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Sample records for monoclonal antibodies 2f5

  1. MABGEL 1: First Phase 1 Trial of the Anti-HIV-1 Monoclonal Antibodies 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 as a Vaginal Microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Georgina C.; Wiggins, Rebecca C.; Woodhall, Sarah C.; Bland, J. Martin; Taylor, Carol R.; Jespers, Vicky; Vcelar, Brigitta A.; Lacey, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which potently neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates are potential microbicide candidates. To date, topical application of mAbs in humans and their stability in vaginal secretions has not been studied. Objectives To assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of the mAbs 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 when applied vaginally in women. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 trial. Methods Twenty-eight healthy, sexually abstinent women administered 2.5 g of gel daily for 12 days containing either 10 or 20 mg/g of each mAb (MABGEL) or placebo. Main clinical evaluations and sampling occurred at baseline, 1, 8, and 24 hours post-1st dose and 12 and 36 hours post-12th dose. Results After adjustment for dilution factors, median levels of 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 in vaginal secretions at 1 hour post high-dose MABGEL were 7.74, 5.28 and 7.48 mg/ml respectively. Levels of 2F5 and 4E10 declined exponentially thereafter with similar estimated half-lives (4.6 and 4.3 hours). In contrast, 2G12 levels declined more rapidly in the first 8 hours, with an estimated half-life of 1.4 hours during this period. There was no evidence of systemic absorption. There were no significant differences in local or systemic adverse event rates or vaginal flora changes (by qPCR) between active and placebo gel arms. Whilst at least 1 adverse event was recorded in 96% of participants, 95% were mild and none were serious. Conclusions Vaginal application of 50 mg of each mAb daily was safe over a 12 day period. Median mAb concentrations detected at 8 hours post dose were potentially sufficient to block HIV transmission.2G12 exhibited more rapid elimination from the human vagina than 4E10 and 2F5, likely due to poor stability of 2G12 in acidic human vaginal secretions. Further research is needed to develop mAb-based vaginal microbicides and delivery systems. Trial Registration ISRCTN 64808733 UK CRN Portfolio 6470 PMID:25546420

  2. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-10-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization.

  3. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  5. Structure-guided alterations of the gp41-directed HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5 reveal new properties regarding its neutralizing function.

    PubMed

    Guenaga, Javier; Wyatt, Richard T

    2012-01-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody 2F5 recognizes an epitope in the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER). The MPER adopts a helical conformation as free peptide, as post-fusogenic forms of gp41, and when bound to the 4E10 monoclonal antibody (Mab). However, when bound to 2F5, the epitope is an extended-loop. The antibody-peptide structure reveals binding between the heavy and light chains with most the long, hydrophobic CDRH3 not contacting peptide. However, mutagenesis identifies this loop as critical for binding, neutralization and for putative hydrophobic membrane interactions. Here, we examined length requirements of the 2F5 CDRH3 and plasticity regarding binding and neutralization. We generated 2F5 variants possessing either longer or shorter CDRH3s and assessed function. The CDRH3 tolerated elongations and reductions up to four residues, displaying a range of binding affinities and retaining some neutralizing capacity. 2F5 antibody variants selective recognition of conformationally distinctive MPER probes suggests a new role for the CDRH3 loop in destabilizing the helical MPER. Binding and neutralization were enhanced by targeted tryptophan substitutions recapitulating fully the activities of the wild-type 2F5 antibody in a shorter CDRH3 variant. MPER alanine scanning revealed binding contacts of this variant downstream of the 2F5 core epitope, into the 4E10 epitope region. This variant displayed increased reactivity to cardiolipin-beta-2-glycoprotein. Tyrosine replacements maintained neutralization while eliminating cardiolipin-beta-2-glycoprotein interaction. The data suggest a new mechanism of action, important for vaccine design, in which the 2F5 CDRH3 contacts and destabilizes the MPER helix downstream of its core epitope to allow induction of the extended-loop conformation.

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  7. Crystallographic Definition of the Epitope Promiscuity of the Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody 2F5: Vaccine Design Implications▿

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Steve; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Hynes, Rosemary C.; Pai, Emil F.

    2009-01-01

    The quest to create a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine capable of eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies against Env has been challenging. Among other problems, one difficulty in creating a potent immunogen resides in the substantial overall sequence variability of the HIV envelope protein. The membrane-proximal region (MPER) of gp41 is a particularly conserved tryptophan-rich region spanning residues 659 to 683, which is recognized by three broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs), 2F5, Z13, and 4E10. In this study, we first describe the variability of residues in the gp41 MPER and report on the invariant nature of 15 out of 25 amino acids comprising this region. Subsequently, we evaluate the ability of the bnMAb 2F5 to recognize 31 varying sequences of the gp41 MPER at a molecular level. In 19 cases, resulting crystal structures show the various MPER peptides bound to the 2F5 Fab′. A variety of amino acid substitutions outside the 664DKW666 core epitope are tolerated. However, changes at the 664DKW666 motif itself are restricted to those residues that preserve the aspartate's negative charge, the hydrophobic alkyl-π stacking arrangement between the β-turn lysine and tryptophan, and the positive charge of the former. We also characterize a possible molecular mechanism of 2F5 escape by sequence variability at position 667, which is often observed in HIV-1 clade C isolates. Based on our results, we propose a somewhat more flexible molecular model of epitope recognition by bnMAb 2F5, which could guide future attempts at designing small-molecule MPER-like vaccines capable of eliciting 2F5-like antibodies. PMID:19740978

  8. Structural Basis for HIV-1 Neutralization by 2F5-Like Antibodies m66 and m66.6

    PubMed Central

    Zirkle, Brett; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Zhongyu; McKee, Krisha; Zhang, Baoshan; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; O'Dell, Sijy; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Mascola, John R.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies m66.6 and 2F5 are the only effective human HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies reported thus far to recognize the N-terminal region of the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Although 2F5 has been extensively characterized, much less is known about antibody m66.6 or antibody m66, a closely related light-chain variant. Here, we report the crystal structure of m66 in complex with its gp41 epitope, along with unbound structures of m66 and m66.6. We used mutational and binding analyses to decipher antibody elements critical for their recognition of gp41 and determined the molecular basis that underlies their neutralization of HIV-1. When bound by m66, the N-terminal region of the gp41 MPER adopts a conformation comprising a helix, followed by an extended loop. Comparison of gp41-bound m66 to unbound m66.6 identified three light-chain residues of m66.6 that were confirmed through mutagenesis to underlie the greater breadth of m66.6-mediated virus neutralization. Recognition of gp41 by m66 also revealed similarities to antibody 2F5 both in the conformation of crucial epitope residues as well as in the angle of antibody approach. Aromatic residues at the tip of the m66.6 heavy-chain third complementarity-determining region, as in the case of 2F5, were determined to be critical for virus neutralization in a manner that correlated with antibody recognition of the MPER in a lipid context. Antibodies m66, m66.6, and 2F5 thus utilize similar mechanistic elements to recognize a common gp41-MPER epitope and to neutralize HIV-1. PMID:24335316

  9. N-terminal residues of an HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region antigen influence broadly neutralizing 2F5-like antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Dezhi; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Li; Xu, Tianshu; Chen, Junheng; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Qi

    2015-12-01

    The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER) is targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies (e.g. 2F5, 4E10, Z13e and m66.6), which makes this region a promising target for vaccine design. One strategy to elicit neutralizing antibodies against the MPER epitope is to design peptide immunogens mimicking neutralization structures. To probe 2F5-like neutralizing antibodies, two yeast-displayed antibody libraries from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a HIV-1 patient were screened against the 2F5 epitope peptide SP62. Two 2F5-like antibodies were identified that specifically recognized SP62. However, these antibodies only weakly neutralized HIV-1 primary isolates. The epitopes recognized by these two 2F5-like antibodies include not only the 2F5 epitope (amino acids (aa) 662-667 in the MPER) but also several other residues (aa 652-655) locating at the N-terminus in SP62. Experimental results suggest that residues of SP62 adjacent to the 2F5 epitope influence the response of broadly neutralizing 2F5-like antibodies in vaccination. Our findings may aid the design of vaccine immunogens and development of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection.

  10. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  11. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  13. Estimating the probability of polyreactive antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 disabling a gp41 trimer after T cell-HIV adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Goldstein, Byron

    2014-01-01

    A few broadly neutralizing antibodies, isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, recognize epitopes in the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 that are transiently exposed during viral entry. The best characterized, 4E10 and 2F5, are polyreactive, binding to the viral membrane and their epitopes in the MPER. We present a model to calculate, for any antibody concentration, the probability that during the pre-hairpin intermediate, the transient period when the epitopes are first exposed, a bound antibody will disable a trivalent gp41 before fusion is complete. When 4E10 or 2F5 bind to the MPER, a conformational change is induced that results in a stably bound complex. The model predicts that for these antibodies to be effective at neutralization, the time to disable an epitope must be shorter than the time the antibody remains bound in this conformation, about five minutes or less for 4E10 and 2F5. We investigate the role of avidity in neutralization and show that 2F5 IgG, but not 4E10, is much more effective at neutralization than its Fab fragment. We attribute this to 2F5 interacting more stably than 4E10 with the viral membrane. We use the model to elucidate the parameters that determine the ability of these antibodies to disable epitopes and propose an extension of the model to analyze neutralization data. The extended model predicts the dependencies of IC50 for neutralization on the rate constants that characterize antibody binding, the rate of fusion of gp41, and the number of gp41 bridging the virus and target cell at the start of the pre-hairpin intermediate. Analysis of neutralization experiments indicate that only a small number of gp41 bridges must be disabled to prevent fusion. However, the model cannot determine the exact number from neutralization experiments alone.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  16. Computational design of protein antigens that interact with the CDR H3 loop of HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5

    PubMed Central

    Azoitei, M.L.; Ban, Y.A.; Kalyuzhny, O.; Guenaga, J.; Schroeter, A.; Porter, J.; Wyatt, R.; Schief, W.R.

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of proteins with novel binding specificities and increased affinity is one of the major goals of computational protein design. Epitope-scaffolds are a new class of antigens engineered by transplanting viral epitopes of pre-defined structure to protein scaffolds, or by building protein scaffolds around such epitopes. Epitope-scaffolds are of interest as vaccine components to attempt to elicit neutralizing antibodies targeting the specified epitope. In this study we developed a new computational protocol, MultiGraft Interface, that transplants epitopes but also designs additional scaffold features outside the epitope to enhance antibody-binding specificity and potentially influence the specificity of elicited antibodies. We employed MultiGraft Interface to engineer novel epitope-scaffolds that display the known epitope of HIV-1 neutralizing antibody 2F5 and that also interact with the functionally important CDR H3 antibody loop. MultiGraft Interface generated an epitope-scaffold that bound 2F5 with sub-nanomolar affinity (KD = 400 pM) and that interacted with the antibody CDR H3 loop through computationally designed contacts. Substantial structural modifications were necessary to engineer this antigen, with the 2F5 epitope replacing a helix in the native scaffold and with 15% of the native scaffold sequence being modified in the design stage. This epitope-scaffold represents a successful example of rational protein backbone engineering and protein-protein interface design and could prove useful in the field of HIV vaccine design. MultiGraft Interface can be generally applied to engineer novel binding partners with altered specificity and optimized affinity. PMID:25043744

  17. Structure and immunogenicity of a peptide vaccine, including the complete HIV-1 gp41 2F5 epitope: implications for antibody recognition mechanism and immunogen design.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Soraya; Araujo, Aitziber; Apellániz, Beatriz; Bryson, Steve; Carravilla, Pablo; de la Arada, Igor; Huarte, Nerea; Rujas, Edurne; Pai, Emil F; Arrondo, José L R; Domene, Carmen; Jiménez, María Angeles; Nieva, José L

    2014-03-07

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 harbors the epitope recognized by the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV 2F5 antibody, a research focus in HIV-1 vaccine development. In this work, we analyze the structure and immunogenic properties of MPERp, a peptide vaccine that includes the following: (i) the complete sequence protected from proteolysis by the 2F5 paratope; (ii) downstream residues postulated to establish weak contacts with the CDR-H3 loop of the antibody, which are believed to be crucial for neutralization; and (iii) an aromatic rich anchor to the membrane interface. MPERp structures solved in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and 25% 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (v/v) confirmed folding of the complete 2F5 epitope within continuous kinked helices. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurements demonstrated the retention of main helical conformations in immunogenic formulations based on alum, Freund's adjuvant, or two different types of liposomes. Binding to membrane-inserted MPERp, IR, molecular dynamics simulations, and characterization of the immune responses further suggested that packed helical bundles partially inserted into the lipid bilayer, rather than monomeric helices adsorbed to the membrane interface, could encompass effective MPER peptide vaccines. Together, our data constitute a proof-of-concept to support MPER-based peptides in combination with liposomes as stand-alone immunogens and suggest new approaches for structure-aided MPER vaccine development.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  19. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  20. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  1. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references.

  4. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  6. [Evolution of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Kubczak, Małgorzata; Rogalińska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since late 90s of last century the new age of directed therapy began using mainly biological constructs produced in rodents called monoclonal antibodies. The side effects of monoclonal antibodies were a challenge for pharmaceutical companies to improve the biological properties of these biological drugs. The humanization of monoclonal constructs was an idea to improve monoclonal antibodies next generation activity cancer cell reduction in humans. Moreover for some other patients sensitive for monoclonal antibodies therapy could also potentially induce immunological differences that might imply on human health. The new idea related to monoclonal antibodies was to design a small molecule constructs of nanoantibodies with ability to enter into cells. Such small molecules could find their targets inside human cells, even in nuclei leading to differences in cancer cells expression. The existing knowledge on monoclonal antibodies as well as directed activity of nanoantibodies could improve anticancer treatment efficancy of diseases.

  7. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9.

  9. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  10. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  12. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Palavra, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Since their introduction in medical therapy, in the last quarter of the 20th century, monoclonal antibodies have gained an increasing importance in the treatment of various diseases. Neurology has been one of the medical specialties benefiting of the therapeutic potential of these monoclonal antibodies and certain neurological conditions may now contain such drugs in their therapeutic algorithms. Multiple sclerosis is one of these diseases and, in addition to the monoclonal antibodies already licensed for clinical use, several others are in development for future utilization in this specific area. The future will certainly pass through this kind of drugs and, in this article, a review of the most relevant data related to monoclonal antibodies already in use and also in clinical development for multiple sclerosis treatment will be performed.

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Drosophila Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shinobu C.; Zipursky, Stephen L.; Benzer, Seymour; Ferrus, Alberto; Shotwell, Sandra L.

    1982-12-01

    A panel of 148 monoclonal antibodies directed against Drosophila neural antigens has been prepared by using mice immunized with homogenates of Drosophila tissue. Antibodies were screened immunohistochemically on cryostat sections of fly heads. A large diversity of staining patterns was observed. Some antigens were broadly distributed among tissues; others were highly specific to nerve fibers, neuropil, muscle, the tracheal system, cell nuclei, photoreceptors, or other structures. The antigens for many of the antibodies have been identified on immunoblots. Monoclonal antibodies that identify specific molecules within the nervous system should prove useful in the study of the molecular genetics of neural development.

  16. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  17. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  18. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  19. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies. PMID:28336958

  20. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; Taichman, N S; Lally, E T

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma cell lines which produce monoclonal antibodies to a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared. The monoclonal antibodies were selected for their ability to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of the leukotoxin and recognize the toxin on nitrocellulose blots. The antibodies belonged to either the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) or IgG2 subclass and differed in their ability to bind to the leukotoxin on nitrocellulose blots. However, only slight differences in neutralization titers were observed. Use of the monoclonal antibodies revealed that polymyxin B-extracted or osmotic shock-released leukotoxin could be separated into several high-molecular-weight polypeptides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblot analysis with the monoclonal antibodies also demonstrated that the leukotoxin was present in eight oral strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans that had been previously classified by a biological assay as leukotoxic. The availability of these monoclonal antibodies should facilitate and expand studies concerning the role of the leukotoxin in the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:3965404

  2. Production of monoclonal antibodies to plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies in plant pathology has improved the quality and specificity of detection methods for diseases. Hybridoma technology allows the limitless production of highly specific antibodies which can be used to identify pathogens to the species or even sub-species level.

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  4. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  5. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  6. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with murine teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, P N; Levinson, J R; Williams, V E; McDevitt, H O

    1979-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced in vitro by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a rat immunized with the C3H mouse teratocarcinoma C86-S1. After the fusion two clones were chosen for further analysis. The first clone, 3C4-10, produced an antibody recognizing an antigen with a distribution restricted to teratocarcinoma cell lines, an endoderm cell line, and a neuroblastoma. The second clone, 4A1-9, produced an antibody that reacted with all cultured murine cells tested and adult brain. Neither antibody reacted with preimplantation embryos. The 3C4-10 antibody recognized an antigen associated with proteins. The apparent molecular weight of the 3C4-10 antigen was greater than 100,000. PMID:284353

  8. Chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, John P.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of therapeutic glycoproteins widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Compelling data have shown that the presence and fine structures of the conserved N-glycans at the Fc domain can profoundly affect the effector functions of antibodies. However, mAbs are usually produced as mixtures of Fc glycoforms and the control of glycosylation to a favorable, homogeneous status in various host expression systems is still a challenging task. In this chapter, we describe a detailed procedure of chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies, using rituximab (a therapeutic monoclonal antibody) as a model system. The protocol includes the deglycosylation of a mAb by an endoglycosidase (such as wild type EndoS) to remove the heterogeneous Fc N-glycans, leaving only the innermost GlcNAc or the core-fucosylated GlcNAc at the glycosylation site. Then the deglycosylated IgG serves as an acceptor for an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation to add a desired N-glycan to the GlcNAc acceptor to reconstitute a defined, homogeneous natural glycoform of IgG, using a glycosynthase mutant as the enzyme and activated glycan oxazoline as the donor substrate. A semi-synthesis of sialylated and asialylated biantennary N-glycan oxazolines is also described. This detailed procedure can be used for the Fc glycosylation remodeling of other mAbs to provide homogeneous Fc glycoforms for various applications. PMID:26082235

  9. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts. PMID:6185604

  10. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  12. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  13. Monoclonal antibodies against metallothioneins and metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Talbot, B G; Bilodeau, G; Thirion, J P

    1986-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against rabbit metallothioneins (MT) were prepared by in vitro immunization of mouse lymphocytes with a mixture of the two forms of metallothionein MT1 and MT2. Six IgM antibodies (TN1,3,4,5,6,7) which bind to metallothionein were characterized. Antibody TN3 is specific for rabbit MT1 and does not react with any other MT's tested. TN5 is specific for both rabbit MT1 and MT2. TN7 is specific for rabbit MT2 but not MT1 and cross-reacts also with Chinese hamster, mouse and rat metallothioneins. The antibodies TN1, TN4 and TN6 bind not only to rabbit MT1 and MT2 but also to other metal binding proteins like alcohol dehydrogenase and carbonic anhydrase.

  14. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. PMID:24183828

  15. Therapeutic monoclonal antibody for sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sandro R.

    2012-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis that affects both humans and animals worldwide. This subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent, Sporothrix schenckii. S. schenckii exhibits considerable genetic variability, and recently, it was suggested that this taxon consists of a complex of species. Sporotrichosis is caused by traumatic inoculation of the fungus, which is a ubiquitous environmental saprophyte that can be isolated from soil and plant debris. The infection is limited to cutaneous forms, but recently, more severe clinical forms of this mycosis have been described, especially among immunocompromised individuals. The immunological mechanisms involved in the prevention and control of sporotrichosis are not well understood. Some studies suggest that cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in protecting the host against S. schenckii. In contrast, the role of the humoral immune response in protection against this fungus has not been studied in detail. In a previous study, we showed that antigens secreted by S. schenckii induced a specific humoral response in infected animals, primarily against a 70-kDa molecule, indicating a possible role of specific antibodies against this molecule in infection control. In another study by our group, we produced a mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein of S. schenckii to better understand the effect of the passive immunization of mice infected with S. schenckii. The results showed a significant reduction in the number of CFUs in various mice organs when the mAb was injected before or during S. schenckii infection. Similar results were observed when T-cell-deficient mice were used. The drugs of choice in the treatment of sporotrichosis require long periods, and relapses are frequently observed, primarily in immunocompromised patients. The strong protection induced by the mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein makes it a strong candidate as a therapeutic vaccine against sporotrichosis. PMID

  16. Common tolerance mechanisms, but distinct cross-reactivities associated with gp41 and lipids, limit production of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Jinsong; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Bouton-Verville, Hilary; Xia, Shi-Mao; Newman, Amanda; Ouyang, Ying-Bin; Haynes, Barton F; Verkoczy, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Developing an HIV-1 vaccine has been hampered by the inability of immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs) that protect against infection. Previously, we used knockin (KI) mice expressing a prototypical gp41-specific BnAb, 2F5, to demonstrate that immunological tolerance triggered by self-reactivity of the 2F5 H chain impedes BnAb induction. In this study, we generate KI models expressing H chains from two other HIV-1 Abs, 4E10 (another self-/polyreactive, anti-gp41 BnAb) and 48d (an anti-CD4 inducible, nonpolyreactive Ab), and find a similar developmental blockade consistent with central B cell deletion in 4E10, but not in 48d VH KI mice. Furthermore, in KI strains expressing the complete 2F5 and 4E10 Abs as BCRs, we find that residual splenic B cells arrest at distinct developmental stages, yet exhibit uniformly low BCR densities, elevated basal activation, and profoundly muted responses to BCR ligation and, when captured as hybridoma mAb lines, maintain their dual (gp41/lipid) affinities and capacities to neutralize HIV-1, establishing a key role for anergy in suppressing residual 2F5- or 4E10-expressing B cells. Importantly, serum IgGs from naive 2F5 and 4E10 KI strains selectively eliminate gp41 and lipid binding, respectively, suggesting B cells expressing 2F5 or 4E10 as BCRs exhibit specificity for a distinct spectrum of host Ags, including selective interactions by 2F5 BCR(+) B cells (i.e., and not 4E10 BCR(+) B cells) with those mimicked by its gp41 neutralization epitope.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  19. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  20. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  1. Recombinant genetic libraries and human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jarrett J; Nelson, Bryce; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively manipulate the human proteome we require a vast repertoire of pharmacological reagents. To address these needs we have developed repertoires of synthetic antibodies by phage display, where diversified oligonucleotides are used to modify the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of a human antigen-binding fragment (Fab) scaffold. As diversity is produced outside the confines of the mammalian immune system, synthetic antibody libraries allow us to bypass several limitations of hybridoma technology while improving the experimental parameters under which pharmacological reagents are produced. Here we describe the methodologies used to produce synthetic antibody libraries from a single human framework with diversity restricted to four CDRs. These synthetic repertoires can be extremely functional as they produce highly selective, high affinity Fabs to the majority of soluble human antigens. Finally we describe selection methodologies that allow us to overcome immuno-dominance in our selections to target a variety of epitopes per antigen. Together these methodologies allow us to produce human monoclonal antibodies to manipulate the human proteome.

  2. Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Herrin, Brantley R; Alder, Matthew N; Roux, Kenneth H; Sina, Christina; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Boydston, Jeremy A; Turnbough, Charles L; Cooper, Max D

    2008-02-12

    Adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates (lamprey and hagfish) is mediated by lymphocytes that undergo combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments to create a diverse repertoire of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes. Immunization with particulate antigens induces VLR-B-bearing lymphocytes to secrete antigen-specific VLR-B antibodies. Here, we describe the production of recombinant VLR-B antibodies specific for BclA, a major coat protein of Bacillus anthracis spores. The recombinant VLR-B antibodies possess 8-10 uniform subunits that collectively bind antigen with high avidity. Sequence analysis, mutagenesis, and modeling studies show that antigen binding involves residues in the beta-sheets lining the VLR-B concave surface. EM visualization reveals tetrameric and pentameric molecules having a central core and highly flexible pairs of stalk-region "arms" with antigen-binding "hands." Remarkable antigen-binding specificity, avidity, and stability predict that these unusual LRR-based monoclonal antibodies will find many biomedical uses.

  3. [Progress in monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yajun

    2015-06-01

    More than 100 years ago, Paul Ehrlich first proposed the "magic bullets" concept in which antibody targeting disease related antigen can fight against human disease. Since then, with the development of hybridoma technology for monoclonal antibody production and cancer serum therapy, immunotherapy based monoclonal antibody bas been used in chinical practice to treat hematological and solid tumor. Up to now, more than 20 recombinant antibody drugs were approved for cancer treatment worldwide. In recent years, the next-generation antibody drug, including immune checkpoint antagonists, bi-specific antibody, and antibody drug conjugates have successfully cured various malignant tumor. This review recalled the history of monoclonal antibody as potent immunotherapy of cancer firstly, and focused on the next-generation antibody drug's mechanism of action, construction strategies, and the side effects in clinic. Lastly, the future trend of anti-tumor antibody drug was also discussed.

  4. Immunochemical Characterization of Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    formation. This conformation was first proposed using studies with monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide mimicking the sequence of the...distinct antigenic determinants on dengue -2 virus using monoclonal antibodies, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 31 (1982) 548-555. 7 D. De la Hoz, B.P. Doctor

  5. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Xenopus Greatwall Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Mitosis is known to be regulated by protein kinases, including MPF, Plk1, Aurora kinases, and so on, which become active in M-phase and phosphorylate a wide range of substrates to control multiple aspects of mitotic entry, progression, and exit. Mechanistic investigations of these kinases not only provide key insights into cell cycle regulation, but also hold great promise for cancer therapy. Recent studies, largely in Xenopus, characterized a new mitotic kinase named Greatwall (Gwl) that plays essential roles in both mitotic entry and maintenance. In this study, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Xenopus Gwl and characterized these antibodies for their utility in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunodepletion in Xenopus egg extracts. Importantly, we generated an MAb that is capable of neutralizing endogenous Gwl. The addition of this antibody into M-phase extracts results in loss of mitotic phosphorylation of Gwl, Plk1, and Cdk1 substrates. These results illustrate a new tool to study loss-of-function of Gwl, and support its essential role in mitosis. Finally, we demonstrated the usefulness of the MAb against human Gwl/MASTL. PMID:22008075

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  8. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  9. Building better monoclonal antibody-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, George J.

    2015-01-01

    For 20 years, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been a standard component of cancer therapy, yet there is still much room for improvement. Efforts continue to build better cancer therapeutics based on mAbs. Anti-cancer mAbs function via a variety of mechanisms including directly targeting the malignant cells, modifying the host response to the malignant cells, delivering cytotoxic moieties to the malignant cells or retargeting cellular immunity towards the malignant cells. Characteristics of mAbs that affect their efficacy include antigen specificity, overall structure, affinity for the target antigen and how a mAb component is incorporated into a construct that can trigger target cell death. This article reviews the various approaches to using mAb-based therapeutics to treat cancer, the strategies used to take advantage of the unique potential of each approach, and provides examples of current mAb-based treatments. PMID:25998715

  10. Antibacterial monoclonal antibodies: the next generation?

    PubMed

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Sellman, Bret R

    2015-10-01

    There is a clear need for renewed efforts to combat the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance. While the antibiotic resistance epidemic is due in part to the misuse of antibiotics, even proper empiric antibiotic therapy increases the selective pressure and potential for drug-resistance and spread of resistance mechanisms between bacteria. Antibiotic resistance coupled with the detrimental effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the healthy microbiome, have led the field to explore pathogen specific antibacterials such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Medical need along with advances in mAb discovery, engineering, and production have driven significant effort developing mAb-based antibacterials. If successful, they will provide physicians with precision weapons to combat bacterial infections and can help prevent a return to a pre-antibiotic era.

  11. Clinical pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Ron J; Huitema, Alwin D R; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2010-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used in the treatment of various diseases for over 20 years and combine high specificity with generally low toxicity. Their pharmacokinetic properties differ markedly from those of non-antibody-type drugs, and these properties can have important clinical implications. mAbs are administered intravenously, intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Oral administration is precluded by the molecular size, hydrophilicity and gastric degradation of mAbs. Distribution into tissue is slow because of the molecular size of mAbs, and volumes of distribution are generally low. mAbs are metabolized to peptides and amino acids in several tissues, by circulating phagocytic cells or by their target antigen-containing cells. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from degradation by binding to protective receptors (the neonatal Fc-receptor [FcRn]), which explains their long elimination half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Population pharmacokinetic analyses have been applied in assessing covariates in the disposition of mAbs. Both linear and nonlinear elimination have been reported for mAbs, which is probably caused by target-mediated disposition. Possible factors influencing elimination of mAbs include the amount of the target antigen, immune reactions to the antibody and patient demographics. Bodyweight and/or body surface area are generally related to clearance of mAbs, but clinical relevance is often low. Metabolic drug-drug interactions are rare for mAbs. Exposure-response relationships have been described for some mAbs. In conclusion, the parenteral administration, slow tissue distribution and long elimination half-life are the most pronounced clinical pharmacokinetic characteristics of mAbs.

  12. A Strategy for Screening Monoclonal Antibodies for Arabidopsis Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qian; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Yingxiang; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The flower is one of the most complex structures of angiosperms and is essential for sexual reproduction. Current studies using molecular genetic tools have made great advances in understanding flower development. Due to the lack of available antibodies, studies investigating the localization of proteins required for flower development have been restricted to use commercial antibodies against known antigens such as GFP, YFP, and FLAG. Thus, knowledge about cellular structures in the floral organs is limited due to the scarcity of antibodies that can label cellular components. To generate monoclonal antibodies that can facilitate molecular studies of the flower, we constructed a library of monoclonal antibodies against antigenic proteins from Arabidopsis inflorescences and identified 61 monoclonal antibodies. Twenty-four of these monoclonal antibodies displayed a unique band in a western blot assay in at least one of the examined tissues. Distinct cellular distribution patterns of epitopes were detected by these 24 antibodies by immunofluorescence microscopy in a flower section. Subsequently, a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis identified potential targets for three of these antibodies. These results provide evidence for the generation of an antibody library using the total plant proteins as antigens. Using this method, the present study identified 61 monoclonal antibodies and 24 of them were efficiently detecting epitopes in both western blot experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. These antibodies can be applied as informative cellular markers to study the biological mechanisms underlying floral development in plants. PMID:28293248

  13. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics.

  14. Clinical laboratory applications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W J; Marshall, D L; Shockley, R K; Martin, W J

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) technology is well recognized as a significant development for producing specific serologic reagents to a wide variety of antigens in unlimited amounts. These reagents have provided the means for developing a number of highly specific and reproducible immunological assays for rapid and accurate diagnosis of an extensive list of diseases, including infectious diseases. The impact that MAbs have had in characterizing infectious disease pathogens, as well as their current and future applications for use in clinical microbiology laboratories, is reviewed. In addition, the advantages (and disadvantages) of the use of MAbs in a number of immunoassays, such as particle agglutination, radioimmunoassays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescent-antibody assays, and immunohistology, are explored, including the use of these reagents in novel test system assays. Also, nucleic acid probe technology is compared with the use of MAbs from the perspective of their respective applications in the diagnosis of infectious disease agents. There is no question that hybridoma technology has the potential to alter significantly the methods currently used in most clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:3058298

  15. Localisation of malignant glioma by a radiolabelled human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J; Alderson, T; Sikora, K; Watson, J

    1983-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies were produced by fusing intratumoral lymphocytes from patients with malignant gliomas with a human myeloma line. One antibody was selected for further study after screening for binding activity to glioma cell lines. The patient from whom it was derived developed recurrent glioma. 1 mg of antibody was purified, radiolabelled with 131I, and administered intravenously. The distribution of antibody was determined in the blood, CSF and tumour cyst fluid and compared with that of a control human monoclonal immunoglobulin. Antibody localisation in the tumour was observed and confirmed by external scintiscanning. Images PMID:6101173

  16. Syngeneic anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to an anti-NeuGc-containing ganglioside monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, A M; Pérez, A; Hernández, A M; Macías, A; Alfonso, M; Bombino, G; Pérez, R

    1998-12-01

    An IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb), named P3, has the characteristic to react specifically with a broad battery of N-glycolyl containing-gangliosides and with antigens expressed on breast tumors. When this MAb was administered alone in syngeneic mice, an specific IgG anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2) response was induced, this Ab2 response was increased when P3 MAb was injected coupled to a carrier protein and in the presence of Freund's adjuvant. Spleen cells from these mice were used in somatic-cell hybridization experiments, using the murine myeloma cell line P3-X63-Ag8.653 as fusion partner. Five Ab2 MAbs specific to P3 MAb were selected. These IgG1 Ab2 MAbs were able to block the binding of P3 MAb to GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside and to a human breast carcinoma cell line. Cross-blocking experiments demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are recognizing the same or very close sites on the Abl MAb. The five Ab2 MAbs were injected into syngeneic mice and four of them produced strong anti-anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab3) response. While these Ab2 MAbs were unable to generate Ab3 antibodies with the same antigenic specificity than P3 MAb, three of them induced antibodies bearing P3 MAb idiotopes (Ag-Id+ Ab3). These results demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are not "internal image" antibodies, but they could define "regulatory idiotopes."

  17. Cation-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Urmann, Marina; Graalfs, Heiner; Joehnck, Matthias; Jacob, Lothar R

    2010-01-01

    A novel cation-exchange resin, Eshmuno™ S, was compared to Fractogel® SO3− (M) and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The stationary phases have different base matrices and carry specific types of polymeric surface modifications. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used as model proteins to characterize these chromatographic resins. Results from gradient elutions, stirred batch adsorptions and confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations were used to elucidate binding behavior of mAbs onto Eshmuno™ S and Fractogel® SO3− and the corresponding transport mechanisms on these two resins. The number of charges involved in mAb binding for Eshmuno™ S is lower than for Fractogel® SO3−, indicating a slightly weaker electrostatic interaction. Kinetics from batch uptake experiments are compared to kinetic data obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy images. Both experimental approaches show an accelerated protein adsorption for the novel stationary phase. The influence of pH, salt concentrations and residence times on dynamic binding capacities was determined. A higher dynamic binding capacity for Eshmuno™ S over a wider range of pH values and residence times was found compared to Fractogel® SO3− and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The capture of antibodies from cell culture supernatant, as well as post-protein A eluates, were analyzed with respect to their host cell protein (hcp) removal capabilities. Comparable or even better hcp clearance was observed at much higher protein loading for Eshmuno™ S than Fractogel® SO3− or Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. PMID:20559022

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies Identify Novel Neural Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Richard; Niday, Evelyn; Matus, Andrew

    1982-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were raised against synaptic plasma membranes from rat cerebellum. The hybridomas were screened with a solid-phase immunoassay, the positive lines were characterized by their immunoperoxidase staining pattern on cerebellum, and the specific polypeptide antigens were identified on protein blots. Among the Mabs described are some that stain only neurons or only glia and others that react with specific parts of cells, such as axons, dendrites, and synapses. Many Mabs reveal novel relationships between antigens and the cells in which they occur. For example, a Mab designated 7D5 reacts with a family of > 30 proteins but stains only glial cells. Several Mabs stain punctate sites of synaptic size and distribution in the cerebellar cortex but each reacts with a different subset of polypeptides. One of the most restricted cytological staining patterns is given by 12D5, which stains punctate sites in the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex and reacts with a single polypeptide band of apparent Mr 270,000. These results illustrate the feasibility of raising Mabs that can be used to follow the expression of specific gene products during brain development.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  2. Adverse cardiac events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kounis, Nicholas G; Soufras, George D; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are currently used in the treatment of neoplastic, hematological, or inflammatory diseases, a practice that is occasionally associated with a variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events. Cardiac adverse events include cardiomyopathy, ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias, arrests, and acute coronary syndromes, such as acute myocardial infarction and vasospastic angina pectoris. These events generally follow hypersensitivity reactions including cutaneous erythema, pruritus chills, and precordial pain. Recently, IgE specific for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been detected, pointing to the existence of hypersensitivity and Kounis hypersensitivity-associated syndrome. Therefore, the careful monitoring of cardiovascular events is of paramount importance in the course of monoclonal antibody-based therapies. Moreover, further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of cardiovascular adverse events elicited by monoclonal antibodies and to identify preventive, protective, and therapeutic measures. PMID:25340003

  3. Specific immunofluorescent staining of pathogenic treponemes with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, F; Hunter, E F; George, R W; Pope, V; Larsen, S A

    1992-01-01

    Two hybrid cell lines which produced mouse monoclonal antibody to the DAL-1 street strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were established. These monoclonal antibodies strongly reacted with T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain, DAL-1, and two other street strains, strains MN-1 and MN-3) and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue by indirect microimmunofluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, but they did not react with normal rabbit testicular tissue. These monoclonal antibodies did not react with nonpathogenic treponemes, such as T. phagedenis Reiter, T. denticola MRB, T. refringens Noguchi, or other spirochetes, such as Borrelia burgdorferi and Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona in microimmunofluorescent antibody smear slides or in Western blots (immunoblots). While unlabeled antibodies are useful for investigating the antigenic structures of T. pallidum, we labeled these monoclonal antibodies with fluorescein isothiocyanate and used them for diagnosing syphilis by direct staining of lesion exudate or T. pallidum subsp. pallidum in formalin-fixed tissues from patients suspected of having syphilis. Both monoclonal antibodies were directed against antigens of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum with a molecular weight of 37,000 as determined by the Western blotting technique. Images PMID:1374079

  4. Monoclonal antibodies: new agents for cancer detection and targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against markers on cancer cells are gaining in importance for the purpose of targeting diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In the past, this approach has had very limited success principally because the classical methods for producing antibodies from blood serum of animals immunized with cancer cells or extracts were unsatisfactory. The situation has changed dramatically since 1975 following the design of procedures for 'immortalizing' antibody-producing cells (lymphocytes) by fusing them with cultured myeloma cells to form hybridomas which continuously secrete antibodies. Since these hybridomas produce antibodies coded for by a single antibody-producing cell, the antibodies are called monoclonal. Building on these advances in biomedical research, it is now possible to reproducibly manufacture monoclonal antibodies on a scale suitable for use in cancer detection and therapy.

  5. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  6. [Comparative studies on monoclonal antibody KM10 and anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Soyama, N; Yamamoto, M; Ohyanagi, H; Saitoh, Y

    1989-11-01

    The specificity of KM10 was evaluated in comparison with newly developed anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (A10, B9, JA4, AH3). Both KM10 and all anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies reacted with CEA in ELISA system, and with adenocarcinoma of the stomach, colon, and pancreas in the immunohistochemical assay. B9, JA4, and AH3 were suggested to react with CEA related antigens, such as NCA and BGPI, whereas KM10 and A10 were suggested to recognize the distinctive part of CEA. The antigenic determinant of CEA reactive with KM10 and A10 was revealed to be protein moiety after enzyme treatment. The competitive binding inhibition assay, however, indicated that epitopes of KM10 and A10 were different each other. Enzyme immunoassay using both KM10 and A10 could detect CEA. These findings showed the possible use of both KM10 and A10 for clinical diagnosis and treatment by means of targeting for the distinctive part of CEA.

  7. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  8. Complete De Novo Assembly of Monoclonal Antibody Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Rahman, M. Ziaur; He, Lin; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is one of the key problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, especially for novel proteins such as monoclonal antibodies for which genome information is often limited or not available. However, due to limitations in peptides fragmentation and coverage, as well as ambiguities in spectra interpretation, complete de novo assembly of unknown protein sequences still remains challenging. To address this problem, we propose an integrated system, ALPS, which for the first time can automatically assemble full-length monoclonal antibody sequences. Our system integrates de novo sequencing peptides, their quality scores and error-correction information from databases into a weighted de Bruijn graph to assemble protein sequences. We evaluated ALPS performance on two antibody data sets, each including a heavy chain and a light chain. The results show that ALPS was able to assemble three complete monoclonal antibody sequences of length 216–441 AA, at 100% coverage, and 96.64–100% accuracy. PMID:27562653

  9. A perspective of monoclonal antibodies: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    DeLand, F.H. )

    1989-07-01

    In 1975, the development of the technique to produce monoclonal antibodies revolutionized the approach to cancer detection and therapy. Hundreds of monoclonal antibodies to the epitopes of tumor cells have been produced, providing more specific tools for probing the cellular elements of cancer. At the same time, these tools have disclosed greater complexity in the character of these cells and stimulated further investigation. Although there are antibodies to specific epitopes of neoplastic cells, this purity has not provided the improved detection and therapy of cancer first expected. Technical manipulations have provided limited improvement in results, but more sophisticated techniques, such as biologic response modifiers, may be required to attain clinical results that can be universally applied. The intense research in monoclonal antibodies and their application does offer promise that the goal of improved cancer detection and therapy will be forthcoming. 58 references.

  10. Immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies: importance of the blocking solution.

    PubMed

    Hauri, H P; Bucher, K

    1986-12-01

    Four commonly used blocking agents, i.e., fetal calf serum, mammalian gelatin-Nonidet-P40, fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40, and defatted powdered milk were compared with respect to their efficiency to block the nonspecific background and to promote maximal immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human intestinal sucrase-isomaltase during immunoblotting. Two of five monoclonal antibodies were found to react with the electroblotted enzyme. However, one of the reacting antibodies gave optimal results with fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40 and the other with defatted powdered milk, while fetal calf serum lead to unacceptably high backgrounds. The results suggest that some of the difficulties encountered with monoclonal antibodies in immunoblotting may be due to inappropriate blocking conditions.

  11. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  12. Two novel anti-von Willebrand factor monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Spadafora-Ferreira, M; Lopes, A A; Coelho, V; Guilherme, L; Kalil, J

    2000-01-15

    Von Willebrand Factor is a multimer produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, being stored in intracellular organelles, such as the Weibel-Palade bodies and alpha-granules in endothelial cells and platelets, respectively. This molecule acts as a carrier protein for factor VIIIc, involved in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation maintaining its stability in circulation. Von Willebrand Factor also plays an important role in platelet aggregation and adhesion to injured vessel wall. It interacts with platelets through two distinct glycoproteins, GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa. We raised two monoclonal antibodies, ECA-3 and ECA-4, against human umbilical vascular endothelial cells that recognize and immunoprecipitate von Willebrand Factor. Interestingly, ECA-4 monoclonal antibody is able to completely inhibit platelet agglutination induced by ristocetin, suggesting that it binds to von Willebrand Factor close to platelet GPIb binding site. The use of monoclonal antibodies to identify von Willebrand Factor binding regions to factor VIII or platelets has been reported by others. In pulmonary hypertension, abnormalities have been detected on the multimeric structure of the molecule as well as on its proteolytic fragments, by using monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies raised against specific regions of von Willebrand Factor molecule may allow studies of functional abnormalities of this protein in inherited and acquired disorders like subtypes of von Willebrand's disease.

  13. New monoclonal antibodies on the horizon in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Elizabeth K.; Raje, Noopur S.

    2016-01-01

    Across all cancers, monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Monoclonal antibodies target antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and accessory cells. This targeted approach uses the host’s immune system to promote the killing of cancer cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy that remains incurable in the majority of patients. The treatment of MM has evolved dramatically over the past decade and continues to evolve with the approval of four new drugs in 2015. Most recently the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved two monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of this disease. Monoclonal antibodies are generally well-tolerated and offer a novel method of action for treated relapsed and refractory disease and are now being studied in the upfront setting. In this article, we review the evidence for the existing approved monoclonal antibodies and discuss promising targeted therapies and innovative strategies for the treatment of MM. PMID:28203341

  14. Breast cancer immunotherapy: monoclonal antibodies and peptide-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Elham; Hashemi, Atieh; Allahyari, Mojgan

    2014-07-01

    Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a treatment strategy in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer. In this review, monoclonal antibodies in passive and peptide-based vaccines, as one of the most commonly studied in active immunotherapy approaches, are discussed. Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu, has demonstrated considerable efficacy. However, resistance to trastuzumab has led to development of many targeted therapies which have been examined in clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies against immune-checkpoint molecules that are dysregulated by tumors as an immune resistance mechanism are also explained in this review. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies with the ability to target breast cancer stem cells that play a role in cancer recurrence are mentioned. Here, clinical trials of HER-2/neu B and T cells, MUC1 and hTERT cancer peptide vaccines are also presented. In addition, various strategies for enhancing vaccine efficacy including combination with monoclonal antibodies and using different delivery systems for peptide/protein-based vaccine are described.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies specific for African swine fever virus proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, A; García-Barreno, B; Nogal, M L; Viñuela, E; Enjuanes, L

    1985-01-01

    We have obtained 60 stable hybridomas which produced immunoglobulins that recognized 12 proteins from African swine fever virus particles and African swine fever virus-infected cells. Most of the monoclonal antibodies were specific for the three major structural proteins p150, p72, and p12. The specificity of some monoclonal antibodies for the structural proteins p150 and p37 and the nonstructural proteins p220 and p60 indicated that proteins p150 and p220 are antigenically related to proteins p37 and p60. The association of some viral antigens to specific subcellular components was determined by immunofluorescence and analysis of the binding of monoclonal antibodies to infected cells. A host protein (p24) seemed to be associated with the virus particles. Images PMID:3882998

  16. Choriocarcinoma: blocking factor and monoclonal antibody iodine 131 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pattillo, R.A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Ruckert, A.C.; Hussa, R.O.; Collier, B.D.; Beierwaltes, W.; Mattingly, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Postoperative iodine 131 monoclonal antibody localization in metastatic choriocarcinoma was accomplished in this study. The monoclonal antibody was prepared to male choriocarcinoma which cross reacted with gestational choriocarcinoma. The antibody was raised against whole choriocarcinoma cells and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cross reactivity was excluded. The purified antibody was iodinated with /sup 131/I and successfully imaged BeWo choriocarcinoma transplanted in nude mice; however, imaging of choriocarcinoma in a patient was verified only after resection. It is our belief that failure to sufficiently concentrate the antibody in the tumor before operation was due to blocking factor in the serum of the patient. Blocking factor and hCG dropped postoperatively. Blocking factor activity in 15 patients with metastatic trophoblastic disease was monitored and, like hCG, was found to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of disease. Its efficacy may be in the small number of patients without hCG but with persistent disease.

  17. The clinical application of monoclonal antibody therapies in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dhanireddy, Kiran K; Xu, He; Mannon, Roslyn B; Hale, Douglas A; Kirk, Allan D

    2004-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become valuable tools for the precise clinical manipulation of the immune system. These highly specific proteins have proven their usefulness in both the treatment and prevention of organ transplant rejection. Indeed, they are the centrepieces of many evolving regimens designed to reduce or eliminate the need for chronic immunosuppression. This manuscript will review the monoclonal antibodies that have made their way into the clinic either as experimental therapies or approved drugs. It will provide a general overview of this class of agents and their mechanisms of action. Standard therapies and potential new applications will be described.

  18. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human breast milk: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elle; Robinson, Steven E; Amato, Carol; McMillan, Colette; Westcott, Jay; Wolf, Tiffany; Robinson, William A

    2014-04-01

    Recently, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other diseases. It remains unclear whether these drugs can be safely administered to women who are breast feeding because of the potential hazardous side effects for nursing infants. One such therapy for metastatic melanoma is ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen-4, and is the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma when other molecular therapies are not viable. This study measured ipilimumab levels in the breast milk of a patient undergoing treatment that were enough to raise concerns for a nursing infant exposed to ipilimumab.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Human Cardiac Troponin I for Immunoassays II.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory; Liu, Suefay

    2015-06-01

    Human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is one of the most specific biomarkers for detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To formulate immunoassay kits for rapid immunodiagnosis of AMI, monoclonal antibodies with high affinity and specificity were generated against cTnI and subsequently tested through a series of experiments. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with cTnI as the immunogen and cell fusions with myeloma cells of BALB/c origin were performed to generate hybridomas. The supernatants of the hybridoma cell culture were routinely screened for antibody secretions against intact cTnI and synthetic peptides from the N-terminal half of cTnI (amino acid residues N1-30, N24-40, N59-79, and N80-95). Monoclonal antibodies specific to different epitope regions were then determined and selected, according to their respective affinity and specificity, for formulation of enzyme immunoassay kits. The results of this study found that most of the selected antibodies revealed comparable binding affinity to cTnI and to the corresponding synthetic peptides. Optimal sandwich enzyme immunoassays with high sensitivity could be achieved through proper combinations of the epitope-distinct monoclonal antibodies in different capture-detection pairs; signal enhancements were frequently observed when a mixture of epitope-distinct anti-cTnI monoclonal antibodies was used for coating. This indicates that a combination of epitope-distinct anti-cTnI monoclonal antibodies recognizing the N-terminal half of cTnI yield reliable detection and greater sensitivity for cTnI in AMI patients.

  20. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against human apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed Central

    Milne, R W; Douste-Blazy, P; Marcel, Y L; Retegui, L

    1981-01-01

    From a single cell fusion, five stable hybridomas secreting antiapolipoprotein E (apo E) were obtained. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses containing the respective monoclonal antibodies were isolated and were used as the antibody component in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. The binding of 125I-apo E to the insolubilized antibody was inhibited by unlabeled apo E but not by unlabeled apoproteins A-I, A-II, C-II, and C-III, or by low density lipoprotein immunodepleted of endogenous apo E. Competition curves were obtained with lipoprotein subfractions that had the same shape as those obtained with purified apo E. Apo E levels in normal and hyperlipidemic plasma were well correlated when measured by the five monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal anti-apo E, although differences in absolute values were observed. In normal subjects 34, 10, 20, and 36% of apo E was recovered in the very low density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, and the d greater than 1.21-gl/ml fractions, respectively, whereas these values were 34, 7, 12, and 47%, respectively, in type III patients. All antibodies indicated the same subfraction distribution of apo E. The monoclonal antibodies reacted with all of the isomorphs of apo E. One of the antibodies could be clearly distinguished by its reactivity with chemically modified very low density lipoprotein. Images PMID:6788802

  1. Identification of mutant monoclonal antibodies with increased antigen binding.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R R; French, D L; Gefter, M L; Scharff, M D

    1988-04-01

    Sib selection and an ELISA have been used to isolate hybridoma subclones producing mutant antibodies that bind antigen better than the parental monoclonal antibody. Such mutants arise spontaneously in culture at frequencies of 2.5-5 X 10(-5). The sequences of the heavy and light chain variable regions of the mutant antibodies are identical to that of the parent and the Ka values of the mutants and the parent are the same. The increase in binding is associated with abnormalities of the constant region polypeptide and probably reflect changes in avidity of these antibodies.

  2. Prediction and reduction of the aggregation of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van der Kant, Rob; Karow-Zwick, Anne R; Van Durme, Joost; Blech, Michaela; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Seeliger, Daniel; Aßfalg, Kerstin; Baatsen, Pieter; Compernolle, Griet; Gils, Ann; Studts, Joey M; Schulz, Patrick; Garidel, Patrick; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-03-17

    Protein aggregation remains a major area of focus in the production of monoclonal antibodies. Improving the intrinsic properties of antibodies can improve manufacturability, attrition rates, safety, formulation, titers, immunogenicity and solubility. Here, we explore the potential of predicting and reducing the aggregation propensity of monoclonal antibodies, based on the identification of aggregation-prone regions (APRs) and their contribution to the thermodynamic stability of the protein. Although APRs are thought to occur in the antigen binding region to drive hydrophobic binding with antigen, we were able to rationally design variants that display a marked decrease in aggregation propensity while retaining antigen binding through the introduction of artificial aggregation gatekeeper residues. The reduction in aggregation propensity was accompanied by an increase in expression titer, showing that reducing protein aggregation is beneficial throughout the development process. The data presented show that this approach can significantly reduce liabilities in novel therapeutic antibodies and proteins, leading to a more efficient path to clinical studies.

  3. Antibody discovery: sourcing of monoclonal antibody variable domains.

    PubMed

    Strohl, William R

    2014-03-01

    Historically, antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies have been sourced primarily from the mouse IgG repertoire, and typically either chimerized or humanized. More recently, human antibodies from transgenic mice producing human IgG, phage display libraries, and directly from human B lymphocytes have been used more broadly as sources of antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies. Of the total 36 antibodies approved by major maket regulatory agencies, the variable domain sequences of 26 originate from the mouse. Of these, four are marketed as murine antibodies (of which one is a mouse-rat hybrid IgG antibody), six are mouse-human chimeric antibodies, and 16 are humanized. Ten marketed antibodies have originated from human antibody genes, three isolated from phage libraries of human antibody genes and seven from transgenic mice producing human antibodies. Five antibodies currently in clinical trials have been sourced from camelids, as well as two from non-human primates, one from rat, and one from rabbit. Additional sources of antibody variable domains that may soon find their way into the clinic are potential antibodies from sharks and chickens. Finally, the various methods for retrieval of antibodies from humans, mouse and other sources, including various display technologies and amplification directly from B cells, are described.

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  5. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography.

    PubMed

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan José; Masood, Asna; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I; Rohrer, Daniel K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural information. We describe the generation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the third intracellular loop (IL3) of the native human beta(2) adrenergic (beta(2)AR) receptor; this antibody was critical for acquiring diffraction-quality crystals.

  6. Cooperative Immunoassays: Ultrasensitive Assays with Mixed Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Paul H.; Moyle, William R.

    1983-07-01

    Mixtures of certain monoclonal antibodies appear to bind human chorionic gonadotropin in a ``cooperative'' fashion because they form circular complexes with the hormone. Experiments illustrate how this property might be exploited to develop very sensitive immunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin or any other antigen. Since the assays are not based on competitive inhibition between radiolabeled and unlabeled antigen, they are much more sensitive than a traditional radioimmunoassay in which either one of the same antibodies is used alone.

  7. Pulmonary monoclonal antibody delivery via a portable microfluidic nebulization platform

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Qi, Aisha; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Friend, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Nebulizers have considerable advantages over conventional inhalers for pulmonary drug administration, particularly because they do not require coordinated breath actuation to generate and deliver the aerosols. Nevertheless, besides being less amenable to miniaturization and hence portability, some nebulizers are prone to denature macromolecular drugs due to the large forces generated during aerosolization. Here, we demonstrate a novel portable acoustomicrofluidic device capable of nebulizing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies into a fine aerosol mist with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 1.1 μm, optimal for deep lung deposition via inhalation. The nebulized monoclonal antibodies were tested for their stability, immunoactivity, and pharmacological properties, which confirmed that nebulization did not cause significant degradation of the antibody. In particular, flow cytometry demonstrated that the antigen binding capability of the antibody is retained and able to reduce phosphorylation in cells overexpressing the EGFR, indicating that the aerosols generated by the device were loaded with stable and active monoclonal antibodies. The delivery of antibodies via inhalation, particularly for the treatment of lung cancer, is thus expected to enhance the efficacy of this protein therapeutic by increasing the local concentration where they are needed. PMID:25945147

  8. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    PubMed

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  9. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies revealed by charge-sensitive methods.

    PubMed

    Vlasak, J; Ionescu, R

    2008-12-01

    The expanding field of monoclonal antibody-based pharmaceuticals has triggered increased interest in analytical characterization of these large proteins and in understanding of their heterogeneity and degradation pathways. As a result, a large number of enzymatic modifications as well as chemical and physical degradations have been reported in monoclonal antibodies in recent years. Most heterogeneity is related to changes in the surface charge of the antibody, either directly, as a change in the number of charged residues, or indirectly as a chemical or physical alteration that changes surface-charge distribution. This review presents an overview of the sources of charge-related heterogeneity in monoclonal antibodies and the methods used for their detection. A detailed section is dedicated to deamidation of asparagine and isomerization of aspartic acid residues, two ubiquitous degradation pathways detected in antibodies and other proteins as well. Finally, kinetic modeling of the accumulation of antibody variants is presented as a tool to determine the expected fraction of molecules that have undergone one or more degradation reactions.

  10. Binding properties of monoclonal antibodies to rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Cusi, M G; Valensin, P E; Tollis, M; Bracci, L; Petreni, S; Soldani, P

    1991-07-01

    The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) obtained by immunizing mice with a tetradecapeptide corresponding to the 190-203 region of rabies virus glycoprotein, involved in binding to the acetylcholine receptor (AchR), displayed different specificities to different rabies virus strains. These mAbs, when used in immunofluorescence tests, allowed differentiation of wild rabies viruses from the attenuated ones.

  11. A mouse monoclonal antibody against Alexa Fluor 647.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Irene; Guillen, Eduardo; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-04-01

    Fluorophores are essential tools in molecular and cell biology. However, their application is mostly confined to the singular exploitation of their fluorescent properties. To enhance the versatility and expand the use of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647), we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody against it. We demonstrate its use of AF647 for immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and cytofluorimetry.

  12. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  13. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies to Prevent Use of Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Marta Feldmesser, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Albert Einstein College of...Monoclonal Antibodies to Prevent Use of Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0085 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  15. Development and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for paxilline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrati...

  16. 78 FR 7438 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4'' (HHS Ref. No. E-158-2010/0) to Customized Biosciences, Inc., which is... relates to the development of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4...

  17. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; -Abanto, Segundo Hernandez; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production. PMID:23533588

  18. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future.

  19. N-Glycosylation Design and Control of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sha, Sha; Agarabi, Cyrus; Brorson, Kurt; Lee, Dong-Yup; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2016-10-01

    The N-linked glycan profiles on recombinant monoclonal antibody therapeutics significantly affect antibody biological functions and are largely determined by host cell genotypes and culture conditions. A key step in bioprocess development for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) involves optimization and control of N-glycan profiles. With pressure from pricing and biosimilars looming, more efficient and effective approaches are sought in the field of glycoengineering. Metabolic studies and mathematical modeling are two such approaches that optimize bioprocesses by better understanding and predicting glycosylation. In this review, we summarize a group of strategies currently used for glycan profile modulation and control. Metabolic analysis and mathematical modeling are then explored with an emphasis on how these two techniques can be utilized to advance glycoengineering.

  20. [Production of human monoclonal antibody reactive with gastrointestinal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Soyama, N; Ohyanagi, H; Saitoh, Y

    1990-12-01

    Lymphocytes obtained from regional lymph nodes and spleen in the patients with gastrointestinal carcinoma were fused with the human B lymphoblastoid cell line GC01 and human hybridomas producing human monoclonal antibody (MoAb) were derived. Human MoAb No. 235 (IgM) derived from spleen cell of a gastric cancer patient reacted with adenocarcinoma of stomach, colon, and pancreas in the new immunohistochemical assay, modified direct immunoperoxidase method, and reacted with KATO III cells in cultured cell lines. The antigenic determinant of this antibody was suspected to be protein moiety after enzyme treatment. The competitive binding inhibition assay indicated that its epitope was different from anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (KM10, A10, B9, AH3, JA4) and KM01. These findings suggested the possible use of human MoAb No. 235 for clinical application of targeting cancer chemotherapy in the future.

  1. Initial Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, Valentina; Nunez, Gabriel; Smith, R. Graham; Stastny, Peter; Capra, J. Donald

    1980-11-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies against human monocytes have been produced by somatic cell fusion. Extensive specificity analysis suggests that these antibodies react with most if not all human peripheral blood monocytes and not with highly purified T or B cells. Initial chemical characterization of the monocyte antigen recognized by two of these antibodies is presented. The molecule is a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 200,000. These reagents should prove useful in the clinical definition of disorders of monocyte differentiation, in studies of monocyte function, and in the elucidation of the genetics and structure of monocyte cell surface antigens.

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Cross-Reactions between Drosophila and Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carol A.; Benzer, Seymour

    1983-12-01

    A panel of 146 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), obtained with Drosophila melanogaster tissue as primary immunogen, was tested for cross-reactivity with the human central nervous system. Sites examined included spinal cord, cerebellum, hippocampus, and optic nerve. Nonnervous tissues tested were liver and lymph node. Approximately half of the antibodies reacted with one or more sites in the human central nervous system, identifying regional, cell class, and subcellular antigens. Some recognized neuronal, glial, or axonal subsets. Immunoblot analysis revealed that some antibodies reacted with similar antigen patterns in both species.

  3. Adsorption of monoclonal antibodies to glass microparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoehne, Matthew; Samuel, Fauna; Dong, Aichun; Wurth, Christine; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2011-01-01

    Microparticulate glass represents a potential contamination to protein formulations that may occur as a result of processing conditions or glass types. The effect of added microparticulate glass to formulations of three humanized antibodies was tested. Under the three formulation conditions tested, all three antibodies adsorbed irreversibly at near monolayer surface coverages to the glass microparticles. Analysis of the secondary structure of the adsorbed antibodies by infrared spectroscopy reveal only minor perturbations as a result of adsorption. Likewise, front-face fluorescence quenching measurements reflected minimal tertiary structural changes upon adsorption. In contrast to the minimal effects on protein structure, adsorption of protein to suspensions of glass microparticles induced significant colloidal destabilization and flocculation of the suspension.

  4. Process economics of industrial monoclonal antibody manufacture.

    PubMed

    Farid, Suzanne S

    2007-03-15

    Pressures for cost-effective manufacture of antibodies are growing given their high doses and increasing market potential that have resulted in significant increases in total site capacities of up to 200,000 L. This paper focuses on the process economic issues associated with manufacturing antibodies and reviews the cost studies published in the literature; many of the issues highlighted are not only specific to antibodies but also apply to recombinant proteins. Data collated at UCL suggest current benchmark investment costs of $660-$1580/ft2 ($7130-$17,000/m2) and $1765-$4220/L for antibody manufacturing facilities with total site capacities in the range of 20,000-200,000 L; the limitations of the data are highlighted. The complications with deriving benchmark cost of goods per gram (COG/g) values are discussed, stressing the importance of stating the annual production rate and either titre or fermentation capacity with the cost so as to allow comparisons. The uses and limitations of the methods for cost analysis and the available software tools for process economics are presented. Specific examples found in the literature of process economic studies related to antibody manufacture for different expression systems are reviewed. The key economic drivers are identified; factors such as fermentation titre and overall yield are critical determinants of economic success. Future trends in antibody manufacture that are driven by economic pressures are discussed, such as the use of alternative expression systems (e.g. transgenics, E. coli and yeast), disposables, and improvements to downstream technology. The hidden costs and the challenges in each case are highlighted.

  5. Idiotypic analysis of a monoclonal anti-Sm antibody.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, D S; Lerner, E A

    1982-10-01

    Among murine models of autoimmunity, MRL mice are unique in their expression of antibodies to the nuclear antigen Sm. To assess genetic mechanisms in the control of this response, the idiotypes borne by a monoclonal anti-Sm antibody of MRL-Ipr/Ipr origin were investigated. Rabbit antisera were prepared against Y2, a hybridoma product with anti-Sm activity, and were rendered specific for idiotype by extensive absorption with normal globulins from BALB/c mice. In assays of idiotype by an inhibition ELISA, Y2 was shown to share idiotypes with Y12, another monoclonal anti-Sm derived from the same fusion as Y2; other monoclonal autoantibodies of MRL origin but different antigenic specificity failed to display idiotype activity in this assay. The presence of other anti-idiotypic specificities was revealed by absorption and elution of the anti-idiotype from an MRL globulin column; sera from both anti-Sm-positive and negative mice demonstrated these idiotypes. These results suggest that the predominant specificities detected by the anti-idiotype were unique to the monoclonal antibodies of the same animal, although there was also activity to idiotypes not related to anti-Sm binding molecules.

  6. Artificial polyepitope HIV-1 immunogen containing mimotope of 2F5 epitope.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Nadezhda S; Shcherbakov, Dmitry N; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yu; Karpenko, Larisa I; Ryzhikov, Alexander B; Ilyichev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Constructing a vaccine against HIV-1, able to induce production of broadly neutralizing antibodies, is crucial. We report here the selection and characterization of RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL peptide mimotope that binds specifically to bNAbs 2F5. The peptide mimotope was selected from 15-mer phage-displayed peptide library by using Mab 2F5 as the selecting agent. The most abundant RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL peptide was inserted into a carrier, an artificial polyepitope immunogen - TBI (T- and B-cell immunogen). TBI-2F5 polyepitope immunogen that includes the mimotope of 2F5 epitope was constructed. It was shown that sera of mice immunized with TBI-2F5 protein recognized TBI protein as well as RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL peptide. The capacity of sera of immunized mice to neutralize HIV-1 was demonstrated using subtype B env-pseudoviruses of HIV-1 QH0692.42 and PVO.4. Based on these results, we conclude that peptide mimotope of 2F5 epitope RDWSFDRWSLSEFWL can be an essential component for a successful HIV-vaccine.

  7. Sperm-immobilizing monoclonal antibody to human seminal plasma antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Shigeta, M; Watanabe, T; Maruyama, S; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1980-01-01

    Rat spleen cells immunized to human azoospermic semen (a mixture of seminal plasma components) and mouse myeloma cells (P3/X63 Ag8U1; P3U1) (Marguilies et al., 1976) were successfully fused with polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) and 19 of 89 fused cell cultures were found to produce sperm-immobilizing antibody. The cells that produced antibody indicating the highest sperm-immobilizing activity were distributed into wells for further recloning and 10 clones producing sperm-immobilizing antibody were established. The clone (1C4) producing the highest antibody titre was found to produce a large amount of IgG in culture supernatants and to contain a mixture of rat and mouse chromosomes. It was proved by immunodiffusion test that the monoclonal antibody was produced to the human seminal plasma antigen No. 7 which is common to human milk protein. Using this hybridoma which produced a large amount of monoclonal sperm-immobilizing antibody, a new method could be developed for purifying human seminal plasma antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography with bound antibody from the hybridoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6783353

  8. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  9. Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Borlido, Luís; Moura, Leila; Azevedo, Ana M; Roque, Ana C A; Aires-Barros, Maria R; Farinha, José Paulo S

    2013-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are important therapeutic proteins. One of the challenges facing large-scale production of monoclonal antibodies is the capacity bottleneck in downstream processing, which can be circumvented by using magnetic stimuli-responsive polymer nanoparticles. In this work, stimuli-responsive magnetic particles composed of a magnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) core with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (P(NIPAM-co-AA)) shell cross-linked with N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide were prepared by miniemulsion polymerization. The particles were shown to have an average hydrodynamic diameter of 317 nm at 18°C, which decreased to 277 nm at 41°C due to the collapse of the thermo-responsive shell. The particles were superparamagnetic in behavior and exhibited a saturation magnetization of 12.6 emu/g. Subsequently, we evaluated the potential of these negatively charged stimuli-responsive magnetic particles in the purification of a monoclonal antibody from a diafiltered CHO cell culture supernatant by cation exchange. The adsorption of antibodies onto P(NIPAM-co-AA)-coated nanoparticles was highly selective and allowed for the recovery of approximately 94% of the mAb. Different elution strategies were employed providing highly pure mAb fractions with host cell protein (HCP) removal greater than 98%. By exploring the stimuli-responsive properties of the particles, shorter magnetic separation times were possible without significant differences in product yield and purity.

  10. Murine monoclonal antibodies generated against mouse/rat hemokinin-1.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Jin, Bo-quan; Song, Chao-jun; Zhang, Yu

    2009-08-01

    The mouse/rat hemokinin-1 (m/rHK-1) was discovered nearly 9 years ago. This molecule is a peptide comprising 11 amino acids. The m/rHK-1 was found to be mainly expressed in central immune organs like bone marrow, and was proven to have lymphopoietic roles in B and T lymphocyte development. m/rHK-1was also reported to have analgesic roles in rat spinal cord, in addition to other functions such as relaxing activity on coronary artery. Unlike its analogues SP, NKA, and NKB, m/rHK-1 does not express in the nervous system. To further study the distribution and function of m/rHK-1, we carried out conventional immunization and cell fusion procedures to acquire the hybridomas secreting specific monoclonal antibodies to m/rHK-1. In the 17 positive clones obtained, three antibodies named 1B12, 2B4, and 4G5 were shown representative in cross-reactivity against m/rHK-1 and its analogues by indirect ELISA, competitive indirect ELISA, and immunofluorescence assays. Among the three clones, the 2B4 monoclonal antibody appeared to be the high-titered and specific clone to m/rHK-1. Monoclonal antibodies to m/rHK-1 will function as good tools in the physiological study of m/rHK-1 in the near future.

  11. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  12. Recent Progress toward Engineering HIV-1-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming; Li, Yue; Zheng, Huiwen; Shao, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of broadly potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies represent a new generation of antiretrovirals for the treatment and prophylaxis. Antibodies are generally considered more effective and safer and have been proved to provide passive protection against mucosal challenge in humanized mice and macaques. Several neutralizing Abs could protect animals against HIV-1 but are not effective when used in an established infected model for therapy. In order to overcome the limitation of antiviral activities, multiple antibody-engineering technologies have been explored to generate “the better” neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 since bNAbs attack viral entry by various mechanisms. Thus, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit rational antibody combination or engineered antibodies (eAbs) as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. It has been reported that inclusion of fusion-neutralizing antibodies in a set of bNAbs could improve their overall activities and neutralizing spectrum. Here, we review several routes for engineering bNAbs, such as design and generation of bispecific antibodies, specific glycosylation of antibodies to enhance antiviral activity, and variable region-specific modification guided by structure and computer, as well as reviewing antibody-delivery technologies by non-viral vector, viral vector, and human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells transduced with a lentiviral construct. We also discuss the optimized antiviral activities and benefits of these strategy and potential mechanisms. PMID:27746780

  13. Cysteinylation of a monoclonal antibody leads to its inactivation

    PubMed Central

    McSherry, Troy; McSherry, Jennifer; Ozaeta, Panfilo; Longenecker, Kenton; Ramsay, Carol; Fishpaugh, Jeffrey; Allen, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Post-translational modifications can have a signification effect on antibody stability. A comprehensive approach is often required to best understand the underlying reasons the modification affects the antibody's potency or aggregation state. Monoclonal antibody 001 displayed significant variation in terms of potency, as defined by surface plasmon resonance testing (Biacore), from lot to lot independent of any observable aggregation or degradation, suggesting that a post-translational modification could be driving this variability. Analysis of different antibody lots using analytical hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) uncovered multiple peaks of varying size. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) indicated that the antibody contained a cysteinylation post-translational modification in complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3 of the antibody light chain. Fractionation of the antibody by HIC followed by ESI-MS and Biacore showed that the different peaks were antibody containing zero, one, or two cysteinylation modifications, and that the modification interferes with the ability of the modified antibody arm to bind antigen. Molecular modeling of the modified region shows that this oxidation of an unpaired cysteine in the antibody CDR would block a potential antigen binding pocket, suggesting an inhibition mechanism. PMID:27050640

  14. Monoclonal antibodies that target pathological assemblies of Abeta.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Mary P; Velasco, Pauline T; Chang, Lei; Viola, Kirsten L; Fernandez, Sara; Lacor, Pascale N; Khuon, Daliya; Gong, Yuesong; Bigio, Eileen H; Shaw, Pamela; De Felice, Fernanda G; Krafft, Grant A; Klein, William L

    2007-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease has shown initial success in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and in human patients. However, because of meningoencephalitis in clinical trials of active vaccination, approaches using therapeutic antibodies may be preferred. As a novel antigen to generate monoclonal antibodies, the current study has used Abeta oligomers (amyloid beta-derived diffusible ligands, ADDLs), pathological assemblies known to accumulate in Alzheimer's disease brain. Clones were selected for the ability to discriminate Alzheimer's disease from control brains in extracts and tissue sections. These antibodies recognized Abeta oligomers and fibrils but not the physiologically prevalent Abeta monomer. Discrimination derived from an epitope found in assemblies of Abeta1-28 and ADDLs but not in other sequences, including Abeta1-40. Immunoneutralization experiments showed that toxicity and attachment of ADDLs to synapses in culture could be prevented. ADDL-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was also inhibited, establishing this response to be oligomer-dependent. Inhibition occurred whether ADDLs were prepared in vitro or obtained from Alzheimer's disease brain. As conformationally sensitive monoclonal antibodies that selectively immunoneutralize binding and function of pathological Abeta assemblies, these antibodies provide tools by which pathological Abeta assemblies from Alzheimer's disease brain might be isolated and evaluated, as well as offering a valuable prototype for new antibodies useful for Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

  15. Quantitative SPECT of uptake of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, G.L.; Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.; Zhang, C.G.; Custer, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    Absolute quantitation of the distribution of radiolabeled antibodies is important to the efficient conduct of research with these agents and their ultimate use for imaging and treatment, but is formidable because of the unrestricted nature of their distribution within the patient. Planar imaging methods have been developed and provide an adequate approximation of the distribution of radionuclide for many purposes, particularly when there is considerable specificity of targeting. This is not currently the case for antibodies and is unlikely in the future. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides potential for greater accuracy because it reduces problems caused by superimposition of tissues and non-target contributions to target counts. SPECT measurement of radionuclide content requires: (1) accurate determination of camera sensitivity; (2) accurate determination of the number of counts in a defined region of interest; (3) correction for attenuation; (4) correction for scatter and septal penetration; (5) accurate measurement of the administered dose; (6) adequate statistics; and (7) accurate definition of tissue mass or volume. The major impediment to each of these requirements is scatter of many types. The magnitude of this problem can be diminished by improvements in tomographic camera design, computer algorithms, and methodological approaches. 34 references.

  16. Immunohistochemical identification of cytotoxic lymphocytes using human perforin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, A.; Olsen, K. J.; Cheng, L.; Fox, W. M.; Hruban, R. H.; Podack, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    Perforin is a potent cytolytic pore-forming protein expressed in cytoplasmic granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. A new monoclonal antibody raised against human perforin was used to detect both in vitro and in vivo perforin expression in cytotoxic cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) showed strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the IL-2 activated cytotoxic cells. Fresh-frozen tissue sections from patients with heart allograft rejection were also stained. Strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate characteristic for perforin in cardiac allograft rejection was observed. The detection and quantitative analysis of perforin-associated cytotoxic cells by the human anti-perforin monoclonal antibody will help to evaluate the significance of these functionally distinct cytotoxic cells in human tissue. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374586

  17. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of trace chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderlaan, M.; Van Emon, J.; Watkins, B.; Stanker, L.

    1986-08-15

    Problems in analytical chemistry may limit monitoring for trace organic residues by traditional chromatographic methods. For example, the cost and analysis time per sample may preclude adequate sampling, making the development of alternative technologies desirable. Immunoassays are one such alternative, with the potential for cost reduction by automation and parallel sample processing. A particularly significant advance in the past decade has been the development of monoclonal antibodies, which offer greater selectivity and reproducibility than conventional antisera. Immunoassays can be developed that use simple, field-portable instrumentation, give rapid results, and have detection limits of less than a part-per-billion. This paper reviews the general technology for developing monoclonal antibodies to small organic molecules using the immunoassay of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) as an example. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in lymphoma: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment of lymphoma. Although newer generation anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are being examined, patent expiries and patient demand have fueled the development of rituximab biosimilars. The development of such agents is both an important and difficult undertaking. By definition, although they aim to have safety and efficacy comparable with their reference agents, biosimilars are not exact replicas of those agents, and small changes in nonclinical and preclinical properties may ultimately affect in vivo activity. Consideration must be given to the complex mechanisms of action, sensitive patient populations that may be treated, and appropriate clinical trial endpoints. Furthermore, extrapolation of indications is multifaceted, deserving close examination. This review represents a critical look at biosimilars in lymphoma and their safety, efficacy and long-term effects on patient outcomes.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  20. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  1. Recovery and purification process development for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfen; Winter, Charles; Bayer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hundreds of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently in development, and many companies have multiple antibodies in their pipelines. Current methodology used in recovery processes for these molecules are reviewed here. Basic unit operations such as harvest, Protein A affinity chromatography and additional polishing steps are surveyed. Alternative processes such as flocculation, precipitation and membrane chromatography are discussed. We also cover platform approaches to purification methods development, use of high throughput screening methods, and offer a view on future developments in purification methodology as applied to mAbs. PMID:20647768

  2. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies against Biological Toxins. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-14

    the original copy. AD-B’i76 29`8 CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-93-C-3083 TITLE: NEUTRALIZING MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST BIOLOGIC4JL TOXINS PRINCIPAL...Biological ’ Toxins DAMDl7-93-C-308.3 6. AUTHOR($) 65502A 30665502MB02. S4 .274 Mark C. Glassy, Ph.D. WUDA336206 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMI(S...NUMBER OF PAGES RA I, SBIR, Antibody, Toxins , BL2, BD 16. PRICE COUE 17. SEC.URIly (LASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIMICATION 19. SECURITY

  3. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Ko, Kisung; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choo, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the production of mAbs for cancer immunotherapy. However, their several limitations have to be resolved for efficient antibody production in plants. PMID:26550566

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A.; Benjamin, William H.; Kaminski, Robert W.; Wenzel, Heather

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei. We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella. Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency. PMID:27280622

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2009-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is a malignant disease with almost equal incidence and mortality. Effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are still urgently needed to improve its survival rate. With advances in structural and functional genomics, recent work has focused on targeted molecular therapy using monoclonal antibodies. This review summarizes the target molecules on the tumor cell surface and normal tissue stroma, which are related to pancreatic cancer oncogenesis, tumor growth or resistance to chemotherapy, as well as molecules involved in regulating inflammation and host immunoresponses. Targeted molecules include cell-surface receptors, such as the EGF receptor, HER2, death receptor 5 and IGF-1 receptor. Effects of monoclonal antibodies against these target molecules alone or in combination with chemotherapy, small-molecule signal transduction inhibitors, or radiation therapy are also discussed. Also discussed are the use of toxin or radioisotope conjugates, and information relating to the use of these targeting agents in pancreatic cancer clinical trials. Although targeted molecular therapy with monoclonal antibodies has made some progress in pancreatic cancer treatment, especially in preclinical studies, its clinical application to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients requires further investigation. PMID:20046965

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency.

  7. [Monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9: from bench to clinic].

    PubMed

    Guijarro Herraiz, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins with high specificity binding to multiple antigens due to the large number of structural conformations of the variable chains. Hybridoma technology (fusion of myeloma cells with immunoglobulin-producing lymphocytes) has allowed the synthesis of large quantities of unique antibodies (monoclonal [mAb]). mAbs were initially murine. Subsequently, chimeric mAbs were developed, followed by humanized mAbs and finally human mAbs. The high selectivity and good tolerance of human mAbs allows their therapeutic administration to block specific exogenous or endogenous molecules. Selective human mAbs to the catalytic domain of PCSK9 have recently been developed. These antibodies block PCSK9, favour low-density lipoprotein receptor recycling and markedly reduce circulating cholesterol. Preliminary studies indicate that lowering cholesterol through anti-PCSK9 antibodies may significantly reduce the cardiovascular complications of arteriosclerosis.

  8. Intravesical administration of radiolabeled antitumor monoclonal antibody in bladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bamias, A.; Keane, P.; Krausz, T.; Williams, G.; Epenetos, A.A. )

    1991-01-15

    Tumor associated AUA1 monoclonal antibody and 11.4.1. nonspecific monoclonal antibody, which does not react with human tissues, were radiolabeled with 111In and administered intravesically to 23 patients undergoing cystoscopy for bladder carcinoma. The antibody solution remained in the bladder for 1 h and then was washed out prior to cystoscopy. Tumor and nontumor samples were obtained during cystoscopy and were counted in a gamma counter. Conventional and immunoperoxidase staining with both antibodies were also performed. AUA1 reacted with all bladder carcinomas while 11.4.1. was negative in all cases. The mean uptake of AUA1 at 2, 24, and 48 h after the instillation (expressed as 10(3) x percentage of injected dose/g of tissue) was: 6.12 +/- 5.50 (SD), 1.70 +/- 2.57, 0.30 +/- 0.17 in the tumors and 0.32 +/- 0.50, 0.22 +/- 0.30, 0 in the nontumor areas, and for 11.4.1. it was: 0.075 +/- 0.075, 0.025 +/- 0.025 in the tumors and 0.30 +/- 0.42, 0.15 +/- 0.26 in the nontumor areas. The uptake of AUA1 by the tumors correlated with the tumor grade. There was no radioactivity in the blood at 2 h, and at 1, 2, and 3 days after the instillation. Our results indicate that intravesical administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody AUA1 targets selectively to tumor tissue without any significant normal tissue uptake. This finding might allow the development of a nontoxic and specific therapeutic approach for superficial bladder carcinoma.

  9. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes.

  10. Efficient generation of human IgA monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lorin, Valérie; Mouquet, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody isotype produced in humans. IgA antibodies primarily ensure immune protection of mucosal surfaces against invading pathogens, but also circulate and are present in large quantities in blood. IgAs are heterogeneous at a molecular level, with two IgA subtypes and the capacity to form multimers by interacting with the joining (J) chain. Here, we have developed an efficient strategy to rapidly generate human IgA1 and IgA2 monoclonal antibodies in their monomeric and dimeric forms. Recombinant monomeric and dimeric IgA1/IgA2 counterparts of a prototypical IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 10-1074, targeting the HIV-1 envelope protein, were produced in large amounts after expression cloning and transient transfection of 293-F cells. 10-1074 IgAs were FPLC-purified using a novel affinity-based resin engrafted with anti-IgA chimeric Fabs, followed by a monomers/multimers separation using size exclusion-based FPLC. ELISA binding experiments confirmed that the artificial IgA class switching of 10-1074 did not alter its antigen recognition. In summary, our technical approach allows the very efficient production of various forms of purified recombinant human IgA molecules, which are precious tools in dissecting IgA B-cell responses in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and studying the biology, function and therapeutic potential of IgAs.

  11. Transformation-Related Antigens Identified by Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Mette

    1980-06-01

    Tumor-cell proteins that were antigenic in a syngeneic animal were identified by immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies. Spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with plasma membranes of Kirsten RNA sarcoma virus-transformed BALB/3T3 cells were fused with NS-l myeloma cells. Antibodies secreted into the culture fluid from these hybridomas were distinguished by their reactivity against proteins of different target cells. A total of 191 cultures were established; 143 produced antibodies that bound to BALB/3T3 cells transformed by the RNA sarcoma virus, of which antibodies from 82 bound to BALB/3T3 transformed with simian virus 40, and antibodies from 56 bound to BALB/3T3 cells. Thus, more than 50% of the cultures produced antibodies that possibly were specific to antigens of the transformed cell. Twenty different hybridomas have been cloned, and antibodies from eight of these were found to immunoprecipitate five different proteins. A protein of approximately 32,000 daltons was precipitated from BALB/3T3 cells transformed by the RNA sarcoma virus, simian virus 40, or methylcholanthrene but not from untransformed BALB/3T3 cells. A protein of about 300,000 daltons was precipitated from all four cell lines; precipitation was enhanced in the viral transformed cells. Proteins of approximately 57,000, 54,000, and 8500 daltons were immunoprecipitated from all four cell lines.

  12. A human monoclonal antibody that binds serotype A botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Adekar, Sharad P; Jones, R Mark; Elias, M D; Al-Saleem, Fetweh H; Root, Michael J; Simpson, Lance L; Dessain, Scott K

    2008-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have demonstrated significant potential as therapeutics for botulinum neurotoxin exposures. We previously described a hybridoma method for cloning native human antibodies that uses a murine myeloma cell line that ectopically expresses the human telomerase catalytic subunit gene (hTERT) and the murine interleukin-6 gene (mIL-6). Here we describe a heterohybridoma cell line that ectopically expresses mIL-6 and hTERT and has improved stability of hTERT expression. We fused this cell line to human peripheral blood B cells from a subject who had received the botulinum toxoid vaccine, cloning a high-affinity antibody (13A) specific for serotype A botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A). The 13A antibody is an affinity-matured, post-germinal center IgG(1) lambda antibody that has partial neutralization activity in vivo. 13A binds an epitope on BoNT/A that overlaps the binding epitope of an IgG antibody previously shown to fully neutralize a lethal dose of BoNT/A in vivo. The 13A antibody may be useful for diagnostic testing or for incorporation into an oligoclonal therapeutic to counteract BoNT/A exposure.

  13. Improved monoclonal antibody tumor/background ratios with exchange transfusions.

    PubMed

    Henry, C A; Clavo, A C; Wahl, R L

    1991-01-01

    Blood exchange transfusions were performed in nude rats with subcutaneous HTB77 human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in an attempt to improve specific monoclonal antibody (MoAb) tumor/non-tumor uptake ratios. Animals were injected intravenously with both 131I-5G6.4 specific and 125I-UPC-10 non-specific MoAb. Twenty-four hours later 65-80% of the original blood was exchanged with normal heparinized rat blood and then these rodents were sacrificed. Exchange transfusion significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased normal tissue activities of 131I (except for muscle) by 63-85%, while tumor activity decreased only 5%. Tumor to background ratios increased from 0.1-0.8 to 2.3-6.3. Exchange transfusions substantially enhance tumor/normal tissue antibody uptake ratios and, along with plasmapheresis, may be useful in enhancing antibody localization in vivo, particularly for therapy.

  14. Monoclonal antibody aggregation intermediates visualized by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanjoo; Kirchmeier, Marc; Mach, Henryk

    2011-02-01

    Ubiquitous but highly variable processes of therapeutic protein aggregation remain poorly characterized, especially in the context of common infusion reactions and clinical immunogenicity. Among the numerous challenges is the characterization of intermediate steps that lead to the appearance of precipitates. Although the biophysical methods for elucidation of secondary and tertiary structures as well as overall size distribution are typically well established in the development laboratories, the use of molecular scale imaging techniques is still relatively rare due to low throughput and technical complexity. In this work, we present the use of atomic force microscopy to examine morphology of monoclonal antibody aggregates. Despite varying in primary structure as a result of different complementarity defining regions, most antibodies studied exhibited a similar aggregation intermediate consisting of several monomers. However, the manner of subsequent condensation of these oligomers appeared to differ between the antibodies, suggesting stability-dependent mechanisms.

  15. Daratumumab: monoclonal antibody therapy to treat multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Ribeiro, M; Scott, S; Lonial, S

    2016-10-01

    Daratumumab (Darzalex[TM]) is a human monoclonal antibody (MAb) that targets CD38; a surface protein highly expressed across multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Preclinical studies have shown daratumumab induces MM cell death through several mechanisms, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), apoptosis upon secondary crosslinking and immunomodulatory effects via a decrease in immune suppressive cells. Daratumumab has a favorable toxicity profile and encouraging clinical activity as a single agent and in combination with lenalidomide in heavily pretreated, relapsed patients in whom other novel agents (such as bortezomib, thalidomide and lenalidomide) and stem cell transplant have already failed. Given the encouraging efficacy and acceptable safety profile, daratumumab has emerged as a novel treatment option for MM both as a monotherapy and in combination with conventional and novel anti-MM agents. This review will focus on preclinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, safety and clinical development of daratumumab in MM.

  16. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs.

  17. Analysis of acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation sites using antibodies to synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Safran, A; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Three peptides corresponding to residues 354-367, 364-374, 373-387 of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) delta subunit were synthesized. These peptides represent the proposed phosphorylation sites of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the tyrosine-specific protein kinase and the calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase respectively. Using these peptides as substrates for phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase it was shown that only peptides 354-367 was phosphorylated whereas the other two were not. These results verify the location of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site within the AChR delta subunit. Antibodies elicited against these peptides reacted with the delta subunit. The antipeptide antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 5.46) specific for the delta subunit were tested for their binding to non-phosphorylated receptor and to receptor phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Antibodies to peptide 354-367 were found to react preferentially with non-phosphorylated receptor whereas the two other anti-peptide antibodies bound equally to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated receptors. Monoclonal antibody 7F2 reacted preferentially with the phosphorylated form of the receptor whereas monoclonal antibody 5.46 did not distinguish between the two forms. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3816758

  18. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  19. [Progress in preparation of small monoclonal antibodies of knock out technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Mao, Xin-min; Li, Lin-lin; Li, Xin-xia; Wang, Ye; Lan, Yi

    2015-10-01

    With the application of monoclonal antibody technology more and more widely, its production technology is becoming more and more perfect. Small molecule monoclonal antibody technology is becoming a hot research topic for people. The application of traditional Chinese medicine small molecule monoclonal antibody technology has been more and more widely, the technology for effective Chinese medicine component knockout provide strong technical support. The preparation of monoclonal antibodies and small molecule knockout technology are reviewed in this paper. The preparation of several steps, such as: in the process of preparation of antigen, hapten carrier coupling, coupling ratio determination and identification of artificial antigen and establishment of animal immunization and hybridoma cell lines of monoclonal antibody, the large-scale preparation; small molecule monoclonal antibody on Immune in affinity chromatography column method is discussed in detail. The author believes that this technology will make the traditional Chinese medicine research on a higher level, and improve the level of internationalization of Chinese medicine research.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against type II rat brain protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, C.H.; Huang, K.P.

    1987-05-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (8/1, 10/10, and 25/3) against rat brain type II protein kinase C (PKC) were used to carry out the immunochemical characterization of this kinase. These antibodies immunoprecipitated the type II PKC in a dose-dependent manner but did neither to type I nor type III isozyme. Purified type II PKC has a molecular weight of 82,000 and consists of heterogeneous isoelectric point species, all of which are cross reactive with these antibodies. Immunoblot analysis of the tryptic fragments from PKC revealed that all three antibodies recognized the 33-38-KDa fragments, the phospholipid/phorbol ester-binding domain, but not the 45-48-KDa fragments, the kinase catalytic domain. The immune complexes of the kinase and the antibodies retained the kinase activity which was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine (PS) and further activated by diacylglycerol. With antibody 8/1, the apparent Km values of the kinase for Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS were not influenced. The initial rate and final extent of autophosphorylation were reduced. The concentration of PS required for half-maximal (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binding was increased and the total PDBu binding was reduced. In the presence of optimum concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS, the Kd of PDBu was unaffected by the antibody but the total binding was reduced. These results demonstrate that the PS/PDBu-binding domain contains the major epitope for the antibodies and the antibody mainly influences the PS/PDBu binding to the kinase.

  1. Immunolocalization of neuroblastoma using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody UJ13A

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, A.; Vivian, G.; Gordon, I.; Pritchard, J.; Kemshead, J.

    1984-08-01

    The monoclonal antibody UJ13A, raised after immunization of mice with human fetal brain, recognized an antigen expressed on human neuroblastoma cell lines and fresh tumors. Antibody was purified and radiolabeled with iodine isotopes using chloramine-T. In preclinical studies, 125I-labeled UJ13A was injected intravenously into nude mice bearing xenografts of human neuroblastoma. Radiolabeled UJ13A uptake by the tumors was four to 23 times greater than that by blood. In control animals, injected with a similar quantity of a monoclonal antibody known not to bind to neuroblastoma cells in vitro (FD44), there was no selective tumor uptake. Nine patients with histologically confirmed neuroblastoma each received 100 to 300 micrograms UJ13A radiolabeled with 1 to 2.8 mCi 123I or 131I. Sixteen positive sites were visible on gamma scans 1 to 7 days after injection: 15 were primary or secondary tumor sites, and one was a false positive; there were two false negatives. In two of the 15 positive sites, tumor had not been demonstrated by other imaging techniques; these were later confirmed as areas of malignant infiltration. No toxicity was encountered.

  2. Characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Stella, Cinzia; Wang, Weiru; Schöneich, Christian; Gennaro, Lynn

    2014-05-20

    In the biotechnology industry, oxidative carbonylation as a post-translational modification of protein pharmaceuticals has not been studied in detail. Using Quality by Design (QbD) principles, understanding the impact of oxidative carbonylation on product quality of protein pharmaceuticals, particularly from a site-specific perspective, is critical. However, comprehensive identification of carbonylation sites has so far remained a very difficult analytical challenge for the industry. In this paper, we report for the first time the identification of specific carbonylation sites on recombinant monoclonal antibodies with a new analytical approach via derivatization with Girard's Reagent T (GRT) and subsequent peptide mapping with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Enhanced ionization efficiency and high quality MS(2) data resulted from GRT derivatization were observed as key benefits of this approach, which enabled direct identification of carbonylation sites without any fractionation or affinity enrichment steps. A simple data filtering process was also incorporated to significantly reduce false positive assignments. Sensitivity and efficiency of this approach were demonstrated by identification of carbonylation sites on both unstressed and oxidized antibody bulk drug substances. The applicability of this approach was further demonstrated by identification of 14 common carbonylation sites on three highly similar IgG1s. Our approach represents a significant improvement to the existing analytical methodologies and facilitates extended characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies and potentially other protein pharmaceuticals in the biotechnology industry.

  3. Practical considerations for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Carmel M; Hart, Bruce W

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a well established class of therapeutics as evidenced by a large number of FDA approved mAbs for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Monoclonal antibodies that are molecularly engineered for enhanced functions and pharmacokinetic properties are routinely being considered for development by many biotechnology companies. Safety evaluation of current generation of mAbs poses new challenges due to the highly complex nature of engineering aspects and variability induced by the diverse recombinant cell systems to generate them. This review provides a basic outline for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic antibodies. Important considerations for planning a preclinical program, the types of nonclinical safety studies, and a general timeline for their conduct in relation to clinical trials are described. A list of relevant regulatory documents issued by government agencies is also provided. Adoption of these principles will greatly enhance the quality and relevance of the nonclinical safety data generated and will facilitate future development of mAb therapeutics. PMID:20046568

  4. Dissociative electron attachment to C2F5 radicals.

    PubMed

    Haughey, Sean A; Field, Thomas A; Langer, Judith; Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Viggiano, A A

    2012-08-07

    Dissociative electron attachment to the reactive C(2)F(5) molecular radical has been investigated with two complimentary experimental methods; a single collision beam experiment and a new flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique. The beam results show that F(-) is formed close to zero electron energy in dissociative electron attachment to C(2)F(5). The afterglow measurements also show that F(-) is formed in collisions between electrons and C(2)F(5) molecules with rate constants of 3.7 × 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1) to 4.7 × 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1) at temperatures of 300-600 K. The rate constant increases slowly with increasing temperature, but the rise observed is smaller than the experimental uncertainty of 35%.

  5. Dissociative electron attachment to C2F5 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haughey, Sean A.; Field, Thomas A.; Langer, Judith; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, A. A.

    2012-08-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to the reactive C2F5 molecular radical has been investigated with two complimentary experimental methods; a single collision beam experiment and a new flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique. The beam results show that F- is formed close to zero electron energy in dissociative electron attachment to C2F5. The afterglow measurements also show that F- is formed in collisions between electrons and C2F5 molecules with rate constants of 3.7 × 10-9 cm3 s-1 to 4.7 × 10-9 cm3 s-1 at temperatures of 300-600 K. The rate constant increases slowly with increasing temperature, but the rise observed is smaller than the experimental uncertainty of 35%.

  6. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies reactive with cellular antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Cote, R J; Morrissey, D M; Houghton, A N; Beattie, E J; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from lymph node, peripheral blood, spleen, and tumor specimens have been fused with the LICR-LON-HMy2 (LICR-2) or SKO-007 human cell lines or the NS-1 mouse myeloma line. Over 75 fusions with the three myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines have been performed. Several factors appeared to improve the fusion outcome, including maintenance of the myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines in logarithmic phase growth at greater than or equal to 95% viability, a delay of 24 hr in the introduction of aminopterin to the fused cells, and preselection of the fetal calf serum used in the medium. For a given number of lymphocytes, fusions with NS-1 produced 5-20 times more clones than fusions with LICR-2 or SKO-007, and LICR-2 produced 4 times as many clones as SKO-007. The percentage of clones secreting human immunoglobulin, the range of immunoglobulin production, and the proportion of IgM, IgA, and IgG secretors were comparable for clones derived from the three myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines. Stable Ig-secreting clones were isolated with approximately equal frequency from LICR-2 and NS-1 fusions. A number of stable clones producing human monoclonal antibodies reacting with cell-surface, cytoplasmic, or nuclear antigens have been isolated from tumor-bearing patients and normal individuals. A surface antigenic system present on normal and malignant cells has been defined with a human monoclonal antibody derived from a patient with breast cancer. Techniques for producing human monoclonal antibody now appear to be sufficiently advanced to initiate a serological dissection of the humoral immune response to cancer. Images PMID:6572959

  7. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies in China: Overview and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mao-Yu; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Liang; Gao, Zi-Chao; Ung, Carolina Oi Lam; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become increasingly important as human therapeutic agents. Yet, current research concentrates on technology itself and pays attention to developed countries. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of mAbs development in China through systematic analysis of drug registry, patent applications, clinical trials, academic publication, and ongoing R&D projects. The trends in therapeutic areas and industrialization process are also highlighted. Development and research trends of mAbs are analyzed to provide a future perspective of mAbs as therapeutic agents in China. PMID:25811022

  8. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  9. Monoclonal antibody therapy in the treatment of Reye's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Treon, S P; Broitman, S A

    1992-11-01

    A role for lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins, LPS) in 7 the pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome (RS) has previously been suggested. Impairment of hepatic LPS clearance can lead to systemic endotoxemia as previous studies by this and other laboratories have suggested for several hepatic disorders including RS. Systemic LPS may mediate many of the clinical findings associated with RS by eliciting monokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8. Monoclonal antibody therapy directed at LPS, and monokines may represent a novel approach to the treatment of RS.

  10. Generation of cell lines for monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Alvin, Krista; Ye, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent the largest group of therapeutic proteins with 30 products approved in the USA and hundreds of therapies currently undergoing clinical trials. The complex nature of mAbs makes their development as therapeutic agents constrained by numerous criteria such as quality, safety, regulation, and quantity. Identification of a clonal cell line expressing high levels of mAb with adequate quality attributes and generated in compliance with regulatory standards is a necessary step prior to a program moving to large-scale production for clinical material. This chapter outlines the stable transfection technology that generates clonal cell lines for commercial manufacturing processes.

  11. Monoclonal antibody against mouse CAR following genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    Carson, Steven D; Switzer, Barbara L; Tracy, Steven M; Chapman, Nora M

    2004-02-01

    To broaden our repertoire of monoclonal antibodies against CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor), we inoculated mice with an expression vector containing the cDNA encoding human CAR extracellular and transmembrane sequence, and boosted the response by inoculation with soluble human CAR protein produced in E. coli. Of the hybridomas obtained following this immunization protocol, one secreted IgG with exceptional reactivity against mouse CAR. Since CAR has been shown to form dimers, expression of human CAR in cells that express mouse CAR may have stimulated the host immune system to recognize endogenous CAR in heterodimers.

  12. Monoclonal Antibody Shows Promise as Potential Therapeutic for MERS | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A monoclonal antibody has proven effective in preventing Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in lab animals, suggesting further development as a potential intervention for the deadly disease in humans, according to new research. MERS is a newly emerged coronavirus first detected in humans in 2012. Most cases have occurred in the Middle East, but the disease has appeared elsewhere. In all, MERS has infected more than 1,700 individuals and killed more than 600, according to the World Health Organization. No vaccines or antiviral therapies currently exist. Several candidate vaccines are being developed, and some have been tested in animal models, a prerequisite to human clinical trials.

  13. Monoclonal antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody-Based Candidate Therapeutics Against HIV Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:21827278

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to human plasma low-density lipoproteins. I. Enhanced binding of 125I-labeled low-density lipoproteins by combined use of two monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mao, S J; Patton, J G; Badimon, J J; Kottke, B A; Alley, M C; Cardin, A D

    1983-11-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) to human plasma low-density lipoproteins (LDL) have been characterized. The binding affinities of each monoclonal antibody to 125I-labeled LDL were moderately high, ranging from 10(8) to 10(10) L/mol at 4 degrees C, but were reduced by at least 50-70% at 37 degrees C. The maximum binding of each monoclonal antibody was unique, ranging from 20 to 95% of total 125I-labeled LDL, suggesting that LDL particles were immunochemically heterogeneous. One antibody, LP-34, had both high and low binding affinities to LDL. Another, LP-47, exhibited high affinity for isolated LDL, yet reacted poorly with native LDL in plasma, indicating that the conformation of isolated LDL differs from that of native LDL in plasma. Unlike polyclonal serum antibodies, a mixture of four monoclonal antibodies failed to precipitate LDL, but did show a drastic increase in binding to LDL. We found that only two of our monoclonal antibodies were necessary for such synergistic enhancement. We propose that one of the monoclonal antibodies may serve as a catalytic reagent, and discuss the clinical significance of this finding.

  16. The application of monoclonal antibodies in cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Soori, Gamini; Dobleman, Thomas J; Xiao, Gary G

    2014-01-01

    Cancer becomes the second leading cause of death in the world. An effective strategy for early diagnosis of the disease is key to reduce the mortality and morbidity. Development of effective monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based assays or diagnostic imaging techniques for detection of antigens and small molecules that are released from cancerous cells will enhance modern diagnostic medicine of cancer significantly. Although mAb technology is still under development, recent advances in preparation of recombinant antigen and antibody engineering techniques have dramatically enhanced the applications of this technology in cancer diagnosis. Compared with other methods, mAb-based assays may provide spatial, temporal, accurate and quantitative measurement for diagnosis of the disease. This review summarizes the progress of the mAb-based assays in the field of molecular diagnosis of cancer.

  17. Discovery and characterization of hydroxylysine in recombinant monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Moore, Benjamin; Beardsley, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tryptic peptide mapping analysis of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-expressed, recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody revealed a previously unreported +16 Da modification. Through a combination of MSn experiments, and preparation and analysis of known synthetic peptides, the possibility of a sequence variant (Ala to Ser) was ruled out and the presence of hydroxylysine was confirmed. Post-translational hydroxylation of lysine was found in a consensus sequence (XKG) known to be the site of modification in other proteins such as collagen, and was therefore presumed to result from the activity of the CHO homolog of the lysyl hydroxylase complex. Although this consensus sequence was present in several locations in the antibody sequence, only a single site on the heavy-chain Fab was found to be modified. PMID:26651858

  18. Internal radiation dosimetry for clinical testing of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Durham, J.S.; Hui, T.E.; Hill, R.L.

    1990-11-01

    In gauging the efficacy of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment, it is important to know the amount of radiation energy absorbed by tumors and normal tissue per unit administered activity. This paper describes methods for estimating absorbed doses to human tumors and normal tissues, including intraperitoneal tissue surfaces, red marrow, and the intestinal tract from incorporated radionuclides. These methods use the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) scheme; however, they also incorporate enhancements designed to solve specific dosimetry problems encountered during clinical studies, such as patient-specific organ masses obtained from computerized tomography (CT) volumetrics, estimates of the dose to tumor masses within normal organs, and multicellular dosimetry for studying dose inhomogeneities in solid tumors. Realistic estimates of absorbed dose are provided within the short time requirements of physicians so that decisions can be made with regard to patient treatment and procurement of radiolabeled antibodies. Some areas in which further research could improve dose assessment are also discussed. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Belimumab: anti-BLyS human monoclonal antibody, anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody, BmAb, human monoclonal antibody to B-lymphocyte stimulator.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Belimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of B-lymphocyte stimulator, or BLyS. Belimumab is in phase III trials for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has completed a phase II trial in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); the product may also have potential in the treatment of other autoimmune disorders. In May 2001, Cambridge Antibody Technology (now MedImmune) completed its discovery programme and Human Genome Sciences identified belimumab as a candidate for clinical development. More than 1000 distinct human antibodies specific to BLyS were characterized by the collaboration.B-lymphocyte stimulator is a naturally occurring protein discovered by Human Genome Sciences that stimulates B-lymphocytes to develop into mature B cells. Laboratory studies have indicated that higher than normal levels of B-lymphocyte stimulator may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as SLE and RA. Human Genome Sciences (HGS) and Cambridge Antibody Technology signed a collaborative agreement in August 1999 to study the B-lymphocyte stimulator as a human protein target. HGS is also developing other BLyS products. In March 2000, HGS and Cambridge Antibody Technology expanded their agreement into a 10-year collaboration and product development alliance, providing Human Genome Sciences with the right to use the antibody technology of Cambridge Antibody Technology to fully develop human antibodies for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Cambridge Antibody Technology will receive royalty payments on product sales from HGS, as well as the development and milestone payments it has already received. Belimumab will be manufactured in Human Genome Sciences' manufacturing facility, located in Rockville, MD, USA. HGS holds commercial rights to the drug. In July 2005, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) exercised its co-development and co-promotion option to belimumab. In an agreement made in June 1996, HGS had

  20. Generation of a rat monoclonal antibody specific for hsp72.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masako; Shiota, Masayuki; Okada, Seiji; Harada, Akihito; Odawara, Jun; Mun, Saya; Iwao, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    The heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family members function as ATP-dependent molecular chaperones that assist in the folding of newly synthesized polypeptides and in the refolding of misfolded/aggregated proteins. These heat shock proteins comprise at least eight sets of molecular groups that share high homology, but differ from each other in their expression level and subcellular localization. Hsp72, which is also known as Hsp70 and Hsp70-1, is localized mainly in the cytoplasm but is also found in the nucleus. Stress-induced Hsp72 functions as a chaperone enabling the cells to cope with harmful aggregations of denatured proteins during and following stress. The difference in the function of Hsp72 from that of other Hsp70 members, however, remains unclear. We report the establishment of a monoclonal antibody specific for Hsp72 using the rat medial iliac lymph node method. Immunoblot analysis revealed that our monoclonal antibody against Hsp72 specifically identified the 65 kDa protein. Immunocytochemical staining also revealed that Hsp72 localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and aggregated in the nucleus in response to heat stress. This MAb against Hsp72 will allow for further studies to elucidate the mechanism by which Hsp72 is localized in the cell in response to stress stimuli, and aid in the identification of specific interacting molecules.

  1. Bothropic antivenom based on monoclonal antibodies, is it possible?

    PubMed

    Frauches, Thiago S; Petretski, Jorge H; Arnholdt, Andrea C V; Lasunskaia, Elena B; de Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Kipnis, Thereza L; da Silva, Wilmar D; Kanashiro, Milton M

    2013-09-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against three major toxic components of Bothrops atrox venom were produced and tested. The mAbs against phospholipase A2, hemorrhagic metalloprotease, and thrombin-like enzymes were produced in large amounts and purified with caprylic acid followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Purified mAbs were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and their ability to neutralize the respective toxins was tested. Five Swiss mice were injected i.p. with 13.5 mg of pooled mAbs and challenged via s.c. route with venom. Survival rate was recorded for the next 48 h. All mice treated and challenged with venom survived, whereas only one mouse in the control group survived. Bleeding time in mice treated with mAbs was similar to that observed in control mice. Our results show that monoclonal antibodies neutralized the lethal toxicity of Bothrops venom and indicate that there is a reasonable possibility of developing antivenoms based on humanized mAbs to treat victims of venomous animals in the future.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed to Fucoidan Preparations from Brown Algae

    PubMed Central

    Torode, Thomas A.; Marcus, Susan E.; Jam, Murielle; Tonon, Thierry; Blackburn, Richard S.; Hervé, Cécile; Knox, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cell walls of the brown algae contain a diverse range of polysaccharides with useful bioactivities. The precise structures of the sulfated fucan/fucoidan group of polysaccharides and their roles in generating cell wall architectures and cell properties are not known in detail. Four rat monoclonal antibodies, BAM1 to BAM4, directed to sulfated fucan preparations, have been generated and used to dissect the heterogeneity of brown algal cell wall polysaccharides. BAM1 and BAM4, respectively, bind to a non-sulfated epitope and a sulfated epitope present in the sulfated fucan preparations. BAM2 and BAM3 identified additional distinct epitopes present in the fucoidan preparations. All four epitopes, not yet fully characterised, occur widely within the major brown algal taxonomic groups and show divergent distribution patterns in tissues. The analysis of cell wall extractions and fluorescence imaging reveal differences in the occurrence of the BAM1 to BAM4 epitopes in various tissues of Fucus vesiculosus. In Ectocarpus subulatus, a species closely related to the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus, the BAM4 sulfated epitope was modulated in relation to salinity levels. This new set of monoclonal antibodies will be useful for the dissection of the highly complex and yet poorly resolved sulfated polysaccharides in the brown algae in relation to their ecological and economic significance. PMID:25692870

  3. Effects of the orientation of anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibody immobilized on scaffold in antibody-mediated osseous regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sahar; Freire, Marcelo; Choi, Moon G; Tavari, Azadeh; Almohaimeed, Mohammad; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can trap endogenous osteogenic BMP ligands, which can in turn mediate osteodifferentiation of progenitor cells. The effectiveness of this strategy requires the availability of the anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies antigen-binding sites for anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies to bind to the scaffold through a domain that will leave its antigen-binding region exposed and available for binding to an osteogenic ligand. We examined whether antibodies bound to a scaffold by passive adsorption versus through Protein G as a linker will exhibit differences in mediating bone formation. In vitro anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies was immobilized on absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) with Protein G as a linker to bind the antibody through its Fc region and implanted into rat calvarial defects. The biomechanical strength of bone regenerated by absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies immune complex was compared to ACS/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies or ACS/Protein G/isotype mAb control group. Results demonstrated higher binding of anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies/BMPs to C2C12 cells, when the mAb was initially attached to recombinant Protein G or Protein G-coupled microbeads. After eight weeks, micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses revealed increased bone formation within defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies compared with defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (p < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed increased BMP-2, -4, and -7 detection in sites implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Biomechanical analysis revealed the regenerated bone in sites with Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies had higher mechanical strength in comparison to anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies. The negative control group, Protein G

  4. Neutralizing determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies on polypeptides specified by bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J K; Butcher, A C; Riegel, C A; McGrane, V; Blair, C D; Teramoto, Y A; Winston, S

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to study neutralizing determinants on polypeptides of bovine herpesvirus 1. Two of three monoclonal antibodies which recognized nonoverlapping epitopes on a glycoprotein of 82,000 daltons were found to neutralize. A second group of monoclonal antibodies that individually precipitated five viral glycopolypeptides ranging in size from 102,000 to 55,000 daltons also neutralized. Two monoclonal antibodies which were the most efficient in neutralization recognized a non-glycosylated protein of 115,000 daltons which was the major polypeptide on the virus. A fourth group of monoclonal antibodies precipitated a non-glycosylated polypeptide of 91,000 daltons and several smaller polypeptides, but these antibodies demonstrated only limited neutralizing activity. Images PMID:6208375

  5. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  6. [Production and characteristics of monoclonal antibodies to the diphtheria toxin].

    PubMed

    Valiakina, T I; Lakhtina, O E; Komaleva, R L; Simonova, M A; Samokhvalova, L V; Shoshina, N S; Kalinina, N A; Rubina, A Iu; Filippova, M A; Vertiev, Iu V; Grishin, E V

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the diphtheria toxin were produced without cross reactivity with the thermolabile toxin (LT) from Escherichia coli; ricin; choleraic toxin; the SeA, SeB, SeE, SeI, and SeG toxins of staphylococcus; the lethal factor of the anthrax toxin; and the protective antigen of the anthrax toxin. A pair of antibodies for the quantitative determination of the diphtheria toxin in the sandwich variation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was chosen. The determination limit of the toxin was 0.7 ng/ml in plate and 1.6 ng/ml in microchip ELISA. The presence of a secretion from the nasopharynx lavage did not decrease the sensitivity of the toxin determination by sandwich ELISA. The immunization of mice with the diphtheria toxin and with a conjugate of the diphtheria toxin with polystyrene microspheres demonstrated that the conjugate immunization resulted in the formation of hybridoma clones which produced antibodies only to the epitopes of the A fragment of the diphtheria toxin. The immunization with the native toxin caused the production of hybridoma clones which predominantly produced antibodies to the epitopes of the B fragment.

  7. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  8. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan

    2006-04-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a key mediator of intracellular transport and metabolism of fatty acids in adipose tissues. FABP4 binds fatty acids with high affinity and transports them to various compartments in the cell. When in complex with fatty acids, FABP4 interacts with and modulates the activity of two important regulators of metabolism: hormone-sensitive lipase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. Genetic studies in mice clearly indicated that deregulation of FABP4 function may lead to the development of severe diseases such as diabetes II type and atherosclerosis. In this study, we report the production and detailed characterization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against FABP4. Recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST)-FABP4 or His-FABP4 was expressed in bacteria, affinity purified, and used for immunization of mice, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, and characterization of selected clones. We have isolated two hybridoma clones that produced antibodies specific for recombinant and native FABP4, as shown by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. The specificity of generated antibodies was further tested in a cell-based model of adipogenesis. In this analysis, the accumulation of FABP4 during NIH 3T3-L1 differentiation into adipocytes was detected by generated antibodies, which correlates well with previously published data. Taken together, we produced MAbs that will be useful for the scientific community working on fatty acid-binding proteins and lipid metabolism.

  9. From the discovery of monoclonal antibodies to their therapeutic application: an historical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2014-09-01

    Vertebrate make billions of different antibodies, each with a binding site that recognizes a specific region of a macromolecule. The hybridoma technique allows monoclonal antibodies, highly specific antibodies produced in the laboratory by a variety of methods. In the last 35 years since the first process for creating monoclonal antibodies was introduced, their application have improved the growing biotechnology industry, but the most important application concerns the therapy of human malignancies.

  10. Using monoclonal antibodies as an international standard for the measurement of anti-adalimumab antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Kruithof, Simone; Wolbink, Gertjan; Wouters, Diana; Rispens, Theo

    2016-02-20

    Comparing studies investigating anti-drug antibody (ADA) formation is hampered by the lack of comparability between study protocols, assay formats, and standardized reference materials. In this respect, the use of an international standard would mean a major step forward. Here we compared 11 fully human monoclonal antibodies against adalimumab in two assays commonly used for ADA measurement; the bridging ELISA and the antigen binding test (ABT). Our results show non-parallel titration of the monoclonal antibodies in both assays, which we also find for polyclonal ADA sources. Moreover, we observed that the output of the bridging ELISA depends to a large degree on the affinity of the monoclonal antibody. For the ABT, results reflect a combination of affinity and avidity. This suggests that rather than reporting ADA values in nanogram per milliliter, arbitrary units may be more appropriate. Together our data highlight the difficulty of ADA standardization by identifying several pitfalls that should be taken into account when selecting a standard for ADA testing.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to cyclodiene insecticides and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, Larry H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Watkins, Bruce E.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies useful for detection of cyclodienes in foods and environmental samples. Monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive with cyclodienes can detect accumulated pesticides in food, tissue or environmental samples. Extraction and preparation of organic samples for immunoassay in a polar-nonpolar reaction medium permits detection of halogenated organic ring structures at concentrations in samples.

  12. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for chicken interleukin 18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which are specific for chicken interleukin 18 (chIL18) were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and neutralization assays. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chIL18 identified a ...

  13. Monoclonal antibody typing of Chlamydia psittaci strains derived from avian and mammalian species.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushi, H; Nojiri, K; Hirai, K

    1987-01-01

    A total of 77 Chlamydia psittaci strains of avian, human, and mammalian origin were grouped into four serovars with 11 monoclonal antibodies recognizing the lipopolysaccharide and the major outer membrane protein antigens. The avian and human strains, which were closely related to each other, were distinct from the mammalian strains. Immunological typing of C. psittaci with monoclonal antibodies seems practical. PMID:3667918

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to cyclodiene insecticides and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, L.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-08-02

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies useful for detection of cyclodienes in foods and environmental samples. Monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive with cyclodienes can detect accumulated pesticides in food, tissue or environmental samples. Extraction and preparation of organic samples for immunoassay in a polar-nonpolar reaction medium permits detection of halogenated organic ring structures at concentrations in samples. 13 figs.

  15. Method of rapid production of hybridomas expressing monoclonal antibodies on the cell surface

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Laterza, Vince

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells. The invention also relates to utilizing genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells in methods of making monoclonal antibodies. The present invention also provides populations of hybridomas and B cells that can be utilized to make a monoclonal antibody of interest.

  16. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance. PMID:21293176

  18. Removal of drugs from the circulation using immobilized monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Brizgys, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity monoclonal antidigoxin antibodies (dig-Ab) were immobilized to a pellicular microbead and characterized in terms of antibody affinity, specificity for other glycosides, and binding capacity. Determination of digoxin binding revealed that the binding capacity decreased to 25% of theoretical capacity. Attempts to improve the binding capacity were ineffective. A guinea pig animal model was developed to determine the efficacy of removing digoxin in vivo from the circulation using an antibody column. Male guinea pigs were hemoperfused with either a dig-Ab or bovine Y-globulin control column 16 h after a single i.v. injection of digoxin. Pre- and postcolumn plasma concentrations were obtained to evaluate the extraction efficiency. Hemoperfusion continued for 3 h at flow rates of 1.0-2.0 mL/min. Bound digoxin was eluted as described earlier and concentrations determined by (/sup 125/I) digoxin RIA. Amounts of digoxin removed represented less than 1% of the total body content. After several studies with the same column, the dig-Ab had lost most of its activity. A freshly prepared dig-Ab column removed approximately 20% of the total body content. Most of the measured constituents of the blood were unaffected by the procedure.

  19. A monoclonal antibody recognizing a differentiation marker on rat gonocytes.

    PubMed

    van Dissel-Emiliani, F M; van Kooten, P J; de Boer-Brouwer, M; de Rooij, D G; van der Donk, J A

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day post coitum (p.c.) rat testes. One antibody, designated 4B6.3E10 (mu, kappa), was obtained which specifically reacted with gonocytes in the fetal testis. No significant cross-reactivity with other tissues from the 18-day p.c. embryo was found. MAb 4B6.3E10 was reactive with rat gonocytes from 17-day p.c. until the day of birth. Germ cells at later stages of testis development did not show any labelling. The epitope recognized by 4B6.3E10 is a carbohydrate as periodate treatment leads to a loss of reactivity of the antibody. By SDS-PAGE and Western blotting of proteins extracted from a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day p.c. testes, MAb 4B6.3E10 was found to recognize at least 3 protein moieties with apparent molecular weights in the ranges of 80-100, 120, 160-180 kDa (either under reducing- or non-reducing conditions). The results suggest that MAb 4B6.3E10 recognizes a specific differentiation marker for fetal rat gonocytes.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Wheeler, Deric L

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance.

  1. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  2. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) specific recombinant monoclonal phage display antibodies for prey detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators.

  3. Purification and identification of cell surface antigens using lamprey monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Ali, Shabab; St. Germain, Jonathan; Liu, Yanling; Yu, Xuecong; Jaye, David L.; Moran, Michael F.; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) B antibodies of the evolutionary distant sea lamprey are structurally distinct from conventional mammalian antibodies. The different protein architecture and large evolutionary distance of jawless vertebrates suggest that VLR antibodies may represent promising tools for biomarker discovery. Here we report the generation of panels of monoclonal VLR antibodies from lamprey larvae immunized with human T cells and the use of a recombinant monoclonal VLR antibody for antigen purification and mass spectrometric identification. We demonstrate that despite predicted low affinity of individual VLR antigen binding units to the antigen, the high avidity resulting from decameric assembly of secreted VLR antibodies allows for efficient antigen capture and subsequent identification by mass spectometry. We show that VLR antibodies detect their antigens with high specificity and can be used in various standard laboratory application techniques. The lamprey antibodies are novel reagents that can complement conventional monoclonal antibodies in multiple scientific research disciplines. PMID:22964555

  4. Effect of polyol sugars on the stabilization of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Cohrs, Nicholas; Arosio, Paolo; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the impact of sugars and polyols on the heat-induced aggregation of a model monoclonal antibody whose monomer depletion is rate-limited by protein unfolding. We follow the kinetics of monomer consumption by size exclusion chromatography, and we interpret the results in the frame of two mechanistic schemes describing the enhanced protein stability in the presence of polyols. It is found that the stabilization effect increases with increasing polyol concentration with a comparable trend for all of the tested polyols. However, the stabilization effect at a given polyol concentration is polyol specific. In particular, the stabilization effect increases as a function of polyol size until a plateau is reached above a critical polyol size corresponding to six carbon atoms. Our results show that the stabilization by polyols does not depend solely on the volume fraction filled by the polyol molecules, but is also affected by the polyol chemistry.

  5. A Monoclonal Antibody Specific to Surface Antigen on Candida krusei

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Raymond; Faure, Odile; Carloti, Arnaud; Lebeau, Bernadette; Bernard, Christian; Marot-Leblond, Agnès; Grillot, Renée; Senet, Jean-Marcel

    1998-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb; MAb 6B3) which reacts specifically with a cell wall antigen found in all strains or isolates of Candida krusei was developed. MAb 6B3 was extensively tested by immunofluorescence assay for cross-reaction with many Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, Trichosporon, and Rhodotorula species and was found to react only with the species C. krusei. The specific epitope is expressed on the surface of fungal cells and appears to reside on a protein moiety. Taking into account the increasing importance of fluconazole-resistant strains in nosocomial fungal infections, the very high degree of specificity of this MAb for C. krusei could be useful for the routine detection of C. krusei in culture or in tissue samples. PMID:9455893

  6. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The overall objective for this research project is to develop methods for utilizing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long term goals are to apply this approach to investigate the following: normal tissue toxicity; radiation dose to the tumor; and early tumor imaging. The research plans of this proposal include the following specific aims: optimize labeling of MAbs with fluorine 18, bromine 76 and bromine 75; label MAb Mel-14 (reactive against human gliomas and melanomas) and its Fab and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments while retaining immunoreactivity; determine the distribution of Mel-14 in athymic mice bearing human gliomas; determine pharmacokinetics of Mel-14 in nonhuman primates. Experiments with another MAb, TP-1, and iodine 124 and 131 are also planned. 8 figs.

  7. [Monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Seco, Victoria Galán; Casanova Peño, Ignacio; Arroyo González, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Until the mid 1990s, with the appearance of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate, there was no treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, due to their moderate therapeutic potential in some patients, a broad search was continued to find new and more effective treatment strategies, largely concentrated on monoclonal antibodies (MOAB). Natalizumab, the first MOAB for the treatment of MS, was approved at the end of 2004, representing a major advance in the field of neuroimmunology. Today, there is broad experience with natalizumab and other MOAB (alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab and anti-lingo-1) that are pending commercialization or are under phase II or III of development with promising results. The present review analyzes the efficacy and safety results of all these drugs.

  8. Target Therapy in Hematological Malignances: New Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Pawlowski, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Apart from radio- and chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) represent a new, more selective tool in the treatment of hematological malignancies. MoAbs bind with the specific antigens of the tumors. This interaction is a basis for targeted therapies which exhibit few side effects and significant antitumor activity. This review provides an overview of the functional characteristics of MoAbs, with some examples of their clinical application. The promising results in the treatment of hematological malignancies have led to the more frequent usage of MoAbs in the therapy. Development of MoAbs is a subject of extensive research. They are a promising method of cancer treatment in the future. PMID:27433507

  9. High-level iodination of monoclonal antibody fragments for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferens, J.M.; Krohn, K.A.; Beaumier, P.L.; Brown, J.P.; Hellstroem, I.; Hellstroem, K.E.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.

    1984-03-01

    Two different murine monoclonal antibody Fab fragments specific for p97, a melanoma-associated antigen, were labeled with I-131 at high activity levels without excessive chemical damage. Up to 20 mg of Fab were labeled with up to 300 mCi of I-131 using the chloramine-T method and large working volumes at room temperature. As much as 90% of the initial activity was recovered as labeled product. The labeled Fabs varied in their sensitivity to radioiodination damage, as measured by an in vitro cell-binding assay. Radioiodination was performed safely using a remote iodination apparatus. The final product was of radiopharmaceutical quality suitable for clinical diagnosis and experimental radiotherapy in humans.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies and the transformation of blood typing.

    PubMed

    Marks, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Today, when monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most important classes of therapeutic drugs, it is easy to forget how much they have transformed our healthcare in other ways. One of the first clinical areas, as this paper shows, where mAbs made their mark was in the field of blood typing. The adoption of mAbs for this purpose was done with little public fanfare or funding. Nonetheless, it radically transformed the accuracy and cost of blood typing and shifted the procedure away from a dependence on reagents made from human blood donated by volunteers. This paper argues that the development of mAbs as reagents for blood typing laid the foundation for the first large-scale production of mAbs thereby paving the way to the advent of mAb diagnostics and therapeutics.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies and the transformation of blood typing

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Today, when monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most important classes of therapeutic drugs, it is easy to forget how much they have transformed our healthcare in other ways. One of the first clinical areas, as this paper shows, where mAbs made their mark was in the field of blood typing. The adoption of mAbs for this purpose was done with little public fanfare or funding. Nonetheless, it radically transformed the accuracy and cost of blood typing and shifted the procedure away from a dependence on reagents made from human blood donated by volunteers. This paper argues that the development of mAbs as reagents for blood typing laid the foundation for the first large-scale production of mAbs thereby paving the way to the advent of mAb diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25484059

  12. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  13. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Shivangi M.; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  14. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics with up to five specificities

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, David W.; Abramyan, Donara; Kanakaraj, Palanisamy; Smith, Rodger G.; Shah, Rutul R.; Wang, Geping; Yao, Xiao-Tao; Kankanala, Spandana; Boyd, Ernie; Zaritskaya, Liubov; Nam, Viktoriya; Puffer, Bridget A.; Buasen, Pete; Kaithamana, Shashi; Burnette, Andrew F.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Patel, Dimki; Roschke, Viktor V.; Kiener, Peter A.; Hilbert, David M.; Barbas III, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    The recognition that few human diseases are thoroughly addressed by mono-specific, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) continues to drive the development of antibody therapeutics with additional specificities and enhanced activity. Historically, efforts to engineer additional antigen recognition into molecules have relied predominantly on the reformatting of immunoglobulin domains. In this report we describe a series of fully functional mAbs to which additional specificities have been imparted through the recombinant fusion of relatively short polypeptides sequences. The sequences are selected for binding to a particular target from combinatorial libraries that express linear, disulfide-constrained, or domain-based structures. The potential for fusion of peptides to the N- and C- termini of both the heavy and light chains affords the bivalent expression of up to four different peptides. The resulting molecules, called zybodies, can gain up to four additional specificities, while retaining the original functionality and specificity of the scaffold antibody. We explore the use of two clinically significant oncology antibodies, trastuzumab and cetuximab, as zybody scaffolds and demonstrate functional enhancements in each case. The affect of fusion position on both peptide and scaffold function is explored, and penta-specific zybodies are demonstrated to simultaneously engage five targets (ErbB2, EGFR, IGF-1R, Ang2 and integrin αvβ3). Bispecific, trastuzumab-based zybodies targeting ErbB2 and Ang2 are shown to exhibit superior efficacy to trastuzumab in an angiogenesis-dependent xenograft tumor model. A cetuximab-based bispecific zybody that targeting EGFR and ErbB3 simultaneously disrupted multiple intracellular signaling pathways; inhibited tumor cell proliferation; and showed efficacy superior to that of cetuximab in a xenograft tumor model. PMID:23575268

  15. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed against the Microsporidium Enterocytozoon bieneusi

    PubMed Central

    Accoceberry, Isabelle; Thellier, Marc; Desportes-Livage, Isabelle; Achbarou, Abderrahim; Biligui, Sylvestre; Danis, Martin; Datry, Annick

    1999-01-01

    Several hybridomas producing antibodies detected by indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) were established by fusion of mouse myeloma SP2/O with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized against whole spores (protocol 1) or chitinase-treated spores (protocol 2) of Enterocytozoon bieneusi and were cloned twice by limiting dilutions. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 3B82H2 from protocol 1, isotyped as immunoglobulin M (IgM), and 6E52D9 from protocol 2, isotyped as IgG, were expanded in both ascites and culture. IFAT with the MAbs showed that both MAbs reacted exclusively with the walls of the spores of E. bieneusi, strongly staining the surface of mature spores, and produced titers of greater than 4,096. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the specific reactivities of both antibodies. No cross-reaction, either with the spores of the other intestinal microsporidium species Encephalitozoon intestinalis or with yeast cells, bacteria, or any other intestinal parasites, was observed. The MAbs were used to identify E. bieneusi spores in fecal specimens from patients suspected of having intestinal microsporidiosis. The IFAT was validated against standard staining methods (Chromotrope 2R and Uvitex 2B) and PCR. We report here the first description and characterization of two MAbs specific for the spore wall of E. bieneusi. These MAbs have great potential for the demonstration and species determination of E. bieneusi, and their application in immunofluorescence identification of E. bieneusi in stool samples could offer a new diagnostic tool for clinical laboratories. PMID:10565939

  16. Generation of monoclonal antibody targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Ovcharenko, Galyna; Klymenko, Tetyana; Zhyvoloup, Olexandr; Gaman, Nadia; Volkova, Darija; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2009-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, whose function has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and tumorigenesis. Deregulation of FGFR3 signaling has been implicated with human pathologies, including cancer. Activating mutations in FGFR3 gene are frequently detected in bladder cancer, multiple myeloma, and noninvasive papillary urothelial cell carcinomas, while the overexpression of the receptor is observed in thyroid lymphoma and bladder cancer. The main aim of this study was to generate hybridoma clones producing antibody that could specifically recognize FGFR3/S249C mutant, but not the wild-type FGFR. To achieve this, we used for immunization bacterially expressed fragment of FGFR3 corresponding to loops II-III of the extracellular domain (GST-His/FGFR3/S249C-LII-III), which possesses oncogenic mutation at Ser249 detected in at least 50% of bladder cancers. Primary ELISA screening allowed us to isolate several hybridoma clones that showed specificity towards FGFR3/S249C, but not FGFR3wt protein. Unfortunately, these clones were not stable during single-cell cloning and expansion and lost the ability to recognize specifically FGFR3/S249C. However, this study allowed us to generate several monoclonal antibodies specific towards both FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C recombinant proteins. Produced hybridomas secreted MAbs that were specific in Western blotting towards bacterially expressed FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C, as well as the full-length receptors ectopically expressed in Sf21 and HEK293 cells. Moreover, transiently expressed wild-type and oncogenic forms of FGFR were efficiently immunoprecipitated with selected antibodies from the lysates of infected Sf21 and transiently transfected HEK293. In summary, generated antibodies should be useful as tools for examining the expression pattern and biological functions of FGFR3 in normal and

  17. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Protective Antigen Component of Bacillus anthracis Toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-21

    F. Jaquet, P. Luethy, R. Huetter, and D. G. Braun. 1986. Characterization of mcnoclonal antibodies to a crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis ...AD-A192 855 UT FILE COPY Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Protective Antigen Component of Bacillus anthracis...Author Tel. No. 301-663-7341 1--ac",- 88 3 14 05 6 Krhirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the protective antigen protein of Bacillus anthracis exotoxin

  18. Anti-bacterial monoclonal antibodies: back to the future?

    PubMed

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Nagy, Gábor; Nagy, Eszter

    2012-10-15

    Today's medicine has to deal with the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, and is beginning to be confronted with pan-resistant microbes. This worsening inadequacy of the antibiotics concept, which has ruled infectious medicine in the last six decades creates an increasing unmet medical need that can be addressed by passive immunization. While past experience from the pre-antibiotic era with serum therapy was in many cases encouraging, antibacterial monoclonal antibodies have so far suffered high attrition rates in the clinic, generally from lack of efficacy. Yet, we believe that recent developments in a number of areas such as infectious disease pathogenesis research, translational medicine, mAb engineering, mAb manufacturing and rapid bedside diagnostics are converging to make the medium-term future permissive for antibacterial mAb development. Here, we review antibacterial mAb-based approaches that are or were in clinical development, and may potentially act as paradigms with regards to molecular targets, antibody formats and mode-of-action, pre-clinical validation and selection of most relevant patient populations, in order to increase the likelihood of successful product development in this field.

  19. Monoclonal antibody-based therapies for microbial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Carolyn; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) revolution that currently provides many new options for the treatment of neoplastic and inflammatory diseases has largely bypassed the field of infectious diseases. Only one mAb is licensed for use against an infectious disease, although there are many in various stages of development. This situation is peculiar given that serum therapy was one of the first effective treatments for microbial diseases and that specific antibodies have numerous antimicrobial properties. The underdevelopment and underutilization of mAb therapies for microbial diseases has various complex explanations that include the current availability of antimicrobial drugs, small markets, high costs and microbial antigenic variation. However, there are signs that the climate for mAb therapeutics in infectious diseases is changing given increasing antibiotic drug resistance, the emergence of new pathogenic microbes for which no therapy is available, and development of mAb cocktail formulations. Currently, the major hurdle for the widespread introduction of mAb therapies for microbial diseases is economic, given the high costs of immunoglobulin preparations and relatively small markets. Despite these obstacles there are numerous opportunities for mAb development against microbial diseases and the development of radioimmunotherapy provides new options for enhancing the magic bullet. Hence, there is cautious optimism that the years ahead will see more mAbs in clinical use against microbial diseases. PMID:20006139

  20. Production of human anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.C.; Mercier, F.; Roger, J.; Varin, M.

    1986-03-01

    Only 40% of the several hundred anti-HLA murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that have been made detect HLA-A,B,C or DR specificities previously defined by human alloantisera, the range of recognized specificities is very narrow, and few of the MAbs have proven useful as tissue typing reagents. In hopes of obtaining HLA typing reagents, the authors are developing a protocol for the production of human anti-HLA MAbs from HLA-antigen (Ag) immunized peripheral blood B cells of volunteering renal patients, immunized to one or more HLA Ags through therapeutic blood transfusions. A simple enrichment of the donor B cells has not been sufficient for anti-HLA MAb production, the authors are currently delineating the conditions necessary for increasing the number of HLA-specific donor B cells by in vitro stimulation with cells expressing the HLA Ag to which the B cell donor is immunized. For the production of MAbs, the stimulated B cells are transformed with Epstein-Barr virus and subsequently fused with KR-4 lymphoblastoid cells. Hybridomas are selected by HAT and Ouabain. Supernatants are screened for anti-HLA activity against lymphocyte targets expressing the original immunizing HLA Ag by complement mediated /sup 51/Cr release assay. Antibody specificity is determined by the complement-dependent microcytotoxicity test used for HLA typing.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Diagnosis of Borrelia crocidurae.

    PubMed

    Fotso Fotso, Aurélien; Mediannikov, Oleg; Nappez, Claude; Azza, Saïd; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae, produced by ectoparasite-borne Borrelia species, cause mild to deadly bacteremia and miscarriage. In the perspective of developing inexpensive assays for the rapid detection of relapsing fever borreliae, we produced 12 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Borrelia crocidurae and characterized the two exhibiting the highest titers. P3A10 MAb reacts with the 35.6-kDa flagellin B (flaB) of B. crocidurae while P6D9 MAb recognizes a 35.1-kDa variable-like protein (Vlp) in B. crocidurae and a 35.2-kDa Vlp in Borrelia duttonii. Indirect immunofluorescence assay incorporating relapsing fever and Lyme group borreliae and 11 blood-borne organisms responsible for fever in West Africa confirmed the reactivity of these two MAbs. Combining these two MAbs in indirect immunofluorescence assays detected relapsing fever borreliae including B. crocidurae in ticks and the blood of febrile Senegalese patients. Both antibodies could be incorporated into inexpensive and stable formats suited for the rapid point-of-care diagnosis of relapsing fever. These first-ever MAbs directed against African relapsing fever borreliae are available for the scientific community to promote research in this neglected field.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies: pharmacokinetics as a basis for new dosage regimens?

    PubMed

    Azanza, J-R; Sádaba, B; Gómez-Guiu, A

    2015-10-01

    Complete monoclonal IgG antibodies which are in use in clinical practice share some pharmacological properties resulting in high concentrations in plasma. This fact is reflected in their low volumes of distribution, which can also be correlated with a high molecular weight and water solubility. This feature allows a novel approach to be applied to the dosing schedule for this group of drugs with fixed doses being used instead of the initially developed weight- or body surface-adjusted dosing schedules. In addition, the development of a new formulation containing hyaluronidase allows a subcutaneous route of administration to be used, because hyaluronidase creates a space in the subcutaneous tissue that helps antibody absorption. This method requires higher doses, but has allowed testing the feasibility of administering a fixed dose, with no individual dose adjustments based on weight or body surface. Moreover, loading doses are not needed, because the first dose results, within 3 weeks, in minimum concentrations that are higher than effective concentrations.

  3. Hierarchical Cluster Formation in Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Zarzar, Jonathan; Zarraga, Isidro Dan; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    Reversible cluster formation has been identified as an underlying cause of large solution viscosities observed in some concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. As high solution viscosity prevents the use of subcutaneous injection as a delivery method for some mAbs, a fundamental understanding of the interactions responsible for high viscosities in concentrated mAb solutions is of significant relevance to mAb applications in human health care as well as of intellectual interest. Here, we present a detailed investigation of a well-studied IgG1 based mAb to relate the short time dynamics and microstructure to significant viscosity changes over a range of pharmaceutically relevant physiochemical conditions. Using a combination of experimental techniques, it is found that upon adding Na2SO4, these antibodies dimerize in solution. Proteins form strongly bounded reversible dimers at dilute concentrations that, when concentrated, interact with each other to form loosely bounded, large, transient clusters. The combined effect of forming strongly bounded dimers and a large transient network is a significant increase in the solution viscosity. Strongly bounded, reversible dimers may exist in many IgG1 based mAb systems such that these results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms producing high viscosities in concentrated protein solutions.

  4. Defining process design space for monoclonal antibody cell culture.

    PubMed

    Abu-Absi, Susan Fugett; Yang, LiYing; Thompson, Patrick; Jiang, Canping; Kandula, Sunitha; Schilling, Bernhard; Shukla, Abhinav A

    2010-08-15

    The concept of design space has been taking root as a foundation of in-process control strategies for biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes. During mapping of the process design space, the multidimensional combination of operational variables is studied to quantify the impact on process performance in terms of productivity and product quality. An efficient methodology to map the design space for a monoclonal antibody cell culture process is described. A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was used as the basis for the process characterization exercise. This was followed by an integrated study of the inoculum stage of the process which includes progressive shake flask and seed bioreactor steps. The operating conditions for the seed bioreactor were studied in an integrated fashion with the production bioreactor using a two stage design of experiments (DOE) methodology to enable optimization of operating conditions. A two level Resolution IV design was followed by a central composite design (CCD). These experiments enabled identification of the edge of failure and classification of the operational parameters as non-key, key or critical. In addition, the models generated from the data provide further insight into balancing productivity of the cell culture process with product quality considerations. Finally, process and product-related impurity clearance was evaluated by studies linking the upstream process with downstream purification. Production bioreactor parameters that directly influence antibody charge variants and glycosylation in CHO systems were identified.

  5. Natalizumab: AN 100226, anti-4alpha integrin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Natalizumab [AN 100226, anti-alpha4 integrin monoclonal antibody, Antegren] is a humanised monoclonal antibody that blocks alpha4beta1 integrin-mediated leukocyte migration. Natalizumab is in phase III trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis in North America and the UK, and for the treatment of Crohn's disease also in the UK. It may have potential in the treatment of other immune-related inflammatory disease. Elan Corporation intends to examine the potential of natalizumab in rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis. 4beta1 integrin on circulating leukocytes binds to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, which is expressed at high levels in the blood vessels in the CNS during exacerbations of multiple sclerosis. This allows leukocytes expressing alpha4beta1 integrin (very late antigen-4) to move from the peripheral blood into the CNS. Inflammatory proteins and other factors released from lymphocytes in the brain lead to the progression of symptoms. A limitation of natalizumab is that it must be injected and cannot be administered orally. Scientists have transformed the large anti-alpha4 monoclonal antibody into much smaller, drug-like molecules suitable for oral administration. Protein Design Labs has granted a worldwide nonexclusive licence under its antibody humanisation patents to Elan Pharmaceuticals for natalizumab. Biogen Inc. has entered into an agreement with Elan for a worldwide exclusive collaboration to develop, manufacture and commercialise natalizumab for multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Development of natalizumab is also being funded, in part, by Axogen (acquired by Elan in 1999). In November 2003, Biogen and IDEC Pharmaceuticals merged to form Biogen Idec. Elan repurchased royalty rights on a package of products, including natalizumab, from Autoimmune Disease Research Company. Elan and Genzyme Transgenics Corporation signed an agreement to produce natalizumab in GTC's genetically engineered goats, which will

  6. Selectivity verification of cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies for cardiac troponin detection by using conventional ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Adzhri, R.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents preparation and characterization of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cardiac troponin detection to determine the selectivity of the cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies, used to capture and bind the targets in this experiment, are cTnI monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnI) and cTnT monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnT), while both cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and T (cTnT) are used as targets. ELISA is performed inside two microtiter plates for MAb-cTnI and MAb-cTnT. For each plate, monoclonal antibodies are tested by various concentrations of cTnI and cTnT ranging from 0-6400 µg/l. The binding selectivity and level of detection between monoclonal antibodies and antigen are determined through visual observation based on the color change inside each well on the plate. ELISA reader is further used to quantitatively measured the optical density of the color changes, thus produced more accurate reading. The results from this experiment are utilized to justify the use of these monoclonal antibodies as bio-receptors for cardiac troponin detection by using field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors coupled with substrate-gate in the future.

  7. The history of monoclonal antibody development – Progress, remaining challenges and future innovations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Justin K.H.

    2014-01-01

    As medicine progresses into a new era of personalised therapy, the use of monoclonal antibodies to treat a wide range of diseases lies at the heart of this new forefront. Since the licencing of the first monoclonal antibody for clinical use 30 years ago, the monoclonal antibody industry has expanded exponentially and is now valued at billions of dollars. With major advances in genetic sequencing and biomedical research, much research into monoclonal antibodies now focuses on identifying new targets for development and maximising their efficacy for use in clinical practice. However, a balance has to be struck with regards to reducing numbers of side-effects and overall economic cost, which arguably somewhat blighted their early clinical and commercial successes. Nowadays, there are approximately 30 monoclonal antibodies that have been approved for use in clinical practice with many more currently being tested in clinical trials. Some of the current major limitations include: the use of inefficient models for generation, a lack of efficacy and issues of cost-effectiveness. Some of the current research focuses on ways to improve the efficacy of existing monoclonal antibodies through optimising their effects and the addition of beneficial modifications. This review will focus on the history of monoclonal antibody development – how it has increasingly moved away from using laborious animal models to a more effective phage display system, some of the major drawbacks from a clinical and economical point of view and future innovations that are currently being researched to maximise their effectiveness for future clinical use. PMID:25568796

  8. Kinetic analysis of the multistep aggregation mechanism of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Arosio, Paolo; Sozo, Margaux; Yates, Andrew; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-09-11

    We investigate by kinetic analysis the aggregation mechanism of two monoclonal antibodies belonging to the IgG1 and IgG2 subclass under thermal stress. For each IgG, we apply a combination of size exclusion chromatography and light scattering techniques to resolve the time evolution of the monomer, dimer, and trimer concentrations, as well as the average molecular weight and the average hydrodynamic radius of the aggregate distribution. By combining the detailed experimental characterization with a theoretical kinetic model based on population balance equations, we extract relevant information on the contribution of the individual elementary steps on the global aggregation process. The analysis shows that the two molecules follow different aggregation pathways under the same operating conditions. In particular, while the monomer depletion of the IgG1 is found to be rate-limited by monomeric conformational changes, bimolecular collision is identified as the rate-limiting step in the IgG2 aggregation process. The measurement of the microscopic rate constants by kinetic analysis allows the quantification of the protein-protein interaction potentials expressed in terms of the Fuchs stability ratio (W). It is found that the antibody solutions exhibit large W values, which are several orders of magnitude larger than the values computed in the frame of the DLVO theory. This indicates that, besides net electrostatic repulsion, additional effects delay the aggregation kinetics of the antibody solutions with respect to diffusion-limited conditions. These effects likely include the limited efficiency of the collision events due to the presence of a limited number of specific aggregation-prone patches on the heterogeneous protein surface, and the contribution of additional repulsive non-DLVO forces to the protein-protein interaction potential, such as hydration forces.

  9. Production, characterization, and protective effect of monoclonal antibodies to Clostridium chauvoei flagella.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Hirayama, N; Tamura, Y

    1987-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to flagella of Clostridium chauvoei were obtained by the fusion of murine myeloma cells (P3-X63-Ag8-U1) and spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with partially purified flagella of strain Okinawa. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis with partially purified flagella, flagellated cells, and nonflagellated mutants were used to show that five monoclonal antibodies are specific for the flagella. In the Western blot analysis, all five antiflagellar antibodies reacted strongly with the 56,000-molecular-weight protein, which corresponds to the flagellin. By using the ELISA-derived reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to the various clostridia and the competitive binding assay, we showed that the flagella of C. chauvoei had at least three epitopes. The three antiflagellar monoclonal antibodies (one immunoglobulin G and two immunoglobulin M) demonstrated passive protective effects in mice. These results strongly suggest that the flagella of C. chauvoei are important for protective immunity in mice.

  10. A broadly reactive monoclonal antibody detects multiple genotypes of hepatitis B virus X protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lili; Shen, Zhongliang; Zhao, Xue; Wu, Yanxin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Junqi; Xie, Youhua; Liu, Jing

    2014-10-01

    A highly specific and broadly reactive monoclonal antibody against hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein was developed that detected, in both immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, HBx proteins of seven of the eight currently known genotypes of HBV, which were overexpressed in cultured cells. Evaluation of HBx expression levels in cultured hepatocytes using this monoclonal antibody showed that cells transiently and stably transfected with HBV genomes expressed far less HBx protein than cells transiently transfected with an HBx overexpression plasmid routinely used for studying HBx functions. The availability of such sensitive and broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies against HBx will enable more-quantitative studies of HBx functions.

  11. The Use of Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies for the Prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Santo; Galletti, Silvia; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used both in infants and in adults for several indications. Humanized monoclonal antibodies (palivizumab) have been used for many years for the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in pediatric populations (preterm infants, infants with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease) at high risk of severe and potentially lethal course of the infection. This drug was reported to be safe, well tolerated and effective to decrease the hospitalization rate and mortality in these groups of infants by several clinical trials. In the present paper we report the development and the current use of monoclonal antibodies for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:23840240

  12. Structure of solid tumors and their vasculature: Implications for therapy with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, H.F.; Nagy, J.A.; Dvorak, A.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Delivery of monoclonal antibodies to solid tumors is a vexing problem that must be solved if these antibodies are to realize their promise in therapy. Such success as has been achieved with monoclonal antibodies is attributable to the local hyperpermeability of the tumor vasculature, a property that favors antibody extravasation at tumor sites and that is mediated by a tumor-secreted vascular permeability factor. However, leaky tumor blood vessels are generally some distance removed from target tumor cells, separated by stroma and by other tumor cells that together represent significant barriers to penetration by extravasated monoclonal antibodies. For this reason, alternative approaches may be attractive. These include the use of antibody-linked cytotoxins, which are able to kill tumor cells without immediate contact, and direction of antibodies against nontumor cell targets, for example, antigens unique to the tumor vascular endothelium or to tumor stroma. 50 refs.

  13. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  14. Protection of mice against Clostridium chauvoei infection by anti-idiotype antibody to a monoclonal antibody to flagella.

    PubMed

    Kijima-Tanaka, M; Nakamura, M; Nagamine, N; Takahashi, T; Aoki, A; Tamura, Y

    1994-03-01

    Polyclonal rabbit anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id) against the protective monoclonal antibody specific to the flagella of Clostridium chauvoei was produced, purified, and characterized. Anti-Id inhibited the binding of its related monoclonal antibody to the flagellar antigen, suggesting that the anti-Id bore an internal image of the flagellar antigen. When mice were immunized with anti-Id intraperitoneally, the survival rate increased significantly, compared with mice immunized with normal rabbit IgG (P < 0.01), and specific anti-flagellar antibodies were induced.

  15. Antibody specificity and antigen characterization of rat monoclonal antibodies against Streptococcus mutans cell wall-associated protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Ackermans, F; Klein, J P; Cormont, F; Bazin, H; Ogier, J A; Frank, R M; Vreven, J

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to Streptococcus mutans OMZ175 (serotype f) cell wall-associated antigens (wall-extracted antigens [WEA]) were derived from the fusion of Lou C plasmocytoma rat cells (IR 983 F) and spleen cells from Wistar R inbred rats immunized with WEA. Four cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against a component of S. mutans WEA have been established. All four monoclonal antibodies reacted only with two antigens of WEA from S. mutans OMZ175 by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation techniques, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and competitive ELISA. Western blot analysis of WEA showed that the four monoclonal antibodies recognized two related cell wall-associated proteins with apparent molecular weights of 125,000 and 76,000. Immunoprecipitation of whole cells with the monoclonal antibodies confirmed the surface localization of the two antigens. The ELISA and competitive ELISA were used to analyze the distribution of the epitopes on seven S. mutans serotypes. All S. mutans serotypes were found to express the recognized epitopes; however, different reactivity patterns could be distinguished among the various strains tested, and the four monoclonal antibodies reacted only weakly with S. mutans serotypes d and g. Images PMID:2410364

  16. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    A monoclonal antibody to an eosinophil specific determinant is very important in assessing eosinophil function during helminthic infection. Eosinophils induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection in BALB/c mice were used to induce C57B1/6 immunocytes for production of hybridomas secreting eosinophil monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were shown to react with an eosinophil surface epitope but not with neutrophils or macrophages as determined by ELISA, immunodiffusion, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot assay. Affinity chromatography with eosinophil chemotactic factor-sepharose consistently selected out a { rm M_ R} 67,000 protein from solubilized eosinophil membrane antigens but not from neutrophil and macrophage antigens. In vitro studies showed that the eosinophil-specific monoclonal antibodies abrogated antibody-dependent eosinophil -mediated killing of S. mansoni schistosomula using mouse, rat or human eosinophils. Neutrophil and macrophage killing activities were unaffected. The monoclonal antibodies effected complement-dependent lysis of mouse and rat eosinophils but not of human eosinophils. ECF-treated eosinophils showed enhanced killing of schistosomula which was blocked by the monoclonal antibody. Murine and human eosinophils preincubated with monoclonal antibody exhibited decreased chemotaxis to ECF at optimal chemotactic concentrations. The monoclonal antibody also blocked eosinophil binding to ECF- sepharose beads. In vivo induction of peripheral blood eosinophilia by injection of S. mansoni eggs was suppressed by injections of monoclonal antibodies 2CD13 and 2QD45 in mouse and rat experimental models. Eosinophilia induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin- cyclophosphamide treatment was also suppressed by monoclonal antibody in both murine and rat systems. Pulmonary granulomas in mice given egg injection and monoclonal antibody were smaller and contained fewer eosinophils than those granulomas from mice given eggs only. In immuno-biochemical studies, the

  17. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against dog immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Arce, C; Moreno, A; Millán, Y; Martín de las Mulas, J; Llanes, D

    2002-09-06

    A panel of six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing antigenic determinants on canine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy or light chains was produced and characterized. All monoclonals recognized the IgG(2) subclass, although only two were subclass-specific (CA3H1 and CA4F1). The CA3B8 mAb was found to be specific for an epitope on canine immunoglobulin G heavy chain, (IgG(1) and IgG(2) subclasses). Two mAbs (CA2E9 and CA5B2) reacted with an epitope on the heavy chain of canine IgG and IgM and another, CA4E7, bound to canine IgA, IgG and IgM isotypes; CA4E7 recognized an epitope on canine immunoglobulin light chain. CA4E7, CA4F1 and CA5B2 recognized an epitope in the Fab region. Three mAbs, CA3B8, CA4E7 and CA5B2, showed much lower reactivity with canine IgG by ELISA when IgG was periodate-treated, suggesting that they recognized a carbohydrate determinant. Cross-reactivity analysis of these mAbs with sera from horse, goat, cow, sheep, pig, cat, rabbit, hamster, rat, mouse and human indicated that two mAbs, CA3B8 and CA5B2, recognized a canine IgG-specific epitope; two others, CA3H1 and CA4E7, recognized an epitope also present in rabbit and sheep immunoglobulin respectively; and the remaining two (CA2E9 and CA4F1) recognized an epitope broadly present on the Igs of the species analyzed. This panel of antibodies will be a useful tool for future canine immunodiagnosis tests. With the exception of CA2E9, all mAbs were able to recognize plasma cells on paraffin-embedded tissues, and will thus be useful for immunohistochemical assays.

  18. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies against the native urease of Helicobacter pylori: synergistic inhibition of urease activity by monoclonal antibody combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, K; Mizuta, T; Tonokatu, Y; Fukuda, Y; Okamura, H; Hayashi, T; Shimoyama, T; Tamura, T

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the native urease of Helicobacter pylori NCTC 11637 were found to clearly inhibit the urease activity. Interestingly, synergistic inhibition by two MAbs recognizing different subunits was also observed. Ten MAbs were produced and classified as two isotypes of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass, IgG1, and IgG2a. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that five MAbs recognized the large subunit and the other five recognized the small subunit of the urease. Among the MAbs, L2 and S2, which recognized the large and the small subunits, respectively, were also able to inhibit the urease activity of clinical isolates from H. pylori-infected patients. The combination of L2 and S2 led to augmented synergistic inhibition. L2, but not S2, could also inhibit the urease activity from Helicobacter mustelae; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis showed that L2 cross-reacted with this urease. These results suggested that the epitope recognized by L2 had a structure common to both Helicobacter species and may be involved in the active site of the urease. In contrast to the MAbs, a polyclonal antibody in sera from mice immunized with H. pylori urease did not have the ability to inhibit H. pylori urease activity. However, the polyclonal antibody retained the ability to abolish the inhibitory action of these MAbs. Moreover, other MAbs which could not inhibit H. pylori urease activity also abolished the inhibitory action. Images PMID:1383158

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to human apolipoproteins: application to the study of high density lipoprotein subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Bustos, P; Ulloa, N; Calvo, C; Muller, D; Durán, D; Martínez, J; Salazar, L; Quiroga, A

    2000-09-01

    We produced, selected and cloned hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies against human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. All of the antibodies corresponded to the IgG(1) subclass and were named 1C11, 2B4, 2C10, 7C5, 8A4 and 8A5. The antibodies were characterized by their reactivity with whole lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, synthetic peptides and fragments generated by cleavage of the apo A-I. Three of the monoclonal antibodies studied (2B4, 2C10 and 7C5) were similarly inhibited by an amino-terminal peptide (amino acid sequence 1-20) of apo A-I, whereas antibodies 1C11, 8A4 and 8A5 had no reaction. Other results show that monoclonal antibody 1C11 recognizes an epitope located between amino acids 135-148. We evaluated the monoclonal antibody 8A4 against different HDL subpopulations by competitive displacement analysis and it showed a similar reactivity with the HDL particles: LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II. This antibody was used to standardize a sandwich ELISA to quantitate LpA-I in plasma. We conclude that these monoclonal antibodies are relevant for the study of apo A-I epitope expression and for quantitating apo A-I containing lipoparticles.

  1. An immunogen synthesis strategy for the development of specific anti-deoxynivalenol monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Melanie; Guo, Yirong; Iyer, Abhishek; García, Yara Ruiz; Galvita, Anastasia; Heyerick, Arne; Deforce, Dieter; Risseeuw, Martijn D P; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Bracke, Marc; Eremin, Sergei; Madder, Annemieke; De Saeger, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    An immunogen synthesis strategy was designed to develop anti-deoxynivalenol (DON) monoclonal antibodies with low cross-reactivity against structurally similar trichothecenes. A total of eight different DON immunogens were synthesised, differing in the type and position of the linker on the DON molecule. After immunisation, antisera from mice immunised with different DON immunogens were checked for the presence of relevant antibodies. Then, both homologous and heterologous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed for hybridoma screening. Finally, three monoclonal antibodies against DON and its analogues were generated. In addition, monoclonal antibody 13H1 could recognise DON and its analogues in the order of HT-2 toxin > 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) > DON, with IC₅₀ ranging from 1.14 to 2.13 µg ml⁻¹. Another monoclonal antibody 10H10 manifested relatively close sensitivities to DON, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON) and 15-ADON, with IC₅₀ values of 22, 15 and 34 ng ml⁻¹, respectively. Using an indirect ELISA format decreases the 10H10 sensitivity to 15-ADON with 92%. A third monoclonal antibody 2A9 showed to be very specific and sensitive to 3-ADON, with IC₅₀ of 0.38 ng ml⁻¹. Using both 2A9 and 10H10 monoclonal antibodies allows determining sole DON contamination.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies against soman: Characterization of soman stereoisomers. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, D.E.; Yourick, J.J.; Dawson, J.S.; Scott, J.

    1992-12-31

    Hybridomas were produced which expressed monoclonal anti-soman antibodies as determined by microtiter enzyme-linked-antibody immunoassay (EIA). Each of these antibodies was titrated using a competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA) with a variety of test ligands. The ligands used included soman (a racemic mixture), sarin, tabun, and each of the four stereoisomers of soman(C+P+, C+P-, C-P+ and C-P-). In all cases the antibodies tested exhibited IC50 values of 10 - 4 - 5 X 10 - 6 M for soman. When sarin or tabun was used as a ligand, the antibodies exhibited no cross reactivity. All of the antibodies cross reacted with the four soman stereoisomers. A second group of hybridomas were produced which expressed monoclonal antibodies against CsPs-soman. These antibodies were used to make preliminary absolute chiral assignments to the four soman stereoisomers. Soman; Antibodies; Stereoisomers; Absolute configuration.

  3. Heterobifunctional reagents: A new approach to radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.T.; Ng, A.K.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Liu, Z.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-05-01

    The use of bifunctional chelate such as the cyclic anhydride of DTPA for radiolabeling antibodies (Abs) may lead to homopolymerization, and intra- or intermolecular cross-linking, with resulting denaturation and decrease immunoreactivity of Abs. The authors, therefore, investigated the use of heterobifunctional reagents, whereby one group selectively couples to the amino group of the Ab and the other group to the radiometal for Ab labeling. One such reagent, 2,6-Dioxo-N-(carboxymethyl)morphine (DCM) was synthesized by reacting nitrilotriacetic acid with acetic anhydride. The other agent tested was commercially available N-Succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). These agents were evaluated independently for their ability to label a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to a melanoma associated antigen (Ag). Labeling proceeded at a 2mg/ml concentration of the Ab, at HEPES pH 8.2, and 7.0, respectively, at room temperature for 30 min. The conjugate subsequently was labeled with Tc-99m or In-111. For comparison, the same labeled Abs also were prepared by using the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Binding of the Ab to melanoma cells and control cells then was assayed. The results of cell binding experiments (N=3 per agent) in the region of Ag excess (X+-SD) were as follows: 62.6 +- 2.83% for Tc-99m-DCM-MoAb and 41.3+-1.84% for Tc-99m-SPDP-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for Tc-99m-DTPA-MoAb (p<0.01); 56.2 +- 2.97% for In-111-DCM-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for In-111-DTPA-M0Ab. Binding of all agents to the control lymphoid cell line was less than 3%. These results suggest that heterobifunctional reagents can reduce the loss of immunoreactivity of labeled MoAbs.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  5. The interaction between pertussis toxin and 10 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schou, C; Au-Jensen, M; Heron, I

    1987-10-01

    Data on the epitope specificity of 10 monoclonal hybridoma antibodies (Mabs) that showed positive reaction in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) towards pertussins toxin (Ptx) are presented. The relative functional affinity of the Mabs was determined in a catching ELISA system. The Mabs were tested for their ability to inhibit the biological activities of this toxin in two in vitro systems, viz. haemagglutination (HA) and Chinese Hamster Ovary cell (CHO) test, and in three in vivo assays: histamine sensitization (HS), leucocytosis-promoting activity (LP) and protection against intra-cerebral challenge (i.c.) with virulent B. pertussis organisms. Four Mabs were found inhibiting HA and three inhibited the effect on CHO cells. Two Mabs showed demonstrable protective effect on mice in i.c. test. The same two Mabs were also able to inhibit HS and LP activity of Ptx. Five of the ten Mabs reacted with Ptx subjected to blotting after separation of the toxin subunits in sodium-dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The five Mabs all bound to more than one subunit. The epitopes defined by several of the Mabs might be useful in the context of a third-generation whooping cough vaccine.

  6. Advective hydrogel membrane chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Brower, Mark; Pollard, David; Kanani, Dharmesh; Jacquemart, Renaud; Kachuik, Bradley; Stout, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein A chromatography is widely employed for the capture and purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because of the high cost of protein A resins, there is a significant economic driving force to seek new downstream processing strategies. Membrane chromatography has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional resin based column chromatography. However, to date, the application has been limited to mostly ion exchange flow through (FT) mode. Recently, significant advances in Natrix hydrogel membrane has resulted in increased dynamic binding capacities for proteins, which makes membrane chromatography much more attractive for bind/elute operations. The dominantly advective mass transport property of the hydrogel membrane has also enabled Natrix membrane to be run at faster volumetric flow rates with high dynamic binding capacities. In this work, the potential of using Natrix weak cation exchange membrane as a mAb capture step is assessed. A series of cycle studies was also performed in the pilot scale device (> 30 cycles) with good reproducibility in terms of yield and product purities, suggesting potential for improved manufacturing flexibility and productivity. In addition, anion exchange (AEX) hydrogel membranes were also evaluated with multiple mAb programs in FT mode. Significantly higher binding capacity for impurities (support mAb loads up to 10Kg/L) and 40X faster processing speed were observed compared with traditional AEX column chromatography. A proposed protein A free mAb purification process platform could meet the demand of a downstream purification process with high purity, yield, and throughput.

  7. Kinetics of Monoclonal Antibody Aggregation from Dilute toward Concentrated Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Jagielski, Jakub; Pfister, David; Lazzari, Stefano; Massant, Jan; Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-04-07

    Gaining understanding on the aggregation behavior of proteins under concentrated conditions is of both fundamental and industrial relevance. Here, we study the aggregation kinetics of a model monoclonal antibody (mAb) under thermal stress over a wide range of protein concentrations in various buffer solutions. We follow experimentally the monomer depletion and the aggregate growth by size exclusion chromatography with inline light scattering. We describe the experimental results in the frame of a kinetic model based on population balance equations, which allows one to discriminate the contributions of the conformational and of the colloidal stabilities to the global aggregation rate. Finally, we propose an expression for the aggregation rate constant, which accounts for solution viscosity, protein-protein interactions, as well as aggregate compactness. All these effects can be quantified by light scattering techniques. It is found that the model describes well the experimental data under dilute conditions. Under concentrated conditions, good model predictions are obtained when the solution pH is far below the isoelectric point (pI) of the mAb. However, peculiar effects arise when the solution pH is increased toward the mAb pI, and possible explanations are discussed.

  8. Role of cosolutes in the aggregation kinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Sozo, Margaux; Arosio, Paolo; Yates, Andrew; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-10-16

    We propose a general strategy based on kinetic analysis to investigate how cosolutes affect the aggregation behavior of therapeutic proteins. We apply this approach to study the impact of NaCl and sorbitol on the aggregation kinetics of two monoclonal antibodies, an IgG1 and an IgG2. By using a combination of size exclusion chromatography and light scattering techniques, we study the impact of the cosolutes on the monomer depletion, as well as on the formation of dimers, trimers, and larger aggregates. We analyze these macroscopic effects in the frame of a kinetic model based on Smoluchowski's population balance equations modified to account for nucleation events. By comparing experimental data with model simulations, we discriminate the effect of cosolutes on the elementary steps which contribute to the global aggregation process. In the case of the IgG1, it is found that NaCl accelerates the kinetics of aggregation by promoting specifically aggregation events, while sorbitol delays the kinetics of aggregation by specifically inhibiting protein unfolding. In the case of the IgG2, whose monomer depletion kinetics is limited by dimer formation, NaCl and sorbitol are found respectively to accelerate and inhibit conformational changes and aggregation events to the same extent.

  9. Ontogeny of Rat Thymic Epithelium Defined by Monoclonal Anticytokeratin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Suzana; Vasiljevski, Milijana; Dujić, Aleksandar

    1990-01-01

    Ontogenetic study on the expression of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides within particular subsets of rat thymic epithelial cells (TEC) has been performed by a large panel of anti-CK monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using the streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Simultaneous presence of two or more CK subunits in the same TEC has been demonstrated by double immunoflouorescence labeling. The obtained results showed that the expression of CK polypeptides in fetal and neonatal thymus differed from the adult patterns. The main difference was observed in expression of CK10, 18, and 19 polypeptides. During fetal ontogeny, CK10 and 18 are markers for most medullary TEC or a subset of medullary TEC, respectively, whereas CK19 is mainly a pan-TEC marker. In the adult animals, they are localized in the cortical and a subset of medullary TEC (CK18), subcapsular/perivascular and some medullary TEC (CK19), or in a subset of medullary TEC and Hasall’s corpuscles (HC) (CK10). The switch in their expression in the cortex was observed during the first two weeks of postnatal life. PMID:1726554

  10. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  11. [Study of plant lectins from Viscum album using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Tonevitskiĭ, A G; Rakhmanova, V A; Shamshiev, A T; Usachaeva, E A; Agapov, I I; Prokov'ev, S A; Denisenko, O N; Pfuller, U; Eifler, R

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (monAT) against both native (TA5, TB12) and denatured (TB33, TB35) plant toxin ML1 from Viscum album have been obtained. The interaction of monAT against native toxin with its isoforms ML2 and ML3 was investigated. It was shown that monAT TA5 to A-chain of ML1 toxin cross-reacted with ML2 and ML3 isoforms. TA5 did not inhibit enzyme activity of A-chain in cell-free rabbit reticulocyte system. It was shown that monAT TB12 reacted with galactose-binding site of B-subunit. Both monAT had no cross-reactions with plant toxin ricin. The binding constants for TA5 with ML1, ML2, ML3 respectively were 4.3.10(7) M-1, 1.2.10(7) M-1, and 0.3.10(7) M-1. The binding constants for TB12 were 2.10(7) M-1 with ML1 toxin, and more than 10(6) M-1 with ML2 and ML3. The nature of heterogeneity in ML toxin family is discussed. Test-systems for ML1 determination in different V. album extracts are suggested.

  12. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail. PMID:27048742

  13. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for Paxilline

    PubMed Central

    Maragos, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrations of PAX required to inhibit signal development by 50% (IC50s) ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 ng/mL. One mAb (2-9) was applied to the detection of PAX in maize silage. The assay was sensitive to the effects of solvents, with 5% acetonitrile or 20% methanol causing a two-fold or greater increase in IC50. For analysis of silage samples, extracts were cleaned up by adsorbing potential matrix interferences onto a solid phase extraction column. The non-retained extract was then diluted with buffer to reduce solvent content prior to assay. Using this method, the limit of detection for PAX in dried silage was 15 µg/kg and the limit of quantification was 90 µg/kg. Recovery from samples spiked over the range of 100 to 1000 µg/kg averaged 106% ± 18%. The assay was applied to 86 maize silage samples, with many having detectable, but none having quantifiable, levels of PAX. The results suggest the CI-ELISA can be applied as a sensitive technique for the screening of PAX in maize silage. PMID:26426046

  14. Trial watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    An expanding panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically target malignant cells or intercept trophic factors delivered by the tumor stroma is now available for cancer therapy. These mAbs can exert direct antiproliferative/cytotoxic effects as they inhibit pro-survival signal transduction cascades or activate lethal receptors at the plasma membrane of cancer cells, they can opsonize neoplastic cells to initiate a tumor-targeting immune response, or they can be harnessed to specifically deliver toxins or radionuclides to transformed cells. As an indication of the success of this immunotherapeutic paradigm, international regulatory agencies approve new tumor-targeting mAbs for use in cancer patients every year. Moreover, the list of indications for previously licensed molecules is frequently expanded to other neoplastic disorders as the results of large, randomized clinical trials become available. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of tumor-targeting mAbs for oncological indications. PMID:25949870

  15. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: beyond B-cells.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Stroopinsky, Dina; Katz, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), employed in treating CD20⁺ lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, appear to have broader functions than just eradicating malignant B-cells and decreasing autoantibody production. Rituximab-induced T-cell inactivation, reported both in-vitro and in-vivo, may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections, observed in patients receiving this therapy. T-cell polarization into a suppressive phenotype, often observed in patients receiving rituximab for autoimmune disorders, was reported to be associated with prolonged remissions. Elimination of B-cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, could play a significant role in induction of these changes. Direct binding of rituximab to a CD20dim T-cell population, inducing its depletion, may contribute to the decreased T-cell activation following rituximab therapy. Further investigation of the complex network through which rituximab and new anti-CD20 MoAbs act, would advance the employment of these agents in different clinical settings.

  16. Monoclonal anti-thrombopoietin antibodies generated by genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Nam-Kyu; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Se-Yeon; Kang, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Keun-Soo; Lee, Sangyoon; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2006-04-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a megakaryocyte growth and differentiation factor that is currently being investigated as a therapeutic for cancer patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy. We generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for human thrombopoietin (hTPO) by genetic immunization using an hTPO expression plasmid and an adjuvant plasmid that encodes mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). All genetically immunized mice exhibited a high humoral immune response. Splenocytes from these mice were used to generate hybridomas. Two MAbs, designated 2B9A10 and 4C16B15 (of IgG1 and IgG3 isotypes, respectively), were subsequently selected and produced. They specifically recognized and precipitated recombinant hTPO produced by mammalian cells and were effective in sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for hTPO quantitation. Our results demonstrate that these MAbs should be useful for purification and quantitation of hTPO in clinical and laboratory settings.

  17. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  18. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-04-06

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail.

  19. Establishment of a novel monoclonal antibody against LGR5.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuka; Kosaka, Hiromichi; Usami, Katsuaki; Toki, Hiroe; Kawai, Hironori; Shiraishi, Norihiko; Ota, Toshio; Nakamura, Kazuyasu; Furuya, Akiko; Satoh, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Kazumasa; Masuda, Kazuhiro

    2010-04-09

    LGR5 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed on the cell surface membrane. LGR5 is reported to be overexpressed in colon, liver, and ovary tumor compared to normal tissue. However, a specific ligand for LGR5 has not yet been determined, and the function is still not clear. An LGR5-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) is needed as a tool for detection and analysis of LGR5 biological function and cancer therapy. To date, no mAb against LGR5 that retains high affinity and specificity has been reported. Here, we report successful establishment and characterization of a mAb (KM4056) that specifically recognizes the extracellular N-terminal domain of human LGR5, but not LGR4 or LGR6. This mAb has potent complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) activity in vitro and shows strong anti-tumor activity in vivo against xenograft model by transplanting LGR5 expressing CHO transfectants into SCID mice. Thus, KM4056 can be a useful tool for detection of LGR5 positive cells and analysis of LGR5 biological function.

  20. Monoclonal antibody probe for assessing beer foam stabilizing proteins.

    PubMed

    Onishi, A; Proudlove, M O; Dickie, K; Mills, E N; Kauffman, J A; Morgan, M R

    1999-08-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab; IFRN 1625) has been produced, which is specific for the most hydrophobic polypeptides responsible for foam stabilization. The binding characteristics of the Mab suggest that it is the conformation of certain hydrophobic polypeptides which is important for foam stabilization. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for assessing the foam-positive form of the foam-stabilizing polypeptides in beer was developed using IFRN 1625. A good correlation was obtained between ELISA determination of foam-stabilizing polypeptides and an empirical means of determining foaming, that is, the Rudin head retention values, for a collection of beers of various foam qualities. Application of the ELISA to different stages of the brewing process showed that the amounts of foam-positive polypeptides increased during barley germination. During the brewing process the proportion of foam-positive polypeptides present after fermentation increased slightly, although a large amount was lost along with other beer proteins during subsequent steps, such as filtering. The present study demonstrates that the amounts of beer polypeptide present in a foam-positive form have a direct relationship with the foaming potential of beer, that their levels are altered by processing, and that there is potential for greater quality control.

  1. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) †

    PubMed Central

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Moroni, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    A number of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are now under investigation in clinical trials to assess their potential role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). The most frequently used mAb is rituximab, which is directed against CD20, a membrane protein expressed on B lymphocytes. Uncontrolled trials reported an improvement of SLE activity in non-renal patients and other studies even reported an improvement of severe lupus nephritis unresponsive to conventional treatments. However two randomized trials failed to show the superiority of rituximab over conventional treatment in non renal SLE and in lupus nephritis. Preliminary trials reported promising results with epratuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against CD22, and with belimumab, a human mAb that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of BLyS a cytokine of the tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF) ligand superfamily. Other clinical trials with mAb directed against TNF-alpha, interleukin-10 (Il-10), Il-6, CD154, CD40 ligand, IL-18 or complement component C5 are under way. At present, however, in spite of good results reported by some studies, no firm conclusion on the risk-benefit profile of these mAbs in patients with SLE can be drawn from the available studies. PMID:27713252

  3. Pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs: peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiunn H

    2009-09-01

    With the advances in recombinant DNA biotechnology, molecular biology and immunology, the number of biotech drugs, including peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies, available for clinical use has dramatically increased in recent years. Although pharmacokinetic principles are equally applicable to the large molecule drugs and conventional small molecule drugs, the underlying mechanisms for the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of large molecule drugs are often very different from that of small molecule drugs. Therefore, a good understanding of the ADME processes of large molecule drugs is essential in support of the development of therapeutic biologics. The purpose of this article is to review the current knowledge of the ADME processes that govern the pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs. The challenges encountered by orally administered peptide and protein drugs, and the nature of lymphatic absorption after subcutaneous administration will be discussed. In addition, molecular mechanisms of biodistribution, metabolism and renal excretion of biotech drugs will also be discussed. Finally, approaches used for prediction of human pharmacokinetics of protein drugs will be briefly discussed.

  4. Trial Watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, for the first time in history, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), i.e., the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of mAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has not stopped to expand, nowadays encompassing a stunning amount of 15 distinct molecules. This therapeutic armamentarium includes mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens, as well as molecules that interfere with tumor-stroma interactions or exert direct immunostimulatory effects. These three classes of mAbs exert antineoplastic activity via distinct mechanisms, which may or may not involve immune effectors other than the mAbs themselves. In previous issues of OncoImmunology, we provided a brief scientific background to the use of mAbs, all types confounded, in cancer therapy, and discussed the results of recent clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach. Here, we focus on mAbs that primarily target malignant cells or their interactions with stromal components, as opposed to mAbs that mediate antineoplastic effects by activating the immune system. In particular, we discuss relevant clinical findings that have been published during the last 13 months as well as clinical trials that have been launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of hitherto investigational tumor-targeting mAbs.

  5. Kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies in oncology: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gharwan, Helen; Groninger, Hunter

    2016-04-01

    Molecularly targeted cancer therapies, such as small-molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, constitute a rapidly growing and an important part of the oncology armamentarium. Unlike conventional (cytotoxic) chemotherapeutics, targeted therapies were designed to disrupt cancer cell pathogenesis at specific biological points essential for the development and progression of the tumour. These agents were developed to disrupt specific targets with the aim of minimizing treatment burden compared with conventional chemotherapy. Nevertheless the increasingly common use of targeted therapies has revealed some unanticipated, often clinically significant toxic effects, as well as compromising effective palliative and end-of-life management approaches. Although patients and clinicians welcome improvements in cancer prognosis, these changes can also impact patient quality-of-life. Therefore, as demand for oncology expertise increases, physicians need to apprise themselves of targeted therapies and their clinical implications, including drug-specific side effects, impact on quality of life, and cost issues, especially in relation to end-of-life care. This Review provides a useful summary and guide for professionals treating patients with malignant diseases.

  6. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  7. Guidelines to cell engineering for monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Rita Costa, A; Elisa Rodrigues, M; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently used for many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The high demand for these biopharmaceuticals has led to the development of large-scale manufacturing processes, with productivity improvements being mainly achieved by optimization of bioreactor systems. However, more recently, the early steps of production, previous to bioreactor culture, have been presented as alternative areas where productivity enhancements can be achieved. Thus, this review describes the progress made for the improvement of productivity in mammalian expression systems for the high production of mAbs. Advances in the development of mAb-producing cell lines are being made, particularly regarding expression vector design and methods used for transfection, with the intent to create a reproducible methodology. Selection of the most suitable clones is also a critical step that can be improved, by including variables other than the expression level, which is still the common practice. Furthermore, strategies of cell engineering, although still mostly based on trial-and-error experimentation and not in standard protocols, hold great interest to improve cell growth and productivity, as well as product quality in the future. Improvements of the initial steps of the production process would not only result in cells with higher expression ability, but would also speed-up the process development.

  8. Production of a Chaetomium globosum Enolase Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Lemons, Angela R.; Rittenour, William R.; Hettick, Justin M.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Chaetomium globosum is a hydrophilic fungal species and a contaminant of water-damaged building materials in North America. Methods to detect Chaetomium species include subjective identification of ascospores, viable culture, or molecular-based detection methods. In this study, we describe the production and initial characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) for C. globosum enolase. MAb 1C7, a murine IgG1 isotype MAb, was produced and reacted with recombinant C. globosum enolase (rCgEno) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with a putative C. globosum enolase in a Western blot. Epitope mapping showed MAb 1C7 specific reactivity to an enolase decapeptide, LTYEELANLY, that is highly conserved within the fungal class Sordariomycetes. Cross-reactivity studies showed MAb 1C7 reactivity to C. atrobrunneum but not C. indicum. MAb 1C7 did not react with enolase from Aspergillus fumigatus, which is divergent in only two amino acids within this epitope. The results of this study suggest potential utility of MAb 1C7 in Western blot applications for the detection of Chaetomium and other Sordariomycetes species. PMID:25495488

  9. Development of a monoclonal antibody specific to cooked mammalian meats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y H; Sheu, S C; Bridgman, R C

    1998-04-01

    Detection of species adulteration in ground meat products is important for consumer protection and food-labeling law enforcement. This study was conducted to develop monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can be used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid detection of any cooked mammalian meats in cooked poultry products. Soluble muscle proteins extracted from cooked pork (heated at 100 degrees C for 15 min) were used as the antigen to immunized mice for developing the MAb. One that was developed, MAb 2F8 (IgG2b class), strongly reacted with cooked meat of five mammalian species (beef cattle, hogs, sheep, horse, and deer) but did not react with any cooked poultry (chicken, turkey, and duck) or raw meats. At least 0.5% by weight of pork, beef, lamb, and horse meats in a chicken-based mixture could not detect using the indirect ELISA with MAb 2F8. The MAb 2F8 is useful in a single initial screening test to detect the presence of five nonpoultry meat adulterants in cooked poultry products.

  10. Enzymic oxidation of monoclonal antibodies by soluble and immobilized bifunctional enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B; Koppel, R; Schwartz, F; Fleminger, G

    1990-06-27

    Site-specific modification of monoclonal antibodies was achieved by oxidation of the carbohydrate moieties of antibodies which are located remote from the antigen binding sites. Sialic acid and galactose are terminal sugars of these carbohydrate chains. Concomitant treatment of the antibodies with neuraminidase and galactose oxidase generated aldehyde groups in the oligosaccharide moieties of immunoglobulins which reacted selectively with amino or hydrazide groups of the matrix. Subsequent immobilization of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase on Eupergit C-adipic dihydrazide proved to be an efficient and selective system for the enzymic oxidation of the monoclonal antibodies without impairing their immunological activity. Oriented immobilization of enzymically oxidized monoclonal antibodies on hydrazide or amino Eupergit C derivatives thus leads to the formation of antibody matrix conjugates which possess high antigen-binding activities.

  11. Comparative testing of monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites for ELISA development*

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, R. A.; Zavala, F.; Charoenvit, Y.; Campbell, G. H.; Burkot, T. R.; Schneider, I.; Esser, K. M.; Beaudoin, R. L.; Andre, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies developed against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites at four institutions were evaluated for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Four of the antibodies were eliminated because of their low sensitivity or requirement for high concentrations of capture antibody, while an additional four were rejected because they exhibited cross-reactivity with P. berghei sporozoites. Of the two remaining monoclonal antibodies, that designated 2A10 had the highest sensitivity, a requirement for lower concentrations of capture antibody, and had been tested successfully against sporozoites from a wider range of geographical areas than the others. Use of this monoclonal antibody in a standardized ELISA method gave a test ten times more sensitive than previously reported for P. falciparum sporozoites and its detection limit was less than 100 sporozoites per mosquito. PMID:3555879

  12. High-dose monoclonal antibodies via the subcutaneous route: challenges and technical solutions, an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Chakravarthy; Mach, Henryk; Shameem, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes the various challenges in product development involved in subcutaneous administration of high-dose monoclonal antibodies and attempts to provide an industry perspective of some of the available technologies and potential avenues to overcome these challenges.

  13. Demonstration of a surface antigen of Clostridium tyrobutyricum by use of immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, F; Robreau, G; Talbot, F; Malcoste, R

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, prepared against whole cells of Clostridium tyrobutyricum, recognized a surface antigen extracted by heat treatment or by hot phenol-water treatment. This antigen, after analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting, has been shown to present a regularly-spaced ladder pattern similar to those shown by the lipopolysaccharide of many gram-negative bacteria. The proteinase K has been shown to have no effect on the recognition of this epitope by the monoclonal antibody. On the contrary, the inhibition of the antigen reactivity to the monoclonal antibody after a mild periodate oxidation suggests the involvement of a carbohydrate moiety in the epitope. Moreover, the SDS-PAGE analysis of phenol-water extracts has shown an additional compound, detected by silver staining but not recognized by the monoclonal antibody.

  14. Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  15. In vitro inhibition of Cryptosporidium parvum infection by human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, B C; Wisnewski, A V; Johnson, J; Fenwick-Smith, D; Wiest, P; Hamer, D; Kresina, T; Flanigan, T P

    1997-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum infection of the small epithelial intestine causes unremitting diarrhea and malabsorption that can lead to chronic and sometimes fatal illness in patients with AIDS. The illness may be ameliorated by passive oral immunoglobulin therapy. The objective of this study was to produce anti-Cryptosporidium human monoclonal antibodies for evaluation as potential therapy. All human monoclonal cell lines that produced C. parvum antibodies were originally generated from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative woman. She had recovered from C. parvum infection and had a high specific antibody titer. Hybridization of these lymphocytes with a tumor cell line was accomplished by hypo-osmolar electrofusion. Twelve clones were identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as secreting anti-Cryptosporidium antibodies after the initial hybridization. From the 12 positive clones, two high antibody-secreting clones, 17A and 17B, were maintained in long-term culture. A second hybridization produced two other human monoclonal cell lines, EC5 and BB2. Human monoclonal antibody from the first two cell lines bound to C. parvum sporozoites and oocysts by immunofluorescence. The ability of human monoclonal antibodies to inhibit C. parvum infection in vitro was assessed by using a human enterocyte cell line, HT29.74. The antibodies of the four different human hybridomas inhibited infection by 35 to 68% (P < 0.05) compared to a control irrelevant human monoclonal antibody derived in a similar fashion. Human monoclonal antibodies are candidate molecules for immunotherapy of C. parvum infection. PMID:9284173

  16. Production and immunoanalytical application of 32 monoclonal antibodies against metacestode somatic antigens of Echinococcus multilocularis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Lu, Rui; Liu, Qiao-Feng; Chen, Jian-Ping; Deng, Qiang; Zhang, Ya-Lou; Zhang, Bing-Hua; Xu, Jia-Nan; Sun, Lei; Niu, Qin-Wang; Liang, Quan-Zeng

    2010-06-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a rare but potentially fatal disease. Immunodiagnosis based on antibodies or antigens plays an important role in its diagnosis. In this study, metacestode somatic antigens of Echinococcus multilocularis were used to immunize BALB/c mice, and hybridomas were formed by cell fusion. Making use of the inherent effect of monoclonal antibody techniques to isolate different epitopes, we obtained a repertoire of 32 monoclonal antibodies against the metacestode somatic antigens. These monoclonal antibodies were used to investigate the specificity and localization of the metacestode antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Nine antibodies specifically reacted with E. multilocularis, while 14 and ten cross-reacted with Echinococcus granulosus and Taenia saginata, respectively. Twenty-five antibodies stained the laminated layer. Eight reacted with the tegument of the protoscolex. Fourteen antibodies recognized the germinal layer. Most of the monoclonal antibodies can react with the antigen Em2. One antibody can react with antigen Em2 and Em10. One antibody that cross-reacted with T. saginata stained the germinal layer and protoscolex, especially its hooklets and suckers, but could not react with Em2 and Em10 antigens. It detected protein bands at 26 and 52 kDa. Two E. multilocularis-specific monoclonal antibodies stained both the germinal and laminated layers and could be used not only to purify specific antigens but also for immunohistochemical studies of E. multilocularis. In summary, these 32 monoclonal antibodies could have potential applications as useful tools in further studies of E. multilocularis antigen profiles.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immunoextract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-05

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals.

  19. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Antibody Internalization with Novel Monoclonal Antibodies against Alexa Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G.; Lai, Michelle; D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface–bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor–labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology. PMID:25894652

  1. Monoclonal antibody epitope mapping of Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry proteins.

    PubMed

    Sam-Yellowe, T Y; Ndengele, M M

    1993-02-01

    . However, these proteins were not immunoprecipitated by a rhoptry protein-specific monoclonal antibody, 1B9. Similar label incorporation was not obtained with [3H]myristate. In Triton X-114 solubility studies, the HMWC proteins partitioned into the aqueous phase, suggesting that they are not integral membrane proteins. In addition, the proteins were extracted by 100 mM Na2CO3, pH 11.5, and immunoprecipitated by rhoptry-specific antibody. These results suggest that the HMWC proteins may exist in a soluble and membrane bound form. The latter may participate in membrane expansion and the formation of the parasitophorous vacuole during merozoite invasion.

  2. Anti-schistosome monoclonal antibodies of different isotypes--correlation with cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, S; Tarrab-Hazdai, R; Eshhar, Z; Arnon, R

    1983-01-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies specific towards Schistosoma mansoni antigens were prepared by fusion of spleen cells of infected and immunized mouse with the murine myeloma NS-1 cells. Three of the five antibodies belonged to the IgG1 class, one was an IgM and the fifth one was an IgE. The IgE monoclonal antibody designated 54.10, induced antigen-specific degranulation of rat basophilic cell line, a property which served as the basis for the screening assay. Its biological function was demonstrated by a specific macrophage activation that led to killing of schistosomula; no such killing was obtained with anti-schistosome antibodies of other classes or with IgE of different antigenic specificity. The second monoclonal antibody of biological significance was an IgG1, designated 27.21 which is reactive in the immunofluorescence staining of surface antigens on intact schistosomula. All three monoclonal antibodies that belonged to the IgG1 class were effective in mediating killing of schistosomula by complement, with the highest effect exerted by 27.21. It is thus apparent that the 27.21 monoclonal antibody is directed against a densely distributed surface antigen on the schistosomula membrane which is possibly involved in the protective immunity. Preliminary data showed that immunoprecipitation with the 27.21 antibodies results in the isolation of three major protein bands, of 60 kd, 50 kd, 19 kd, respectively. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:11894925

  3. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  4. Development of a standardized subgrouping scheme for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Joly, J R; McKinney, R M; Tobin, J O; Bibb, W F; Watkins, I D; Ramsay, D

    1986-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and a subclassification scheme were developed in a collaborative project among three laboratories. The seven most useful monoclonal antibodies were selected from three previously developed panels on the basis of indirect fluorescent antibody patterns with 83 strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 that were obtained from widely distributed geographic locations. The isolates were divided into 10 major subgroups on the basis of reactivity patterns that can be readily reproduced in any laboratory and are not subject to major inconsistencies of interpretation of staining intensity. A standard protocol for the indirect fluorescent antibody procedure was also developed. PMID:3517064

  5. Quality control of murine monoclonal antibodies using isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of murine hybridoma secretory products has been performed using two approaches for isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis: (1) a method in which antigen-coated nitrocellulose is placed on top of an acrylamide gel containing isoelectrically focused ascites to bind the antigen specific monoclonal antibody; and (2) a method in which focused ascite proteins were passively blotted onto nitrocellulose and specific monoclonal antibodies were detected with enzyme-conjugated antigen. Analysis by both methods of batches of ascites containing antihuman IgG antibodies that were produced by six hybridomas permitted effective monitoring of immunoreactive antibodies for pI microheterogeneity.

  6. Daratumumab: a first-in-class CD38 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Larysa; Wang, Yucai; Siegel, David S; Wang, Michael L

    2016-06-30

    Daratumumab is a human monoclonal antibody that targets CD38, a cell surface protein that is overexpressed on multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Preclinical studies have shown that daratumumab induces MM cell death through several mechanisms, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and apoptosis. Given the encouraging efficacy and acceptable safety profile of daratumumab demonstrated in clinical trials, daratumumab has emerged as a novel treatment option for myeloma and became the first monoclonal antibody approved by the FDA for the treatment of MM.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies for use in man: current regulatory situation in the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Haase, M

    1990-01-01

    The article addresses the requirement to be met for approval of monoclonal antibodies with special emphasis on products coupled with radionuclides and on principles for the conduct of clinical trials. According to the German Drug Law monoclonal antibodies are considered as being sera. Therefore, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Federal Office for Sera and Vaccines, is responsible for marketing authorizations. Sera and vaccines need a special manufacturing licence which is given by the competent authority of the Federal State. Batches of monoclonal antibodies can only be marketed if they have been released by the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut; in connexion with batch control the importance of reference preparations is stressed. The standard requirements for the data to be submitted with the applications for marketing authorizations are in accordance with the EEC Council Directives and Notes for Guidance. For the testing of radioactive monoclonal antibodies in clinical trials, compliance with both the Drug Law and The German Radiation Protection Ordinance must be ensured. In addition to the authorizations required for non-labelled monoclonal antibody products, the use of radioactive substances in diagnosis and therapy requires an authorization by the competent Federal State authority. The main purpose of the planning and performance of clinical trials with new monoclonal antibody in diagnosis and therapy must be the comparison with established diagnostic tools and/or established medicinal products of known effect.

  8. Application of monoclonal antibodies for antigen mapping of male and female generative tissue.

    PubMed

    Mettler, L

    1985-01-01

    With the single experiment of nature hindering the rejection of the fetus in the mother, new basic mechanisms of this immunological phenomenon can be studied. The technique of monoclonal antibodies provides a helpful tool for the study of membrane structural and cytoplasmic molecules. Hybridoma clones offer for the first time the possibility of obtaining unlimited amounts of almost pure antibodies or very high titers and of defined characteristics. The most common application with reproductive tract monoclonals are found as follows: 1) Immuno-assays; 2) Immuno-diagnostics; 3) Imaging of tumors; 4) Immuno-therapy; 5) Induction of anti-idio-types; 6) Fertility control; 7) Application in basic studies and mechanisms. The following interesting results were obtained in this area: 1) The biological role of hormones can be critically analysed by the use of highly specific non-cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies. 2) A synthetic decapeptide earlier shown by our group to be reactive with naturally occurring human iso and autosperm antibodies demonstrated to be reactive with the monoclonal antibodies Ki VII-5 presenting potentials for an investigation of sperm as target of immunological contraception for possible diagnostic and therapeutic use in immunologic infertility. 3) A specific post fertilization-development influencing antigen was identified by Menge using monoclonal antibodies. 4) Five hybridoma clones producing monoclonals to porcine zona pellucida were established, and showed a characteristic staining pattern of oocytes from human eggs, hamsters, rabbits and mice by immunofluorescence.

  9. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  10. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody against infective larvae of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed Central

    Parab, P B; Rajasekariah, G R; Chandrashekar, R; Alkan, S S; Braun, D G; Subrahmanyam, D

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced following immunization of mice with live infective larvae of Brugia malayi. One of these, 46.08.76, is an antibody that promotes adherence of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood leucocytes to the infective larvae of B. malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti, respectively, and kills them. Fresh normal serum, as a source of complement, augments this effect. The same monoclonal antibody conferred 89% protection to jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) against challenge infection of B. malayi stage-three larvae. This monoclonal antibody recognizes antigens of 80,000, 67,000, 52,000 and 36,000 MW proteins present among the antigens of larvae, as detected by an immunoblotting technique. The antibody also reacts with antigens of infective larvae of Litomosoides carinii, Dipetalonema viteae and B. pahangi, but to a smaller extent. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3384450

  11. Monoclonal antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of bovine enteric coronavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, C F; Raybould, T J; Acres, S D

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with three different viral polypeptides were evaluated singly and in combination as the capture antibody(s) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system for the detection of bovine enteric coronavirus. Similar levels of sensitivity were found for all combinations tested. A sensitive, highly specific, and reproducible assay for the detection of bovine enteric coronavirus was developed, using a mixture of two of these monoclonal antibodies reactive with antigenic components either external or internal to the virion. These monoclonal antibodies were bound indirectly to 96-well plates via rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin. After sample application and incubation, virus was detected by using rabbit anti-coronavirus peroxidase conjugate followed by enzyme substrate and chromagen. Fecal samples from a single herd of cows were screened for the presence of coronavirus by this assay. Five percent of clinically normal cows were found to be shedding coronavirus. Images PMID:6325490

  12. Mapping Broadly Reactive Norovirus Genogroup I and II Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Sue E.; Ajami, Nadim; Parker, Tracy Dewese; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Natori, Katsuro; Takeda, Naokazu; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Kou, Baijun; Atmar, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses are responsible for most acute nonbacterial epidemic outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. To develop cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for rapid identification of genogroup I and II (GI and GII) noroviruses (NoVs) in field specimens, mice were immunized with baculovirus-expressed recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) corresponding to NoVs. Nine MAbs against the capsid protein were identified that detected both GI and GII NoV VLPs. These MAbs were tested in competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to identify common epitope reactivities to GI and GII VLPs. Patterns of competitive reactivity placed these MAbs into two epitope groups (groups 1 and 2). Epitopes for MAbs NV23 and NS22 (group 1) and MAb F120 (group 2) were mapped to a continuous region in the C-terminal P1 subdomain of the capsid protein. This domain is within regions previously defined to contain cross-reactive epitopes in GI and GII viruses, suggesting that common epitopes are clustered within the P1 domain of the capsid protein. Further characterization in an accompanying paper (B. Kou et al., Clin Vaccine Immunol 22:160–167, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00519-14) revealed that MAb NV23 (epitope group 1) is able to detect GI and GII viruses in stool. Inclusion of the GI and GII cross-reactive MAb NV23 in antigen detection assays may facilitate the identification of GI and GII human noroviruses in stool samples as causative agents of outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis worldwide. PMID:25428246

  13. Safety and immunotoxicity assessment of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Laura Dill; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Kiessling, Andrea; Allenspach, Roy; Hey, Adam; Muller, Patrick Y; Frings, Werner; Sims, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) licensed for human use or in clinical development are indicated for treatment of patients with cancer and inflammatory/autoimmune disease and as such, are designed to directly interact with the immune system. A major hurdle for the development and early clinical investigation of many of these immunomodulatory mAbs is their inherent risk for adverse immune-mediated drug reactions in humans such as infusion reactions, cytokine storms, immunosuppression and autoimmunity. A thorough understanding of the immunopharmacology of a mAb in humans and animals is required to both anticipate the clinical risk of adverse immunotoxicological events and to select a safe starting dose for first-in-human (FIH) clinical studies. This review summarizes the most common adverse immunotoxicological events occurring in humans with immunomodulatory mAbs and outlines non-clinical strategies to define their immunopharmacology and assess their immunotoxic potential, as well as reduce the risk of immunotoxicity through rational mAb design. Tests to assess the relative risk of mAb candidates for cytokine release syndrome, innate immune system (dendritic cell) activation and immunogenicity in humans are also described. The importance of selecting a relevant and sensitive toxicity species for human safety assessment in which the immunopharmacology of the mAb is similar to that expected in humans is highlighted, as is the importance of understanding the limitations of the species selected for human safety assessment and supplementation of in vivo safety assessment with appropriate in vitro human assays. A tiered approach to assess effects on immune status, immune function and risk of infection and cancer, governed by the mechanism of action and structural features of the mAb, is described. Finally, the use of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicity data in determining a minimum anticipated biologic effect Level (MABEL) and in the selection of safe human

  14. Biotherapies in inflammatory ocular disorders: Interferons, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, D; Bodaghi, B; Bienvenu, B; Wechsler, B; Sene, D; Trad, S; Abad, S; Cacoub, P; Kodjikian, L; Sève, P

    2013-05-01

    Biotherapies used in clinical practice for the treatment of ophthalmologic manifestations of systemic diseases include interferons (IFN), intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) and monoclonal antibodies (anti-TNF, anakinra, tocilizumab and rituximab). Several open prospective studies have shown the effectiveness of IFN-α (78 to 98% complete remission) for the treatment of severe uveitis in Behcet's disease. IFN is capable of inducing prolonged remission and continued after his arrest, in 20-40% of patients. Side effects (flu-like, psychological effects) limit its use in practice. Anti-TNFα (infliximab and adalimumab) represents an attractive alternative therapeutic in severe uveitis refractory to immunosuppressants, especially in Behcet's disease. They are almost always (>90% of cases) and rapidly effective but their action is often suspensive. Anti-TNFα requires an extended prescription or takes over from another immunosuppressant once ocular inflammation has been controlled. IVIG are used for the treatment of Kawasaki disease and Birdshot disease. Several open or retrospective studies showed their effectiveness for the treatment of severe and refractory cicatricial pemphigoid. Tolerance of IVIG is good but their efficacy is transient. Rituximab showed an efficacy in few observations of various inflammatory eye diseases (uveitis, scleritis and idiopathic inflammatory pseudo-tumors or associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis) and cicatricial pemphigoid. The risk of infection associated with this biotherapy limits its use in refractory diseases to conventional therapy. Anakinra (a soluble antagonist of IL-1R) showed interesting results in terms of efficiency in one small open study in Behcet's disease. Its safety profile is good and with a quick action that could be interesting for the treatment of severe uveitis.

  15. Accessing of recombinant human monoclonal antibodies from patient libraries by eukaryotic ribosome display.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Wang, Lin; Markiv, Anatoliy; Jeffs, Simon A; Dreja, Hanna; McKnight, Áine; He, Mingyue; Kang, Angray S

    2012-01-01

    What are effective antibodies and when do they arise to prevent or delay disease onset during a natural infection or in the course of vaccination? To address these questions at a molecular level requires longitudinal studies, capturing and analyzing the antibody repertoire at regular intervals following exposure or sero-conversion. Such studies require a method that allows the rapid generation and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies from relatively small volumes of blood. Here we describe an approach for rapidly generating human monoclonal antibodies in vitro by directly screening single-chain antibody repertories derived from donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells using ribosome display. Two single-chain antibody libraries were constructed using RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of two HIV-1 long-term non-progressor donors (K530 and M325). Both libraries were subjected to a single round of in vitro ribosome display for enrichment of human monoclonal antibodies against recombinant gp120(K530), derived from virus isolated from donor K530. This study has validated a novel, in vitro method for the rapid generation of human monoclonal antibodies. An antibody library could be constructed from as little as 3 μg of total RNA, the equivalent of 3-5 mL of human blood.

  16. Site-specific covalent modification of monoclonal antibodies: in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    PubMed Central

    Rodwell, J D; Alvarez, V L; Lee, C; Lopes, A D; Goers, J W; King, H D; Powsner, H J; McKearn, T J

    1986-01-01

    A strategy for covalent modification of monoclonal antibodies utilizing the oxidized oligosaccharide moieties on the molecule was evaluated and compared to more conventional methods. As judged by quantitative in vitro measurements, a monoclonal antibody conjugate prepared via the oligosaccharides retained the homogeneous antigen binding property and affinity of the unmodified antibody. In contrast, conjugates of the same antibody, modified to the same degree on either lysines or aspartic and glutamic acid side chains, were heterogeneous in their antigen binding and had lowered affinity. In vivo biodistribution and nuclear-imaging experiments were also performed with a second monoclonal antibody and a tumor xenograft model. Antibodies modified on the oligosaccharides with either a peptide labeled with iodine-125 or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid chelate with indium-111 localize into target tumors more efficiently than the same antibody radiolabeled on either tyrosines or lysines. These in vivo results, when compared to those reported in the literature for conventionally modified antibodies, suggest that oligosaccharide modification of monoclonal antibodies is a preferred method of preparing conjugates. Images PMID:3458222

  17. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  18. Production and characterization of an Mls-1-specific monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Superantigens (SAGs) represent a new class of antigens, characterized as T cell receptor (TCR) V beta-reactive elements. Bacterial toxins constitute the major group of exogenous SAGs, while the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-encoded Mls molecules represent the endogenous SAGs. Mls-1 is the prototype of the latter SAGs, because it elicits a very potent T cell stimulatory response in vitro in unprimed T cells expressing the TCR V beta 6 or 8.1 chains. In vivo, Mls-1 causes deletion of immature T cells bearing the V beta 6, 7, 8.1, or 9 chains. Although Mls-1 was functionally discovered > 20 yr ago, it has not been possible to raise antibodies against this molecule. We have previously cloned and sequenced the Mtv-7 sag gene, which encodes Mls-1. Sequence comparisons with other MMTV sag genes suggested that the polymorphic 3' end encodes the TCR V beta specificity of these SAGs. We have, therefore, immunized hamsters with a 14-amino acid peptide from the deduced COOH-terminal sequence of the Mtv-7 sag gene. We describe here the production of a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3B12, which is peptide specific and reacts with a recombinant baculovirus product of Mtv-7 sag. This mAb blocks Mls-1-specific T cell recognition and detects the Mls-1 protein on the surface of the B cell hybridoma LBB.A, but not on LBB.11, which is an Mtv-7 loss variant of LBB.A. Transfection of the Mtv-7 sag gene into LBB.11 renders this cell functionally Mls-1+ as well as positive for 3B12 binding, confirming the specificity of this mAb. It is well documented that B cells and CD8+ T cells express T cell stimulatory Mls-1 determinants, and we show here that this functional profile correlates with the expression of MMTV-specific mRNA. However, primary lymphocytes derived from Mls-1+ mice do not stain with 3B12, even after in vitro activation with mitogens or phorbol ester. PMID:8381154

  19. Threshold behavior in electron-transfer collisions between rubidium atoms and C2F5Cl or C2F5I molecules.

    PubMed

    Jia, Beike; Harris, Sean; Lewis, Larry L; Zhan, Jiping; Brooks, Philip R

    2005-10-20

    Rubidium atoms are accelerated in a high-temperature expansion of hydrogen to produce beams with energies high enough to observe collisional ionization with a cross beam. The speed of the atoms is directly measured by time-of-flight techniques, and the positive and negative ions produced are detected in separate mass spectrometers and detected in coincidence. Chloroperfluoroethane produces C(2)F(5)(-) and Cl(-) ions, whereas iodoperfluoroethane produces I(-), C(2)F(5)(-), and C(2)F(5)I(-) ions. When the measured speed distributions are used, the signal versus energy may be deconvolved to yield thresholds and electron affinities (EAs). The EA for C(2)F(5)I is measured to be 0.96 +/- 0.1 eV. Anomalously high EA values result for C(2)F(5) apparently because C(2)F(5)(-) is produced by parts per million concentrations of Rb(2).

  20. Generation of Recombinant Human IgG Monoclonal Antibodies from Immortalized Sorted B Cells.

    PubMed

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Saxena, Abhishek; Hoffmann, Carolin; Hounjet, Judith; Coenen, Daniëlle; Molenaar, Peter; Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2015-06-05

    Finding new methods for generating human monoclonal antibodies is an active research field that is important for both basic and applied sciences, including the development of immunotherapeutics. However, the techniques to identify and produce such antibodies tend to be arduous and sometimes the heavy and light chain pair of the antibodies are dissociated. Here, we describe a relatively simple, straightforward protocol to produce human recombinant monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells using immortalization with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Toll-like receptor 9 activation. With an adequate staining, B cells producing antibodies can be isolated for subsequent immortalization and clonal expansion. The antibody transcripts produced by the immortalized B cell clones can be amplified by PCR, sequenced as corresponding heavy and light chain pairs and cloned into immunoglobulin expression vectors. The antibodies obtained with this technique can be powerful tools to study relevant human immune responses, including autoimmunity, and create the basis for new therapeutics.

  1. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  2. Serological characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diolepoxide-DNA adducts using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Newman, M J; Weston, A; Carver, D C; Mann, D L; Harris, C C

    1990-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of structurally related compounds that are present in the environment in complex mixtures as common pollutants. These compounds have been studied extensively because of their carcinogenic and toxic properties to humans. We reported previously that humans exposed to certain PAHs produce antibodies that bind to different PAH diolepoxide-DNA (PAH-DNA) adducts. The ability to detect and measure antibodies to PAH-DNA adducts in human blood samples could prove useful as a biological dosimeter for identifying persons that have been exposed to high levels of PAHs, i.e. persons who may be at high cancer risk. In our initial studies we found that it was common for persons who were exposed to PAH to produce antibodies against PAH-DNA adducts. However, we were unable to identify the actual chemical types of PAH-DNA adducts that were recognized by the serum antibodies because many serum samples contained antibody activity to more than one adduct. These data indicate that different PAH-DNA adducts may be serologically similar or that humans actually produce immune responses against more than a single PAH-DNA adduct. We have used monoclonal antibody technology to determine the extent to which different PAH-DNA adducts share serologically recognized epitopes. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against two different PAH-DNA adducts, benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide-DNA (BPDE-DNA) and benz[a]anthracene diolepoxide-DNA (BADE-DNA). The binding of these antibodies to five PAH-DNA adduct preparations and to soluble PAHs was assessed. We found that most monoclonal antibodies bound to more than a single type of PAH-DNA adduct, documenting the serological relatedness of different PAH-DNA adducts. However, two monoclonal antibodies were produced that bound only to BPDE-DNA. Soluble non-metabolized PAHs and PAH tetraols were not recognized by these antibodies, thus demonstrating their specificity for PAH-DNA adducts and not the PAHs alone

  3. Immunodiagnosis of human cysticercosis (Taenia solium) with antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A; Lopes, J D

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated from mice immunized with scolex protein antigen of Cysticercus cellulosae. Three monoclonal antibodies specific for cysticercal antigens, which did not show any cross-reactivity with Taenia solium or Taenia saginata antigens, were selected. Each monoclonal antibody coupled to Sepharose could purify one antigen, which appeared as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies were used to detect antibody in serum samples taken from patients with cysticercosis, taeniasis, and other parasitic infections in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cross-reactivity was observed until a serum dilution of 1:128 was reached. Since serum samples from unexposed subjects showed positive reactions until a dilution of 1:64 was reached, we chose a discriminative dilution (1:128) above which no cross-reaction was observed. The percent positive serum samples from cysticercosis patients was 100% by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with any of the antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies. Images PMID:3611310

  4. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  5. 77 FR 9678 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers and Autoimmune Disease AGENCY... Antibodies Specific for CD22'' , PCT Application PCT/US2009/124109 entitled ``Human and Improved Murine Monoclonal Antibodies Against CD22'' , U.S. patent application 12/934,214 entitled ``Human...

  6. Mapping of SLE-specific Sm B cell epitopes using murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pruijn, G J; Schoute, F; Thijssen, J P; Smeenk, R J; van Venrooij, W J

    1997-04-01

    In this study we have used a number of monoclonal antibodies with various anti-Sm specificities originating from MRL/lpr mice to map B cell epitopes of the Sm-B/B' and Sm-D1 proteins. Selection of Sm-B subfragments reactive with the Sm-B/B'-specific monoclonal antibody ANA125 from a DNaseI fragment expression library revealed that the epitope recognized by this monoclonal antibody is located between amino acids 146 and 158: GRGTVAAAAAAAT. The epitopes recognized by two distinct Sm-D1-specific monoclonal antibodies, 7.13 and ANA127, appeared to be located in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated deletion mutants of Sm-D1. These epitopes are probably identical and not simply composed of a GR repeat, which is a characteristic feature of this part of the protein. Immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated deletion mutants of both Sm-B and Sm-D1 was also employed to determine the sequence requirements for recognition by two monoclonal antibodies that are cross-reactive with several Sm proteins, Y12 and ANA128. The epitope recognized by these two monoclonal antibodies is probably also identical and composed by the juxtaposition of several regions in the folded protein. The low, but significant, level of immunoprecipitation of truncated versions of both Sm-B and Sm-D1, suggests that the Sm domain, which is shared by all Sm proteins, in particular the amino-terminal part of the Sm1 motif of Sm-B and Sm-D1, plays an important role in formation of the cross-reactive epitope and might contribute to cross-reactivity with other Sm proteins. The results of immunoprecipitation experiments with cellular extracts show that the epitopes recognized by all anti-Sm monoclonal antibodies used in this study are accessible in the assembled snRNPs.

  7. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  8. New Stx2e monoclonal antibodies for immunological detection and distinction of Stx2 subtypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Stx2e is a primary virulence factor in STEC strains that cause edema disease in neonatal piglets. Though Stx2a and Stx2e are similar, most antibody-based Stx detection kits are designed to detect Stx2a and do not recognize the Stx2e subtype. Methods and Findings Four monoclonal antibodie...

  9. The generation of monoclonal antibodies and their use in rapid diagnostic tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are the most important component of an immunoassay. In these proceedings we outline novel methods used to generate and select monoclonal antibodies that meet performance criteria for use in rapid lateral flow and microfluidic immunoassay tests for the detection of agricultural pathogens ...

  10. Prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia in mice by intratracheal instillation of monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study on passive immunity dealt principally with the following topics: pathogenesis of the pneumonia produced by influenza virus (PR8) in CF-1 mice; the distribution and retention of monoclonal antibody instilled intratracheally (IT) into the lung; and prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia using specific monoclonal antibody (IgG 2a/k anti-HA). The fate of a single 50 ul bolus of antibody instilled IT was determined by monitoring the activity of /sup 125/I-labelled monoclonal IgG in the lungs and by lavage recovery of functional antibody.Antibody was demonstrated in high concentrations for the first 3 days and was present in the lungs for a period of 7 days. For prophylaxis several trials indicated that monoclonal antibody provided significant protection from lethal effects of the virus. Antibody given to clinically ill mice on day 3 produced a highly significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001) when compared to control mice. The treatment reversed the weight loss and apparently arrested the development of lesions in most of the mice within 2 days following antibody administration.

  11. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) might contaminate murine monoclonal antibodies after purification on protein G.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Jörg A; Fettke, Joerg; Lenz, Christine; Albers, Katharina; Mallwitz, Frank; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Kusch, Emely; Sellrie, Frank

    2012-03-31

    The large scale production of a monoclonal anti-progesterone antibody in serum free medium followed by affinity chromatography on protein G lead to a contamination of the antibody sample with a protein of about 14 kDa. This protein was identified by mass spectrometry as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). This SLPI contamination lead to a failure of the fiber-optic based competitive fluorescence assay to detect progesterone in milk. Purification of the monoclonal antibody using protein A columns circumvented this problem.

  12. Virus mutation frequencies can be greatly underestimated by monoclonal antibody neutralization of virions.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; de la Torre, J C; Steinhauer, D A; Clarke, D; Duarte, E; Domingo, E

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-resistant mutants have been widely used to estimate virus mutation frequencies. We demonstrate that standard virion neutralization inevitably underestimates monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant genome frequencies of vesicular stomatitis virus, due to phenotypic masking-mixing when wild-type (wt) virions are present in thousandsfold greater numbers. We show that incorporation of antibody into the plaque overlay medium (after virus penetration at 37 degrees C) can provide accurate estimates of genome frequencies of neutral monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant viruses in wt clones. By using this method, we have observed two adjacent G----A base transition frequencies in the I3 epitope to be of the order of 10(-4) in a wt glycine codon. This appears to be slightly lower than the frequencies observed at other sites for total (viable and nonviable) virus genomes when using a direct sequence approach. Images PMID:2479770

  13. [Development and identification of monoclonal antibodies of cape jasmine proteins in Reduning injection].

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Zhou, Jian-Ming; Wang, Hong-Mei; Zhou, Jun; Bi, Yu-An; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2013-05-01

    Liposoluble cape jasmine proteins were used to immunize BALB/C mice. Indirect ELISA was utilized to develop one monoclonal antibody by integrating SP2/0 cells and spleen cells from immunized BALB/C mice. The subclass of the monoclonal antibody was identified as IgG2b, with Kappa chain as its light chain. The ascite titer of 2H8 monoclonal antibody was 1:204 080. Western-blot analysis proved that 2H8 reacted with cape jasmine proteins to identify specific liposoluble protein with molecuar weight of around 58.5 kDa. Dot-ELISA was established with 2H8 ascites as the primary antibody, showing the minimum detectable amount of 19.5 ng. This study lays a foundation for the development of protein kits of Reduning injection.

  14. Diffusion and binding of monoclonal antibody TNT-1 in multicellular tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.M.; Hansen, E.B.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1991-02-06

    Tumor spheroids of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma and A375 melanoma were established to investigate the uptake and clearance kinetics of TNT-1, a monoclonal antibody that targets necrotic cells of tumors. Our data reveal that there was rapid uptake of TNT-1 and its F(ab')2 fragment in both spheroid models, whereas an antibody of irrelevant specificity, Lym-1, and its F(ab')2 fragment bound poorly to the spheroids. Unlike previously reported monoclonal antibodies to tumor cell-surface antigens, TNT-1 showed (1) a linear uptake that increased over time without saturation in tumor spheroids and (2) an unexpected uptake by a subpopulation of cells in the viable outer rim of the spheroids. These preclinical studies provide important information concerning the therapeutic potential of TNT monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and micrometastases.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies provide specific intramolecular markers for the study of epithelial tonofilament organization

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The tonofilament-associated protein antigens recognized in epithelial cells by a group of six monoclonal antibodies have been studied by immunofluorescence and gel immunoautoradiography. The monoclonal antibodies were generated against detergent insoluble cytoskeleton extracts from a cultured simple epithelium derived cell line, Ptk1 cells. They show various tissue specificities, and while they all recognize components at the low end of the molecular weight range for intermediate filament proteins, they confirm that single antibody species can react with multiple polypeptides of different molecular weights in the tonofilament complex. The monoclonal antibodies described here demonstrate the presence of a simple epithelium antigenic determinant associated with intermediate filaments that is not detectable in the specialized cells of squamous and keratinizing epithelia but can reappear in such cells after transformation. PMID:6177700

  16. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties.

  17. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies to xanthine oxidase and other proteins of bovine milk-fat-globule membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Mather, I H; Nace, C S; Johnson, V G; Goldsby, R A

    1980-01-01

    Nine hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibody to proteins of bovine milk-fat-globule membrane were isolated. All nine cell lines continued to secrete monoclonal antibody after serial transfer in culture and after passage as solid tumours in Balb/cJ mice. Four of the cell lines secreted monoclonal antibody specific for xanthine oxidase, one of the major proteins of milk-fat-globule membrane. PMID:6894088

  18. Advantage of dose fractionation in monoclonal antibody-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, J.; Molinolo, A.; Simpson, J.F.; Siler, K.; Roselli, M.; Hinkle, G.; Houchens, D.P.; Colcher, D. )

    1990-05-02

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) B72.3 IgG was radiolabeled with 131I and administered to female athymic NCr-nu mice bearing the LS-174T human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft to determine if fractionation of MAb dose had any advantage in tumor therapy. In the LS-174T xenograft, only approximately 30%-60% of tumor cells express the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen. The LS-174T xenograft was used to reflect the heterogeneity of the TAG-72 antigen often seen in biopsy specimens from patients. In contrast to a single 600-muCi dose of 131I-B72.3 IgG where 60% of the animals died from toxic effects, two 300-muCi doses of 131I-B72.3 IgG reduced or eliminated tumor growth in 90% of mice, with only 10% of the animals dying from toxic effects. Dose fractionation even permitted escalation of the dose to three doses of 300 muCi of 131I-B72.3 IgG, resulting in even more extensive tumor reduction or elimination and minimal toxic effects. The use of an isotype-matched control MAb revealed a nonspecific component to tumor growth retardation, but the use of the specific B72.3 IgG demonstrated a much greater therapeutic effect. Tumors that had escaped MAb therapy were analyzed for expression of the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen with the use of the immunoperoxidase method; they were shown to have the same antigenic phenotype as the untreated tumors. We verified tumor elimination by killing the test animals after a 7-week observation period and performing histologic examination of tumor sites. We also monitored toxic effects by histologic examination of numerous organs. These studies thus demonstrate the advantage of dose fractionation of a radiolabeled MAb for tumor therapy. We anticipate that the concept of dose fractionation can be practically applied in radioimmunotherapeutic clinical trials with the development and use of recombinant-chimeric MAbs and modified constructs.

  19. Mouse anti-benzylpenicilloyl IgE monoclonal antibody: preparation, characterization and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, H; Misaki, R; Takeuchi, M; Niinomi, Y; Harada, M

    1987-01-01

    Anti-benzylpenicilloyl (BPO-) monoclonal antibody of the IgE class was prepared from spleens of immune C57BL/6 mice whose sera reacted with BPO-hapten, penicillin G(PCG) polymer, cephalothin (CET)-hapten and CET polymer. Affinity chromatography experiments showed that the haptenic specificity of the IgE monoclonal antibody (designated BIE-13CE) was directed mainly to phenylacetyl portion of BPO group. BIE-13CE antibody reacted on passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) assay with BPO-hapten, CET-hapten, cephaloridine-hapten and CET polymer, but did not react with PCG polymer, ampicillin-hapten, or cefazolin-hapten. These results indicated that the sera of the immune C57BL/6 mice contained IgE antibodies capable of cross-reacting at the monoclonal antibody level with various forms of eliciting antigens and that the cross-reactivity of the antibody could be ascribed essentially to the structural similarity of acyl side chains of the antibiotics. The structure of the CET polymer is also discussed in terms of its PCA reactivity with the monoclonal antibody and analytical and spectral data of the polymer. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3652521

  20. Role of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of immune-mediated glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Joaquín; Cravedi, Paolo

    2014-05-21

    Non-specific immunosuppressants have represented for decades the only therapies for patients with immune-mediated glomerular diseases. These treatments, however, are associated with high rates of no-response and are burdened by toxicities that frequently offset the benefits of proteinuria reduction. Monoclonal antibodies targeting selective cell populations or mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of glomerular diseases have recently become available. Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the CD20 antigen on B cells, safely reduced proteinuria in patients with nephrotic syndrome secondary to membranous nephropathy, minimal change disease, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Its ability to reduce auto-antibody formation has been instrumental to treat also ANCA-associated vasculitis, lupus nephritis, and mixed cryoglobulinemia. Many reports have also documented the efficacy of the anti-C5 humanized monoclonal antibody Eculizumab to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 nephropathy, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Thanks to these encouraging findings, monoclonals are becoming very helpful tools to treat patients with glomerular diseases. Moreover, thanks to their specific mechanism of action, these and other monoclonal antibodies are important in improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of glomerular diseases. Their still high costs, however, might represent a major hurdle for their widespread implementation for all patients in need.

  1. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Carly N; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  3. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics.

  4. Detection of antibodies to equine arteritis virus by a monoclonal antibody-based blocking ELISA.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H J; Entz, S C; Deregt, D; Jordan, L T; Timoney, P J; McCollum, W H

    2000-01-01

    A potent ELISA antigen was prepared from equine arteritis virus (EAV) by differential centrifugation of EAV-infected cell culture fluid, followed by solubilization of the preparation by Triton X-100 treatment. Using this antigen and a mouse monoclonal antibody against the G(L) protein of EAV, a reliable blocking ELISA (bELISA) was developed for the detection of EAV antibodies in equine sera. The bELISA was evaluated using a total of 837 test serum samples. The relative sensitivity (n = 320) of the bELISA compared to the serum neutralization (SN) test was 99.4%. The bELISA appears to be a highly specific test, the specificity of which did not appear to be adversely affected by previous exposure of horses to non-EAV-containing biologicals. Of 119 serum samples, 21 from horses without any history of exposure to EAV and 98 from racetrack Thoroughbreds, 118 were negative in the SN test and bELISA. One sample was SN-negative but suspicious with the bELISA. Based on testing 465 SN-negative field samples and 52 SN-negative samples from experimental horses, and excluding any sera giving a suspicious reaction, the relative specificity of the bELISA was 97.7%. Samples should be examined undiluted and diluted 1/10 in the bELISA because the testing of sera of high neutralizing antibody titer may be affected by a prozone-like phenomenon. The bELISA is a more rapid and cost-efficient test than the SN test for the detection of EAV antibodies in equine sera. PMID:10680655

  5. Development, characterization, and use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the myxosporean, Ceratomyxa shasta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Both monoclonal and polyclonal antisera were produced against Ceratomyxa shasta. Ascites containing trophozoites of the parasite was collected from infected fish and used as antigen for immunization of mice. The resulting monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with trophozoite and sporoblast stages but did not react with C. shasta spores by either indirect fluorescent antibody techniques or in Western blots. This indicates that some C. shasta antigens are specific to certain life stages of the parasite. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in a rabbit by injecting a spore protein electro-eluted from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. This antiserum reacted with both trophozoites and spores by indirect fluorescent antibody techniques and in Western blots. All antisera were tested for cross-reactivity to trout white blood cells, a contaminant of the ascites, and to other myxosporea. Two monoclonal antibodies reacted with white blood cells and myxosporea of the genera Sphaerospora and Myxobilatus. One hybridoma produced antibodies of high specificity for C. shasta pre-spore stages. This is the first report of a monoclonal antibody produced against a myxosporean parasite.

  6. Reversible self-association increases the viscosity of a concentrated monoclonal antibody in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Nguyen, Mary D H; Andya, James D; Shire, Steven J

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of reversible protein self-association on the viscosity of concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions. The viscosities of the monoclonal antibody solutions were measured by either a capillary viscometer or a cone-plate rheometer at different protein concentrations, pH, and ionic strength. Soluble aggregates were determined by size exclusion chromatography, light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Self-association of protein at high protein concentration was monitored by sedimentation equilibrium analysis using a preparative ultracentrifuge and a microfractionator. The viscosity of one of the monoclonal antibodies investigated is highly dependent on protein concentration, pH, and ionic strength of buffer and charged excipients. This antibody shows the highest viscosity near its pI at low ionic strength conditions. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis suggests that this antibody tends to reversibly self-associate at high protein concentration. The self-association appears to be quite weak and is not detectable by sedimentation velocity and size exclusion chromatography at low protein concentration. There are no significant differences in the amounts of non-dissociable soluble aggregates formed between low viscosity and high viscosity samples. These results suggest that the reversible multivalent self-association of this protein appears to be mediated mainly by electrostatic interactions of charged residues and results in unusually high viscosity of this monoclonal antibody in solution at low ionic strength conditions.

  7. The effect of space flight on monoclonal antibody synthesis in a hybridoma mouse cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiley, S. A.; Gillock, E. T.; Black, M. C.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The hybridoma cell line, 3G10G5, producing a monoclonal antibody to the major capsid protein VP1 from the avian polyomavirus budgerigar fledgling disease virus, was produced from a Balb/C mouse. This cell line was used to test the effects of microgravity on cellular processes, specifically protein synthesis. A time course study utilizing incorporation of [35S]methionine into newly synthesized monoclonal antibody was performed on STS-77. After 5.5 days, it was observed that cell counts for the samples exposed to microgravity were lower than those of ground-based samples. However, radiolabel incorporation of the synthesized monoclonal antibody was similar in both orbiter and ground control samples. Overall, microgravity does not seem to have an effect on this cell line's ability to synthesize IgG protein.

  8. Comparison of biodistribution profile of monoclonal antibodies nanoparticles and aptamers in rats with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, Cristal; Missailidis, Sotiris; Alessandra-Perini, Jéssica; Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2017-05-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies and aptamers is growing every single day, as the use of nanoparticle systems. Although most of the products are under investigation, there are a few commercialized products available at the market, for human consume. In this study, we have compared three formulations (aptamer anti-MUC1, monoclonal antibody - Trastuzumab and monoclonal antibodies nanoparticles - PLA/PVA/MMT trastuzumab) to identify their profile as also to understand their behavior into an alive biological system. In this direction the radiolabeling of the products were done and they were all tested in animals (in vivo) in two conditions: healthy rats and breast cancer induced animals. The results showed that the nanoparticle has the better biodistribution profile, followed by the aptamer. We conclude that more studies and a global effort to elucidate the biological behavior of drugs and especially nano-drugs are necessary.

  9. A monoclonal antibody for distinction of invasive and noninvasive clinical isolates of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Ruiz, A; Haque, R; Rehman, T; Aguirre, A; Jaramillo, C; Castañon, G; Hall, A; Guhl, F; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Warhurst, D C

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the world population is infected with Entamoeba histolytica, but only 10% of the carriers develop symptomatic amebiasis. This discrepancy could be explained by the genotypic differences between the morphologically indistinguishable invasive and noninvasive strains of E. histolytica currently identified by zymodeme analysis, a technique that is unsuitable for routine diagnostic laboratories. Here we report the production of a monoclonal antibody against E. histolytica and its use in an immunofluorescence assay to identify invasive isolates cultured from stool samples of infected patients in several regions where amebiasis is endemic: Bangladesh, Colombia, and Mexico. After testing a total of 88 E. histolytica isolates, the correlation between zymodeme characterization and the immunofluorescence assay with the invasive isolate-specific monoclonal antibody was 100%. The epitope detected by the invasive isolate-specific monoclonal antibody resides in a previously undescribed internal protein with molecular masses of 84 and 81 kDa in axenic and polyxenic E. histolytica strains, respectively. Images PMID:1452651

  10. Monoclonal antibody therapy in multiple myeloma: where do we stand and where are we going?

    PubMed

    Thanendrarajan, Sharmilan; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J; Schinke, Carolina; Mathur, Pankaj; Heuck, Christoph J; Zangari, Maurizio; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Weinhold, Niels; Barlogie, Bart; van Rhee, Frits

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy that is characterized by refractory and relapsing course of disease. Despite the introduction of high-dose chemotherapy in combination with autologous stem cell transplantation and innovative agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, achieving cure in multiple myeloma is a challenging endeavor. In the last couple of years, enormous advances were made in implementing monoclonal antibody therapy in multiple myeloma. A large number of preclinical and clinical studies have been introduced successfully, demonstrating a safe and efficient administration of monoclonal antibodies in multiple myeloma. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies in combination with immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, corticosteroids or conventional chemotherapy seem to be promising and will expand the treatment arsenal for patients with multiple myeloma.

  11. Simultaneous Raising of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies to Fluoroquinolones with Diverse Recognition Functionalities via Single Mixture Immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Zhao, Zhiyong; Tan, Yanglan; Lu, Lei; Wang, Lin; Liao, Yucai; Beloglazova, Natalia; De Saeger, Sarah; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wu, Aibo

    2016-01-19

    Highly specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are the key components in a diverse set of immunoassay applications, from research work to routine monitoring and analysis. In the current manuscript, combinatorial strategies for a single mixture immunization, screening and rabbit hybridoma cell technology were described. Fluoroquinolones (FQs) drugs were chosen as representative analytes. Six FQs were conjugated with bovine serum albumin and used as immunogens for subsequent immunization, while a mixture of all was injected for coimmunization. The hybridomas obtained against the individual and multiple FQs were used for the production of diverse varieties of rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMAbs) against the target analytes. As was proven by indirect competitive ELISA and quantitative lateral flow immunoassay, this approach opens a new way for simultaneously obtaining functional monoclonal antibodies which are capable of recognizing both individual and multiple analytes in a single preparation circle. This addresses various needs of different monitoring regulations as analytical methodology advances.

  12. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs.

  13. Enhanced activity of immobilized dimethylmaleic anhydride-protected poly- and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hadas, E; Koppel, R; Schwartz, F; Raviv, O; Fleminger, G

    1990-06-27

    The effect of reversible protection of the free amino groups of poly- and monoclonal antibodies by dimethylmaleic anhydride on their binding activity following immobilization onto various carriers was studied. The treatment with dimethylmaleic anhydride resulted in a 1.6-1.8-fold increase in the activity of immobilized goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibody immobilized onto different epoxy containing carriers and a 3-10.7-fold increase in the activity of immobilized monoclonal antibodies specific for carboxypeptidase A. The increase in activity was most pronounced at low antigen to carrier loads and over a wide range of modifier to protein ratios. The application of reversible protection of antibodies may permit the development of highly active immobilized antibody preparations for use in immunoaffinity purification.

  14. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  15. The Cloning and Expression of Human Monoclonal Antibodies: Implications for Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K

    2016-02-01

    Allergic responses are dependent on the highly specific effector functions of IgE antibodies. Conversely, antibodies that block the activity of IgE can mediate tolerance to allergen. Technologies that harness the unparalleled specificity of antibody responses have revolutionized the way that we diagnose and treat human disease. This area of research continues to advance at a rapid pace and has had a significant impact on our understanding of allergic disease. This review will present an overview of humoral responses and provide an up-to-date summary of technologies used in the generation of human monoclonal antibodies. The impact that monoclonal antibodies have on allergic disease will be discussed, with a particular focus on allergen immunotherapy, which remains the only form of treatment that can modulate the underlying immune mechanisms and induce long-term clinical tolerance.

  16. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody against CREPT, a novel protein highly expressed in tumors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fangli; Wang, Ruoke; Zhang, Yanquan; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Yinyin; Hu, Jim; Zhang, Linqi; Chang, Zhijie

    2014-12-01

    CREPT (cell-cycle related and expression-elevated protein in tumor), a novel gene also called RPRD1B and C20ORF77, was recently identified to promote tumorigenesis through up-regulation of the expression of genes related to cell cycle. The previous study demonstrated that CREPT is highly expressed in a variety of tumors and enhances the expression of Cyclin D1 by promoting the formation of a chromatin loop. To study the correlation of CREPT expression with clinical factors in different tumors, we generated a monoclonal antibody (3E10) using purified recombinant human GST-CREPT protein as an antigen. In this study, we characterized the specificity of the monoclonal antibody and cloned the gene encoding the antibody for preparation of industrial production. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 3E10 was sensitive and specific to recognize human endogenous CREPT protein. We have mapped the epitope of the antibody and cloned the variable region sequence of the gene encoding the antibody. We confirmed that the cloned gene produced an equivalent antibody as that produced by the original hybridoma. This study provided a basis for large-scale production of the CREPT antibody, which will be useful for the study of the role of CREPT in different tumors.

  17. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Against CREPT, a Novel Protein Highly Expressed in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fangli; Wang, Ruoke; Zhang, Yanquan; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Yinyin; Hu, Jim; Zhang, Linqi

    2014-01-01

    CREPT (cell-cycle related and expression-elevated protein in tumor), a novel gene also called RPRD1B and C20ORF77, was recently identified to promote tumorigenesis through up-regulation of the expression of genes related to cell cycle. The previous study demonstrated that CREPT is highly expressed in a variety of tumors and enhances the expression of Cyclin D1 by promoting the formation of a chromatin loop. To study the correlation of CREPT expression with clinical factors in different tumors, we generated a monoclonal antibody (3E10) using purified recombinant human GST-CREPT protein as an antigen. In this study, we characterized the specificity of the monoclonal antibody and cloned the gene encoding the antibody for preparation of industrial production. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 3E10 was sensitive and specific to recognize human endogenous CREPT protein. We have mapped the epitope of the antibody and cloned the variable region sequence of the gene encoding the antibody. We confirmed that the cloned gene produced an equivalent antibody as that produced by the original hybridoma. This study provided a basis for large-scale production of the CREPT antibody, which will be useful for the study of the role of CREPT in different tumors. PMID:25545209

  18. Single-domain GPC-3 Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to license human monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates and co-develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize large-scale antibody production and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenograft mouse models.

  19. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Soluble Rat Lung Guanylate Cyclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandwein, Harvey; Lewicki, John; Murad, Ferid

    1981-07-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) EC 4.6.1.2] have been produced by fusing spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice with SP-2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were detected by their ability to bind immobilized guanylate cyclase and by immunoprecipitation of purified enzyme in the presence of second (rabbit anti-mouse) antibody. After subcloning by limiting dilution, hybridomas were injected intraperitoneally into mice to produce ascitic fluid containing 2-5 mg of antibody per ml. The four antibodies obtained had titers of between 1:1580 and 1:3160 but were detectable at dilutions greater than 1:20,000. Soluble guanylate cyclase from several rat tissues were crossreactive with the four monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the soluble enzyme from different rat tissues is antigenically similar. The antibodies also recognized soluble lung enzyme from rat, beef, and pig, while enzyme from rabbit was not crossreactive and mouse enzyme was recognized by only one of the antibodies. Particulate guanylate cyclase from a number of tissues had only minimal crossreactivity with the antibodies. Immunoprecipitated guanylate cyclase retained catalytic activity, could be activated with sodium nitroprusside, and was inhibited by cystamine. None of the antibodies were inhibitory under the conditions examined. These antibodies will be useful probes for the study of guanylate cyclase regulation and function under a variety of physiological conditions.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies and an indirect ELISA for detection of psychrotrophic bacteria in refrigerated milk.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, R; González, I; García, T; Carrera, E; Sanz, B; Hernández, P E; Martín, R

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies generated against live cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens have been used in an indirect ELISA format for the detection of Pseudomonas spp. and related psychrotrophic bacteria in refrigerated milk. The immunorecognition of monoclonal antibodies adsorbed to bacteria bound to the wells of a microtiter plate was performed with rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulins conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. Subsequent enzymic conversion of the substrate resulted in distinct absorbance differences when assaying milk samples containing psychrotrophic bacteria in the range 10(5) to 10(9) CFU ml(-1) . The detection threshold for the ELISA assay developed in this work is 10(5) CFU ml(-1).

  1. Monoclonal antibody, mAb 4C13, an effective detoxicant antibody against ricin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Dong, Na; Luo, Longlong; Wu, Junhua; Jia, Peiyuan; Li, Qian; Wang, Yuxia; Gao, Zhongcai; Peng, Hui; Lv, Ming; Huang, Chunqian; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Hua; Shan, Junjie; Han, Gang; Shen, Beifen

    2015-07-31

    Ricin is a glycoprotein produced in castor seeds and consists of two polypeptide chains named Ricin Toxin A Chain (RTA) and Ricin Toxin B Chain (RTB), linked via a disulfide bridge. Due to its high toxicity, ricin is regarded as a high terrorist risk for the public. However, antibodies can play a pivotal role in neutralizing the toxin. In this research, the anti-toxicant effect of mAb 4C13, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) established using detoxicated ricin as the immunized antigen, was evaluated. Compared with mAb 4F2 and mAb 5G6, the effective mechanism of mAb 4C13 was analyzed by experiments relating to its cytotoxicity, epitope on ricin, binding kinetics with the toxin, its blockage on the protein synthesis inhibition induced by ricin and the intracelluar tracing of its complex with ricin. Our result indicated that mAb 4C13 could recognize and bind to RTA, RTB and exert its high affinity to the holotoxin. Both cytotoxicity and animal toxicity of ricin were well blocked by pre-incubating the toxin with mAb 4C13. By intravenous injection, mAb 4C13 could rescue the mouse intraperitoneally (ip) injected with a lethal dose of ricin (20μg/kg) even at 6h after the intoxication and its efficacy was dependent on its dosage. This research indicated that mAb 4C13 could be an excellent candidate for therapeutic antibodies. Its potent antitoxic efficiency was related to its recognition on the specific epitope with very high affinity and its blockage of protein synthesis inhibition in cytoplasm followed by cellular internalization with ricin.

  2. Development of a stable radioiodinating reagent to label monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hadley, S.W.; Hylarides, M.D.; Abrams, P.G.; Beaumier, P.A.; Morgan, A.C.; Reno, J.M.; Fritzberg, A.R. )

    1989-02-01

    A method of radioiodinating monoclonal antibodies such that the labeled antibodies do not undergo in vivo deiodination has been studied. The method utilizes conjugation of succinimidyl para-iodobenzoate to the antibody. The iodobenzoate was radiolabeled by using an organometallic intermediate to facilitate the reaction. Thus, succinimidyl para-tri-n-butylstannylbenzoate was radiolabeled in 60-90% radiochemical yield and subsequently conjugated to the antibody in 80-90% yield. Animal biodistribution studies were carried out with two separate anti-melanoma antibodies (9.2.27 and NR-M1-05) labeled by this method, and examined in nude mice bearing human melanoma tumor xenografts. Very large differences in the localization of radioactivity were observed in the thyroids and stomachs of mice when the iodobenzoyl-labeled antibodies were compared with the same antibodies labeled using the chloramine-T method of radioiodination. Few other significant differences in the tissue distribution of the radioiodinated antibodies were seen.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to human interferon-gamma: production, affinity purification and radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Novick, D; Eshhar, Z; Fischer, D G; Friedlander, J; Rubinstein, M

    1983-01-01

    Human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a cation exchange h.p.l.c., was used for the development of monoclonal antibodies. Following immunization, spleen lymphocytes of two mice showing the highest binding and neutralizing titers were isolated, fused with NSO mouse myeloma cells and cloned. The screening of hybridomas was based on precipitation of the immune complexes with a second antibody and recovery of the biological activity of IFN-gamma from the precipitate. Twenty nine independent hybridomas secreting antibodies specific to IFN-gamma were obtained. Twelve out of these 29 hybridomas produced antibodies that neutralized the antiviral activity of pure as well as crude IFN-gamma. Moreover, IFN-gamma obtained by various induction procedures was neutralized as well, indicating that these various IFN-gamma subtypes are immunologically cross-reactive. Immune precipitation of partially purified 125I-labelled IFN-gamma by several monoclonal antibodies revealed two protein bands of 26,000 and 21,000 daltons. Immunoaffinity chromatography of IFN-gamma gave a 50-fold purification to a specific activity > or = 4 x 10(7) units/mg. Two of the monoclonal antibodies were found suitable for a sensitive and rapid double antibody solid-phase radioimmunoassay, allowing the detection of IFN-gamma at concentrations of at least 4 ng/ml (150 units/ml) within 8 h. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:11892806

  4. Effect of kinase inhibitors on the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Mathé, Doriane; Evesque, Anne; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies of malignancies currently consist of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors. The combination of these novel agents raises the issue of potential antagonisms. We evaluated the potential effect of 4 kinase inhibitors, including the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, and 3 PI3K inhibitors idelalisib, NVP-BEZ235 and LY294002, on the effects of the 3 monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and obinutuzumab (directed against CD20) and trastuzumab (directed against HER2). We found that ibrutinib potently inhibits antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity exerted by all antibodies, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.2 microM for trastuzumab, 0.5 microM for rituximab and 2 microM for obinutuzumab, suggesting a lesser effect in combination with obinutuzumab than with rituximab. The 4 kinase inhibitors were found to inhibit phagocytosis by fresh human neutrophils, as well as antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis induced by the 3 antibodies. Conversely co-administration of ibrutinib with rituximab, obinutuzumab or trastuzumab did not demonstrate any inhibitory effect of ibrutinib in vivo in murine xenograft models. In conclusion, some kinase inhibitors, in particular, ibrutinib, are likely to exert inhibitory effects on innate immune cells. However, these effects do not compromise the antitumor activity of monoclonal antibodies in vivo in the models that were evaluated. PMID:25523586

  5. Effect of kinase inhibitors on the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Mathé, Doriane; Evesque, Anne; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies of malignancies currently consist of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors. The combination of these novel agents raises the issue of potential antagonisms. We evaluated the potential effect of 4 kinase inhibitors, including the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, and 3 PI3K inhibitors idelalisib, NVP-BEZ235 and LY294002, on the effects of the 3 monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and obinutuzumab (directed against CD20) and trastuzumab (directed against HER2). We found that ibrutinib potently inhibits antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity exerted by all antibodies, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.2 microM for trastuzumab, 0.5 microM for rituximab and 2 microM for obinutuzumab, suggesting a lesser effect in combination with obinutuzumab than with rituximab. The 4 kinase inhibitors were found to inhibit phagocytosis by fresh human neutrophils, as well as antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis induced by the 3 antibodies. Conversely co-administration of ibrutinib with rituximab, obinutuzumab or trastuzumab did not demonstrate any inhibitory effect of ibrutinib in vivo in murine xenograft models. In conclusion, some kinase inhibitors, in particular, ibrutinib, are likely to exert inhibitory effects on innate immune cells. However, these effects do not compromise the antitumor activity of monoclonal antibodies in vivo in the models that were evaluated.

  6. Invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by Plasmodium falciparum can be inhibited by monoclonal antibody directed against an S antigen.

    PubMed

    Saul, A; Cooper, J; Ingram, L; Anders, R F; Brown, G V

    1985-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been produced which binds to the heat stable S antigen present in the FCQ-27/PNG isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. This monoclonal antibody also inhibits the invasion in vitro of erythrocytes by malarial merozoites thus demonstrating that the S antigens of Plasmodium falciparum may be a target of protective immune responses.

  7. Targeting endogenous nuclear antigens by electrotransfer of monoclonal antibodies in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Guillaume; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Desplancq, Dominique; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Gannon, Julian; Van Regenmortel, Marc H.; Weiss, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are valuable tools for functional studies in vitro, but their use in living cells remains challenging because they do not naturally cross the cell membrane. Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for the intracytoplasmic delivery of any antibody into cultured cells. By following the fate of monoclonal antibodies that bind to nuclear antigens, it was possible to image endogenous targets and to show that inhibitory antibodies are able to induce cell growth suppression or cell death. Our electrotransfer system allowed the cancer cells we studied to be transduced without loss of viability and may have applications for a variety of intracellular immuno-interventions. PMID:23765067

  8. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fattaey, A.; Lenz, L.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against intact budgerigar fledgling disease (BFD) virions were produced and characterized. These antibodies were selected for their ability to react with BFD virions in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these antibodies was reactive in the immunofluorescent detection of BFD virus-infected cells. These antibodies immunoprecipitated intact virions and specifically recognized the major capsid protein, VP1, of the dissociated virion. The MAbs were found to preferentially recognize native BFD virus capsid protein when compared with denatured virus protein. These MAbs were capable of detecting BFD virus protein in chicken embryonated cell-culture lysates by dot-blot analysis.

  9. Characterization of Two Human Monoclonal Antibodies Neutralizing Influenza A H7N9 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Pang, XingHuo; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    H7N9 was a cause of significant global health concern due to its severe infection and approximately 35% mortality in humans. By screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infections, we characterized two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGD5 and HNIgGH8. The epitope of these two antibodies was dependent on two residues in the receptor binding site at positions V186 and L226 of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Both antibodies possessed high neutralizing activity. PMID:26063436

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies in the Lymphatics: Selective Delivery to Lymph Node Metastases of a Solid Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, John N.; Steller, Michael A.; Keenan, Andrew M.; Covell, David G.; Key, Marc E.; Sieber, Susan M.; Oldham, Robert K.; Hwang, Kou M.; Parker, Robert J.

    1983-10-01

    After subcutaneous injection, monoclonal antibodies directed against a tumor can enter local lymphatic vessels, pass to the draining lymph nodes, and bind to metastases there. Lymphatic delivery of antibody to early metastases is more efficient than intravenous administration, and the lymphatic route can be used to image smaller metastatic deposits. Perhaps more important, the lymphatic route minimizes binding of antibodies to circulating tumor antigens and to cross-reactive antigens present on normal tissues. Antibodies inappropriate for intravenous use because of binding to normal tissues may therefore be useful against lymph node metastases when injected subcutaneously or directly into lymphatic vessels.

  11. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies to antigens of specific murine suppressor T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chervonskii, A.V.; Suslov, A.P.; Shitin, A.G.; Abronina, I.F.; Brondz, B.D.

    1986-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to obtain monoclonal antibodies (MCAB) interacting selectively with suppressor T cells. Mice were used in the experiments and antibodies in the culture fluids were determined by radioimmunoassay. Pure rabbit antibodies against rat immunoglobulins (Ig) absorbed with mouse Ig were used as /sup 125/I-labeled antibodies. Activity of specific suppressor T cells was estimated as the index of inhibition of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation after incubation. The class and type of the MCAB and their concentration were determined by gel filtration and inhibition of radioimmunoadsorption.

  12. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  13. Purification of human adult and foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatases by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Vockley, J; Harris, H

    1984-01-01

    We have used the technique of monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography to purify adult and foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatases. Pure adult intestinal enzyme was obtained from a crude tissue extract with a single immunoaffinity chromatographic step in yields exceeding 95%. An additional ion-exchange chromatographic step was necessary for purification of the foetal enzyme, but yields still exceeded 70%. Experiments to optimize the efficiency of the monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography procedure suggest that the relative strength of binding of an antibody to its antigen is the most important factor to consider when constructing such columns. A column made from an antibody of too low an avidity will not retain the enzyme, while one of too high an avidity will make elution of enzyme in the active state difficult. A scheme is suggested for the application of this technique to a general approach to enzyme purification. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6365087

  14. Characterization of a Novel Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Against Ebola Virus GP.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Olivier; Volchkov, Viktor E

    2015-10-01

    Ebola virus is the etiological agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. As the only protein exposed on the surface of viral particles, the spike glycoprotein GP is the unique target for neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. In this study, we demonstrate the strong neutralization capacity of the monoclonal antibody #3327 and characterize its activity. GP residues that are required for recognition and neutralization were found to be located both in the internal fusion loop and in the receptor-binding domain. Analysis of Ebola virus entry in the presence of #3327 allows us to hypothesize that this antibody binds to the virus particle before internalization and endosomal processing of GP and likely prevents the final viral fusion step. Importantly, #3327 is able to block entry of virions bearing GP that contain the Q508 escape mutation common to a number of virus-neutralizing antibodies, and therefore provides future perspectives for treatment strategies against Ebola virus infection.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Stanker, Larry H.; Branscomb, Elbert W.; Grabske, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.W.; Grabske, R.J.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguishing between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype. 4 figs.

  17. The human thymus microenvironment: heterogeneity detected by monoclonal anti-epithelial cell antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    de Maagd, R A; MacKenzie, W A; Schuurman, H J; Ritter, M A; Price, K M; Broekhuizen, R; Kater, L

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against human thymus stromal cells and their specificity for the epithelial component of thymus stroma assessed by double immunofluorescence using anti-keratin antibodies to identify epithelium. Our monoclonal antibodies identify six distinct patterns of epithelial cell antigen expression within the thymus: pan epithelial (antibody IP1); cortex (MR3 and MR6); cortical/medullary junction (IP2); subcapsule and subpopulation of medulla (MR10/MR14); Hassall's corpuscles and adjacent subpopulation of medulla (IP3); Hassall's corpuscles only (MR13/IP4). This heterogeneity of antigen expression suggests that many different epithelial microenvironments exist within the human thymus. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 Cont Figure 2 PMID:3884494

  18. Lupus anticoagulant activities of murine monoclonal antibodies to liposomal phosphatidylinositol phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Alving, B M; Banerji, B; Fogler, W E; Alving, C R

    1987-01-01

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies having high levels of activity against phosphatidyl-inositol phosphate (PIP) were tested for lupus anticoagulant activity. The antibodies showed different degrees of potency in a modified partial thromboplastin time test (APTT) that used dilutions of either bovine brain extract (Thrombofax) or liposomes consisting of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) as the phospholipid source. The same relative order of anticoagulant potency that was observed in the APTT that used the PC/PS liposomes was maintained when the anti-PIP antibodies were tested for cross-reactivity either by induction of complement-dependent immune damage to liposomes containing PS, or in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays that used PS, cardiolipin (CL), or phosphatidylinositol (PI) as antigens. The data indicate that monoclonal antibodies to PIP can express anticoagulant activity in a modified APTT that correlates with their different degrees of cross-reactivity against the negatively-charged phospholipids PS, CL, and PI. PMID:2820640

  19. Inhibition of kinesin-driven microtubule motility by monoclonal antibodies to kinesin heavy chains

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have prepared and characterized seven mouse monoclonal antibodies (SUK 1-7) to the 130-kD heavy chain of sea urchin egg kinesin. On immunoblots, SUK 3 and SUK 4 cross-reacted with Drosophila embryo 116- kD heavy chains, and SUK 4, SUK 5, SUK 6, and SUK 7 bound to the 120-kD heavy chains of bovine brain kinesin. Three out of seven monoclonal antikinesins (SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of sea urchin egg kinesin-induced microtubule translocation, whereas the other four monoclonal antibodies had no detectable effect on this motility. The inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7) appear to bind to spatially related sites on an ATP- sensitive microtubule binding 45-kD chymotryptic fragment of the 130-kD heavy chain, whereas SUK 2 binds to a spatially distinct site. None of the monoclonal antikinesins inhibited the microtubule activated MgATPase activity of kinesin, suggesting that SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7 uncouple this MgATPase activity from motility. PMID:2974459

  20. The clinical application of monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Alinari, Lapo; Lapalombella, Rosa; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) represents the most prevalent adult leukemia. Treatment with chemotherapy over the past 3 decades has been palliative. The introduction of therapeutic antibodies has increased the number of treatment options for this disease. Despite this increase, our true understanding of the mechanism of action of antibody therapy in CLL remains limited. Rituximab, a CD20 antibody, is currently widely used in combination-based strategies for both previously untreated symptomatic CLL and as salvage therapy. Recent data suggest that the addition of rituximab to fludarabine with or without cyclophosphamide prolongs survival in younger patients with CLL. Other improved CD20 antibodies with promising clinical activity, including ofatumumab and GA-101, are coming forward. Alemtuzumab, a CD52 antibody, likewise has demonstrated benefit in both symptomatic, previously untreated CLL and in patients with relapsed disease but has less selectivity. Development of other therapeutic antibodies targeting alternative B-cell–specific antigens in CLL has been less successful, although many promising candidate antibodies and/or small modular immune pharmaceuticals (SMIPs) are coming forward. In addition, recent efforts to combine currently applied therapeutic antibodies with other biologic and targeted therapies with efficacy in CLL offers the potential to move toward alternative non–chemotherapy-based treatment approaches. PMID:20610811

  1. Specificities of monoclonal antibodies to domain I of alpha-gliadins.

    PubMed

    Ellis, H J; Doyle, A P; Wieser, H; Sturgess, R P; Ciclitira, P J

    1993-03-01

    Eight monoclonal antibodies were raised against a sequenced 54-amino-acid peptide of alpha-gliadin, which is thought to exacerbate coeliac disease. Five of the antibodies cross-reacted with coeliac non-toxic cereals. Two of eight of the antibodies bound specifically to coeliac toxic prolamins. These two antibodies cross-reacted with high molecular weight gliadins, which are closely related to alpha-gliadins and whose toxicity to patients with coeliac disease is unclear. The antibodies were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against three amino-acid-sequenced peptides of alpha-gliadin with single amino-acid differences. Differential binding of antibody WC2 suggested that this antibody binds in the region of amino-acid residue 36, a proline residue, where there may be an antigenic beta-reverse turn. This proline residue forms part of a tetrapeptide motif, QQQP, which is thought to be present in all coeliac-active peptides.

  2. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Plethora of Viral Pathogens From Single Combinatorial Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, R. Anthony; Burioni, Roberto; Sanna, Pietro P.; Partridge, Lynda J.; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

    1993-05-01

    Conventional antibody generation usually requires active immunization with antigen immediately prior to the preparation procedure. Combinatorial antibody library technology offers the possibility of cloning a range of antibody specificities at a single point in time and then accessing these specificities at will. Here we show that human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against a plethora of infectious agents can be readily derived from a single library. Further examination of a number of libraries shows that whenever antibody against a pathogen can be detected in the serum of the donor, then specific antibodies can be derived from the corresponding library. We describe the generation of human Fab fragments against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, rubella, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and respiratory syncytial virus. The antibodies are shown to be highly specific and a number are effective in neutralizing virus in vitro.

  3. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Friederike S; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  4. Isolation of Highly Active Monoclonal Antibodies against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Friederike S.; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials. PMID:25706415

  5. In vivo Therapy with Monoclonal Anti-I-A Antibody Suppresses Immune Responses to Acetylcholine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldor, Matthew K.; Sriram, Subramaniam; McDevitt, Hugh O.; Steinman, Lawrence

    1983-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody to I-A gene products of the immune response gene complex attenuates both humoral and cellular responses to acetylcholine receptor and appears to suppress clinical manifestations of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. This demonstrates that use of antibodies against immune response gene products that are associated with susceptibility to disease may be feasible for therapy in autoimmune conditions such as myasthenia gravis.

  6. Combined active and passive immunization against nicotine: minimizing monoclonal antibody requirements using a target antibody concentration strategy.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Katherine E; Harris, Andrew C; LeSage, Mark G; Keyler, Dan E; Burroughs, Danielle; Earley, Cathy; Pentel, Paul R

    2011-11-01

    Nicotine vaccines have shown preliminary evidence of efficacy for enhancing smoking cessation rates, but the serum nicotine-specific antibody (NicAb) concentrations produced are highly variable and many subjects do not develop effective levels. As an alternative to vaccination, passive immunization with nicotine-specific monoclonal antibodies could produce more uniform serum NicAb concentrations, but its use is limited by their high cost and shorter elimination half-life. This study investigated supplementing vaccination with monoclonal antibodies in a targeted fashion to increase vaccine efficacy while minimizing the required monoclonal antibody dose. Rats were vaccinated and then given individualized supplemental doses of the nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody Nic311 to achieve a target total serum NicAb concentration known to be effective for blocking locomotor sensitization (LMS) to nicotine. Rats received vaccine, Nic311, both, or neither, followed by 0.3 mg/kg nicotine s.c. for 10 days to produce LMS. Combination immunotherapy completely blocked the development of LMS, while monotherapy with vaccine or Nic311 alone was only minimally effective. Lower brain nicotine levels were associated with reduced locomotor activity averaged over days 7-10. Despite its greater efficacy, combination immunotherapy did not reduce the variability in the resulting total serum NicAb concentrations. Variability in total serum NicAb concentrations was contributed to by both vaccine-generated antibody and by Nic311. These data show that combination immunotherapy, using a Nic311 dose that is by itself only minimally effective, can substantially enhance nicotine vaccine efficacy. However, variability in serum NicAb levels with combination immunotherapy may make translation of this approach challenging.

  7. Isolation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for chondroitin sulfate E.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ippei; Hikita, Tomoya; Mizuno, Haruka; Sekita, Risa; Minami, Akira; Ishii, Ami; Minamisawa, Yuka; Suzuki, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Hidari, Kazuya I P J; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Chondroitin sulfate E (CSE) is a polysaccharide containing mainly disaccharide units of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) and 4,6-O-disulfated N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) residues (E-unit) in the amount of ∼ 60%. CSE is involved in many biological and pathological processes. In this study, we established new monoclonal antibodies, termed E-12C and E-18H, by using CSE that contained more than 70% of E-units as an immunogen. These antibodies recognized CSE but not other CSs isomers or dermatan sulfate (DS). We evaluated the reactivities of the antibodies to 6-O-sulfated CSA (6S-CSA) and DS (6S-DS) that possessed ∼ 60% of GalNAc (4S, 6S) moieties in their structures. Neither of the antibodies reacted with 6S-DS. The antibodies strictly distinguished the structural difference of GlcA and L-iduronic acid in the polysaccharide. Binding affinities of the antibodies were determined by a surface plasmon resonance assay using CSE and 6S-CSA. The binding affinities were strongly associated with the molecular weight of CSE and the E-unit content of 6S-CSA. Moreover, we demonstrated that the antibodies are applicable to histochemical analysis. In conclusion, the new anti-CSE monoclonal antibodies specifically recognize the E-unit of CSE. The antibodies will become useful tools for the investigation of the biological and pathological significance of CSE.

  8. Anti-MrkA Monoclonal Antibodies Reveal Distinct Structural and Antigenic Features of MrkA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Yan; Cvitkovic, Romana; Pennini, Meghan E.; Chang, Chew shun; Pelletier, Mark; Bonnell, Jessica; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.; Stover, C. Kendall; Xiao, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Antibody therapy against antibiotics resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections represents a promising strategy, the success of which depends critically on the ability to identify appropriate antibody targets. Using a target-agnostic strategy, we recently discovered MrkA as a potential antibody target and vaccine antigen. Interestingly, the anti-MrkA monoclonal antibodies isolated through phage display and hybridoma platforms all recognize an overlapping epitope, which opens up important questions including whether monoclonal antibodies targeting different MrkA epitopes can be generated and if they possess different protective profiles. In this study we generated four anti-MrkA antibodies targeting different epitopes through phage library panning against recombinant MrkA protein. These anti-MrkA antibodies elicited strong in vitro and in vivo protections against a multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain. Furthermore, mutational and epitope analysis suggest that the two cysteine residues may play essential roles in maintaining a MrkA structure that is highly compacted and exposes limited antibody binding/neutralizing epitopes. These results suggest the need for further in-depth understandings of the structure of MrkA, the role of MrkA in the pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumoniae and the protective mechanism adopted by anti-MrkA antibodies to fully explore the potential of MrkA as an efficient therapeutic target and vaccine antigen. PMID:28107434

  9. Monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 in hematological malignancies and beyond.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Janmaat, Maarten L; Mutis, Tuna; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Sasser, A Kate; Lokhorst, Henk M; Parren, Paul W H I

    2016-03-01

    CD38 is a multifunctional cell surface protein that has receptor as well as enzyme functions. The protein is generally expressed at low levels on various hematological and solid tissues, while plasma cells express particularly high levels of CD38. The protein is also expressed in a subset of hematological tumors, and shows especially broad and high expression levels in plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma (MM). Together, this triggered the development of various therapeutic CD38 antibodies, including daratumumab, isatuximab, and MOR202. Daratumumab binds a unique CD38 epitope and showed strong anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. The antibody engages diverse mechanisms of action, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis, programmed cell death, modulation of enzymatic activity, and immunomodulatory activity. CD38-targeting antibodies have a favorable toxicity profile in patients, and early clinical data show a marked activity in MM, while studies in other hematological malignancies are ongoing. Daratumumab has single agent activity and a limited toxicity profile, allowing favorable combination therapies with existing as well as emerging therapies, which are currently evaluated in the clinic. Finally, CD38 antibodies may have a role in the treatment of diseases beyond hematological malignancies, including solid tumors and antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  10. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the transforming proteins of avian sarcoma viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lipsich, L A; Lewis, A J; Brugge, J S

    1983-01-01

    Thirteen clones of hybrid cells which synthesize antibodies directed against the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) transforming protein, pp60src, were isolated. Mouse myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from mice that had been immunized with purified pp60src from bacterial recombinants which direct the synthesis of the RSV src gene. The hybridomas which survived the selection medium were screened by immunoprecipitation of pp60src from 32P-labeled lysates of RSV-transformed cells. Monoclonal antibodies produced by subclones derived from 13 hybridomas recognized pp60src encoded by the Schmidt-Ruppin and Prague strains of RSV and the cellular homolog of pp60src. Antibody from clone 261 had a high affinity for the viral yes gene product, and antibodies from clones 443 and 463 recognized the transforming proteins encoded by viruses containing the related transforming genes fps and ros. Several other clones had a low affinity for the viral yes, fps, and ros gene products which could be detected by in vitro phosphorylation of the transforming proteins after immunoprecipitation with the monoclonal antibody. All of the monoclonal antibodies allowed phosphorylation of pp60src and casein in an immune complex-bound reaction. Images PMID:6312092

  11. INITIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST THE FUNGAL HEMOLYSIN STACHYLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is known to produce the hemolysin stachylysin and its detection in human serum has been proposed as a biomarker for exposure to the fungus. In this study we report the initial characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against stachylysin and the dev...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to synthetic pyrethroids and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, Larry H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Watkins, Bruce E.; Van Emon, Jeanette M.; Bigbee, Carolyn L.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies which may be used in a sensitive immunoassay for detection of synthetic pyrethroids in foods and environmental samples. Appropriate sample preparation and enzyme amplification of the immunoassay for this widely-used class of pesticides permits detection at low levels in laboratory and field tested samples.

  13. Production, characterization and application of monoclonal antibody to spherulocytes: A subpopulation of coelomocytes of Apostichopus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One monoclonal antibody (mAb 3F6) against coelomocytes of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus was developed by immunization of Balb/C mice. Analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay test (IIFAT), immunocytochemical assay (ICA),Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), mAb 3...

  14. Anticancer Teamwork: Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells Collaborate with Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Robert-Tissot, Céline; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Cross-presentation of tumor antigens represents a key pathway in antitumor immune responses that can be exploited to synergize not only with the already prominent "checkpoint blockade," but also with newer attempts to use T-cell stimulatory monoclonal antibodies in immunotherapy.

  15. Development and Characterization of Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Chicken CD83

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was carried out to develop and characterize mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against chicken CD83 (chCD83), a membrane-bound glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily that is primarily expressed on mature dendritic cells (DCs). A recombinant chCD83/IgG4 fusion protein con...

  16. Application of Tryptophan Fluorescence Bandwidth-Maximum Plot in Analysis of Monoclonal Antibody Structure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Yen; Hsieh, Ming-Ching; Zhou, Qinwei

    2017-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become the fastest growing protein therapeutics in recent years. The stability and heterogeneity pertaining to its physical and chemical structures remain a big challenge. Tryptophan fluorescence has been proven to be a versatile tool to monitor protein tertiary structure. By modeling the tryptophan fluorescence emission envelope with log-normal distribution curves, the quantitative measure can be exercised for the routine characterization of monoclonal antibody overall tertiary structure. Furthermore, the log-normal deconvolution results can be presented as a two-dimensional plot with tryptophan emission bandwidth vs. emission maximum to enhance the resolution when comparing samples or as a function of applied perturbations. We demonstrate this by studying four different monoclonal antibodies, which show the distinction on emission bandwidth-maximum plot despite their similarity in overall amino acid sequences and tertiary structures. This strategy is also used to demonstrate the tertiary structure comparability between different lots manufactured for one of the monoclonal antibodies (mAb2). In addition, in the unfolding transition studies of mAb2 as a function of guanidine hydrochloride concentration, the evolution of the tertiary structure can be clearly traced in the emission bandwidth-maximum plot.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to synthetic pyrethroids and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, L.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.; Van Emon, J.M.; Bigbee, C.L.

    1992-04-28

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies which may be used in a sensitive immunoassay for detection of synthetic pyrethroids in foods and environmental samples. Appropriate sample preparation and enzyme amplification of the immunoassay for this widely-used class of pesticides permits detection at low levels in laboratory and field tested samples. 6 figs.

  18. The treatment of intraperitoneal malignant disease with monoclonal antibody guided 131I radiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, B.; Mather, S.; Shepherd, J.; Crowther, M.; Hawkins, L.; Britton, K.; Slevin, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    Seven patients with small volume ovarian carcinoma, remaining after conventional therapy with surgery and a platinum containing chemotherapy regimen, were treated with intraperitoneal monoclonal antibody guided radiotherapy. 100 mCi131I conjugated to 10 mg of monoclonal antibody were injected i.p. in 2,000 ml peritoneal dialysis fluid. Patients were evaluated 3 months later; 3 had clinical progressive disease while third look laparotomy demonstrated progressive disease in 3 of the remaining 4 patients. The seventh patient did not have a third look laparotomy and is currently inevaluable for response. Five patients with recurrent malignant ascites not controlled by diuretics or repeated paracentesis were similarly treated with 75-170 mCi131I conjugated to 10 mg monoclonal antibody. In three patients the ascites was controlled for a mean of 4 months. One patient died too early to assess the control of his ascites but tumour cells disappeared from the ascitic fluid after therapy. In the patient whose ascites were not controlled, a subpopulation of antigen-negative tumour cells was demonstrated. This study was unable to demonstrate a therapeutic benefit for i.p. injected monoclonal antibody guided radiotherapy for solid intraperitoneal tumour but suggests that it may be capable of controlling the accumulation of antigen positive malignant ascites. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3219277

  19. Harnessing the immune system's arsenal: producing human monoclonal antibodies for therapeutics and investigating immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Meghan; Kaur, Kaval; Pauli, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technology has undergone rapid and innovative reinvention over the last 30 years. Application of these technologies to human samples revealed valuable therapeutic and experimental insights. These technologies, each with their own benefits and flaws, have proven indispensable for immunological research and in our fight to provide new treatments and improved vaccines for infectious disease. PMID:21876728

  20. Comparison of avian Chlamydia psittaci isolates by restriction endonuclease analysis and serovar-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A A

    1991-01-01

    Avian Chlamydia psittaci isolates were examined by restriction endonuclease analysis and serovar-specific monoclonal antibodies and compared with ovine abortion and polyarthritis isolates. The avian isolates were divided into four serovars (turkey, psittacine, pigeon, and duck) based on their reactivity to the monoclonal antibodies. The DNA digest patterns were similar across the four avian serovars; most bands were identical when the isolates were tested with PstI, BamHI, and EcoRI restriction endonuclease enzymes. The turkey group restriction endonuclease analysis patterns were distinguished from those of the other avian strains by three to four band differences with all enzymes. The duck and pigeon isolates showed only minor DNA pattern differences when compared with the psittacine isolates. Four psittacine isolates from various locations in Texas had an extra band with the EcoRI restriction enzyme, suggesting that they were from a common source; however, they were indistinguishable from the other psittacine isolates when examined with the monoclonal antibodies. The avian isolates were distinctly different from either abortion or polyarthritis isolates by both restriction endonuclease analysis and monoclonal antibody analysis. The data demonstrate that the avian isolates form a distinct group or separate biovar with at least four serovars. Images PMID:1848867

  1. Characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against Shewanella marisflavi, a novel pathogen of Apostichopus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella marisflavi strain AP629 was certified as a novel pathogen of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. In this study, four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (3C1, 3D9, 2F2, 2A8) against strain AP629 were developed by immunizing Balb/C mice. 3C1 and 3D9 recognized S. marisflavi only, showing no ...

  2. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies reactive with chicken IL1 Beta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for chicken interleukin-1 Beta (chIL-1 Beta) were produced and characterized. Both mAbs identified a 66.0 kDa recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli by Western blot analysis that corresponded to the expected molecular weight of a recombinant...

  3. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies reactive with chicken IL-1ß

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for chicken interleukin-1ß (chIL-1ß) were produced and characterized. Both mAbs identified a 66.0 kDa recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli by Western blot analysis that corresponded to the expected molecular weight of a recombinant fusion ...

  4. Specific killing of human melanoma cells with an efficient 10B-compound on monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, A.; Tokuhisa, T.; Nakagawa, T.; Sasase, A.; Ichihashi, M.; Ferrone, S.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-07-01

    We previously established methods which have enabled us to target a sufficient number of 10B atoms on human melanoma cells to destroy them by thermal neutron irradiation. Monoclonal antibodies were here used as vector of 10B atoms on the target cell. Thermal neutrons require at least 10(9) 10B atoms to destroy the cell. In order to accumulate an adequate number of 10B atoms on target cells, our first approach was to make an effective compound that contains 12 atoms of 10B in a molecule. The second step was to conjugate the compound with an avidin molecule (10B12-avidin). One molecule of the 10B12-avidin carries about 30 atoms of 10B. This 10B12-avidin can be specifically targeted on human melanoma cells by biotinated monoclonal antibodies specific for the cells. Furthermore, the number of 10B atoms on target cells can be augmented by a hapten-antihapten monoclonal antibody system. The cultured human melanoma cells treated with these methods were damaged by thermal neutron irradiation. This is the first study that indicates thermal neutrons do injure target cells boronated by monoclonal antibodies.

  5. Survey of citrus tristeza virus populations in Central California that react with MCA13 monoclonal antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Citrus Pest Detection Program (CPDP) of the Central California Tristeza Eradication Agency monitors Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in Central California. MCA13 is a severe strain discriminating monoclonal antibody used to screen for potentially virulent CTV isolates. MCA13-reactive CTV isolates are...

  6. Antibody networks and imaging: elicitation of anti-fluorescein antibodies in response to the metatypic state of fluorescein-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A M; Miklasz, S D; Voss, E W

    1996-01-01

    Studies are described regarding generation of anti-hapten antibodies starting with a monoclonal Ig immunogen in the ligand-induced conformation or metatypic state. Liganded monoclonal Ab1 antibodies represent the unique feature of the study since previous reports investigating internal imaging in the original Idiotype Network Hypothesis [Jerne, 1974 (Ann. Immun. 125C, 373-389)] were based on the non-liganded or idiotypic state [as reviewed in: Rodkey, 1980 (Microbiol. Rev. 44, 631-659); Kohler et al., 1979 (In: Methods in Enzymology: Antibodies, Antigens and Molecular Mimicry, pp. 3-35); Greenspan and Bona, 1993 (FASEB J. 7,437-444)]. Affinity-labeled liganded murine monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibodies served as immunogens administered both in the syngenic and xenogenic modes to determine if the metatypic state elicited anti-hapten antibodies through imaging-like mechanisms. Polyclonal and monoclonal anti-Ab1 reagents in various hosts were assayed for anti-fluorescein and/or anti-metatype specificity. Significant anti-fluorescein responses were measured indicating that the metatypic state directly or indirectly stimulates an anti-hapten antibody population.

  7. Mice are actively immunized after passive monoclonal antibody prophylaxis and ricin toxin challenge. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, P.V.; Wright, D.C.

    1992-12-31

    Mice passively immunized by a protective, anti-ricin A-chain monoclonal antibody, then challenged intravenously with ricin, were protected from a subsequent ricin challenge, and were actively immunized. Two significant advantages accrued from this experiment: the monoclonal antibody neutralized the toxicity of the ricin immunogen, and active immunization was achieved with very low antigen load (approx. 0.5 micrograms/mouse). We ruled out the possibility that residual monoclonal antibody provided the protection by using three independent criteria. There was significant (four orders of magnitude) enhancement of the immune response in the presence of the monoclonal antibody; control immunizations of mice with ricin A-chain, ricin B-chain or either chain with the monoclonal antibody did not induce active immunity; and the active immunization could not be replicated when protective goat polyclonal antibody was substituted for the monoclonal antibody. Because high titers were achieved rapidly without any adjuvant, we are currently investigating haptenized ricin to determine if anti-hapten monoclonal antibodies can be produced by this refined procedure.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of internally labeled monoclonal antibodies as a gold standard: comparison of biodistribution of /sup 75/Se-, /sup 111/In-, and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Konishi, J.; Yamamuro, T.; Toyama, S.

    1989-04-01

    In order to know the true biodistribution of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies, three monoclonal antibodies (OST6, OST7, and OST15) against human osteosarcoma and control antibody were internally labeled with 75Se by incubating (75Se)methionine and hybridoma cells. 75Se-labeled monoclonal antibodies were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line KT005, and the results were compared with those of 125I- and 111In-labeled antibodies. 75Se-, 125I- and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies had identical binding activities to KT005 cells, and the immunoreactivity was in the decreasing order of OST6, OST7, and OST15. On the contrary, in vivo tumor uptake (% injected dose/g) of 75Se- and 125I-labeled antibodies assessed using nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma KT005 was in the order of OST7, OST6, and OST15. In the case of 111In, the order was OST6, OST7, and OST15. High liver uptake was similarly seen with 75Se- and 111In-labeled antibodies, whereas 125I-labeled antibodies showed the lowest tumor and liver uptake. These data indicate that tumor targeting of antibody conjugates are not always predictable from cell binding studies due to the difference of blood clearance of labeled antibodies. Furthermore, biodistribution of both 111In- and 125I-labeled antibodies are not identical with internally labeled antibody. Admitting that internally labeled antibody is a ''gold standard'' of biodistribution of monoclonal antibody, high liver uptake of 111In-radiolabeled antibodies may be inherent to antibodies. Little, if any, increase in tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of antibody conjugates will be expected compared to those of 111In-labeled antibodies if stably coupled conjugates are administered i.v.

  9. Structure and Immunogenicity of a Peptide Vaccine, Including the Complete HIV-1 gp41 2F5 Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Soraya; Araujo, Aitziber; Apellániz, Beatriz; Bryson, Steve; Carravilla, Pablo; de la Arada, Igor; Huarte, Nerea; Rujas, Edurne; Pai, Emil F.; Arrondo, José L. R.; Domene, Carmen; Jiménez, María Angeles; Nieva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 harbors the epitope recognized by the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV 2F5 antibody, a research focus in HIV-1 vaccine development. In this work, we analyze the structure and immunogenic properties of MPERp, a peptide vaccine that includes the following: (i) the complete sequence protected from proteolysis by the 2F5 paratope; (ii) downstream residues postulated to establish weak contacts with the CDR-H3 loop of the antibody, which are believed to be crucial for neutralization; and (iii) an aromatic rich anchor to the membrane interface. MPERp structures solved in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and 25% 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (v/v) confirmed folding of the complete 2F5 epitope within continuous kinked helices. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurements demonstrated the retention of main helical conformations in immunogenic formulations based on alum, Freund's adjuvant, or two different types of liposomes. Binding to membrane-inserted MPERp, IR, molecular dynamics simulations, and characterization of the immune responses further suggested that packed helical bundles partially inserted into the lipid bilayer, rather than monomeric helices adsorbed to the membrane interface, could encompass effective MPER peptide vaccines. Together, our data constitute a proof-of-concept to support MPER-based peptides in combination with liposomes as stand-alone immunogens and suggest new approaches for structure-aided MPER vaccine development. PMID:24429284

  10. Prevalence, specificity and functionality of anti-ganglioside antibodies in neuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; Jacobs, Bart C; Tio-Gillen, Anne P; Eurelings, Marijke; Jansen, Marc D; van den Berg, Leonard H; Notermans, Nicolette C; van der Pol, W-Ludo

    2014-03-15

    IgM antibodies against gangliosides and their complexes were studied in sera from 54 patients with polyneuropathy and IgM monoclonal gammopathy (IgM-PNP) without anti-MAG antibodies. Anti-ganglioside antibodies were found in 19 (35%) patients. Five (9%) patients had antibodies against ganglioside complexes. IgM antibodies against gangliosides activated complement in vitro. Light chain usage was restricted to kappa or lambda in most, but not all patients. In conclusion, anti-ganglioside antibodies in IgM-PNP are common, display pathogenic properties and do not always arise from a monoclonal B cell proliferation.

  11. Model-based prediction of monoclonal antibody retention in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-07-12

    In order to support a model-based process design in ion-exchange chromatography, an adsorption equilibrium model was adapted to predict the protein retention behavior from the amino acid sequence and from structural information on the resin. It is based on the computation of protein-resin interactions with a colloidal model and accounts for the contribution of each ionizable amino acid to the protein charge. As a verification of the protein charge model, the experimental titration curve of a monoclonal antibody was compared to its predicted net charge. Using this protein charge model in the computation of the protein-resin interactions, it is possible to predict the adsorption equilibrium constant (i.e. retention factor or Henry constant) with an explicit pH and salt dependence. The application of the model-based predictions for an in silico screening of the protein retention on various stationary phases or, alternatively, for the comparison of various monoclonal antibodies on a given cation-exchanger was demonstrated. Furthermore, considering the structural differences between charge variants of a monoclonal antibody, it was possible to predict their individual retention times. The selectivity between the side variants and the main isoform of the monoclonal antibody were computed. The comparison with the experimental data showed that the model was reliable with respect to the identification of the operating conditions maximizing the selectivity, i.e. the most promising conditions for a monoclonal antibody variant separation. Such predictions can be useful in reducing the experimental effort to identify the parameter space.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with the mouse interleukin 5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The rat mAbs R52.120 and R52.625 inhibit the action of IL-5 on both IL- 5-sensitive cell lines and freshly isolated splenic B lymphocytes. Neither antibody inhibits the proliferative cell responses promoted by IL-2, IL-3, or IL-4. Purified R52.120+ lymphoid spleen cells contain 15- 20-fold higher numbers of B lymphocytes responding to IL-5 in the form of maturation into antibody-producing cells. By immunofluorescence staining and flow fluorocytometry, the R52.120 and R52.625 antibodies bound to all 12 IL-5-sensitive cell lines tested. Both antibodies react with 2-4% cells in the spleen, 5% lymphoid cells, and 10-15% myeloid cells in the bone marrow, and 10-14% in the peritoneum of C57BL/6, DBA/2, and BALB/c adult mice. No positive cells for either antibody were detected in the thymus and lymph nodes of these mice. Both R52.120 and R52.625 antibodies specifically inhibit the binding of radiolabeled IL-5 to its receptor. Finally, R52.120 and R52.625 antibodies precipitate from 35S-methionine-labeled IL-5-R+ cell lysates three proteins with Mr 46,000, 130,000, and 140,000. Taken together from these results, we conclude that the R52.120 and R52.625 mAbs recognize epitopes on the IL-5-R complex very close or identical to the IL-5 binding sites. PMID:2469765

  13. Discovery and characterization of antibody variants using mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis for biosimilar candidates of monoclonal antibody drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhua; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Dongmei; Xu, Jun; Ke, Zhi; Suen, Wen-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the most commonly used technique for the characterization of antibody variants. MAb-X and mAb-Y are two approved IgG1 subtype monoclonal antibody drugs recombinantly produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We report here that two unexpected and rare antibody variants have been discovered during cell culture process development of biosimilars for these two approved drugs through intact mass analysis. We then used comprehensive mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis including reduced light, heavy chains, and domain-specific mass as well as peptide mapping analysis to fully characterize the observed antibody variants. The "middle-up" mass comparative analysis demonstrated that the antibody variant from mAb-X biosimilar candidate was caused by mass variation of antibody crystalline fragment (Fc), whereas a different variant with mass variation in antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab) from mAb-Y biosimilar candidate was identified. Endoproteinase Lys-C digested peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry analysis further revealed that a leucine to glutamine change in N-terminal 402 site of heavy chain was responsible for the generation of mAb-X antibody variant. Lys-C and trypsin coupled non-reduced and reduced peptide mapping comparative analysis showed that the formation of the light-heavy interchain trisulfide bond resulted in the mAb-Y antibody variant. These two cases confirmed that mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis plays a critical role for the characterization of monoclonal antibody variants, and biosimilar developers should start with a comprehensive structural assessment and comparative analysis to decrease the risk of the process development for biosimilars.

  14. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing the active conformation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ise, Nobuyuki; Omi, Kazuya; Miwa, Kyoko; Honda, Hideo; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Goishi, Katsutoshi

    2010-04-09

    The precise regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for its function in cellular growth control. Although many antibodies against EGFR have been developed and used to analyze its regulation and function, it is not yet easy to analyze activated EGFR specifically. Activated EGFR has been mainly detected by its phosphorylation state using anti-phospho-EGFR and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. In the present study, we have established novel monoclonal antibodies which recognize the activated EGFR independently of its phosphorylation. Our antibodies detected active state of EGFR in immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, by recognizing the epitopes which are exposed through the conformational change induced by ligand-binding. Furthermore, we found that our antibodies preferentially detected the conformation of constitutively active EGFR mutants found in lung cancer cell lines. These results indicate that our antibodies may become novel research and diagnostic tools for detecting and analyzing the conformation of active EGFR in various cells and tissues.

  15. Characterization of carbohydrate structural features recognized by anti-arabinogalactan-protein monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yates, E A; Valdor, J F; Haslam, S M; Morris, H R; Dell, A; Mackie, W; Knox, J P

    1996-03-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are a diverse class of plant cell surface proteoglycans implicated in a range of fundamental processes associated with plant cell development. Anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies have been used extensively for the investigation of the developmental regulation of AGPs although virtually nothing is known about the structure of the carbohydrate epitopes recognised by these antibodies. In this report, a series of methyl glycosides of monosaccharides and a range of oligosaccharides that are elements of the carbohydrate component of AGPs have been investigated for recognition by previously derived anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies. No clear evidence was obtained for the involvement of terminal arabinofuranosides, nor of the galactan backbone, in the recognition of the glycan structure of AGPs by any of the antibodies used in this study. Interestingly, the most effective inhibitor of the binding of the monoclonal antibodies MAC207, JIM4 and JIM13 to exudate gum antigens was an acidic trisaccharide, isolated from a partial acid hydrolysate of gum karaya which has the structure: GlcA beta(1-->3) GalA alpha(1-->2)Rha, determined by a combination of FAB-MS, GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits triosephosphate isomerase activity of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Víctor, Sanabria-Ayala; Yolanda, Medina-Flores; Araceli, Zavala-Carballo; Lucía, Jiménez; Abraham, Landa

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we obtained and characterized partially a monoclonal antibody (4H11D10B11 mAb) against triosephosphate isomerase from Taenia solium (TTPI). This antibody recognized the enzyme by both ELISA and western blot and was able to inhibit its enzymatic activity in 74%. Moreover, the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs), products of digestion of the monoclonal antibody with papain, retained almost the same inhibitory effect. We determined the binding site by ELISA; synthetic peptides containing sequences from different non-conserved regions of the TTPI were confronted to the 4H11D10B11 mAb. The epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody was located on peptide TTPI-56 (ATPAQAQEVHKVVRDWIRKHVDAGIADKARI), and an analysis of mimotopes, obtained with the 4H11D10B11 mAb, suggests that the epitope spans the sequence WIRKHVDAGIAD, residues 193-204 of the enzyme. This epitope is located within helix 6, next to loop 6, an essential active loop during catalysis. The antibody did not recognize triosephosphate isomerase from man and pig, definitive and intermediary hosts of T. solium, respectively. Furthermore, it did not bind to the catalytic site, since kinetic analysis demonstrated that inhibition had a non-competitive profile.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies in the detection of bone marrow metastases in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Skov, B G; Hirsch, F R; Bobrow, L

    1992-04-01

    Using conventional examination (CE) of H&E stained slides from bone marrow aspirates, metastases can be detected in approximately 25% of patients with small cell lung cancer. We investigated a panel of monoclonal antibodies using immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of bone marrow infiltration from SCLC and compared the results with CE. Seven monoclonal antibodies raised against epithelial antigens (CAM 5.2, MOV 15, NCCST 433, PE 35, LCA1/L38, HMFG 1 AND HMFG 2) were applied on bone marrow sections from three groups of patients (pts): (1) 19 pts in whom SCLC-metastases were detected by CE, (2) 44 pts with SCLC in whom metastases could not be detected by CE, and (3) 20 pts with non-malignant bone marrow diseases. All the antibodies except LCA1/L38 were positive in 60-90% of the slides with infiltrating tumour cells in group 1. No positive tumour cells were detected in group 2. A few plasma cells and megakaryocytes were slightly positive for MOV 15 and NCCST 433, but no other positive cells were detected in group 3. In conclusion, the monoclonal antibodies used in this study may be useful for diagnostic purposes when a suspicious looking infiltration is detected by CE. However, these antibodies could not detect metastatic tumour cells in the bone marrow sections from patients in whom CE did not reveal any tumour cells.

  18. Development and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies reactive with porcine CSF1R (CD115).

    PubMed

    Moffat, L; Rothwell, L; Garcia-Morales, C; Sauter, K A; Kapetanovic, R; Gow, D J; Hume, D A

    2014-11-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1) controls the proliferation and differentiation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. CSF1, alongside a second ligand, interleukin-34 (IL-34), acts by binding to a cell surface receptor (CSF1R). We previously cloned and expressed pig CSF1 and IL-34. Here we produced a pig CSF1R-Ig+pFUSE Fc fusion protein and used it as an immunogen to produce three monoclonal antibodies (ROS8G11, ROS3A5 and ROS3B10) targeted against porcine CSF1R. Specific binding of each monoclonal antibody was confirmed by ELISA, Western blot, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The antibodies did not block CSF1 signalling. The surface expression of CSF1R in pig peripheral blood was restricted to CD14-positive monocytes and was also detected on lung macrophages. These antibodies provided an opportunity to investigate the increase of available CSF1R during pig BMDM differentiation. The new monoclonal antibodies provide useful reagents to support the study of monocyte and macrophage biology in the pig.

  19. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  20. Common epitope on the lipopolysaccharide of Legionella pneumophila recognized by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, C; Joly, J R; Ramsay, D; Boissinot, M; Benhamou, N

    1988-01-01

    Serogroup-specificity of Legionella pneumophila is related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and few cross-reactions between serogroups have been observed with rabbit or monkey antisera. C57BL/6 mice were sequentially immunized with crude outer membrane fractions of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 7, Legionella bozemanii, and Legionella micdadei. Spleen cells from these mice were then fused with the Sp2-0/Ag14 mouse myeloma cell line. Outer membrane-rich fractions and LPS were prepared from L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8 and other Legionella and non-Legionella species. Immunoblots of these extracts were performed with monoclonal antibody obtained from these fusions. One of these monoclonal antibodies recognized an epitope common to all tested serogroups of L. pneumophila and attached to the major constituent of the outer membrane, LPS. This antibody did not react with other Legionella species and numerous gram-negative rods other than Pseudomonas fluorescens CDC93. This monoclonal antibody may be useful in preliminary identification of L. pneumophila as an alternative to direct fluorescent-antibody testing. Images PMID:2454935

  1. Escape From Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Affects Henipavirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Borisevich, Viktoriya; Lee, Benhur; Hickey, Andrew; DeBuysscher, Blair; Broder, Christopher C; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2016-02-01

    Henipaviruses are zoonotic viruses that can cause severe and acute respiratory diseases and encephalitis in humans. To date, no vaccine or treatments are approved for human use. The presence of neutralizing antibodies is a strong correlate of protection against lethal disease in animals. However, since RNA viruses are prone to high mutation rates, the possibility that these viruses will escape neutralization remains a potential concern. In the present study, we generated neutralization-escape mutants, using 6 different monoclonal antibodies, and studied the effect of these neutralization-escape mutations on in vitro and in vivo fitness. These data provide a mechanism for overcoming neutralization escape by use of cocktails of cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that recognize residues within the glycoprotein that are important for virus replication and virulence.

  2. Purification of bovine thyroid-stimulating hormone by a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, A.J.; van Denderen, J.; Aarden, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against bovine TSH was obtained by hybridoma technology. This antibody was specific for TSH and did not react with bovine LH and FSH. Affinity chromatography of crude TSH was performed on anti-TSH Sepharose. Bovine TSH was purified in a single step to near homogeneity by this technique, as shown by cation exchange chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified TSH. The biological activity of the hormone was not affected during the purification, as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation of the TSH-dependent FRTL5 cell line. The results indicate that affinity purification of TSH by means of a monoclonal antibody is a simple one-step procedure for the production of biologically active, highly purified TSH.

  3. Escape From Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Affects Henipavirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Borisevich, Viktoriya; Lee, Benhur; Hickey, Andrew; DeBuysscher, Blair; Broder, Christopher C.; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Henipaviruses are zoonotic viruses that can cause severe and acute respiratory diseases and encephalitis in humans. To date, no vaccine or treatments are approved for human use. The presence of neutralizing antibodies is a strong correlate of protection against lethal disease in animals. However, since RNA viruses are prone to high mutation rates, the possibility that these viruses will escape neutralization remains a potential concern. In the present study, we generated neutralization-escape mutants, using 6 different monoclonal antibodies, and studied the effect of these neutralization-escape mutations on in vitro and in vivo fitness. These data provide a mechanism for overcoming neutralization escape by use of cocktails of cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that recognize residues within the glycoprotein that are important for virus replication and virulence. PMID:26357909

  4. Antibacterial monoclonal antibodies and the dawn of a new era in the control of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Macario, A.J.L.; Conway de Macario, E.

    1984-01-01

    Literature reports concerned with monoclonal antibodies against bacteria or their toxins, which are pathogens for man and animals were surveyed. These antibodies have important potential uses in human and veterinary pathology and medicine. They are likely to become key elements in a fast progression toward a more complete understanding and control of infectious diseases and of toxin poisoning. A new area of bacteriology relevant to sanitary engineering is also being advanced with the help of antibacterial monoclonal antibodies. This area involves bacteria that produce the biofuel methane, along with other molecules of nutritional value, through a process which brings about the recycling of organic wastes and thereby limits or controls microbial contamination of soil and water. 52 references.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the interaction between lysozyme and monoclonal antibody D1.3.

    PubMed

    McInerney, T L; Howlett, G J; Gruen, L C; Jackson, D C

    1993-01-01

    The method of sedimentation equilibrium has been used to determine the stoichiometry and binding constant for the interaction between hen egg white lysozyme and monoclonal antibody D1.3. The procedures described allow the relative binding affinities of 125I-labelled lysozyme and unlabelled lysozyme to be compared. The data indicate that labelled and unlabelled lysozyme bind to monoclonal D1.3 with similar affinity (binding constant, K = 1.6 x 10(9)/M). Using solid-phase methods estimates obtained for the binding constant were lower and dependent both on the amount of antigen coated on the plate and the dilution of primary antibody (D1.3). These data were not consistent with a simple equilibrium binding model, suggesting kinetic or orientation effects. In contrast sedimentation equilibrium experiments provide a rapid and accurate method for determining both the stoichiometry and binding constants for the interaction between antigens and antibodies.

  6. Dashboard systems: Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic mediated dose optimization for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2015-03-01

    Many marketed drugs exhibit high variability in exposure and response. While these drugs are efficacious in their approved indications, finding appropriate dose regimens for individual patients is not straightforward. Similar dose adjustment problems are also seen with drugs that have a complex relationship between exposure and response and/or a narrow therapeutic window. This is particularly true for monoclonal antibodies, where prolonged dosing at a sub-therapeutic dose can also elicit anti-drug antibodies which will further compromise safety and efficacy. Thus, finding appropriate doses quickly would represent a substantial improvement in healthcare. Dashboard systems, which are decision-support tools, offer an improved, convenient means of tailoring treatment for individual patients. This article reviews the clinical need for this approach, particularly with monoclonal antibodies, the design, development, and testing of such systems, and the likely benefits of dashboard systems in clinical practice. We focus on infliximab for reference.

  7. Strategy for the treatment of multiple myeloma utilizing monoclonal antibodies: A new era begins.

    PubMed

    Magarotto, Valeria; Salvini, Marco; Bonello, Francesca; Bringhen, Sara; Palumbo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Novel agents, such as immunomodulantory drugs (IMiDs) and proteasome inhibitors (PI), have significantly improved overall survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Yet, MM remains an incurable disease, relapse inevitably occurs and patients tend to become resistant to subsequent treatments. This led to the evaluation of new treatment strategies. The recent development of monoclonal antibodies is changing the treatment algorithm of MM by increasing the therapeutic armamentarium. Elotuzumab and Daratumumab were shown to be very effective and are likely to be soon approved by the FDA. Other antibodies are in pre-clinical or early clinical phases of evaluation and further investigation and more robust data are needed. This review will give an overview of the most active monoclonal antibodies against MM.

  8. New monoclonal-antibody two-site solid-phase immunoradiometric assay for human thyrotropin evaluated

    SciTech Connect

    Pekary, A.E.; Hershman, J.M.

    1984-07-01

    The authors compared results with a commercial solid-phase two-site immunoradiometric assay kit for human thyrotropin in which monoclonal antibodies are used with those by our radioimmunoassay, which is optimized for measurement of low concentrations of thyrotropin. In the immunoradiometric assay a specific antibody to the beta subunit of human thyrotropin is immobilized on a polystyrene bead, and a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha subunit provides a measure of bead-immobilized hormone. The mean thyrotropin concentrations in 70 euthyroid serum samples were similar in the two assays. Values for hypothyroid patients were clearly higher in both assays than values for euthyroid individuals. In commercial assays the major source of error in measurement of thyrotropin response to thyroliberin in terms of the increment over the basal concentration of thyrotropin has been systematic errors in the measurement of those basal concentrations. With the present assay, however, basal values are obtained with good precision and accuracy.

  9. Clinical efficacy and management of monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 and SLAMF7 in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Moreau, Philippe; Plesner, Torben; Palumbo, Antonio; Gay, Francesca; Laubach, Jacob P; Malavasi, Fabio; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Sonneveld, Pieter; Lokhorst, Henk M; Richardson, Paul G

    2016-02-11

    Immunotherapeutic strategies are emerging as promising therapeutic approaches in multiple myeloma (MM), with several monoclonal antibodies in advanced stages of clinical development. Of these agents, CD38-targeting antibodies have marked single agent activity in extensively pretreated MM, and preliminary results from studies with relapsed/refractory patients have shown enhanced therapeutic efficacy when daratumumab and isatuximab are combined with other agents. Furthermore, although elotuzumab (anti-SLAMF7) has no single agent activity in advanced MM, randomized trials in relapsed/refractory MM have demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival when elotuzumab is added to lenalidomide-dexamethasone or bortezomib-dexamethasone. Importantly, there has been no significant additive toxicity when these monoclonal antibodies are combined with other anti-MM agents, other than infusion-related reactions specific to the therapeutic antibody. Prevention and management of infusion reactions is important to avoid drug discontinuation, which may in turn lead to reduced efficacy of anti-MM therapy. Therapeutic antibodies interfere with several laboratory tests. First, interference of therapeutic antibodies with immunofixation and serum protein electrophoresis assays may lead to underestimation of complete response. Strategies to mitigate interference, based on shifting the therapeutic antibody band, are in development. Furthermore, daratumumab, and probably also other CD38-targeting antibodies, interfere with blood compatibility testing and thereby complicate the safe release of blood products. Neutralization of the therapeutic CD38 antibody or CD38 denaturation on reagent red blood cells mitigates daratumumab interference with transfusion laboratory serologic tests. Finally, therapeutic antibodies may complicate flow cytometric evaluation of normal and neoplastic plasma cells, since the therapeutic antibody can affect the availability of the epitope for binding

  10. Monoclonal antibodies for the separate detection of halodeoxyuridines and method for their use

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Watkins, Bruce E.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are described which have specific affinities for halogenated nucleoside analogs and are preferentially selective for one particular halogen. Such antibodies, when incorporated into immunochemical reagents, may be used to identify and independently quantify the cell division character of more than one population or subpopulation in flow cytometric measurements. Independent assessment of division activity in cell sub-populations facilitates selection of appropriate time and dose for administration of anti-proliferative agents. The hybridomas which secrete halogen selective antibodies and the method of making them are described.

  11. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies for the separate detection of halodeoxyuridines and method for their use

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.; Stanker, L.H.

    1991-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are described which have specific affinities for halogenated nucleoside analogs and are preferentially selective for one particular halogen. Such antibodies, when incorporated into immunochemical reagents, may be used to identify and independently quantify the cell division character of more than one population or subpopulation in flow cytometric measurements. Independent assessment of division activity in cell sub-populations facilitates selection of appropriate time and dose for administration of anti-proliferative agents. The hybridomas which secrete halogen selective antibodies and the method of making them are described. 14 figures.

  13. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Fight HIV-1: On the Threshold of Success

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Juan Pablo; Vendrell, Alejandrina; Chiavenna, Sebastián Matias

    2017-01-01

    Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (anti-HIV-1) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies are broadening the spectrum of pre- and post-exposure treatment against HIV-1. A better understanding of how these antibodies develop and interact with particular regions of the viral envelope protein is guiding a more rational structure-based immunogen design. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in the field, from the development of these particular antibodies during natural HIV-1 infection, to their role preventing infection, boosting endogenous immune responses and clearing both free viral particles and persistently infected cells. PMID:28123384

  14. Preparation of novel anti-ski monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ye, Feng; Yang, Yi-Xuan; Hu, Huai-Dong; Tong, Jian-Bin; Cai, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Hu, Peng; Li, Sang-Lin; Ren, Hong

    2011-08-01

    Ski is an avian sarcoma virus oncogene homolog best known for inhibiting TGF beta signaling through its association with the SMAD proteins. Anti-Ski antibodies (MAbs) of high titer were prepared by immunizing BALB/c mice with multifocal intradermal injections and fusing high titer antibody producing spleen cells with myeloma cells of SP2/0 origin. Three MAbs were selected for further characterization as classes and subclasses. Antibodies were produced by these three clones with high affinities ranging from 10(9) to 10(11)/m. These clones were found to be of the immunoglobulin IgG1 and IgG2b subclass with kappa light chain. They could recognize Ski as determined by Western blot analysis. The produced MAbs will be a useful tool for further investigation of Ski functions in organisms.

  15. Production of mouse monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; Petri, W A; Murphy, C F; Smith, R D

    1986-01-01

    Adherence by axenic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to mammalian cells is mediated by an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-inhibitable adhesin on the surface of the parasite. We isolated 35 hybridoma cell lines producing antibodies to E. histolytica as indicated by ELISA with sonicated amebic protein or by immunofluorescence assay with fixed whole trophozoites. Tissue culture supernatants were further screened for subcloning by the ability to bind to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells which were first exposed to a partially purified soluble preparation of the amebic GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. Eight tissue culture supernatants were positive in this assay. Antibodies from four subcloned cell lines (D3-14, H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence to CHO cells (P less than 0.01). Of the original 35 tissue culture supernatants, 3 also inhibited amebic adherence (P less than 0.01; F1, F14, and J10); monoclonal antibodies in these supernatants did not bind to lectin-exposed CHO cells. Three purified monoclonal antibodies (H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence at greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/10(4) amebae (P less than 0.05). None of these inhibitory monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated with a soluble amebic protein preparation following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. Monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence by E. histolytica will be useful in purification of the GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. PMID:2873102

  16. Immuno-histological diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases by selected combinations of antisera and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Janossy, G.; Thomas, J. A.; Pizzolo, G.; Granger, S. M.; McLaughlin, J.; Habeshaw, J. A.; Stansfeld, A. G.; Sloane, J.

    1980-01-01

    Tissue sections of frozen biopsy specimens obtained from normal and hyperplastic human lymphoid tissues, 33 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas as well as various forms of immunoregulatory disorders (angioimmunoblastic and dermatopathic lymphadenopathy) were analysed in immunofluorescence tests (using red TRITC and green FITC double-labelling). A panel of antisera including well-characterized conventional reagents to immunoglobulin classes, T lymphoid and Ia-like antigens, and monoclonal antibodies was used. In selected cases the results were compared with the observations of membrane-marker staining on viable cells in suspension. the findings show that the immunological methods can give a very accurate analysis of the normal and malignant lymphoid cells, and can provide complementary information to conventional histology. The investigator can choose the reagent combinations which give answers to various specific questions: e.g. antisera to light chains establish the monoclonality of lymphomas, whilst staining combinations for human T and Ia-like antigens are particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful reagents for analysing the tissue distribution of lymphoid subpopulations and ancillary cells in tissue biopsy specimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6775656

  17. [Monoclonal antibodies to type A, B, E and F botulinum neurotoxins].

    PubMed

    Abbasova, S G; Ruddenko, N V; Gorokhovatskiĭ, A Iu; Kapralova, M V; Vinogradova, I D; Vertiev, Iu V; Nesmeianov, V A; Grishin, E V

    2011-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies against the most acutely toxic substances, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) of types A, B, E, and F, was generated and characterized, that recognize their respective toxins in natural toxin complex. Based on these antibodies, we developed sandwich-ELISA for quantitative detection of these toxins. For each respective toxin the detection limit of the assay was: BoNT/A - 0.4 ng/ml, BoNT/B - 0.5 ng/ml; BoNT/E - 0.1 ng/ml; and for BoNT/F - 2.4 ng/ml. The developed assays permitted quantitative identification of the BoNTs in canned meat and vegetables. The BNTA-4.1 and BNTA-9.1 antibodies possessed neutralizing activity against natural complex of the botulinium toxin type A in vivo, both individually and in mixture, the mixture of the antibodies neutralized the higher dose of the toxin. The BNTA-4.1 antibody binds specifically the light chain (the chain with protease activity) of the toxin, whereas BNTA-9.1 interacts with the heavy chain. We believe that the BNTA-4.1 and BNTA-9.1 monoclonal antibodies are prospective candidates for development of humanized therapeutic antibodies for treatment of BoNT/A-caused botulism.

  18. Epitope map for a growth hormone receptor agonist monoclonal antibody, MAb 263.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Zheng, Yuan Zhi; Harris, Jonathan M; Brown, Richard; Waters, Michael J

    2003-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 263 is a widely used monoclonal antibody that recognizes the extracellular domain (ECD) of the GH receptor. It has been shown to act as a GH agonist both in vitro and in vivo, and we report here that it must be divalent to exert its effect on the full-length receptor. To understand the mechanism of its agonist action, we have determined the precise epitope for this antibody using a novel random PCR mutagenesis approach together with expression screening in yeast. A library of 5200 clones of rabbit GH receptor ECD mutants were screened both with MAb 263 and with an anticarboxy-tag antibody to verify complete ECD expression. Sequencing for clones that expressed complete ECD but were not MAb 263 positive identified 20 epitope residues distributed in a discontinuous manner throughout the ECD. The major part of the epitope, as revealed after mapping onto the crystal structure model of the ECD molecule, was located on the side and upper portion of domain 1, particularly within the D-E strand disulfide loop 79-96. Molecular dynamics docking of an antibody of the same isotype as MAb 263 was used to dock the bivalent antibody to the 1528-A2 epitope and to visualize the likely consequences of MAb binding. The minimized model enables the antibody to grasp two receptors in a pincer-like movement from opposite sides, facilitating alignment of the receptor dimerization domains in a manner similar to, but not identical with, GH.

  19. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Könitzer, Jennifer D.; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery. PMID:28055305

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Apical Chloride Channel in Necturus Gallbladder Inhibit the Chloride Conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Arthur L.; Tsai, Lih-Min; Falk, Ronald J.

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised by injecting Necturus gallbladder cells into mice were tested for their ability to inhibit the apical chloride conductance induced by elevation of cellular cAMP. Five of these monoclonal antibodies bound to the apical cells, as shown by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and inhibited the chloride conductance; one antibody that bound only to subepithelial smooth muscle, by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, showed no inhibition of chloride transport. The channel or a closely related molecule is present in the membrane whether or not the pathway is open, since, in addition to inhibiting the conductance of the open channel, the antibody also bound to the membrane in the resting state and prevented subsequent opening of the channel. The antibody was shown to recognize, by ELISA, epitopes from the Necturus gallbladder and small intestine. Finally, by Western blot analysis of Necturus gallbladder homogenates, the antibody was shown to recognize two protein bands of Mr 219,000 and Mr 69,000. This antibody should permit isolation and characterization of this important ion channel.

  1. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor.

    PubMed

    Könitzer, Jennifer D; Pramanick, Shreya; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-05

    Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery.

  2. Biokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in heterotransplanted nude rats: Evaluation of corrected specific tissue uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ingvar, C.; Norrgren, K.; Strand, S.E.; Brodin, T.; Joensson, P.E.S.; Sjoegren, H.O. )

    1989-07-01

    A tumor model is presented to study the biokinetics and localization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the nude rat (Rowett RNu/RNu) heterotransplanted with human melanoma metastases. The nude rat is larger, less sensitive, and lives longer than the nude mouse. It is, therefore, well suited for in vivo studies of tumor localization with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The tumor-to-host weight ratio was closer to the human situation for the nude rat than for the mouse, and quantitative imaging could be performed with a parallel hole collimator. We followed the antibody biokinetics for as long as 8 days, with repeated blood sampling and imaging. Specific uptake of MAb was higher in tumor tissue than in all other tissues except blood. Initial high uptake was also recorded in the bone marrow. The lymph glands showed a slow uptake of specific and control antibody. A simple in vitro correction procedure is described to calculate the corrected specific tissue uptake (STUcorr) that takes the blood activity into account. Thus it was shown that 80% of the tissue uptake in the dissected liver at 30 hr was due to labeled antibodies circulating in the blood. The specific tissue uptake ratio of antibodies 96.5 and OKT3 (nonspecific control) was unity for all other organs except for tumor tissue, where the ratio was greater than two and even higher when correction for blood content of labeled antibody was made.

  3. Elicitation of distinct populations of monoclonal antibodies specific for the variable domains of monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Weidner, K M; Denzin, L K; Kim, M L; Mallender, W D; Miklasz, S D; Voss, E W

    1993-08-01

    Armenian hamsters were immunized with non-liganded, partially liganded or affinity-labeled anti-fluorescein Mab 4-4-20. Seventeen hybridoma producing monoclonal anti-4-4-20 antibodies were characterized from chemically-mediated fusions of immune hamster lymphocytes with murine Sp2/O-Ag14 myeloma cells. Distinct populations of anti-4-4-20 monoclonal antibodies were isolated from hamsters receiving immunizations with partially liganded Mab 4-4-20 relative to those receiving affinity-labeled 4-4-20. Two of the three monoclonal antibodies produced in response to partially liganded 4-4-20 were inhibited in their interaction with 4-4-20 by fluorescyl ligand. These two clones, 1F4 and 1B7, recognized unique epitopes on the 4-4-20 molecules, as demonstrated by non-reactivity with members of the 4-4-20 idiotype family. Additionally, 1F4 and 1B7 demonstrated the ability to delay the association of fluorescein with Mab 4-4-20. The 14 characterized non-ligand-inhibitable Mabs elicited to affinity-labeled 4-4-20 were classified into four separate groups based on various binding properties with members of the 4-4-20 idiotype family and binding to resolved H- and L-chains in a western blot. Members of three of the four groups showed strong reactivity with both 04-01 Ig and 04-01 SCA, which utilizes the same L-chain as Mab 4-4-20. Six non-ligand-inhibitable Mabs, 4A6, P1E11, 3A5-1, 2C3, 2C4, and 1A4, delayed the dissociation rate of ligand from Mab 4-4-20 and mutant 4-4-20 SCA L32phe.

  4. Data on the characterization of follicle-stimulating hormone monoclonal antibodies and localization in Japanese eel pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jung; Park, Chae-Won; Byambaragchaa, Munkhzaya; Kim, Shin-Kwon; Lee, Bae-Ik; Hwang, Hyung-Kyu; Myeong, Jeong-In; Hong, Sun-Mee; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rec-FSH) from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica; rec-FSH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA Sepharose column chromatography. In support of our recent publication, "Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica" [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of eel follicle-stimulating hormone antibodies. Here, the production and ELISA system of these monoclonal antibodies are presented. The affinity-purified monoclonal antibodies specifically detected eel rec-FSH in ELISA and on western blots of rec-FSH produced from CHO cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that FSH staining was specifically localized in the eel pituitary.

  5. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    PubMed

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma.

  6. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  7. Developing the next generation of monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jamie; Lowe, David; Sleeman, Matthew A

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the commonest autoimmune diseases affecting 0.8% of the population. Over the last decade the treatment of this chronic disease has been revolutionized by the use of monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins, targeting molecules like tumour necrosis factor alpha. Nevertheless, approximately one-third of subjects fail to respond to these therapies and therefore significant unmet medical need remains. Following a decade of use, clinical, government and regulatory agency expectations have changed for new antibodies therapies entering this highly competitive area. In this review, we discuss the current advances being made in antibody engineering and how they are being considered and used in the development of the next generation of antibodies to meet future expectations of healthcare providers, physicians and patients. Moreover, we discuss how pattern recognition receptors may provide new antibody tractable targets that may break the cycle of autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21182494

  8. Effect of monoclonal antibodies on limited proteolysis of native glycoprotein gD of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Pereira, L.; Hampar, B.; Zweig, M.; Cohen, G.H.

    1982-02-01

    We examined the properties of 17 monoclonal antibodies to glycoprotein gD of herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) (gD-1) and HSV-2 (gD-2). The antibodies recognized eight separate determinants of gD, based on differences in radioimmuno-precipitation and neutralization assays. The determinants were distributed as follows: three were gD-1 specific, one was gD-2 specific, and four were type common. Several type-specific and type-common determinants appeared to be involved in neutralization. We developed a procedure for examining the effect that binding of monoclonal antibody has on proteolysis of native gD-1 by Staphylococcus aureus protease V8. We showed that several different patterns of protease V8 cleavage were obtained, depending on the monoclonal antibody used. The proteolysis patterns were generally consistent with the immunological groupings. With four groups of antibodies, we found that fragments of gD-1 remained bound to antibody after V8 treatment. A 38,000-dalton fragment remained bound to antibodies in three different groups of monoclonal antibodies. This fragment appeared to contain one type-common and two type-specific determinants. A 12,000-dalton fragment remained bound to antibodies belonging to one type-common group of monoclonal antibodies. Tryptic peptide analysis revealed that the 12,000-dalton fragment represented a portion of the 38,000-dalton fragment and was enriched in a type-common arginine tryptic peptide.

  9. Tumor immunotherapy in the mouse with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in two experimental models for tumor immunotherapy. In vitro treatment of the radiation-induced murine thymoma ITT-1-75NS with radiolabeled anti-Ly-2.1 significantly impaired subsequent tumor growth in vivo. However, in vivo treatment of this tumor, which previously had been injected into C57BL/6 mice, was unsuccessful. By contrast, in vitro treatment of a human colorectal tumor cell line (COLO 205) with 131I-labeled 250-30.6--a monoclonal antibody directed against a secretory component of normal and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium--completely inhibited subsequent tumor growth in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of preexisting human colorectal tumor xenografts significantly impaired progressive tumor growth. Although some tumor inhibition was also produced by unlabeled 250-30.6 antibody, this response was considerably amplified by treatment with (131I)-labeled 250-30.6 (P less than .05), suggesting that in vivo treatment of human tumors with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies may be clinically beneficial. The antithyroid drug propylthiouracil was used to reduce dehalogenation of the radiolabeled immunoglobulins in an attempt to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  10. Monoclonal antibody therapy directed against human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Majeti, R

    2011-03-03

    Accumulating evidence indicates that many human cancers are organized as a cellular hierarchy initiated and maintained by self-renewing cancer stem cells. This cancer stem cell model has been most conclusively established for human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), although controversies still exist regarding the identity of human AML stem cells (leukemia stem cell (LSC)). A major implication of this model is that, in order to eradicate the cancer and cure the patient, the cancer stem cells must be eliminated. Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as effective targeted therapies for the treatment of a number of human malignancies and, given their target antigen specificity and generally minimal toxicity, are well positioned as cancer stem cell-targeting therapies. One strategy for the development of monoclonal antibodies targeting human AML stem cells involves first identifying cell surface antigens preferentially expressed on AML LSC compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. In recent years, a number of such antigens have been identified, including CD123, CD44, CLL-1, CD96, CD47, CD32, and CD25. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies targeting CD44, CD123, and CD47 have demonstrated efficacy against AML LSC in xenotransplantation models. Hopefully, these antibodies will ultimately prove to be effective in the treatment of human AML.

  11. Capillary ion-exchange chromatography with nanogram sensitivity for the analysis of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rea, Jennifer C; Freistadt, Benny S; McDonald, Daniel; Farnan, Dell; Wang, Yajun Jennifer

    2015-12-11

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) is widely used for profiling the charge heterogeneity of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Despite good resolving power and robustness, ionic strength-based ion-exchange separations are generally product specific and can be time consuming to develop. In addition, conventional analytical scale ion-exchange separations require tens of micrograms of mAbs for each injection, amounts that are often unavailable in sample-limited applications. We report the development of a capillary IEC (c-IEC) methodology for the analysis of nanogram amounts of mAb charge variants. Several key modifications were made to a commercially available liquid chromatography system to perform c-IEC for charge variant analysis of mAbs with nanogram sensitivity. We demonstrate the method for multiple monoclonal antibodies, including antibody fragments, on different columns from different manufacturers. Relative standard deviations of <10% were achieved for relative peak areas of main peak, acidic and basic regions, which are common regions of interest for quantifying monoclonal antibody charge variants using IEC. The results herein demonstrate the excellent sensitivity of this c-IEC characterization method, which can be used for analyzing charge variants in sample-limited applications, such as early-stage candidate screening and in vivo studies.

  12. Development and use of monoclonal antibodies against an oncofetal protein associated with carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runge, S W; Larroya-Runge, S N; Schumm, D E; Webb, T E

    1991-06-01

    An oncofetal protein (OFP) studied in our laboratory associated with embryogenesis, carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis has as its known biological function the modification of RNA release from isolated nuclei. In the present study, we have developed and investigated the use of monoclonal antibodies against OFP. Six hybridoma cell lines (A-F) were isolated by screening the hybridoma culture media for anti-OFP antibodies (MOFP) with an indirect ELISA and by testing the ability of these antibodies complexed with anti-mouse IgG-agarose to bind to rat OFP and remove its associated RNA transport activity from solution (Immunobioassay). An inhibition ELISA developed to measure OFP gave a linear response up to 20 ng of plasma protein from a tumor-bearing rat. Western blot analysis using these monoclonals showed that OFP from a rat tumor (H7777) cytosol that shed to the blood consisted of two species exhibiting molecular weights of 50 and 55 kD respectively. In order to show the usefulness of our assays, a preliminary study showing the ability of the immunobioassay to detect the expression of OFP in the plasma of carcinogen treated rats in a dosage dependent manner has been presented. Since OFP is produced in the target organ of rats shortly after treatment with carcinogens and persists in the preneoplastic foci and subsequent tumors, these monoclonal antibodies will be valuable in studying its involvement in chemical carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  13. Autoimmunity induced by HgCl/sub 2/ in Brown-Norway rats. II. Monoclonal antibodies sharing specificities and idiotypes with mouse natural monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Lymberi, P.; Hirsch, F.; Kuhn, J.; Ternynck, T.; Druet, P.; Avrameas, S.

    1986-05-01

    Spleen cells derived from BN rats receiving HgCl/sub 2/ were fused with the nonsecreting rat myeloma cell line IR983F. Supernatants from immunoglobulin-secreting hybrids for antibody activity against actin, tubulin, autologous and heterologous myosin, myoglobin, dsDNA, peroxidase, and the haptens TNP, NIP, NNP, and NBrP were severed. Six monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were found to react with antigen(s) of the panel. At least three groups of antibody specificities were identified: 1) clones reacting with TNP (1 IgM, 1 Ige); 2) clones reacting with horseradish peroxidase (1 IgM); and 3) clones possessing widespread reactivity for several antigens as found for mouse natural autoantibodies (2 IgM, 1 IgE). The idiotypic (Id) determinants of the 59 mAb were also analyzed. All rat mAb that possessed widespread reactivities bore this Id. Similar studies were performed in sera from normal and mercury-stimulated rats. The results indicate 1) a role for HgCl/sub 2/ in the stimulation of natural antibodies producing cells and 2) the existence of interspecies cross-reactive Id among mouse and rat natural antibodies.

  14. Triggering of monoclonal human lymphoma B cells with antibodies to IgM heavy chains: differences of response obtained with monoclonal as compared to polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Godal, T; Ruud, E; Heikkilä, R; Funderud, S; Michaelsen, T; Jefferis, R; Ling, N R; Hildrum, K

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of human B lymphoma cells activation by monoclonal (murine hybridoma) antibodies to mu heavy chains (Ma-mu) as compared to polyclonal (rabbit) antibodies to mu heavy chains (Ra-mu) has been carried out. Early events related to calmodulin activation such as 86Rb influx and changes in cell volume at 4 h could be induced by Ma-mu. One antibody (AF6) approached Ra-mu with regard to the strength of response obtained. However, Ma-mus including AF6 were deficient in inducing DNA synthesis under conditions where this was achieved with Ra-mu. Studies in one lymphoma, where stimulation of re-expressed surface IgM could be studied, revealed that Ma-mu was deficient in stimulating re-expressed sIgM. These findings raise questions with regard to polyclonal antibody to surface Ig as a model for B cell triggering by antigen and suggest that antigen-induced B cell triggering may be more complex than indicated by previous studies with polyclonal antibody. PMID:6418424

  15. Pegfilgrastim Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Sébastien; Mathé, Doriane; Chettab, Kamel; Evesque, Anne; Matera, Eva-Laure; Trédan, Olivier; Dumontet, Charles

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic mAbs exert antitumor activity through various mechanisms, including apoptotic signalization, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or phagocytosis (ADCP). G-CSF and GM-CSF have been reported to increase the activity of antibodies in preclinical models and in clinical trials. To determine the potential role of pegfilgrastim as an enhancer of anticancer antibodies, we performed a comparative study of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim. We found that pegfilgrastim was significantly more potent than filgrastim in murine xenograft models treated with mAbs. This was observed with rituximab in CD20(+) models and with trastuzumab in HER2(+) models. Stimulation with pegfilgrastim was associated with significant enhancement of leukocyte content in spleen as well as mobilization of activated monocytes/granulocytes from the spleen to the tumor bed. These results suggest that pegfilgrastim could constitute a potent adjuvant for immunotherapy with mAbs possessing ADCC/ADCP properties. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1238-47. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Use of monoclonal antibodies to facilitate identification, cloning, and purification of Chlamydia trachomatis hsp10.

    PubMed Central

    LaVerda, D; Byrne, G I

    1997-01-01

    As a requisite for a physiological and immunological investigation, reagents were developed that facilitated the identification and purification of Chlamydia trachomatis hsp10 (chsp10). Monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize chsp10 were generated with multiple-antigen peptides (MAPs) to promote recognition of Chlamydia-specific epitopes. MAP2, containing amino acids 54 to 69 of the hsp10 sequence, elicited strong antibody responses after immunization of BALB/c mice. Monoclonal antibodies from several cloned hybridomas reacted on immunoblots with an approximately 15-kDa chlamydial protein and recombinant chsp10. Because of its strict specificity for chsp10, monoclonal antibody M1.2 was selected for routine use. M1.2 reacted by immunoblot with the hsp10s of several C. trachomatis strains but not with Chlamydia psittaci hsp10 or Escherichia coli homolog GroES, suggesting that M1.2 recognizes a species-specific epitope. Recombinant chsp10 was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography with M1.2. For large-scale purification, chsp10 was appended with a C-terminal six-histidine tag for purification by nickel chelate affinity chromatography. The hypA gene encoding the chsp10 of C. trachomatis serovar E/Bour was cloned into the pQE-60 vector (QIAGEN, Inc.) following PCR amplification from genomic DNA. E. coli DH5 transformants were screened for chsp10 expression by colony immunoblotting with M1.2, were tested for nickel matrix binding, and were sequenced. The sequence of serovar E/Bour chsp10 was found to be closely homologous to those of hsp10s of other chlamydiae. Purified chsp10 and specific anti-chsp10 monoclonal antibodies will be useful for investigating the biological and immunological roles of hsp10 in chlamydial infections. PMID:9114409

  17. Effects of CD11b/18 monoclonal antibody on rats with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. H.; Liu, K. F.; Bree, M. P.

    1996-01-01

    The progression of a lesion from ischemic injury to infarct, after the permanent occlusion of a middle cerebral artery, may be influenced by the influx of leukocytes into the ischemic territory. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of treating rats that had permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion with a single dose of an anti-CD11b/18 monoclonal antibody injected 1 hour after the arterial occlusion. To mimic the clinical situation of patients with ischemic strokes who may be treated within 1 hour of the ischemic event, the artery remained occluded. Forty-one adult Wistar rats had permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, and one was subjected to a sham operation. One hour later, 22 rats received CD11b/18 monoclonal antibody and an additional 20 were injected either with a nonspecific antibody (n = 10) or a buffer solution (n = 10). Experiments were terminated at intervals ranging 12 to 96 hours after the arterial occlusion. Endpoints included neurological testing, daily evaluation of body weight, counts of white blood cells in the peripheral blood, measurement of the area of pallor in the ischemic hemisphere, counts of necrotic neurons, and counts of leukocytes sequestered in the ischemic hemisphere. In experiments terminated 12 hours after the arterial occlusion (n = 4), there were fewer necrotic neurons in the group treated with the CD11b/18 monoclonal antibody compared with the two controls (P < .05), but this difference was not reflected in the neurological scores. Numbers of necrotic neurons in experiments terminated > 12 hours later were not different among the three subgroups. White blood cell counts in peripheral blood were lower in animals with arterial occlusion injected with the monoclonal antibody CD11b/18 (P < .05); numbers of leukocytes sequestered in the ischemic hemisphere were not different in the three groups. Neither changes in body weight nor in the volume of the area of pallor were significantly different among the three groups. Images

  18. Guinea pig line 10 hepatocarcinoma model: characterization of monoclonal antibody and in vivo effect of unconjugated antibody and antibody conjugated to diphtheria toxin A chain.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M I; Foon, K A; Oeltmann, T N; Key, M E; Hwang, K M; Clarke, G C; Christensen, W L; Hoyer, L C; Hanna, M G; Oldham, R K

    1983-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against the guinea pig line 10 (L10) hepatocarcinoma, and an IgG1-producing hybridoma (D3) was selected for further study. D3 is a true monoclonal antibody as demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Radioimmunoassays on live cells revealed no cross-reactivity with normal tissues or with the line 1 hepatocarcinoma which was used as a control. Membrane immunofluorescence assays demonstrated similar specificity. Immunoperoxidase staining of cryostat sections of tumor and normal tissues of both adult animals and fetuses showed that the D3 monoclonal antibody reacted primarily with the L10 tumor, but some cross-reactivity with smooth muscle, placenta, fetal skeletal muscle, and fetal liver was also demonstrated. Radioimmunoprecipitation of detergent extracts of iodinated L10 cells showed that the antigen is present on the cell surface as a dimer of Mr 290,000 (unit size, Mr 148,000). Therapy studies with unconjugated D3 antibody demonstrated a minor dose-dependent effect on tumor growth. D3 antibody conjugated to the A chain of diphtheria toxin (10(-7) M) was cytotoxic to 100% of L10 cells in vitro. Animals treated with a single 1-mg i.v. injection of this immunoconjugate on Day 7 following the intradermal injection of 10(5) tumor cells demonstrated a highly significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control animals and those treated with unconjugated antibody.

  19. Assessment of disulfide and hinge modifications in monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Bernd; Stracke, Jan Olaf

    2016-12-16

    During the last years there was a substantial increase in the use of antibodies and related proteins as therapeutics. The emphasis of the pharmaceutical industry is on IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 antibodies, which are therefore in the focus of this article. In order to ensure appropriate quality control of such biopharmaceuticals, deep understanding of their chemical degradation pathways and the resulting impact on potency, pharmacokinetics, and safety is required. Criticality of modifications may be specific for individual antibodies and has to be assessed for each molecule. However, some modifications of conserved structure elements occur in all or at least most IgGs. In these cases, criticality assessment may be applicable to related molecules or molecule formats. The relatively low dissociation energy of disulfide bonds and the high flexibility of the hinge region frequently lead to modifications and cleavages. Therefore, the hinge region and disulfide bonds require specific consideration during quality assessment of mAbs. In this review, available literature knowledge on underlying chemical reaction pathways of modifications, analytical methods for quantification and criticality are discussed. The hinge region is prone to cleavage and is involved in pathways that lead to thioether bond formation, cysteine racemization, and iso-Asp (Asp, aspartic acid) formation. Disulfide or sulfhydryl groups were found to be prone to reductive cleavage, trisulfide formation, cysteinylation, glutathionylation, disulfide bridging to further light chains, and disulfide scrambling. With regard to potency, disulfide cleavage, hinge cleavage, disulfide bridging to further light chains, and cysteinylation were found to influence antigen binding and fragment crystallizable (Fc) effector functionalities. Renal clearance of small fragments may be faster, whereas clearance of larger fragments appears to depend on their neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) functionality, which in turn may be impeded by

  20. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Aimin; Callahan, Cheryl; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro; Nahas, Debbie; Galli, Jennifer; Cosmi, Scott; DiStefano, Daniel; Hoang, Van M.; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction. PMID:27258388

  1. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Swanstrom, J. A.; Plante, J. A.; Plante, K. S.; Young, E. F.; McGowan, E.; Gallichotte, E. N.; Widman, D. G.; Heise, M. T.; de Silva, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], <1:100 serum dilution; 18%) or moderate to high (EC50, >1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. PMID:27435464

  2. Identification of human plasma cells with a lamprey monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Liu, Yanling; Chan, Justin Tze Ho; Tong, Jiefei; Li, Zhihua; Shi, Mengyao; Davani, Dariush; Parsons, Marion; Khan, Srijit; Zhan, Wei; Kyu, Shuya; Grunebaum, Eyal; Campisi, Paolo; Propst, Evan J.; Jaye, David L.; Trudel, Suzanne; Moran, Michael F.; Ostrowski, Mario; Herrin, Brantley R.; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung; Sanz, Ignacio; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ab-producing plasma cells (PCs) serve as key participants in countering pathogenic challenges as well as being contributors to autoimmune and malignant disorders. Thus far, only a limited number of PC–specific markers have been identified. The characterization of the unique variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) Abs that are made by evolutionarily distant jawless vertebrates prompted us to investigate whether VLR Abs could detect novel PC antigens that have not been recognized by conventional Abs. Here, we describe a monoclonal lamprey Ab, VLRB MM3, that was raised against primary multiple myeloma cells. VLRB MM3 recognizes a unique epitope of the CD38 ectoenzyme that is present on plasmablasts and PCs from healthy individuals and on most, but not all, multiple myelomas. Binding by the VLRB MM3 Ab coincides with CD38 dimerization and NAD glycohydrolase activity. Our data demonstrate that the lamprey VLRB MM3 Ab is a unique reagent for the identification of plasmablasts and PCs, with potential applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of PC or autoimmune disorders. PMID:27152361

  3. Monoclonal antibody selection for interleukin-4 quantification using suspension arrays and forward-phase protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Cole, K D; Peterson, A; He, Hua-Jun; Gaigalas, A K; Zong, Y

    2007-12-01

    A recombinant mouse interleukin-4 (IL-4) and three different purified rat antimouse IL-4 monoclonal antibodies (Mab) with different clonalities were employed as a model system. This system was used to examine monoclonal antibody effectiveness using both conventional and high-throughput measurement techniques to select antibodies for attaining the most sensitive detection of the recombinant IL-4 through the "sandwich-type" immunoassays. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements and two high-throughput methods, suspension arrays (also called multiplexed bead arrays) and forward-phase protein microarrays, predicted the same capture (BVD4-1D11) and detection (BVD6-24G2) antibody pair for the most sensitive detection of the recombinant cytokine. By using this antibody pair, we were able to detect as low as 2 pg/mL of IL-4 in buffer solution and 13.5 pg/mL of IL-4 spiked in 100% normal mouse serum with the multiplexed bead arrays. Due to the large amount of material required for SPR measurements, the study suggests that the multiplexed bead arrays and protein microarrays are both suited for the selection of numerous antibodies against the same analyte of interest to meet the need in the areas of systems biology and reproducible clinical diagnostics for better patient care.

  4. Functional analysis of the anti-adalimumab response using patient-derived monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Kruithof, Simone; Votsmeier, Christian; van Schie, Karin; Hart, Margreet H; de Jong, Rob N; van Buren, Esther E L; van Ham, Marieke; Aarden, Lucien; Wolbink, Gertjan; Wouters, Diana; Rispens, Theo

    2014-12-12

    The production of antibodies to adalimumab in autoimmune patients treated with adalimumab is shown to diminish treatment efficacy. We previously showed that these antibodies are almost exclusively neutralizing, indicating a restricted response. Here, we investigated the characteristics of a panel of patient-derived monoclonal antibodies for binding to adalimumab. Single B-cells were isolated from two patients, cultured, and screened for adalimumab specificity. Analysis of variable region sequences of 16 clones suggests that the immune response against adalimumab is broad, involving multiple B-cell clones each using different combinations of V(D)J segments. A strong bias for replacement mutations in the complementarity determining regions was found, indicating an antigen-driven response. We recombinantly expressed 11 different monoclonal antibodies and investigated their affinity and specificity. All clones except one are of high affinity (Kd between 0.6 and 233 pm) and compete with TNF as well as each other for binding to adalimumab. However, binding to a panel of single-point mutants of adalimumab indicates markedly different fine specificities that also result in a differential tendency of each clone to form dimeric and multimeric immune complexes. We conclude that although all anti-adalimumab antibodies compete for binding to TNF, the response is clonally diverse and involves multiple epitopes on adalimumab. These results are important for understanding the relationship between self and non-self or idiotypic determinants on therapeutic antibodies and their potential immunogenicity.

  5. Characterization of four monoclonal antibodies to recombinant human tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Hokari, Shigeru; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2002-06-01

    In this study we produced a recombinant human Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) enzyme from baculovirus-infected insect cells, generated four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 15A4, 13B9, 1C6 and 3G7, to the enzyme, and characterized these antibodies. In the human serum and lung specimen, all four antibodies appeared to have a high specificity for native TRAP enzyme in western blot analysis, immunohistochemical analysis and enzyme immunoassay. These antibodies may react with respective conformational determinants, therefore, they may be useful for detection of active TRAP. Only one of the antibodies, 15A4 also reacted with a denatured epitope, therefore, it is suitable for western blot analysis, enzyme immunoassay and for immunohistochemistry in the rat. Taken together, having characterized properties of four monoclonal antibodies against recombinant human TRAP enzyme may be useful for development of TRAP specific immunoassays in pathology and hematology of the bone. They will certainly be of use for the study of biosynthesis, regulation and function of the TRAP enzyme.

  6. Immunochemical identification of three proteinic determinants on the archaebacterium Methanococcus vannielii by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    de Macario, E.C.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Archaebacteria evolved independently from Eubacteria and Eukaryotes and present unique biochemical features. One group, the methanogens, show a variety of cell-walls paralleling their own evolutionary diversity. Chemical analyses revealed proteins in the cell-wall of Methanococcacea but no murein or pseudomurein. Immunochemical studies were begun using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against M. vannielii SB and quantitative micro-immunoenzymatic methods developed for this purpose. Direct binding and inhibition-blocking assays using sugars and aminosugars also indicated absence of these residues in the SB's cell-wall. Three antibodies, however, recognized three different antigenic determinants involving amino acids: Lys, Phe and Thr (antibody 5A); Ser, Try and Tyr (antibody 5B); and Arg, Lys and Phe (antibody 5F). Each site was recognized by one antibody only, and vice versa. These results agree with those provided by well established chemical methods and support the notion that SB possesses a peculiar cell-wall with proteins only. The data also show the resolution power and reliability of monoclonal probes for structural analysis of the bacterial envelope.

  7. Detection of complement activation using monoclonal antibodies against C3d

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Kulik, Liudmila; Orth, Heather; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Sargsyan, Siranush A.; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Hannan, Jonathan P.; Kovacs, James M.; Coughlin, Beth; Woodell, Alex S.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Rohrer, Bärbel; Holers, V. Michael

    2013-01-01

    During complement activation the C3 protein is cleaved, and C3 activation fragments are covalently fixed to tissues. Tissue-bound C3 fragments are a durable biomarker of tissue inflammation, and these fragments have been exploited as addressable binding ligands for targeted therapeutics and diagnostic agents. We have generated cross-reactive murine monoclonal antibodies against human and mouse C3d, the final C3 degradation fragment generated during complement activation. We developed 3 monoclonal antibodies (3d8b, 3d9a, and 3d29) that preferentially bind to the iC3b, C3dg, and C3d fragments in solution, but do not bind to intact C3 or C3b. The same 3 clones also bind to tissue-bound C3 activation fragments when injected systemically. Using mouse models of renal and ocular disease, we confirmed that, following systemic injection, the antibodies accumulated at sites of C3 fragment deposition within the glomerulus, the renal tubulointerstitium, and the posterior pole of the eye. To detect antibodies bound within the eye, we used optical imaging and observed accumulation of the antibodies within retinal lesions in a model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Our results demonstrate that imaging methods that use these antibodies may provide a sensitive means of detecting and monitoring complement activation–associated tissue inflammation. PMID:23619360

  8. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against substrate specific loop region of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Nuzhat A; Kaushal, Deep C

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase, terminal enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, has been shown to be biochemically, immunologically and structurally different from the mammalian enzyme. The substrate specific loop region of plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) has 5 amino acids insert (DKEWN) important for anti-malarial drug targeting. In the present study, we have produced six monoclonal antibodies, which are against three different epitopes of Plasmodium falciparum LDH (PfLDH). Two of these monoclonal antibodies (10C4D5 and 10D3G2) are against the substrate specific loop region of PfLDH (residues 98-109, AGFTKAPGKSDKEWNR). The 10C4D5 and 10D3G2 monoclonals bind to substrate specific loop region resulting in inhibition of PfLDH activity. A Microplate Sandwich ELISA was developed employing high affinity non-inhibitory (10A5H5, Kaff 1.272 ± 0.057 nM) and inhibitory (10C4D5, Kaff 0.306 ± 0.011 nM) monoclonal antibodies and evaluated using gossypol, a well known inhibitor of pLDH. The binding of gossypol to substrate specific loop region resulted in inhibition of binding of 10C4D5 monoclonal. This Microplate Sandwich ELISA can be utilized for identification of compounds inhibitory to PfLDH (binding to substrate specific loop region of parasite LDH) from combinatory chemical libraries or medicinal plants extracts. The Microplate Sandwich ELISA has also shown potential for specific diagnosis of malaria using finger prick blood samples.

  9. Purification of human monoclonal antibodies and their fragments.

    PubMed

    Müller-Späth, Thomas; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the most common chromatographic mAb and mAb fragment purification methods, starting by elucidating the relevant properties of the compounds and introducing the various chromatography modes that are available and useful for this application. A focus is put on the capture step affinity and ion exchange chromatography. Aspects of scalability play an important role in judging the suitability of the methods. The chapter introduces also analytical chromatographic methods that can be utilized for quantification and purity control of the product. In the case of mAbs, for most purposes the purity obtained using an affinity capture step is sufficient. Polishing steps are required if material of particularly high purity needs to be generated. For mAb fragments, affinity chromatography is not yet fully established, and the capture step potentially may not provide material of high purity. Therefore, the available polishing techniques are touched upon briefly. In the case of mAb isoform and bispecific antibody purification, countercurrent chromatography techniques have been proven to be very useful and a part of this chapter has been dedicated to them, paying tribute to the rising interest in these antibody formats in research and industry.

  10. Effects of anti-alpha monoclonal antibodies on initiation and elongation by the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Venezia, N D; Krakow, J S

    1990-05-15

    Anti-alpha monoclonal antibodies have been used to investigate the role of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase in initiation and elongation. The four inhibitory monoclonal antibodies studied strongly inhibit cAMP receptor protein-dependent initiation with lac P+ and partially inhibit initiation directed by the lac UV5 promoter. The data suggest that the epitopes to which each of the monoclonal antibodies bind may be proximal to the contact domain between cAMP receptor protein and RNA polymerase. Recycling of RNA polymerase through the initiation process is slower in the presence of an inhibitory monoclonal antibody. Once a 9-nucleotide-long transcript has formed, incubation with the anti-alpha monoclonal antibody does not affect subsequent elongation. The monoclonal antibodies still bind to the elongation complex as indicated by sedimentation of the complex formed after incubation with Staphylococcus aureus cells (immunoprecipitin). These results suggest that the resistance of the elongation complex to these antibodies is not a consequence of their inability to bind to RNA polymerase. Only one of the alpha subunits may be involved in the initial process of transcription, and the antigenic domain of this subunit appears to be occluded by the nascent transcript present in the elongation complex.

  11. Monocyte/macrophage-reactive monoclonal antibody Ki-M6 recognizes an intracytoplasmic antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Parwaresch, M. R.; Radzun, H. J.; Kreipe, H.; Hansmann, M. L.; Barth, J.

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, termed Ki-M6, is described, which shows a restricted reactivity to cells of the monocyte/macrophage system. On light- and electron-microscopic immunoperoxidase staining Ki-M6 recognizes monocytes and the phagocytosing compartment of macrophages residing in different tissue sites; granulocytes and the so-called immune accessories of B- and T-cell immune response as closely monocyte/macrophage related cell populations do not reveal any reactivity. This is shown by comparison with the monoclonal antibodies Ki-M4 and Ki-M1 or OKT6 recognizing immune accessory cells by immunohistochemical methods. Ki-M6 binds to a lysosomal membrane-restricted antigen of 60,000 daltons without influencing significantly lysosome-related functions as far as the chemiluminescence response is concerned. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:3777131

  12. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 subgrouping by monoclonal antibodies--an epidemiological tool.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, I. D.; Tobin, J. O.; Dennis, P. J.; Brown, W.; Newnham, R.; Kurtz, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies was used to subgroup 326 strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. All but two strains could be classified into three major subgroups named after their representative strains Pontiac 1, Olda and Bellingham 1. Of the 50 isolates from patients, 44 representing 32 separate incidents were of the Pontiac subgroup. This subgroup was also found in 16 of 18 buildings epidemiologically associated with Legionnaires' Disease. In contrast, strains of the Olda subgroup predominated in buildings where no infections had occurred. In 9 of the 11 incidents where isolates were available from at least one patient as well as from the suspected environmental source, the monoclonal antibody reaction patterns of strains from patients were identical to those of one or more of their environmental counterparts. PMID:3905954

  13. Detection of Penicillinase in Milk by Sandwich ELISA Based Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinli; Li, Guoxi

    2016-01-01

    A sandwich ELISA has been developed using polyclonal and monoclonal antibody for the determination of penicillinase in milk. For this purpose, specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against penicillinase were generated and characterized. Using penicillinase standards prepared from 1-128 ng/mL, the method indicated that the detection limit of the sandwich ELISA, as measured in an ELISA plate reader, was as low as 0.86 ng/mL of penicillinase. For determine the accuracy, raw milk containing 2, 8, 32, and 64 ng/mL of penicillinase were tested by sandwich ELISA. Recoveries were from 93-97.5%, and the coefficient of variation [CV (%)] were from 5.55-8.38%. For interassay reproducibility, recoveries were from 89.5-95.1%, the coefficient of variation [CV (%)] were from 5.26-9.58%. This sandwich ELISA provides a useful screening method for quantitative detection of penicillinase in milk.

  14. Introduction to the application of QbD principles for the development of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Finkler, Christof; Krummen, Lynne

    2016-09-01

    Quality by Design (QbD) is a global regulatory initiative with the goal of enhancing pharmaceutical development through the proactive design of pharmaceutical manufacturing process and controls to consistently deliver the intended performance of the product. The principles of pharmaceutical development relevant to QbD are described in the ICH guidance documents (ICHQ8-11). An integrated set of risk assessments and their related elements developed at Roche/Genentech were designed to provide an overview of product and process knowledge for the production of a recombinant monoclonal antibody. This chapter introduces a publication series on the application of Quality by Design for biopharmaceuticals, with a focus on the development of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The development of and overview on the QbD concept applied by Roche and Genentech is described and essential QbD elements are presented.

  15. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for Shewanella colwelliana exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Sledjeski, D D; Weiner, R M

    1993-01-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies were produced to whole cells of Shewanella colwelliana (Aco1 to Aco6) and two (Aco22 to Aco23) to purified exopolysaccharide (EPS). Aco1, -4 to -6, -22, and -23 bound to both the cell surface and the purified EPS, while Aco2 and -3 bound to cells only. The EPS of S. colwelliana was antigenically unique from those of nine other species of marine bacteria that were tested. Mapping studies revealed that all of the EPS-specific monoclonal antibodies bound to the same epitope. This EPS epitope was sensitive to cleavage of ester bonds, but neither pyruvate, acetate, nor terminal nonreducing sugars were required for antigenicity. When S. colwelliana was grown on rich media, most of its EPS was loosely associated with the cell surface. Images PMID:7686001

  16. [Anti Shiga-like toxin II(SLT-II) humanized monoclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoh-ichi

    2002-03-01

    Anti-Shiga-Like Toxin II(SLT-II) Humanized Monoclonal Antibody(TMA-15) was constructed from Mouse Monoclonal Antibody(MuVTm1.1) recognizing the same antigen using recombinant and CDR grafting technology. TMA-15 had almost the same affinity to SLT-II as MuVTm1.1 and showed the good protective activity of mice challenged either with SLT-II or with SLT-II secreting Shiga-like Toxin producing E. coli(STEC). TMA-15 showed no acute toxicity to monkeys and no cross-reactivity to human tissues in pre-clinical safety studies. From the preliminary results of Phase 1 clinical trial using healthy adult volunteers, doses up to planned maximum dose were well tolerated and TMA-15 showed long half life in blood almost comparable to gamma globulin preparations. Therefore, TMA-15 is expected to show clinical efficacy in coming clinical trial using pediatric STEC patients.

  17. Application of a monoclonal antibody to a comparative study of alpha-lactalbumins from various species

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminogawa, S.; Shimoda, M.; Kurisaki, J.; Yamauchi, K.

    1989-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody to bovine alpha-lactalbumin was prepared and purified. The binding ability of alpha-lactalbumin from different species (cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, human, monkey, and guinea pig) was examined by a competitive radioimmunoassay. The order in strength of the binding affinity was cow goat, giraffe, horse, cynomolgus monkey and human, pig, and guinea pig. The order of evolutional divergence calculated from the amino acid composition was cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, guinea pig and human, and monkey. The orders in both cases were similar. Hence, it is suggested that immunological divergence as deduced by a monoclonal antibody is likely to be close to the evolutional divergence of alpha-lactalbumin.

  18. Pneumocystis carinii and specific fungi have a common epitope, identified by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, B; Kovacs, J A; Nelson, N N; Stock, F; Martinez, A; Gill, V J

    1992-01-01

    Because Pneumocystis carinii may be related to fungi, we evaluated the reactivities of monoclonal antibodies raised against P. carinii with a variety of fungi. Fifty-two fungi and six protozoa were evaluated by immunofluorescence. One of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested (MAb 7D7) reacted with 15 fungi but no protozoa. Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed the strongest reactivity by immunofluorescence. The reactive antigen was characterized for four fungi by the immunoblot technique. In all cases the antigen that was reactive with MAb 7D7 was larger than the P. carinii antigens that reacted with 7D7. In further studies with P. carinii, Aspergillus species, and S. cerevisiae, we found that MAb 7D7 reacted with a carbohydrate component in all organisms. The presence of an epitope that is common to P. carinii and a number of fungi further supports the fungal nature of P. carinii. Images PMID:1371519

  19. Acrosomal Component of Rat Round Spermatids Recognized by a Novel Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Russinova; Atanassova; Paskaleva; Kancheva

    1998-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize immunocytochemically the antigen recognized which appears at specific stages of germ cell development and acrosomal biogenesis by the novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 3C2). METHODS: The novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 3C2) raised against testicular Sertoli and germ cells. RESULTS: The immunoreactivity of this Mab in testicular sections from immature 20-day-old rats was confined to the pachytene spermatocytes. In adult testis the Mab 3C2, besides meiotic cells, recognized also acrosomal component of round spermatids. The immune reaction was observed in Golgi and cap phases of acrosomal development until the stage VIII of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. Immunostaining was absent in acrosome of elongating and mature spermatids and indicated that some modifications in acrosomal protein may exist in subsequent stages of acrosomal development. CONCLUSIONS: Novel Mab 3C2 shares a common antigen in pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. Therefore, it may be a marker of meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells.

  20. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody with specificity for holo-transcobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Orning, Lars; Rian, Anne; Campbell, Andrew; Brady, Jeff; Fedosov, Sergey N; Bramlage, Birgit; Thompson, Keith; Quadros, Edward V

    2006-01-01

    Background Holotranscobalamin, cobalamin-saturated transcobalamin, is the minor fraction of circulating cobalamin (vitamin B12), which is available for cellular uptake and hence is physiologically relevant. Currently, no method allows simple, direct quantification of holotranscobalamin. We now report on the identification and characterization of a monoclonal antibody with a unique specificity for holotranscobalamin. Methods The specificity and affinity of the monoclonal antibodies were determined using surface plasmon resonance and recombinant transcobalamin as well as by immobilizing the antibodies on magnetic microspheres and using native transcobalamin in serum. The epitope of the holotranscobalamin specific antibody was identified using phage display and comparison to a de novo generated three-dimensional model of transcobalamin using the program Rosetta. A direct assay for holotrnscobalamin in the ELISA format was developed using the specific antibody and compared to the commercial assay HoloTC RIA. Results An antibody exhibiting >100-fold specificity for holotranscobalamin over apotranscobalamin was identified. The affinity but not the specificity varied inversely with ionic strength and pH, indicating importance of electrostatic interactions. The epitope was discontinuous and epitope mapping of the antibody by phage display identified two similar motifs with no direct sequence similarity to transcobalamin. A comparison of the motifs with a de novo generated three-dimensional model of transcobalamin identified two structures in the N-terminal part of transcobalamin that resembled the motif. Using this antibody an ELISA based prototype assay was developed and compared to the only available commercial assay for measuring holotranscobalamin, HoloTC RIA. Conclusion The identified antibody possesses a unique specificity for holotranscobalamin and can be used to develop a direct assay for the quantification of holotranscobalamin. PMID:16393340

  1. [Cloning and expression of VLRB of Lampetra japonica and generation of the corresponding monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fen-Fang; Ma, Ning; Chen, Li-Yong; Su, Peng; Li, Qing-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The agnathans (lampreys and hagfishes) are representatives of the jawless vertebrates. The receptor molecules of adaptive immune system in lampreys are different from the antigen receptors in mammal vertebrates. The unique receptor molecules of lampreys are known as variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR). There are three types of VLRs in lampreys, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC. Multimeric antigen-specific VLRB antibodies are secreted by VLRB+ lymphocytes and constitute the major components of the humoral arm of the lamprey adaptive immune system. Oligomeric VLRB antibodies are composed of four or five disulfide-linked dimeric subunits, which are similar to IgM antibodies in structure and function. In this study, the conservative c-terminal of Lampetra japonica VLRB was cloned and expressed in BL21 E. coli. The recombinant VLRB protein was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography column. After Balb/c mice immunity, cell fusion, the positive clones were screened by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Finally, the hybridoma cells that produced specific anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies were obtained. In order to get a large number of antibodies against VLRB, the hybridoma cells were injected into the abdominal cavity of Balb/c mice and the antibodies were purified by protein G sepharose. The results of ELISA indicated that the valence of anti-VLRB antibodies was 1:40000. Western blotting assay showed that the antibodies were able to detect both recombinant VLRB and secreted VLRB in lamprey sera. Flow cytometry analysis also revealed the existence of VLRB on the surface of lymphocytes. In summary, the anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies provided a major tool for studying lamprey adaptive immune system.

  2. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  3. Diverse molecular recognition properties of blood group A binding monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Wright, Whitney Shea

    2016-05-01

    Information about specificity and affinity is critical for use of carbohydrate-binding antibodies. Herein, we evaluated eight monoclonal antibodies to the blood group A (BG-A) antigen. Antibodies 87-G, 9A, HE-10, HE-24, HE-193, HE-195, T36 and Z2A were profiled on a glycan microarray to assess specificity, relative affinity and the influence of glycan density on recognition. Our studies highlight several noteworthy recognition properties. First, most antibodies bound GalNAcα1-3Gal and the BG-A trisaccharide nearly as well as larger BG-A oligosaccharides. Second, several antibodies only bound the BG-A trisaccharide when displayed on certain glycan chains. These first two points indicate that the carrier glycan chains primarily influence selectivity, rather than binding strength. Third, binding of some antibodies was highly dependent on glycan density, illustrating the importance of glycan presentation for recognition. Fourth, some antibodies recognized the tumor-associated Tn antigen, and one antibody only bound the variant composed of a GalNAc-alpha-linked to a serine residue. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the recognition properties of anti-BG-A antibodies.

  4. Novel conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies against amyloidogenic forms of transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Jeffrey N.; Chakrabartty, Avi; Galant, Natalie J.; Hadley, Kevin C.; Hammerson, Bradley; Nijjar, Tarlochan; Torres, Ronald; Tapia, Jose R.; Salmans, Joshua; Barbour, Robin; Tam, Stephen J.; Flanagan, Ken; Zago, Wagner; Kinney, Gene G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR amyloidosis) is caused by the misfolding and deposition of the transthyretin (TTR) protein and results in progressive multi-organ dysfunction. TTR epitopes exposed by dissociation and misfolding are targets for immunotherapeutic antibodies. We developed and characterized antibodies that selectively bound to misfolded, non-native conformations of TTR. Methods: Antibody clones were generated by immunizing mice with an antigenic peptide comprising a cryptotope within the TTR sequence and screened for specific binding to non-native TTR conformations, suppression of in vitro TTR fibrillogenesis, promotion of antibody-dependent phagocytic uptake of mis-folded TTR and specific immunolabeling of ATTR amyloidosis patient-derived tissue. Results: Four identified monoclonal antibodies were characterized. These antibodies selectively bound the target epitope on monomeric and non-native misfolded forms of TTR and strongly suppressed TTR fibril formation in vitro. These antibodies bound fluorescently tagged aggregated TTR, targeting it for phagocytic uptake by macrophage THP-1 cells, and amyloid-positive TTR deposits in heart tissue from patients with ATTR amyloidosis, but did not bind to other types of amyloid deposits or normal tissue. Conclusions: Conformation-specific anti-TTR antibodies selectively bind amyloidogenic but not native TTR. These novel antibodies may be therapeutically useful in preventing deposition and promoting clearance of TTR amyloid and in diagnosing TTR amyloidosis. PMID:26981744

  5. Studying host cell protein interactions with monoclonal antibodies using high throughput protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sisodiya, Vikram N; Lequieu, Joshua; Rodriguez, Maricel; McDonald, Paul; Lazzareschi, Kathlyn P

    2012-10-01

    Protein A chromatography is typically used as the initial capture step in the purification of monoclonal antibodies produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Although exploiting an affinity interaction for purification, the level of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent varies significantly with different feedstocks. Using a batch binding chromatography method, we performed a controlled study to assess host cell protein clearance across both MabSelect Sure and Prosep vA resins. We individually spiked 21 purified antibodies into null cell culture fluid generated with a non-producing cell line, creating mock cell culture fluids for each antibody with an identical composition of host cell proteins and antibody concentration. We demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions are primarily responsible for the variable levels of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent for both resins when antibody is present. Using the additives guanidine HCl and sodium chloride, we demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions may be disrupted, reducing the level of host cell proteins present after purification on both resins. The reduction in the level of host cell proteins differed between antibodies suggesting that the interaction likely varies between individual antibodies but encompasses both an electrostatic and hydrophobic component.

  6. Verification of the Cross Immunoreactivity of A60, a Mouse Monoclonal Antibody against Neuronal Nuclear Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shanping; Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Cohen, Noam A.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2016-01-01

    A60, the mouse monoclonal antibody against the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), is the most widely used neuronal marker in neuroscience research and neuropathological assays. Previous studies identified fragments of A60-immunoprecipitated protein as Synapsin I (Syn I), suggesting the antibody will demonstrate cross immunoreactivity. However, the likelihood of cross reactivity has never been verified by immunohistochemical techniques. Using our established tissue processing and immunofluorescent staining protocols, we found that A60 consistently labeled mossy fiber terminals in hippocampal area CA3. These A60-positive mossy fiber terminals could also be labeled by Syn I antibody. After treating brain slices with saponin in order to better preserve various membrane and/or vesicular proteins for immunostaining, we observed that A60 could also label additional synapses in various brain areas. Therefore, we used A60 together with a rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody to confirm the existence of this cross reactivity. We showed that the putative band positive for A60 and Syn I could not be detected by the rabbit anti-NeuN in Western blotting. As efficient as Millipore A60 to recognize neuronal nuclei, the rabbit NeuN antibody demonstrated no labeling of synaptic structures in immunofluorescent staining. The present study successfully verified the cross reactivity present in immunohistochemistry, cautioning that A60 may not be the ideal biomarker to verify neuronal identity due to its cross immunoreactivity. In contrast, the rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody used in this study may be a better candidate to substitute for A60. PMID:27242450

  7. Preparation of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibody Fab Fragments Specific for Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Watanabe, Katsuomi; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshimasa; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ihara, Seiji

    1999-01-01

    Genes coding for human antibody Fab fragments specific for Entamoeba histolytica were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Lymphocytes were separated from the peripheral blood of a patient with an amebic liver abscess. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from the lymphocytes, and then genes coding for the light chain and Fd region of the heavy chain were amplified by a reverse transcriptase PCR. The amplified DNA fragments were ligated with a plasmid vector and were introduced into Escherichia coli. Three thousand colonies were screened for the production of antibodies to E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS by an indirect fluorescence-antibody (IFA) test. Lysates from five Escherichia coli clones were positive. Analysis of the DNA sequences of the five clones showed that three of the five heavy-chain sequences and four of the five light-chain sequences differed from each other. When the reactivities of the Escherichia coli lysates to nine reference strains of E. histolytica were examined by the IFA test, three Fab fragments with different DNA sequences were found to react with all nine strains and another Fab fragment was found to react with seven strains. None of the four human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments reacted with Entamoeba dispar reference strains or with other enteric protozoan parasites. These results indicate that the bacterial expression system reported here is effective for the production of human monoclonal antibodies specific for E. histolytica. The recombinant human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments may be applicable for distinguishing E. histolytica from E. dispar and for use in the serodiagnosis of amebiasis. PMID:10225840

  8. Adsorption and recovery issues of recombinant monoclonal antibodies in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Beck, Alain; Wagner, Elsa; Vuignier, Karine; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-01-01

    The poor recovery of large biomolecules is a well-known issue in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Several papers have reported this problem, but the reasons behind this behavior are not yet fully understood. In the present study, state-of-the-art reversed-phase wide-pore stationary phases were used to evaluate the adsorption of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. These biomolecules possess molar mass of approximately 150,000 g/mol and isoelectric points between 6.6 and 9.3. Two types of stationary phases were tested, the Phenomenex Aeris Widepore (silica based), with 3.6 μm superficially porous particles, and the Waters Acquity BEH300 (ethylene-bridged hybrid), with 1.7 μm fully porous particles. A systematic investigation was carried out using 11 immunoglobulin G1, G2, and G4 antibodies, namely, panitumumab, natalizumab, cetuximab, bevacizumab, trastuzumab, rituximab, palivizumab, belimumab, adalimumab, denosumab, and ofatumumab. All are approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in various therapeutic indications and are considered as reference antibodies. Several test proteins, such as human serum albumin, transferrin, apoferritin, ovalbumin, and others, possessing a molar mass between 42,000 and 443,000 g/mol were also evaluated to draw reliable conclusions. The purpose of this study was to find a correlation between the adsorption of monoclonal antibodies and their physicochemical properties. Therefore, the impact of isoelectric point, molar mass, protein glycosylation, and hydrophobicity was investigated. The adsorption of intact antibodies on the stationary phase was significantly higher than that of proteins of similar size, isoelectric point, or hydrophobicity. The present study also demonstrates the unique behavior of monoclonal antibodies, contributing some unwanted and unpredictable strong secondary interactions.

  9. Characterization and immunotherapeutic potential of a monoclonal antibody against a ras oncogene transformed cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Transformed cells express cell surface antigens not present, or present in diminished amounts on normal cells. Monoclonal antibodies can be used to identify and biochemically characterize tumor-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 45-2D9 was produced by immunization of BALB/c mice with a transformed cell line (45-2D9) induced by transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a c-H-ras oncogene in DNA isolated from a human lung carcinoma. By immunoperoxidase staining, this antibody binds to the 45-342 cells as well as to the ras transformed primary and 3 secondary transfectants, including the one used to induce 45-342, but not to other ras transformed cell lines. Murine tumors as well as human fetal and most normal adult tissues are not stained. This antibody does bind to a variety of human tumors, including lung adenocarcinomas, as well as breast, colon and esophageal carcinomas. The ability of MoAb 45-2D9 to target ricin toxin A chain (RTA) and radio-isotopes to gp74 expressing cells was investigated. An immunotoxin generated by conjugating RTA to MoAb 45-2D9 inhibits protein and DNA synthesis by the 45-342 cells. Radiolabeled antibody specifically localizes to and can be used to image subcutaneous and pulmonary gp74 expressing tumors in nu/nu mice. Monoclonal antibodies against oncogene transformed cell lines may be useful for the detection and characterization of tumor-associated antigens as well as for the development of new tumor therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  10. Combining phage display with de novo protein sequencing for reverse engineering of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Keith W; Grinberg, Luba; Woods, Robert M; Wilson, Susan; Bowen, Michael A; Baca, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The enormous diversity created by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation makes de novo protein sequencing of monoclonal antibodies a uniquely challenging problem. Modern mass spectrometry-based sequencing will rarely, if ever, provide a single unambiguous sequence for the variable domains. A more likely outcome is computation of an ensemble of highly similar sequences that can satisfy the experimental data. This outcome can result in the need for empirical testing of many candidate sequences, sometimes iteratively, to identity one which can replicate the activity of the parental antibody. Here we describe an improved approach to antibody protein sequencing by using phage display technology to generate a combinatorial library of sequences that satisfy the mass spectrometry data, and selecting for functional candidates that bind antigen. This approach was used to reverse engineer 2 commercially-obtained monoclonal antibodies against murine CD137. Proteomic data enabled us to assign the majority of the variable domain sequences, with the exception of 3-5% of the sequence located within or adjacent to complementarity-determining regions. To efficiently resolve the sequence in these regions, small phage-displayed libraries were generated and subjected to antigen binding selection. Following enrichment of antigen-binding clones, 2 clones were selected for each antibody and recombinantly expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs). In both cases, the reverse-engineered Fabs exhibited identical antigen binding affinity, within error, as Fabs produced from the commercial IgGs. This combination of proteomic and protein engineering techniques provides a useful approach to simplifying the technically challenging process of reverse engineering monoclonal antibodies from protein material.

  11. Combining phage display with de novo protein sequencing for reverse engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Rickert, Keith W.; Grinberg, Luba; Woods, Robert M.; Wilson, Susan; Bowen, Michael A.; Baca, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The enormous diversity created by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation makes de novo protein sequencing of monoclonal antibodies a uniquely challenging problem. Modern mass spectrometry-based sequencing will rarely, if ever, provide a single unambiguous sequence for the variable domains. A more likely outcome is computation of an ensemble of highly similar sequences that can satisfy the experimental data. This outcome can result in the need for empirical testing of many candidate sequences, sometimes iteratively, to identity one which can replicate the activity of the parental antibody. Here we describe an improved approach to antibody protein sequencing by using phage display technology to generate a combinatorial library of sequences that satisfy the mass spectrometry data, and selecting for functional candidates that bind antigen. This approach was used to reverse engineer 2 commercially-obtained monoclonal antibodies against murine CD137. Proteomic data enabled us to assign the majority of the variable domain sequences, with the exception of 3–5% of the sequence located within or adjacent to complementarity-determining regions. To efficiently resolve the sequence in these regions, small phage-displayed libraries were generated and subjected to antigen binding selection. Following enrichment of antigen-binding clones, 2 clones were selected for each antibody and recombinantly expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs). In both cases, the reverse-engineered Fabs exhibited identical antigen binding affinity, within error, as Fabs produced from the commercial IgGs. This combination of proteomic and protein engineering techniques provides a useful approach to simplifying the technically challenging process of reverse engineering monoclonal antibodies from protein material. PMID:26852694

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies Detect a Spectrin-Like Protein in Normal and Dystrophic Human Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleyard, S. T.; Dunn, M. J.; Dubowitz, V.; Scott, M. L.; Pittman, S. J.; Shotton, D. M.

    1984-02-01

    Spectrin is the major protein of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, which is bound to the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane's lipid bilayer and is responsible for cell shape and membrane elasticity. Inability to identify spectrin in other cell types led to the assumption that this protein was unique to erythrocytes. However, spectrin-like proteins have been demonstrated recently in a variety of cell types, including skeletal and cardiac muscle, in several species. We used monoclonal antibodies against human erythrocyte spectrin subunits in an immunocytochemical study to detect related proteins in normal and diseased human skeletal muscle. Six of seven monoclonal antibodies against β -spectrin determinants were bound at the cytoplasmic surface of muscle fiber plasma membranes, whereas none of six monoclonal antibodies against α -spectrin determinants was bound. Muscle fibers of patients with neuromuscular diseases showed similar distribution and specificity of antibody binding to those of normal subjects, but the intensity of binding was increased. In contrast, probable regenerating fibers in muscle of patients with muscular dystrophies showed reduced binding of antibodies, but reduced binding was not seen in fetal muscle fibers nor in those of a patient with a myotubular myopathy. We conclude that human skeletal muscle fibers possess a spectrin-related protein associated with their plasma membrane that shows extensive β -chain similarities to erythrocyte spectrin but differs significantly with respect to the α -subunit. Its function may be associated with the maintenance of membrane and myofibril integrity during contraction, and the increased antibody binding in diseased muscle may reflect a structural rearrangement of spectrin or a compensatory increase in spectrin abundance in response to increased stress on these systems.

  13. Identification of a Monoclonal Antibody Against Pneumococcal Pilus 1 Ancillary Protein Impairing Bacterial Adhesion to Human Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Amerighi, Fulvia; Valeri, Maria; Donnarumma, Danilo; Maccari, Silvia; Moschioni, Monica; Taddei, Annarita; Lapazio, Lucia; Pansegrau, Werner; Buccato, Scilla; De Angelis, Gabriella; Ruggiero, Paolo; Masignani, Vega; Soriani, Marco; Pezzicoli, Alfredo

    2016-02-15

    The adhesion of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a key step during colonization of human respiratory tract mucosae. Here we demonstrate that pneumococcal type I pilus significantly increases the adhesiveness of poorly adhering highly capsulated strains in vitro. Interestingly, preincubation of bacteria with antibodies against the major pilus backbone subunit (RrgB) or the adhesin component (RrgA) impaired pneumococcal association to human epithelial cells. Screening for anti-RrgA monoclonal antibodies specifically affecting the adhesive capacity of S. pneumoniae led to the identification of the monoclonal 11B9/61 antibody, which greatly reduced pilus-dependent cell contact. Proteomic-based epitope mapping of 11B9/61 monoclonal antibody revealed a well-exposed epitope on the D2 domain of RrgA as the target of this functional antibody. The data presented here confirm the importance of pilus I for S. pneumoniae pathogenesis and the potential use of antipilus antibodies to prevent bacterial colonization.

  14. The laboratory of clinical virology in monitoring patients undergoing monoclonal antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, R

    2011-12-01

    The relevant efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has resulted in the successful treatment of several diseases, although susceptibility to infections remains a major problem. This review summarizes aspects of the literature regarding viral infections and mAbs, specifically addressing the risk of infection/reactivation, the measures that can reduce this risk, and the role played by the laboratory of clinical virology in monitoring patients undergoing mAb therapy.

  15. Isolation of oligonucleosomes from active chromatin using HMG17-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Dorbic, T; Wittig, B

    1986-01-01

    We report the preparation of HMG17-containing oligonucleosomes from chicken embryos and from liver and oviduct of laying hens. Monoclonal antibodies against HMG17 were used for their isolation. An unusual size distribution with respect to their repeat number was observed. The oligonucleosomes of repeat number up to N6 were highly enriched for DNA of the vitellogenin II gene (liver) and for DNA of the ovalbumin and lysozyme genes (oviduct). Images PMID:3703677

  16. Anti-(+)-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody antagonists designed to prevent the progression of human diseases of addiction.

    PubMed

    Gentry, W B; Rüedi-Bettschen, D; Owens, S M

    2010-09-01

    Anti-(+)-methamphetamine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have the potential to reduce the devastating behavioral and societal effects of the worldwide epidemic of (+)-methamphetamine (METH) addiction and transform the treatment paradigm for diseases of addiction. These novel, protein-based medications could play a vital role in helping patients to achieve sustainable abstinence from METH abuse by serving as an in vivo, around-the-clock sentry against a patient's vulnerability to relapse.

  17. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody that selectively recognizes a subset of Entamoeba histolytica isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, A; Ghildyal, R; Bhattacharya, S; Diamond, L S

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 2D7.10 recognized an antigen present in seven of nine isolates of axenically cultured Entamoeba histolytica and absent in all other Entamoeba isolates studied. The antigen was absent in two isolates: 200:NIH and Rahman. All nine isolates belonged to pathogenic zymodeme II. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and treatment with periodate and the proteolytic enzyme trypsin suggest that the antigen recognized by 2D7.10 is a carbohydrate moiety. Images PMID:1698182

  18. Use of monoclonal antibodies as an effective strategy for treatment of ciguatera poisoning.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masayuki; Lee, Nayoung; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Hirama, Masahiro

    2009-06-01

    Ciguatera is a global food poisoning caused by the consumption of fish that have accumulated sodium channel activator toxins, ciguatoxins. At present, most diagnosed cases of ciguatera are treated with symptomatic and supportive remedies, and no specific therapy has been devised. Here we report that ciguatoxin CTX3C can be effectively neutralized in vitro and in vivo by simultaneous use of two anti-ciguatoxin monoclonal antibodies, providing the first rational approach toward directly preventing and treating ciguatera.

  19. [Canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody against IL-1β, with potential utility in different inflammatory processes].

    PubMed

    Carné, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Canakinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeted at IL-1β which has shown to be effective in the control the symptoms of patients affected by CAPS and other autoinflammatory diseases. Its effect is rapid and sustained. In clinical trials conducted up until now, the most common adverse effects reported with the use of this drug have been different types of infections, migraines and vertigo.

  20. Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Stem Cells to TRA-8 Anti-DR5 Monoclonal Antibody

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    were purchased from Cell Signaling Technology, Inc. (Danvers, MA). Monoclonal anti-β-catenin was purchased from BD Biosciences (San Jose , CA...Luo MH, Ni YB, Chan SK, Lui PC, et al. Cancer stem cell markers are associated with adverse biomarker profiles and molecular subtypes of breast cancer...APC mouse anti-human CD44, PE-Cy7 rat anti- mouse CD44, and corresponding isotype control antibodies were purchased from BD Pharmingen (San Jose , CA

  1. Phytochrome in photosynthetically competent plants characterization by monoclonal antibodies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed information concerning the physicochemical properties of phytochrome is sought, but since only trace quantities are present in plant tissues, it is extremely labile to modification in crude plant extracts, efficient and sensitive methods for its purification and characterization will be required. Towards this end immune serums directed towards oat phytochrome have been prepared. Unfortunately the phytochrome in green oats is immunochemically distinct from phytochrome in etiolated oats. Consequently, effort has been directed at preparation of monoclonal antibodies for green-oat phytochrome.

  2. Belimumab: anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody; Benlysta; BmAb; LymphoStat-B.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Belimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody for the treatment of autoimmune disorders that is being developed by Human Genome Sciences and GlaxoSmithKline. Two pivotal phase III trials in systemic lupus erythematosus have been concluded with the primary endpoints being met in both studies. A phase II trial in rheumatoid arthritis has also been completed, with positive results. Marketing authorization submissions are being prepared in the major markets worldwide. This review discusses the development history and scientific profile of belimumab.

  3. Humanized Monoclonal Antibody That Passively Protects Mice against Systemic and Intranasal Ricin Toxin Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael H.; Whaley, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    PB10 is a murine monoclonal antibody against an immunodominant epitope on ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit. Here, we characterize a fully humanized version of PB10 IgG1 (hPB10) and demonstrate that it has potent in vitro and in vivo toxin-neutralizing activities. We also report the minimum serum concentrations of hPB10 required to protect mice against 10 times the 50% lethal dose of ricin when delivered by injection and inhalation. PMID:27466351

  4. One-step purification of mouse monoclonal antibodies from ascitic fluid by DEAE Affi-Gel blue chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bruck, C; Portetelle, D; Glineur, C; Bollen, A

    1982-09-30

    Monoclonal antibodies can be purified directly from ascitic fluids by chromatography on a DEAE Affi-gel blue column. Optimal conditions were determined for the recovery of immunoglobulins free of contaminating protease and nuclease activities.

  5. Monoclonal antibody based enzyme immunoassay for marihuana (cannabinoid) compounds.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Goto, Y; Shoyama, Y

    1996-11-01

    MAb against delta 1-THCA was produced by fusing hybridoma with splenocytes immunized with delta 1-THCA-BSA conjugate and hypoxanthine, aminopterine, thymidine-sensitive mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8-653. The cross-reaction of anti-delta 1-THCA antibody against other cannabinoids was very wide, thus many cannabinoids and a spiro-compound were reactive suggesting that 2'-hydroxyl, 6'-hydroxyl or 6'-O-alkyl, 4'-alkylbenzene ring moiety is necessary for its reactivity. It became evident that this ELISA was able to be applied to the biotransformation experiments of cannabinoids in plant tissue culture system. The metabolites of delta 6-THC such as two major metabolites, 7-oxo-delta 6-THC and 7-hydroxyl-delta 6-THC were also detectable by this ELISA.

  6. Development of a Monoclonal Antibody against a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W. W.; Bressler, J. P.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, E.; de Vellis, J.

    1982-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody-producing hybrid cell line was obtained by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with C6 glioma cells. This antibody binds to a specific cell-surface antigen that is present on C6 rat glioma cells, transformed astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and a human glioma cell line but is absent on a normal glial cell line, fibroblasts, and primary cultures of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The antigen also appears on tumor tissue of transformed oligodendrocytes but not on normal brain tissue.

  7. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro. PMID:6787164

  8. Selective cytotoxicity of an oxygen-radical-generating enzyme conjugated to a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Tazzari, P L; Dinota, A; Rizzi, S; Grassi, G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1988-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 8A, which recognizes a human plasma cell-associated antigen, was covalently linked to xanthine oxidase in a conjugate maintaining both immunological and enzymatic properties. A significant degree of target cell lysis was obtained at an enzyme concentration that was ineffective on non-target cells and on myeloid staminal cells (CFU-GM). The cytotoxic activity was abolished by an excess of antibody, by allopurinol and by superoxide dismutase and catalase. A possible use of the conjugate for bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients is suggested. PMID:3262464

  9. Improved immunobinding test using monoclonal antibodies for detection of Mycoplasma bovis in milk

    PubMed Central

    Infante, F.; Infante, F.; Flores-Gutiérrez, G. H.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an improved immunobinding test (IBT) using monoclonal antibodies to identify Mycoplasma bovis in naturally infected milk. The IBT and the improved IBT were highly specific and had an immunologic sensitivity of 5 × 103 colony-forming units per milliliter. The results for the 2 methods agreed in the 130 milk samples tested. However, the IBT required 158 min, whereas the improved IBT required only 110 min. In addition, the improved IBT used smaller quantities of antibodies and conjugates. PMID:12418785

  10. Simulation model for overloaded monoclonal antibody variants separations in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Ströhlein, Guido; Lattuada, Marco; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-08-31

    A model was developed for the design of a monoclonal antibody charge variants separation process based on ion-exchange chromatography. In order to account for a broad range of operating conditions in the simulations, an explicit pH and salt concentration dependence has been included in the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The reliability of this model was tested using experimental chromatographic retention times as well as information about the structural characteristics of the different charge variants, e.g. C-terminal lysine groups and deamidated groups. Next, overloaded isocratic elutions at various pH and salt concentrations have been performed to determine the saturation capacity of the ion-exchanger. Furthermore, the column simulation model was applied for the prediction of monoclonal antibody variants separations with both pH and salt gradient elutions. A good prediction of the elution times and peak shapes was observed, even though none of the model parameters was adjusted to fit the experimental data. The trends in the separation performance obtained through the simulations were generally sufficient to identify the most promising operating conditions. The predictive column simulation model thus developed in this work, including a set of parameters determined through specific independent experiments, was experimentally validated and offers a useful basis for a rational optimization of monoclonal antibody variants separation processes on ion-exchange chromatography.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticle based purification and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibody against enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Gun; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Park, Young-Il; Jung, Tae-Sung; Son, Seong-Wan; So, ByungJae; Kang, Hwan-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-enrofloxacin antibody was prepared for a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and purification system using monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupled magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The IC50 values of the developed mAb for enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, sarafloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin were 5.0, 8.3, 9.7, 21.7, 36.0, and 63.7 ng/mL, respectively. The lowest detectable level of ENR was 0.7 ng/mL in the prepared ELISA system. To validate the developed ELISA in the food matrix, known amounts of ENR were spiked in meat and egg samples at 10, 20 and 30 ng/mL. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 72.9 to 113.16% with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.42 to 10.11%. The applicability of the mAb-MNP system was verified by testing the recoveries for ENR residue in three different matrices. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 75.16 to 86.36%, while the CV ranged from 5.08 to 11.53%. Overall, ENR-specific monoclonal antibody was prepared and developed for use in competitive to ELISAs for the detection of ENR in animal meat samples. Furthermore, we suggest that a purification system for ENR using mAb-coupled MNPs could be useful for determination of ENR residue in food.

  12. Evaluation of multidrug resistant phenotype by flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies and functional tests.

    PubMed

    Lizard, G; Maynadié, M; Roignot, P; Lizard-Nacol, S; Poupon, M F

    1995-03-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype is characterized by a defect in drug accumulation caused by overexpression of a transmembrane glycoprotein, the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). MDR phenotype can be characterized either with monoclonal antibodies raised against P-gp or with functional tests, most often based on the incorporation of fluorescent compounds. In the present study, data obtained with the monoclonal antibodies C219, JSB1 and MRK16 are compared to those of functional tests performed by flow cytometry including uptake of daunorubicin (DNR), Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) or Hoechst 33342. Sensitive and resistant cell lines K562S, K562R, KBA1 and KB31, derived either from a human chronic myeloid leukemia or from a human epithelial carcinoma, were used. In resistant cells, P-gp expression was revealed with either the monoclonal antibodies C219, JSB1 or MRK-16. The most specific results were obtained with MRK-16. With functional tests, no matter which dyes were used, the fluorescence was always stronger in sensitive than in resistant cells. However, with DNR and Hoechst 33342, an incorporation of these dyes was exhibited in resistant cells. This phenomenon was not observed with Rh 123, which makes it possible to distinguish clearly between sensitive and resistant cells and to detect as few as 1% of resistant cells. Because of its high sensitivity, the functional test involving incorporation of Rh 123 was successfully used in acute myeloid leukemia to detect multichemoresistant cells.

  13. Myosin at the apical pole of ciliated epithelial cells as revealed by a monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (CC-212), obtained in a fusion experiment in which basal bodies from quail oviduct were used as immunogen, has been shown to label the apical pole of ciliated cells and to react with a 200-kD protein. This monoclonal antibody was demonstrated to be an anti- myosin from smooth muscle or from nonmuscular cells using the following criteria: On Western blots it reacted with the myosin heavy chains from gizzard and platelet extracts and from cultured cell line extracts, but did not react with striated muscle myosin heavy chains. By immunofluorescence it decorated the stress fibers of well-spread cells with a characteristic striated pattern, while it did not react with myotubes containing organized myofibrils. On native ciliated cells as well as on Triton-extracted ciliated cortices from quail oviduct, this monoclonal antibody decorated the apical pole with a stronger labeling of the periphery of the apical area. Ultrastructural localization was attempted using the immunogold technique on the same preparation. Myosin was associated with a filamentous material present between striated rootlets and the proximal extremities of the basal bodies. No labeling of the basal body itself or of axoneme was observed. PMID:3525577

  14. Abortive activation of B lymphocytes by monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Cambier, J.C.; Heusser, C.H.; Julius, M.H.

    1986-05-01

    Toward a better understanding of the signaling role of antigen-mIg binding in the generation of humoral immune responses, we have assessed the effects of soluble, monoclonal anti-Ig antibodies on various cell physiologic parameters known to change during B cell activation. These parameters include membrane potential, I-A antigen expression, narrow angle light scattering properties (size), and cell cycle state. Results indicate that all monoclonal antibodies that bind cell to surface IgM or IgD, or both, induce virtually all small B cells to undergo membrane depolarization and increased I-A expression. Only a small subset of these antibodies, exemplified by b-7-6 anti-mu, induce all small B cells to enter G1. An increasingly smaller proportion of these cells traverse each subsequent cell cycle phase, with 10% of cells reaching G2 or M phases by 60 hr of culture. The kinetics of this response to b-7-6 are considerably slower than those of the response induced by LPS. Finally, analysis of Percoll density-fractionated cells revealed that although B blasts made by b-7-6 stimulation of small cells remain b-7-6 responsive, natural B blasts isolated from the spleen are refractory to monoclonal anti-Ig stimulation as indicated by membrane depolarization, increased IA expression, blastogenesis, and (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies - A new era in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Tomas; Hajek, Roman

    2016-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently the most investigated therapeutic compounds in oncology, but there is no monoclonal antibody approved in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). Nevertheless several really promising molecules are under investigation in phase III clinical trials. Dominantly daratumumab (anti-CD38) and elotuzumab (anti-CS1) showed extraordinary effectiveness in phase I/II trials. The toxicity was acceptable which is important for their addition to standard anti-myeloma agents like proteasome inhibitors or immunomodulatory drugs. Monoclonal antibodies such as denosumab (anti-RANKL) or BHQ880 (anti-DKK-1) are investigated also in the management of myeloma bone disease. This review is focused on the most promising mAbs, their mechanisms of action and the rationale of use. Practically all available results have been described. If the ongoing trials confirm the efficacy and safety of mAbs, they would become an important part of MM treatment that would be translated in the further improvement of therapeutic outcomes.

  16. Monoclonal antibody against Saint Louis encephalitis prM viral protein.

    PubMed

    Pupo-Antúnez, M; Vázquez, S; Sosa, A L; Caballero, Y; Vásquez, Y; Morier, L; Álvarez, M; Guzmán, M G

    2015-06-15

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus belongs to Flavivirus genus; Flaviviridae family jointly with other medically important flaviviruses including dengue virus and West Nile virus. The biological properties and functions of prM flavivirus protein are under investigation due to its importance in the generation of infectious virion and host interactions. Monoclonal antibodies have become powerful tools in this approach. Also the use of monoclonal antibodies has been successfully applied for antigenic analysis, clinical diagnosis and treatments. Here, using an immunofluorescence assay we describe a monoclonal antibody (mAb 3D2) that uniquely recognizes native prM Saint Louis encephalitis virus protein expressed in either C6/36-HT or Vero cells. In conclusion, mAb3D2 has significant potential for use in (a) the diagnosis of infections caused by this virus and (b) therapeutic use to treat patients infected by this virus and fundamental research to understand the role of the prM in the Saint Louis encephalitis virus infectious process.

  17. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing different subsets of lymphocytes from the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryoji; Maekawa, Shin-ichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shuzo; Ishii, Hajime; Tanioka, Yoshikuni; Satake, Masanobu; Yagita, Hideo; Habu, Sonoko; Ito, Mamoru

    2008-12-22

    Callithrix jacchus, the common marmoset, is a small new world primate that is considered effective as an experimental animal model for various human diseases. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against common marmoset lymphocytes for immunological studies on the common marmoset. We established five hybridoma clones, 6C9, 10D7, 6F10, 7A4 and 5A1, producing anti-marmoset mAbs against cell surface antigens on marmoset T and/or B lymphocytes. We confirmed that 6C9 and 10D7 antibodies recognized CD45 antigen, and 6F10 antibody recognized CD8 antigen by flow cytometry using marmoset cDNA transfectants. We also tested them for application of immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. We found that immunohistochemistry using marmoset spleen sections could be applied with all established mAbs but immunoprecipitation and the Western blot analysis could be applied with 6F10 and 10D7 antibodies but not with the other three mAbs. These results show that these monoclonal antibodies are useful for advancing immunological research on the common marmoset.

  18. Structural basis of checkpoint blockade by monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun Tae; Shin, Woori; Chae, Jongseok; Choi, Jaemo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Heejin; Won Heo, Tae; Park, Kyeong Young; Lee, Yeon Ji; Ryu, Seong Eon; Son, Ji Young; Lee, Jee Un; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells express tumour-specific antigens derived via genetic and epigenetic alterations, which may be targeted by T-cell-mediated immune responses. However, cancer cells can avoid immune surveillance by suppressing immunity through activation of specific inhibitory signalling pathways, referred to as immune checkpoints. In recent years, the blockade of checkpoint molecules such as PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4, with monoclonal antibodies has enabled the development of breakthrough therapies in oncology, and four therapeutic antibodies targeting these checkpoint molecules have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of several types of cancer. Here, we report the crystal structures of checkpoint molecules in complex with the Fab fragments of therapeutic antibodies, including PD-1/pembrolizumab, PD-1/nivolumab, PD-L1/BMS-936559 and CTLA-4/tremelimumab. These complex structures elucidate the precise epitopes of the antibodies and the molecular mechanisms underlying checkpoint blockade, providing useful information for the improvement of monoclonal antibodies capable of attenuating checkpoint signalling for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27796306

  19. The present state of the art in expression, production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Christopher L

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) have become one the most powerful therapeutic and diagnostic tools in modern medicine. Some estimates target the worldwide market of MAb's on the order of $125 billion in the next four years. Recent advances in molecular biology, immunology, and development of robust production platforms will drive the development of more MAb's suitable to treat an ever increasing number of disease states. This circumstance combined with the fact that many of the original antibody therapies from the 1980 s and 1990 s will soon be coming off patent will attract a great deal of investment in the development of larger industrial facilities to increase monoclonal antibody to meet increasing demand. In this review, the present state of the science that underlies the development of new antibodies therapies in Chinese hamster ovary cells combined with a description of the present challenges facing the industry in terms of the limitations of output and compliance with current good manufacturing practices and FDA regulations. Also addressed are future challenges to overcome production bottlenecks, description of critical quality control attributes particular to antibodies, and detailed treatment of scale-up considerations.

  20. A murine monoclonal antibody based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for almond (Prunus dulcis L.) detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Mengna; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Liu, Changqi; Zhang, Ying; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2013-11-13

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-almond soluble protein rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and murine monoclonal antibody 4C10 as the detection antibodies was developed. The assay is specific and sensitive (3-200 ng almond protein/mL) for almond detection. The standardized assay is accurate (<15% CV) and reproducible (intra- and inter assay variability <15% CV). The assay did not register any cross-reactivity with the tested food matrices, suggesting the assay to be almond amandin specific. The assay could detect the presence of declared almond in the tested matched commercial samples. Further, the assay reliably detected the presence of almonds in the laboratory prepared food samples spiked with almond flour.