. Conclusions An iron oxide nanoparticle enhanced therapeutic effect with relatively low tissue concentration of iron and 10 Gy of monochromatic X-rays. Since 7.1 keV X-rays is attenuated very sharply in the tissue, FeO NP-PAT may have promise as a potent treatment option for superficial malignancies in the skin, like chest wall recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:23111059

  9. Mass attenuation coefficients in the range 3.8⩽E⩽11 keV, K fluorescence yield and Kβ/Kα relative X-ray emission rate for Ti, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn measured with a tunable monochromatic X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Lépy, M.-C.

    2010-08-01

    This work presents new measurements of mass attenuation coefficients in the range 3.8⩽E⩽11 keV, K-absorption jump-ratios, Kα and Kβ fluorescence yields for Ti, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn. We use the experimental facility SOLEX, a tunable monochromatic X-ray source combined with an energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. The results are compared with theoretical values as well as with other experimental data and show a relatively good agreement. However, the derived K-jump-ratios appear larger than those widely used in the XCOM database. The Kα and Kβ fluorescence yields and the corresponding relative emission rates Kβ/Kα are also derived, which was made possible by the use of energy-dispersive detectors with good spectral resolution.

  10. X-ray vision of fuel sprays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin

    2005-03-01

    With brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources, microsecond time-resolved synchrotron X-ray radiography and tomography have been used to elucidate the detailed three-dimensional structure and dynamics of high-pressure high-speed fuel sprays in the near-nozzle region. The measurement allows quantitative determination of the fuel distribution in the optically impenetrable region owing to the multiple scattering of visible light by small atomized fuel droplets surrounding the jet. X-radiographs of the jet-induced shock waves prove that the fuel jets become supersonic under appropriate injection conditions and that the quantitative analysis of the thermodynamic properties of the shock waves can also be derived from the most direct measurement. In other situations where extremely axial-asymmetric sprays are encountered, mass deconvolution and cross-sectional fuel distribution models can be computed based on the monochromatic and time-resolved X-radiographic images collected from various rotational orientations of the sprays. Such quantitative analysis reveals the never-before-reported characteristics and most detailed near-nozzle mass distribution of highly transient fuel sprays.

  11. A soft X-ray beam-splitting multilayer optic for the NASA GEMS Bragg Reflection Polarimeter

    DOE PAGES

    Allured, Ryan; Kaaret, Philip; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; ...

    2013-04-12

    A soft X-ray, beam-splitting, multilayer optic has been developed for the Bragg Reflection Polarimeter (BRP) on the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer Mission (GEMS). The optic is designed to reflect 0.5 keV X-rays through a 90° angle to the BRP detector, and transmit 2–10 keV X-rays to the primary polarimeter. The transmission requirement prevents the use of a thick substrate, so a 2 μm thick polyimide membrane was used. Atomic force microscopy has shown the membrane to possess high spatial frequency roughness less than 0.2 nm rms, permitting adequate X-ray reflectance. A multilayer thin film was especially developedmore » and deposited via magnetron sputtering with reflectance and transmission properties that satisfy the BRP requirements and with near-zero stress. Furthermore, reflectance and transmission measurements of BRP prototype elements closely match theoretical predictions, both before and after rigorous environmental testing.« less

  12. A soft X-ray beam-splitting multilayer optic for the NASA GEMS Bragg Reflection Polarimeter

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Allured, Ryan; Kaaret, Philip; Fernandez-Perea, Monica

    A soft X-ray, beam-splitting, multilayer optic has been developed for the Bragg Reflection Polarimeter (BRP) on the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer Mission (GEMS). The optic is designed to reflect 0.5 keV X-rays through a 90° angle to the BRP detector, and transmit 2–10 keV X-rays to the primary polarimeter. The transmission requirement prevents the use of a thick substrate, so a 2 μm thick polyimide membrane was used. Atomic force microscopy has shown the membrane to possess high spatial frequency roughness less than 0.2 nm rms, permitting adequate X-ray reflectance. A multilayer thin film was especially developedmore » and deposited via magnetron sputtering with reflectance and transmission properties that satisfy the BRP requirements and with near-zero stress. Furthermore, reflectance and transmission measurements of BRP prototype elements closely match theoretical predictions, both before and after rigorous environmental testing.« less

  13. CVD-diamond-based position sensitive photoconductive detector for high-flux x-rays and gamma rays.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shu, D.

    1999-04-19

    A position-sensitive photoconductive detector (PSPCD) using insulating-type CVD diamond as its substrate material has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Several different configurations, including a quadrant pattern for a x-ray-transmitting beam position monitor (TBPM) and 1-D and 2-D arrays for PSPCD beam profilers, have been developed. Tests on different PSPCD devices with high-heat-flux undulator white x-ray beam, as well as with gamma-ray beams from {sup 60}Co sources have been done at the APS and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). It was proven that the insulating-type CVD diamond can be used to make a hard x-ray andmore » gamma-ray position-sensitive detector that acts as a solid-state ion chamber. These detectors are based on the photoconductivity principle. A total of eleven of these TBPMs have been installed on the APS front ends for commissioning use. The linear array PSPCD beam profiler has been routinely used for direct measurements of the undulator white beam profile. More tests with hard x-rays and gamma rays are planned for the CVD-diamond 2-D imaging PSPCD. Potential applications include a high-dose-rate beam profiler for fourth-generation synchrotrons radiation facilities, such as free-electron lasers.« less

  14. Density Measurement for MORB Melts by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Urakawa, S.; Suzuki, A.; Ohtani, E.; Katayama, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Density of silicate melts at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior and the differentiation of the terrestrial planets. The density measurements of silicate melts have been carried out by several methods (shock compression experiments and sink-float method in static experiments, etc.). However, since these methods have difficulties in acquisition of data at a desired pressure and temperature, the density of the silicate melt have been measured under only a few conditions. Recently a new density measurement was developed by the X-ray absorption method. Advantage of this method is to measure density of liquids at a desired pressure and temperature. In the present study we measured the density of MORB melt by X-ray absorption method. Experiments were carried out at the BL22XU beamline at SPring-8. A DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus was used for generation of high pressure and temperature. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the top anvil sizes of 6 mm and 4 mm. The energy of monochromateized X-ray beam was 23 keV. The intensities of incident and transmitted X-ray were measured by ion chambers. The density of the melt was calculated on the basis of Beer-Lambert law. The starting material was a glass with the MORB composition. Experiments were made from 1 atm to 5 GPa, from 300 to 2000 K. We compared the density of MORB melt with the compression curve of the melt in previous works. The density measured by this study is lower than that expected from the compression curve determined at higher pressures by the sink-float method. Structural change of the MORB melt with increasing pressure might be attributed to this discrepancy.

  15. Density Measurement for MORB Melts by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Urakawa, S.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Katayama, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Density of silicate melts at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior and the differentiation of the terrestrial planets. The density measurements of silicate melts have been carried out by several methods (shock compression experiments and sink-float method in static experiments, etc.). However, since these methods have difficulties in acquisition of data at a desired pressure and temperature, the density of the silicate melt have been measured under only a few conditions. Recently a new density measurement was developed by the X-ray absorption method. Advantage of this method is to measure density of liquids at a desired pressure and temperature. In the present study we measured the density of MORB melt by X-ray absorption method. Experiments were carried out at the BL22XU beamline at SPring-8. A DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus was used for generation of high pressure and temperature. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the edge-length of 6 mm. The energy of monochromateized X-ray beam was 23 keV. The intensities of incident and transmitted X-ray were measured by ion chambers. The density of the melt was calculated on the basis of Beer-Lambert law. The starting material was a glass with the MORB composition. Experiments were made from 1 atm to 4 GPa, from 300 to 2200 K. We compared the density of MORB melt with the compression curve of the melt in previous works. The density measured by this study is lower than that expected from the compression curve determined at higher pressures by the sink-float method. Structural change of the MORB melt with increasing pressure might be attributed to this discrepancy.

  16. Toward a fourth-generation x-ray source.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Monction, D. E.

    1999-05-19

    The field of synchrotron radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research that is possible with them. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the optical laser. Theoretical workmore » over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in flee-electron lasers. A major facility of this type based upon a superconducting linac could produce a cost-effective facility that spans wave-lengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotrons facilities, immense new scientific opportunities would result from fourth-generation sources.« less

  17. SU-F-T-53: Treatment Planning with Inhomogeneity Correction for Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using KV X-Ray Beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chen, Y; Ghaly, M; Souri, S

    Purpose: The current standard in dose calculation for intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using the ZEISS Intrabeam 50 kV x-ray system is based on depth dose measurements in water and no heterogeneous tissue effect has been taken into account. We propose an algorithm for pre-treatment planning including inhomogeneity correction based on data of depth dose measurements in various tissue phantoms for kV x-rays. Methods: Direct depth dose measurements were made in air, water, inner bone and cortical bone phantoms for the Intrabeam 50 kV x-rays with a needle applicator. The data were modelled by a function of power law combining exponential withmore » different parameters. Those phantom slabs used in the measurements were scanned to obtain CT numbers. The x-ray beam initiated from the source isocenter is ray-traced through tissues. The corresponding doses will be deposited/assigned at different depths. On the boundary of tissue/organ changes, the x-ray beam will be re-traced in new tissue/organ starting at an equivalent depth with the same dose. In principle, a volumetric dose distribution can be generated if enough directional beams are traced. In practice, a several typical rays traced may be adequate in providing estimates of maximum dose to the organ at risk and minimum dose in the target volume. Results: Depth dose measurements and modeling are shown in Figure 1. The dose versus CT number is shown in Figure 2. A computer program has been written for Kypho-IORT planning using those data. A direct measurement through 2 mm solid water, 2 mm inner bone, and 1 mm solid water yields a dose rate of 7.7 Gy/min. Our calculation shows 8.1±0.4 Gy/min, consistent with the measurement within 5%. Conclusion: The proposed method can be used to more accurately calculate the dose by taking into account the heterogeneous effect. The further validation includes comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.« less

  18. Comment on "Collision monochromatization in e+e- colliders"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatilov, D.

    2018-02-01

    Bogomyagkov and Levichev [Phys. Rev. Accel. Beams 20, 051001 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevAccelBeams.20.051001] have recently reported on monochromatization in collision schemes with crossing angle. From their results, in particular, it may seem that: (1) horizontal dispersion at the IP can provide monochromatization factor Λ ≫1 while retaining Piwinski angle ϕ >1 , (2) production rate in such a scheme for FCC-ee at 62.5 GeV can be larger than that in the nominal crab waist collision, and (3) strong rf focusing can be used for monochromatization purposes. We demonstrate here that the first two statements are not correct, and the last one is very doubtful.

  19. Spectromicroscope for the PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX): performance in biology, medicine and geology.

    PubMed

    Frazer, Bradley H; Girasole, Marco; Wiese, Lisa M; Franz, Torsten; De Stasio, Gelsomina

    2004-05-01

    Several X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopes (X-PEEMs) exist around the world at this time. We present recent performance and resolution tests of one of them, the Spectromicroscope for PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX) X-PEEM, installed at the University of Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center. With this state-of-the-art instrument we demonstrate chemical analysis capabilities on conducting and insulating specimens of diverse interests, and an unprecedented lateral resolution of 10 nm with monochromatic X-rays and 7.2 nm with ultraviolet illumination.

  20. Radio emission from an ultraluminous x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Kaaret, Philip; Corbel, Stephane; Prestwich, Andrea H; Zezas, Andreas

    2003-01-17

    The physical nature of ultraluminous x-ray sources is uncertain. Stellar-mass black holes with beamed radiation and intermediate black holes with isotropic radiation are two plausible explanations. We discovered radio emission from an ultraluminous x-ray source in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 5408. The x-ray, radio, and optical fluxes as well as the x-ray spectral shape are consistent with beamed relativistic jet emission from an accreting stellar black hole. If confirmed, this would suggest that the ultraluminous x-ray sources may be stellar-mass rather than intermediate-mass black holes. However, interpretation of the source as a jet-producing intermediate-mass black hole cannot be ruled out at this time.

  1. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-12-09

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray micro-beam studies of ancient Egyptian make-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinetto, P.; Anne, M.; Dooryhée, E.; Drakopoulos, M.; Dubus, M.; Salomon, J.; Simionovici, A.; Walter, Ph.

    2001-07-01

    Vases full of make-up are most often present in the burial furniture of Egyptian tombs dated from the pharaonic period. The powdered cosmetics made of isolated grains are analysed to identify their trace element signature. From this signature we identify the provenance of the mineral ingredients in the make-up and we observe different impurities in products, which have been demonstrated as synthetic substances by previous works. Focused X-ray micro-beam ( 2×5 μm2) is successively tuned at 11 keV, below the L III absorption edge of Pb, and 31.8 keV for global characterisation of the metal impurities. The fluorescence signal integrated over each single grain is detected against the X-ray micro-diffraction pattern collected in transmission with a bi-dimensional detector. Furthermore, for galena grains rich in Zn, the XANES signal at the K-absorption edge of Zn shows its immediate nearest-neighbour environment.

  3. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Habibi, M., E-mail: habibi.physics@gmail.com; Ghamari, F.

    2014-05-15

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration ofmore » the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.« less

  4. Rapid prototyping of Fresnel zone plates via direct Ga(+) ion beam lithography for high-resolution X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Eigenthaler, Ulrike; Weigand, Markus; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-11-26

    A significant challenge to the wide utilization of X-ray microscopy lies in the difficulty in fabricating adequate high-resolution optics. To date, electron beam lithography has been the dominant technique for the fabrication of diffractive focusing optics called Fresnel zone plates (FZP), even though this preparation method is usually very complicated and is composed of many fabrication steps. In this work, we demonstrate an alternative method that allows the direct, simple, and fast fabrication of FZPs using focused Ga(+) beam lithography practically, in a single step. This method enabled us to prepare a high-resolution FZP in less than 13 min. The performance of the FZP was evaluated in a scanning transmission soft X-ray microscope where nanostructures as small as sub-29 nm in width were clearly resolved, with an ultimate cutoff resolution of 24.25 nm, demonstrating the highest first-order resolution for any FZP fabricated by the ion beam lithography technique. This rapid and simple fabrication scheme illustrates the capabilities and the potential of direct ion beam lithography (IBL) and is expected to increase the accessibility of high-resolution optics to a wider community of researchers working on soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet microscopy using synchrotron radiation and advanced laboratory sources.

  5. Fast prototyping of high-aspect ratio, high-resolution x-ray masks by gas-assisted focused ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, F.; Malek, C.; Neogi, J.

    2001-01-01

    The capacity of chemically-assisted focused ion beam (fib) etching systems to undertake direct and highly anisotropic erosion of thin and thick gold (or other high atomic number [Z])coatings on x-ray mask membranes/substrates provides new levels of precision, flexibility, simplification and rapidity in the manufacture of mask absorber patterns, allowing the fast prototyping of high aspect ratio, high-resolution masks for deep x-ray lithography.

  6. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    As synchrotron light sources and optics deliver greater photon flux on samples, X-ray-induced photo-chemistry is increasingly encountered in X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments. The resulting problems are particularly pronounced for biological XAS experiments. This is because biological samples are very often quite dilute and therefore require signal averaging to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratios, with correspondingly greater exposures to the X-ray beam. This paper reviews the origins of photo-reduction and photo-oxidation, the impact that they can have on active site structure, and the methods that can be used to provide relief from X-ray-induced photo-chemical artifacts. PMID:23093745

  7. Optimizing contrast agents with respect to reducing beam hardening in nonmedical X-ray computed tomography experiments.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is commonly used as a contrast agent in nonmedical science and engineering, for example, to visualize Darcy flow in porous geological media using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Undesirable beam hardening artifacts occur when a polychromatic X-ray source is used, which makes the quantitative analysis of CT images difficult. To optimize the chemistry of a contrast agent in terms of the beam hardening reduction, we performed computer simulations and generated synthetic CT images of a homogeneous cylindrical sand-pack (diameter, 28 or 56 mm; porosity, 39 vol.% saturated with aqueous suspensions of heavy elements assuming the use of a polychromatic medical CT scanner. The degree of cupping derived from the beam hardening was assessed using the reconstructed CT images to find the chemistry of the suspension that induced the least cupping. The results showed that (i) the degree of cupping depended on the position of the K absorption edge of the heavy element relative to peak of the polychromatic incident X-ray spectrum, (ii) (53)I was not an ideal contrast agent because it causes marked cupping, and (iii) a single element much heavier than (53)I ((64)Gd to (79)Au) reduced the cupping artifact significantly, and a four-heavy-element mixture of elements from (64)Gd to (79)Au reduced the artifact most significantly.

  8. Observation of Threading Dislocations in Ammonothermal Gallium Nitride Single Crystal Using Synchrotron X-ray Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Ishikawa, Y.; Sugawara, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Hirano, K.

    2018-04-01

    Synchrotron monochromatic-beam x-ray topography observation has been performed on high-quality ammonothermal gallium nitride single crystal to evaluate threading dislocations (TD) in a nondestructive manner. Asymmetric diffractions with six equivalent g-vectors of 11-26, in addition to a symmetric diffraction with g = 0008, were applied to determine the Burgers vectors (b) of dislocations. It was found that pure edge-type TDs with \\varvec b = < {11 - 20} > /3 did not exist in the sample. A dominant proportion of TDs were of mixed type with \\varvec b = < {11 - 20} > /3 + < {0001} > , i.e., so-called c + a dislocations. Pure 1c screw dislocations with \\varvec b = < {0001} > and TDs with c-component larger than 1c were also observed.

  9. First demonstration of 10 keV-width energy-discrimination K-edge radiography using a cadmium-telluride X-ray camera with a tungsten-target tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-05-01

    Energy-discrimination X-ray camera is useful to perform monochromatic radiography using polychromatic X-rays. This X-ray camera was developed to carry out K-edge radiography using cerium and gadolinium-based contrast media. In this camera, objects are irradiated by a cone beam from a tungsten-target X-ray generator, and penetrating X-ray photons are detected by a cadmium-telluride detector with amplifiers. Both optimal photon-energy level and energy width are selected using a multichannel analyzer, and the photon number is counted by a counter card. Radiography was performed by the detector scanning using an x- y stage driven by a two-stage controller, and radiograms were shown on a personal computer monitor. In radiography, tube voltage and current were 90 kV and 5.8 μA, respectively, and the X-ray intensity was 0.61 μGy/s at 1.0 m from the X-ray source. The K-edge energies of cerium and gadolinium are 40.3 and 50.3 keV, respectively, and 10 keV-width enhanced K-edge radiography was performed using X-ray photons with energies just beyond K-edge energies of cerium and gadolinium. Thus, cerium K-edge radiography was carried out using X-ray photons with an energy range from 40.3 to 50. 3 keV, and gadolinium K-edge radiography was accomplished utilizing photon energies ranging from 50.3 to 60.3 keV.

  10. SU-G-201-08: Energy Response of Thermoluminescent Microcube Dosimeters in Water for Kilovoltage X-Ray Beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Di Maso, L; Lawless, M; Culberson, W

    Purpose: To characterize the energy dependence for TLD-100 microcubes in water at kilovoltage energies. Methods: TLD-100 microcubes with dimensions of (1 × 1 × 1) mm{sup 3} were irradiated with kilovoltage x-rays in a custom-built thin-window liquid water phantom. The TLD-100 microcubes were held in Virtual Water™ probes and aligned at a 2 cm depth in water. Irradiations were performed using the M-series x-ray beams of energies ranging from 50-250 kVp and normalized to a {sup 60}Co beam located at the UWADCL. Simulations using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code System were performed to model the x-ray beams, the {sup 60}Comore » beam, the water phantom and the dosimeters in the phantom. The egs-chamber user code was used to tally the dose to the TLDs and the dose to water. The measurements and calculations were used to determine the intrinsic energy dependence, absorbed-dose energy dependence, and absorbed-dose sensitivity. These values were compared to TLD-100 chips with dimensions of (3.2 × 0.9 × 0.9) mm{sup 3}. Results: The measured TLD-100 microcube response per dose to water among all investigated x-ray energies had a maximum percent difference of 61% relative to {sup 60}Co. The simulated ratio of dose to water to the dose to TLD had a maximum percent difference of 29% relative to {sup 60}Co. The ratio of dose to TLD to the TLD output had a maximum percent difference of 13% relative to {sup 60}Co. The maximum percent difference for the absorbed-dose sensitivity was 15% more than the used value of 1.41. Conclusion: These results confirm that differences in beam quality have a significant effect on TLD response when irradiated in water. These results also indicated a difference in TLD-100 response between microcube and chip geometries. The intrinsic energy dependence and the absorbed-dose energy dependence deviated up to 10% between TLD-100 microcubes and chips.« less

  11. Reflex Triode X-Ray Source Research on Gamble

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    dosimeters ( TLDs ) located at the vacuum window (18-27 cm from the converter), near the pinhole camera and near the image plate. II. EXPERIMENTAL...MeV- electron beams to thin converters in order to optimize emission of sub-100- keV x-rays. Thin converters reduce self-absorption of low-energy...x-rays, but the beam electrons must pass many times through the converter for efficient x-ray production. The triode configuration was found to be

  12. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainlessmore » steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.« less

  13. Single crystal CVD diamond membranes as Position Sensitive X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, K.; Menneglier, C.; Pomorski, M.

    2017-12-01

    Transparent X-ray Beam Position Monitor (XBPM) has been specifically developed for low energy X-ray beamlines (1.4 keV < E < 5 keV) allowing to transmit more than 80% of 2 keV energy beam. The detector is based on a free-standing single crystal CVD diamond membrane of 4 μm thickness with position-sensitive DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) resistive electrodes in duo-lateral configuration. The measured X-ray beam induced current (XBIC) due to the interaction of X-rays with diamond membrane allows precise monitoring of the absolute beam flux and the beam position (by the reconstruction of its center-of-gravity) at beam transmissions reaching 95%. This detector has been installed at SOLEIL synchrotron on the SIRIUS beamline monochromator output and it has shown charge collection efficiency (CCE) reaching 100% with no lag-effects and excellent beam intensity sensitivity monitoring. X-ray beam mapping of the detector showed an XBIC response inhomogeneity of less than 10% across the membrane, corresponding mainly to the measured variation of the diamond plate thickness. The measured beam position resolution is at sub-micron level depending on the beam flux and the readout electronics bandwidth.

  14. A simulation-based study on the influence of beam hardening in X-ray computed tomography for dimensional metrology.

    PubMed

    Lifton, Joseph J; Malcolm, Andrew A; McBride, John W

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a radiographic scanning technique for visualising cross-sectional images of an object non-destructively. From these cross-sectional images it is possible to evaluate internal dimensional features of a workpiece which may otherwise be inaccessible to tactile and optical instruments. Beam hardening is a physical process that degrades the quality of CT images and has previously been suggested to influence dimensional measurements. Using a validated simulation tool, the influence of spectrum pre-filtration and beam hardening correction are evaluated for internal and external dimensional measurements. Beam hardening is shown to influence internal and external dimensions in opposition, and to have a greater influence on outer dimensions compared to inner dimensions. The results suggest the combination of spectrum pre-filtration and a local gradient-based surface determination method are able to greatly reduce the influence of beam hardening in X-ray CT for dimensional metrology.

  15. Exploring vacuum birefringence based on a 100 PW laser and an x-ray free electron laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Baifei; Bu, Zhigang; Xu, Jiancai; Xu, Tongjun; Ji, Liangliang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2018-04-01

    Exploring vacuum birefringence with the station of extreme light at Shanghai Coherent Light Facility is considered. Laser pulses of intensity beyond 1023 W cm-2 are capable of polarizing the vacuum due to the ultra-strong electro-magnetic fields. The subtle difference of the vacuum refractive indexes along electric and magnetic fields leads to a birefringence effect for lights propagating through. The vacuum birefringence effect can now be captured by colliding a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam with a high-power laser. The initial XFEL beam of pure linear polarization is predicated to gain a very small ellipticity after passing through the laser stimulated vacuum. Various interaction geometries are considered, showing that the estimated ellipticity lies between 1.8 × 10-10 and 10-9 for a 100 PW laser interacting with a 12.9 keV XFEL beam, approaching the threshold for todays’ polarity detection technique. The detailed experimental set-up is designed, including the polarimeter, the focusing compound refractive lens and the optical path. When taking into account the efficiencies of the x-ray instruments, it is found that about 10 polarization-flipped x-ray photons can be detected for a single shot for our design. Considering the background noise level, accumulating runs are necessary to obtain high confident measurement.

  16. Development, beam characterization and chromosomal effectiveness of X-rays of RBC characteristic X-ray generator.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Ejima, Yosuke; Saigusa, Shin; Tachibana, Akira; Sasaki, Masao S

    2006-06-01

    A characteristic hot-filament type X-ray generator was constructed for irradiation of cultured cells. The source provides copper K, iron K, chromium K, molybdenum L, aluminium K and carbon K shell characteristic X-rays. When cultured mouse m5S cells were irradiated and frequencies of dicentrics were fitted to a linear-quadratic model, Y = alphaD + betaD2, the chromosomal effectiveness was not a simple function of photon energy. The alpha-terms increased with the decrease of the photon energy and then decreased with further decrease of the energy with an inflection point at around 10 keV. The beta-terms stayed constant for the photon energy down to 10 keV and then increased with further decrease of energy. Below 10 keV, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at low doses was proportional to the photon energy, which contrasted to that for high energy X- or gamma-rays where the RBE was inversely related with the photon energy. The reversion of the energy dependency occurred at around 1-2 Gy, where the RBE of soft X-rays was insensitive to X-ray energy. The reversion of energy-RBE relation at a moderate dose may shed light on the controversy on energy dependency of RBE of ultrasoft X-rays in cell survival experiments.

  17. Advanced High Brilliance X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Walter M.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility to dramatically increase the efficiency of laboratory based protein structure measurements through the use of polycapillary X-ray optics was investigated. This project initiated April 1, 1993 and concluded December 31, 1996 (including a no cost extension from June 31, 1996). This is a final report of the project. The basis for the project is the ability to collect X-rays from divergent electron bombardment laboratory X-ray sources and redirect them into quasiparallel or convergent (focused) beams. For example, a 0.1 radian (approx. 6 deg) portion of a divergent beam collected by a polycapillary collimator and transformed into a quasiparallel beam of 3 millradian (0.2 deg) could give a gain of 6(exp 2)/0.2(exp 2) x T for the intensity of a diffracted beam from a crystal with a 0.2 deg diffraction width. T is the transmission efficiency of the polycapillary diffraction optic, and for T=0.5, the gain would be 36/0.04 x O.5=45. In practice, the effective collection angle will depend on the source spot size, the input focal length of the optic (usually limited by the source spot-to-window distance on the x-ray tube) and the size of the crystal relative to the output diameter of the optic. The transmission efficiency, T, depends on the characteristics (fractional open area, surface roughness, shape and channel diameter) of the polycapillary optic and is typically in the range 0.2-0.4. These effects could substantially reduce the expected efficiency gain. During the course of this study, the possibility to use a weakly focused beam (0.5 deg convergence) was suggested which could give an additional 10-20 X efficiency gain for small samples . Weakly focused beams from double focusing mirrors are frequently used for macromolecular crystallography studies. Furthermore the crystals are typically oscillated by as much as 2 deg during each X-ray exposure in order to increase the reciprocal space (number of crystal planes) sampled and use of a slightly convergent

  18. Comparison of Online 6 Degree-of-Freedom Image Registration of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac X-Ray for Intracranial Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Shi, Wenyin; Andrews, David; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Lu, Bo; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam; Liu, Haisong

    2017-06-01

    The study was aimed to compare online 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam computed tomography and BrainLab ExacTrac X-ray imaging systems for intracranial radiosurgery. Phantom and patient studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (version 2.5), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (version 6.1.1). The phantom study was based on a Rando head phantom and was designed to evaluate isocenter location dependence of the image registrations. Ten isocenters at various locations representing clinical treatment sites were selected in the phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken when the phantom was located at each isocenter. The patient study included 34 patients. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken at each patient's treatment position. The 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations were performed on cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac, and residual errors calculated from cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac were compared. In the phantom study, the average residual error differences (absolute values) between cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac image registrations were 0.17 ± 0.11 mm, 0.36 ± 0.20 mm, and 0.25 ± 0.11 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.34° ± 0.08°, 0.13° ± 0.09°, and 0.12° ± 0.10°, respectively. In the patient study, the average residual error differences in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.20 ± 0.16 mm, 0.30 ± 0.18 mm, 0.21 ± 0.18 mm, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.40°± 0.16°, 0.17° ± 0.13°, and 0.20° ± 0.14°, respectively. Overall, the average residual error differences were <0.4 mm in the translational directions and <0.5° in the rotational directions. ExacTrac X-ray image

  19. Astronomy and Cancer Research: X-Rays and Nanotechnology from Black Holes to Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.

    It seems highly unlikely that any connection is to be found between astronomy and medicine. But then it also appears to be obvious: X-rays. However, that is quite superficial because the nature of X-rays in the two disciplines is quite different. Nevertheless, we describe recent research on exactly that kind of link. Furthermore, the linkage lies in atomic physics, and via spectroscopy which is a vital tool in astronomy and may also be equally valuable in biomedical research. This review begins with the physics of black hole environments as viewed through X-ray spectroscopy. It is then shown that similar physics can be applied to spectroscopic imaging and therapeutics using heavy-element (high-Z) moieties designed to target cancerous tumors. X-ray irradiation of high-Z nanomaterials as radiosensitizing agents should be extremely efficient for therapy and diagnostics (theranostics). However, broadband radiation from conventional X-ray sources (such as CT scanners) results in vast and unnecessary radiation exposure. Monochromatic X-ray sources are expected to be considerably more efficient. We have developed a new and comprehensive methodology—Resonant Nano-Plasma Theranostics (RNPT)—that encompasses the use of monochromatic X-ray sources and high-Z nanoparticles. Ongoing research entails theoretical computations, numerical simulations, and in vitro and in vivo biomedical experiments. Stemming from basic theoretical studies of Kα resonant photoabsorption and fluorescence in all elements of the Periodic Table, we have established a comprehensive multi-disciplinary program involving researchers from physics, chemistry, astronomy, pathology, radiation oncology and radiology. Large-scale calculations necessary for theory and modeling are done at a variety of computational platforms at the Ohio Supercomputer Center. The final goal is the implementation of RNPT for clinical applications.

  20. Kα resonance fluorescence in Al, Ti, Cu and potential applications for X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2015-04-01

    The Kα resonance fluorescence (RFL) effect via photoabsorptions of inner shell electrons as the element goes through multiple ionization states is studied. We demonstrate that the resonances observed recently in Kα (1s-2p) fluorescence in aluminum plasmas by using a high-intensity X-ray free-electron laser [1] are basically K-shell resonances in hollow atoms going through multiple ionization states at resonant energies as predicted earlier for gold and iron ions [2]. These resonances are formed below the K-shell ionization edge and shift toward higher energies with ionization states, as observed. Fluorescence emission intensities depend on transition probabilities for each ionization stage of the given element for all possible Kα (1 s → 2 p) transition arrays. The present calculations for resonant photoabsorptions of Kα photons in Al have reproduced experimentally observed features. Resonant cross sections and absorption coefficients are presented for possible observation of Kα RFL in the resonant energy ranges of 4.5-5.0 keV for Ti ions and 8.0-8.7 keV for Cu ions respectively. We suggest that theoretically the Kα RFL process may be driven to enhance the Auger cycle by a twin-beam monochromatic X-ray source, tuned to the K-edge and Kα energies, with potential applications such as the development of narrow-band biomedical X-ray devices.

  1. 3D localization of electrophysiology catheters from a single x-ray cone-beam projection

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Robert, Normand, E-mail: normand.robert@sri.utoronto.ca; Polack, George G.; Sethi, Benu

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray images allow the visualization of percutaneous devices such as catheters in real time but inherently lack depth information. The provision of 3D localization of these devices from cone beam x-ray projections would be advantageous for interventions such as electrophysiology (EP), whereby the operator needs to return a device to the same anatomical locations during the procedure. A method to achieve real-time 3D single view localization (SVL) of an object of known geometry from a single x-ray image is presented. SVL exploits the change in the magnification of an object as its distance from the x-ray source is varied.more » The x-ray projection of an object of interest is compared to a synthetic x-ray projection of a model of said object as its pose is varied. Methods: SVL was tested with a 3 mm spherical marker and an electrophysiology catheter. The effect of x-ray acquisition parameters on SVL was investigated. An independent reference localization method was developed to compare results when imaging a catheter translated via a computer controlled three-axes stage. SVL was also performed on clinical fluoroscopy image sequences. A commercial navigation system was used in some clinical image sequences for comparison. Results: SVL estimates exhibited little change as x-ray acquisition parameters were varied. The reproducibility of catheter position estimates in phantoms denoted by the standard deviations, (σ{sub x}, σ{sub y}, σ{sub z}) = (0.099 mm,  0.093 mm,  2.2 mm), where x and y are parallel to the detector plane and z is the distance from the x-ray source. Position estimates (x, y, z) exhibited a 4% systematic error (underestimation) when compared to the reference method. The authors demonstrated that EP catheters can be tracked in clinical fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: It has been shown that EP catheters can be localized in real time in phantoms and clinical images at fluoroscopic exposure rates. Further work is required to

  2. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  3. SU-E-I-77: X-Ray Coherent Scatter Diffraction Pattern Modeling in GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, A; Samei, E; Harrawood, B; Sahbaee, P; Chawla, A; Tan, Z; Brady, D

    2012-06-01

    To model X-ray coherent scatter diffraction patterns in GEANT4 for simulating experiments involving material detection through diffraction pattern measurement. Although coherent scatter cross-sections are modeled accurately in GEANT4, diffraction patterns for crystalline materials are not yet included. Here we describe our modeling of crystalline diffraction patterns in GEANT4 for specific materials and the validation of the results against experimentally measured data. Coherent scatter in GEANT4 is currently based on Hubbell's non-relativistic form factor tabulations from EPDL97. We modified the form-factors by introducing an interference function that accounts for the angular dependence between the Rayleigh-scattered photons and the photon wavelength. The modified form factors were used to replace the inherent form-factors in GEANT4. The simulation was tested using monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams (separately) incident on objects containing one or more elements with modified form-factors. The simulation results were compared against the experimentally measured diffraction images of corresponding objects using an in-house x-ray diffraction imager for validation. The comparison was made using the following metrics: number of diffraction rings, radial distance, absolute intensity, and relative intensity. Sharp diffraction pattern rings were observed in the monochromatic simulations at locations consistent with the angular dependence of the photon wavelength. In the polychromatic simulations, the diffraction patterns exhibited a radial blur consistent with the energy spread of the polychromatic spectrum. The simulated and experimentally measured patterns showed identical numbers of rings with close agreement in radial distance, absolute and relative intensities (barring statistical fluctuations). No significant change was observed in the execution time of the simulations. This work demonstrates the ability to model coherent scatter diffraction in GEANT4 in

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karaoui, Mohamed-Karim

    2007-04-15

    X-ray buildup factors of lead in broad beam geometry for energies from 15 to 150 keV are determined using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C). The obtained buildup factors data are fitted to a modified three parameter Archer et al. model for ease in calculating the broad beam transmission with computer at any tube potentials/filters combinations in diagnostic energies range. An example for their use to compute the broad beam transmission at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The calculated broad beam transmission is compared to data derived from literature, presenting good agreement.more » Therefore, the combination of the buildup factors data as determined and a mathematical model to generate x-ray spectra provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for lead barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.« less

  5. Comparison Between the NIST and the KEBS for the Determination of Air Kerma Calibration Coefficients for Narrow X-Ray Spectra and 137Cs Gamma-Ray Beams

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Michelle; Minniti, Ronaldo; Masinza, Stanslaus Alwyn

    2010-01-01

    Air kerma calibration coefficients for a reference class ionization chamber from narrow x-ray spectra and cesium 137 gamma-ray beams were compared between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). A NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber was calibrated by each laboratory in terms of the quantity air kerma in four x-ray reference radiation beams of energies between 80 kV and 150 kV and in a cesium 137 gamma-ray beam. The reference radiation qualities used for this comparison are described in detail in the ISO 4037 publication.[1] The comparison began in September 2008 and was completed in March 2009. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The comparison of the calibration coefficients is based on the average ratios of calibration coefficients. PMID:27134777

  6. Comparison Between the NIST and the KEBS for the Determination of Air Kerma Calibration Coefficients for Narrow X-Ray Spectra and (137)Cs Gamma-Ray Beams.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michelle; Minniti, Ronaldo; Masinza, Stanslaus Alwyn

    2010-01-01

    Air kerma calibration coefficients for a reference class ionization chamber from narrow x-ray spectra and cesium 137 gamma-ray beams were compared between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). A NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber was calibrated by each laboratory in terms of the quantity air kerma in four x-ray reference radiation beams of energies between 80 kV and 150 kV and in a cesium 137 gamma-ray beam. The reference radiation qualities used for this comparison are described in detail in the ISO 4037 publication.[1] The comparison began in September 2008 and was completed in March 2009. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The comparison of the calibration coefficients is based on the average ratios of calibration coefficients.

  7. Monochromatic x-ray radiography of laser-driven spherical targets using high-energy, picoseconds LFEX laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Fujioka, S.; Lee, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Shigemori, K.; Nagatomo, H.; Nishimura, H.; Sunahara, A.; Theobald, W.; Perez, F.; Patel, P. K.; Beg, F. N.

    2015-11-01

    Formation of a high density fusion fuel is essential in both conventional and advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) schemes for the self-sustaining fusion process. In cone-guided Fast Ignition (FI), a metal cone is attached to a spherical target to maintain the path for the injection of an intense short-pulse ignition laser from blow-off plasma created when nanoseconds compression lasers drive the target. We have measured a temporal evolution of a compressed deuterated carbon (CD) sphere using 4.5 keV K-alpha radiography with the Kilo-Joule, picosecond LFEX laser at the Institute of Laser Engineering. A 200 μm CD sphere attached to the tip of a Au cone was directly driven by 9 Gekko XII beams with 300 J/beam in a 1.3 ns Gaussian pulse. The LFEX laser irradiated on a Ti foil to generate 4.51 Ti K-alpha x-ray. By varying the delay between the compression and backlighter lasers, the measured radiograph images show an increase of the areal density of the imploded target. The detail of the quantitative analyses to infer the areal density and comparisons to hydrodynamics simulations will be presented. This work was performed with the support and under the auspices of the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS13KUGK072). H.S. was supported by the UNR's International Activities Grant program.

  8. Transmission of broad W/Rh and W/Al (target/filter) x-ray beams operated at 25-49 kVp through common shielding materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2012-07-01

    To provide transmission data for broad 25-39 kVp (kilovolt peak) W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al (target/filter, W-tungsten, Rh-rhodium, and Al-aluminum) x-ray beams through common shielding materials, such as lead, concrete, gypsum wallboard, wood, steel, and plate glass. The unfiltered W-target x-ray spectra measured on a Selenia Dimensions system (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA) set at 20-49 kVp were, respectively, filtered using 50-μm Rh and 700-μm Al, and were subsequently used for Monte Carlo calculations. The transmission of broad x-ray beams through shielding materials was simulated using Geant4 low energy electromagnetic physics package with photon- and electron-processes above 250 eV, including photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, and Rayleigh scattering. The calculated transmission data were fitted using Archer equation with a robust fitting algorithm. The transmission of broad x-ray beams through the above-mentioned shielding materials was calculated down to about 10(-5) for 25-39 kVp W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al. The fitted results of α, β, and γ in Archer equation were provided. The α values of kVp ≥ 40 were approximately consistent with those of NCRP Report No. 147. These data provide inputs for the shielding designs of x-ray imaging facilities with W-anode x-ray beams, such as from Selenia Dimensions.

  9. Technique charts for Kodak EC-L film screen system for portal localization in a 6MV X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Sandilos, P; Antypas, C; Paraskevopoulou, C; Kouvaris, J; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    Port films are used in radiotherapy for visual evaluation of the radiation fields and subsequent quantitative analysis. Common port films suffer from poor image quality compared to the simulator-diagnostic films and is desirable to determine the appropriate exposure required for the best image contrast. The aim of this work is to generate technique charts for the Kodak EC-L film screen system for use in a 6MV x-ray beam. Three homogeneous water phantoms were used to simulate head-neck, thorax and abdomen dimensions of adult human, correspondingly. The film screen system was calibrated in a 6MV x-ray beam and under various irradiation conditions. The film screen system behavior was studied as a function of phantom thickness, field size and air gap between the phantom and the film screen system. In each case the optimum film exposure which produces the maximum image contrast was determined. The generated technique charts for the EC-L film screen system and for a 6 MV x-ray beam are used in our radiotherapy department for daily quality assurance of the radiotherapy procedure.

  10. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  11. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Boone, John M.; Lane, Stephen M.

    1998-01-27

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  12. Can AERONET data be used to accurately model the monochromatic beam and circumsolar irradiances under cloud-free conditions in desert environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Y.; Blanc, P.; Wald, L.; Ghedira, H.

    2015-12-01

    Routine measurements of the beam irradiance at normal incidence include the irradiance originating from within the extent of the solar disc only (DNIS), whose angular extent is 0.266° ± 1.7 %, and from a larger circumsolar region, called the circumsolar normal irradiance (CSNI). This study investigates whether the spectral aerosol optical properties of the AERONET stations are sufficient for an accurate modelling of the monochromatic DNIS and CSNI under cloud-free conditions in a desert environment. The data from an AERONET station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and the collocated Sun and Aureole Measurement instrument which offers reference measurements of the monochromatic profile of solar radiance were exploited. Using the AERONET data both the radiative transfer models libRadtran and SMARTS offer an accurate estimate of the monochromatic DNIS, with a relative root mean square error (RMSE) of 6 % and a coefficient of determination greater than 0.96. The observed relative bias obtained with libRadtran is +2 %, while that obtained with SMARTS is -1 %. After testing two configurations in SMARTS and three in libRadtran for modelling the monochromatic CSNI, libRadtran exhibits the most accurate results when the AERONET aerosol phase function is presented as a two-term Henyey-Greenstein phase function. In this case libRadtran exhibited a relative RMSE and a bias of respectively 27 and -24 % and a coefficient of determination of 0.882. Therefore, AERONET data may very well be used to model the monochromatic DNIS and the monochromatic CSNI. The results are promising and pave the way towards reporting the contribution of the broadband circumsolar irradiance to standard measurements of the beam irradiance.

  13. High pressure and high temperature in situ X-ray diffraction studies in the Paris-Edinburgh cell using a laboratory X-ray source†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulemonde, Pierre; Goujon, Céline; Laversenne, Laetitia; Bordet, Pierre; Bruyère, Rémy; Legendre, Murielle; Leynaud, Olivier; Prat, Alain; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a new laboratory experimental set-up to study in situ the pressure-temperature phase diagram of a given pure element or compound, its associated phase transitions, or the chemical reactions involved at high pressure and high temperature (HP-HT) between different solids and liquids. This new tool allows laboratory studies before conducting further detailed experiments using more brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources or before kinetic studies. This device uses the diffraction of X-rays produced by a quasi-monochromatic micro-beam source operating at the silver radiation (λ(Ag)Kα 1, 2≈0.56 Å). The experimental set-up is based on a VX Paris-Edinburgh cell equipped with tungsten carbide or sintered diamond anvils and uses standard B-epoxy 5 or 7 mm gaskets. The diffracted signal coming from the compressed (and heated) sample is collected on an image plate. The pressure and temperature calibrations were performed by diffraction, using conventional calibrants (BN, NaCl and MgO) for determination of the pressure, and by crossing isochores of BN, NaCl, Cu or Au for the determination of the temperature. The first examples of studies performed with this new laboratory set-up are presented in the article: determination of the melting point of germanium and magnesium under HP-HT, synthesis of MgB2 or C-diamond and partial study of the P, T phase diagram of MgH2.

  14. Thermal management and prototype testing of Compton scattering X-ray beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Yang, B. X.; Collins, J. T.; Ramanathan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade. In the next-generation XBPMs for the canted-undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0 mrad, the lower beam power (<10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scattering from a diamond placed edge-on to the x-ray beam. Because of the high peak power density of the x-ray beams, this diamond experiences high temperatures and has to be clamped to a water-cooled heat spreader using thermal interface materials (TIMs), which play a key role in reducing the temperature of the diamond. To evaluate temperature changes through the interface via thermal simulations, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) of TIMs at an interface between two solid materials under even contact pressure must be known. This paper addresses the TCR measurements of several TIMs, including gold, silver, pyrolytic graphite sheet, and 3D graphene foam. In addition, a prototype of a Compton-scattering XBPM with diamond blades was installed at APS Beamline 24-ID-A in May 2015 and has been tested. This paper presents the design of the Compton-scattering XBPM, and compares thermal simulation results obtained for the diamond blade of this XBPM by the finite element method with in situ empirical measurements obtained by using reliable infrared technology.

  15. Thermal management and prototype testing of Compton scattering X-ray beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, S. H.; Yang, B. X.; Collins, J. T.; ...

    2017-02-07

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade. In the next-generation XBPMs for the canted-undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0 mrad, the lower beam power (<10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scattering from a diamond placed edge-on to the x-ray beam. Because of the high peak power density of the x-ray beams, this diamond experiences high temperatures and has to be clamped to a water-cooled heat spreader using thermal interface materials (TIMs),more » which play a key role in reducing the temperature of the diamond. To evaluate temperature changes through the interface via thermal simulations, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) of TIMs at an interface between two solid materials under even contact pressure must be known. This paper addresses the TCR measurements of several TIMs, including gold, silver, pyrolytic graphite sheet, and 3D graphene foam. In addition, a prototype of a Compton-scattering XBPM with diamond blades was installed at APS Beamline 24-ID-A in May 2015 and has been tested. This study presents the design of the Compton-scattering XBPM, and compares thermal simulation results obtained for the diamond blade of this XBPM by the finite element method with in situ empirical measurements obtained by using reliable infrared technology.« less

  16. Thermal management and prototype testing of Compton scattering X-ray beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Yang, B X; Collins, J T; Ramanathan, M

    2017-02-01

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade. In the next-generation XBPMs for the canted-undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0 mrad, the lower beam power (<10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scattering from a diamond placed edge-on to the x-ray beam. Because of the high peak power density of the x-ray beams, this diamond experiences high temperatures and has to be clamped to a water-cooled heat spreader using thermal interface materials (TIMs), which play a key role in reducing the temperature of the diamond. To evaluate temperature changes through the interface via thermal simulations, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) of TIMs at an interface between two solid materials under even contact pressure must be known. This paper addresses the TCR measurements of several TIMs, including gold, silver, pyrolytic graphite sheet, and 3D graphene foam. In addition, a prototype of a Compton-scattering XBPM with diamond blades was installed at APS Beamline 24-ID-A in May 2015 and has been tested. This paper presents the design of the Compton-scattering XBPM, and compares thermal simulation results obtained for the diamond blade of this XBPM by the finite element method with in situ empirical measurements obtained by using reliable infrared technology.

  17. Refractive optics to compensate x-ray mirror shape-errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal; Dhamgaye, Vishal; Pape, Ian

    2017-08-01

    Elliptically profiled mirrors operating at glancing angle are frequently used at X-ray synchrotron sources to focus X-rays into sub-micrometer sized spots. Mirror figure error, defined as the height difference function between the actual mirror surface and the ideal elliptical profile, causes a perturbation of the X-ray wavefront for X- rays reflecting from the mirror. This perturbation, when propagated to the focal plane results in an increase in the size of the focused beam. At Diamond Light Source we are developing refractive optics that can be used to locally cancel out the wavefront distortion caused by figure error from nano-focusing elliptical mirrors. These optics could be used to correct existing optical components on synchrotron radiation beamlines in order to give focused X-ray beam sizes approaching the theoretical diffraction limit. We present our latest results showing measurement of the X-ray wavefront error after reflection from X-ray mirrors and the translation of the measured wavefront into a design for refractive optical elements for correction of the X-ray wavefront. We show measurement of the focused beam with and without the corrective optics inserted showing reduction in the size of the focus resulting from the correction to the wavefront.

  18. Measurement of strain in Al-Cu interconnect lines with x-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solak, H. H.; Vladimirsky, Y.; Cerrina, F.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; Cai, Z.; Ilinski, P.; Legnini, D.; Rodrigues, W.

    1999-07-01

    We report measurement of strain in patterned Al-Cu interconnect lines with x-ray microdiffraction technique with a ˜1 μm spatial resolution. Monochromatized x rays from an undulator were focused on the sample using a phase fresnel zone plate and diffracted light was collected by an area detector in a symmetric, angle dispersive x-ray diffraction geometry. Measurements were made before and after the line sample was stressed for electromigration. Results show an increase in inter- and intra-grain strain variation after the testing. Differences in strain behavior of grains with (111) and (200) crystallographic planes parallel to the substrate surface were observed. A position dependent variation of strain after the testing was measured whereas no such dependence was found before the testing.

  19. X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, John H.; Bonse, Ulrich K.; Johnson, Quintin C.; Nichols, Monte C.; Saroyan, Ralph A.; Massey, Warren N.; Nusshardt, Rudolph

    1993-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor.

  20. Bremsstrahlung hard x-ray source driven by an electron beam from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, N.; Albert, F.; Shaw, J. L.; Papp, D.; Polanek, R.; King, P.; Milder, A. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Pak, A.; Pollock, B. B.; Hegelich, B. M.; Moody, J. D.; Park, J.; Tommasini, R.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, Hui; Joshi, C.

    2018-05-01

    An x-ray source generated by an electron beam produced using a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator (SM-LWFA) is explored for use in high energy density science facilities. By colliding the electron beam, with a maximum energy of 380 MeV, total charge of >10 nC and a divergence of 64 × 100 mrad, from a SM-LWFA driven by a 1 ps 120 J laser, into a high-Z foil, an x/gamma-ray source was generated. A broadband bremsstrahlung energy spectrum with temperatures ranging from 0.8 to 2 MeV was measured with an almost 2 orders of magnitude flux increase when compared with other schemes using LWFA. GEANT4 simulations were done to calculate the source size and divergence.

  1. X-ray Reflectivity Characterization of Ion Distribution at Biomimetic Membrane Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Peter; Pittler, Jens; Vaknin, David; Lösche, Mathias

    2003-03-01

    Ions at cell membrane surfaces may control the function and conformation of nearby biomolecules, thus playing an important role in inter- and intracellular transport as well as in biorecognition processes. Moreover, charge patterns at membrane surfaces may direct the growth of inorganic crystals in biomineralization. Langmuir monolayers are widely employed as model systems for studying charge distribution and growth processes at the organic/inorganic interface. We present a novel x-ray reflectivity technique that provides detailed information on ion distribution at biomembrane surfaces by using monochromatic x-rays at various energies at and away from the ion x-ray absorption edges. As a model, the interaction of Ba^2+ with DMPA^- (dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid) monolayers at the aqueous surface was studied. We find an unexpectedly large concentration of the cations near the interface where they form a Stern layer of bound ions. These studies have been complemented with conventional x-ray reflectivity measurements and extended to other anionic lipid species (DMPS, DMPG) and cations (Ca^2+).

  2. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of 145 MeV proton-irradiated AlBeMet 162

    DOE PAGES

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; McDonald, Kirk T.; Ghose, Sanjit; ...

    2016-08-03

    AlBeMet 162 (Materion Co., formerly Brush Wellman) has been irradiated with 145 MeV protons up to 1.2x10 20 cm -2 fluence, with irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-220oC. Macroscopic postirradiation evaluation on the evolution of mechanical and thermal properties was integrated with a comprehensive X-ray- diffraction study using high-energy monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray beams, which offered a microscopic view of the irradiation damage effects on AlBeMet. The study confirmed the stability of the metal-matrix composite, its resistance to proton damage, and the continuing separation of the two distinct phases, fcc aluminum and hcp beryllium, following irradiation. Furthermore, based onmore » the absence of inter-planar distance change during proton irradiation, it was confirmed that the stacking faults and clusters on the Al (111) planes are stable, and thus can migrate from the cascade region and be absorbed at various sinks. XRD analysis of the unirradiated AlBeMet 162 showed clear change in the texture of the fcc phase with orientation especially in the Al (111) reflection which exhibits a “non-perfect” six-fold symmetry, implying lack of isotropy in the composite.« less

  3. Quantum theory of structured monochromatic light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punnoose, Alexander; Tu, J. J.

    2017-08-01

    Applications that envisage utilizing the orbital angular momentum (OAM) at the single photon level assume that the OAM degrees of freedom of the photons are orthogonal. To test this critical assumption, we quantize the beam-like solutions of the vector Helmholtz equation from first principles. We show that although the photon operators of a diffracting monochromatic beam do not in general satisfy the canonical commutation relations, implying that the photon states in Fock space are not orthogonal, the states are bona fide eigenstates of the number and Hamiltonian operators. As a result, the representation for the photon operators presented in this work form a natural basis to study structured monochromatic light at the single photon level.

  4. Propagation of modulated electron and X-ray beams through matter and interactions with radio-frequency structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Miller, R. B.

    2018-02-01

    The generation and evolution of modulated particle beams and their interactions with resonant radiofrequency (RF) structures are of fundamental interest for both particle accelerator and vacuum electronic systems. When the constraint of propagation in a vacuum is removed, the evolution of such beams can be greatly affected by interactions with matter including scattering, absorption, generation of atmospheric plasma, and the production of multiple generations of secondary particles. Here, we study the propagation of 21 MeV and 25 MeV electron beams produced in S-band and L-band linear accelerators, and their interaction with resonant RF structures, under a number of combinations of geometry, including transmission through both air and metal. Both resonant and nonresonant interactions were observed, with the resonant interactions indicating that the RF modulation on the electron beam is at least partially preserved as the beam propagates through air and metal. When significant thicknesses of metal are placed upstream of a resonant structure, preventing any primary beam electrons from reaching the structure, RF signals could still be induced in the structures. This indicated that the RF modulation present on the electron beam was also impressed onto the x-rays generated when the primary electrons were stopped in the metal, and that this RF modulation was also present on the secondary electrons generated when the x-rays struck the resonant structures. The nature of these interactions and their sensitivities to changes in system configurations will be discussed.

  5. Ground-based x-ray calibration of the Astro-H/Hitomi soft x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Ryo; Hayashi, Takayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ishida, Manabu; Tomikawa, Kazuki; Sato, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Okajima, Takashi; Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Mori, Hideyuki; Izumiya, Takanori; Minami, Sari

    2018-01-01

    We present the summary of the on-ground calibration of two soft x-ray telescopes (SXT-I and SXT-S), developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), onboard Astro-H/Hitomi. After the initial x-ray measurements with a diverging beam at the GSFC 100-m beamline, we performed the full calibration of the x-ray performance, using the 30-m x-ray beamline facility at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in Japan. We adopted a raster scan method with a narrow x-ray pencil beam with a divergence of ˜15″. The on-axis effective area (EA), half-power diameter, and vignetting function were measured at several energies between 1.5 and 17.5 keV. The detailed results appear in tables and figures in this paper. We measured and evaluated the performance of the SXT-S and the SXT-I with regard to the detector-limited field-of-view and the pixel size of the paired flight detector, i.e., SXS and the SXI, respectively. The primary items measured are the EA, image quality, and stray light for on-axis and off-axis sources. The accurate measurement of these parameters is vital to make the precise response function of the ASTRO-H SXTs. This paper presents the definitive results of the ground-based calibration of the ASTRO-H SXTs.

  6. Simulation tools for analyzer-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudevilla, Oriol; Zhou, Wei; Stoupin, Stanislav; Verman, Boris; Brankov, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) belongs to a broader family of phase-contrast (PC) X-ray imaging modalities. Unlike the conventional X-ray radiography, which measures only X-ray absorption, in PC imaging one can also measures the X-rays deflection induced by the object refractive properties. It has been shown that refraction imaging provides better contrast when imaging the soft tissue, which is of great interest in medical imaging applications. In this paper, we introduce a simulation tool specifically designed to simulate the analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. By utilizing ray tracing and basic physical principles of diffraction theory our simulation tool can predicting the X-ray beam profile shape, the energy content, the total throughput (photon count) at the detector. In addition we can evaluate imaging system point-spread function for various system configurations.

  7. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  8. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics. PMID:26642305

  9. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  10. X-ray focal spot locating apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Hubert W.

    1985-07-30

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  11. Hybrid deterministic-stochastic modeling of x-ray beam bowtie filter scatter on a CT system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Hsieh, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of scatter generated by bowtie filter (i.e. x-ray beam compensator) is crucial for providing artifact free images on the CT scanners. Our approach is to use a hybrid deterministic-stochastic simulation to estimate the scatter level generated by a bowtie filter made of a material with low atomic number. First, major components of CT systems, such as source, flat filter, bowtie filter, body phantom, are built into a 3D model. The scattered photon fluence and the primary transmitted photon fluence are simulated by MCNP - a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit. The rejection of scattered photon by the post patient collimator (anti-scatter grid) is simulated with an analytical formula. The biased sinogram is created by superimposing scatter signal generated by the simulation onto the primary x-ray beam signal. Finally, images with artifacts are reconstructed with the biased signal. The effect of anti-scatter grid height on scatter rejection are also discussed and demonstrated.

  12. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    PubMed Central

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  13. HPHT growth and x-ray characterization of high-quality type IIa diamond.

    PubMed

    Burns, R C; Chumakov, A I; Connell, S H; Dube, D; Godfried, H P; Hansen, J O; Härtwig, J; Hoszowska, J; Masiello, F; Mkhonza, L; Rebak, M; Rommevaux, A; Setshedi, R; Van Vaerenbergh, P

    2009-09-09

    applications with coherence preservation. The targets for further development of the type IIa diamond are size, crystal perfection, as measured by the techniques of white beam and monochromatic x-ray diffraction imaging (historically called x-ray topography), and also surface quality. Diamond plates extracted from the cubic growth sector furthest from the seed of the new low strain material produces no measurable broadening of the x-ray rocking curve width. One measures essentially the crystal reflectivity as defined by the intrinsic reflectivity curve (Darwin curve) width of a perfect crystal. In these cases the more sensitive technique of plane wave topography has been used to establish a local upper limit of the strain at the level of an 'effective misorientation' of 10(-7) rad.

  14. Transmission of broad W/Rh and W/Al (target/filter) x-ray beams operated at 25-49 kVp through common shielding materials

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To provide transmission data for broad 25-39 kVp (kilovolt peak) W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al (target/filter, W-tungsten, Rh-rhodium, and Al-aluminum) x-ray beams through common shielding materials, such as lead, concrete, gypsum wallboard, wood, steel, and plate glass. Methods: The unfiltered W-target x-ray spectra measured on a Selenia Dimensions system (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA) set at 20-49 kVp were, respectively, filtered using 50-{mu}m Rh and 700-{mu}m Al, and were subsequently used for Monte Carlo calculations. The transmission of broad x-ray beams through shielding materials was simulated using Geant4 low energy electromagnetic physics package with photon- and electron-processes above 250 eV,more » including photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, and Rayleigh scattering. The calculated transmission data were fitted using Archer equation with a robust fitting algorithm. Results: The transmission of broad x-ray beams through the above-mentioned shielding materials was calculated down to about 10{sup -5} for 25-39 kVp W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al. The fitted results of {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} in Archer equation were provided. The {alpha} values of kVp Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 40 were approximately consistent with those of NCRP Report No. 147. Conclusions: These data provide inputs for the shielding designs of x-ray imaging facilities with W-anode x-ray beams, such as from Selenia Dimensions.« less

  15. Monochromator for continuous spectrum x-ray radiation

    DOEpatents

    Staudenmann, J.L.; Liedl, G.L.

    1983-12-02

    A monochromator for use with synchrotron x-ray radiation comprises two diffraction means which can be rotated independently and independent means for translationally moving one diffraction means with respect to the other. The independence of the rotational and translational motions allows Bragg angles from 3.5/sup 0/ to 86.5/sup 0/, and facilitates precise and high-resolution monochromatization over a wide energy range. The diffraction means are removably mounted so as to be readily interchangeable, which allows the monochromator to be used for both non-dispersive and low dispersive.

  16. Monochromator for continuous spectrum x-ray radiation

    DOEpatents

    Staudenmann, Jean-Louis; Liedl, Gerald L.

    1987-07-07

    A monochromator for use with synchrotron x-ray radiation comprises two diffraction means which can be rotated independently and independent means for translationally moving one diffraction means with respect to the other. The independence of the rotational and translational motions allows Bragg angles from 3.5.degree. to 86.5.degree., and facilitates precise and high-resolution monochromatization over a wide energy range. The diffraction means are removably mounted so as to be readily interchangeable, which allows the monochromator to be used for both non-dispersive and low dispersive work.

  17. Soft X-ray Spectrometer for Characterization of Electron Beam Driven WDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramey, Nicholas; Coleman, Joshua; Perry, John

    2017-10-01

    A preliminary design study is being performed on a soft X-ray spectrometer to measure K-shell spectra emitted by a warm dense plasma generated by an intense, relativistic electron beam interacting with a thin, low-Z metal foil. A 100-ns-long electron pulse with a beam current of 1.7 kA and energy of 19.8 MeV deposits energy into the thin metal foil heating it to a warm dense plasma. The collisional ionization of the target by the electron beam produces an anisotropic angular distribution of K-shell radiation and a continuum of both scattered electrons and Bremsstrahlung up to the beam energy of 19.8 MeV. A proof-of-principle Bragg-type spectrometer has been built to measure the Ti K- α and K- β lines. The goal of the spectrometer is to measure the temperature and density of this warm dense plasma for the first time with this heating technique. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  18. Combined use of infrared and hard X-ray microprobes for spectroscopy-based neuroanatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surowka, A. D.; Ziomber, A.; Czyzycki, M.; Migliori, A.; Pieklo, L.; Kasper, K.; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M.

    2018-05-01

    Understanding the pathological triggers that affect the structural and physiological integrity of biochemical milieu of neurons is crucial to extend our knowledge on brain disorders, that are in many circumstances hardly treatable. Over recently, by using sophisticated hyperspectral micro-imaging modalities, it has been placed within our reach to get an insight into high fidelity histological details along with corresponding biochemical information in a label-free fashion, without using any additional chemical fixatives. However, in order to push forwards extensive application of these methods in the clinical arena, it is viable to make further iterations in novel data analysis protocols in order to boost their sensitivity. Therefore, in our study we proposed a new combined approach utilizing both benchtop Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) micro-spectroscopies coupled with multivariate data clustering using the K-means algorithm for combined molecular and elemental micro-imaging, so that these complimentary analytical tools could be used for delineating between various brain structures based on their biochemical composition. By utilizing mid-IR transmission FTIR experiments, the biochemical composition in terms of lipids, proteins and phosphodiesters became accessible. In turn, the SR-XRF experiment was carried out at the advanced IAEA X-ray spectrometry station at Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste. By measuring in vacuum and by using the primary exciting X-ray beam, monochromatized to 10.5 keV, we took advantage of accessing the characteristic X-ray lines of a variety of elements ranging from carbon to zinc. Herein, we can report that the developed methodology has high specificity for label-free discriminating between lipid- and protein-rich brain tissue areas.

  19. Focusing properties of x-ray polymer refractive lenses from SU-8 resist layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigirev, Anatoly A.; Snigireva, Irina; Drakopoulos, Michael; Nazmov, Vladimir; Reznikova, Elena; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Grigoriev, Maxim; Mohr, Jurgen; Saile, Volker

    2003-12-01

    Compound refractive lenses printed in Al and Be are becoming the key X-ray focusing and imaging components of beamline optical layouts at the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation sources. Recently proposed planar optical elements based on Si, diamond etc. may substantially broaden the spectrum of the refractive optics applicability. Planar optics has focal distances ranging from millimeters to tens of meters offering nano- and micro-focusing lenses, as well as beam condensers and collimators. Here we promote deep X-ray lithography and LIGA-type techniques to create high aspect-ratio lens structures for different optical geometries. Planar X-ray refractive lenses were manufactured in 1 mm thick SU-8 negative resist layer by means of deep synchrotron radiation lithography. The focusing properties of lenses were studied at ID18F and BM5 beamlines at the ESRF using monochromatic radiation in the energy range of 10 - 25 keV. By optimizing lens layout, mask making and resist processing, lenses of good quality were fabricated. The resolution of about 270 nm (FWHM) with gain in the order of 300 was measured at 14 keV. In-line holography of B-fiber was realized in imaging and projection mode with a magnification of 3 and 20, respectively. Submicron features of the fiber were clearly resolved. A radiation stability test proved that the fabricated lenses don't change focusing characteristics after dose of absorbed X-ray radiation of about 2 MJ/cm3. The unique radiation stability along with the high effficiency of SU8 lenses opens wide range of their synchrotron radiation applications such as microfocusing elements, condensers and collimators.

  20. A beam optics study of a modular multi-source X-ray tube for novel computed tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brandon J.; Radtke, Jeff; Chen, Guang-Hong; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    A modular implementation of a scanning multi-source X-ray tube is designed for the increasing number of multi-source imaging applications in computed tomography (CT). An electron beam array coupled with an oscillating magnetic deflector is proposed as a means for producing an X-ray focal spot at any position along a line. The preliminary multi-source model includes three thermionic electron guns that are deflected in tandem by a slowly varying magnetic field and pulsed according to a scanning sequence that is dependent on the intended imaging application. Particle tracking simulations with particle dynamics analysis software demonstrate that three 100 keV electron beams are laterally swept a combined distance of 15 cm over a stationary target with an oscillating magnetic field of 102 G perpendicular to the beam axis. Beam modulation is accomplished using 25 μs pulse widths to a grid electrode with a reverse gate bias of -500 V and an extraction voltage of +1000 V. Projected focal spot diameters are approximately 1 mm for 138 mA electron beams and the stationary target stays within thermal limits for the 14 kW module. This concept could be used as a research platform for investigating high-speed stationary CT scanners, for lowering dose with virtual fan beam formation, for reducing scatter radiation in cone-beam CT, or for other industrial applications.

  1. Improvement of graphite crystal analyzer for light elements on X-ray fluorescence holography measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happo, Naohisa; Hada, Takuma; Kubota, Atsushi; Ebisu, Yoshihiro; Hosokawa, Shinya; Kimura, Koji; Tajiri, Hiroo; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2018-05-01

    Using a graphite crystal analyzer, focused monochromatic fluorescent X-rays can be obtained on an X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) measurement. To measure the holograms of elements lighter than Ti, we improved a cylindrical-type crystal analyzer and constructed a small C-shaped analyzer. Using the constructed C-shaped analyzer, a Ca Kα hologram of a fluorite single crystal was obtained, from which we reconstructed a clear atomic image. The XFH measurements for the K, Ca, and Sc elements become possible using the presently constructed analyzer.

  2. X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, J.H.; Bonse, U.K.; Johnson, Q.C.; Nichols, M.C.; Saroyan, R.A.; Massey, W.N.; Nusshardt, R.

    1993-09-14

    A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: (a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, (b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the (c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, (d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and (e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor. 25 figures.

  3. X-ray Optics Testing Beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Macrander, Albert; Erdmann, Mark; Kujala, Naresh

    2016-07-27

    Beamline 1-BM at the APS has been reconfigured in part for testing of synchrotron optics with both monochromatic and white beams. Operational since 2013, it was reconfigured to accommodate users of the APS as well as users from other DOE facilities. Energies between 6 and 28 keV are available. The beamline was reconfigured to remove two large mirrors and to provide a 100 mm wide monochromatics beam at 54 m from the source. In addition a custom white beam shutter was implemented for topography exposures as short as 65 millisec over the full available horizontal width. Primary agendas include bothmore » white beam and monochromatic beam topography, Talbot grating interferometry, and tests of focusing optics. K-B mirrors, MLLs, and FZPs have been characterized. Measurements of the spatial coherence lengths on the beamline were obtained with Talbot interferometry. Topography data has been reported.« less

  4. X-ray optics testing beamline 1-BM at the advanced photon source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Macrander, Albert, E-mail: atm@anl.gov; Erdmann, Mark; Kujala, Naresh

    2016-07-27

    Beamline 1-BM at the APS has been reconfigured in part for testing of synchrotron optics with both monochromatic and white beams. Operational since 2013, it was reconfigured to accommodate users of the APS as well as users from other DOE facilities. Energies between 6 and 28 keV are available. The beamline was reconfigured to remove two large mirrors and to provide a 100 mm wide monochromatic beam at 54 m from the source. In addition a custom white beam shutter was implemented for topography exposures as short as 65 millisec over the full available horizontal width. Primary agendas include bothmore » white beam and monochromatic beam topography, Talbot grating interferometry, and tests of focusing optics. K-B mirrors, MLLs, and FZPs have been characterized. Measurements of the spatial coherence lengths on the beamline were obtained with Talbot interferometry. Topography data has been reported.« less

  5. Dual energy scanning beam laminographic x-radiography

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    1998-01-01

    A multiple x-ray energy level imaging system includes a scanning x-ray beam and two detector design having a first low x-ray energy sensitive detector and a second high x-ray energy sensitive detector. The low x-ray energy detector is placed next to or in front of the high x-ray energy detector. The low energy sensitive detector has small stopping power for x-rays. The lower energy x-rays are absorbed and converted into electrical signals while the majority of the higher energy x-rays pass through undetected. The high energy sensitive detector has a large stopping power for x-rays as well as it having a filter placed between it and the object to absorb the lower energy x-rays. In a second embodiment; a single energy sensitive detector is provided which provides an output signal proportional to the amount of energy in each individual x-ray it absorbed. It can then have an electronic threshold or thresholds set to select two or more energy ranges for the images. By having multiple detectors located at different positions, a dual energy laminography system is possible.

  6. Dual energy scanning beam laminographic x-radiography

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.F.

    1998-04-21

    A multiple x-ray energy level imaging system includes a scanning x-ray beam and two detector design having a first low x-ray energy sensitive detector and a second high x-ray energy sensitive detector. The low x-ray energy detector is placed next to or in front of the high x-ray energy detector. The low energy sensitive detector has small stopping power for x-rays. The lower energy x-rays are absorbed and converted into electrical signals while the majority of the higher energy x-rays pass through undetected. The high energy sensitive detector has a large stopping power for x-rays as well as it having a filter placed between it and the object to absorb the lower energy x-rays. In a second embodiment; a single energy sensitive detector is provided which provides an output signal proportional to the amount of energy in each individual x-ray it absorbed. It can then have an electronic threshold or thresholds set to select two or more energy ranges for the images. By having multiple detectors located at different positions, a dual energy laminography system is possible. 6 figs.

  7. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  8. HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY PINHOLE CAMERA FOR HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON BEAM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yang, B.; Morgan, J.; Lee, S.H.

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is developing a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice based storage ring as the next major upgrade, featuring a 20-fold reduction in emittance. Combining the reduction of beta functions, the electron beam sizes at bend magnet sources may be reduced to reach 5 – 10 µm for 10% vertical coupling. The x-ray pinhole camera currently used for beam size monitoring will not be adequate for the new task. By increasing the operating photon energy to 120 – 200 keV, the pinhole camera’s resolution is expected to reach below 4 µm. The peak height of the pinhole imagemore » will be used to monitor relative changes of the beam sizes and enable the feedback control of the emittance. We present the simulation and the design of a beam size monitor for the APS storage ring.« less

  9. Two-colour hard X-ray free-electron laser with wide tunability.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Inubushi, Yuichi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sato, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Togashi, Tadashi; Togawa, Kazuaki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Ultrabrilliant, femtosecond X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) have promoted the investigation of exotic interactions between intense X-rays and matters, and the observation of minute targets with high spatio-temporal resolution. Although a single X-ray beam has been utilized for these experiments, the use of multiple beams with flexible and optimum beam parameters should drastically enhance the capability and potentiality of XFELs. Here we show a new light source of a two-colour double-pulse (TCDP) XFEL in hard X-rays using variable-gap undulators, which realizes a large and flexible wavelength separation of more than 30% with an ultraprecisely controlled time interval in the attosecond regime. Together with sub-10-fs pulse duration and multi-gigawatt peak powers, the TCDP scheme enables us to elucidate X-ray-induced ultrafast transitions of electronic states and structures, which will significantly contribute to the advancement of ultrafast chemistry, plasma and astronomical physics, and quantum X-ray optics.

  10. Laue lens for radiotherapy applications through a focused hard x-ray beam: a feasibility study on requirements and tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camattari, Riccardo

    2017-09-01

    Focusing a hard x-ray beam would represent an innovative technique for tumour treatment, since such a beam may deliver a dose to a tumour located at a given depth under the skin, sparing the surrounding healthy cells. A detailed study of a focusing system for hard x-ray aimed at radiotherapy is presented here. Such a focusing system, named Laue lens, exploits x-ray diffraction and consists of a series of crystals disposed as concentric rings capable of concentrating a flux of x-rays towards a focusing point. A feasibility study regarding the positioning tolerances of the crystalline optical elements has been carried out. It is shown that a Laue lens can effectively be used in the context of radiotherapy for tumour treatments provided that the mounting errors are below certain values, which are reachable in the modern micromechanics. An extended survey based on an analytical approach and on simulations is presented for precisely estimating all the contributions of each mounting error, analysing their effect on the focal spot of the Laue lens. Finally, a simulation for evaluating the released dose in a water phantom is shown.

  11. Compensating the electron beam energy spread by the natural transverse gradient of laser undulator in all-optical x-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong; Dai, Zhimin; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-06-02

    All-optical ideas provide a potential to dramatically cut off the size and cost of x-ray light sources to the university-laboratory scale, with the combination of the laser-plasma accelerator and the laser undulator. However, the large longitudinal energy spread of the electron beam from laser-plasma accelerator may hinder the way to high brightness of these all-optical light sources. In this paper, the beam energy spread effect is proposed to be significantly compensated by the natural transverse gradient of a laser undulator when properly transverse-dispersing the electron beam. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations on conventional laser-Compton scattering sources and high-gain all-optical x-ray free-electron lasers with the electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators are presented.

  12. Development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray sources using ultrahigh power lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Hojbota, Calin; Jeon, Jong Ho; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seong Ku; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Hwang Woon; Pathak, Vishwa B.; Pae, Ki Hong; Sebban, Stéphane; Tissandier, Fabien; Gautier, Julien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Malka, Victor; Nam, Chang Hee

    2017-05-01

    Short-pulse x-ray/gamma-ray sources have become indispensable light sources for investigating material science, bio technology, and photo-nuclear physics. In past decades, rapid advancement of high intensity laser technology led extensive progresses in the field of radiation sources based on laser-plasma interactions - x-ray lasers, betatron radiation and Compton gamma-rays. Ever since the installation of a 100-TW laser in 2006, we have pursued the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiations, such as x-ray lasers, relativistic high-order harmonics, betatron radiation and all-optical Compton gamma-rays. With the construction of two PW Ti:Sapphire laser beamlines having peak powers of 1.0 PW and 1.5 PW in 2010 and 2012, respectively [1], we have investigated the generation of multi-GeV electron beams [2] and MeV betatron radiations. We plan to carry out the Compton backscattering to generate MeV gamma-rays from the interaction of a GeV electron beam and a PW laser beam. Here, we present the recent progress in the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiation sources based on laser plasma interactions and the plan for developing Compton gamma-ray sources driven by the PW lasers. In addition, we will present the applications of laser-plasma x-ray lasers to x-ray holography and coherent diffraction imaging. [references] 1. J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. J. Yu, T. M. Jeong, and J. Lee, Opt. Lett. 35, 3021 (2010). 2. H. T. Kim, K. H. Pae, H. J. Cha, I J. Kim, T. J. Yu, J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. M. Jeong, J. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165002 (2013).

  13. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole.more » The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.« less

  14. REDSoX: Monte-Carlo ray-tracing for a soft x-ray spectroscopy polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Hans M.; Egan, Mark; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Heine, Sarah N. T.; Hellickson, Tim; Frost, Jason; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Theriault-Shay, Adam

    2017-08-01

    X-ray polarimetry offers a new window into the high-energy universe, yet there has been no instrument so far that could measure the polarization of soft X-rays (about 17-80 Å) from astrophysical sources. The Rocket Experiment Demonstration of a Soft X-ray Polarimeter (REDSoX Polarimeter) is a proposed sounding rocket experiment that uses a focusing optic and splits the beam into three channels. Each channel has a set of criticalangle transmission (CAT) gratings that disperse the x-rays onto a laterally graded multilayer (LGML) mirror, which preferentially reflects photons with a specific polarization angle. The three channels are oriented at 120 deg to each other and thus measure the three Stokes parameters: I, Q, and U. The period of the LGML changes with position. The main design challenge is to arrange the gratings so that they disperse the spectrum in such a way that all rays are dispersed onto the position on the multi-layer mirror where they satisfy the local Bragg condition despite arriving on the mirror at different angles due to the converging beam from the focusing optics. We present a polarimeteric Monte-Carlo ray-trace of this design to assess non-ideal effects from e.g. mirror scattering or the finite size of the grating facets. With mirror properties both simulated and measured in the lab for LGML mirrors of 80-200 layers we show that the reflectivity and the width of the Bragg-peak are sufficient to make this design work when non-ideal effects are included in the simulation. Our simulations give us an effective area curve, the modulation factor and the figure of merit for the REDSoX polarimeter. As an example, we simulate an observation of Mk 421 and show that we could easily detect a 20% linear polarization.

  15. Hard alpha-keratin degradation inside a tissue under high flux X-ray synchrotron micro-beam: a multi-scale time-resolved study.

    PubMed

    Leccia, Emilie; Gourrier, Aurélien; Doucet, Jean; Briki, Fatma

    2010-04-01

    X-rays interact strongly with biological organisms. Synchrotron radiation sources deliver very intense X-ray photon fluxes within micro- or submicro cross-section beams, resulting in doses larger than the MGy. The relevance of synchrotron radiation analyses of biological materials is therefore questionable since such doses, million times higher than the ones used in radiotherapy, can cause huge damages in tissues, with regard to not only DNA, but also proteic and lipid organizations. Very few data concerning the effect of very high X-ray doses in tissues are available in the literature. We present here an analysis of the structural phenomena which occur when the model tissue of human hair is irradiated by a synchrotron X-ray micro-beam. The choice of hair is supported by its hierarchical and partially ordered keratin structure which can be analysed inside the tissue by X-ray diffraction. To assess the damages caused by hard X-ray micro-beams (1 microm(2) cross-section), short exposure time scattering SAXS/WAXS patterns have been recorded at beamline ID13 (ESRF) after various irradiation times. Various modifications of the scattering patterns are observed, they provide fine insight of the radiation damages at various hierarchical levels and also unexpectedly provide information about the stability of the various hierarchical structural levels. It appears that the molecular level, i.e. the alpha helices which are stabilized by hydrogen bonds and the alpha-helical coiled coils which are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, is more sensitive to radiation than the supramolecular architecture of the keratin filament and the filament packing within the keratin associated proteins matrix, which is stabilized by disulphide bonds. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurements of Hard X-Ray Emission Suggest Absorption Along the Path of the Inner Beams in High Foot Implosion Experiments on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, Joseph; Pak, Arthur; Otto, Landen; Kritcher, Andrea; Ma, Tammy; Charles, Jarrott; Callahan, Debra; Hinkel, Denise; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Moody, John; Khan, Shahab; Doeppner, Tilo; Rygg, Ryan; Hurricane, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The current high foot hohlraum design fielded on the National Ignition Facility is aimed at providing uniform x-ray drive to provide a spherical implosion by lowering the gas fill from 1.6 to 0.6 mg/cc and increasing the hohlraum width from 5.75 to 6.72 mm while maintaining the same 1.8 mm capsule diameter from previous designs. These changes are intended to improve beam propagation without the need for crossed beam energy transfer. Analysis of the measurements of hard x-ray emission from the gated x-ray detector (GXD) and the static x-ray imager (SXI) looking through the laser entrance hole indicate a significant fraction of the inner beam incident energy is absorbed in the high z blow-off region (either uranium or gold) before reaching the inner wall near the equator. Comparison of inner beam absorption in this region and its effect on the implosion symmetry measurements will be presented. Additionally, the sensitivity of this absorption feature and therefore the implosion symmetry to the pulse shape, hohlraum fill pressure and fraction of energy in beams depositing energy at the hohlraum equator will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Line focus x-ray tubes—a new concept to produce high brilliance x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzsch, Stefan; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-11-01

    Currently hard coherent x-ray radiation at high photon fluxes can only be produced with large and expensive radiation sources, such as 3rd generation synchrotrons. Especially in medicine, this limitation prevents various promising developments in imaging and therapy from being translated into clinical practice. Here we present a new concept of highly brilliant x-ray sources, line focus x-ray tubes (LFXTs), which may serve as a powerful and cheap alternative to synchrotrons and a range of other existing technologies. LFXTs employ an extremely thin focal spot and a rapidly rotating target for the electron beam which causes a change in the physical mechanism of target heating, allowing higher electron beam intensities at the focal spot. Monte Carlo simulations and numeric solutions of the heat equation are used to predict the characteristics of the LFXT. In terms of photon flux and coherence length, the performance of the line focus x-ray tube compares with inverse Compton scattering sources. Dose rates of up to 180 Gy s-1 can be reached in 50 cm distance from the focal spot. The results demonstrate that the line focus tube can serve as a powerful compact source for phase contrast imaging and microbeam radiation therapy. The production of a prototype seems technically feasible.

  18. Development of a simulation method for dynamics of electrons ejected from DNA molecules irradiated with X-rays.

    PubMed

    Kai, Takeshi; Higuchi, Mariko; Fujii, Kentaro; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Yokoya, Akinari

    2012-12-01

    To develop a method for simulating the dynamics of the photoelectrons and Auger electrons ejected from DNA molecules irradiated with pulsed monochromatic X-rays. A 30-base-pair (bp) DNA molecule was used as the target model, and the X-rays were assumed to have a Gaussian-shaped time distribution. Photoionization and Auger decay were considered as the atomic processes. The atoms from which the photoelectrons or Auger electrons were emitted were specified in the DNA molecule (or DNA ion) using the Monte Carlo method, and the trajectory of each electron in the electric field formed around the positively charged DNA molecule was calculated with a Newtonian equation. The kinetics of the electrons produced by irradiation with X-rays at an intensity ranging from 1 × 10(12) to 1 × 10(16) photons/mm(2) and energies of 380 eV (below the carbon K-edge), 435 eV (above the nitrogen K-edge), and 560 eV (above the oxygen K-edge) were evaluated. It was found that at an X-ray intensity of 1 × 10(14) photons/mm(2) or less, all the produced electrons escaped from the target. However, above an X-ray intensity of 1 × 10(15) photons/mm(2) and an energy of 560 eV, some photoelectrons that were ejected from the oxygen atoms were trapped near the target DNA. A simulation method for studying the trajectories of electrons ejected from a 30-bp DNA molecule irradiated with pulsed monochromatic X-rays has been developed. The present results show that electron dynamics are strongly dependent on the charged density induced in DNA by pulsed X-ray irradiation.

  19. Insights into Spray Development from Metered-Dose Inhalers Through Quantitative X-ray Radiography

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mason-Smith, Nicholas; Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    Typical methods to study pMDI sprays employ particle sizing or visible light diagnostics, which suffer in regions of high spray density. X-ray techniques can be applied to pharmaceutical sprays to obtain information unattainable by conventional particle sizing and light-based techniques. We present a technique for obtaining quantitative measurements of spray density in pMDI sprays. A monochromatic focused X-ray beam was used to perform quantitative radiography measurements in the near-nozzle region and plume of HFA-propelled sprays. Measurements were obtained with a temporal resolution of 0.184 ms and spatial resolution of 5 mu m. Steady flow conditions were reached after around 30more » ms for the formulations examined with the spray device used. Spray evolution was affected by the inclusion of ethanol in the formulation and unaffected by the inclusion of 0.1% drug by weight. Estimation of the nozzle exit density showed that vapour is likely to dominate the flow leaving the inhaler nozzle during steady flow. Quantitative measurements in pMDI sprays allow the determination of nozzle exit conditions that are difficult to obtain experimentally by other means. Measurements of these nozzle exit conditions can improve understanding of the atomization mechanisms responsible for pMDI spray droplet and particle formation.« less

  20. X-ray scattering study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wriston, R. S.; Froechtenigt, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A soft X-ray glancing incidence telescope mirror and a group of twelve optical flat samples were used to study the scattering of X-rays. The mirror was made of Kanigen coated beryllium and the images produced were severely limited by scattering of X-rays. The best resolution attained was about fifteen arc seconds. The telescope efficiency was found to be 0.0006. The X-ray beam reflected from the twelve optical flat samples was analyzed by means of a long vacuum system of special design for these tests. The scattering then decreased with increasing angle of incidence until a critical angle was passed. At larger angles the scattering increased again. The samples all scattered more at 44 A than at 8 A. Metal samples were found to have about the same scattering at 44 A but greater scattering at 8 A than glass samples.

  1. A phase-contrast X-ray imaging system—with a 60×30 mm field of view—based on a skew-symmetric two-crystal X-ray interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Wu, Jin; Thet-Thet-Lwin; Koizumi, Aritaka; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Itai, Yuji

    2004-05-01

    A phase-contrast X-ray imaging system—with a 60×30 mm field of view—for biomedical observations was developed. To extend the observation field of view, the system is fitted with a skew-symmetric two-crystal X-ray interferometer. To attain the required sub-nanoradian mechanical stability between the crystal blocks for precise operation, the interferometer was mounted on two extremely rigid positioning tables (one with a sleeve bearings) and was controlled by a feedback positioning system using phase-lock interferometry. The imaging system produced a 60×30 mm interference pattern with 60% visibility using 17.7 keV monochromatic synchrotron X-rays at the Photon Factory. It was then used to perform radiographic observation (i.e., phase mapping) of rat liver vessels. These results indicate that this imaging system can be used to perform observations of large and in vivo biological samples.

  2. Performance verification of the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) x-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Black, J. Kevin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Hayato, Asami; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Tamagawa, Toru; Kaneko, Kenta; Takeuchi, Yoko; Yoshikawa, Akifumi; Marlowe, Hannah; Griffiths, Scott; Kaaret, Philip E.; Kenward, David; Khalid, Syed

    2014-07-01

    Polarimetry is a powerful tool for astrophysical observations that has yet to be exploited in the X-ray band. For satellite-borne and sounding rocket experiments, we have developed a photoelectric gas polarimeter to measure X-ray polarization in the 2-10 keV range utilizing a time projection chamber (TPC) and advanced micro-pattern gas electron multiplier (GEM) techniques. We carried out performance verification of a flight equivalent unit (1/4 model) which was planned to be launched on the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) satellite. The test was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facility in April 2013. The polarimeter was irradiated with linearly-polarized monochromatic X-rays between 2.3 and 10.0 keV and scanned with a collimated beam at 5 different detector positions. After a systematic investigation of the detector response, a modulation factor >=35% above 4 keV was obtained with the expected polarization angle. At energies below 4 keV where the photoelectron track becomes short, diffusion in the region between the GEM and readout strips leaves an asymmetric photoelectron image. A correction method retrieves an expected modulation angle, and the expected modulation factor, ~20% at 2.7 keV. Folding the measured values of modulation through an instrument model gives sensitivity, parameterized by minimum detectable polarization (MDP), nearly identical to that assumed at the preliminary design review (PDR).

  3. Spatial coherence measurements and x-ray holographic imaging using a laser-generated plasma x-ray source in the water window spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, I. C. E.; Ross, I. N.; Schulz, M. S.; Daido, H.; Tallents, G. J.; Krishnan, J.; Dwivedi, L.; Hening, A.

    1993-06-01

    The properties of a coherent x-ray point source in the water window spectral region generated using a small commercially available KrF laser system focused onto a Mylar (essentially carbon) target have been measured. By operating the source in a low-pressure (approximately 20 Torr) nitrogen environment, the degree of monochromaticity was improved due to the nitrogen acting as an x-ray filter and relatively enhancing the radiation at a wavelength of 3.37 nm (C vi 1s-2p). X-ray pinhole camera images show a minimum source size of 12 μm. A Young's double slit coherence measurement gave fringe visibilities of approximately 62% for a slit separation of 10.5 μm at a distance of 31.7 cm from the source. To demonstrate the viability of the laser plasma as a source for coherent imaging applications a Gabor (in-line) hologram of two carbon fibers, of different sizes, was produced. The exposure time and the repetition rate was 2 min and 10 Hz, respectively.

  4. Development of a low-energy x-ray camera for the imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation for range estimation.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koki; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Kawachi, Naoki

    2017-06-21

    Imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation is a possible method for measurement of the proton beam distribution in phantom. However, it is not clear that the method is used for range estimation of protons. For this purpose, we developed a low-energy x-ray camera and conducted imaging of the bremsstrahlung x-ray produced during irradiation of proton beams. We used a 20 mm  ×  20 mm  ×  1 mm finely grooved GAGG scintillator that was optically coupled to a one-inch square high quantum efficiency (HQE)-type position-sensitive photomultiplier tube to form an imaging detector. The imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm-thick tungsten container, and a pinhole collimator was attached to its camera head. After performance of the camera was evaluated, secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray imaging was conducted during irradiation of the proton beams for three different proton energies, and the results were compared with Monte Carlo simulation as well as calculated value. The system spatial resolution and sensitivity of the developed x-ray camera with 1.5 mm-diameter pinhole collimator were estimated to be 32 mm FWHM and 5.2  ×  10 -7 for ~35 keV x-ray photons at 100 cm from the collimator surface, respectively. We could image the proton beam tracks by measuring the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray during irradiation of the proton beams, and the ranges for different proton energies could be estimated from the images. The measured ranges from the images were well matched with the Monte Carlo simulation, and slightly smaller than the calculated values. We confirmed that the imaging of the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation with the developed x-ray camera has the potential to be a new tool for proton range estimations.

  5. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOEpatents

    Siddons, D.P.; Johnson, E.D.; Guckel, H.; Klein, J.L.

    1997-10-21

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures. 21 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOEpatents

    Siddons, David Peter; Johnson, Erik D.; Guckel, Henry; Klein, Jonathan L.

    1997-10-21

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures.

  7. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M [Berkeley, CA; Weber, Franz A [Oakland, CA; Moon, Stephen J [Tracy, CA

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  8. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  9. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-01: Nanometric Organic Photovoltaic Thin Film X-Ray Detectors for Clinical KVp Beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Elshahat, Bassem; Gill, Hardeep; Kumar, Jayant

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To fabricate and test nanometric organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells made of various active-layer/electrode thicknesses and sizes; to determine the optimal material combinations and geometries suitable for dose measurements in clinical kilovoltage x-ray beams. Methods: The OPV consisted of P3HT:PCBM photoactive materials sandwiched between aluminum and Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) electrodes. Direct conversion of xrays in the active layer composed of donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials generated signal in photovoltaic mode (without external voltage bias). OPV cells were fabricated with different active layer thicknesses (150, 270, 370 nm) and electrode areas (0.4, 0.7, 0.9, 1.4, 2.6 cm{sup 2}). Amore » series of experiments were preformed in the energy range of 60–150 kVp. The net current per unit area (nA/cm{sup 2}) was measured using 200 mAs time-integrated beam current. Results: The net OPV current as function of beam energy (kVp) was proportional to ∼E{sup 0,4} {sup 5} when adjusted for beam output. The best combination of parameters for these cells was 270 nm active layer thicknesses for 0.7 cm{sup 2} electrode area. The measured current ranged from 0.69 to 2.43 nA/cm{sup 2} as a function of x-ray energy between 60 and 150 kVp, corresponding to 0.09 – 0.06 nA/cm{sup 2}/mGy, respectively, when adjusted for the beam output. Conclusion: The experiments indicate that OPV detectors possessing 270 nm active layer and 0.7 cm{sup 2} Al electrode areas have sensitivity by a factor of 2.5 greater than commercial aSi thin film PV. Because OPV can be made flexible and they do not require highvoltage bias supply, they open the possibility for using as in-vivo detectors in radiation safety in x-ray imaging beams.« less

  10. X-Ray Structure determination of the Glycine Cleavage System Protein H of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using An Inverse Compton Synchrotron X-Ray Source

    PubMed Central

    Abendroth, Jan; McCormick, Michael S.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Staker, Bart; Loewen, Roderick; Gifford, Martin; Rifkin, Jeff; Mayer, Chad; Guo, Wenjin; Zhang, Yang; Myler, Peter; Kelley, Angela; Analau, Erwin; Hewitt, Stephen Nakazawa; Napuli, Alberto J.; Kuhn, Peter; Ruth, Ronald D.; Stewart, Lance J.

    2010-01-01

    Structural genomics discovery projects require ready access to both X-ray and NMR instrumentation which support the collection of experimental data needed to solve large numbers of novel protein structures. The most productive X-ray crystal structure determination laboratories make extensive frequent use of tunable synchrotron X-ray light to solve novel structures by anomalous diffraction methods. This requires that frozen cryo-protected crystals be shipped to large government-run synchrotron facilities for data collection. In an effort to eliminate the need to ship crystals for data collection, we have developed the first laboratory-scale synchrotron light source capable of performing many of the state-of-the-art synchrotron applications in X-ray science. This Compact Light Source is a first-in-class device that uses inverse Compton scattering to generate X-rays of sufficient flux, tunable wavelength and beam size to allow high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection from protein crystals. We report on benchmarking tests of X-ray diffraction data collection with hen egg white lysozyme, and the successful high-resolution X-ray structure determination of the Glycine cleavage system protein H from Mycobacterium tuberculosis using diffraction data collected with the Compact Light Source X-ray beam. PMID:20364333

  11. Development of High-Speed Fluorescent X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Kuroe, T.; Zeniya, T.; Wu, J.; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Yashiro, T.; Yuasa, T.; Hyodo, K.; Matsumura, K.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Itai, Y.; Akatsuka, T.

    2004-05-01

    A high-speed fluorescent x-ray CT (FXCT) system using monochromatic synchrotron x rays was developed to detect very low concentration of medium-Z elements for biomedical use. The system is equipped two types of high purity germanium detectors, and fast electronics and software. Preliminary images of a 10mm diameter plastic phantom containing channels field with iodine solutions of different concentrations showed a minimum detection level of 0.002 mg I/ml at an in-plane spatial resolution of 100μm. Furthermore, the acquisition time was reduced about 1/2 comparing to previous system. The results indicate that FXCT is a highly sensitive imaging modality capable of detecting very low concentration of iodine, and that the method has potential in biomedical applications.

  12. Bragg x-ray optics for imaging spectroscopy of plasma microsources.

    PubMed

    Pikuz, T A; Ya Faenov, A; Pikuz, S A; Romanova, V M; Shelkovenko, T A

    1995-01-01

    Bragg x-ray optics based on crystals with transmission and reflection properties bent on cylindrical or spherical surfaces are discussed. Applications of such optics for obtaining one- and two-dimensional monochromatic images of different plasma sources in the wide spectral range 1-20 Å are described. Samples of spectra obtained with spectral resolution of up to λ/Δλ ~ 10,000 and spatial resolution of up to 18 μm are presented.

  13. First Results from a Microfocus X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Gibson, Walter; Joy, Marshall

    1999-01-01

    The design and performance of a 40 Watt laboratory crystallography system optimized for the structure determination of small protein crystals are described. This system combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 microns FWHM spot size at a power level of 40 Watts) and a short focal length (F = 2.6 mm) polycapillary collimating optic, and produces a small diameter quasi-parallel x-ray beam. Measurements of x-ray flux, divergence and spectral purity of the resulting x-ray beam are presented. The x-ray flux in a 250 microns diameter aperture produced by the microfocus system is 14.7 times higher .than that from a 3.15 kW rotating anode generator equipped with graphite monochromator. Crystallography data taken with the microfocus system are presented, and indicate that the divergence and spectral purity of the x-ray are sufficient to refine the diffraction data using a standard crystallographic software. Significant additional improvements in flux and beam divergence are possible, and plans for achieving these coals are discussed.

  14. Adaptive x-ray threat detection using sequential hypotheses testing with fan-beam experimental data (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Huang, Liang-Chih; Ashok, Amit; Gong, Qian; Coccarelli, David; Greenberg, Joel A.; Gehm, Michael E.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2017-05-01

    We employ an adaptive measurement system, based on sequential hypotheses testing (SHT) framework, for detecting material-based threats using experimental data acquired on an X-ray experimental testbed system. This testbed employs 45-degree fan-beam geometry and 15 views over a 180-degree span to generate energy sensitive X-ray projection data. Using this testbed system, we acquire multiple view projection data for 200 bags. We consider an adaptive measurement design where the X-ray projection measurements are acquired in a sequential manner and the adaptation occurs through the choice of the optimal "next" source/view system parameter. Our analysis of such an adaptive measurement design using the experimental data demonstrates a 3x-7x reduction in the probability of error relative to a static measurement design. Here the static measurement design refers to the operational system baseline that corresponds to a sequential measurement using all the available sources/views. We also show that by using adaptive measurements it is possible to reduce the number of sources/views by nearly 50% compared a system that relies on static measurements.

  15. Commercial CMOS image sensors as X-ray imagers and particle beam monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Maffessanti, S.; Montemurro, G. V.; Carraresi, L.

    2015-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are widely used in several applications such as mobile handsets webcams and digital cameras among others. Furthermore they are available across a wide range of resolutions with excellent spectral and chromatic responses. In order to fulfill the need of cheap systems as beam monitors and high resolution image sensors for scientific applications we exploited the possibility of using commercial CMOS image sensors as X-rays and proton detectors. Two different sensors have been mounted and tested. An Aptina MT9v034, featuring 752 × 480 pixels, 6μm × 6μm pixel size has been mounted and successfully tested as bi-dimensional beam profile monitor, able to take pictures of the incoming proton bunches at the DeFEL beamline (1-6 MeV pulsed proton beam) of the LaBeC of INFN in Florence. The naked sensor is able to successfully detect the interactions of the single protons. The sensor point-spread-function (PSF) has been qualified with 1MeV protons and is equal to one pixel (6 mm) r.m.s. in both directions. A second sensor MT9M032, featuring 1472 × 1096 pixels, 2.2 × 2.2 μm pixel size has been mounted on a dedicated board as high-resolution imager to be used in X-ray imaging experiments with table-top generators. In order to ease and simplify the data transfer and the image acquisition the system is controlled by a dedicated micro-processor board (DM3730 1GHz SoC ARM Cortex-A8) on which a modified LINUX kernel has been implemented. The paper presents the architecture of the sensor systems and the results of the experimental measurements.

  16. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Nelson, J.; Holzner, C.; Andrews, J. C.; Pianetta, P.

    2013-12-01

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented.

  17. Development of cable fed flash X-ray (FXR) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rakhee; Mitra, S.; Patel, A. S.; Kumar, R.; Singh, G.; Senthil, K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Kolge, T. S.; Roy, Amitava; Acharya, S.; Biswas, D.; Sharma, Archana

    2017-08-01

    Flash X-ray sources driven by pulsed power find applications in industrial radiography, and a portable X-ray source is ideal where the radiography needs to be taken at the test site. A compact and portable flash X-ray (FXR) system based on a Marx generator has been developed with the high voltage fed to the FXR tube via a cable feed-through arrangement. Hard bremsstrahlung X-rays of few tens of nanosecond duration are generated by impinging intense electron beams on an anode target of high Z material. An industrial X-ray source is developed with source size as low as 1 mm. The system can be operated from 150 kV to 450 kV peak voltages and a dose of 10 mR has been measured at 1 m distance from the source window. The modeling of the FXR source has been carried out using particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations for the electron beam dynamics and X-ray generation, respectively. The angular dose profile of X-ray has been measured and compared with the simulation.

  18. Simulation and Laboratory results of the Hard X-ray Polarimeter: X-Calibur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qingzhen; Beilicke, M.; Kislat, F.; Krawczynski, H.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry promises to give qualitatively new information about high-energy sources, such as binary black hole (BH) systems, Microquasars, active galactic nuclei (AGN), GRBs, etc. We designed, built and tested a hard X-ray polarimeter 'X-Calibur' to be flown in the focal plane of the InFOCuS grazing incidence hard X-ray telescope in 2014. X-Calibur combines a low-Z Compton scatterer with a CZT detector assembly to measure the polarization of 20- 80 keV X-rays making use of the fact that polarized photons Compton scatter preferentially perpendicular to the E field orientation. X-Calibur achieves a high detection efficiency of order unity. We optimized of the design of the instrument based on Monte Carlo simulations of polarized and unpolarized X-ray beams and of the most important background components. We have calibrated and tested X-Calibur extensively in the laboratory at Washington University and at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). Measurements using the highly polarized synchrotron beam at CHESS confirm the polarization sensitivity of the instrument. In this talk we report on the optimization of the design of the instrument based on Monte Carlo simulations, as well as results of laboratory calibration measurements characterizing the performance of the instrument.

  19. Using refractive optics to broaden the focus of an X-ray mirror

    PubMed Central

    Dhamgaye, Vishal

    2017-01-01

    X-ray mirrors are widely used at synchrotron radiation sources for focusing X-rays into focal spots of size less than 1 µm. The ability of the beamline optics to change the size of this spot over a range up to tens of micrometres can be an advantage for many experiments such as X-ray microprobe and X-ray diffraction from micrometre-scale crystals. It is a requirement that the beam size change should be reproducible and it is often essential that the change should be rapid, for example taking less than 1 s, in order to allow high data collection rates at modern X-ray sources. In order to provide a controlled broadening of the focused spot of an X-ray mirror, a series of refractive optical elements have been fabricated and installed immediately before the mirror. By translation, a new refractive element is moved into the X-ray beam allowing a variation in the size of the focal spot in the focusing direction. Measurements using a set of prefabricated refractive structures with a test mirror showed that the focused beam size could be varied from less than 1 µm to over 10 µm for X-rays in the energy range 10–20 keV. As the optics is in-line with the X-ray beam, there is no effect on the centroid position of the focus. Accurate positioning of the refractive optics ensures reproducibility in the focused beam profile and no additional re-alignment of the optics is required. PMID:28664880

  20. Using refractive optics to broaden the focus of an X-ray mirror.

    PubMed

    Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal; Dhamgaye, Vishal

    2017-07-01

    X-ray mirrors are widely used at synchrotron radiation sources for focusing X-rays into focal spots of size less than 1 µm. The ability of the beamline optics to change the size of this spot over a range up to tens of micrometres can be an advantage for many experiments such as X-ray microprobe and X-ray diffraction from micrometre-scale crystals. It is a requirement that the beam size change should be reproducible and it is often essential that the change should be rapid, for example taking less than 1 s, in order to allow high data collection rates at modern X-ray sources. In order to provide a controlled broadening of the focused spot of an X-ray mirror, a series of refractive optical elements have been fabricated and installed immediately before the mirror. By translation, a new refractive element is moved into the X-ray beam allowing a variation in the size of the focal spot in the focusing direction. Measurements using a set of prefabricated refractive structures with a test mirror showed that the focused beam size could be varied from less than 1 µm to over 10 µm for X-rays in the energy range 10-20 keV. As the optics is in-line with the X-ray beam, there is no effect on the centroid position of the focus. Accurate positioning of the refractive optics ensures reproducibility in the focused beam profile and no additional re-alignment of the optics is required.

  1. Compositional homogeneity and X-ray topographic analyses of CdTe xSe 1-x grown by the vertical Bridgman technique

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.

    2015-02-01

    We grew CdTe xSe 1-x crystals with nominal Se concentrations of 5%, 7%, and 10% by the vertical Bridgman technique, and evaluated their compositional homogeneity and structural quality at the NSLS’ X-ray fluorescence and white beam X-ray topography beam lines. Both X-ray fluorescence and photoluminescence mapping revealed very high compositional homogeneity of the CdTe xSe 1-x crystals. Here, we noted that those crystals with higher concentrations of Se were more prone to twinning than those with a lower content. The crystals were fairly free from strains and contained low concentrations of sub-grain boundaries and their networks.

  2. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, andmore » can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.« less

  3. Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution approaching one micron - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa - High speed radiography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x- ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The formation of frost flowers on Arctic sea-ice, which is important in controlling the atmospheric chemistry of mercury. - The distribution of

  4. Demonstration of imaging X-ray Thomson scattering on OMEGA EP.

    PubMed

    Belancourt, Patrick X; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul A; Collins, Tim J B; Bonino, Mark J; Kozlowski, Pawel M; Regan, Sean P; Drake, R Paul

    2016-11-01

    Foams are a common material for high-energy-density physics experiments because of low, tunable densities, and being machinable. Simulating these experiments can be difficult because the equation of state is largely unknown for shocked foams. The focus of this experiment was to develop an x-ray scattering platform for measuring the equation of state of shocked foams on OMEGA EP. The foam used in this experiment is resorcinol formaldehyde with an initial density of 0.34 g/cm 3 . One long-pulse (10 ns) beam drives a shock into the foam, while the remaining three UV beams with a 2 ns square pulse irradiate a nickel foil to create the x-ray backlighter. The primary diagnostic for this platform, the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer, spectrally resolves the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. Ray tracing analysis of the density profile gives a compression of 3 ± 1 with a shock speed of 39 ± 6 km/s. Analysis of the scattered x-ray spectra gives an upper bound temperature of 20 eV.

  5. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of nanoparticles by velocity map imaging

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kostko, O.; Xu, B.; Jacobs, M. I.

    Velocity map imaging (VMI), a technique traditionally used to study chemical dynamics in the gas phase, is applied to study X-ray photoemission from aerosol nanoparticles. Soft X-rays from the Advanced Light Source synchrotron, probe a beam of nanoparticles, and the resulting photoelectrons are velocity mapped to obtain their kinetic energy distributions. A new design of the VMI spectrometer is described. The spectrometer is benchmarked by measuring vacuum ultraviolet photoemission from gas phase xenon and squalene nanoparticles followed by measurements using soft X-rays. It is demonstrated that the photoelectron distribution from X-ray irradiated squalene nanoparticles is dominated by secondary electrons. Bymore » scanning the photon energies and measuring the intensities of these secondary electrons, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum is obtained. The NEXAFS technique is used to obtain spectra of aqueous nanoparticles at the oxygen K edge. By varying the position of the aqueous nanoparticle beam relative to the incident X-ray beam, evidence is presented such that the VMI technique allows for NEXAFS spectroscopy of water in different physical states. Finally, we discuss the possibility of applying VMI methods to probe liquids and solids via X-ray spectroscopy.« less

  6. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of nanoparticles by velocity map imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Kostko, O.; Xu, B.; Jacobs, M. I.; ...

    2017-05-05

    Velocity map imaging (VMI), a technique traditionally used to study chemical dynamics in the gas phase, is applied to study X-ray photoemission from aerosol nanoparticles. Soft X-rays from the Advanced Light Source synchrotron, probe a beam of nanoparticles, and the resulting photoelectrons are velocity mapped to obtain their kinetic energy distributions. A new design of the VMI spectrometer is described. The spectrometer is benchmarked by measuring vacuum ultraviolet photoemission from gas phase xenon and squalene nanoparticles followed by measurements using soft X-rays. It is demonstrated that the photoelectron distribution from X-ray irradiated squalene nanoparticles is dominated by secondary electrons. Bymore » scanning the photon energies and measuring the intensities of these secondary electrons, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum is obtained. The NEXAFS technique is used to obtain spectra of aqueous nanoparticles at the oxygen K edge. By varying the position of the aqueous nanoparticle beam relative to the incident X-ray beam, evidence is presented such that the VMI technique allows for NEXAFS spectroscopy of water in different physical states. Finally, we discuss the possibility of applying VMI methods to probe liquids and solids via X-ray spectroscopy.« less

  7. Intense X-ray and EUV light source

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Joshua; Ekdahl, Carl; Oertel, John

    2017-06-20

    An intense X-ray or EUV light source may be driven by the Smith-Purcell effect. The intense light source may utilize intense electron beams and Bragg crystals. This may allow the intense light source to range from the extreme UV range up to the hard X-ray range.

  8. The feasibility study on 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography using the pinhole effect for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    We propose a 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (CT) pinhole collimator, aimed at providing molecular imaging with quantifiable measures and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept and investigate imaging properties such as spatial resolution, contrast resolution and quantifiable measures, by imaging physical phantoms using a preliminary imaging system developed with monochromatic synchrotron x rays constructed at the BLNE-7A experimental line at KEK, Japan.

  9. Monochromatic neutron beam production at Brazilian nuclear research reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiulevicius, Roberto; Rodrigues, Claudio; Parente, Carlos B. R.; Voi, Dante L.; Rogers, John D.

    2000-12-01

    Monochomatic beams of neutrons are obtained form a nuclear reactor polychromatic beam by the diffraction process, suing a single crystal energy selector. In Brazil, two nuclear research reactors, the swimming pool model IEA-R1 and the Argonaut type IEN-R1 have been used to carry out measurements with this technique. Neutron spectra have been measured using crystal spectrometers installed on the main beam lines of each reactor. The performance of conventional- artificial and natural selected crystals has been verified by the multipurpose neutron diffractometers installed at IEA-R1 and simple crystal spectrometer in operator at IEN- R1. A practical figure of merit formula was introduced to evaluate the performance and relative reflectivity of the selected planes of a single crystal. The total of 16 natural crystals were selected for use in the neutron monochromator, including a total of 24 families of planes. Twelve of these natural crystal types and respective best family of planes were measured directly with the multipurpose neutron diffractometers. The neutron spectrometer installed at IEN- R1 was used to confirm test results of the better specimens. The usually conventional-artificial crystal spacing distance range is limited to 3.4 angstrom. The interplane distance range has now been increased to approximately 10 angstrom by use of naturally occurring crystals. The neutron diffraction technique with conventional and natural crystals for energy selection and filtering can be utilized to obtain monochromatic sub and thermal neutrons with energies in the range of 0.001 to 10 eV. The thermal neutron is considered a good tool or probe for general applications in various fields, such as condensed matter, chemistry, biology, industrial applications and others.

  10. The Race To X-ray Microbeam and Nanobeam Science

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ice, Gene E; Budai, John D; Pang, Judy

    2011-01-01

    X-ray microbeams are an emerging characterization tool with transformational implications for broad areas of science ranging from materials structure and dynamics, geophysics and environmental science to biophysics and protein crystallography. In this review, we discuss the race toward sub-10 nm- x-ray beams with the ability to penetrate tens to hundreds of microns into most materials and with the ability to determine local (crystal) structure. Examples of science enabled by current micro/nanobeam technologies are presented and we provide a perspective on future directions. Applications highlighted are chosen to illustrate the important features of various submicron beam strategies and to highlight themore » directions of current and future research. While it is clear that x-ray microprobes will impact science broadly, the practical limit for hard x-ray beam size, the limit to trace element sensitivity, and the ultimate limitations associated with near-atomic structure determinations are the subject of ongoing research.« less

  11. A Monochromatic, Aberration-Corrected, Dual-Beam Low Energy Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-01-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. PMID:23582636

  12. A monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-07-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High resolution projection X-ray microscope equipped with fluorescent X-ray analyzer and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, K.; Saito, Y.; Kai, H.; Shirota, K.; Yada, K.

    2009-09-01

    We have newly developed an open type fine-focus X-ray tube "TX-510" to realize a spatial resolution of 50nm and to radiate low energy characteristic X-rays for giving high absorption contrast to images of microscopic organisms. The "TX-510" employs a ZrO/W(100) Schottky emitter and an "In-Lens Field Emission Gun". The key points of the improvements are (1) reduced spherical aberration coefficient of magnetic objective lens, (2) easy and accurate focusing, (3) newly designed astigmatism compensator, (4) segmented thin film target for interchanging the target materials by electron beam shift and (5) fluorescent X-ray analysis system.

  14. Analysis of axial spatial resolution in a variable resolution x-ray cone beam CT (VRX-CBCT) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahi, Bahram; Keyes, Gary S.; Rendon, David A.; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2008-03-01

    The Variable Resolution X-ray (VRX) technique has been successfully used in a Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) system to increase the spatial resolution of CT images in the transverse plane. This was achieved by tilting the Flat Panel Detector (FPD) to smaller vrx y angles in a VRX Cone Beam CT (VRX-CBCT) system. In this paper, the effect on the axial spatial resolution of CT images created by the VRX-CBCT system is examined at different vrx x angles, where vrx x is the tilting angle of the FPD about its x-axis. An amorphous silicon FPD with a CsI scintillator is coupled with a micro-focus x-ray tube to form a CBCT. The FPD is installed on a rotating frame that allows rotation of up to 90° about x and y axes of the FPD. There is no rotation about the z-axis (i.e. normal to the imaging surface). Tilting the FPD about its x-axis (i.e. decreasing the vrx x angle) reduces both the width of the line-spread function and the sampling distance by a factor of sin vrx x, thereby increasing the theoretical detector pre-sampling spatial resolution proportionately. This results in thinner CT slices that in turn help increase the axial spatial resolution of the CT images. An in-house phantom is used to measure the MTF of the reconstructed CT images at different vrx x angles.

  15. Coherent x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitney, John Allen

    Conventional x-ray diffraction has historically been done under conditions such that the measured signal consists of an incoherent addition of scattering which is coherent only on a length scale determined by the properties of the beam. The result of the incoherent summation is a statistical averaging over the whole illuminated volume of the sample, which yields certain kinds of information with a high degree of precision and has been key to the success of x-ray diffraction in a variety of applications. Coherent x-ray scattering techniques, such as coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD) and x-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy (XIFS), attempt to reduce or eliminate any incoherent averaging so that specific, local structures couple to the measurement without being averaged out. In the case of XIFS, the result is analogous to dynamical light scattering, but with sensitivity to length scales less than 200 nm and time scales from 10-3 s to 103 s. When combined with phase retrieval, CXD represents an imaging technique with the penetration, in situ capabilities, and contrast mechanisms associated with x-rays and with a spatial resolution ultimately limited by the x-ray wavelength. In practice, however, the spatial resolution of CXD imaging is limited by exposure to about 100 A. This thesis describes CXD measurements of the binary alloy Cu3Au and the adaptation of phase retrieval methods for the reconstruction of real-space images of Cu3Au antiphase domains. The theoretical foundations of CXD are described in Chapter 1 as derived from the kinematical formulation for x-ray diffraction and from the temporal and spatial coherence of radiation. The antiphase domain structure of Cu 3Au is described, along with the associated reciprocal-space structure which is measured by CXD. CXD measurements place relatively stringent requirements on the coherence properties of the beam and on the detection mechanism of the experiment; these requirements and the means by which they have been

  16. Studies of LSO:Tb radio-luminescence properties using white beam hard X-ray synchrotron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, A.; Rack, A.; Pelliccia, D.; Douissard, P.-A.; Martin, T.; Couchaud, M.; Dupré, K.; Baumbach, T.

    A radio-luminescence set-up was installed at the synchrotron light source ANKA to characterise scintillators under the high X-ray photon flux density of white beam synchrotron radiation. The system allows for investigating the radio-luminescence spectrum of the material under study as well as analysing in situ changes of its scintillation behaviour (e.g. under heat load and/or intensive ionising radiation). In this work we applied the radio-luminescence set-up for investigating the radiation damage effects on the luminescence properties of a new kind of thin single crystal scintillator for high resolution X-ray imaging based on a layer of modified Lu2SiO5 grown by liquid phase epitaxy on a dedicated substrate within the framework of an EC project (SCINTAX).

  17. ID16B: a hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline at the ESRF for nano-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Criado, Gema; Villanova, Julie; Tucoulou, Rémi; Salomon, Damien; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Labouré, Sylvain; Guilloud, Cyril; Valls, Valentin; Barrett, Raymond; Gagliardini, Eric; Dabin, Yves; Baker, Robert; Bohic, Sylvain; Cohen, Cédric; Morse, John

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the ESRF Phase I Upgrade Programme, a new state-of-the-art synchrotron beamline ID16B has been recently developed for hard X-ray nano-analysis. The construction of ID16B was driven by research areas with major scientific and societal impact such as nanotechnology, earth and environmental sciences, and bio-medical research. Based on a canted undulator source, this long beamline provides hard X-ray nanobeams optimized mainly for spectroscopic applications, including the combination of X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, X-ray excited optical luminescence, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and 2D/3D X-ray imaging techniques. Its end-station re-uses part of the apparatus of the earlier ID22 beamline, while improving and enlarging the spectroscopic capabilities: for example, the experimental arrangement offers improved lateral spatial resolution (∼50 nm), a larger and more flexible capability for in situ experiments, and monochromatic nanobeams tunable over a wider energy range which now includes the hard X-ray regime (5–70 keV). This paper describes the characteristics of this new facility, short-term technical developments and the first scientific results. PMID:26698084

  18. Review of the applications of x-ray refraction and the x-ray waveguide phenomenon to estimation of film structures.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2010-12-01

    Based on our previous work, I review the applications of x-ray refraction and the x-ray waveguide phenomenon to organic and inorganic thin films in the present paper. Under grazing incidence conditions, observations of refracted x-rays and guided x-rays due to the x-ray waveguide phenomenon provide information about thin film structures, and thus have potential as alternative methods to x-ray reflectivity. To date, we have measured the spectra of the refracted x-rays and guided x-rays from end faces of thin films using white incident x-ray beams, and utilized them for the determination of film density and thickness. Some of this work is summarized in the present paper. At the end of this paper, I describe our recent achievement in this field, namely the in situ measurement of guided x-rays during the film degradation process due to strong synchrotron radiation damage. Moreover, I discuss the perspective of the present technique from the viewpoint of micro-characterization and real-time estimation of thin films.

  19. On the radiation beaming of bright X-ray pulsars and constraints on neutron star mass-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Verhagen, Patrick A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; van der Klis, Michiel; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Larchenkova, Tatiana I.

    2018-03-01

    The luminosity of accreting magnetized neutron stars can largely exceed the Eddington value due to appearance of accretion columns. The height of the columns can be comparable to the neutron star radius. The columns produce the X-rays detected by the observer directly and illuminate the stellar surface, which reprocesses the X-rays and causes additional component of the observed flux. The geometry of the column and the illuminated part of the surface determine the radiation beaming. Curved space-time affects the angular flux distribution. We construct a simple model of the beam patterns formed by direct and reflected flux from the column. We take into account the possibility of appearance of accretion columns, whose height is comparable to the neutron star radius. We argue that depending on the compactness of the star, the flux from the column can be either strongly amplified due to gravitational lensing, or significantly reduced due to column eclipse by the star. The eclipses of high accretion columns result in specific features in pulse profiles. Their detection can put constraints on the neutron star radius. We speculate that column eclipses are observed in X-ray pulsar V 0332+53, leading us to the conclusion of large neutron star radius in this system (˜15 km if M ˜ 1.4 M⊙). We point out that the beam pattern can be strongly affected by scattering in the accretion channel at high luminosity, which has to be taken into account in the models reproducing the pulse profiles.

  20. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase.

  1. Energy dependence of CP-violation reach for monochromatic neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Espinoza, Catalina

    2008-06-01

    The ultimate goal of future neutrino facilities is the determination of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. Besides | U (e 3) | ≠ 0, this will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: (I) γ = 90 and γ = 195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; (II) γ = 195 and γ = 440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is important to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline.

  2. Capillary Optics Based X-Ray Micro-Imaging Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Cappuccio, G.; Longoni, A.; Frizzi, T.; Cibin, G.

    2010-04-01

    A rapidly developed during the last few years micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μXRF) is a promising multi-elemental technique for non-destructive analysis. Typically it is rather hard to perform laboratory μXRF analysis because of the difficulty of producing an original small-size X-ray beam as well as its focusing. Recently developed for X-ray beam focusing polycapillary optics offers laboratory X-ray micro probes. The combination of polycapillary lens and fine-focused micro X-ray tube can provide high intensity radiation flux on a sample that is necessary in order to perform the elemental analysis. In comparison to a pinhole, an optimized "X-ray source-op tics" system can result in radiation density gain of more than 3 orders by the value. The most advanced way to get that result is to use the confocal configuration based on two X-ray lenses, one for the fluorescence excitation and the other for the detection of secondary emission from a sample studied. In case of X-ray capillary microfocusing a μXRF instrument designed in the confocal scheme allows us to obtain a 3D elemental mapping. In this work we will show preliminary results obtained with our prototype, a portable X-ray microscope for X-ray both imaging and fluorescence analysis; it enables μXRF elemental mapping simultaneously with X-ray imaging. A prototype of compact XRF spectrometer with a spatial resolution less than 100 μm has been designed.

  3. Ultralow-dose, feedback imaging with laser-Compton X-ray and laser-Compton gamma ray sources

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    Ultralow-dose, x-ray or gamma-ray imaging is based on fast, electronic control of the output of a laser-Compton x-ray or gamma-ray source (LCXS or LCGS). X-ray or gamma-ray shadowgraphs are constructed one (or a few) pixel(s) at a time by monitoring the LCXS or LCGS beam energy required at each pixel of the object to achieve a threshold level of detectability at the detector. An example provides that once the threshold for detection is reached, an electronic or optical signal is sent to the LCXS/LCGS that enables a fast optical switch that diverts, either in space or time the laser pulsesmore » used to create Compton photons. In this way, one prevents the object from being exposed to any further Compton x-rays or gamma-rays until either the laser-Compton beam or the object are moved so that a new pixel location may be illumination.« less

  4. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray–X-ray pump–probe scheme

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼1019 W/cm2) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump–probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double–5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray–induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray–matter interactions. The X-ray pump–probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray–matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities. PMID:26811449

  5. Two-dimensional single crystal diamond refractive x-ray lens

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Antipov, S., E-mail: s.antipov@euclidtechlabs.com; Baryshev, S. V.; Butler, J. E.

    2016-07-27

    The next generation light sources such as diffraction-limited storage rings and high repetition rate x-ray free-electron lasers will generate x-ray beams with significantly increased brilliance. These future machines will require X-ray optical components that are capable of handling higher instantaneous and average power densities while tailoring the properties of the x-ray beams for a variety of scientific experiments. Single crystal diamond is one of the best bulk materials for this application, because it is radiation hard, has a suitable uniform index of refraction and the best available thermal properties. In this paper we report on fabrication and experimental testing ofmore » a two-dimensional (2D) single crystal diamond compound refractive X-ray lenses (CRL). These lenses were manufactured using femto-second laser cutting and tested at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory.« less

  6. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  7. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  8. Advanced X-Ray Sources Ensure Safe Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded inXitu Inc. (formerly Microwave Power Technology), of Mountain View, California, an SBIR contract to develop a new design of electron optics for forming and focusing electron beams that is applicable to a broad class of vacuum electron devices. This technology offers an inherently rugged and more efficient X-ray source for material analysis; a compact and rugged X-ray source for smaller rovers on future Mars missions; and electron beam sources to reduce undesirable emissions from small, widely distributed pollution sources; and remediation of polluted sites.

  9. In Situ Density Measurement of Basaltic Melts at High Pressure by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, R.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Urakawa, S.; Katayama, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Density of silicate melt at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior. However, because of experimental difficulties, the density of magma at high pressure is poorly known. Katayama et al. (1996) recently developed a new in situ density measurement method for metallic melts, based on the density dependency of X-ray absorption in the sample. In this study, we tried to measure the density of basaltic melt by this absorption method. When X-ray is transmitted to the sample, the intensity of the transmitted X-ray beam (I) is expressed as follows; I=I0exp(-μ ρ t), where I0 is the intensity of incident X-ray beam, μ is the mass absorption coefficient, ρ is the density of the sample, and t is the thickness of the sample. If t and μ are known, we can determine the density of the sample by measuring I and I0. This is the principle of the absorption method for density measurement. In this study, in order to determine t, we used a single crystalline diamond cylinder as a sample capsule, diamond is less compressive and less deformable so that even at high pressure t (thickness of the sample at the point x) is expressed as follows; t = 2*(R02-x2)1/2, R0 is the inner radius of cylinder at the ambient condition, and x is distance from a center of the capsule. And diamond also shows less absorption so that this make it possible to measure the density of silicate melt with smaller absorption coefficient than metallic melts. In order to know the μ of the sample, we measured both densities (ρ ) and absorptions (I/I0) for some glasses and crystals with same composition of the sample at the ambient condition, and calculated as fallows; μ =ln(I/I0)/ρ . Experiments were made at the beamline (BL22XU) of SPring-8. For generation of high pressure and high temperature, we used DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus (SMAP180) there. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the edge-length of 6 mm. The energy of monochromatic X-ray

  10. Dynamics of modulated beams in spectral domain

    DOE PAGES

    Yampolsky, Nikolai A.

    2017-07-16

    General formalism for describing dynamics of modulated beams along linear beamlines is developed. We describe modulated beams with spectral distribution function which represents Fourier transform of the conventional beam distribution function in the 6-dimensional phase space. The introduced spectral distribution function is localized in some region of the spectral domain for nearly monochromatic modulations. It can be characterized with a small number of typical parameters such as the lowest order moments of the spectral distribution. We study evolution of the modulated beams in linear beamlines and find that characteristic spectral parameters transform linearly. The developed approach significantly simplifies analysis ofmore » various schemes proposed for seeding X-ray free electron lasers. We use this approach to study several recently proposed schemes and find the bandwidth of the output bunching in each case.« less

  11. Observation and theory of X-ray mirages

    PubMed Central

    Magnitskiy, Sergey; Nagorskiy, Nikolay; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Tanaka, Mamoko; Ishino, Masahiko; Nishikino, Masaharu; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    The advent of X-ray lasers allowed the realization of compact coherent soft X-ray sources, thus opening the way to a wide range of applications. Here we report the observation of unexpected concentric rings in the far-field beam profile at the output of a two-stage plasma-based X-ray laser, which can be considered as the first manifestation of a mirage phenomenon in X-rays. We have developed a method of solving the Maxwell–Bloch equations for this problem, and find that the experimentally observed phenomenon is due to the emergence of X-ray mirages in the plasma amplifier, appearing as phase-matched coherent virtual point sources. The obtained results bring a new insight into the physical nature of amplification of X-ray radiation in laser-induced plasma amplifiers and open additional opportunities for X-ray plasma diagnostics and extreme ultraviolet lithography. PMID:23733009

  12. Observation and theory of X-ray mirages.

    PubMed

    Magnitskiy, Sergey; Nagorskiy, Nikolay; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Tanaka, Mamoko; Ishino, Masahiko; Nishikino, Masaharu; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    The advent of X-ray lasers allowed the realization of compact coherent soft X-ray sources, thus opening the way to a wide range of applications. Here we report the observation of unexpected concentric rings in the far-field beam profile at the output of a two-stage plasma-based X-ray laser, which can be considered as the first manifestation of a mirage phenomenon in X-rays. We have developed a method of solving the Maxwell-Bloch equations for this problem, and find that the experimentally observed phenomenon is due to the emergence of X-ray mirages in the plasma amplifier, appearing as phase-matched coherent virtual point sources. The obtained results bring a new insight into the physical nature of amplification of X-ray radiation in laser-induced plasma amplifiers and open additional opportunities for X-ray plasma diagnostics and extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  13. Asymmetrically cut crystal pair as x-ray magnifier for imaging at high intensity laser facilitiesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Seely, J. F.; Curry, J. J.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.

    2010-10-01

    The potential of an x-ray magnifier prepared from a pair of asymmetrically cut crystals is studied to explore high energy x-ray imaging capabilities at high intensity laser facilities. OMEGA-EP and NIF when irradiating mid and high Z targets can be a source of high-energy x-rays whose production mechanisms and use as backlighters are a subject of active research. This paper studies the properties and potential of existing asymmetric cut crystal pairs from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) built in a new enclosure for imaging x-ray sources. The technique of the x-ray magnifier has been described previously. This new approach is aimed to find a design that could be used at laser facilities by magnifying the x-ray source into a screen far away from the target chamber center, with fixed magnification defined by the crystals' lattice spacing and the asymmetry angles. The magnified image is monochromatic and the imaging wavelength is set by crystal asymmetry and incidence angles. First laboratory results are presented and discussed.

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Wafer Mapping Method for Rhombohedral Super-Hetero-Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yoonjoon; Choi, Sang Hyouk; King, Glen C.; Elliott, James R.; Dimarcantonio, Albert L.

    2010-01-01

    A new X-ray diffraction (XRD) method is provided to acquire XY mapping of the distribution of single crystals, poly-crystals, and twin defects across an entire wafer of rhombohedral super-hetero-epitaxial semiconductor material. In one embodiment, the method is performed with a point or line X-ray source with an X-ray incidence angle approximating a normal angle close to 90 deg, and in which the beam mask is preferably replaced with a crossed slit. While the wafer moves in the X and Y direction, a narrowly defined X-ray source illuminates the sample and the diffracted X-ray beam is monitored by the detector at a predefined angle. Preferably, the untilted, asymmetric scans are of {440} peaks, for twin defect characterization.

  15. Direct experimental observation of the gas density depression effect using a two-bunch X-ray FEL beam.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Schafer, D W; Song, S; Sun, Y; Zhu, D; Krzywinski, J; Robert, A; Wu, J; Decker, F J

    2018-01-01

    The experimental observation of the depression effect in gas devices designed for X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) is reported. The measurements were carried out at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a two-bunch FEL beam at 6.5 keV with 122.5 ns separation passing through an argon gas cell. The relative intensities of the two pulses of the two-bunch beam were measured, after and before the gas cell, from X-ray scattering off thin targets by using fast diodes with sufficient temporal resolution. At a cell pressure of 140 hPa, it was found that the after-to-before ratio of the intensities of the second pulse was about 17% ± 6% higher than that of the first pulse, revealing lower effective attenuation of the gas cell due to heating by the first pulse and subsequent gas density reduction in the beam path. This measurement is important in guiding the design and/or mitigating the adverse effects in gas devices for high-repetition-rate FELs such as the LCLS-II and the European XFEL or other future high-repetition-rate upgrades to existing FEL facilities.

  16. Direct experimental observation of the gas density depression effect using a two-bunch X-ray FEL beam

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Y.; Schafer, D. W.; Song, S.; ...

    2018-01-01

    The experimental observation of the depression effect in gas devices designed for X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) is reported. The measurements were carried out at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a two-bunch FEL beam at 6.5 keV with 122.5 ns separation passing through an argon gas cell. The relative intensities of the two pulses of the two-bunch beam were measured, after and before the gas cell, from X-ray scattering off thin targets by using fast diodes with sufficient temporal resolution. At a cell pressure of 140 hPa, it was found that the after-to-before ratio of the intensities of the secondmore » pulse was about 17% ± 6% higher than that of the first pulse, revealing lower effective attenuation of the gas cell due to heating by the first pulse and subsequent gas density reduction in the beam path. Furthermore, this measurement is important in guiding the design and/or mitigating the adverse effects in gas devices for high-repetition-rate FELs such as the LCLS-II and the European XFEL or other future high-repetition-rate upgrades to existing FEL facilities.« less

  17. Direct experimental observation of the gas density depression effect using a two-bunch X-ray FEL beam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Feng, Y.; Schafer, D. W.; Song, S.

    The experimental observation of the depression effect in gas devices designed for X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) is reported. The measurements were carried out at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a two-bunch FEL beam at 6.5 keV with 122.5 ns separation passing through an argon gas cell. The relative intensities of the two pulses of the two-bunch beam were measured, after and before the gas cell, from X-ray scattering off thin targets by using fast diodes with sufficient temporal resolution. At a cell pressure of 140 hPa, it was found that the after-to-before ratio of the intensities of the secondmore » pulse was about 17% ± 6% higher than that of the first pulse, revealing lower effective attenuation of the gas cell due to heating by the first pulse and subsequent gas density reduction in the beam path. Furthermore, this measurement is important in guiding the design and/or mitigating the adverse effects in gas devices for high-repetition-rate FELs such as the LCLS-II and the European XFEL or other future high-repetition-rate upgrades to existing FEL facilities.« less

  18. Time-resolved measurements of supersonic fuel sprays using synchrotron X-rays.

    PubMed

    Powell, C F; Yue, Y; Poola, R; Wang, J

    2000-11-01

    A time-resolved radiographic technique has been developed for probing the fuel distribution close to the nozzle of a high-pressure single-hole diesel injector. The measurement was made using X-ray absorption of monochromatic synchrotron-generated radiation, allowing quantitative determination of the fuel distribution in this optically impenetrable region with a time resolution of better than 1 micros. These quantitative measurements constitute the most detailed near-nozzle study of a fuel spray to date.

  19. Central X-ray beam correction of radiographic acetabular cup measurement after THA: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, T; Weber, M; Wörner, M; Renkawitz, T; Grifka, J; Craiovan, B

    2017-05-01

    Accurate assessment of cup orientation on postoperative radiographs is essential for evaluating outcome after THA. However, accuracy is impeded by the deviation of the central X-ray beam in relation to the cup and the impossibility of measuring retroversion on standard pelvic radiographs. In an experimental trial, we built an artificial cup holder enabling the setting of different angles of anatomical anteversion and inclination. Twelve different cup orientations were investigated by three examiners. After comparing the two methods for radiographic measurement of the cup position developed by Lewinnek and Widmer, we showed how to differentiate between anteversion and retroversion in each cup position by using a second plane. To show the effect of the central beam offset on the cup, we X-rayed a defined cup position using a multidirectional central beam offset. According to Murray's definition of anteversion and inclination, we created a novel corrective procedure to balance measurement errors caused by deviation of the central beam. Measurement of the 12 different cup positions with the Lewinnek's method yielded a mean deviation of [Formula: see text] (95 % CI 1.3-2.3) from the original cup anteversion. The respective deviation with the Widmer/Liaw's method was [Formula: see text] (95 % CI 2.4-4.0). In each case, retroversion could be differentiated from anteversion with a second radiograph. Because of the multidirectional central beam offset ([Formula: see text] cm) from the acetabular cup in the cup holder ([Formula: see text] anteversion and [Formula: see text] inclination), the mean absolute difference for anteversion was [Formula: see text] (range [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] (range [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] for inclination. The application of our novel mathematical correction of the central beam offset reduced deviation to a mean difference of [Formula: see text] for anteversion and [Formula: see text

  20. An instrument for 3D x-ray nano-imaging

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Holler, M.; Raabe, J.; Diaz, A.

    We present an instrument dedicated to 3D scanning x-ray microscopy, allowing a sample to be precisely scanned through a beam while the angle of x-ray incidence can be changed. The position of the sample is controlled with respect to the beam-defining optics by laser interferometry. The instrument achieves a position stability better than 10 nm standard deviation. The instrument performance is assessed using scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy and we demonstrate a resolution of 18 nm in 2D imaging of a lithographic test pattern while the beam was defined by a pinhole of 3 {mu}m in diameter. In 3D on amore » test object of copper interconnects of a microprocessor, a resolution of 53 nm is achieved.« less

  1. Physics Design Considerations for Diagnostic X Electron Beam Transport System

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chen, Y-J

    2000-04-10

    The Diagnostic X (D-X) beamlines will transport the DARHT-II beam from the end of the accelerator to the Diagnostic X firing point providing four lines of sight for x-ray radiography. The design goal for the Diagnostic X beamline is to deliver four x-ray pulses with the DARHT-II dose format and time integrated spot size on each line of sight. The D-X beamline's final focus should be compatible with a range of first conjugates from 1 m-5 m. Furthermore, the D-X beamline operational parameters and the beamline layout should not preclude a possible upgrade to additional lines of sight. The DARHT-IImore » accelerator is designed to deliver beams at a rate of 1 pulse per minute or less. Tuning the D-X beamline with several hundred optical elements would be time consuming. Therefore, minimizing the required number of tuning shots for the D-X beamline is also an important design goal. Many different beamline configurations may be able to accomplish these design objectives, and high beam quality (i.e., high current and low emittance) must be maintained throughout the chosen beamline configuration in order to achieve the DARHT-II x-ray dose format. In general, the longer the distance a beam travels, the harder it is to preserve the beam quality. Therefore, from the point of view of maintaining beam quality, it is highly desirable to minimize the beamline length. Lastly, modification to the DARHT-II building and the downstream transport should be minimized. Several processes can degrade beam quality by increasing the beam emittance, increasing the time-varying transverse beam motion, creating a beam halo, or creating a time-varying beam envelope. In this report, we consider those processes in the passive magnet lattice beamline and indicate how they constrain the beamline design. The physics design considerations for the active components such as the kicker system will be discussed in Ref. 2. In Sec. I, we discuss how beam emittance affects the x-ray forward dose. We also

  2. On the influence of monochromator thermal deformations on X-ray focusing

    DOE PAGES

    Antimonov, M. A.; Khounsary, A. M.; Sandy, A. R.; ...

    2016-03-02

    A cooled double crystal monochromator system is used on many high heat load X-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines in order to select, by diffraction, a narrow spectrum of the beam. Thermal deformation of the first crystal monochromator – and the potential loss of beam brightness – is often a concern. However, if downstream beam focusing is planned, the lensing effect of the monochromator must be considered even if thermal deformations are small. In this paper we report on recent experiments at an Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline that focuses the X-ray beam using compound refractive lenses downstream of an X-ray monochromatormore » system. Increasing the X-ray beam power by increasing the storage ring current from 100 mA to 130 mA resulted in an effective doubling of the focal distance. We show quantitatively that this is due to a lensing effect of the distorted monochromator that results in the creation of a virtual source downstream of the actual source. Lastly, an analysis of the defocusing and options to mitigate this effect are explored.« less

  3. Synergistic effect of heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin and X-rays, but not carbon-ion beams, on lethality in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Musha, Atsushi; Yoshida, Yukari; Takahashi, Takeo; Ando, Koichi; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Negishi, Akihide; Yokoo, Satoshi; Nakano, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), in combination with X-rays or carbon-ion beams on cell killing in human oral squamous cell carcinoma LMF4 cells. Cell survival was measured by colony formation assay. Cell-cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Expression of DNA repair-related proteins was investigated by western blotting. The results showed 17-AAG to have synergistic effects on cell lethality with X-rays, but not with carbon-ion beams. The 17-AAG decreased G2/M arrest induced by X-rays, but not by carbon-ion beams. Both X-ray and carbon-ion irradiation up-regulated expression of non-homologous end-joining-associated proteins, Ku70 and Ku80, but 17-AAG inhibited only X-ray-induced up-regulation of