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Sample records for monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

  1. Nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Edward, Justin A; Swan, Kevin W; Bourgeois, Camille R T; Bartow, Matthew J; Yoo, Daniel; Peak, Taylor A; Song, Bryant M; Chan, Ryan A; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Prieto, Minolfa C; Giles, Thomas D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a rare disorder that, without treatment, is progressive and fatal within 3-4 years. Current treatment involves a diverse group of drugs that target the pulmonary vascular bed. In addition, strategies that increase nitric oxide (NO) formation have a beneficial effect in rodents and patients. Nebivolol, a selective β1 adrenergic receptor-blocking agent reported to increase NO production and stimulate β3 receptors, has vasodilator properties suggesting that it may be beneficial in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. The present study was undertaken to determine whether nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced (60 mg/kg) pulmonary hypertension in the rat. These results show that nebivolol treatment (10 mg/kg, once or twice daily) attenuates pulmonary hypertension, reduces right ventricular hypertrophy, and improves pulmonary artery remodeling in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. This study demonstrates the presence of β3 adrenergic receptor immunoreactivity in pulmonary arteries and airways and that nebivolol has pulmonary vasodilator activity. Studies with β3 receptor agonists (mirabegron, BRL 37344) and antagonists suggest that β3 receptor-mediated decreases in systemic arterial pressure occur independent of NO release. Our results suggest that nebivolol, a selective vasodilating β1 receptor antagonist that stimulates β3 adrenergic receptors and induces vasodilation by increasing NO production, may be beneficial in treating pulmonary hypertensive disorders.

  2. Therapeutic efficacy of TBC3711 in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Endothelin-1 signalling plays an important role in pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Although different endothelin-A receptor antagonists are developed, a novel therapeutic option to cure the disease is still needed. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the selective endothelin-A receptor antagonist TBC3711 in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Methods Monocrotaline-injected male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized and treated orally from day 21 to 35 either with TBC3711 (Dose: 30 mg/kg body weight/day) or placebo. Echocardiographic measurements of different hemodynamic and right-heart hypertrophy parameters were performed. After day 35, rats were sacrificed for invasive hemodynamic and right-heart hypertrophy measurements. Additionally, histologic assessment of pulmonary vascular and right-heart remodelling was performed. Results The novel endothelin-A receptor antagonist TBC3711 significantly attenuated monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension, as evident from improved hemodynamics and right-heart hypertrophy in comparison with placebo group. In addition, muscularization and medial wall thickness of distal pulmonary vessels were ameliorated. The histologic evaluation of the right ventricle showed a significant reduction in fibrosis and cardiomyocyte size, suggesting an improvement in right-heart remodelling. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the selective endothelin-A receptor antagonist TBC3711 demonstrates therapeutic benefit in rats with established pulmonary hypertension, thus representing a useful therapeutic approach for treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:21699729

  3. Intratracheal Gene Transfer of Adrenomedullin Using Polyplex Nanomicelles Attenuates Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Takamisawa, Itaru; Miyata, Kanjiro; Ishii, Takehiko; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Itaka, Keiji; Kangawa, Kenji; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Asada, Yujiro; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Nagaya, Noriya; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by progressive PAH and right ventricular failure. Despite recent advances in therapeutic approaches using prostanoids, endothelin antagonists, and so on, PAH remains a challenging condition. To develop a novel therapeutic approach, we have established a nonviral gene delivery system of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based block catiomers, which form a polyplex nanomicelle with a nanoscaled core–shell structure in the presence of DNA. The polyplex nanomicelle from PEG-b-poly{N-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]aspartamide} (PEG-b-P[Asp(DET)]), having ethylenediamine units at the side chain, showed ~100-fold increase in luciferase transgene expression activity in mouse lung via intratracheal administration with a minimal toxicity compared with the polyplex from linear poly(ethylenimine) (LPEI). The transfection activity was highest on day 3 after administration and remained detectable until day 14. PEG-b-P[Asp(DET)] polyplex nanomicelles were formulated with a therapeutic plasmid bearing the human adrenomedullin (AM) gene and intratracheally administered to rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The right ventricular pressure significantly decreased 3 days after administration as confirmed by a notable increase of pulmonary human AM mRNA levels. Intratracheal administration of PEG-b-P[Asp-(DET)] polyplex nanomicelles showed remarkable therapeutic efficacy with PAH animal models without compromising biocompatibility. PMID:19337232

  4. The Beneficial Effect of Suramin on Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Izikki, Mohamed; Mercier, Olaf; Lecerf, Florence; Lubert Guin, Lauriane; Hoang, Eric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Dartevelle, Philippe; Fadel, Elie; Eddahibi, Saadia

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disorder characterized by an increase in pulmonary artery pressure and structural changes in the pulmonary vasculature. Several observations indicate that growth factors play a key role in PH by modulating pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PA-SMC) function. In rats, established monocrotaline-induced PH (MCT-PH) can be reversed by blocking platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-R), epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R), or fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGF-R). All these receptors belong to the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family. Methods and Results We evaluated whether RTK blockade by the nonspecific growth factor inhibitor, suramin, reversed advanced MCT-PH in rats via its effects on growth-factor signaling pathways. We found that suramin inhibited RTK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cultured human PA-SMCs. Suramin inhibited PA-SMC proliferation induced by serum, PDGF, FGF2, or EGF in vitro and ex vivo. Treatment with suramin from day 1 to day 21 after monocrotaline injection attenuated PH development, as shown by lower values for pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and distal vessel muscularization on day 21 compared to control rats. Treatment with suramin from day 21 to day 42 after monocrotaline injection reversed established PH, thereby normalizing the pulmonary artery pressure values and vessel structure. Suramin treatment suppressed PA-SMC proliferation and attenuated both the inflammatory response and the deposition of collagen. Conclusions RTK blockade by suramin can prevent MCT-PH and reverse established MCT-PH in rats. This study suggests that an anti-RTK strategy that targets multiple RTKs could be useful in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24143201

  5. Delivery of imatinib-incorporated nanoparticles into lungs suppresses the development of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Miura, Daiji; Saito, Yukihiro; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ogawa, Aiko; Matoba, Tetsuya; Egashira, Kensuke; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-05-13

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Imatinib, a PDGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved hemodynamics, but serious side effects and drug discontinuation are common when treating PAH. A drug delivery system using nanoparticles (NPs) enables the reduction of side effects while maintaining the effects of the drug. We examined the efficacy of imatinib-incorporated NPs (Ima-NPs) in a rat model and in human PAH-pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Rats received a single intratracheal administration of PBS, FITC-NPs, or Ima-NPs immediately after monocrotaline injection. Three weeks after monocrotaline injection, intratracheal administration of Ima-NPs suppressed the development of pulmonary hypertension, small pulmonary artery remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy in the rat model of monocrotaline-induced PAH. We also examined the effects of imatinib and Ima-NPs on PDGF-induced proliferation of human PAH-PASMCs by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Imatinib and Ima-NPs significantly inhibited proliferation after 24 hours of treatment. Ima-NPs significantly inhibited proliferation compared with imatinib at 24 hours after removal of these drugs. Delivery of Ima-NPs into lungs suppressed the development of MCT-induced PAH by sustained antiproliferative effects on PAS-MCs.

  6. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular contractility in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by vascular remodeling of pulmonary arteries (PAs) and increased vascular resistance in the lung. Monocrotaline (MCT), a toxic alkaloid, is widely used for developing rat models of PAH caused by injury to pulmonary endothelial cells; however, characteristics of vascular functions in MCT-induced PAH vary and are not fully understood. Here, we investigated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) responses and effects of various vasoconstrictors with isolated/perfused lungs of MCT-induced PAH (PAH-MCT) rats. Using hematoxylin and eosin staining, we confirmed vascular remodeling (i.e., medial thickening of PA) and right ventricle hypertrophy in PAH-MCT rats. The basal pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and PAP increase by a raised flow rate (40 mL/min) were higher in the PAH-MCT than in the control rats. In addition, both high K+ (40 mM KCl)- and angiotensin II-induced PAP increases were higher in the PAH-MCT than in the control rats. Surprisingly, application of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), induced a marked PAP increase in the PAH-MCT rats, suggesting that endothelial functions were recovered in the three-week PAH-MCT rats. In addition, the medial thickening of the PA was similar to that in chronic hypoxia-induced PAH (PAH-CH) rats. However, the HPV response (i.e., PAP increased by acute hypoxia) was not affected in the MCT rats, whereas HPV disappeared in the PAH-CH rats. These results showed that vascular contractility and HPV remain robust in the MCT-induced PAH rat model with vascular remodeling. PMID:27847441

  7. Superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-134 prevents diaphragm muscle weakness in monocrotalin-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tatebayashi, Daisuke; Lee, Jaesik; Westerblad, Håkan; Lanner, Johanna T.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) suffer from inspiratory insufficiency, which has been associated with intrinsic contractile dysfunction in diaphragm muscle. Here, we examined the role of redox stress in PH-induced diaphragm weakness by using the novel antioxidant, EUK-134. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (CNT), CNT + EUK-134 (CNT + EUK), monocrotaline-induced PH (PH), and PH + EUK groups. PH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg body weight). EUK-134 (3 mg/kg body weight/day), a cell permeable mimetic of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, was daily intraperitoneally administered starting one day after induction of PH. After four weeks, diaphragm muscles were excised for mechanical and biochemical analyses. There was a decrease in specific tetanic force in diaphragm bundles from the PH group, which was accompanied by increases in: protein expression of NADPH oxidase 2/gp91phox, SOD2, and catalase; 3-nitrotyrosine content and aggregation of actin; glutathione oxidation. Treatment with EUK-134 prevented the force decrease and the actin modifications in PH diaphragm bundles. These data show that redox stress plays a pivotal role in PH-induced diaphragm weakness. Thus, antioxidant treatment can be a promising strategy for PH patients with inspiratory failure. PMID:28152009

  8. Pioglitazone alleviates cardiac and vascular remodelling and improves survival in monocrotaline induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Arnica; Trappiel, Manuela; Berghausen, Eva Maria; Ten Freyhaus, Henrik; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Odenthal, Margarete; Blaschke, Florian; Er, Fikret; Gassanov, Natig; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Baldus, Stephan; Kappert, Kai; Caglayan, Evren

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease with limited therapeutic options. Pathophysiological changes comprise obliterative vascular remodelling of small pulmonary arteries, elevated mean pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) due to elevated resistance of pulmonary vasculature, adverse right ventricular remodelling, and heart failure. Recent findings also indicate a role of increased inflammation and insulin resistance underlying the development of PAH. We hypothesized that treatment of this condition with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activator pioglitazone, known to regulate the expression of different genes addressing insulin resistance, inflammatory changes, and vascular remodelling, could be a beneficial approach. PAH was induced in adult rats by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (MCT). Pioglitazone was administered for 2 weeks starting 3 weeks after MCT-injection. At day 35, hemodynamics, organ weights, and -indices were measured. We performed morphological and molecular characterization of the pulmonary vasculature, including analysis of the degree of muscularization, proliferation rates, and medial wall thickness of the small pulmonary arteries. Furthermore, markers of cardiac injury, collagen content, and cardiomyocyte size were analyzed. Survival rates were monitored throughout the experimental period. Pioglitazone treatment improved survival, reduced PASP, muscularization of small pulmonary arteries, and medial wall thickness. Further, MCT-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis were attenuated. This was accompanied with reduced cardiac expression of brain natriuretic peptide, as well as decreased cardiomyocyte size. Finally, pulmonary macrophage content and osteopontin gene expression were attenuated. Based on the beneficial impact of pioglitazone, activation of PPARγ might be a promising treatment option in PAH.

  9. N-acetylcysteine improves established monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of patients suffering from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are predominantly determined by the response of the right ventricle to the increase afterload secondary to high vascular pulmonary resistance. However, little is known about the effects of the current available or experimental PAH treatments on the heart. Recently, inflammation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of PAH. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-known safe anti-oxidant drug, has immuno-modulatory and cardioprotective properties. We therefore hypothesized that NAC could reduce the severity of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats exposed to monocrotaline (MCT), lowering inflammation and preserving pulmonary vascular system and right heart function. Methods Saline-treated control, MCT-exposed, MCT-exposed and NAC treated rats (day 14–28) were evaluated at day 28 following MCT for hemodynamic parameters (right ventricular systolic pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure and cardiac output), right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular morphometry, lung inflammatory cells immunohistochemistry (monocyte/macrophages and dendritic cells), IL-6 expression, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis. Results The treatment with NAC significantly decreased pulmonary vascular remodeling, lung inflammation, and improved total pulmonary resistance (from 0.71 ± 0.05 for MCT group to 0.50 ± 0.06 for MCT + NAC group, p < 0.05). Right ventricular function was also improved with NAC treatment associated with a significant decrease in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy (625 ± 69 vs. 439 ± 21 μm2 for MCT and MCT + NAC group respectively, p < 0.001) and heart fibrosis (14.1 ± 0.8 vs. 8.8 ± 0.1% for MCT and MCT + NAC group respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions Through its immuno-modulatory and cardioprotective properties, NAC has beneficial effect on pulmonary vascular and right heart function in experimental PH. PMID:24929652

  10. Role of oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide and transforming growth factor-beta in the protective effect of diosgenin in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Obaid, Al Arqam Z; Zaki, Hala F; Agha, Azza M

    2014-10-05

    Pulmonary hypertension is a progressive disease of various origins that is associated with right ventricular dysfunction. In the present study, the protective effect of diosgenin was investigated in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Diosgenin (100 mg/kg) was given by oral administration once daily for 3 weeks. At the end of the experiment, mean arterial blood pressure, electrocardiography and echocardiography were recorded. Rats were then sacrificed and serum was separated for determination of total nitrate/nitrite level. Right ventricles and lungs were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, total nitrate/nitrite and transforming growth factor-beta contents. Myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activities in addition to endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression were also determined. Moreover, histological analysis of pulmonary arteries and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was performed. Diosgenin treatment provided a significant improvement toward preserving hemodynamic changes and alleviating oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers induced by monocrotaline in rats. Furthermore, diosgenin therapy prevented monocrotaline-induced changes in nitric oxide production, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as histological analysis. These findings support the beneficial effect of diosgenin in pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline in rats.

  11. Combination of Sildenafil and Simvastatin Ameliorates Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Tuguang; Wang, Jun; Pang, Baosen; Huang, Xiuxia; Burg, Elyssa D.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Wang, Chen

    2010-01-01

    Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, and simvastatin, a cholesterol lowering drug, both have therapeutic effects on PAH; however, the combination of these drugs has not been tested in the treatment of PAH. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of sildenafil and simvastatin is superior to each drug alone in the prevention of MCT-induced PAH. Phosphorylated Smad levels were decreased in lung tissue in MCT-injected rats, whereas ERK protein levels were increased. This indicates a possible role for an increase in mitogenic ERK activity in addition to decreased proapoptotic Smad signaling in the MCT model of PAH. Combination sildenafil and simvastatin treatment prevented the MCT-induced increases in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), exerted an antiproliferative effect on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Our results indicate that combination therapy with sildenafil and simvastatin attenuated the development of pulmonary hypertension more than either treatment alone. PMID:20188205

  12. Arrhythmogenic substrate in hearts of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Stones, Rachel; Drinkhill, Mark; Bernus, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms associated with right ventricular (RV) hypertension and arrhythmias are less understood than those in the left ventricle (LV). The aim of our study was to investigate whether and by what mechanisms a proarrhythmic substrate exists in a rat model of RV hypertension and hypertrophy. Rats were injected with monocrotaline (MCT; 60 mg/kg) to induce pulmonary artery hypertension or with saline (CON). Myocardial levels of mRNA for genes expressing ion channels were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Monophasic action potential duration (MAPD) was recorded in isolated Langendorff-perfused hearts. MAPD restitution was measured, and arrhythmias were induced by burst stimulation. Twenty-two to twenty-six days after treatment, MCT animals had RV hypertension, hypertrophy, and decreased ejection fractions compared with CON. A greater proportion of MCT hearts developed sustained ventricular tachycardias/fibrillation (0.83 MCT vs. 0.14 CON). MAPD was prolonged in RV and less so in the LV of MCT hearts. There were decreased levels of mRNA for K+ channels. Restitution curves of MCT RV were steeper than CON RV or either LV. Dispersion of MAPD was greater in MCT hearts and was dependent on stimulation frequency. Computer simulations based on ion channel gene expression closely predicted experimental changes in MAPD and restitution. We have identified a proarrhythmic substrate in the hearts of MCT-treated rats. We conclude that steeper RV electrical restitution and rate-dependant RV-LV action potential duration dispersion may be contributing mechanisms and be implicated in the generation of arrhythmias associated with in RV hypertension and hypertrophy. PMID:21398591

  13. Protective Effects of Methylsulfonylmethane on Hemodynamics and Oxidative Stress in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sadollah; Najafi, Moslem; Hamzeiy, Hossein; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Pezeshkian, Masoud; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayon; Darabi, Masoud; Mostafalou, Sara; Bohlooli, Shahab; Garjani, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is naturally occurring organic sulfur that is known as a potent antioxidant/anti-inflammatory compound. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of MSM on hemodynamics functions and oxidative stress in rats with monocrotaline- (MCT-) induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 38-days treatment. MSM was administered to rats at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day doses 10 days before a single dose of 60 mg/kg, IP, MCT. Hemodynamics of ventricles were determined by Powerlab AD instrument. Blood samples were obtained to evaluate changes in the antioxidative system including activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Improvements in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were observed in the MSM-treated pulmonary arterial hypertensive rats, with a significant reduction in right ventricular systolic pressure (RSVP) and an increase in the mean arterial pressure (MAP). The values of CAT, SOD, GSH-px activities, and GSH were significantly lower in MCT-induced PAH (P < 0.01), but they were recovered to control levels of MSM-treated groups. Our present results suggest that long-term administration of the MSM attenuates MCT-induced PAH in rats through modulation of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. PMID:23118745

  14. Contribution of elastin and collagen to the pathogenesis of monocrotaline induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Todorovich, L.; Johnson, D.; Ranger, P.; Keeley, F.; Rabinovitch, M.

    1986-03-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were selected randomly for subcutaneous injections, 24 with monocrotaline (M) (60mg/kg) and 24 with an equivolume of saline, and studied 8, 16 or 28 days later. The right (RV) and left ventricle with septum (LV + S) were separated and weighed. The pulmonary artery (PA) was assessed by light and electron microscopy. Synthesis of elastin collagen and non-collagenous proteins was determined by measuring incorporations of /sup 3/H-valine, /sup 14/C-OH-proline and /sup 14/C-proline respectively. Total content of elastin was determined by weight of residue after CNBr digestion, and of collagen by total OH-proline content in SDS and CNBr extracts. At 16 days, the M injected rats developed a 6-fold increase in PA elastin synthesis and a 2-fold increase in medial wall thickness. Ultrastructural changes included increased microtubules and golgi apparatus in endothelium, decreased proportion of mature elastin in subendothelium and increased ground substance in media. By 28 days, M rats showed a progressive increase in PA elastin and collagen synthesis, greater than 20-fold, and in medial wall thickness, 3-fold. This was associated with a 2-fold increase in total elastin in proportion to the increase in PA weight and the development of RV hypertrophy (RV/LV + S increased more than 2-fold). Progressive irreversible pulmonary hypertension induced by M may be related to continuing stimulation of PA elastin and collagen synthesis.

  15. Role of secretory phospholipase A(2) in rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Saito-Tanji, Maki; Morikawa, Yuki; Kamataki, Akihisa; Sawai, Takashi; Nakayama, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Excessive stretching of the vascular wall in accordance with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induces a variety of pathogenic cellular events in the pulmonary arteries. We previously reported that indoxam, a selective inhibitor for secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), blocked the stretch-induced contraction of rabbit pulmonary arteries by inhibition of untransformed prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) production. The present study was undertaken to investigate involvement of sPLA(2) and untransformed PGH(2) in the enhanced contractility of pulmonary arteries of experimental PAH in rats. Among all the known isoforms of sPLA(2), sPLA(2)-X transcript was most significantly augmented in the pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension (MCT-PHR). The pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR frequently showed two types of spontaneous contraction in response to stretch; 27% showed rhythmic contraction, which was sensitive to indoxam and SC-560 (selective COX-1 inhibitor), but less sensitive to NS-398 (selective COX-2 inhibitor); and 47% showed sustained incremental tension (tonic contraction), which was insensitive to indoxam and SC-560, but sensitive to NS-398 and was attenuated to 45% of the control. Only the rhythmically contracting pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR produced a substantial amount of untransformed PGH(2), which was abolished by indoxam. These results suggest that sPLA(2)-mediated PGH(2) synthesis plays an important role in the rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR.

  16. H2S inhibits pulmonary arterial endothelial cell inflammation in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shasha; Chen, Siyao; Yu, Wen; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to determine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits pulmonary arterial endothelial inflammation in rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension and its possible mechanisms. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided randomly into control, MCT, and MCT+H2S treatment groups. Human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAEC) were cultured and divided into four groups: control, MCT, MCT+H2S, and H2S. Pulmonary artery pressure was determined using a right cardiac catheterization procedure 3 weeks after MCT administration. Pulmonary vascular morphological changes and inflammatory infiltration were measured. Endogenous H2S levels, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) expression, and inflammatory cytokines were determined both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα was detected by western blotting, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, as well as its DNA-binding activity, was determined. Pulmonary hypertension and vascular remolding developed 3 wks after MCT administration, with elevated lung tissue inflammatory infiltration and cytokine level associated with activation of the NF-κB pathway, both in vivo and in vitro. However, the endogenous H2S/CSE pathway was downregulated in MCT rats. By contrast, an H2S donor markedly reduced pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular structural remolding, and increased lung inflammatory infiltration and cytokine levels of MCT-treated rats. Meanwhile, H2S reversed the activation of the NF-κB pathway successfully. The downregulated pulmonary arterial endothelial H2S/CSE pathway is involved in the pulmonary inflammatory response in MCT-treated pulmonary hypertensive rats. H2S attenuated endothelial inflammation by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  17. [Effect of chrysin on expression of NOX4 and NF-κB in right ventricle of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension of rats].

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-wei; Guo, Bo; Shen, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Jie-ren

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the protective effect of chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) on right ventricular remodeling in a rat model of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). PAH rats were induced by a single injection of monocrotaline (60 mg x kg(-1), sc) and were administered with chrysin (50 or 100 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) for 4 weeks. At the end of experiment, the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) were monitored via the right jugular vein catheterization into the right ventricle. Right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle (LV) + septum (S) and RV to tibial length were calculated. Right ventricular morphological change was observed by HE staining. Masson's trichrome stain was used to demonstrate collagen deposition. The total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in right ventricle were determined according to the manufacturer's instructions. The expressions of collagen I, collagen III, NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were analyzed by immunohistochemisty, qPCR and (or) Western blot. The results showed that chrysin treatment for 4 weeks attenuated RVSP, mPAP and right ventricular remodeling index (RV/LV+S and RV/Tibial length) of PAH rats induced by monocrotaline. Furthermore, monocrotaline-induced right ventricular collagen accumulation and collagen I and collagen III expression were both significantly suppressed by chrysin. The expressions of NOX4, NF-κB and MDA contents were obviously decreased, while the T-AOC was significantly increased in right ventricule from PAH rats with chrysin treatment. These results suggest that chrysin ameliorates right ventricular remodeling of PAH induced by monocrotaline in rats through its down-regulating of NOX4 expression and antioxidant activity, and inhibiting NF-κB expression and collagen accumulation.

  18. Vascular endothelial-cadherin downregulation as a feature of endothelial transdifferentiation in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Maltabe, Violetta; Manitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Karras, Panagiotis; Kouklis, Panos; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Maniatis, Nikolaos A

    2016-08-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary hypertension (PH) is caused by vasoconstriction and obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by proliferating vascular cells. In analogy to cancer, subsets of proliferating cells may be derived from endothelial cells transitioning into a mesenchymal phenotype. To understand phenotypic shifts transpiring within endothelial cells in PH, we injected rats with alkaloid monocrotaline to induce PH and measured lung tissue levels of endothelial-specific protein and critical differentiation marker vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. VE-cadherin expression by immonoblotting declined significantly 24 h and 15 days postinjection to rebound to baseline at 30 days. There was a concomitant increase in transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug, along with a reduction in VE-cadherin mRNA. Mesenchymal markers α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin were upregulated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, and α-smooth muscle actin was colocalized with endothelial marker platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 by confocal microscopy. Apoptosis was limited in this model, especially in the 24-h time point. In addition, monocrotaline resulted in activation of protein kinase B/Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and increased lung tissue nitrotyrosine staining. To understand the etiological relationship between nitrosative stress and VE-cadherin suppression, we incubated cultured rat lung endothelial cells with endothelin-1, a vasoconstrictor and pro-proliferative agent in pulmonary arterial hypertension. This resulted in activation of eNOS, NF-κB, and Akt, in addition to induction of Snail, downregulation of VE-cadherin, and synthesis of vimentin. These effects were blocked by eNOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. We propose that transcriptional repression of VE-cadherin by nitrosative stress is involved in endothelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation in experimental PH.

  19. 1H NMR-Based Analysis of Serum Metabolites in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Taijie; Gu, Jinping; Huang, Caihua; Zheng, Suli; Lin, Xu; Xie, Liangdi; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To study the changes of the metabolic profile during the pathogenesis in monocrotaline (MCT) induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods. Forty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 8, each). PAH rats were induced by a single dose intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg MCT, while 8 rats given intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml normal saline and scarified in the same day (W0) served as control. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured through catherization. The degree of right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary hyperplasia were determined at the end of first to fourth weeks; nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sera were then acquired for the analysis of metabolites. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were used to discriminate different metabolic profiles. Results. The prominent changes of metabolic profiles were seen during these four weeks. Twenty specific metabolites were identified, which were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, energy metabolism, ketogenesis, and methionine metabolism. Profiles of correlation between these metabolites in each stage changed markedly, especially in the fourth week. Highly activated methionine and betaine metabolism pathways were selected by the pathway enrichment analysis. Conclusions. Metabolic dysfunction is involved in the development and progression of PAH. PMID:27057080

  20. Aspirin attenuates monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats by suppressing the ERK/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hua; Cheng, Yuqing; Zong, Liguo; Huang, Linian; Qiao, Chenchen; Li, Wei; Gong, Beilei; Hu, Junfeng; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhao, Chengling

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of aspirin (ASA) and its potential mechanisms of action in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in rats. PAH was induced in a rat model by a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of MCT. Saline was injected in a control group. Two weeks following MCT injection, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were measured in six rats from each group to confirm establishment of a PAH model. The remaining MCT-treated rats were randomly allocated to receive IP injection of saline, ASA, or ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Four weeks following treatment, RVSP was measured and all rats were sacrificed for histological study. There was no significant difference in SBP in any group two weeks following MCT administration. Nonetheless RVSP was significantly increased in the MCT group compared with the control group. At 6 weeks, ASA treatment remarkably attenuated MCT-induced increased RVSP, RV hypertrophy, and pulmonary artery remodeling compared with the MCT group. The density of pulmonary capillaries in ASA-treated rats was also dramatically increased. Treatment with ASA significantly inhibited the increased p-ERK1/2 and restored the impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in MCT-treated rats. This study demonstrated that ASA distinctively attenuates MCT-induced PAH by inhibition of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  1. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB in the lungs prevents monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wei, Chuanyu; Kim, Il-Kwon; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with various lung and heart diseases. PAH is characterized by vascular obstruction which leads to a sustained increased pulmonary vascular resistance, vascular remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Limited PAH therapies indicate that novel approaches are urgently needed for the treatment of PAH. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been shown to play an important role in different cardiac pathologies; however, the role of NF-κB remains limited in the setting of PAH. Here, we investigated whether NF-κB inhibition in the lungs using Club (Clara) cell-10 promoter driving IκBα mutant had any effect in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH mouse model. Our data revealed that MCT-induced PAH and right ventricular hypertrophy were associated with NF-κB activation, inflammatory response, and altered expression of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, inhibitor of differentiation, and Notch-3 signaling molecules in wild-type mice; and all these alterations were prevented in IκBα mutant mice treated with MCT. Moreover, endothelial cell apoptosis and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurred in the lungs of MCT-treated wild-type mice and were restored in IκBα mutant+MCT mice, indicating an association with NF-κB signaling. In lung microvascular endothelial cells, IκBα (AA) mutant plasmid restored the decreased bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 protein level and reversed the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition process induced by transforming growth factor-β1. We conclude that NF-κB regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2-inhibitor of differentiation-Notch-3 axis genes and the subsequent endothelial cell apoptosis and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition events in the lungs, providing new mechanistic information about MCT-induced PAH and right ventricular hypertrophy.

  2. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate In Vivo Treatment Improves Oxidative Stress and Vascular Dysfunction by Suppression of Endothelin-1 Signaling in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Sebastian; Oelze, Matthias; Brandt, Moritz; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Heeren, Tjebo; Tran, Lan P.; Daub, Steffen; Dib, Mobin; Stalleicken, Dirk; Wenzel, Philip; Münzel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The role of the nitrovasodilator pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) on endothelial function and oxidative stress in PAH has not yet been defined. Methods and Results. PAH was induced by monocrotaline (MCT, i.v.) in Wistar rats. Low (30 mg/kg; MCT30), middle (40 mg/kg; MCT40), or high (60 mg/kg; MCT60) dose of MCT for 14, 28, and 42 d was used. MCT induced endothelial dysfunction, pulmonary vascular wall thickening, and fibrosis, as well as protein tyrosine nitration. Pulmonary arterial pressure and heart/body and lung/body weight ratio were increased in MCT40 rats (28 d) and reduced by oral PETN (10 mg/kg, 24 d) therapy. Oxidative stress in the vascular wall, in the heart, and in whole blood as well as vascular endothelin-1 signaling was increased in MCT40-treated rats and normalized by PETN therapy, likely by upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). PETN therapy improved endothelium-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries and inhibited endothelin-1-induced oxidative burst in whole blood and the expression of adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) in endothelial cells. Conclusion. MCT-induced PAH impairs endothelial function (aorta and pulmonary arteries) and increases oxidative stress whereas PETN markedly attenuates these adverse effects. Thus, PETN therapy improves pulmonary hypertension beyond its known cardiac preload reducing ability. PMID:28337251

  3. Beneficial effects of a novel agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, Allan K N; Pereira, Sharlene L; Montagnoli, Tadeu L; Maia, Rodolfo C; Kümmerle, Arthur E; Landgraf, Sharon S; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Ferraz, Emanuelle B; Tesch, Roberta; Nascimento, José H M; de Sant'Anna, Carlos M R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by enhanced pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy and increased right ventricular systolic pressure. Here, we investigated the effects of a N-acylhydrazone derivative, 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-N-methyl-benzoylhydrazide (LASSBio-1359), on monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Experimental Approach PAH was induced in male Wistar rats by a single i.p. injection of MCT (60 mg·kg−1) and 2 weeks later, oral LASSBio-1359 (50 mg·kg−1) or vehicle was given once daily for 14 days. Echocardiography was used to measure cardiac function and pulmonary artery dimensions, with histological assay of vascular collagen. Studies of binding to human recombinant adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A3) and of docking with A2A receptors were also performed. Key Results MCT administration induced changes in vascular and ventricular structure and function, characteristic of PAH. These changes were reversed by treatment with LASSBio-1359. MCT also induced endothelial dysfunction in pulmonary artery, as measured by diminished relaxation of pre-contracted arterial rings, and this dysfunction was reversed by LASSBio-1359. In pulmonary artery rings from normal Wistar rats, LASSBio-1359 induced relaxation, which was decreased by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, ZM 241385. In adenosine receptor binding studies, LASSBio-1359 showed most affinity for the A2A receptor and in the docking analyses, binding modes of LASSBio-1359 and the A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, were very similar. Conclusion and Implications In rats with MCT-induced PAH, structural and functional changes in heart and pulmonary artery were reversed by treatment with oral LASSBio-1359, most probably through the activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:23530610

  4. Gene Expressions of Nitric Oxide Synthase and Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats After Bosentan Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hee Sun; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Nitric oxide (NO) is a major endothelium dependent vasomediator and growth inhibitor. NO synthesis is catalyzed by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and NO can also produce peroxynitrite, which activates matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The purpose of this study was to determine the gene expression of eNOS and MMP-2 in the lungs of a rat model of pulmonary hypertension after bosentan treatment. Materials and Methods Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated as follows: control group, subcutaneous (sc) injection of saline; monocrotaline (MCT) group, sc injection of MCT (60 mg/kg); and bosentan group, sc injection of MCT (60 mg/kg) plus 20 mg/day bosentan orally. The rats were sacrificed after 1, 5, 7, 14 and 28 days. Results The right ventricle/(left ventricle+septum) ratio significantly increased in the MCT group compared to the control group on day 14 and 28. The expression of eNOS messenger ribonucleic acid was significantly increased in the MCT group compared to the control group on day 28. MMP-2 gene expression was significantly increased in the MCT-treated rats compared to the control group on day 5 and 28. Following bosentan treatment to reduce pulmonary hypertension, the expression levels of MMP-2 gene were significantly decreased on day 7 and 28. eNOS and tissue inhibitor of MMPs genes were also significantly decreased on day 28 after bosentan treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that elevated eNOS expression may be responsible for MMP-2 activation. The causal relationship between eNOS and MMP-2 and their role in pulmonary hypertension require further investigations. PMID:21430993

  5. PRX-08066, a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2B antagonist, reduces monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Porvasnik, Stacy L; Germain, Sean; Embury, Jennifer; Gannon, Kimberley S; Jacques, Vincent; Murray, Justin; Byrne, Barry J; Shacham, Sharon; Al-Mousily, Faris

    2010-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that results in right ventricular failure. 5-((4-(6-Chlorothieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamino)piperidin-1-yl)methyl)-2-fluorobenzonitrile monofumarate (PRX-08066) is a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2B (5-HT2BR) antagonist that causes selective vasodilation of pulmonary arteries. In the current study, the effects of PRX-08066 were assessed by using the monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rat model. Male rats received 40 mg/kg MCT or phosphate-buffered saline and were treated orally twice a day with vehicle or 50 or 100 mg/kg PRX-08066 for 5 weeks. Pulmonary and cardiac functions were evaluated by hemodynamics, heart weight, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pulmonary artery (PA) morphology, and histology. Cardiac MRI demonstrated that PRX-08066 (100 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) improved right ventricular ejection fraction. PRX-08066 significantly reduced peak PA pressure at 50 and 100 mg/kg (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively) compared with MCT control animals. PRX-08066 therapy also significantly reduced right ventricle (RV)/body weight and RV/left ventricle + septum (P < 0.01 and < 0.001, respectively) compared with MCT-treated animals. Morphometric assessment of pulmonary arterioles revealed a significant reduction in medial wall thickening and lumen occlusion associated with both doses of PRX-08066 (P < 0.01). The 5-HT2BR antagonist PRX-08066 significantly attenuated the elevation in PA pressure and RV hypertrophy and maintained cardiac function. Pulmonary vascular remodeling was also diminished compared with MCT control rats. PRX-08066 prevents the severity of PAH in the MCT rat model.

  6. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  7. Comparison of preventive effect of sildenafil and therapeutic effect of sildenafil treatment in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIYUKI, Rieko; FUKUSHIMA, Ryuji; TANAKA, Ryo; MACHIDA, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of sildenafil on pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH rat. Twenty-four, 12-week-old, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with MCT or saline solution. After injection of MCT, rats received oral sildenafil immediately (early-phase treatment group: E group), 4 weeks after injection (late-phase treatment group: L group) or no treatment (MCT group) until 6 weeks after injection. Serial echocardiography and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) measurements via a cardiac catheter were performed. RVSP was reduced in the E and L groups compared with the MCT group. Echocardiography indicated that sildenafil therapy prevents an increase in RVSP and preserves diastolic function, and this effect is not dependent on timing of initiation of therapy. PMID:27320637

  8. Acute and chronic effects of T-1032, a novel selective phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hirotaka; Yano, Koji; Noto, Tsunehisa; Takagi, Michino; Ikeo, Tomihiro; Kikkawa, Kohei

    2002-11-01

    We examined the hemodynamic property of T-1032 (methyl 2-(4-aminophenyl)-1,2-dihydro-1-oxo-7-(2-pyridylmethoxy)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-phenyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxylate sulfate), a novel selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, and evaluated the chronic effect of T-1032 on cardiac remodeling and its related death in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertensive rats. T-1032 (1, 10, 100 micro g/kg, i.v.) significantly reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) without a change in heart rate. The change in RVSP was more potent than that in MAP with 1 micro g/kg T-1032 treatment (RVSP: -8.2+/-1.2%, mean arterial pressure: -5.7+/-1.2%), and reductions in RVSP and MAP reached a peak at doses of 1 and 10 micro g/kg, respectively. In contrast, nitroglycerin (0.1, 1, 10 micro g/kg, i.v.) and beraprost (0.1, 1 micro g/kg, i.v.) did not cause a selective reduction in RVSP at any dose. When T-1032 (300 ppm in diet) was chronically administered, it delayed the death, and significantly suppressed right ventricular remodeling (T-1032-treated: 0.318+/-0.021 g, control: 0.401+/-0.013 g, p<0.05). Our present results suggest that T-1032 selectively reduces RVSP, and resulting in the suppression of right ventricular remodeling with a delay of the death in MCT-induced pulmonary hypertensive rats.

  9. Effect of early administration of lower dose versus high dose of fresh mitochondria on reducing monocrotaline-induced pulmonary artery hypertension in rat

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tien-Hung; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Chua, Sarah; Chai, Han-Tan; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Tong, Meng-Shen; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Lu, Hung-I; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aim to investigate whether early mitochondrial administration would be effective and whether high-dose mitochondria (15000 μg/rat) would be more effective than low-dose mitochondria (1500 μg/rat) for attenuating the monocrotaline (MCT/65 mg/kg/rat)-induced pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) in rat. Method and results: Male-adult SD rats (n = 32) were randomized categorized into groups 1 (sham-control), 2 (PAH), 3 (PAH + low-dose mitochondria), and 4 (PAH + high-dose mitochondria). Mitochondria were admitted at day 5 and rats were sacrificed at day 35 post-MCT treatment. By day 35, oxygen saturation (saO2) was highest in group 1 and lowest in group 2, and significantly higher in group 3 than in group 4 (P<0.001). Conversely, right ventricular systolic blood pressure showed an opposite pattern compared with saO2 among all groups (P<0.001). Histological integrity of alveolar sacs exhibited a pattern identical to saO2, whereas lung crowding score and number of muscularized artery displayed an opposite pattern (all P<0.001). The protein expression of indices of inflammation (MMP-9, TNF-α, NF-κB), oxidative stress (oxidized protein, NO-1, NOX-2, NOX-4), apoptosis (Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP), fibrosis (p-Smad3, TGF-β), mitochondrial-damage (cytosolic cytochrome-C), and hypoxia-smooth muscle proliferative factors (HIF-α, connexin43, TRPCs) showed an opposite pattern compared, whereas anti-fibrosis (p-Smad1/5, BMP-2) and mitochondrial integrity (mitochondrial cytochrome-C) exhibited an identical pattern to saO2 in all groups (all P<0.001). Conclusion: Low dose is superior to high dose of mitochondria for protecting against MCT-induced PAH. The paradoxical beneficial effect may imply therapy with 15000 μg/rat mitochondria is overdose in this situation. PMID:28077992

  10. MicroRNA-26b attenuates monocrotaline-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling via targeting connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 (CCND1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sijing; Li, Min; Sun, Li; Xu, Xuan; Fei, Guanghe

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in the control of cell growth, and deregulated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation plays an essential role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to identify differentially expressed microRNA(s) and explore its therapeutic role in treatment of the disease. MicroRNA expression profile analysis showed microRNA-26b was differentially expressed in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells harvested from monocrotaline-treated rats, and we validated microRNA-26b targets, in vitro and in vivo, CTGF and CCND1, both of which have been shown, in our previous work, to be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. In vivo experiments demonstrated monocrotaline-induced pulmonary artery remodeling could be almost completely abolished by administration of microRNA-26b, while CTGF or CCND1 shRNA significantly, but only partially, attenuated the remodeling by silencing the designed target. Additionally, exogenous expression of the microRNA-26b substantially downregulated CTGF and CCND1 in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. MicroRNA-26b might be a potent therapeutic tool to treat pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27322082

  11. Microrna-26b attenuates monocrotaline-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling via targeting connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 (CCND1).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Ding, Xing; Zhou, Sijing; Li, Min; Sun, Li; Xu, Xuan; Fei, Guanghe

    2016-11-08

    MicroRNAs are involved in the control of cell growth, and deregulated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation plays an essential role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to identify differentially expressed microRNA(s) and explore its therapeutic role in treatment of the disease. MicroRNA expression profile analysis showed microRNA-26b was differentially expressed in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells harvested from monocrotaline-treated rats, and we validated microRNA-26b targets, in vitro and in vivo, CTGF and CCND1, both of which have been shown, in our previous work, to be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. In vivo experiments demonstrated monocrotaline-induced pulmonary artery remodeling could be almost completely abolished by administration of microRNA-26b, while CTGF or CCND1 shRNA significantly, but only partially, attenuated the remodeling by silencing the designed target. Additionally, exogenous expression of the microRNA-26b substantially downregulated CTGF and CCND1 in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. MicroRNA-26b might be a potent therapeutic tool to treat pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  13. Fractalkine-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, F; Dorfmüller, P; Souza, R; Durand-Gasselin, I; Godot, V; Capel, F; Adnot, S; Eddahibi, S; Mazmanian, M; Fadel, E; Hervé, P; Simonneau, G; Emilie, D; Humbert, M

    2007-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial resistance due to endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation resulting in chronic obstruction of small pulmonary arteries. There is evidence that inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of human and experimental pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the study was to address the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in the inflammatory responses and pulmonary vascular remodelling of a monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension model. The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by means of immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR on laser-captured microdissected pulmonary arteries. It was demonstrated that CX3CL1 was expressed by inflammatory cells surrounding pulmonary arterial lesions and that smooth muscle cells from these vessels had increased CX3CR1 expression. It was then shown that cultured rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressed CX3CR1 and that CX3CL1 induced proliferation but not migration of these cells. In conclusion, the current authors proposed that fractalkine may act as a growth factor for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Chemokines may thus play a role in pulmonary artery remodelling.

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), or PH, is increased pressure in the pulmonary arteries. These arteries carry blood from your heart to your lungs to pick up oxygen. PH causes symptoms such as shortness of ...

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  16. Lodenafil treatment in the monocrotaline model of pulmonary hypertension in rats*

    PubMed Central

    Polonio, Igor Bastos; Acencio, Milena Marques Pagliareli; Pazetti, Rogério; de Almeida, Francine Maria; da Silva, Bárbara Soares; Pereira, Karina Aparecida Bonifácio; Souza, Rogério

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the effects of lodenafil on hemodynamics and inflammation in the rat model of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH). Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control; monocrotaline (experimental model); and lodenafil (experimental model followed by lodenafil treatment, p.o., 5 mg/kg daily for 28 days) Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was obtained by right heart catheterization. We investigated right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and IL-1 levels in lung fragments. The number of cases of RVH was significantly higher in the monocrotaline group than in the lodenafil and control groups, as were mPAP and IL-1 levels. We conclude that lodenafil can prevent monocrotaline-induced PH, RVH, and inflammation. PMID:25210965

  17. Reversal of experimental pulmonary hypertension by PDGF inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Dony, Eva; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Pullamsetti, Soni; Savai, Rajkumar; Roth, Markus; Sydykov, Akylbek; Lai, Ying Ju; Weissmann, Norbert; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    Progression of pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased proliferation and migration of pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells. PDGF is a potent mitogen and involved in this process. We now report that the PDGF receptor antagonist STI571 (imatinib) reversed advanced pulmonary vascular disease in 2 animal models of pulmonary hypertension. In rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension, therapy with daily administration of STI571 was started 28 days after induction of the disease. A 2-week treatment resulted in 100% survival, compared with only 50% in sham-treated rats. The changes in RV pressure, measured continuously by telemetry, and right heart hypertrophy were reversed to near-normal levels. STI571 prevented phosphorylation of the PDGF receptor and suppressed activation of downstream signaling pathways. Similar results were obtained in chronically hypoxic mice, which were treated with STI571 after full establishment of pulmonary hypertension. Moreover, expression of the PDGF receptor was found to be significantly increased in lung tissue from pulmonary arterial hypertension patients compared with healthy donor lung tissue. We conclude that STI571 reverses vascular remodeling and cor pulmonale in severe experimental pulmonary hypertension regardless of the initiating stimulus. This regimen offers a unique novel approach for antiremodeling therapy in progressed pulmonary hypertension. PMID:16200212

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION IN SCLERODERMA PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the blood vessels ... with scleroderma are at increased risk for developing PH from several mechanisms. Frequently patients with scleroderma have ...

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  2. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) into five groups. These groups are organized based ... lungs. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension Group 2 includes PH with left heart disease. Conditions that affect the ...

  3. Pulmonary hypertension - at home

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. With PAH, the right side ... Chin K, Channick RN. Pulmonary hypertension. In: Broaddus VC, Mason ... Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  5. Fractal Dimension in Quantifying Experimental-Pulmonary-Hypertension-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Sabela, Ana Karênina Dias de Almeida; Mariano, Thaoan Bruno; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Castoldi, Robson Chacon; do Carmo, Edna Maria; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Okoshi, Katashi; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-01-01

    Background Right-sided heart failure has high morbidity and mortality, and may be caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fractal dimension is a differentiated and innovative method used in histological evaluations that allows the characterization of irregular and complex structures and the quantification of structural tissue changes. Objective To assess the use of fractal dimension in cardiomyocytes of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to providing histological and functional analysis. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (C; n = 8) and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (M; n = 8). Five weeks after pulmonary arterial hypertension induction with monocrotaline, echocardiography was performed and the animals were euthanized. The heart was dissected, the ventricles weighed to assess anatomical parameters, and histological slides were prepared and stained with hematoxylin/eosin for fractal dimension analysis, performed using box-counting method. Data normality was tested (Shapiro-Wilk test), and the groups were compared with non-paired Student t test or Mann Whitney test (p < 0.05). Results Higher fractal dimension values were observed in group M as compared to group C (1.39 ± 0.05 vs. 1.37 ± 0.04; p < 0.05). Echocardiography showed lower pulmonary artery flow velocity, pulmonary acceleration time and ejection time values in group M, suggesting function worsening in those animals. Conclusion The changes observed confirm pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction, and point to fractal dimension as an effective method to evaluate cardiac morphological changes induced by ventricular dysfunction. PMID:27223643

  6. Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 improves pulmonary arteriole remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Min; Liu, Su-Xuan; Zhang, Guan-Xin; Yang, Fan; Wang, Yang; Wu, Feng; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    While the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathological processes, its role relating to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect in which HSP90 improves pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and explored the therapeutic utility of targeting HSP90 as therapeutic drug for PAH. By Elisa and immunohistochemistry, HSP90 was found to be increased in both plasma and membrane walls of pulmonary arterioles from PAH patients. Moreover, plasma HSP90 levels positively correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and C-reactive protein. In a monocrotaline-induced rat model of PH, we found that 17-AAG, a HSP90-inhibitor, alleviated the progress of PH, demonstrated by lower pulmonary arterial pressure and absence of right ventricular hypertrophy. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that 17-AAG improved pulmonary arteriole remodeling on the basis of reduced wall thickness and wall area. The inflammatory response attributed to PH could be attenuated by 17-AAG through reduction of NF-κB signaling. Moreover, 17-AAG was found to suppress PDGF-stimulated proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In conclusion, HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG could improve pulmonary arteriole remodeling via inhibiting the excessive proliferation of PASMCs, and inhibition of HSP90 may represent a therapeutic avenue for the treatment of PAH. PMID:27472464

  7. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and oxidative stress in monocrotaline-induced right heart dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Puukila, Stephanie; Fernandes, Rafael Oliveira; Türck, Patrick; Carraro, Cristina Campos; Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; de Lima-Seolin, Bruna Gazzi; da Rosa Araujo, Alex Sander; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Boreham, Douglas; Khaper, Neelam

    2017-03-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occurs when remodeling of pulmonary vessels leads to increased pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in increased pulmonary arterial pressure. Increased pulmonary arterial pressure results in right ventricle hypertrophy and eventually heart failure. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PAH and may play a role in the regulation of cellular signaling involved in cardiac response to pressure overload. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), a component from flaxseed, has been shown to reduce cardiac oxidative stress in various pathophysiological conditions. We investigated the potential protective effects of SDG in a monocrotaline-induced model of PAH. Five- to six-week-old male Wistar rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg) and sacrificed 21 days later where heart, lung, and plasma were collected. SDG (25 mg/kg) was given via gavage as either a 21-day co-treatment or pre-treatment of 14 days before monocrotaline administration and continued for 21 days. Monocrotaline led to right ventricle hypertrophy, increased lipid peroxidation, and elevated plasma levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). Co-treatment with SDG did not attenuate hypertrophy or ALT and AST levels but decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and catalase and superoxide dismutase activity compared to the monocrotaline-treated group. Pre-treatment with SDG decreased right ventricle hypertrophy, ROS levels, lipid peroxidation, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activity and plasma levels of ALT and AST when compared to the monocrotaline group. These findings indicate that pre-treatment with SDG provided better protection than co-treatment in this model of right heart dysfunction, suggesting an important role for SDG in PAH and right ventricular remodeling.

  8. miR-223 reverses experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Meloche, Jolyane; Le Guen, Marie; Potus, François; Vinck, Jérôme; Ranchoux, Benoit; Johnson, Ian; Antigny, Fabrice; Tremblay, Eve; Breuils-Bonnet, Sandra; Perros, Frederic; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease affecting lung vasculature. The pulmonary arteries become occluded due to increased proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) within the vascular wall. It was recently shown that DNA damage could trigger this phenotype by upregulating poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) expression, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. In silico analyses and studies in cancer demonstrated that microRNA miR-223 targets PARP-1. We thus hypothesized that miR-223 downregulation triggers PARP-1 overexpression, as well as the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance observed in PAH. We provide evidence that miR-223 is downregulated in human PAH lungs, distal PAs, and isolated PASMCs. Furthermore, using a gain and loss of function approach, we showed that increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, which is observed in PAH, triggers this decrease in miR-223 expression and subsequent overexpression of PARP-1 allowing PAH-PASMC proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that restoring the expression of miR-223 in lungs of rats with monocrotaline-induced PAH reversed established PAH and provided beneficial effects on vascular remodeling, pulmonary resistance, right ventricle hypertrophy, and survival. We provide evidence that miR-223 downregulation in PAH plays an important role in numerous pathways implicated in the disease and restoring its expression is able to reverse PAH.

  9. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  10. Pulmonary Vascular Impedance in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION , *PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD CIRCULATION, LUNG, PATHOLOGY, VASCULAR DISEASES, ARTERIES, OBSTRUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY...EMBOLISM, HISTOLOGY, DOGS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, BLOOD PRESSURE , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PHYSIOLOGY.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  12. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation.

  13. Methamphetamine Use and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Methamphetamine Use Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have used methamphetamines you are at risk for Pulmonary Hypertension? www. ... are made every year. PH in Association with Methamphetamine Use My doctor recently told me that I ...

  14. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary hypertension? ... tissue diseases (scleroderma and lupus for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, or HIV infec- tion. ...

  15. Pulmonary hypertension management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Kartikey A; Puligandla, Pramod S

    2015-02-01

    The management of pulmonary hypertension is multi-faceted, with therapies directed at supporting cardiovascular and pulmonary function, treating the underlying cause (if feasible), and preventing irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Recently, manipulation of signaling pathways and mediators contained within the pulmonary vascular endothelial cell has become a new target. This article will review the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension and the broad principles involved in its management, with specific emphasis on pharmacological therapies directed at the pulmonary vascular endothelium.

  16. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a referral to a counselor. A support group for people living with pulmonary hypertension can be invaluable in learning how to cope with the illness. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  17. Treprostinil for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Skoro-Sajer, Nika; Lang, Irene; Naeije, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Treprostinil is a stable, long-acting prostacyclin analogue which can be administered as a continuous subcutaneous infusion using a portable miniature delivery system. Subcutaneous treprostinil has been shown in a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to improve exercise capacity, clinical state, functional class, pulmonary hemodynamics, and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, an uncommon disease of poor prognosis. Side effects include facial flush, headache, jaw pain, abdominal cramping, and diarrhea, all typical of prostacyclin, and manageable by symptom-directed dose adjustments, and infusion site pain which may make further treatment impossible in 7%–10% of the patients. Long-term survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients treated with subcutaneous treprostinil is similar to that reported with intravenous epoprostenol. There are uncontrolled data suggesting efficacy of subcutaneous treprostinil in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Treprostinil can also be administered intravenously, although increased doses, up to 2–3 times those given subcutaneously, appear to be needed to obtain the same efficacy. Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial of inhaled treprostinil on top of bosentan and sildenafil therapies have shown significance on the primary endpoint, which was exercise capacity as assessed by the distance walked in 6 minutes. Trials of oral formulations of treprostinil have been initiated. PMID:18827901

  18. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reesink, H.J.; Kloek, J.J.; Bresser, P.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rapidly progressive and deadly disease, resulting from incomplete resolution of acute pulmonary embolism. Historically, the incidence of CTEPH was significantly underestimated but it may be as high as 3.8% following acute pulmonary embolism. Although the medical management of CTEPH may be supportive, the only curative treatment is pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA). However, a careful screening programme is mandatory to select CTEPH patients who are likely to benefit from PEA. In this review we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical and diagnostic pitfalls, surgical treatment, outcome after surgery, and the potential benefit of medical treatment in inoperable CTEPH patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696637

  19. Pulmonary hypertension in polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Liu, Tao; Cai, Ying-ying; Luo, Lian; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mengmeng; Cai, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is relatively common in connective tissue diseases. However, few studies have focused on the pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with polymyositis (PM). Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of PH and determine the associated factors for PH in patients with PM. Multicenter study of 61 patients with PM underwent evaluation including general information, physical examination, laboratory indictors, thoracic high-resolution CT (HRCT) imaging, and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). TTE was performed to estimate the pulmonary arterial pressure. PH was defined as resting systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) ≥40 mmHg. PH was identified in ten patients (16.39 %) who had few cardiopulmonary symptoms. PM patients with PH had higher prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pericardial effusion (PE) compared with patients without PH (18 vs. 11.5 %, p = 0.005; 11.5 vs. 9.8 %, p = 0.004; respectively). After controlling for age, gender, and potential factors, ILD and PE were independently associated with PH in patients with PM in multivariate analysis (OR = 8.193, 95 % CI 1.241-54.084, p = 0.029; OR = 8.265, 95 % CI 1.298-52.084, p = 0.025; respectively). Depending on TTE, the possible prevalence of PH was 16.39 % in patients with PM. Both ILD and PE may contribute to the development of PH in PM.

  20. Pulmonary hypertension in women

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Meredith E; Hemnes, Anna R

    2011-01-01

    Female predominance in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been known for several decades and recent interest in the effects of sex hormones on the development of disease has substantially increased our understanding of this epidemiologic observation. Basic science data suggest a beneficial effect of estrogens in the pulmonary vasculature both acutely and chronically, which seems to contradict the known predilection in women. Recent human and rodent data have suggested that altered levels of estrogen, differential signaling and altered metabolism of estrogens in PAH may underlie the gender difference in this disease. Studies of the effects of sex hormones on the right ventricle in animal and human disease will further aid in understanding gender differences in PAH. This article focuses on the effects of sex hormones on the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricle on both a basic science and translational level. PMID:21090930

  1. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on your medical and family histories, a ... exam, and the results from tests and procedures. PH can develop slowly. In fact, you may have ...

  2. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions pulmonary arterial hypertension pulmonary arterial hypertension Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...

  4. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.

  5. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  7. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-07-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  8. Management of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Essop, M R; Galie, N; Badesch, D B; Lalloo, U; Mahomed, A G; Naidoo, D P; Ntsekhe, M; Williams, P G

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a potentially lethal disease mainly affecting young females. Although the precise mechanism of PAH is unknown, the past decade has seen the advent of many new classes of drugs with improvement in the overall prognosis of the disease. Unfortunately the therapeutic options for PAH in South Africa are severely limited. The Working Group on PAH is a joint effort by the South African Heart Association and the South African Thoracic Society tasked with improving the recognition and management of patients with PAH. This article provides a brief summary of the disease and the recommendations of the first meeting of the Working Group.

  9. Primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rashid, A; Lehrman, S; Romano, P; Frishman, W; Dobkin, J; Reichel, J

    2000-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a condition characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) without demonstrable cause. The most common symptom at presentation is dyspnea. Other complaints include fatigue, chest pain, syncope, leg edema, and palpitations. Right heart catheterization is diagnostic, showing a mean PAP >25 mmHg at rest and >30 mmHg during exercise, with a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In the National Institutes of Health-PPH registry, the median survival period was 2.8 years. Treatment is aimed at lowering PAP, increasing cardiac output, and decreasing in situ thrombosis. Vasodilators have been used with some success in the treatment of PPH. They include prostacyclin, calcium-channel blockers, nitric oxide and adenosine. Anticoagulation has also been advised for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and in situ thromboses of the lungs. New drug treatments under investigation include L-arginine, plasma endothelin-I, and bosentan. Use of oxygen, digoxin, and diuretics for symptomatic relief have also been recommended. Patients with severe PPH refractory to medical management should be considered for surgery.

  10. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  11. Peptide-micelle hybrids containing fasudil for targeted delivery to the pulmonary arteries and arterioles to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nilesh; Ibrahim, Hany M; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the respirability and efficacy of peptide-micelle hybrid nanoparticles as carriers for inhalational therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CARSKNKDC (CAR), a cell-penetrating and lung-homing peptide, conjugated polyethylene glycol-distearoyl-phosphoethanolamine micelles containing fasudil, an investigational anti-PAH drug, were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for various physicochemical properties. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacological efficacy of hybrid particles containing fasudil were evaluated in healthy rats and monocrotaline-induced PAH rats. CAR micelles containing fasudil had an entrapment efficiency of approximately 58%, showed controlled release of the drug, and were monodispersed with an average size of approximately 14 nm. Nuclear magnetic resonance scan confirmed the drug's presence in the core of peptide-micelle hybrid particles. Compared with plain micelles, CAR peptide increased the cellular uptake by approximately 1.7-fold and extended the drug half-life by approximately fivefold. The formulations were more prone to accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature than in the peripheral blood, which is evident from the ratio of the extent of reduction of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. On the whole, this study demonstrates that peptide-polymer hybrid micelles can serve as inhalational carriers for PAH therapy.

  12. Pulmonary function in advanced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, C M; Glanville, A R; Morris, A J; Rubin, D; Harvey, J A; Theodore, J; Robin, E D

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary mechanical function and gas exchange were studied in 33 patients with advanced pulmonary vascular disease, resulting from primary pulmonary hypertension in 18 cases and from Eisenmenger physiology in 15 cases. Evidence of airway obstruction was found in most patients. In addition, mean total lung capacity (TLC) was only 81.5% of predicted and 27% of our subjects had values of TLC less than one standard deviation below the mean predicted value. The mean value for transfer factor (TLCO) was 71.8% of predicted and appreciable arterial hypoxaemia was present, which was disproportionate to the mild derangements in pulmonary mechanics. Patients with Eisenmenger physiology had significantly lower values of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) (p less than 0.05) and of maximum mid expiratory flow (p less than 0.05) and significantly higher pulmonary arterial pressure (p less than 0.05) than those with primary pulmonary hypertension, but no other variables were significantly different between the two subpopulations. It is concluded that advanced pulmonary vascular disease in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger physiology is associated not only with severe hypoxaemia but also with altered pulmonary mechanical function. PMID:3433237

  13. Pulmonary hypertension in congenital shunts.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2010-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension frequently arises in patients with congenital heart disease. The vast majority present with congenital cardiac shunts. Initially these may manifest as left-to-right (i.e. systemic-to-pulmonary) shunts. The natural history of disease progression involves vascular remodeling and dysfunction that lead to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and, finally, to the development of Eisenmenger's syndrome, which is the most advanced form. The anatomical, pathological and structural abnormalities occurring in the pulmonary circulation of these patients are, to some extent, similar to those observed in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This understanding has recently led to significant changes in the management of Eisenmenger's syndrome, with the introduction of treatment specifically targeting pulmonary vascular disease. Early closure of the cardiac shunt remains the best way of preventing pulmonary vascular lesions. However, it is still not clear which preoperative parameters predict safe and successful repair, though hemodynamic evaluation is still routinely used for assessment. Postoperative pulmonary hypertension, both in the immediate period after surgical repair and during long-term follow-up, remains a real therapeutic challenge. The clinical situation of a single ventricle with Fontan circulation also presents difficulties when pulmonary vascular lesions are present. This article reviews pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital shunts and discusses a number of the specific problems encountered.

  14. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B

    1997-01-01

    Progress in treatment of pulmonary hypertension has been impaired by the lack of formal clinical trials. This is now beginning to change, and the impact on our approach to treating patients with pulmonary hypertension in substantial. As with other relatively uncommon medical disorders, randomized, controlled, multi-center trials are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of potential therapeutic modalities. Treatments showing promise at the level of small pilot studies within a single center should be studied more rigorously.

  15. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  16. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance.

  17. Molecular Mechanism of Dihydropyridine Ca(2+) Channel Blockers in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Aya

    2016-01-01

     Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive and fatal disease of unidentified pathogenesis. IPAH is pathologically characterized as sustained vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling of the pulmonary artery. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) triggers vasoconstriction and stimulates cell proliferation leading to vascular remodeling. However, dihydropyridine-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel blockers are only effective in very few patients with IPAH (<10%). It is unclear why dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers are not therapeutically effective in a majority of IPAH patients. We have previously shown that extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) is upregulated in PASMCs from IPAH patients, and it contributes to enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt responses and augmented cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers on [Ca(2+)]cyt responses mediated by CaSR were examined in IPAH-PASMCs. Nifedipine (dihydropyridines) enhanced the CaSR-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt in IPAH-PASMCs, but not in PASMCs from normal subjects. Nicardipine (dihydropyridines) and Bay K 8644 (a dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel activator) also augmented the CaSR-mediated [Ca(2+)]cyt increase in IPAH-PASMCs. In contrast, non-dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers such as diltiazem (benzothiazepines) and verapamil (phenylalkylamines) had no effect on the [Ca(2+)]cyt response in IPAH-PASMCs. Finally, in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertensive rats, nifedipine caused further increase in right ventricular systolic pressure and thus right ventricular hypertrophy. In conclusion, dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers could exacerbate symptoms of pulmonary hypertension in IPAH patients with upregulated CaSR in PASMCs.

  18. Distal vessel stiffening is an early and pivotal mechanobiological regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Haeger, Christina Mallarino; Dieffenbach, Paul B.; Sicard, Delphine; Chrobak, Izabela; Coronata, Anna Maria F.; Velandia, Margarita M. Suárez; Vitali, Sally; Colas, Romain A.; Norris, Paul C.; Marinković, Aleksandar; Liu, Xiaoli; Ma, Jun; Rose, Chase D.; Lee, Seon-Jin; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Serhan, Charles N.; Walsh, Stephen R.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial (PA) stiffness is associated with increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH); however, the role of PA stiffening in the pathogenesis of PH remains elusive. Here, we show that distal vascular matrix stiffening is an early mechanobiological regulator of experimental PH. We identify cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) suppression and corresponding reduction in prostaglandin production as pivotal regulators of stiffness-dependent vascular cell activation. Atomic force microscopy microindentation demonstrated early PA stiffening in experimental PH and human lung tissue. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) grown on substrates with the stiffness of remodeled PAs showed increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, exaggerated contraction, enhanced matrix deposition, and reduced COX-2–derived prostanoid production compared with cells grown on substrates approximating normal PA stiffness. Treatment with a prostaglandin I2 analog abrogated monocrotaline-induced PA stiffening and attenuated stiffness-dependent increases in proliferation, matrix deposition, and contraction in PASMC. Our results suggest a pivotal role for early PA stiffening in PH and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of interrupting mechanobiological feedback amplification of vascular remodeling in experimental PH. PMID:27347562

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicates the course of many children and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). The increase in pulmonary pressure associated with CHD is secondary to either increased pulmonary blood flow or increased postcapillary pressures. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is in the vast majority associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Despite major advances in the understanding of the regulation of the pulmonary vascular bed and the pulmonary endothelial lesions leading to pulmonary vascular disease, despite the advances in surgical repair and the discovery of potential therapies in the pre- and postoperative period, pulmonary hypertension still carries a significant mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. The recent introduction of targeted therapies in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to a renewed interest in pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD and this particularly for the most advanced form, the so-called Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD, focusing on the pathophysiology and treatment of ES.

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Savale, Laurent; Sattler, Caroline; Sitbon, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) is defined by the combination of portal hypertension and precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP < 15 mmHg and PVR > 3 Wood units). PoPH is characterised by pathobiological mechanisms that are similar to other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Prevalence of PoPH is estimated at 0.5-5% among patients with portal hypertension with or without cirrhosis. Treatment strategies most commonly employed for PoPH patients are based on recommendations for idiopathic PAH management. Indeed, the choice of specific PAH treatment must take account the severity of the underlying liver disease. Prognosis of PoPH patients is dependent on both the severity of PAH and of the underlying liver disease. PoPH may be a contraindication for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) if mean pulmonary arterial pressure is > 35 mmHg associated with severe right ventricular dysfunction or high level of pulmonary vascular resistance (> 3-4 Wood units). Bridge therapy with specific PAH therapies should be considered in those patients in an attempt to improve pulmonary hemodynamic and thereby allow OLT with acceptable risk. Recent data suggest that stabilize, improve or cure PoPH seems to be possible by combining specific PAH therapies and liver transplantation in selected patients. Clinical and experimental evidences suggest that IFN therapy may be a possible risk factor for PAH.

  1. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic limitations].

    PubMed

    Dias, Bruno Arantes; Jardim, Carlos; Hovnanian, André; Fernandes, Caio Júlio César; Souza, Rogério

    2008-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is the only potentially curable form of pulmonary hypertension, assuming that surgical treatment is possible. However, there are hindrances to making a definitive, noninvasive diagnosis. We present the case of a 40-year-old female patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, confirmed in 1994. This patient developed thrombi in pulmonary vessels (as an overlap syndrome) mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The identification of these conditions, which present high intraoperative mortality and unsatisfactory surgical resolution, is quite difficult in clinical practice. We discuss the current approach to candidate selection for surgical treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the possible repercussions of inappropriate selection.

  2. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Venous Hypertension: Epidemiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Craig B; Horn, Evelyn M

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension from left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common form of PH, defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg and pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≥15 mm Hg. PH-LHD development is associated with more severe left-sided disease and its presence portends a poor prognosis, particularly once right ventricular failure develops. Treatment remains focused on the underlying LHD and despite initial enthusiasm for PH-specific therapies, most studies have been disappointing and their routine clinical use cannot be recommended. More work is urgently needed to better understand the pathophysiology underlying this disease and to develop effective therapeutic strategies.

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension: Types and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Rose-Jones, Lisa J; Mclaughlin, Vallerie V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a panvasculopathy that affects the distal pulmonary arteries and leads to restricted blood flow. This increased afterload leads to adaptive mechanisms of the right ventricle, with eventual failure once it can no longer compensate. Pulmonary hypertension from associated conditions, most importantly left heart disease, i.e. heart failure, can also lead to the same sequela. Patients often experience early vague symptoms of dyspnea and exercise intolerance, and thus PH can elude clinicians until right heart failure symptoms predominate. Evidence-based treatment options with pulmo-nary vasodilators are available for those with PAH and should be employed early. It is essential that patients be accurately categorized by their etiology of PH, as treatment strategies differ, and can potentially be dangerous if employed in the wrong clinical scenario. PMID:24251459

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, George; Aguilera, Didier; Carceles, Odette; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Boletis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients is relatively high and varies in different studies from 17% to 49.53% depending on the mode of dialysis and other selection factors, such as the presence of other cardiovascular comorbidities. The etiopathogenic mechanisms that have been studied in relatively small studies mainly include arteriovenous fistula-induced increased cardiac output, which cannot be accomodated by, the spacious under normal conditions pulmonary circulation. Additionally, pulmonary vessels show signs of endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of vascular tone due to an imbalance in vasoactive substances, and local as well as systemic inflammation. It is also believed that microbubbles escaping from the dialysis circuit can trigger vasoconstriction and vascular sclerosis. The non-specific therapeutic options that proved to be beneficial in pulmonary artery pressure reduction are endothelin inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, and vasodilatory prostaglandins in various forms. The specific modes of treatment are renal transplantation, size reduction or closure of high-flow arteriovenous fistulas, and transfer from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis-a modality that is associated with a lesser prevalence of pulmonary hypertension.

  5. “Denervation” of autonomous nervous system in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension by low-dose radiation: a case report with an unexpected outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Oezkan, Filiz; Mahnkopf, Christian; Grabenbauer, Gerhard; Kreczy, Alfons; Bartunek, Rudolf; Darwiche, Kaid; Freitag, Lutz; Li, Qiang; Huang, Haidong; Vogl, Thomas; LePilvert, Patrick; Tsiouda, Theodora; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Vasointestinal peptide metabolism plays a key physiological role in multimodular levels of vasodilatory, smooth muscle cell proliferative, parenchymal, and inflammatory lung reactions. In animal studies, vasointestinal peptide relaxes isolated pulmonary arterial segments from several mammalian species in vitro and neutralizes the pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of endothelin. In some animal models, it reduces pulmonary vascular resistance in vivo and in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. A 58-year-old woman presented with dyspnea and mild edema of the lower extremities. A bronchoscopy was performed without any suspicious findings suggesting a central tumor or other infiltrative disease. Endobronchial ultrasound revealed enlarged pulmonary arteries containing thrombi, a few enlarged lymph nodes, and enlarged mediastinal tissue anatomy with suspicion for mediastinal infiltration of a malignant process. We estimated that less than 10% of the peripheral vascular bed of the lung was involved in direct consolidated fibrosis as demonstrated in the left upper lobe apex. Further, direct involvement of fibrosis around the main stems of the pulmonary arteries was assumed to be low from positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Assuming a positive influence of low-dose radiation, it was not expected that this could have reduced pulmonary vascular resistance by over two thirds of the initial result. However; it was noted that this patient had idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension mixed with “acute” (mediastinal) fibrosis which could have contributed to the unexpected success of reduction of pulmonary vascular resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, probably as a result of low-dose radiation to the pulmonary arterial main stems. The patient continues to have no specific complaints concerning her idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    McGoon, Michael D.; Kane, Garvan C.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive, symptomatic, and ultimately fatal disorder for which substantial advances in treatment have been made during the past decade. Effective management requires timely recognition and accurate diagnosis of the disorder and appropriate selection among therapeutic alternatives. Despite progress in treatment, obstacles remain that impede the achievement of optimal outcomes. The current article provides an overview of the pathobiologic mechanisms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, including genetic substrates and molecular and cellular mechanisms, and describes the clinical manifestations and classification of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The article also reviews established approaches to evaluation and treatment, with emphasis on the appropriate application of calcium channel blockers, prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors. In addition, the authors discuss unresolved issues that may complicate patient management, such as the clinical importance of mild or exercise-related pulmonary arterial hypertension, and they identify avenues by which treatment may advance in the future through the use of combination treatment, outcomes assessment, and exploration of alternative pharmacologic strategies. PMID:19181654

  7. Treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Tulloh, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension was once thought to be a rare condition and only managed in specialized centers. Now however, with the advent of echocardiography, it is found in many clinical scenarios, in the neonate with chronic lung disease, in the acute setting in the intensive care unit, in connective tissue disease and in cardiology pre- and postoperatively. We have a better understanding of the pathological process and have a range of medication which is starting to be able to palliate this previously fatal condition. This review describes the areas that are known in this condition and those that are less familiar. The basic physiology behind pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular disease is explained. The histopathologic process and the various diagnostic tools are described and are followed by the current and future therapy at our disposal. PMID:19554091

  8. Lung function in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Low, A T; Medford, A R L; Millar, A B; Tulloh, R M R

    2015-10-01

    Breathlessness is a common symptom in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and an important cause of morbidity. Though this has been attributed to the well described pulmonary vascular abnormalities and subsequent cardiac remodelling, changes in the airways of these patients have also been reported and may contribute to symptoms. Our understanding of these airway abnormalities is poor with conflicting findings in many studies. The present review evaluates these studies for the major PH groups. In addition we describe the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by evaluating cardiopulmonary interaction during exercise. As yet, the reasons for the abnormalities in lung function are unclear, but potential causes and the possible role of inflammation are discussed. Future research is required to provide a better understanding of this to help improve the management of these patients.

  9. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH.

  10. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies.

  11. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  12. Hematological disorders and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Rajamma; Huang, Jing; Wu, Joseph M; Fallon, John T; Gewitz, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a serious disorder with a high morbidity and mortality rate, is known to occur in a number of unrelated systemic diseases. Several hematological disorders such as sickle cell disease, thalassemia and myeloproliferative diseases develop PH which worsens the prognosis. Associated oxidant injury and vascular inflammation cause endothelial damage and dysfunction. Pulmonary vascular endothelial damage/dysfunction is an early event in PH resulting in the loss of vascular reactivity, activation of proliferative and antiapoptotic pathways leading to vascular remodeling, elevated pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and premature death. Hemolysis observed in hematological disorders leads to free hemoglobin which rapidly scavenges nitric oxide (NO), limiting its bioavailability, and leading to endothelial dysfunction. In addition, hemolysis releases arginase into the circulation which converts L-arginine to ornithine, thus bypassing NO production. Furthermore, treatments for hematological disorders such as immunosuppressive therapy, splenectomy, bone marrow transplantation, and radiation have been shown to contribute to the development of PH. Recent studies have shown deregulated iron homeostasis in patients with cardiopulmonary diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Several studies have reported low iron levels in patients with idiopathic PAH, and iron deficiency is an important risk factor. This article reviews PH associated with hematological disorders and its mechanism; and iron homeostasis and its relevance to PH. PMID:28070238

  13. Pulmonary hypertension associated with use of phentermine.

    PubMed

    Bang, Woo-Dae; Kim, Ji-Ye; Yu, Hee-Tae; Cho, Sung-Soo; Jang, Ji-Yong; Oh, Chang-Myung; Joung, Boyoung; Chang, Hyuk-Jae

    2010-11-01

    Weight-control drugs (known as anorexigens) such as fenfluramine have been linked with pulmonary hypertension in previous reports. In our case, a 29 year old woman was admitted for shortness of breath and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension. Three months ago, she had been taking phentermine for five weeks. Other factors that might have contributed to the development of pulmonary hypertension were excluded. With treatment, her symptoms improved. This is the first case that can suggest a possible connection between phenermine single medication with pulmonary hypertension. Phentermine has been considered a relatively safe drug to treat obesity, and further investigation is needed to decide the safety and dosage of phentermine.

  14. [Pathophysiology and classification of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sládková, H; Jansa, P; Susa, Z; Aschermann, M

    2004-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary pressure is increased above 25 mm Hg in a rest or above 30 mm Hg during exercise. It is possible to divide it from different point of view. Well known is pathophysiologic classification and Venice classification suggested by WHO symposium 2003. The rise of arterial pulmonary pressure is caused by three essential abnormalities, these are elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, blood flow and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Vasoconstriction, remodeling of vessels and in situ trombosis are pathogenetic mechanism which contribute to rise of pulmonary hypertension.

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in primary amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Lyska L.; Bull, David A.; Hatton, Nathan; Nativi-Nicolai, Jose; Hildebrandt, Gerhard C.; Ryan, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Amyloidosis involves extravascular deposition of fibrillar proteins within tissues and organs. Primary light chain amyloidosis represents the most common form of systemic amyloidosis involving deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains. Although pulmonary amyloid deposition is common in primary amyloidosis, clinically significant pulmonary amyloidosis is uncommon, and elevated pulmonary artery pressures are rarely observed in the absence of other underlying etiologies for pulmonary hypertension, such as elevated filling pressures secondary to cardiac amyloid. In this case report, we present a patient with primary light chain amyloidosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension in the setting of pulmonary vascular and right ventricular myocardial amyloid deposition. PMID:27252852

  16. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis.

  17. Genetics of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliott, C Gregory

    2013-12-01

    Painstaking research led to the discovery of gene mutations responsible for heritable forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mutations in the gene BMPR2, which codes for a cell surface receptor (BMPRII), cause the approximately 80% of heritable cases of PAH. Less commonly mutations in ALK1, CAV1, ENG, and SMAD9, and newly discovered mutations in KCNK3, may cause heritable PAH. Other family members of many patients diagnosed with idiopathic PAH may be diagnosed with PAH. Genetic counseling and testing should be offered to patients diagnosed with heritable or idiopathic PAH.

  18. Sickle Cell Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle Cell Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have Sickle Cell Disease you are at risk for Pulmonary Hypertension? ... for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, sickle cell disease and HIV infection. Finally, PAH can be ...

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: Basic knowledge for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ribeiro, Diana; Mendes-Ferreira, Pedro; Maia-Rocha, Carolina; Adão, Rui; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Brás-Silva, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive syndrome based on diverse aetiologies, which is characterized by a persistent increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and overload of the right ventricle, leading to heart failure and death. Currently, none of the available treatments is able to cure pulmonary arterial hypertension; additional research is therefore needed to unravel the associated pathophysiological mechanisms. This review summarizes current knowledge related to this disorder, and the several experimental animal models that can mimic pulmonary arterial hypertension and are available for translational research.

  20. Intralipid prevents and rescues fatal pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Umar, Soban; Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Li, Jingyuan; Maltese, Federica; Partownavid, Parisa; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling leading to right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy and failure. Intralipid (ILP), a source of parenteral nutrition for patients, contains γ-linolenic acid and soy-derived phytoestrogens that are protective for lungs and heart. We, therefore, investigated the therapeutic potential of ILP in preventing and rescuing monocrotaline-induced PAH and RV dysfunction. PAH was induced in male rats with monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Rats then received daily ILP (1 mL of 20% ILP per day IP) from day 1 to day 30 for prevention protocol or from day 21 to day 30 for rescue protocol. Other monocrotaline-injected rats were left untreated to develop severe PAH by day 21 or RV failure by approximately day 30. Saline or ILP-treated rats served as controls. Significant increase in RV pressure and decrease in RV ejection fraction in the RV failure group resulted in high mortality. Therapy with ILP resulted in 100% survival and prevented PAH-induced RV failure by preserving RV pressure and RV ejection fraction and preventing RV hypertrophy and lung remodeling. In preexisting severe PAH, ILP attenuated most lung and RV abnormalities. The beneficial effects of ILP in PAH seem to result from the interplay of various factors, among which preservation and/or stimulation of angiogenesis, suppression and/or reversal of inflammation, fibrosis and hypertrophy, in both lung and RV, appear to be major contributors. In conclusion, ILP not only prevents the development of PAH and RV failure but also rescues preexisting severe PAH.

  1. A review of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gan, C.T.; Noordegraaf, A. Vonk; Marques, K.M.J.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Postmus, P.E.; Boonstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure. The precapillary pulmonary arteries show distinct pathobiological changes, i.e. medial hypertrophy, intimal fibrosis, microthrombi and plexiform lesions. Although the pathogenesis is not completely understood, pulmonary vascular proliferation and remodelling, due to a variety of mediators, is believed to play the pathogenetic key role. Genetic research reveals molecular deformities and gene mutations associated with phenotypic PAH. This article covers novel insights into pathobiology, pathogenesis and genes of PAH, which led to a novel classification system and a diagnostic work-up, emanated from the World Health Organisation Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Venice in June 2003. PMID:25696347

  2. Therapeutic Strategies in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fuso, Leonello; Baldi, Fabiana; Perna, Alessandra Di

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. It is clinically classified into five groups: patients in the first group are considered to have pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) whereas patients of the other groups have PH that is due to cardiopulmonary or other systemic diseases. The management of patients with PH has advanced rapidly over the last decade and the introduction of specific treatments especially for PAH has lead to an improved outcome. However, despite the progress in the treatment, the functional limitation and the survival of these patients remain unsatisfactory and there is no cure for PAH. Therefore the search for an “ideal” therapy still goes on. At present, two levels of treatment can be identified: primary and specific therapy. Primary therapy is directed at the underlying cause of the PH. It also includes a supportive therapy consisting in oxygen supplementation, diuretics, and anticoagulation which should be considered in all patients with PH. Specific therapy is directed at the PH itself and includes treatment with vasodilatators such as calcium channel blockers and with vasodilatator and pathogenetic drugs such as prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. These drugs act in several pathogenetic mechanisms of the PH and are specific for PAH although they might be used also in the other groups of PH. Finally, atrial septostomy and lung transplantation are reserved for patients refractory to medical therapy. Different therapeutic approaches can be considered in the management of patients with PH. Therapy can be established on the basis of both the clinical classification and the functional class. It is also possible to adopt a goal-oriented therapy in which the timing of treatment escalation is determined by inadequate response to known prognostic indicators. PMID:21687513

  3. [Sildenafil in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    García Martínez, E; Ibarra de la Rosa, I; Pérez Navero, J L; Tejero Mateo, I; Expósito Montes, J F; Suárez de Lezo y Cruz Conde, J

    2003-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is a rare entity that is difficult to treat. Prognosis is poor. Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of type 5 phosphodiesterase, has been proposed among the many treatments available for primary and secondary pulmonary hypertension. We report our experience with an infant with pulmonary hypertension due to congenital mitral stenosis and persistent ductus arteriosus, who developed congestive cardiac failure with persistent PHT despite surgical correction. Conventional treatment was unsuccessful and the patient was treated with sildenafil. The clinical course was satisfactory, allowing extubation and withdrawal of vasoactive drugs; pulmonary and left atrial pressure decreased and the patient was discharged. She is currently being treated on an outpatient basis with oral sildenafil and shows satisfactory hemodynamic status. We review alternatives to conventional treatments for pulmonary hypertension with special reference to pediatrics.

  4. Infantile pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis: a lethal form of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eiméar; McNally, Paul; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Phelan, Ethna; Sumner, Kelli; Best, D Hunter; McMahon, Colin J

    2016-04-01

    We describe the cases of two children who both presented in infancy with recurrent severe pulmonary hypertensive crises. Exhaustive clinical work-up failed to identify an underlying aetiology. The patients had no clinical response to steroids, immunoglobulins, or pulmonary vasodilators. Post-mortem examination revealed extensive invasive pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis. There was no evidence of pulmonary venous occlusive disease. Given the lethal nature of this condition, early consideration of referral to a lung transplant centre should be considered in selected patients.

  5. [Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Roman, Antonio; López-Meseguer, Manuel; Domingo, Enric

    2015-06-22

    Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension has achieved significant progress over the past 20 years. Currently, 3 groups of drugs have proven useful for the treatment of this disease: endothelin receptor antagonist, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and prostacyclin and its analogues. It is recommended to initiate treatment with one of these drugs, the choice depending on the initial severity of patient disease and the preferences of the treating physician. When the patient does not have a satisfactory response, new drugs acting at a different pathway are most commonly added. At this time, considering referral for lung transplantation could be an alternative. Most experts recommend grouping maximum experience in what is known as expert centers. Treatment has led to better survival in these patients, but there is still a long way to cure this life-threatening disease.

  6. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis.

  7. Ischemia-induced Drp1 and Fis1-mediated mitochondrial fission and right ventricular dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Neuber-Hess, Monica; Mewburn, Jeffrey; Dasgupta, Asish; Dunham-Snary, Kimberly; Wu, Danchen; Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Hong, Zhigang; Sharp, Willard W; Kutty, Shelby; Archer, Stephen L

    2017-04-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function determines prognosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesize that ischemia causes RV dysfunction in PAH by triggering dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fission. RV function was compared in control rats (n = 50) versus rats with monocrotaline-induced PAH (MCT-PAH; n = 60) both in vivo (echocardiography) and ex vivo (RV Langendorff). Mitochondrial membrane potential and morphology and RV function were assessed before or after 2 cycles of ischemia-reperfusion injury challenge (RV-IR). The effects of Mdivi-1 (25 μM), a Drp1 GTPase inhibitor, and P110 (1 μM), a peptide inhibitor of Drp1-Fis1 interaction, were studied. We found that MCT caused RV hypertrophy, RV vascular rarefaction, and RV dysfunction. Prior to IR, the mitochondria in MCT-PAH RV were depolarized and swollen with increased Drp1 content and reduced aconitase activity. RV-IR increased RV end diastolic pressure (RVEDP) and mitochondrial Drp1 expression in both control and MCT-PAH RVs. IR depolarized mitochondria in control RV but did not exacerbate the basally depolarized MCT-PAH RV mitochondria. During RV IR mdivi-1 and P110 reduced Drp1 translocation to mitochondria, improved mitochondrial structure and function, and reduced RVEDP. In conclusion, RV ischemia occurs in PAH and causes Drp1-Fis1-mediated fission leading to diastolic dysfunction. Inhibition of mitochondrial fission preserves RV function in RV-IR.

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins. We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH. Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18–84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n = 13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n = 9), mediastinal irradiation (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27–90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m2 (range 1.6–4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5–1 mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1

  9. Pulmonary Thromboendarterectomy for Pulmonary Hypertension Before Considering Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Kooperkamp, Hannah; Mehta, Inder; Fary, David; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: In cases of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), referral for possible surgical intervention is important because surgery can be curative. Surgery necessitates cardiopulmonary bypass and deep circulatory arrest with pulmonary thrombectomy and bilateral endarterectomy (PTE). If surgery fails, lung transplant is the next best surgical option. Medical treatment is also an important adjunct. Case Report: A 35-year-old female presented 3 months after a pulmonary embolus was found to be completely occluding her left pulmonary artery. She was found to have pulmonary hypertension with a pulmonary artery pressure of 81/33 mmHg, with a mean pressure of 52 mmHg. The right atrial pressure was also severely elevated at 29 mmHg, and her echocardiogram revealed severe tricuspid regurgitation and severe right ventricular dysfunction. She underwent PTE and postoperatively was followed by the heart failure team. Her 6-minute walk distance improved from 396 meters at 1 month to 670 meters at 7 months, and her pulmonary artery pressure improved significantly to 55/17 mmHg with a mean pressure of 31 mmHg. The patient's right atrial pressure also improved significantly from 29 mmHg to 13 mmHg. Conclusion: CTEPH is likely underrecognized, and patients with pulmonary hypertension or a history of pulmonary embolism should be screened for CTEPH. This case illustrates the surgical treatment for CTEPH and discusses alternative and adjunctive treatments. Residual pulmonary hypertension after PTE occurs in approximately 35% of patients. Overall, 4-year mortality rates after surgery appear to be approximately 15%, and mortality rates correlate with the postoperative pulmonary vascular resistance. Recognition of chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease as the etiology of pulmonary hypertension warrants evaluation for surgery. PMID:28331450

  10. Diagnosis and assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, David B; Champion, Hunter C; Sanchez, Miguel Angel Gomez; Hoeper, Marius M; Loyd, James E; Manes, Alessandra; McGoon, Michael; Naeije, Robert; Olschewski, Horst; Oudiz, Ronald J; Torbicki, Adam

    2009-06-30

    The diagnosis and assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rapidly evolving area, with changes occurring in the definition of the disease, screening and diagnostic techniques, and staging and follow-up assessment. The definition of pulmonary hypertension has been simplified, and is now based on currently available evidence. There has been substantial progress in advancing the imaging techniques and biomarkers used to screen patients for the disease and to follow up their response to therapy. The importance of accurate assessment of right ventricular function in following up the clinical course and response to therapy is more fully appreciated. As new therapies are developed for pulmonary arterial hypertension, screening, prompt diagnosis, and accurate assessment of disease severity become increasingly important. A clear definition of pulmonary hypertension and the development of a rational approach to diagnostic assessment and follow-up using both conventional and new tools will be essential to deriving maximal benefit from our expanding therapeutic armamentarium.

  11. Riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hambly, Nathan; Granton, John

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical signaling molecule in the pulmonary vasculature. NO activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) resulting in the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) - a key mediator of pulmonary artery vasodilatation that may also inhibit smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Pulmonary hypertension, a serious, progressive and often fatal disease is characterized by NO-sGC-sGMP pathway dysregulation. Riociguat is a member of a novel therapeutic class known as soluble guanylate stimulators. Riociguat has a dual mode of action, acting in synergy with endogenous NO and also directly stimulating sGC independently of NO availability. Phase 3 randomized control trials have demonstrated that riociguat improves clinical, physiologic and hemodynamic parameters in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. In this review we will discuss the pharmacologic properties of riociguat and its appropriate implementation into clinical practice.

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension in Children - a Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Eliza, Cinteza; Alin, Nicolescu; Cristina, Filip; Andrei, Lupu; Georgiana, Nicolae; Gabriela, Duica; Mihaela, Balgradean

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is mean pulmonary arterial pressure above 25 mmHg at rest. Although considered a rare disease, the prevalence of PH in certain risk groups is higher, from 0.5% in patients with HIV infection to 30% in congenital heart disease (CHD) associating PH. In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with CHD, early changes of the vascular bed are reversible after correction of the defect, but there is a point from where the disease becomes irreversible or progression continues despite correction. Among patients with "operable" and "inoperable" CHD, there is a "gray area" group in between, which is defined by pulmonary vascular resistance equal to 4-8 WU/m and ratio of pulmonary vascular resistance to systemic vascular resistance of 0.3-0.5, measured by cardiac catheterization. In this situation a pulmonary vasoreactivity test is indicated. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe disease with increased morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary hypertension can result in death by decreased cardiac output, and heart failure.

  13. Epoprostenol Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ogawa, Aiko; Sarashina, Toshihiro; Ejiri, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevation of pulmonary artery pressure caused by pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling, which leads to right heart failure and death. Epoprostenol (prostaglandin I2) has a potent short-acting vasodilator property, and intravenous continuous epoprostenol is therefore used for treatment of PAH. Here we review evidence for the usefulness of intravenous continuous epoprostenol therapy in patients with PAH. Epoprostenol therapy is effective in idiopathic PAH patients and in patients with PAH associated with connective tissue disease, portal hypertension or congenital heart diseases, but it is not effective in patients with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease or pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis. High-dose epoprostenol therapy markedly improved hemodynamics in some patients with PAH, possibly due to reverse remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This therapy has several side effects and complications such as headache, hypotension and catheter-related infections. Intravenous continuous epoprostenol is an effective treatment, but there are still some problems to be resolved.

  14. Nursing considerations in the care of patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jo Ann; Kohr, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a potentially lethal condition that may be encountered during the entire life span of patients with many forms of congenital or acquired heart disease, pulmonary disorders, and other diseases. Each pulmonary hypertensive patient requires anticipatory interventions geared to prevent severe exacerbations of the pulmonary hypertensive condition, promote pulmonary vasodilation, and optimize ventricular function. Patients with pulmonary hypertension are at higher risk for developing pulmonary hypertensive episodes in the immediate postoperative period after cardiac surgery, as well as during nonsurgical admissions. Nurses are in a critical position to provide anticipatory care to prevent the development of pulmonary hypertensive events. Nurses can be instrumental in optimizing outcomes for patients with pulmonary hypertension by providing immediate care upon the development of a pulmonary hypertension event and by monitoring ongoing responses to adjustments in therapeutic interventions.

  15. Diagnostic Evaluation of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Deepa; Blanchard, Daniel; Auger, William R

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure greater than 25 mm Hg. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is defined as pulmonary hypertension in the presence of an organized thrombus within the pulmonary vascular bed that persists at least 3 months after the onset of anticoagulant therapy. Because CTEPH is potentially curable by surgical endarterectomy, correct identification of patients with this form of pulmonary hypertension and an accurate assessment of surgical candidacy are essential to provide optimal care. Patients most commonly present with symptoms of exertional dyspnea and otherwise unexplained decline in exercise capacity. Atypical chest pain, a nonproductive cough, and episodic hemoptysis are observed less frequently. With more advanced disease, patients often develop symptoms suggestive of right ventricular compromise. Physical examination findings are minimal early in the course of this disease, but as pulmonary hypertension progresses, may include nonspecific finding of right ventricular failure, such as a tricuspid regurgitation murmur, pedal edema, and jugular venous distention. Chest radiographs may suggest pulmonary hypertension, but are neither sensitive nor specific for the diagnosis. Radioisotopic ventilation-perfusion scanning is sensitive for detecting CTEPH, making it a valuable screening study. Conventional catheter-based pulmonary angiography retains an important role in establishing the presence and extent of chronic thromboembolic disease. However, computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging are playing a growing diagnostic role. Innovative technologies such as dual-energy computed tomography, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and optical coherence tomography show promise for contributing diagnostic information and assisting in the preoperative characterization of patients with CTEPH.

  16. Role of prostacyclin in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jane A.; Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Wright, William R.; Mackenzie, Louise S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Mohamed, Nura

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin is a powerful cardioprotective hormone released by the endothelium of all blood vessels. Prostacyclin exists in equilibrium with other vasoactive hormones and a disturbance in the balance of these factors leads to cardiovascular disease including pulmonary arterial hypertension. Since it's discovery in the 1970s concerted efforts have been made to make the best therapeutic utility of prostacyclin, particularly in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This has centred on working out the detailed pharmacology of prostacyclin and then synthesising new molecules based on its structure that are more stable or more easily tolerated. In addition, newer molecules have been developed that are not analogues of prostacyclin but that target the receptors that prostacyclin activates. Prostacyclin and related drugs have without doubt revolutionised the treatment and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension but are seriously limited by side effects within the systemic circulation. With the dawn of nanomedicine and targeted drug or stem cell delivery systems it will, in the very near future, be possible to make new formulations of prostacyclin that can evade the systemic circulation allowing for safe delivery to the pulmonary vessels. In this way, the full therapeutic potential of prostacyclin can be realised opening the possibility that pulmonary arterial hypertension will become, if not curable, a chronic manageable disease that is no longer fatal. This review discusses these and other issues relating to prostacyclin and its use in pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:25780793

  17. A review of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gan, C.T.; Noordegraaf, A. Vonk; Marques, K.M.J.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Postmus, P.E.; Boonstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    Medical therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) focuses on pulmonary vascular remodelling and smooth muscle cell proliferation. This article covers the drugs which are approved or are in sight and the evidence-based treatment strategies that target the different pathobiological pathways, emanated from the World Health Organisation Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Venice, June 2003. In addition we briefly look at the 'Venice consensus' on surgical treatment. In the past five and a half years more than 360 patients were seen for pulmonary hypertension in the Free University Medical Centre (VUmc). Present-day treatment, research studies and novel treatment strategies in the VUmc will be reviewed. Future treatments will be on the basis of insights into pathobiology, pathogenesis and genes in PAH and should focus on drug combinations, which theoretically target different or similar pathobiological pathways. PMID:25696358

  18. Medical treatment update on pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Enderby, Cher Y; Burger, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a chronic, progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature resulting in poor outcomes if left untreated. The management of group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension has included the use of prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and endothelin receptor antagonists targeting the prostacyclin, endothelin-1, and nitric oxide pathways. Three new medications have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration over the past couple of years. Macitentan is the newest endothelin receptor antagonist, riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, and treprostinil diolamine is the first oral prostanoid. This review will focus on the key trials leading to their approval, special considerations for each medication, and their potential place in therapy. The use of combination therapy as initial therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension will also be discussed.

  19. MicroRNAs in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guofei; Chen, Tianji

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease without effective treatment. Despite decades of research and the development of novel treatments, PAH remains a fatal disease, suggesting an urgent need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of PAH. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in patients with PAH and in experimental pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, normalization of a few miRNAs is reported to inhibit experimental pulmonary hypertension. We have reviewed the current knowledge about miRNA biogenesis, miRNA expression pattern, and their roles in regulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. We have also identified emerging trends in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PAH and propose future studies that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25192340

  20. Group 4 Pulmonary Hypertension: Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nick H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a serious but treatable complication of pulmonary embolism. Proper diagnosis and referral are critical, as pulmonary thromboendarterectomy offers the possibility of a cure. For patients with CTEPH deemed inoperable, new and effective treatments have emerged to help fill this unmet need.

  1. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: The Clinical Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yen-Chun; Potoka, Karin C.; Champion, Hunter C.; Mora, Ana L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disorder in which endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling obstruct small pulmonary arteries, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary pressures. This leads to reduced cardiac output, right heart failure, and ultimately death. In this review, we attempt to answer some important questions commonly asked by patients diagnosed with PAH pertaining to the disease, and aim to provide an explanation in terms of classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology, genetic etiologies, demographics, and prognostic factors. Furthermore, important molecular pathways that are central to the pathogenesis of PAH are reviewed, including nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelin-1, reactive oxygen species, and endothelial and smooth muscle proliferation. PMID:24951762

  2. cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling pathway is involved in aggravated cardiotoxicity during Fuzi and Beimu Combination Treatment of Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Pengwei; Huang, Yingying; Lu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zhen; Xu, Liman; Sun, Fengjiao; Zhang, Yanjun; Duan, Jinao

    2016-01-01

    Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata (Fuzi) and Fritillariae Thunbergii bulbus (Beimu) have been widely used clinically to treat cardiopulmonary related diseases in China. However, according to the classic rules of traditional Chinese medicine, Fuzi and Beimu should be prohibited to use as a combination for their incompatibility. Therefore, it is critical to elucidate the paradox on the use of Fuzi and Beimu combination therapy. Monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension rats were treated with either Fuzi, Beimu, or their combination at different stages of PH. We demonstrated that at the early stage of PH, Fuzi and Beimu combination significantly improved lung function and reduced pulmonary histopathology. However, as the disease progressed, when Fuzi and Beimu combination were used at the late stage of PH, right ventricular chamber dilation was histologically apparent and myocardial apoptosis was significantly increased compared with each drug alone. Western-blotting results indicated that the main chemical ingredient of Beimu could down-regulate the protein phosphorylation levels of Akt and PDE4D, whereas the combination of Fuzi and Beimu could up-regulate PKA and CaMKII signaling pathways. Therefore, we concluded that Fuzi and Beimu combination potentially aggravated the heart injury due to the inhibition of PDK1/Akt/PDE4D axis and subsequent synergistic activation of βAR-Gs-PKA/CaMKII signaling pathway. PMID:27739450

  3. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Castro, Oswaldo L; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-18

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  4. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lang, Irene; Meyer, Bernhard C; Ogo, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Kurzyna, Marcin; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Mayer, Eckhard; Brenot, Philippe

    2017-03-31

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is thought to result from incomplete resolution of pulmonary thromboemboli that undergo organisation into fibrous tissue within pulmonary arterial branches, filling pulmonary arterial lumina with collagenous obstructions. The treatment of choice is pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) in CTEPH centres, which has low post-operative mortality and good long-term survival. For patients ineligible for PEA or who have recurrent or persistent pulmonary hypertension after surgery, medical treatment with riociguat is beneficial. In addition, percutaneous balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA) is an emerging option, and promises haemodynamic and functional benefits for inoperable patients. In contrast to conventional angioplasty, BPA with undersized balloons over guide wires exclusively breaks intraluminal webs and bands, without dissecting medial vessel layers, and repeat sessions are generally required. Observational studies report that BPA improves haemodynamics, symptoms and functional capacity in patients with CTEPH, but controlled trials with long-term follow-up are needed. Complications include haemoptysis, wire injury, vessel dissection, vessel rupture, reperfusion pulmonary oedema, pulmonary parenchymal bleeding and haemorrhagic pleural effusions. This review summarises the available evidence for BPA, patient selection, recent technical refinements and periprocedural imaging, and discusses the potential future role of BPA in the management of CTEPH.

  5. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases: novel vasoconstrictor pathways.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Simon C; Keane, Michael P; Gaine, Seán; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well recognised complication of chronic hypoxic lung diseases, which are among the most common causes of death and disability worldwide. Development of pulmonary hypertension independently predicts reduced life expectancy. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, long-term oxygen therapy ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and greatly improves survival, although the correction of alveolar hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension is only partial. Advances in understanding of the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone show that chronic vasoconstriction plays a more important part in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension than previously thought, and that structural vascular changes contribute less. Trials of existing vasodilators show that pulmonary hypertension can be ameliorated and systemic oxygen delivery improved in carefully selected patients, although systemic hypotensive effects limit the doses used. Vasoconstrictor pathways that are selective for the pulmonary circulation can be blocked to reduce hypoxic pulmonary hypertension without causing systemic hypotension, and thus provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations.

  7. Developments in pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapy for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hadinnapola, Charaka; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare disease characterised by the presence of organised chronic thromboembolic material occluding the proximal pulmonary arteries and a vasculopathy in the distal pulmonary arterial tree. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a potential cure for many patients with CTEPH. However, PEA is not suitable for patients with a significant distal distribution of chronic thromboembolic material or with significant comorbidities. Also, a proportion of patients are left with residual CTEPH post PEA. Until recently, pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapies have been used off licence to treat patients with inoperable or residual CTEPH. The CHEST1 study investigated the use of riociguat and was the first randomised controlled trial to show efficacy in inoperable or residual CTEPH. In this review, we explore the pathophysiology of CTEPH and review the current trial evidence for pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapies. We also include a discussion of physiological considerations that require further investigation.

  8. Pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance relationship in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Denis; Lau, Edmund M T; Papelier, Yves; Attal, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Right ventricular adaptation to the increased pulmonary arterial load is a key determinant of outcomes in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and total arterial compliance (C) quantify resistive and elastic properties of pulmonary arteries that modulate the steady and pulsatile components of pulmonary arterial load, respectively. PVR is commonly calculated as transpulmonary pressure gradient over pulmonary flow and total arterial compliance as stroke volume over pulmonary arterial pulse pressure (SV/PApp). Assuming that there is an inverse, hyperbolic relationship between PVR and C, recent studies have popularised the concept that their product (RC-time of the pulmonary circulation, in seconds) is "constant" in health and diseases. However, emerging evidence suggests that this concept should be challenged, with shortened RC-times documented in post-capillary PH and normotensive subjects. Furthermore, reported RC-times in the literature have consistently demonstrated significant scatter around the mean. In precapillary PH, the true PVR can be overestimated if one uses the standard PVR equation because the zero-flow pressure may be significantly higher than pulmonary arterial wedge pressure. Furthermore, SV/PApp may also overestimate true C. Further studies are needed to clarify some of the inconsistencies of pulmonary RC-time, as this has major implications for our understanding of the arterial load in diseases of the pulmonary circulation.

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shlobin, Oksana A; Brown, A Whitney; Nathan, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can be triggered by any number of disease processes that result in increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Although historically associated with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), most patients with PH do not have the idiopathic subtype, but rather PH associated with another underlying diagnosis, such as left heart or lung disease. The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of PH helps conceptualize the different categories based on presumed etiology. WHO group 3 is PH associated with lung disease. This review focuses on PH in diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs), such as the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and other more rare forms of DPLD. Although there are clear associations of PH with DPLD, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms and full clinical significance remain uncertain. Treatment of PH related to DPLD remains investigational, but an area of great interest given the negative prognostic implications and the growing number of available pulmonary vasoactive agents.

  10. Autoimmunity and pulmonary hypertension: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Nicolls, M R; Taraseviciene-Stewart, L; Rai, P R; Badesch, D B; Voelkel, N F

    2005-12-01

    The association between autoimmunity and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been appreciated for >40 yrs, but how autoimmune injury might contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease has only been examined in a case-specific manner. It is becoming increasingly clear that a variety of diverse clinical diseases, ranging from viral infections to connective tissue disorders, can culminate in pulmonary vascular pathology that is indistinguishable. Is there a hitherto unappreciated biology that unites these seemingly unrelated conditions? The answer to this question may come from the increasing body of evidence concerned with the central importance of regulatory T-cells in preventing inappropriate B-cell activity. Two striking similarities between conditions associated with severe angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension are a defect in the CD4 T-cell compartment and auto-antibody production. Pathogenic auto-antibodies targeting endothelial cells are capable of inducing vascular endothelial apoptosis and may initiate the development of PAH. The present review will focus on what is known about autoimmune phenomena in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients, in order to better consider whether an early loss of self-tolerance followed by autoimmune injury could influence the early development of severe angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Endothelial HIF signaling regulates pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Ryan P.; McConaha, Melinda E.; Jones, Brittany R.; Shay, Sheila D.; Moore, Christy S.; Blackwell, Thomas R.; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L.; Burman, Ankita; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Hemnes, Anna R.; Karwandyar, Ayub K.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Talati, Megha A.; Dong, Hui-Jia; Gleaves, Linda A.; Carrier, Erica J.; Gaskill, Christa; Scott, Edward W.; Majka, Susan M.; Fessel, Joshua P.; West, James D.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicating chronic parenchymal lung disease, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Since the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling pathway is important for development of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hypoxia, we investigated whether HIF signaling in vascular endothelium regulates development of PH related to pulmonary fibrosis. We generated a transgenic model in which HIF is deleted within vascular endothelial cells and then exposed these mice to chronic intraperitoneal bleomycin to induce PH associated with lung fibrosis. Although no differences in the degree of fibrotic remodeling were observed, we found that endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected against development of PH, including right ventricle and pulmonary vessel remodeling. Similarly, endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected from PH after a 4-wk exposure to normobaric hypoxia. In vitro studies of pulmonary vascular endothelial cells isolated from the HIF-targeted mice and controls revealed that endothelial HIF signaling increases endothelial cell expression of connective tissue growth factor, enhances vascular permeability, and promotes pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and wound healing ability, all of which have the potential to impact the development of PH in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that vascular endothelial cell HIF signaling is necessary for development of hypoxia and pulmonary fibrosis associated PH. As such, HIF and HIF-regulated targets represent a therapeutic target in these conditions. PMID:26637636

  12. Right ventricular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Franco, Veronica

    2012-07-01

    The right ventricle (RV) is in charge of pumping blood to the lungs for oxygenation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by high pulmonary vascular resistance and vascular remodeling, which results in a striking increase in RV afterload and subsequent failure. There is still unexploited potential for therapies that directly target the RV with the aim of supporting and protecting the right side of the heart, striving to prolong survival in patients with PAH.

  13. A Case of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Park, Bo-Min; Kim, Jae-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Jin; Song, Pil-Sang; Kim, Dong-Kie; Kim, Ki-Hun; Kim, Doo-Il

    2012-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe complication of incomplete resolution of large pulmonary embolism (PE).Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and chest computed tomography (CT) are useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of CTEPH. We report a case of 40-year-old male who wasadmitted with gradually aggravated dyspnea in recent 2 years and had history of acute PE 10 years ago, was detected CTEPH by TTE and confirmed with chest CT.

  14. Autoimmune disease leading to pulmonary AL amyloidosis and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, Claire M; McLean, Catriona; Williams, Trevor J; Snell, Gregory I; Whitford, Helen M

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman with past history of Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus presented with dyspnea and syncope secondary to pulmonary hypertension. After progressive symptoms over 4 years, she received bilateral lung transplantation. Histopathology of the explanted lungs showed isolated pulmonary amyloid light-chain amyloidosis and pulmonary cysts. No evidence of systemic amyloidosis was found at the time of transplantation. Seven years post lung transplantation, she remains well with no evidence of systemic amyloidosis recurrence. PMID:26090118

  15. Potassium channels in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Chabot, Sophie; Antigny, Fabrice; Perros, Frédéric; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with various origins. All forms of PAH share a common pulmonary arteriopathy characterised by vasoconstriction, remodelling of the pre-capillary pulmonary vessel wall, and in situ thrombosis. Although the pathogenesis of PAH is recognised as a complex and multifactorial process, there is growing evidence that potassium channels dysfunction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of PAH. Besides regulating many physiological functions, reduced potassium channels expression and/or activity have significant effects on PAH establishment and progression. This review describes the molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of potassium channel modulation. Special emphasis is placed on KCNA5 (Kv1.5) and KCNK3 (TASK1), which are considered to play a central role in determining pulmonary vascular tone and may represent attractive therapeutic targets in the treatment of PAH.

  16. [Left ventricular function in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Khomaziuk, V A

    1998-12-01

    Echocardiographic evaluation was done of left ventricular functional state in 90 patients with primary and secondary pulmonary arterial hypertension with and without intercavitary shunting. Changes in left ventricular function were identified in 86% cases; they reflected disturbances in both ventricles compensatory interaction. The degree of changes depended on the degree of dilatation of the right ventricle and level of interchamber shunting.

  17. Perfusion lung scanning: differentiation of primary from thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Kreisman, H.; Novales-Diaz, J.; Derbekyan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Of eight patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, final diagnosis established by autopsy or angiography, four had primary hypertension and four hypertension from thromboembolism. The perfusion lung scan was distinctly different in the two groups. The lung scan in primary pulmonary hypertension was associated with nonsegmental, patchy defects of perfusion, while in thromboembolic hypertensives it was characterized by segmental and/or lobar defects of perfusion with or without subsegmental defects. The perfusion lung scan is a valuable, noninvasive study in the evaluation of the patient with pulmonary hypertension of undetermined cause and in the exclusion of occult large-vessel pulmonary thromboembolism.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  19. Inhaled treprostinil and pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Samuel T; Edelman, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Multiple conditions result in development of pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the subclassification of pulmonary hypertension, in which known or unknown underlying conditions lead to similar intrinsic alterations in the pulmonary vasculature. PAH is a progressive condition characterized by restricted blood flow through the pulmonary circulation leading to poor survival in the absence of effective therapy. Over the last two decades, new therapeutic agents have substantially improved the course and prognosis for PAH patients. Three available classes of drugs, ie, prostacyclins, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provide multiple options for treatment of PAH. Endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors are administered orally, whereas prostacyclin therapies are delivered by continuous intravenous or subcutaneous infusion, or as aerosols by nebulization. Because of the risks and inconveniences associated with administration, prostacyclins are typically reserved for patients with more advanced disease or progression despite oral therapy. Inhaled administration may be a safer and easier route for prostacyclin administration. Treprostinil is a prostacyclin analog that has been demonstrated to be effective when administered by continuous subcutaneous or intravenous infusion, and more recently by nebulization. PMID:21191432

  20. [Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Román, J Sánchez; Hernández, F J García; Palma, M J Castillo; Medina, C Ocaña

    2008-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is an idiopathic process or can be associated with another circumstances (connective tissue diseases, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, exposure to appetite suppressants or another drugs or infectious agents such as HIV). Most patients are diagnosed as the result of an evaluation of symptoms, whereas others are diagnosed incidentally or during screening of asymptomatic populations at risk. We reviews systematic screening for the approach to diagnosing pulmonary arterial hypertension. A diagnostic algorithm can guide the evaluation but it can be modified according to specific clinical circumstances. The number of therapeutic options has increased.in the last years. We reviews the use of calcium-channel blockers, prostacyclin (and analogues), endothelin-receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and the use of combination therapy, and provides specific recommendations about the actual treatment.

  1. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Tsapenko, Mykola V; Tsapenko, Arseniy V; Comfere, Thomas BO; Mour, Girish K; Mankad, Sunil V; Gajic, Ognjen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV) pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in combinations with other agents, and must be individualized based on patient response. PMID:19183752

  2. [Novel immunopathological approaches to pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Montani, David; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in the most commun animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and its therapeutical targeting blocks PH development in these models. In human, pulmonary vascular lesions of PH are also the source of an intense chemokine production, linked to inflammatory cell recruitment. However, arteritis is uncommon in PH patients. Of note, current PH treatments have immunomodulatory properties. In addition, some studies have shown a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patients' survival. The study of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension is becoming an area of intense investigation. New immunopathological approaches to PH should allow the development of innovative treatments for this very severe condition.

  3. Challenges in pulmonary hypertension: managing the unexpected.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Karen M; Palazzini, Massimiliano

    2015-12-01

    The diverse challenges associated with diagnosis and management of patients with pulmonary hypertension are illustrated in this case-based review. Case 1 describes a patient diagnosed with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) with right heart failure and active systemic lupus erythematosus who was effectively treated with an up-front triple combination of PAH therapies and immunosuppressive therapy. In case 2, a diagnosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease was reached after a combined approach of clinical suspicion, physical examination, and invasive and noninvasive tests. Cautious PAH therapy and high-dose diuretics provided clinical benefit in this patient and served as a bridge to lung transplantation. These cases highlight the need for ongoing follow-up of patients with PAH, comprising frequent assessment of treatment success and continued diagnostic evaluation.

  4. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

  5. Use of β-Blockers in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; de Man, Frances S; Bogaard, Harm J; Antigny, Fabrice; Simonneau, Gérald; Bonnet, Sébastien; Provencher, Steeve; Galiè, Nazzareno; Humbert, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Contrasting with the major attention that left heart failure has received, right heart failure remains understudied both at the preclinical and clinical levels. However, right ventricle failure is a major predictor of outcomes in patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension because of pulmonary arterial hypertension, and in patients with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension because of left heart disease. In pulmonary hypertension, the status of the right ventricle is one of the most important predictors of both morbidity and mortality. Paradoxically, there are currently no approved therapies targeting the right ventricle in pulmonary hypertension. By analogy with the key role of β-blockers in the management of left heart failure, some authors have proposed to use these agents to support the right ventricle function in pulmonary hypertension. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the use of β-blockers in pulmonary hypertension.

  6. Definitions and diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoeper, Marius M; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Condliffe, Robin; Frantz, Robert; Khanna, Dinesh; Kurzyna, Marcin; Langleben, David; Manes, Alessandra; Satoh, Toru; Torres, Fernando; Wilkins, Martin R; Badesch, David B

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg at rest, measured during right heart catheterization. There is still insufficient evidence to add an exercise criterion to this definition. The term pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) describes a subpopulation of patients with PH characterized hemodynamically by the presence of pre-capillary PH including an end-expiratory pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) ≤ 15 mm Hg and a pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units. Right heart catheterization remains essential for a diagnosis of PH or PAH. This procedure requires further standardization, including uniformity of the pressure transducer zero level at the midthoracic line, which is at the level of the left atrium. One of the most common problems in the diagnostic workup of patients with PH is the distinction between PAH and PH due to left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). A normal PAWP does not rule out the presence of HFpEF. Volume or exercise challenge during right heart catheterization may be useful to unmask the presence of left heart disease, but both tools require further evaluation before their use in general practice can be recommended. Early diagnosis of PAH remains difficult, and screening programs in asymptomatic patients are feasible only in high-risk populations, particularly in patients with systemic sclerosis, for whom recent data suggest that a combination of clinical assessment and pulmonary function testing including diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, biomarkers, and echocardiography has a higher predictive value than echocardiography alone.

  7. Modern Age Pathology of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, Elvira; Graham, Brian B.; Hunt, James M.; Gandjeva, Aneta; Groshong, Steve D.; McLaughlin, Vallerie V.; Jessup, Marsha; Grizzle, William E.; Aldred, Michaela A.; Cool, Carlyne D.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The impact of modern treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) on pulmonary vascular pathology remains unknown. Objectives: To assess the spectrum of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the modern era of PAH medication. Methods: Assessment of pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in 62 PAH and 28 control explanted lungs systematically sampled. Measurements and Main Results: Intima and intima plus media fractional thicknesses of pulmonary arteries were increased in the PAH group versus the control lungs and correlated with pulmonary hemodynamic measurements. Despite a high variability of morphological measurements within a given PAH lung and among all PAH lungs, distinct pathological subphenotypes were detected in cohorts of PAH lungs. These included a subset of lungs lacking intima or, most prominently, media remodeling, which had similar numbers of profiles of plexiform lesions as those in lungs with more pronounced remodeling. Marked perivascular inflammation was present in a high number of PAH lungs and correlated with intima plus media remodeling. The number of profiles of plexiform lesions was significantly lower in lungs of male patients and those never treated with prostacyclin or its analogs. Conclusions: Our results indicate that multiple features of pulmonary vascular remodeling are present in patients treated with modern PAH therapies. Perivascular inflammation may have an important role in the processes of vascular remodeling, all of which may ultimately lead to increased pulmonary artery pressure. Moreover, our study provides a framework to interpret and design translational studies in PAH. PMID:22679007

  8. Group III Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Lung Disease: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with chronic lung disease (WHO group 3) is the second leading cause of PH and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is usually moderate and correlates with severity of lung disease. In a small minority, PAP may approach that seen in WHO group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Current medications for treating PAH have not shown benefit in controlled trials of group 3 PH and their routine use is discouraged. Patients with severe group 3 PH should be considered for referral to expert centers or entry into clinical trials.

  9. Sex differences in the pulmonary circulation: implications for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Yvette N.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a form of pulmonary hypertension, is a complex disease of multifactorial origin. While new developments regarding pathophysiological features and therapeutic options in PAH are being reported, one important fact has emerged over the years: there is a sex difference in the incidence of this disease such that while there is a higher incidence in females, disease outcomes are much worse in males. Accordingly, recent attention has been focused on understanding the features of sex differences in the pulmonary circulation and the contributory mechanisms, particularly sex hormones and their role in the pathological and pathophysiological features of PAH. However, to date, there is no clear consensus whether sex hormones (particularly female sex steroids) are beneficial or detrimental in PAH. In this review, we highlight some of the most recent evidence regarding the influence of sex hormones (estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone) and estrogen metabolites on key pathophysiological features of PAH such as proliferation, vascular remodeling, vasodilation/constriction, and inflammation, thus setting the stage for research avenues to identify novel therapeutic target for PAH as well as potentially other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24610923

  10. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension and chronic cor pulmonale in COPD.

    PubMed

    Shujaat, Adil; Minkin, Ruth; Eden, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxia and endothelial dysfunction play a central role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. Cor pulmonale is a maladaptive response to pulmonary hypertension. The presence of peripheral edema in cor pulmonale is almost invariably associated with hypercapnia. Correction of abnormalities of gas exchange and ventilation can ameliorate pulmonary hypertension and improve survival. This review focuses on new information about the pathogenesis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in COPD including information derived from lung volume reduction surgery, the role of brain natriuretic peptide, exhaled nitric oxide for diagnosis, and the treatment of cor pulmonale with recently available specific pulmonary vasodilators.

  12. Treatment for pulmonary hypertension including lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Kengo F

    2011-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease characterized by sustained elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure and increased pulmonary vascular resistance, leading to right-sided ventricular failure. The untreated median survival period is 2-3 years from the time of diagnosis, with the cause of death usually being right-sided ventricular failure. However, outcomes have dramatically changed in recent years because of great advances in medical management of PH, including early diagnosis and new drugs such as prostaglandins, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Long-term continuous intravenous prostacyclin therapy has shown excellent results in patients with PH. More recently, a molecular-targeted agent, imatinib mesylate, that acts by specifically inhibiting a certain enzyme that is characteristic of a particular cancer cell, rather than nonspecifically inhibiting and killing all rapidly dividing cells, has also been shown to have a potential role in the treatment of PH. This drug has been shown to reduce both pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in a variety of disease processes. We summarize here recent topics regarding PH and advances in treatments for PH, particularly pulmonary arterial hypertension, including lung transplantation.

  13. [Pediatric pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to congenital heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Olguntürk, Rana

    2010-08-01

    Causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are similar in adults and children. The main difference is that PAH secondary to congenital heart diseases, is the predominant cause in pediatric patients. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn shows completely different clinical course and pathophysiological mechanisms. It is usually seen in full term babies with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Improved prognosis has been reported with inhaled nitric oxide (NO) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in babies hospitalized in well equipped and experienced newborn centers. Primary pulmonary hypertension and familial pulmonary hypertension are rare in pediatric age group because the diagnosis is initially made in adolescence. The incidence of PAH secondary to congenital heart disease is estimated as 1.6 - 12.5 case/million/year. Eisenmenger syndrome is diagnosed in 1% of patients with PAH. Patients with left to right shunts are the main group who develop pulmonary vascular disease if not treated in the early infancy. Some cyanotic congenital heart diseases are also the causes of PAH. The best treatment of patients at risk for the development of pulmonary vascular disease is prevention by early surgical elimination of defects or repairing the anatomy. Treatment options with vasodilating agents like NO, prostaglandin analogs, phosphodiesterase -5 inhibitors and endothelin receptor antagonists are used to improve survival and quality of life. Heart lung or bilateral lung transplantation is the only surgical option for many of these patients. Results of national and international registries will bring valuable epidemiological and prognostic perspectives to pediatric PAH.

  14. Complications of pulmonary hypertension: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Mak, Sze M; Strickland, Nicola; Gopalan, Deepa

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disease with a significant morbidity and mortality if untreated. The disease has a multifactorial aetiology and is often associated with insidious onset of signs and symptoms. Multimodality imaging is often required for establishing the diagnosis, evaluating the underlying haemodynamic compromise and follow-up after institution of therapy. The range of potential complications associated with PH vary widely. We aimed to summarize the imaging findings of complications that the radiologist should be familiar with.

  15. Pulmonary hypertension associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Karen A; Badesch, David B

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a life threatening complication of several connective tissue diseases including scleroderma (both diffuse and limited scleroderma, or the CREST syndrome--calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangectasia), systemic lupus erythomatosis (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and less commonly, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and dermatomyositis/polymyositis. This report reviews the occurrence of this complication, potential etiologies, clinical presentation, and treatment options.

  16. Treatment of idiopathic/hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiromi; Ogawa, Aiko

    2014-10-01

    Treatment of pulmonary hypertension has progressed by recently developed pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted drugs. However, long-term survival of the patients with idiopathic/heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension is still suboptimal. To improve the outcomes, treatment goals of pulmonary hypertension were proposed at the 5th World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension held at Nice, France in 2013; parameters were obtained from cardiopulmonary exercise test, blood tests, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, parameters evaluating right ventricular function have been highlighted because survival of the patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension is closely related to right ventricular function. However, treatment specifically targeted to improve right ventricular function in pulmonary hypertension is not yet established. In this setting, we need to maintain or improve right ventricular function with available vasodilators. In this review, we focus on the following two points: (1) Why can pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted drugs improve right ventricular function without an apparent decrease in pulmonary artery pressure? (2) Are proposed goals sufficient to improve long-term prognosis of the patients? Further, we will discuss what would be the appropriate goal in treating patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  17. Electron microscopy of Crotalaria pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J. M.; Smith, Paul; Heath, Donald

    1969-01-01

    The lungs of 11 rats fed on Crotalaria spectabilis seeds for periods ranging from 12 to 61 days were examined by both light and electron microscopy. The findings were compared with those obtained from nine control rats given a normal diet. Eight of the 11 test rats showed morphological evidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in the form of right ventricular hypertrophy; the exceptions were rats killed after receiving the Crotalaria diet for 12, 22, and 29 days respectively. On light microscopy, all the test rats showed exudative lesions in the lungs consisting of eosinophilic alveolar coagulum, intra-alveolar haemorrhage, interstitial fibrosis, and a proliferation of mast cells. Enlarged and proliferated cells were seen to line the alveolar walls or lie free within the alveolar spaces. Electron microscopy showed these cells to be enlarged granular pneumocytes containing enlarged, electron-dense, lamellar secretory inclusions. Scanty macrophages were also seen in the alveolar spaces, in which excessive numbers of myelin figures and lattices were seen: these structures resembled phospholipid membranes and were probably related to pulmonary surfactant. We think that proliferation of granular pneumocytes is a non-specific reaction of the alveolar walls to injury. The alveolar-capillary wall showed interstitial oedema with the formation of intraluminal endothelial vesicles, probably representing the early ultrastructural phase of pulmonary oedema, and more likely to be an effect of the pulmonary hypertension than its cause. Images PMID:5348317

  18. Evaluation and management of the patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Lewis J; Badesch, David B

    2005-08-16

    Increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation, or pulmonary hypertension, is a common disorder that may complicate various cardiopulmonary conditions, including severe obstructive airways disease and left ventricular dysfunction. An increase in pulmonary arterial pressure that is not due to coexistent cardiopulmonary disease, known as pulmonary arterial hypertension, may occur in the absence of a demonstrable cause (idiopathic or familial); as a complication of systemic conditions, such as connective tissue disease, HIV infection, or chronic liver disease; or as a result of the use of fenfluramine anorexigens, amphetamines, or cocaine. The development of disease-specific therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past decade underscores the importance of diagnosing pulmonary hypertension early in the course of the condition and implementing a treatment strategy that is based on the condition's cause and severity. In this review, the authors present approaches to the diagnosis and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension, using a hypothetical case to highlight the key management points.

  19. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension and BMP system abnormality].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Fumio

    2008-11-01

    Genetic analysis has uncovered that familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is linked to germline mutations in BMP type II receptor (BMPRII). PAH is characterized by enhanced remodeling of pulmonary arteries due to arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation. BMPRII mutations contribute to abnormal mitotic responses to BMP ligands in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Unbalanced Smad signaling induced by BMP and TGFbeta is functionally involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. BMPRII mutations also increase the susceptibility of endothelial cell apoptosis. The combination of increased endothelial injury and impaired suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation is critical for the cellular pathogenesis of PAH. However, the detailed molecular mechanism leading to severe vascular remodeling caused by BMPRII mutations has yet to be elucidated.

  20. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in newborns: therapeutic indications.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-Mendonça, Carina; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2013-12-01

    Failure of the normal cardiopulmonary transition can lead to persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Some degree of pulmonary hypertension complicates the course of more than 10% of all neonates with respiratory failure. This review article discusses the vascular abnormalities associated with neonatal pulmonary hypertension. Common therapies including inhaled nitric oxide, high frequency ventilation, surfactant, and extracorporeal life support are included. Promising new treatment approaches like phosphodiesterase inhibition and cell-targeted therapies are presented.

  1. [Definitions and diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Hoeper, Marius M; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Condliffe, Robin; Frantz, Robert; Khanna, Dinesh; Kurzyna, Marcin; Langleben, David; Manes, Alessandra; Satoh, Toru; Torres, Fernando; Wilkins, Martin R; Badesch, David B

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure 25 mm Hg at rest, measured during right heart catheterization. There is still insufficient .evidence to add an exercise criterion to this definition. The term pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) describes a subpopulation of patients with PH characterized hemodynamically by the presence of pre-capillary PH including an end-expiratory pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) 15 mm Hg and a pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units. Right heart catheterization remains essential for a diagnosis of PH or PAH. This procedure requires further standardization, including uniformity of the pressure transducer zero level at the midthoracic line, which is at the level of the left atrium. One of the most common problems in the diagnostic workup of patients with PH is the distinction between PAH and PH due to left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). A normal PAWP does not rule out the presence of HFpEF. Volume or exercise challenge during right heart catheterization may be useful to unmask the presence of left heart disease, but both tools require further evaluation before their use in general practice can be recommended. Early diagnosis of PAH remains difficult, and screening programs in asymptomatic patients are feasible only in high-risk populations, particularly in patients with systemic sclerosis, for whom recent data suggest that a combination of clinical assessment and pulmonary function testing including diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, biomarkers, and echocardiography has a higher predictive value than echocardiography alone. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62: D42-50) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center Network: Improving Care and Outcomes in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Sandeep; Melendres-Groves, Lana; Pawar, Leena; Cajigas, Hector R

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a chronic, progressive, life-threatening disease that requires expert multidisciplinary care. To facilitate this level of care, the Pulmonary Hypertension Association established across the United States a network of pulmonary hypertension care centers (PHCCs) with special expertise in PH, particularly pulmonary arterial hypertension, to raise the overall quality of care and outcomes for patients with this life-threatening disease. Since the inception of PHCCs in September 2014, to date 35 centers have been accredited in the United States. This model of care brings together physicians and specialists from other disciplines to provide care, facilitate basic and clinical research, and educate the next generation of providers. PHCCs also offer additional opportunities for improvements in PH care. The patient registry offered through the PHCCs is an organized system by which data are collected to evaluate the outcomes of patients with PH. This registry helps in detecting variations in outcomes across centers, thus identifying opportunities for improvement. Multiple tactics were undertaken to implement the strategic plan, training, and tools throughout the PHCC network. In addition, strategies to foster collaboration between care center staff and individuals with PH and their families are the cornerstone of the PHCCs. The Pulmonary Vascular Network of the American College of Chest Physicians believes this to be a positive step that will improve the quality of care delivered in the United States to patients with PH.

  3. Validation of high-resolution echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging vs. high-fidelity catheterization in experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Urboniene, Dalia; Haber, Idith; Fang, Yong-Hu; Thenappan, Thenappan; Archer, Stephen L

    2010-09-01

    High-frequency echocardiography and high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are new noninvasive methods for quantifying pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy (RVH). We compared these noninvasive methods of assessing the pulmonary circulation to the gold standard, cardiac catheterization (micromanometer-tipped catheters), in rats with monocrotaline-induced PAH and normal controls. Closed-chest, Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with inhaled isoflurane (25 monocrotaline, 6 age-matched controls). Noninvasive studies used 37.5-MHz ultrasound (Vevo 770; VisualSonics) or a 9.4-T MRI (Bruker BioSpin). Catheterization used a 1.4-F micromanometer-tipped Millar catheter and a thermodilution catheter to measure cardiac output (CO). We compared noninvasive measures of pulmonary artery (PA) pressure (PAP) using PA acceleration time (PAAT) and CO, using the geometric PA flow method and RV free wall (RVFW) thickness/mass with cardiac catheterization and/or autopsy. Blinded operators performed comparisons using each method within 2 days of another. In a subset of rats with monocrotaline PAH, weekly echocardiograms, catheterization, and autopsy data assessed disease progression. Heart rate was similar during all studies (>323 beats/min). PAAT shortened, and the PA flow envelope displayed systolic "notching," reflective of downstream vascular remodeling/stiffening, within 3 wk of monocrotaline. MRI and echocardiography measures of PAAT were highly correlated (r(2) = 0.87) and were inversely proportional to invasive mean PAP (r(2) = 0.72). Mean PAP by echocardiography was estimated as 58.7 - (1.21 x PAAT). Invasive and noninvasive CO measurement correlated well (r(2) >or= 0.75). Noninvasive measures of RVFW thickness/mass correlated well with postmortem measurements. We conclude that high-resolution echocardiography and MRI accurately determine CO, PAP, and RV thickness/mass, offering similar results as high-fidelity right heart

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2013-11-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature.

  5. LTB4 activates pulmonary artery adventitial fibroblasts in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinguo; Tamosiuniene, Rasa; Sung, Yon K.; Shuffle, Eric M.; Tu, Allen B.; Valenzuela, Antonia; Jiang, Shirley; Zamanian, Roham T.; Fiorentino, David F.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Chung, Lorinda; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent study demonstrated a significant role for leukotriene B4 (LTB4) causing pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). LTB4 was found to directly injure luminal endothelial cells and promote growth of the smooth muscle cell layer of pulmonary arterioles. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of LTB4 on the pulmonary adventitial layer, largely composed of fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate that LTB4 enhanced human pulmonary artery adventitial fibroblast (HPAAF) proliferation, migration and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner through its cognate G-protein coupled receptor, BLT1. LTB4 activated HPAAF by up-regulating p38 MAPK as well as Nox4 signaling pathways. In an autoimmune model of PH, inhibition of these pathways blocked perivascular inflammation, decreased Nox4 expression, reduced reactive oxygen species production, reversed arteriolar adventitial fibroblast activation and attenuated PH development. This study uncovers a novel mechanism by which LTB4 further promotes PAH pathogenesis, beyond its established effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cells, by activating adventitial fibroblasts. PMID:26558820

  6. Surgical Treatment of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE), also referred to as pulmonary endarterectomy, is the definitive treatment for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The true incidence of CTEPH is unknown and difficult to ascertain; however, most experts agree that approximately 4% to 5% of all patients who have an acute episode of pulmonary embolism (PE) will continue to develop CTEPH. Based on an incidence rate of about 0.1% for acute PE, this translates into a CTEPH incidence of approximately 10,000 to 15,000 annually in the United States alone. Furthermore, there are patients with CTEPH who have no history of prior PE or deep vein thrombosis, adding to the estimated number. Despite these facts, the disease remains significantly underdiagnosed, and currently there are only about 300 PTEs performed nationwide, the majority of which are done at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Health System. The technical aspects of the procedure can be somewhat challenging and require meticulous and complete dissection of the entire pulmonary vascular tree, with the patient under profound hypothermic circulatory arrest. However, the determination of true CTEPH patients and those who would benefit from surgery can also be challenging and relies heavily on the experience of the CTEPH team. In this article, we will highlight some key points about the disease and describe the surgical techniques of PTE. PMID:28289496

  7. [Pulmonary hypertension in pediatric heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Falcone, N

    2001-12-01

    Congenital heart disease can increase or decrease pulmonary blood flow, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) or pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). PAP is the product of PVR and pulmonary minute volume (Qp), such that pulmonary hypertension (PHT) may develop as a result of an increase in either PVR or Qp or both. Given that the pulmonary vascular bed is a low pressure system with high flow, any increase in resistance would generate PHT. The normal value of PVR is 2 Woods units (mm Hg/l/min). Increased PAP is due to hypoxic lesions of the endothelium, which release proteolytic enzymes that alter the balance of metabolites of arachidonic acid, regulators of pulmonary vasomotor tone. Hypoxia and acidosis cause intense pulmonary vasoconstriction (hypoxic vasoconstrictor reflex). An increase of PVR is due to a combination of vasoconstrictive processes and remodeling, with hypertrophy of the pulmonary artery. Structural lesions are related to hypertrophy of the endothelium, the transformation of fibroblasts to myocytes and the decrease of the alveolar/arteriolar ratio with the formation of new vessels.PHT may be primary or secondary to another disease. Primary PHT is a rare genetic disease. The most common secondary forms of PHT in pediatrics are due to persistence of neonatal anatomy (neonatal PHT), to heart diseases with left-right shunt (CIV, DAP, etc.), to diseases of the pulmonary parenchyma (interstitial viral infection, mucoviscidosis), and complications of heart surgery. All congenital heart diseases can lead to PHT if not treated promptly. Clinical signs of PHT are highly non-specific: dyspnea, fatigue, syncopes, exercise intolerance, precordialgia, cyanosis and edema. The best approaches to diagnosis and prognosis are echocardiography and cardiac catheterization with vasodilators. Anesthetics that do not alter PVR should be used in such patients, who are sensitive to changes in pulmonary ventilation, to changes in cardiac output and to anesthetics. The treatment of

  8. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sakkijha, Husam; Idrees, Majdy M

    2014-07-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertension and chronic lung disease and made general guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management. In this article, we will provide a detailed revision about the new classification and give general recommendations about the management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

  9. [Pulmonary hypertension : What is new in therapy?].

    PubMed

    Sommer, N; Hecker, M; Tello, K; Richter, M; Liebetrau, C; Weigand, M A; Seeger, W; Ghofrani, A; Gall, H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a group of pulmonary vascular diseases that are characterized by progressive exertional dyspnea and right heart insufficiency ultimately resulting in right heart decompensation. The classification is into five clinical subgroups that form the absolutely essential basis for decisions on the indications for different pharmacological and non-pharmacological forms of treatment. The guidelines were updated in 2015 and in addition to the hitherto existing pharmacological treatment options of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists and prostacyclins, the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat has now been incorporated for treatment of certain forms of PH. This article provides an overview of the new treatment recommendations in the current guidelines, e. g. for PH patients who are in intensive care units due to surgical interventions or progressive right heart insufficiency.

  10. Developing treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Developing new treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a challenge. We have enjoyed success with regulatory approvals for three drug classes—prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. But we have also seen some disappointing results, for example, from studies with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, statins and tergolide. Animal models are an unreliable predictor of efficacy in humans. The best model for the disease is the patient. This review discusses three major issues facing the evaluation of drugs in PAH patients—target validation, choosing the right dose, and early trial design. PMID:23662193

  11. "Nocturnal seizures" in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Anthony; McSweeney, Julia; Kulik, Thomas; Khatwa, Umakanth; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-10-15

    The usual differential diagnoses of nocturnal events in children include parasomnias, nocturnal seizures, nocturnal reflux (Sandifer syndrome), hypnic jerks, periodic limb movements of sleep, and sleep disordered breathing. We report a previously healthy young girl who presented to the sleep clinic for evaluation of nocturnal events which were diagnosed as medically refractory nocturnal seizures. It was not until a syncopal event occurred in the daytime, which prompted referral for cardiac evaluation, the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hyper-tension (IPAH) was made. Sleep physicians should consider IPAH in the differential diagnosis of nocturnal events in children.

  12. [Anticoagulation therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima

    2008-11-01

    Vascular thrombosis implicates in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Anticoagulation therapy (warfarin) has been recommended by many experts in the treatment of PAH. However, the long-term effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy remains controversial. Because of the various drugs, such as epoprostenol, bosentan, and sildenafil, for the treatment of PAH recently, warfarin alone is not a realistic therapy for PAH. Accordingly we reviewed the previous manuscript regarding anticoagulation therapy for PAH, and looked at the current role of anticoagulation therapy in Japan.

  13. Pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Isabel S; Fares, Wassim H

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a hemodynamic and pathophysiologic state that can be found in multiple conditions with associated symptoms of dyspnea, decreased exercise tolerance, and progression to right heart failure. The World Health Organization has classified PH into five groups. The first group is pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which can be idiopathic, heritable, due to drugs and toxins, or associated with conditions such as connective tissue diseases, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, and others. The development of PAH is believed to result from smooth muscle cells and endothelial dysfunction that impairs production of vasodilators, including nitric oxide and prostacyclin. The importance of distinguishing this group from the other groups of PH is that there are PAH-specific drugs that target the molecular pathways that are pathogenic in the vascular derangements, leading to arterial hypertension, which should not be used in the other forms of PH. Other groups of PH include PH due to left heart disease, lung disease, chronic thromboembolic disease, as well as a miscellaneous category. Echocardiography is used to screen for PH and has varying sensitivity and specificity in detecting PH. Additionally, the right heart pressures estimated during echocardiogram often differ from those obtained during confirmatory testing with right heart catheterization. The most challenging PH diagnosis is in a case that does not fit one group of PH, but meets criteria that overlap between several groups. This also makes the treatment challenging because each group of PH is managed differently. This review provides an overview of the five groups of PH and discusses the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of each. PMID:26316767

  14. Management of a child with pulmonary arterial hypertension presenting with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Flores, Saul; Daily, Joshua; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Cash, Michelle C; Hirsch, Russel

    2016-02-01

    We describe the course and management of a 12-year-old girl with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who initially presented with severe systemic hypertension. Successful therapy included pulmonary vasodilators and an atrial septostomy, while ensuring adequate maintenance of her systemic vascular resistance to maintain cardiac output. Clear understanding of the physiology and judicious medical management in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension using extreme compensatory mechanisms is vitally important.

  15. Drug Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension in Children

    PubMed Central

    Vorhies, Erika E; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease in infants and children that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The disease is characterized by progressive pulmonary vascular functional and structural changes resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance and eventual right heart failure and death. In the majority of pediatric patients, PAH is idiopathic or associated with congenital heart disease and rarely is associated with other conditions such as connective tissue or thromboembolic disease. Although treatment of the underlying disease and reversal of advanced structural changes has not yet been achieved with current therapy, quality of life and survival have been improved significantly. Targeted pulmonary vasodilator therapies, including endothelin receptor antagonists, prostacyclin analogues and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have demonstrated hemodynamic and functional improvement in children. The management of pediatric PAH remains challenging as treatment decisions continue to depend largely on results from evidence-based adult studies and the clinical experience of pediatric experts. This article reviews the current drug therapies and their use in the management of PAH in children. PMID:24114695

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Caminati, Antonella; Cassandro, Roberto; Harari, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. The degree of PH in ILDs is typically mild-to-moderate. However, some of these patients may develop a disproportionate increase in PH that cannot be justified solely by hypoxia and parenchymal injury: this condition has been termed "out-of-proportion" PH. The pathogenesis of PH in these diseases is various, incompletely understood and may be multifactorial. The clinical suspicion (i.e. increased dyspnoea, low diffusion capacity) and echocardiographic assessment are the first steps towards proper diagnosis of PH; however, right heart catheterisation remains the current gold standard for diagnosis of PH. At present, no specific therapies have been approved for the treatment of PH in patients with ILDs.

  17. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John; Dasgupta, Asish; Huston, Jessica; Chen, Kuang-Huieh; Archer, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an idiopathic cardiopulmonary disease characterized by obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by excessive proliferation and apoptosis-resistance of vascular cells, as well as inflammation, thrombosis and vasoconstriction. Vascular obstruction increases the afterload faced by the right ventricle (RV), leading to RV failure. The proliferative, obstructive vasculopathy of PAH shares several mitochondrial abnormalities with cancer, notably a shift to aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondria in the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) normally serve as oxygen sensors. In PAH, acquired mitochondrial abnormalities, including epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disrupt oxygen sensing creating a pseudo-hypoxic environment characterized by normoxic activation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α). The resulting metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg phenomenon) reflects inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases. In addition, altered mitochondrial dynamics result in mitochondrial fragmentation. The molecular basis of this structural change includes upregulation and activation of fission mediators, notably dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP-1), and downregulation of fusion mediators, especially mitofusin-2 (MFN2). These pathogenic mitochondrial abnormalities offer new therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mitotic fission or enhancement of fusion in PAH PASMC slows cell proliferation, causes cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis. DRP-1 inhibition or MFN2 gene therapy can regress PAH in experimental models of PAH. This review focuses on the etiology of mitochondrial fragmentation in PAH and explores the therapeutic implications of mitochondrial dynamics in the pulmonary vasculature and RV. PMID:25672499

  18. Tadalafil as treatment for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Adriana Castro; Hovnanian, André Luiz; Fernandes, Caio Julio César dos Santos; Lapa, Mônica; Jardim, Carlos; Souza, Rogério

    2006-11-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors like sildenafil have already been shown to improve functional capacity and hemodynamics in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Few studies address the effects of new phosphodiesterase inhibitors as tadalafil. We report a case of a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in functional class IV (New York Heart Association) with significant response to treatment with tadalafil.

  19. Multifactorial Etiology Pulmonary Hypertension in a Patient with Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucas Vinícius da Fonseca, Barreto; Felipe Naze Rodrigues, Cavalcante; Joselina Luzia Menezes, Oliveira; Marcos Antônio, Almeida-Santos; José Augusto Soares, Barreto-Filho; Antônio Carlos Sobral, Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between pre- and postcapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with diastolic heart failure (DHF) is a challenge in clinical practice. The presence of PH is implicated in worse prognosis in patients with this disease. This case report approaches the process of investigation of pulmonary hypertension in adult patient with DHF, double mitral lesion, and sarcoidosis with poor clinical outcome. PMID:27800190

  20. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  1. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: Pearls and Pitfalls of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Humna Abid; Lin, C. Huie; Guha, Ashrith

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by chronic obstruction of major pulmonary arteries by organized thromboembolic material. Untreated CTEPH can result in pulmonary hypertension and eventually right heart failure, yet it is the only form of pulmonary hypertension that is potentially curable with surgical or catheter-based intervention. While early diagnosis is key to increasing the likelihood of successful treatment, CTEPH remains largely underdiagnosed. This article reviews the role of echocardiogram, ventilation/perfusion scan, and other available modalities in the diagnosis of CTEPH. PMID:28289494

  2. Pulmonary hypertension associated with lung diseases and hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension that develops in the setting of underlying lung diseases such as COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is associated with decreased functional status, worsening hypoxemia and quality of life, and increased mortality. This complication of lung disease is complex in its origin and carries a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic issues. This review attempts to provide an overview of mechanisms associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension in COPD and IPF, touches on appropriate evaluation, and reviews the state of knowledge on treating pulmonary hypertension related to underlying lung disease.

  3. Overview of current therapeutic approaches for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, Jason A.; Risbano, Michael G.; Mathier, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    There have been tremendous strides in the management of pulmonary hypertension over the past 20 years with the introduction of targeted medical therapies and overall improvements in surgical treatment options and general supportive care. Furthermore, recent data shows that the survival of those with pulmonary arterial hypertension is improving. While there has been tremendous progress, much work remains to be done in improving the care of those with secondary forms of pulmonary hypertension, who constitute the majority of patients with this disorder, and in the optimal treatment approach in those with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This article will review general and targeted medical treatment, along with surgical interventions, of those with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22034603

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Werner; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, Simon; Martinez, Fernando J; Semigran, Marc J; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol U; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-24

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and sarcoidosis, are associated with a high incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is linked with exercise limitation and a worse prognosis. Patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are particularly prone to the development of PH. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization are the principal modalities for the diagnosis of COPD and DPLD. For discrimination between group 1 PH patients with concomitant respiratory abnormalities and group 3 PH patients (PH caused by lung disease), patients should be transferred to a center with expertise in both PH and lung diseases for comprehensive evaluation. The task force encompassing the authors of this article provided criteria for this discrimination and suggested using the following definitions for group 3 patients, as exemplified for COPD, IPF, and CPFE: COPD/IPF/CPFE without PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP] <25 mm Hg); COPD/IPF/CPFE with PH (mPAP ≥25 mm Hg); PH-COPD, PH-IPF, and PH-CPFE); COPD/IPF/CPFE with severe PH (mPAP ≥35 mm Hg or mPAP ≥25 mm Hg with low cardiac index [CI <2.0 l/min/m(2)]; severe PH-COPD, severe PH-IPF, and severe PH-CPFE). The "severe PH group" includes only a minority of chronic lung disease patients who are suspected of having strong general vascular abnormalities (remodeling) accompanying the parenchymal disease and with evidence of an exhausted circulatory reserve rather than an exhausted ventilatory reserve underlying the limitation of exercise capacity. Exertional dyspnea disproportionate to pulmonary function tests, low carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and rapid decline of arterial oxygenation upon exercise are typical clinical features of this subgroup with poor prognosis. Studies evaluating the effect of pulmonary arterial hypertension drugs currently not approved for group 3 PH patients should focus on

  5. [Pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Werner; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, Simon; Martinez, Fernando J; Semigran, Marc J; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol U; Vachiéy, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and sarcoidosis, are associated with a high incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is linked with exercise limitation and a worse prognosis. Patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are particularly prone to the development of PH. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization are the principal modalities for the diagnosis of COPD and DPLD. For discrimination between group 1 PH patients with concomitant respiratory abnormalities and group 3 PH patients (PH caused by lung disease), patients should be transferred to a center with expertise in both PH and lung diseases for comprehensive evaluation. The task force encompassing the .authors of this article provided criteria for this discrimination and suggested using the following definitions for group 3 patients, as exemplified for COPD, IPF, and CPFE: COPD/IPF/CPFE without PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP]<25mmHg); COPD/IPF/CPFE with PH (mPAP25mmHg); PH-COPD, PH-IPF, and PH-CPFE); COPD/IPF/CPFE with severe PH (mPAP 35 mmHg or mPAP 25 mmHg with low cardiac index [CI <2.0.l/min/m2]; severe PH-COPD, severe PH-IPF, and severe PH-CPFE). The "severe PH group" includes only a minority of chronic lung disease patients who are suspected of having strong general vascular abnormalities (remodeling) accompanying the parenchymal disease and with evidence of an exhausted circulatory reserve rather than an exhausted ventilatory reserve underlying the limitation of exercise capacity. Exertional dyspnea disproportionate to pulmonary function tests, low carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and rapid decline of arterial oxygenation upon exercise are typical clinical features of this subgroup with poor prognosis. Studies evaluating the effect of pulmonary arterial hypertension drugs currently not approved for group 3 PH patients should focus on this severe PH group

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: current theories of pathogenesis and their implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J; Levy, R; Churg, A

    2005-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic sign in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), affecting both mortality and quality of life. Although pulmonary hypertension in COPD is traditionally viewed as a result of emphysematous destruction of the vascular bed and/or hypoxia, recent studies indicate that neither of these factors correlates very well with pulmonary artery pressures. New human and animal experimental data are beginning to show that pulmonary hypertension in this setting is probably a result of the direct effect of tobacco smoke on the intrapulmonary vessels with abnormal production of mediators that control vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, and vascular cell proliferation, ultimately leading to aberrant vascular remodelling and aberrant vascular physiology. These changes are in many ways similar to those seen in other forms of pulmonary hypertension and suggest that the treatments used for primary pulmonary hypertension may be beneficial in patients with COPD. PMID:15994270

  7. Treatment-Related Biomarkers in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Aparna C.; Dusek, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) over the last two decades have led to the introduction of multiple classes of oral therapy, but the disease remains devastating for many patients. Disease progression, in spite of oral monotherapy, is a major problem, and alternative therapy, such as infusion of prostacyclins, is cumbersome and carries considerable potential morbidity. Use of combination oral therapy, including drugs from both the endothelin receptor antagonist and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor classes, has increased, and there is some evidence to support this approach. Given the multiple options now available in pulmonary hypertension (PH) therapy, biomarkers to guide treatment decisions could be helpful. Here, we review the evidence for and against the clinical use of molecular biomarkers relevant to PH pathogenesis, emphasizing assayable markers that may also inform more rational selection of agents that influence pathways targeted by treatment. We emphasize the interactive nature of changes in mediators and messengers, such as endothelin-1, prostacyclin, brain natriuretic peptide (which has demonstrated biomarker utility), nitric oxide derivatives, and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which play important roles in processes central to progression of PAH, such as vascular remodeling, vasoconstriction, and maladaptive right ventricular changes, and are relevant to its therapy. Accordingly, we propose that the identification and use of a molecular biomarker panel that assays these molecules in parallel and serially might, if validated, better inform unique patient phenotypes, prognosis, and the rational selection and titration of combination oral and other therapy in individual patients with PH/PAH. PMID:25611885

  8. Large animal model of chronic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hitoshi; Hall, Candice M; Griffith, Grant W; Johnson, Kent F; McGillicuddy, John W; Bartlett, Robert H; Cook, Keith E

    2008-01-01

    A large animal model is needed to study artificial lung attachment in a setting simulating chronic lung disease with significant pulmonary hypertension (PH). This study sought to create a sheep model that develops significant PH within 60 days with a low rate of mortality. Sephadex beads were injected in the pulmonary circulation of sheep every other day for 60 days at doses of 0.5, 0.75, and 1 g (n = 10, 10, 7). Mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and cardiac output were obtained every 2 weeks. In the 0.5, 0.75, and 1-g groups, 90, 70, and 14.3% of sheep completed the study, respectively, with the remainder experiencing heart failure. By the 60th day, pulmonary vascular resistance had increased (p < 0.01) from 0.89 +/- 0.3 to 3.2 +/- 0.9 mm Hg/(L/min) and from 0.9 +/- 0.3 to 4.3 +/- 3.2 mm Hg/(L/min) in the 0.5 and 0.75-g groups, respectively. Significant right ventricular hypertrophy was observed in the 0.75-g group but not in the 0.5-g group. Data from the 1-g group were insufficient for analysis due to high mortality. Thus, the 0.5 and 0.75-g groups generate significant PH, but the 0.75-g group is a better model of chronic PH in lung disease due to the development of right ventricular hypertrophy.

  9. Vascular lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wakaki, K; Koizumi, F; Fukase, M

    1984-05-01

    An autopsy case with SLE suffering from Raynaud's phenomenon and pulmonary hypertension was reported. Histological examinations revealed systemically marked fibrous intimal thickening of arteries and arterioles with or without thrombus throughout the whole body, especially of the pulmonary arteries and arterioles. Pulmonary arterial changes in the present case were compared with those in 52 autopsied cases with SLE without pulmonary hypertension, but there were no cases with such marked arterial changes as the present case. In addition, the incidence of pulmonary thrombosis was significantly higher in the cases with Raynaud's phenomenon than the cases without this phenomenon. However, the relation between pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud's phenomenon, pulmonary thrombosis, fibrous pericarditis, or type of lupus nephritis in SLE could not be clarified with a significant difference.

  10. [Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:D100-8) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need.

  12. [Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Fraisse, A; Habib, G

    2004-08-01

    Treatment strategies for pulmonary hypertension in children have dramatically evolved. Traditional therapy with calcium channel blockers and pulmonary transplantation is only indicated in selected patients and does not reduce mortality very significantly. New pulmonary vasodilators are emerging from recent trials in the adult population. Their indications are based on the patient's NYHA classification. The epoprostenol (prostacyclin, Flolan) has shown reduction in mortality and improvement in functional symptoms in pediatric patients. The frequent side effects and continuous intravenous infusion limit the indication of prostacyclin in NYHA class IV children. The endothelin receptor blocker bosentan (Tracleer) is an orally given agent. It improves functional symptoms in adults and hemodynamic measures in children. It can be started in children with moderate functional symptoms (NYHA class II and III). The type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil (Viagra) is being evaluated and may represent a promising therapy in the future. Invasive strategies like catheter-based atrial septostomy may be useful in particular cases. Randomized-controlled studies are urgently needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these new therapies.

  13. Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Keszler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is often secondary to parenchymal lung disease (such as meconium aspiration syndrome) or lung hypoplasia (with congenital diaphragmatic hernia) but can also be idiopathic. PPHN is characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, resulting in right-to-left shunting of blood and hypoxemia. The diagnosis of PPHN is based on clinical evidence of labile hypoxemia often associated with differential cyanosis and confirmed by echocardiography. Lung volume recruitment with optimal use of positive end-expiratory pressure or mean airway pressure and/or surfactant is very important in secondary PPHN due to parenchymal lung disease. Other management strategies include optimal oxygenation, avoiding respiratory and metabolic acidosis, blood pressure stabilization, sedation, and pulmonary vasodilator therapy. Failure of these measures leads to consideration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, although this rescue therapy is needed less frequently with advances in medical management. Randomized clinical trials with long-term follow-up are required to evaluate various therapeutic strategies in PPHN. PMID:26783388

  14. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinay; Berkelhamer, Sara; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in right-to-left shunting of blood and hypoxemia. PPHN is often secondary to parenchymal lung disease (such as meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia or respiratory distress syndrome) or lung hypoplasia (with congenital diaphragmatic hernia or oligohydramnios) but can also be idiopathic. The diagnosis of PPHN is based on clinical evidence of labile hypoxemia often associated with differential cyanosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by the echocardiographic demonstration of - (a) right-to-left or bidirectional shunt at the ductus or foramen ovale and/or, (b) flattening or leftward deviation of the interventricular septum and/or, (c) tricuspid regurgitation, and finally (d) absence of structural heart disease. Management strategies include optimal oxygenation, avoiding respiratory and metabolic acidosis, blood pressure stabilization, sedation and pulmonary vasodilator therapy. Failure of these measures would lead to consideration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO); however decreased need for this rescue therapy has been documented with advances in medical management. While trends also note improved survival, long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities such as deafness and learning disabilities remain a concern in many infants with severe PPHN. Funded by: 1R01HD072929-0 (SL).

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Failure in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Susan R; Kabrhel, Christopher; Channick, Richard N

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a hemodynamic condition, defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure by right-sided heart catheterization of at least 25 mm Hg at rest. It is classified into 5 general groups based on the underlying cause, with left ventricular failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being 2 of the most common causes in the United States. Although the specifics of the pathophysiology will vary with the cause, appreciating the risks of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure is critical to appropriately evaluating and resuscitating pulmonary hypertension patients in the emergency department (ED). Patients may present to the ED with complaints related to pulmonary hypertension or unrelated ones, but this condition will affect all aspects of care. Exertional dyspnea is the most common symptom attributable to pulmonary hypertension, but the latter should be considered in any ED patient with unexplained dyspnea on exertion, syncope, or signs of right ventricular dysfunction. Patients with right ventricular failure are often volume overloaded, and careful volume management is imperative, especially in the setting of hypotension. Vasopressors and inotropes, rather than fluid boluses, are often required in shock to augment cardiac output and reduce the risk of exacerbating right ventricular ischemia. Intubation should be avoided if possible, although hypoxemia and hypercapnia may also worsen right-sided heart function. Emergency physicians should appreciate the role of pulmonary vasodilators in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and recognize that patients receiving these medications may rapidly develop right ventricular failure and even death without these therapies. Patients may require interventions not readily available in the ED, such as a pulmonary artery catheter, inhaled pulmonary vasodilators, and mechanical support with a right ventricular assist device or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Therefore, early

  16. Peripheral airway obstruction in primary pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, F; Ewert, R; Hoeper, M; Olschewski, H; Behr, J; Winkler, J; Wilkens, H; Breuer, C; Kubler, W; Borst, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: As there is controversy about changes in lung function in primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), lung mechanics were assessed with a focus on expiratory airflow in relation to pulmonary haemodynamics. Methods: A cross sectional study was performed in 64 controls and 171 patients with PPH (117 women) of mean (SD) age 45 (13) years, pulmonary artery pressure (PAPmean) 57 (15) mm Hg, and pulmonary vascular resistance 1371 (644) dyne.s/cm5. Results: Mean (SD) total lung capacity was similar in patients with PPH and controls (98 (12)% predicted v 102 (17)% predicted, mean difference –4 (95% confidence interval (CI) –7.89 to –0.11); residual volume (RV) was increased (118 (24)% predicted v 109 (27)% predicted, mean difference 9 (95% CI 1.86 to 16.14); and vital capacity (VC) was decreased (91 (16)% predicted v 102 (10)% predicted, mean difference –11 (95% CI 15.19 to –6.80). RV/TLC was increased (117 (27)% predicted v 97 (29)% predicted, mean difference 20 (95% CI 12.3 to 27.8)) and correlated with PAPmean (r=0.31, p<0.001). In patients with PAPmean above the median of 56 mm Hg, RV/TLC was further increased (125 (32)% predicted v 111 (22)% predicted, mean difference –14 (95% CI –22.2 to –5.8)). Expiratory flow-volume curves were reduced and curvilinear in patients with PPH. Conclusions: Peripheral airway obstruction is common in PPH and is more pronounced in severe disease. This may contribute to symptoms. Reversibility of bronchodilation and relation to exercise capacity need further evaluation. PMID:12037220

  17. Sildenafil citrate for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hrometz, Sandra L; Shields, Kelly M

    2006-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disease that has a high rate of mortality. For these reasons, early treatment is essential. Treatment choices for pulmonary arterial hypertension are limited by drug tolerability, drug cost and inconvenience associated with administration techniques and dosing schedules. Therefore, a therapy that provides oral dosing with limited side effects would prove useful in managing many patients. Sildenafil citrate, the first and highly publicized oral medication to receive approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for erectile dysfunction, has recently been approved for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This review summarizes the normal physiology of the pulmonary vasculature, and the pathophysiology involved in pulmonary arterial hypertension and the role of sildenafil in its treatment.

  18. Recapitulation of developing artery muscularization in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Abdul Q; Lighthouse, Janet K; Greif, Daniel M

    2014-03-13

    Excess smooth muscle accumulation is a key component of many vascular disorders, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and pulmonary artery hypertension, but the underlying cell biological processes are not well defined. In pulmonary artery hypertension, reduced pulmonary artery compliance is a strong independent predictor of mortality, and pathological distal arteriole muscularization contributes to this reduced compliance. We recently demonstrated that embryonic pulmonary artery wall morphogenesis consists of discrete developmentally regulated steps. In contrast, poor understanding of distal arteriole muscularization in pulmonary artery hypertension severely limits existing therapies that aim to dilate the pulmonary vasculature but have modest clinical benefit and do not prevent hypermuscularization. Here, we show that most pathological distal arteriole smooth muscle cells, but not alveolar myofibroblasts, derive from pre-existing smooth muscle. Furthermore, the program of distal arteriole muscularization encompasses smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation, distal migration, proliferation, and then redifferentiation, thereby recapitulating many facets of arterial wall development.

  19. [Pulmonary hypertension: a rare cause of unexplained dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, J L

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by an increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure above 25 mmHg, measured at right heart catheterization. The various conditions (up to 37) leading to PH are described in a clinical classification identifying 5 groups, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). With an incidence of 2-4 cases/million/year, PAH is a rare, rapidly progressive and incurable form or PH. The differential diagnosis of PH relies on a decision tree, which is typically triggered by the presence of unexplained dyspnea and followed by a non invasive approach that includes simple tests such as EKG, chest radiography, pulmonary function tests and echocardiography. Other tests have some value to exclude chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, such as ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy, angio CT scanner and pulmonary angiogram. Finally, right heart catheterization is mandatory to establish the diagnosis of PH.

  20. A Review of Targeted Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Specific Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ataya, Ali; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past two decades have led to the development of targeted therapies and improved patient outcomes. Currently, a broad armamentarium of pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific drugs exists to assist in the treatment of this complex disease state. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive review of the current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, and their supporting evidence for adults, targeting the nitric oxide, soluble guanylate cyclase, endothelin, and prostacyclin pathways. PMID:27929408

  1. A Review of Targeted Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Specific Pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ataya, Ali; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2016-12-06

    Significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past two decades have led to the development of targeted therapies and improved patient outcomes. Currently, a broad armamentarium of pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific drugs exists to assist in the treatment of this complex disease state. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive review of the current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, and their supporting evidence for adults, targeting the nitric oxide, soluble guanylate cyclase, endothelin, and prostacyclin pathways.

  2. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François

    2009-11-01

    Among connective tissue diseases, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is frequently associated with systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PAH is less common in mixed connective tissue diseases and Sjögren's syndrome, and rare in rheumatoid arthritis. PAH in systemic sclerosis may be either isolated (prevalence about 8%) or associated with interstitial lung disease. Echocardiographic screening for PAH is worthwhile in patients with systemic sclerosis, especially as treatments for idiopathic PAH (endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and prostanoids) are effective in this setting. The prevalence of PAH among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is poorly known; immunosuppressive treatment is sometimes effective by itself but most patients benefit from PAH treatment. PAH associated with connective tissue diseases has a worse prognosis than idiopathic PAH.

  3. Prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Crary, Shelley E; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Buchanan, George R

    2011-12-01

    Vascular complications, including pulmonary hypertension (PH), have been reported to occur following splenectomy for various disorders,including hereditary spherocytosis (HS). We performed a prospective cross-sectional study of 36 adults with HS (78% with prior splenectomy)utilizing echocardiography to estimate tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) as well as measurement of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) to screen for PH. No participant with HS hada significantly elevated TRV or NT-proBNP level, despite a median 25-year interval since splenectomy (95% confidence interval for point prevalence 0, 0.097). Although our study was limited by a small sample size, it appears that persons with HS, following splenectomy, appear unlikely to be at significantly increased risk of developing PH to the degree reported for thalassemia and sickle cell disease

  4. Sildenafil in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dhariwal, AK; Bavdekar, SB

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease of varied etiologies. Although PAH has no curative treatment, a greater understanding of pathophysiology, technological advances resulting in early diagnosis, and the availability of several newer drugs have improved the outlook for patients with PAH. Sildenafil is one of the therapeutic agents used extensively in the treatment of PAH in children, as an off-label drug. In 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) issued a warning regarding the of use high-dose sildenafil in children with PAH. This has led to a peculiar situation where there is a paucity of approved therapies for the management of PAH in children and the use of the most extensively used drug being discouraged by the regulator. This article provides a review of the use of sildenafil in the treatment of PAH in children. PMID:26119438

  5. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: changing approaches to management].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, B A; Preobrazhenskiĭ, D V; Batyraliev, T A; Belenkov, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to different aspects of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); new classification of PAH is published in 2010. There are idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with other diseases. Current guidelines recommend to treat PAH only after the verification of diagnosis with right heart catheterization and acute tests with vasodilators. Patients-reactors should be treated with calcium antagonists. The following drugs related to one of three categories should be used in PAH: (1) prostanoids (epoprostenol, iloprost et al.); (2) blockers of endothelin receptors (bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan); (3) phosphodiesterase 5 type inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil et al.) In majority of cases the combined treatment is used, usually the combination of bosentan and sildenafil is used.

  6. Sildenafil in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhariwal, A K; Bavdekar, S B

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease of varied etiologies. Although PAH has no curative treatment, a greater understanding of pathophysiology, technological advances resulting in early diagnosis, and the availability of several newer drugs have improved the outlook for patients with PAH. Sildenafil is one of the therapeutic agents used extensively in the treatment of PAH in children, as an off-label drug. In 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) issued a warning regarding the of use high-dose sildenafil in children with PAH. This has led to a peculiar situation where there is a paucity of approved therapies for the management of PAH in children and the use of the most extensively used drug being discouraged by the regulator. This article provides a review of the use of sildenafil in the treatment of PAH in children.

  7. The right ventricle in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert; Manes, Alessandra

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a right heart failure syndrome. In early-stage PAH, the right ventricle tends to remain adapted to afterload with increased contractility and little or no increase in right heart chamber dimensions. However, less than optimal right ventricular (RV)-arterial coupling may already cause a decreased aerobic exercise capacity by limiting maximum cardiac output. In more advanced stages, RV systolic function cannot remain matched to afterload and dilatation of the right heart chamber progressively develops. In addition, diastolic dysfunction occurs due to myocardial fibrosis and sarcomeric stiffening. All these changes lead to limitation of RV flow output, increased right-sided filling pressures and under-filling of the left ventricle, with eventual decrease in systemic blood pressure and altered systolic ventricular interaction. These pathophysiological changes account for exertional dyspnoea and systemic venous congestion typical of PAH. Complete evaluation of RV failure requires echocardiographic or magnetic resonance imaging, and right heart catheterisation measurements. Treatment of RV failure in PAH relies on: decreasing afterload with drugs targeting pulmonary circulation; fluid management to optimise ventricular diastolic interactions; and inotropic interventions to reverse cardiogenic shock. To date, there has been no report of the efficacy of drug treatments that specifically target the right ventricle.

  8. Metformin Reverses Development of Pulmonary Hypertension via Aromatase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dean, Afshan; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Salt, Ian P; MacLean, Margaret R

    2016-08-01

    Females are more susceptible to pulmonary arterial hypertension than males, although the reasons remain unclear. The hypoglycemic drug, metformin, is reported to have multiple actions, including the inhibition of aromatase and stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Inhibition of aromatase using anastrazole is protective in experimental pulmonary hypertension but whether metformin attenuates pulmonary hypertension through this mechanism remains unknown. We investigated whether metformin affected aromatase activity and if it could reduce the development of pulmonary hypertension in the sugen 5416/hypoxic rat model. We also investigated its influence on proliferation in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Metformin reversed right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and decreased pulmonary vascular remodeling in the rat. Furthermore, metformin increased rat lung AMP-activated protein kinase signaling, decreased lung and circulating estrogen levels, levels of aromatase, the estrogen metabolizing enzyme; cytochrome P450 1B1 and its transcription factor; the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. In human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, metformin decreased proliferation and decreased estrogen synthesis by decreasing aromatase activity through the PII promoter site of Cyp19a1 Thus, we report for the first time that metformin can reverse pulmonary hypertension through inhibition of aromatase and estrogen synthesis in a manner likely to be mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension: a review of pathophysiology and anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a condition that can result in serious complications in patients undergoing any type of anesthesia during the perioperative period. By definition, pulmonary artery hypertension is caused by a persistent rise in mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg with Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mm Hg or exercise mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥35 mm Hg and pulmonary vascular resistance ≥ 3 wood unit's. The severity of the complications depends on the severity of the underlying condition, other comorbidities, and type of procedure, anesthetic technique, and anesthetic drugs. In this article, we briefly review the pulmonary vascular physiology, pathophysiology of the disease, clinical assessment and diagnosis, treatment options, and the anesthetic management of these patients.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension: an update.

    PubMed

    Hoette, Susana; Jardim, Carlos; Souza, Rogério de

    2010-01-01

    Over the last five years, knowledge in the field of pulmonary hypertension has grown consistently and significantly. On the basis of various clinical studies showing the usefulness of new diagnostic tools, as well as the efficacy of new medications and drug combinations, new diagnostic and treatment algorithms have been developed. Likewise, in order to simplify the clinical management of patients, the classification of pulmonary hypertension has been changed in an attempt to group the various forms of pulmonary hypertension in which the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are similar. The objective of this review was to discuss these modifications, based on the 2005 Brazilian guidelines for the management of pulmonary hypertension, emphasizing what has been added to the international guidelines.

  11. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, R.; Fernandez-Infante, B.; Fernandez-Rozas, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking. PMID:9799910

  12. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Golpe, R; Fernandez-Infante, B; Fernandez-Rozas, S

    1998-07-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking.

  13. Pulmonary hypertension associated with diffuse deposition of pentosidine in pulmonary arterioles.

    PubMed

    Munenori, Komoda; Kitazawa, Riko; Makita, Kenji; Yoshida, Keisuke; Takeji, Miyuki; Soga, Yoshiko; Kurata, Mie; Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes induces advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that per se are not only a major cause of oxidative stress but also reduce the plasticity of connective tissue by pathological collagen cross-linking. We describe a case of severe pulmonary hypertension manifesting as a major diabetic complication. Impaired pulmonary arteriolar plasticity attributed to pentosidine, together with increased circulation volume by hyperosmotic pressure and reduction in myocardial compliance by multiple patchy fibrosis, may contribute to the clinical manifestation of severe pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Familial pulmonary hypertension. Evidence of autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P; McRae, C

    1970-01-01

    A patient with primary pulmonary hypertension is the fourth member of a family proven to have the disease. The patient's father married twice; the disease appeared in both families, and was transmitted through two generations. Multiple genetic and environmental factors may result in pulmonary hypertension, but the distribution of cases in this family and in others reported is consistent with the autosomal dominant inheritance of a single genetic trait. PMID:5212347

  15. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R Peter; Ley, Sebastian; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Eberle, Balthasar; Mayer, Eckhard; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Düber, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature. PMID:24083892

  17. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  18. [Pulmonary hypertension from the viewpoint of the pediatric pulmonologist].

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, M; Amacher, A

    1986-11-07

    The main cause of secondary pulmonary hypertension in the view of a pulmonologist is alveolar hypoventilation - eventually potentiated by acidosis and hypercapnia - which leads to reflectory hypoxemic vasoconstriction of the small pulmonary arteries. Anatomic changes in the pulmonary vessels may be absent or may be limited to medial hypertrophy of the arterioles. If the underlying cause of the hypoxia can be corrected, this reflectory pulmonary hypertension is reversible. In diffuse progressive lung disease, interstitial fibrosis with destruction of the alveolar wall and capillaries may occur, leading to restriction of the pulmonary vascular bed. In such cases pulmonary hypertension may not be completely reversible. The most frequent causes of pulmonary hypertension in childhood are obstructive (e.g. Cystic Fibrosis) or restrictive lung diseases (e.g. interstitial fibrosis). Rare but important in the differential diagnosis are upper airway obstruction, thoracic cage deformity, neuromuscular disorders, high altitude and respiratory center dysfunction. The therapy is elimination of the underlying disease or optimal treatment. In addition prophylactic or therapeutic longterm application of oxygen is more efficient than treatment with pulmonary vasodilators or modern substances like Almitrine. Right heart decompensation should be treated by diuretics. The longterm prognosis is dependent of the underlying disease and is poor in a chronic progressive lung disease like cystic fibrosis and certain types of lung fibrosis.

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sanges, Sébastien; Yelnik, Cécile M.; Sitbon, Olivier; Benveniste, Olivier; Mariampillai, Kuberaka; Phillips-Houlbracq, Mathilde; Pison, Christophe; Deligny, Christophe; Inamo, Jocelyn; Cottin, Vincent; Mouthon, Luc; Launay, David; Lambert, Marc; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Rottat, Laurence; Humbert, Marc; Hachulla, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Occurrence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) without extensive interstitial lung disease (ILD) has rarely been described in the medical literature. This study aimed to report all cases with association of PAH and IIM in the French Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) Registry, to identify IIM features associated with the presence of PAH, and to describe treatment modalities of these patients. All cases of IIM-PAH were retrieved from the French PH Registry, which gathers PH patients prospectively enrolled by 27 referral hospital centers across France. Patients were excluded if they had an extensive ILD or overlap syndrome. Characteristics of IIM-PAH patients were compared with a control group of IIM patients without PH. Among the 5223 PH patients in the Registry, 34 had a diagnosis of IIM. Among them, 3 IIM-PAH patients (2 females and 1 male) had no evidence of extensive ILD or overlap syndrome, and were included in this study. In these 3 patients, dermatomyositis (DM) was the only identified IIM. One patient had autoantibodies classically associated with IIM (anti-Ku). PAH had always developed after IIM onset, was severe in all cases, and led to a marked functional impairment. By pooling our cases with 6 patients previously reported in the literature, and comparing them with a control cohort of 35 IIM patients without PH, we identify several IIM characteristics possibly associated with PAH occurrence, including DM subtype (78% vs 46%; P = 0.02), skin involvement (P = 0.04), anti-SSA antibodies (P = 0.05), and peripheral microangiopathy (P = 0.06). Overall, IIM-PAH patients were managed by corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants, either alone or combined with PAH therapy. Patients did not seem to respond to IIM treatment alone. Our study reports for the first time the rare but possible association of PAH and IIM in a large prospective PH Registry. In that setting, PAH seems associated with DM, skin involvement

  20. Prostanoid therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, David B; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Delcroix, Marion; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Olschewski, Horst; Sitbon, Olivier; Barst, Robyn J

    2004-06-16

    Prostanoids have played a prominent role in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Several compounds and methods of administration have been studied: chronic intravenously infused epoprostenol, chronic subcutaneously infused treprostinil, inhaled iloprost, and oral beraprost. Chronic intravenous epoprostenol therapy has had a substantial impact on the clinical management of patients with severe PAH. It improves exercise capacity, hemodynamics, and survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). It also improves exercise capacity and hemodynamics in patients with PAH occurring in association with scleroderma. The complexity of epoprostenol therapy (chronic indwelling catheters, reconstitution of the drug, operation of the infusion pump, and others) has led to attempts to develop other prostanoids with simpler modes of delivery. Treprostinil, a stable prostacyclin analogue with a half-life of 3 h, has been developed for subcutaneous delivery. It has beneficial effects on exercise and hemodynamics, which depend somewhat on the dose achieved. This, in turn, is determined by the patient's ability to tolerate the drug's side effects, including pain and erythema at the infusion site. Inhaled iloprost therapy may provide selectivity of the hemodynamic effects to the lung vasculature, thus avoiding systemic side effects. In a randomized and controlled trial, iloprost resulted in improvement in a combined end point incorporating the New York Heart Association functional class, 6-min walk test, and deterioration or death. Beraprost is the first orally active prostacyclin analogue. In the first of two randomized controlled trials, beraprost increased exercise capacity in patients with IPAH, with no significant changes in subjects with associated conditions. Hemodynamics did not change significantly, and no difference in survival was detected between the two treatment groups. The second study showed that beraprost-treated patients

  1. MicroRNAs and mesenchymal stem cells: hope for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaowei; Fang, Zhenfei; Hu, Xinqun; Zhou, Shenghua

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a devastating and refractory disease and there is no cure for this disease. Recently, microRNAs and mesenchymal stem cells emerged as novel methods to treat pulmonary hypertension. More than 20 kinds of microRNAs may participate in the process of pulmonary hypertension. It seems microRNAs or mesenchymal stem cells can ameliorate some symptoms of pulmonary hypertension in animals and even improve heart and lung function during pulmonary hypertension. Nevertheless, the relationship between mesenchymal stem cells, microRNAs and pulmonary hypertension is not clear. And the mechanisms underlying their function still need to be investigated. In this study we review the recent findings in mesenchymal stem cells - and microRNAs-based pulmonary hypertension treatment, focusing on the potential role of microRNAs regulated mesenchymal stem cells in pulmonary hypertension and the role of exosomes between mesenchymal stem cells and pulmonary hypertension.

  2. MicroRNAs and mesenchymal stem cells: hope for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhaowei; Fang, Zhenfei; Hu, Xinqun; Zhou, Shenghua

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a devastating and refractory disease and there is no cure for this disease. Recently, microRNAs and mesenchymal stem cells emerged as novel methods to treat pulmonary hypertension. More than 20 kinds of microRNAs may participate in the process of pulmonary hypertension. It seems microRNAs or mesenchymal stem cells can ameliorate some symptoms of pulmonary hypertension in animals and even improve heart and lung function during pulmonary hypertension. Nevertheless, the relationship between mesenchymal stem cells, microRNAs and pulmonary hypertension is not clear. And the mechanisms underlying their function still need to be investigated. In this study we review the recent findings in mesenchymal stem cells - and microRNAs-based pulmonary hypertension treatment, focusing on the potential role of microRNAs regulated mesenchymal stem cells in pulmonary hypertension and the role of exosomes between mesenchymal stem cells and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26313730

  3. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Serino, G; Giacomazzi, F

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is definited by a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) >25 mmHg at rest. The Dana Point 2008 Revised Classification System represents the most recent classification system update with respect of various etiologies of PH. About 10 % of adolescents or adults with uncorrected congenital heart disease (CHD) with left-to-right shunt and high pulmonary blood flow develop Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) . Progressive vascular remodeling and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) may ultimately lead to reversal of the shunt (pulmonary to systemic) causing cyanosis and determining the so-called Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES). Recent advances in the early diagnosis and medical targeted treatment of adult patients with CHD-PAH and ES can improve PAP, PVR and exercise tolerance, together with NYHA Class and survival, and may potentially reverse the vascular remodeling process in selected patients.

  4. Genetics and genomics of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Soubrier, Florent; Chung, Wendy K; Machado, Rajiv; Grünig, Ekkehard; Aldred, Micheala; Geraci, Mark; Loyd, James E; Elliott, C Gregory; Trembath, Richard C; Newman, John H; Humbert, Marc

    2013-12-24

    Major discoveries have been obtained within the last decade in the field of hereditary predisposition to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Among them, the identification of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) as the major predisposing gene and activin A receptor type II-like kinase-1 (ACVRL1, also known as ALK1) as the major gene when PAH is associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. The mutation detection rate for the known genes is approximately 75% in familial PAH, but the mutation shortfall remains unexplained even after careful molecular investigation of these genes. To identify additional genetic variants predisposing to PAH, investigators harnessed the power of next-generation sequencing to successfully identify additional genes that will be described in this report. Furthermore, common genetic predisposing factors for PAH can be identified by genome-wide association studies and are detailed in this paper. The careful study of families and routine genetic diagnosis facilitated natural history studies based on large registries of PAH patients to be set up in different countries. These longitudinal or cross-sectional studies permitted the clinical characterization of PAH in mutation carriers to be accurately described. The availability of molecular genetic diagnosis has opened up a new field for patient care, including genetic counseling for a severe disease, taking into account that the major predisposing gene has a highly variable penetrance between families. Molecular information can be drawn from the genomic study of affected tissues in PAH, in particular, pulmonary vascular tissues and cells, to gain insight into the mechanisms leading to the development of the disease. High-throughput genomic techniques, on the basis of next-generation sequencing, now allow the accurate quantification and analysis of ribonucleic acid, species, including micro-ribonucleic acids, and allow for a genome-wide investigation of epigenetic or

  5. [Inhaled iloprost, a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Clinical evidence from its use in perioperative pulmonary hypertension cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Telona-Fermán, Eslí; Barragán-García, Rodolfo; Calderón-Abbo, Moisés Cutiel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled iloprost is one of the most recent drugs from prostanoids group's in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. His place in pulmonary hypertension seen in the perioperative cardiovascular surgery has not been defined. In this review we analyze pulmonary hypertension group's susceptibles of cardiac surgery and its importance, besides the current clinical evidence from drug use in this context.

  6. World Health Organization Group I Pulmonary Hypertension: Epidemiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Prins, Kurt W; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a debilitating disease characterized by pathologic remodeling of the resistance pulmonary arteries, ultimately leading to right ventricular (RV) failure and death. In this article we discuss the definition of PAH, the initial epidemiology based on the National Institutes of Health Registry, and the updated epidemiology gleaned from contemporary registries, pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular dysfunction and proliferation, and RV failure in PAH.

  7. Inhaled iloprost for therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Ralf; Gläser, Sven; Bollmann, Tom; Schäper, Christoph

    2011-04-01

    Iloprost (Ventavis, Bayer Schering Pharma, Germany) is a synthetic prostacyclin that is used in its inhalative form for the therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Long-term therapy can increase exercise capacity and quality of life. The use of modern nebulizers especially designed for the administration of iloprost guarantees the pulmonary deposition of the required doses and systematically minimizes side effects. Regarding existing data, inhalative iloprost acts in effective and safe combination with other classes of medication; indeed, such combination therapy is frequently necessary in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  8. Nitric oxide-sensitive pulmonary hypertension in congenital rubella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Migliaro, Fiorella; Di Pietro, Elisa; Borgia, Francesco; Rapacciuolo, Antonio; Capasso, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a very rare presentation of congenital virus infection. We discuss the case of complete congenital rubella syndrome presenting at echocardiography with pulmonary hypertension that worsened after ductus ligation. Cardiac catheterization showed a normal pulmonary valve and vascular tree but a PAP = 40 mmHg. The infant promptly responded to inhaled nitric oxide while on mechanical ventilation and was later shifted to oral sildenafil. It is not clear whether our observation may be due to direct viral damage to the endothelium or to the rubella virus increasing the vascular tone via a metabolic derangement.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with hematological disorders following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Meera, V; Jijina, Farah

    2009-06-01

    Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was studied by echocardiography and Doppler in 43 splenectomized patients with various disorders 1-20 years after splenectomy. Pulmonary arterial hypertension was detected only in thalassemia major, intermedia, hereditary sphereocytosis and myelofibrosis groups comprising a total of 21 patients. Six patients out of 21 was found to have PAH with mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 46.28 ± 28.17 mm of Hg. Twenty-one controls having similar duration and type of disease also were assessed for PAH in this case control study 3/21 had pulmonary arterial hypertension in this control group. The difference in number of patients showing pulmonary hypertension between case and control was not statistically significant (Chi square test P=0.29) though the difference in pulmonary arterial pressure between case and control were significantly different (t test P<0.0029) with control group showing a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 ± 19 mm Hg.Platelet count in the splenectomized group was significantly higher (P=0.0029) than the controls. Pulmonary thromboembolism was equally high in the PAH patients with and without splenectomy. Patients undergoing splenectomy due to trauma, immune thrombocytopenia, sideroblastic anemia, extrahepatic portal hypertension, autoimmune hemolytic anemia did not show PAH after splenectomy even years after the procedure PAH following splenectomy is common after certain disorders and control patients in these diseases have tendency to develop PAH even without splenectomy. Pulmonary thromboembolism may be an important pathophysiological mechanism leading to this condition. Patients having hemolytic anemia and myelofibrosis should have regular evaluation of pulmonary arterial pressure whether he/she has been splenectomized or not.This is particularly important as availability of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as sildenafil allows one to manage these cases.

  10. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients.

  11. Left main bronchus compression due to main pulmonary artery dilatation in pulmonary hypertension: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jaijee, Shareen K; Ariff, Ben; Howard, Luke; O'Regan, Declan P; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Davies, Rachel; Gibbs, J Simon R

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial dilatation associated with pulmonary hypertension may result in significant compression of local structures. Left main coronary artery and left recurrent laryngeal nerve compression have been described. Tracheobronchial compression from pulmonary arterial dilatation is rare in adults, and there are no reports in the literature of its occurrence in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Compression in infants with congenital heart disease has been well described. We report 2 cases of tracheobronchial compression: first, an adult patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension who presents with symptomatic left main bronchus compression, and second, an adult patient with Eisenmenger ventricular septal defect and right-sided aortic arch, with progressive intermedius and right middle lobe bronchi compression in association with enlarged pulmonary arteries.

  12. Pulmonary artery haemodynamic properties in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tao; Zhang, Guan-xin; Li, Bai-lin; Zhong, Keng; Xu, Zhi-yun; Han, Lin

    2012-12-01

    We sought to explore the pulmonary haemodynamic changes in rheumatic mitral stenosis patients with secondary pulmonary hypertension. The pulmonary artery resistance and compliance of 35 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis and 12 controls without cardiopulmonary vascular disease were evaluated by using an improved method, which is based on making calculations with parameters obtained from right heart catheterisation. The results are as follows: (1) pulmonary artery compliance in patients with secondary pulmonary hypertension was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.01); (2) linear correlation analyses showed that preoperative mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) closely correlated with zero-pressure compliance in the mitral stenosis group (r=-0.745, P<0.05); (3) PAP and pulmonary vascular resistance decreased significantly in both groups with mitral stenosis after infusing 0.5 μg kg(-1) min(-1) of sodium nitroprusside (P<0.01). The pulmonary zero pressure compliance and mean pressure compliance increased significantly in the group with mild pulmonary hypertension; whereas in the severe group, the mean compliance changed with significance as the mPAP decreased (1.51 ± 0.59 vs 1.81 ± 0.77 ml/mmHg), however no significant change occurred in the pulmonary zero pressure compliance (2.35 ± 1.24 ml/mmHg vs. 2.24 ± 1.53 ml/mmHg, P>0.05) The walls of pulmonary artery vessels in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to rheumatic mitral stenosis appeared to be remodelled by varying degrees as indicated by their haemodynamic properties. Structural remodelling may be a factor affecting preoperative pulmonary artery pressure. Mitral stenosis patients with severe pulmonary hypertension have significantly lower responses to sodium nitroprusside possibly due to aggradation and deposition of collagen in the artery walls, decreasing constriction and dilation, or atrophy of smooth muscle cells.

  13. Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Stephen C.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic sclerosis is commonly complicated by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SSc) and is a leading cause of death in this population. We will review existing challenges and recent advances in the treatment of this disease. Recent findings Traditionally employed outcome measures in pulmonary arterial hypertension research may not be applicable in PAH-SSc. Importantly, new therapies that target abnormal cellular proliferation in the pulmonary vasculature are currently under investigation and may be particularly relevant to PAH-SSc. Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension complicating systemic sclerosis occurs commonly and portends a poor prognosis. However, recent advances in our understanding of the disease in the context of systemic sclerosis may lead to novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that will ultimately improve quality of life and survival in this population. PMID:19667994

  14. Why there is a need to discuss pulmonary hypertension other than pulmonary arterial hypertension?

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, George

    2015-11-04

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a condition characterized by the elevation of the mean pulmonary artery pressure above 25 mmHg and the pulmonary vascular resistance above 3 wood units. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon condition with severe morbidity and mortality, needing early recognition and appropriate and specific treatment. PH is frequently associated with hypoxemia, mainly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and DPLD and/or left heart diseases (LHD), mainly heart failure with reduced or preserved ejection fraction. Although in the majority of patients with PH the cause is not PAH, a significant number of published studies are still in regard to group I PH, leading to a logical assumption that PH due to other causes is not such an important issue. So, is there a reason to discuss PH other than PAH? Chronic lung diseases, mainly chronic obstructive lung disease and DPLD, are associated with a high incidence of PH which is linked to exercise limitations and a worse prognosis. Although pathophysiological studies suggest that specific PAH therapy may benefit such patients, the results presented from small studies in regard to the safety and effectiveness of the specific PAH therapy are discouraging. PH is a common complication of left heart disease and is related to disease severity, especially in patients with reduced ejection fraction. There are two types of PH related to LHD based on diastolic pressure difference (DPD, defined as diastolic pulmonary artery pressure - mean PAWP): Isolated post-capillary PH, defined as PAWP > 15 mmHg and DPD < 7 mmHg, and combined post-capillary PH and pre-capillary PH, defined as PAWP > 15 mmHg and DPD ≥ 7 mmHg. The potential use of PAH therapies in patients with PH related to left heart disease is based on a logical pathobiological rationale. In patients with heart failure, endothelial dysfunction has been proposed as a cause of PH and hence as a target for treatment, supported by the presence of

  15. Pulmonary artery dissection: an emerging cardiovascular complication in surviving patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khattar, R S; Fox, D J; Alty, J E; Arora, A

    2005-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial dissection is an extremely rare and usually lethal complication of chronic pulmonary hypertension. The condition usually manifests as cardiogenic shock or sudden death and is therefore typically diagnosed at postmortem examination rather than during life. However, recent isolated reports have described pulmonary artery dissection in surviving patients. The first case of pulmonary artery dissection in a surviving patient with cor pulmonale caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is presented. The aetiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of pulmonary artery dissection are reviewed and factors that may aid diagnosis during life are discussed.

  16. Congenital right pulmonary artery agenesis with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Orun, Utku Arman; Yilmaz, Osman; Bilici, Meki; Karademir, Selmin; Uner, Cigdem; Senocak, Filiz; Dogan, Vehbi

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly caused by a backward displacement of the conical artery of the truncus arteriosus. It is commonly associated with additional cardiovascular abnormalities. A 7-year-old girl was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of shortness of breath upon exertion. Chest radiography revealed a hypoplastic right lung. Absence of the right pulmonary artery with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension was demonstrated by echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac catheterization. Bosentan is effectively used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  17. Current insights on the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Humbert, Marc

    2005-08-01

    Regardless of the initial trigger, the elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular resistance in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension are primarily caused by remodeling and thrombosis of small- and medium-sized pulmonary arteries and arterioles, as well as sustained vasoconstriction. The process of pulmonary vascular remodeling involves all layers of the vessel wall and is complicated by cellular heterogeneity within each compartment. Indeed, each cell type (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts), as well as inflammatory cells and platelets, may play significant roles in this condition. Recent studies have emphasized the relevance of several mediators in this condition, including prostaglandin-I (2) (prostacyclin), nitric oxide, endothelin-1, angiopoietin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), cytokines, chemokines, and members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily. Targeting some of these dysfunctional pathways (prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelin-1) has been beneficial in subjects displaying pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  18. [Physiopathology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Cellular and molecular aspects].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc

    2005-02-12

    The combined effects of vasoconstriction, remodelling of the pulmonary vessel walls and in situ thrombosis contribute to the increase in pulmonary vascular resistance during pulmonary arterial hypertension. Vascular remodelling involves all the sheaths of the vessel wall and all the cell types of which it is composed (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, inflammatory cells and platelets). Excessive vasoconstriction has been related to a defect in the function of expression of the potassium channels and endothelial dysfunction. This leads to chronic insufficiency in the production of vasodilators, notably nitrogen monoxide and prostacyclin and the excessive production of vasoconstrictors such as endotheline-1. These defects contribute to the increase in vascular tonus and pulmonary vascular remodelling and represent pertinent pharmacological targets. Certain growth factors, including those of the super-family of transforming growth factor beta, angiopoietine-1 and serotonin, may play a part in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  19. Calcium antagonist verapamil prevented pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers with ascites by arresting pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Qiao, Jian; Wang, Huiyu; Gao, Mingyu; Ou, Deyuan; Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Maohong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaobo; Guo, Yuming

    2007-04-30

    Calcium signaling has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Verapamil, one of the calcium antagonists, is used to characterize the role of calcium signaling in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension syndrome in broilers. The suppression effect of verapamil on pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling was examined in broilers, from the age of 16 days to 43 days. Our results showed that oral administration of lower dose of verapamil (5 mg/kg body weight every 12 h) prevented the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, the ascites heart index and the erythrocyte packed cell volume of birds at low temperature from increasing, the heart rate from decreasing, and pulmonary arteriole median from thickening, and no pulmonary arteriole remodeling in broilers treated with the two doses of verapamil at low temperature was observed. Our results indicated that calcium signaling was involved in the development of broilers' pulmonary arterial hypertension, which leads to the development of ascites, and we suggest that verapamil may be used as a preventive agent to reduce the occurrence and development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers.

  20. Upregulated copper transporters in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zimnicka, Adriana M; Tang, Haiyang; Guo, Qiang; Kuhr, Frank K; Oh, Myung-Jin; Wan, Jun; Chen, Jiwang; Smith, Kimberly A; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Choudhury, Moumita S R; Levitan, Irena; Machado, Roberto F; Kaplan, Jack H; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu) plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX), a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2) also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness.

  1. Treatment of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: The Role of Medical Therapy and Balloon Pulmonary Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Timothy M.; Poch, David S.; Auger, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a potentially curable disease when treated with pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE). However, even at experienced surgical centers, nearly one-third of patients with CTEPH will be deemed inoperable for reasons including distal disease, comorbidities, or out-of-proportion pulmonary hypertension. It is in these patients with inoperable CTEPH that pulmonary hypertension (PH)-targeted medical therapy and balloon pulmonary angioplasty have potential therapeutic value. Previous unblinded cohort trials have assessed PH-targeted medical therapy in various subpopulations of CTEPH patients using epoprostenol, treprostinil, sildenafil, bosentan, and iloprost, each demonstrating measurable pulmonary hemodynamic effects. However, riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, is the first FDA-approved therapy for inoperable CTEPH to demonstrate both an improvement in functional capabilities (6-minute walk time) as well as significant gains in secondary pulmonary hemodynamic end points in a large placebo-controlled trial. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty is an interventional procedure using telescoping catheters placed in the pulmonary arteries, through which wires and balloons are used to mechanically disrupt chronic clot material and relieve pulmonary vascular obstruction. Contemporary case series from multiple centers worldwide have demonstrated pulmonary hemodynamic improvement with this approach. As a result of these advances, patients with inoperable CTEPH who had few options as recently as 5 years ago now have alternatives with emerging evidence of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28289495

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Abnormalities in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mourani, Peter M; Abman, Steven H

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of preterm infants, these infants remain at risk bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which results in prolonged need for supplemental oxygen, recurrent respiratory exacerbations, and exercise intolerance. Recent investigations have highlighted the important contribution of the developing pulmonary circulation to lung development, showing that these infants are also at risk for pulmonary vascular disease (PVD), including pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Several epidemiologic studies have delineated the incidence of PH in preterm infants and the impact on outcomes. These studies have also highlighted gaps in the understanding of PVD in BPD.

  3. Inhaled iloprost for the control of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Sabine; Sablotzki, Armin; Hammerschmidt, Stefan; Wirtz, Hubert; Seyfarth, Hans-Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular resistance with a poor prognosis. Various pulmonary and extrapulmonary causes are now recognized to exist separately from the idiopathic form of pulmonary hypertension. An imbalance in the presence of vasoconstrictors and vasodilators plays an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease, one example being the lack of prostacyclin. Prostacyclin and its analogues are potent vasodilators with antithrombotic, antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory qualities, all of which are important factors in the pathogenesis of precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Iloprost is a stable prostacyclin analogue available for intravenous and aerosolized application. Due to the severe side effects of intravenous administration, the use of inhaled iloprost has become a mainstay in PAH therapy. However, owing to the necessity for 6 to 9 inhalations a day, oral treatment is often preferred as a first-line therapy. Numerous studies proving the efficacy and safety of inhaled iloprost have been performed. It is therefore available for a first-line therapy for PAH. The combination with endothelin-receptor antagonists or sildenafil has shown encouraging effects. Further studies with larger patient populations will have to demonstrate the use of combination therapy for long-term treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:19475782

  4. Vasopressors induce passive pulmonary hypertension by blood redistribution from systemic to pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunling; Qian, Hong; Luo, Shuhua; Lin, Jing; Yu, Jerry; Li, Yajiao; An, Qi; Luo, Nanfu; Du, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Vasopressors are widely used in resuscitation, ventricular failure, and sepsis, and often induce pulmonary hypertension with undefined mechanisms. We hypothesize that vasopressor-induced pulmonary hypertension is caused by increased pulmonary blood volume and tested this hypothesis in dogs under general anesthesia. In normal hearts (model 1), phenylephrine (2.5 μg/kg/min) transiently increased right but decreased left cardiac output, associated with increased pulmonary blood volume (63% ± 11.8, P = 0.007) and pressures in the left atrium, pulmonary capillary, and pulmonary artery. However, the trans-pulmonary gradient and pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable. These changes were absent after decreasing blood volume or during right cardiac dysfunction to reduce pulmonary blood volume (model 2). During double-ventricle bypass (model 3), phenylephrine (1, 2.5 and 10 μg/kg/min) only slightly induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. Vasopressin (1U and 2U) dose-dependently increased pulmonary artery pressure (52 ± 8.4 and 71 ± 10.3%), but did not cause pulmonary vasoconstriction in normally beating hearts (model 1). Pulmonary artery and left atrial pressures increased during left ventricle dysfunction (model 4), and further increased after phenylephrine injection by 31 ± 5.6 and 43 ± 7.5%, respectively. In conclusion, vasopressors increased blood volume in the lung with minimal pulmonary vasoconstriction. Thus, this pulmonary hypertension is similar to the hemodynamic pattern observed in left heart diseases and is passive, due to redistribution of blood from systemic to pulmonary circulation. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may improve clinical management of patients who are taking vasopressors, especially those with coexisting heart disease.

  5. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, pregnancy, and a pulmonary endarterectomy: a rare challenge

    PubMed Central

    Biscotti, Mauer; Cleary, Kirsten; Smiley, Richard; Bacchetta, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is well described that patients with group 1 forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension have a high risk of mortality during pregnancy and in the early postpartum period. However, to the authors’ knowledge, the diagnosis and management of group 4 pulmonary hypertension due to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) during pregnancy with early postpartum pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) has not been previously reported. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman who received a diagnosis of CTEPH during her pregnancy, was managed as an inpatient by a multidisciplinary team throughout the pregnancy and early postpartum period, and underwent PEA 6 weeks after delivery. While the management of acute pulmonary embolus in pregnancy is well described, this unique case of CTEPH diagnosed during pregnancy illustrates several challenging management issues. PMID:27683616

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (ascites syndrome) in broilers: a review.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Rhoads, D D; Erf, G F; Anthony, N B

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) syndrome in broilers (also known as ascites syndrome and pulmonary hypertension syndrome) can be attributed to imbalances between cardiac output and the anatomical capacity of the pulmonary vasculature to accommodate ever-increasing rates of blood flow, as well as to an inappropriately elevated tone (degree of constriction) maintained by the pulmonary arterioles. Comparisons of PAH-susceptible and PAH-resistant broilers do not consistently reveal differences in cardiac output, but PAH-susceptible broilers consistently have higher pulmonary arterial pressures and pulmonary vascular resistances compared with PAH-resistant broilers. Efforts clarify the causes of excessive pulmonary vascular resistance have focused on evaluating the roles of chemical mediators of vasoconstriction and vasodilation, as well as on pathological (structural) changes occurring within the pulmonary arterioles (e.g., vascular remodeling and pathology) during the pathogenesis of PAH. The objectives of this review are to (1) summarize the pathophysiological progression initiated by the onset of pulmonary hypertension and culminating in terminal ascites; (2) review recent information regarding the factors contributing to excessively elevated resistance to blood flow through the lungs; (3) assess the role of the immune system during the pathogenesis of PAH; and (4) present new insights into the genetic basis of PAH. The cumulative evidence attributes the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance in PAH-susceptible broilers to an anatomically inadequate pulmonary vascular capacity, to excessive vascular tone reflecting the dominance of pulmonary vasoconstrictors over vasodilators, and to vascular pathology elicited by excessive hemodynamic stress. Emerging evidence also demonstrates that the pathogenesis of PAH includes characteristics of an inflammatory/autoimmune disease involving multifactorial genetic, environmental, and immune system components. Pulmonary

  7. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Treatment with thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, J; Amigo, M C; Barragan, R; Izaguirre, R; Reyes, P A; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Palomar, A; Gomez, A; Garcia-Torres, R

    1996-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension may occur in the antiphospholipid syndrome as a result of recurrent pulmonary embolism or microthrombosis of pulmonary vessels. We describe 3 cases of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and cor pulmonale that fulfilled the criteria for chronic major vessel thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy was performed in all 3 patients and it was successful in 2. One patient died in the immediate postoperative period from hemorrhagic pulmonary edema. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension should be added to the list of pulmonary vascular complications of primary APS. Despite its risk, pulmonary thromboendarterectomy represents a treatment option for this otherwise lethal condition.

  8. Sildenafil for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Wacker Bou Puigdefabregas, Julie; Merali, Sausan

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), is a serious disease in children, but few clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate treatment regimens in this population. Currently, treatment of children with PAH is mostly based on clinical studies conducted in adults and a few dedicated pediatric studies. Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, has an established efficacy and safety profile for the treatment of adults with PAH. In May 2011, sildenafil received approval for the treatment of pediatric patients aged 1-17 years in the EU; however, pediatric use is not approved in the USA. This systematic literature review summarizes the clinical data available on the use of sildenafil to treat children with PAH and pulmonary hypertension.

  9. Intravenous Epoprostenol for Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Julia; Ruiz, George; Fries, Melissa; Driggers, Rita W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension carries a high risk of mortality in pregnancy. Recent advances in treatment may improve disease course and allow for successful management of the pregnancy. Case Report We present the case of a 20-year-old gravida 1, para 0 with diagnosis of severe primary pulmonary hypertension. The patient was managed with epoprostenol (prostacyclin) infusion via an indwelling catheter, which was initiated at 23 weeks' gestation. The dose was adjusted to the patient's symptoms and a successful vaginal delivery was achieved at 36 weeks' gestation. Although maternal postpartum course was uncomplicated, unexplained neonatal demise occurred at 11 days of life. Conclusion Successful management of pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy can be accomplished with a multidisciplinary approach and intensive therapy. Long-term effects of epoprostenol on fetal or neonatal well-being are unknown. PMID:24147238

  10. Intravenous Epoprostenol for Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Julia; Ruiz, George; Fries, Melissa; Driggers, Rita W

    2013-10-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension carries a high risk of mortality in pregnancy. Recent advances in treatment may improve disease course and allow for successful management of the pregnancy. Case Report We present the case of a 20-year-old gravida 1, para 0 with diagnosis of severe primary pulmonary hypertension. The patient was managed with epoprostenol (prostacyclin) infusion via an indwelling catheter, which was initiated at 23 weeks' gestation. The dose was adjusted to the patient's symptoms and a successful vaginal delivery was achieved at 36 weeks' gestation. Although maternal postpartum course was uncomplicated, unexplained neonatal demise occurred at 11 days of life. Conclusion Successful management of pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy can be accomplished with a multidisciplinary approach and intensive therapy. Long-term effects of epoprostenol on fetal or neonatal well-being are unknown.

  11. Computer-assisted diagnostic tool to quantify the pulmonary veins in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Pamulapati, Vivek; Alam, Shoaib; Mehari, Alem; Kato, Gregory J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common cause of death among patients with sickle cell disease. This study investigates the use of pulmonary vein analysis to assist the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension non-invasively with CT-Angiography images. The characterization of the pulmonary veins from CT presents two main challenges. Firstly, the number of pulmonary veins is unknown a priori and secondly, the contrast material is degraded when reaching the pulmonary veins, making the edges of these vessels to appear faint. Each image is first denoised and a fast marching approach is used to segment the left atrium and pulmonary veins. Afterward, a geodesic active contour is employed to isolate the left atrium. A thinning technique is then used to extract the skeleton of the atrium and the veins. The locations of the pulmonary veins ostia are determined by the intersection of the skeleton and the contour of the atrium. The diameters of the pulmonary veins are measured in each vein at fixed distances from the corresponding ostium, and for each distance, the sum of the diameters of all the veins is computed. These indicators are shown to be significantly larger in sickle-cell patients with pulmonary hypertension as compared to controls (p-values < 0.01).

  12. Intra--and Intercellular Calcium Handling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mouratoglou, Sophia-Anastasia; Giannakoulas, George; Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Cleman, Michael W; Vassilikos, Vassilios P

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious life threatening disease that leads to right heart failure and death. Elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is the main pathophysiological component that leads to elevated pulmonary arterial pressures and increased right ventricular afterload. Increased PVR is related to different mechanisms that include vasoconstriction, proliferative and obstructive remodeling of the pulmonary vessel wall and in situ thrombosis. Numerous molecular, genetic and humoral abnormalities have been proposed to play an important role in pulmonary vasoconstriction and remodeling. Of those, calcium (Ca(+2)) is a well recognized parameter involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms of PAH, because of its twofold role in both vasoconstriction and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. The aim of this review is to focus on Ca(+2) handling and dysregulation in PASMC of PAH patients.

  13. End points and clinical trial design in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Badesch, David B; Delcroix, Marion; Fleming, Thomas R; Gaine, Sean P; Galiè, Nazzareno; Gibbs, J Simon R; Kim, Nick H; Oudiz, Ronald J; Peacock, Andrew; Provencher, Steeve; Sitbon, Olivier; Tapson, Victor F; Seeger, Werner

    2009-06-30

    New and emerging therapies might provide benefit in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Their efficacy and safety will be compared with existing combination therapies in randomized clinical trials. Appropriate end points for these trials need to be identified: these will include exercise testing, the composite end point of time to clinical worsening, and hemodynamic markers, including advanced imaging modalities and biomarkers. Quality-of-life questionnaires are useful and important secondary end points; pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific questionnaires are currently being developed. Advantages and disadvantages of various trial designs, including placebo-controlled monotherapy or add-on trials, noninferiority studies, and withdrawal trials are also discussed.

  14. Surrogate and combined end points in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ventetuolo, Corey E; Benza, Raymond L; Peacock, Andrew J; Zamanian, Roham T; Badesch, David B; Kawut, Steven M

    2008-07-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and often devastating disease, although various effective therapies are now available. Clinical trials have used hemodynamic, cardiac imaging, laboratory, and exercise measurements as surrogate and intermediate end points in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Yet, based on the current literature, it is difficult to surmise which of these (if any) have been definitively validated. In addition, investigators have advocated the use of combined clinical end points in future clinical trials. The dependence of clinical trials and clinical management on such end points warrants a review of their use.

  15. New-onset neonatal pulmonary hypertension associated with a rhinovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishit; The, Tiong G

    2012-01-01

    A 3.5-week-old male neonate who developed an upper and lower respiratory tract rhinovirus infection that was temporally associated with the development of severe pulmonary hypertension is described. Rhinovirus has not previously been associated with pulmonary hypertension. This child developed severe pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure, requiring mechanical ventilation, nitric oxide inhalation and, eventually, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  16. Type 1 neurofibromatosis and pulmonary hypertension: a report of two cases and a review

    PubMed Central

    Malviya, Amit; Mishra, Sundeep; Kothari, Shyam S

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in type 1 neurofibromatosis is not well known and was previously attributed to diffuse fibrosing alveolitis and parenchymal tumours. More recently, cases of severe pulmonary hypertension due to pulmonary vasculopathy have been described. Involvement of vascular beds, both large and medium calibre vessels, but not pulmonary vasculature, in type 1 neurofibromatosis is well known. The authors describe two such cases and briefly review the literature. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in neurofibromatosis warrants further studies. PMID:27326022

  17. Practical considerations for the pharmacotherapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Bryan M; Mauro, Vincent F; Khouri, Samer J

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease. Before the 1990s, when pharmacologic treatment was finally approved, only supportive therapy was available, consisting of anticoagulation, digoxin, diuretics, and supplemental oxygen. Calcium channel blocker therapy was also an option, but only a small percentage of patients respond to it. However, starting with epoprostenol in 1996, the number of drugs approved to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension increased. Three distinct classes of drugs were developed based on the pathophysiology of the disease: the prostanoids, endothelin-1 receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. The prostanoids are administered either parenterally or by inhalation to replace the lack of prostacyclin within the pulmonary arterial vasculature. The endothelin-1 receptor antagonists were the first class of oral drugs to be developed, but drug interactions and adverse effects are prominent with this class. The phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors increase the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP) that is induced by nitric oxide stimulation. All of the drugs within these three classes are distinct in and of themselves, and their clinical use requires in-depth knowledge of pulmonary arterial hypertension and its pathophysiology. Because these drugs have different mechanisms of action, combination therapy has shown promise in patients with severe disease, although data are still lacking. This article should serve as a practical guide for clinicians who encounter patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and the drugs used for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  18. Transcatheter Embolization of Pulmonary Artery False Aneurysm Associated with Primary Pulmonary Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, T. Kanazawa, S.; Mimura, H.; Yasui, K.; Okumura, Y.; Dendo, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Takahara, M.; Hiraki, Y.

    2004-03-15

    A 29-year-old woman with primary pulmonary hypertension presented with recurrent hemoptysis. Contrast-enhanced CT of the chest demonstrated the enhanced mass surrounded by consolidation related to parenchymal hemorrhage. Pulmonary angiography suggested that the mass was a pulmonary artery false aneurysm. After a microcatheter was superselectively inserted into the parent artery of the falseaneurysm, the false aneurysm was successfully treated by transcatheterembolization with coils. Her hemoptysis has never recurred.

  19. Pulmonary Agenesis and Associated Pulmonary Hypertension: A Case Report and Review on Variability, Therapy, and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Muensterer, Oliver; Abellar, Rosanna; Otterburn, David; Mathew, Rajamma

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital disorder with large variability in presentation and prognosis. We describe a full-term infant born with right-sided pulmonary agenesis who underwent thoracoscopic placement of a tissue expander. He ultimately died of pulmonary hypertension. Immunohistology showed intimal hyperplasia without the loss of endothelial caveolin-1 expression. A literature review revealed that while some of these patients have favorable outcome, many succumb despite therapy.

  20. Continuous intravenous epoprostenol for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bresser, P; Fedullo, P F; Auger, W R; Channick, R N; Robbins, I M; Kerr, K M; Jamieson, S W; Rubin, L J

    2004-04-01

    Pathophysiological findings in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) have suggested that a secondary small vessel arteriopathy may contribute to the haemodynamic impairment observed in these patients. It was hypothesised that this element of the elevated vascular resistance may be responsive to continuous intravenous epoprostenol therapy. Retrospectively, the clinical and haemodynamic responses to continuous intravenous epoprostenol were evaluated in nine CTEPH patients who subsequently underwent pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE). Cardiopulmonary haemodynamics were determined prior to the initiation of epoprostenol, while on epoprostenol, prior to PTE, and after PTE. Six patients, treated for 2-26 months prior to PTE, experienced either clinical stability or improvement that was associated with a mean reduction in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) of 28% (median 33%, range 0-46%). Three patients, treated for 3-9 months, experienced clinical deterioration during epoprostenol administration, with a significant increase in PVR in two patients. Subsequent PTE resulted in a highly significant improvement of cardiac index, mean pulmonary artery pressure and total pulmonary resistance. To conclude, selected patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension may benefit clinically and haemodynamically from continuous intravenous epoprostenol treatment prior to pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Factors predictive of a beneficial response, and whether this intervention influences either morbidity or mortality associated with pulmonary thromboendarterectomy, remain to be established.

  1. Inhaled iloprost for severe persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Chotigeat, Uraiwan; Jaratwashirakul, Santiwan

    2007-01-01

    The authors report one case of persistent pulmonary hypertension that had hypoxia although receiving treatment with high frequency oscillation, inotropic drugs, blood transfusion, and oral sildenafil for pulmonary vasodilatation. The patient developed hypotension after two doses of oral sildenafil and no response to high dose of inotropic drugs. So aerosolized iloprost was given via endotracheal tube and oxygen saturation improved within 10 minutes. Oxygen was weaned at 36 hours after treatment with this drug and no any side effect was found.

  2. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis as a cause of pulmonary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mostafa; Hamed, Fadi; Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS) is an underrecognized condition in the adult population. PPAS can lead to pulmonary hypertension but is likely misdiagnosed as either idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively identified adult patients with PPAS either in its isolated form or related to other congenital defects from January 1998 to September 2012. We reviewed the patients’ clinical data by using our hospital electronic medical records and/or their paper charts. We identified 6 adult patients with PPAS with an age range of 16–56 years (1 woman and the rest men). Presenting signs and symptoms were thoracic murmurs, progressive dyspnea, and syncope. Three patients had Williams-Beuren syndrome. Pulmonary angiography showed that PPAS was predominantly located in main branches or lobar pulmonary arteries in 5 patients, while in 1 patient the arterial narrowing was at the level of the segmental pulmonary arteries. Right heart catheterization showed a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) ranging from 35 to 60 mmHg. Balloon dilation was performed in all patients, predominantly in the lobar arteries, and it caused a decrease in mean PAP that ranged from 16% to 46% in 5 patients. In 1 patient the mean PAP did not decrease. All but 1 patient had follow-up echocardiograms at 1 year that showed stable echocardiographic findings. Pulmonary hypertension due to PPAS continues to presents a diagnostic challenge. Therefore, a high index of suspicion during the initial evaluation of pulmonary hypertension is essential for its prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:25992283

  3. The Flavonoid Quercetin Reverses Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Enrique; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Barreira, Bianca; Galindo, Pilar; Pandolfi, Rachele; Jimenez, Rosario; Moreno, Laura; Cogolludo, Angel; Duarte, Juan; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin is a dietary flavonoid which exerts vasodilator, antiplatelet and antiproliferative effects and reduces blood pressure, oxidative status and end-organ damage in humans and animal models of systemic hypertension. We hypothesized that oral quercetin treatment might be protective in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Three weeks after injection of monocrotaline, quercetin (10 mg/kg/d per os) or vehicle was administered for 10 days to adult Wistar rats. Quercetin significantly reduced mortality. In surviving animals, quercetin decreased pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and muscularization of small pulmonary arteries. Classic biomarkers of pulmonary arterial hypertension such as the downregulated expression of lung BMPR2, Kv1.5, Kv2.1, upregulated survivin, endothelial dysfunction and hyperresponsiveness to 5-HT were unaffected by quercetin. Quercetin significantly restored the decrease in Kv currents, the upregulation of 5-HT2A receptors and reduced the Akt and S6 phosphorylation. In vitro, quercetin induced pulmonary artery vasodilator effects, inhibited pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, quercetin is partially protective in this rat model of PAH. It delayed mortality by lowering PAP, RVH and vascular remodeling. Quercetin exerted effective vasodilator effects in isolated PA, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in PASMCs. These effects were associated with decreased 5-HT2A receptor expression and Akt and S6 phosphorylation and partially restored Kv currents. Therefore, quercetin could be useful in the treatment of PAH. PMID:25460361

  4. Current therapeutics and practical management strategies for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Richa; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi

    2011-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) develops from an abnormal interaction between the endothelium and smooth muscle cells in the pulmonary vasculature and is characterized by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from vascular remodeling, vasoconstriction, and cellular proliferation. Currently, 3 classes of drugs are approved for the treatment of PAH based on results from small short-term clinical trials-prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. The pharmacologic management of PAH is rapidly evolving as newer therapeutic targets that stabilize or reverse pulmonary vascular disease and target right ventricular function are being sought and as clinical practice patterns shift in favor of earlier diagnosis and aggressive treatment. This manuscript will review the practical management aspects of currently approved PAH treatments and briefly discuss combination therapy and novel pharmacologic targets. In addition, the treatment of acute right ventricular failure and evidence (or lack thereof) for therapies in non-PAH pulmonary hypertension, such as pulmonary hypertension from left side of the heart disease, are addressed.

  5. Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linguraru, Marius George; Mukherjee, Nisha; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Summers, Ronald M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Machado, Roberto F.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a known complication associated with sickle-cell disease; roughly 75% of sickle cell disease-afflicted patients have pulmonary arterial hypertension at the time of death. This prospective study investigates the potential of image analysis to act as a surrogate for presence and extent of disease, and whether the size change of the pulmonary arteries of sickle cell patients could be linked to sickle-cell associated pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary CT-Angiography scans from sickle-cell patients were obtained and retrospectively analyzed. Randomly selected pulmonary CT-Angiography studies from patients without sickle-cell anemia were used as negative controls. First, images were smoothed using anisotropic diffusion. Then, a combination of fast marching and geodesic active contours level sets were employed to segment the pulmonary artery. An algorithm based on fast marching methods was used to compute the centerline of the segmented arteries. From the centerline, the diameters at the pulmonary trunk and first branch of the pulmonary arteries were measured automatically. Arterial diameters were normalized to the width of the thoracic cavity, patient weight and body surface. Results show that the pulmonary trunk and first right and left pulmonary arterial branches at the pulmonary trunk junction are significantly larger in diameter with increased blood flow in sickle-cell anemia patients as compared to controls (p values of 0.0278 for trunk and 0.0007 for branches). CT with image processing shows great potential as a surrogate indicator of pulmonary hemodynamics or response to therapy, which could be an important tool for drug discovery and noninvasive clinical surveillance.

  6. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension: Time for a consortium.

    PubMed

    Newman, John H; Elliott, Gregory C; Haworth, Glennis S; Zampaglione, Edio; Brar, Satjit; Gibbs, Simon J; Sandoval, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Current and past clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension, while valuable, are limited by the absence of mechanistic aims, by dissatisfaction with endpoints and the inability to share data. Clinical studies in pulmonary hypertension might be enhanced by a consortium approach that utilizes the expertise of academic medicine, the treatment initiatives of the pharmaceutical industry and study design from funding agencies interested in biological mechanisms. A meeting of interested parties, the Pulmonary Hypertension Academic Research Consortium (PHARC), was held from 30 April to 1 May 2012 in Bethesda, Maryland. Members at the conference were from the USA Federal Drug Administration (FDA); pharmaceutical industry (Pfizer, Novartis, Bayer and Gilead); USA National Institutes of Health (NHLBI); the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI), a non-governmental organization (NGO); and research and clinical members of pulmonary hypertension programs of international scope. A recommendation to develop a clinical trials consortium was the product of the working group on academic standards in clinical trials. The working group concluded that clinical trials hold immense promise to move the field of pulmonary hypertension forward if the trials are designed by a consortium with input from multiple groups. This would result in study design, conduct and analysis determined by consortium members with a high degree of independent function. The components of a well-balanced consortium that give it scientific effectiveness are: (1) the consortium can work with multiple companies simultaneously; (2) sponsors with special interests, such as testing biological mechanisms, can add investigations to a study at lower cost than with present granting strategies; (3) data handling including archiving, analysis and future sharing would be improved; (4) ancillary studies supported by the collection and dissemination of tissues and fluids would generate a broader approach to discovery than

  7. Statement on pregnancy in pulmonary hypertension from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, David G.; Cockrill, Barbara A.; Safdar, Zeenat; Wilson, Victoria J.; Al Hazmi, Manal; Preston, Ioana R.; MacLean, Mandy R.; Lahm, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy outcomes in patients with pulmonary hypertension remain poor despite advanced therapies. Although consensus guidelines recommend against pregnancy in pulmonary hypertension, it may nonetheless occasionally occur. This guideline document sought to discuss the state of knowledge of pregnancy effects on pulmonary vascular disease and to define usual practice in avoidance of pregnancy and pregnancy management. This guideline is based on systematic review of peer-reviewed, published literature identified with MEDLINE. The strength of the literature was graded, and when it was inadequate to support high-level recommendations, consensus-based recommendations were formed according to prespecified criteria. There was no literature that met standards for high-level recommendations for pregnancy management in pulmonary hypertension. We drafted 38 consensus-based recommendations on pregnancy avoidance and management. Further, we identified the current state of knowledge on the effects of sex hormones during pregnancy on the pulmonary vasculature and right heart and suggested areas for future study. There is currently limited evidence-based knowledge about both the basic molecular effects of sex hormones and pregnancy on the pulmonary vasculature and the best practices in contraception and pregnancy management in pulmonary hypertension. We have drafted 38 consensus-based recommendations to guide clinicians in these challenging topics, but further research is needed in this area to define best practices and improve patient outcomes. PMID:26401246

  8. Intraoperative pulmonary hypertension occurred in an asymptomatic patient with pre-existent liver cirrhotic and portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling; Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiang-Cheng; Li, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Chuan-Yong; Wang, Xue-Hao

    2008-01-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) is clinically defined as the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension complicated by portal hypertension, with or without advanced hepatic disease. Physical signs may be absent in mild to moderate PPH and only appear in a hyperdynamic circulatory state. Similar signs of advanced liver disease can be observed in severe PPH, with ascites and lower extremity edema. Pulmonary hypertension is usually diagnosed after anesthetic induction during liver transplantation (LT). We present intraoperative pulmonary hypertension in a 41-year-old male patient with hepatic cirrhosis. Since this patient had no preoperation laboratory data supporting the diagnosises of pulmonary hypertension and was asymptomatic for a number of years, it was necessary to send him to the intensive care unit after operation. Further study should be focued on the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in order to reduce its mortality. PMID:19084945

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Hypertension in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sweiss, Nadera J.; Hushaw, Linda; Thenappan, Thenappan; Sawaqed, Ray; Machado, Roberto F.; Patel, Amit R.; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Husain, Aliya N.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) can develop pulmonary hypertension (PH; mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg) caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), left ventricular disease, or pulmonary fibrosis. PAH is a pulmonary vascular disease, the diagnosis of which requires pulmonary capillary wedge pressure less than 15 mm Hg, pulmonary vascular resistance greater than 3 Wood Units, and exclusion of thromboembolism and parenchymal lung disease. Molecular mechanisms underlying PAH-SSc include activation of inflammatory and fibrogenic pathways in the vasculature and right ventricle. Circulating autoantibodies trigger endothelial damage and fibroblast activation. PAH most commonly occurs as a late complication in patients with limited cutaneous disease and anticentromere antibodies. Although echocardiography is a useful screening tool, heart catheterization is required to diagnose PAH before initiating therapy. Prognosis and therapeutic response are worse in PAH-SSc than in other PAH categories (median survival, 1–3 y). Approved therapies include prostacyclins, endothelin antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Research is needed to define disease mechanisms and develop effective therapies. PMID:20425528

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus: report of four cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, H.D.; Kramer, N.

    1981-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has been reported rarely in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). During the past 31/2 yr we have observed pulmonary hypertension as a major clinical manifestation of their disease in four of 43 patients with well-documented SLE followed at out institution. Pulmonary hypertension could be attributed to underlying lung disease in three and was considered to be primary in the remaining patient. Neither hydralazine nor prednisone administration had any effect on the course of the pulmonary hypertension in these patients. The presence of pulmonary hypertension in the course of active SLE may be more common than previously recognized.

  11. Mycophenolate mofetil attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Takahashi, Masafumi . E-mail: masafumi@sch.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Morimoto, Hajime; Izawa, Atsushi; Ise, Hirohiko; Hongo, Minoru; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Ito, Takayuki; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Uichi

    2006-10-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), leading to occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, and death. We investigated whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a potent immunosuppresssant, prevents the development of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH in rats. MMF effectively decreased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, and reduced the medial thickness of pulmonary arteries. MMF significantly inhibited the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells, infiltration of macrophages, and expression of P-selectin and interleukin-6 on the endothelium of pulmonary arteries. The infiltration of T cells and mast cells was not affected by MMF. In vitro experiments revealed that mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active metabolite of MMF, dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of human pulmonary arterial SMCs. MMF attenuated the development of PAH through its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. These findings provide new insight into the potential role of immunosuppressants in the treatment of PAH.

  12. Pulmonary hemodynamics in obstructive sleep apnea: frequency and causes of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, M; Kochs, M; Marx, N; Woehrle, H; Mobarak, I; Hombach, V; Hetzel, J

    2003-01-01

    The association between nocturnal apneas and transient pulmonary hypertension (PHT) has been well documented. However, there is controversy over the frequency and pathophysiological mechanisms of daytime pulmonary hypertension in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS). The present study sought to evaluate frequency and mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with OSAS. It included 49 consecutive patients with polysomnographically proven OSAS without pathological lung function testing. All patients performed daytime measurements of pulmonary hemodynamics at rest and during exercise (50-75W). Six patients (12%) had resting PHT mean pulmonary of artery pressure (PAPM) of >20 mmHg), whereas 39 patients (80%) showed PHT during exercise (PAPM >30 mmHg). Multiple regression analysis revealed 3 independent contributing factors for mean pulmonary artery pressure during exercise (PAPMmax): body mass index, age and total lung capacity % of predicted. Twenty-five of the 39 patients with pathologically high PAPMmax (64%) showed elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressures (PCWPmax > 20 mmHg), whereas no patient had elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (PVRmax > 120 dynes x s x cm(-5)). In conclusion, daytime PHT during exercise is frequently seen in patients with OSAS and normal lung function testing and is mainly caused by abnormally high PCWP, whereas PVR seems to play a minor role.

  13. [Clinical utility of inhaled iloprost in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Moreno-Ruiz, Luis Antonio; Jiménez-Santos, Moisés; Olmos-Temois, Sergio Gabriel; Bojorquez-Guerrero, Luis Armando; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled iloprost is a drug from the group of prostacyclins used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Its efficacy and safety have allowed its use as monotherapy and combination therapy. This review describes the product characteristics, amenable to treatment groups, and updated clinical evidence of drug use.

  14. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  15. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-A Deadly Complication of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A; Epps, Matthew; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease with limited therapeutic options. Moreover, when PAH occurs in patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, worse outcomes are observed. The purpose of this review is to discuss the etiologies of PAH found in the systemic sclerosis patient, limitations of current medical therapies, and, finally, potential therapies for patients with this combination. PMID:23626904

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with hematological disorders following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Meera, V; Jijina, Farah; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2010-03-01

    Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was studied by Echocardiography and Doppler in 43 splenectomised patients with various disorders 1-20 years after splenectomy. PAH was detected only in thalassemia major, intermedia, hereditary sphereocytosis and myelofibrosis groups comprising a total of 21 patients. Six patients out of 21 was found to have PAH with mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 46.28 ± 28.17 mmHg. Twenty one controls having similar duration and type of disease also were assessed for PAH in this case control study 3/21 had PAH in this control group. The difference in number of patients showing pulmonary hypertension between case and control was not statistically significant (chi-square test p = 0.29-though the difference in pulmonary arterial pressure between case and control were significantly different (t-test p<0.0029) with control group showing a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 ± 19 mmHg.Platelet count in the splenectomised group was significantly higher (p = 0.0029) than the controls. Pulmonary thromboembolism was equally high in the PAH patients with and without splenectomy. Patients undergoing splenectomy due to trauma, immune thrombocytopenia, sideroblastic anemia, extra hepatic portal hypertension, autoimmune hemolytic anemia did not show PAH after splenectomy even years after the procedure PAH following splenectomy is common after certain disorders and control patients with these diseases have tendency to develop PAH even without splenectomy. Pulmonary thromboembolism may be an important pathophysiological mechanism leading to this condition. Patients having hemolytic anemia and myelofibrosis should have regular evaluation of pulmonary arterial pressure whether he/she has been splenectomised or not. This is particularly important as availability of phosphodiesterase inhibitors like sildenafil allows one to manage these cases.

  17. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Ravindran, Krishnan; Goldenberg, Neil M; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right-sided heart failure and can arise from a wide range of etiologies. The most common cause of PH, termed Group 2 PH, is left-sided heart failure and is commonly known as pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD). Importantly, while sharing many clinical features with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH-LHD differs significantly at the cellular and physiological levels. These fundamental pathophysiological differences largely account for the poor response to PAH therapies experienced by PH-LHD patients. The relatively high prevalence of this disease, coupled with its unique features compared with PAH, signal the importance of an in-depth understanding of the mechanistic details of PH-LHD. The present review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms of PH-LHD, highlighting work carried out both in human trials and in preclinical animal models. Adaptive processes at the alveolocapillary barrier and in the pulmonary circulation, including alterations in alveolar fluid transport, endothelial junctional integrity, and vasoactive mediator secretion will be discussed in detail, highlighting the aspects that impact the response to, and development of, novel therapeutics.

  18. Management of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, Joan Albert; Blanco, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic pulmonary diseases, especially in advanced disease, and is associated with greater mortality and worse clinical course. Patients with symptoms that exceed those expected by their pulmonary disease should be further evaluated by echocardiography. Confirmatory right heart catheterization is indicated in those conditions where the results of the hemodynamic assessment will determine treatment options. The treatment of choice for patients who are hypoxemic and have pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung disease is long-term oxygen therapy. Conventional vasodilators or drugs approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension are not recommended in patients with mild-to-moderate PH because they may impair gas exchange and because there is a lack of evidence supporting their efficacy. Patients with severe PH should be considered for referral to a center with expertise in PH and lung diseases. Ideally, these patients should be included in randomized controlled trials to determine which patients are more likely to derive benefit and which therapies are most likely to be successful.

  19. The Intersection of Pulmonary Hypertension and Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frost, Adaani E

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complication and marker of disease severity in many parenchymal lung diseases. It also is a frequent complication of portal hypertension and negatively impacts survival with liver transplant. Pulmonary hypertension is frequently diagnosed in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing dialysis, and it has recently been demonstrated to adversely affect posttransplant outcome in this patient population even though the mechanism of PH is substantially different from that associated with liver disease. The presence of PH in patients with heart failure is frequent, and the necessity for PH therapy prior to heart transplant has evolved in the last decade. We review the frequency of and risk factors for PH in recipients of and candidates for lung, liver, heart, and renal transplants as well as the impact of this diagnosis on posttransplant outcomes.

  20. The Intersection of Pulmonary Hypertension and Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Adaani E.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complication and marker of disease severity in many parenchymal lung diseases. It also is a frequent complication of portal hypertension and negatively impacts survival with liver transplant. Pulmonary hypertension is frequently diagnosed in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing dialysis, and it has recently been demonstrated to adversely affect posttransplant outcome in this patient population even though the mechanism of PH is substantially different from that associated with liver disease. The presence of PH in patients with heart failure is frequent, and the necessity for PH therapy prior to heart transplant has evolved in the last decade. We review the frequency of and risk factors for PH in recipients of and candidates for lung, liver, heart, and renal transplants as well as the impact of this diagnosis on posttransplant outcomes. PMID:28298957

  1. Nesiritide for pulmonary arterial hypertension with decompensated cor pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Kingman, Martha S; Thompson, Brenda S; Newkirk, Trixie; Torres, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension complicated by decompensated cor pulmonale is a challenging clinical problem with few effective therapeutic options. B-type natriuretic peptide is a pluripotent hormone that promotes diuresis and natriuresis, vasodilates systemic and pulmonary vessels, and reduces circulating levels of endothelin and aldosterone. It may represent a possible therapeutic strategy for decompensated cor pulmonale in the same manner that it is used to treat decompensated left heart failure. The authors report their experience with B-type natriuretic peptide as adjunctive therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension complicated by decompensated cor pulmonale. A detailed case report is presented followed by the evaluation of a series of 11 cases occurring in eight patients from December 2002 through April 2004.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension in Heart Failure Patients: Pathophysiology and Prognostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, Marco; Labate, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to left heart disease (LHD), i.e., group 2 PH, is the most common reason for increased pressures in the pulmonary circuit. Although recent guidelines incorporate congenital heart disease in this classification, left-sided heart diseases of diastolic and systolic origin including valvular etiology are the vast majority. In these patients, an increased left-sided filling pressure triggers a multistage hemodynamic evolution that ends into right ventricular failure through an initial passive increase in pulmonary artery pressure complicated over time by pulmonary vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, and remodeling of the small-resistance pulmonary arteries. Regardless of the underlying left heart pathology, when present, PH-LHD is associated with more severe symptoms, worse exercise tolerance, and outcome, especially when right ventricular dysfunction and failure are part of the picture. Compared with group 1 and other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, PH-LHD is more often seen in elderly patients with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities and most, if not all, of the features of metabolic syndrome, especially in case of HF preserved ejection fraction. In this review, we provide an update on current knowledge and some potential challenges about the pathophysiology and established prognostic implications of group 2 PH in patients with HF of either preserved or reduced ejection fraction.

  3. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  4. Efficacy of inhaled iloprost in cor pulmonale and severe pulmonary hypertension associated with tuberculous destroyed lung.

    PubMed

    Park, Yae Min; Chung, Wook-Jin; Lee, Sang Pyo; Choi, Deok Young; Baek, Han Joo; Jung, Sung Hwan; Choi, In Suck; Shin, Eak Kyun

    2014-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the causes of cor pulmonale. Cor pulmonale patients with pulmonary hypertension have a significant lower survival rate than patients without. However, there is no conclusive treatment options in cor pulmonale and pulmonary hypertension associated with COPD until now. We report a patient with cor pulmonale and pulmonary hypertension associated with severe form of COPD and tuberculous destroyed lung who achieved marked clinical, functional and echocardiographic hemodynamic improvements with inhaled iloprost for six months.

  5. High Frequency of Pulmonary Hypertension-Causing Gene Mutation in Chinese Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Qunying; Liu, Zhihong; Zhao, Zhihui; Luo, Qin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is unknown. Histopathologic studies revealed that pulmonary vasculature lesions similar to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) existed in CTEPH patients as well. It’s well-known that genetic predisposition plays an important role in the mechanism of PAH. So we hypothesized that PAH-causing gene mutation might exist in some CTEPH patients and act as a background to facilitate the development of CTEPH. In this study, we analyzed 7 PAH-causing genes including BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, KCNK3, and CBLN2 in 49 CTEPH patients and 17 patients recovered from pulmonary embolism (PE) but without pulmonary hypertension(PH). The results showed that the nonsynonymous mutation rate in CTEPH patients is significantly higher than that in PE without PH patients (25 out of 49 (51%) CTEPH patients vs. 3 out of 17 PE without PH patients (18%); p = 0.022). Four CTEPH patients had the same point mutation in ACVRL1 exon 10 (c.1450C>G), a mutation approved to be associated with PH in a previous study. In addition, we identified two CTEPH associated SNPs (rs3739817 and rs55805125). Our results suggest that PAH-causing gene mutation might play an important role in the development of CTEPH. PMID:26820968

  6. Independent ventilation and ECMO for severe unilateral pulmonary edema after SLT for primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; Zamora, M R; Jones, S; Campbell, D W; Fullerton, D A

    1995-06-01

    Single lung transplantation (SLT) is now accepted therapy for selected cases of severe pulmonary hypertension. A recognized complication is the postoperative development of reperfusion edema in the graft, a potentially fatal cause of respiratory failure. Because reperfusion edema may be a reversible process, temporizing support measures can be life-saving. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman who developed severe reperfusion edema following right SLT for primary (unexplained) pulmonary hypertension. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was instituted. Independent lung ventilation was later begun and resulted in markedly improved oxygenation allowing withdrawal of ECMO. We conclude that reperfusion edema following SLT for pulmonary hypertension may be uniquely amenable to treatment with independent lung ventilation and ECMO if needed.

  7. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH.

  8. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  9. Pulmonary Vascular Stiffness: Measurement, Modeling, and Implications in Normal and Hypertensive Pulmonary Circulations

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Lammers, Steven R.; Shandas, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  10. Chymase: a multifunctional player in pulmonary hypertension associated with lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kosanovic, Djuro; Luitel, Himal; Dahal, Bhola Kumar; Cornitescu, Teodora; Janssen, Wiebke; Danser, A H Jan; Garrelds, Ingrid M; De Mey, Jo G R; Fazzi, Gregorio; Schiffers, Paul; Iglarz, Marc; Fischli, Walter; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Weissmann, Norbert; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Reiss, Irwin; Schermuly, Ralph Theo

    2015-10-01

    Limited literature sources implicate mast-cell mediator chymase in the pathologies of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary fibrosis. However, there is no evidence on the contribution of chymase to the development of pulmonary hypertension associated with lung fibrosis, which is an important medical condition linked with increased mortality of patients who already suffer from a life-threatening interstitial lung disease.The aim of this study was to investigate the role of chymase in this particular pulmonary hypertension form, by using a bleomycin-induced pulmonary hypertension model.Chymase inhibition resulted in attenuation of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary fibrosis, as evident from improved haemodynamics, decreased right ventricular remodelling/hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular remodelling and lung fibrosis. These beneficial effects were associated with a strong tendency of reduction in mast cell number and activity, and significantly diminished chymase expression levels. Mechanistically, chymase inhibition led to attenuation of transforming growth factor β1 and matrix-metalloproteinase-2 contents in the lungs. Furthermore, chymase inhibition prevented big endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction of the pulmonary arteries.Therefore, chymase plays a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension associated with pulmonary fibrosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target. In addition, this study may provide valuable insights on the contribution of chymase in the pulmonary hypertension context, in general, regardless of the pulmonary hypertension form.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in connective tissue diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Aithala, Ramya; Alex, Anoop G; Danda, Debashish

    2017-02-16

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a relatively commoner complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc) with estimated prevalence ranging between 8% and 12% as compared to much lower figures in other connective tissue diseases (CTD). It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CTDs. PH is classified into five major groups. CTD-associated PH belongs to group 1 PH, also known as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Around 30% of scleroderma-related deaths are due to PAH. Underlying pathogenesis is related to pulmonary vasculopathy involving small vessels. The Evidence-based Detection of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Systemic sclerosis (DETECT) algorithm outperforms the current European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society guidelines as a screening tool in SSc-PAH; it can, therefore, suggest when to refer a patient for right heart catheterization. CTD-PAH patients constitute at least 20% of patients included in all major trials of PH-specific therapy and the results are comparable to those of idiopathic PAH. The role of anticoagulation in CTD-PAH is associated with a high risk-benefit ratio with the caveat of its potential role in those with severe disease. There appears to be no role of immunosuppression in scleroderma-PAH; however, immunosuppressive agents, namely the combination of glucocorticoids and pulse cyclophosphamide / possibly mycophenolate, may result in clinical improvement in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease-related PAH.

  12. Genetic counselling in a national referral centre for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Girerd, Barbara; Montani, David; Jaïs, Xavier; Eyries, Mélanie; Yaici, Azzedine; Sztrymf, Benjamin; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Coulet, Florence; Godinas, Laurent; Lau, Edmund M; Tamura, Yuichi; Sitbon, Olivier; Soubrier, Florent; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Genetic causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) have been identified, leading to a growing need for genetic counselling.Between 2003 and 2014, genetic counselling was offered to 529 PAH and 100 PVOD patients at the French Referral Centre for Pulmonary Hypertension.Mutations in PAH-predisposing genes were identified in 72 patients presenting as sporadic PAH (17% of cases; 62 mutations in BMPR2, nine in ACVRL1 (ALK1) and one in ENG) and in 94 patients with a PAH family history (89% of cases; 89 mutations in BMPR2, three in ACVRL1 (ALK1) and two in KCNK3). Bi-allelic mutations in EIF2AK4 were identified in all patients with a family history of PVOD (n=19) and in seven patients (8.6%) presenting as sporadic PVOD. Pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis was offered to 272 relatives of heritable PAH patients, identifying mutations in 36.4% of them. A screening programme is now offered to asymptomatic mutation carriers to detect PAH in an early phase and to identify predictors of outcomes in asymptomatic BMPR2 mutation carriers. BMPR2 screening allowed us to offer pre-implantation diagnosis to two couples with a BMPR2 mutation.Genetic counselling can be implemented in pulmonary hypertension centres.

  13. Factor V Leiden and post thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Naudziūnas, Albinas; Miliauskas, Skaidrius

    2003-01-01

    Literature review and original data concerning the most common cause of inherited thrombophilia - activated protein C resistance have been presented. One hundred and three patients with confirmed venous thromboembolism have been investigated for activated protein C resistance with 2 ( nd ) generation "Diagnostica Stago" test. Activated protein C resistance has been found in 22.3 % cases. In the group of 70 healthy unselected men and women, matched by sex and age, this mutation has been found in 7.1% cases. Out of 101 patients with pulmonary thromboembolism confirmed by pulmoangiography or perfusion lung scan, 78 have been investigated by Doppler echocardioscopy in order to detect pulmonary hypertension after 1.5 months. Statistically significant correlation between age and pulmonary artery pressure has been found. No correlation between pulmonary artery pressure and activated protein C resistance has been detected.

  14. Diagnosis and management of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Bendapudi, Perraju; Rao, Gopinath Gangadhara; Greenough, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of new born (PPHN) is associated with mortality and morbidity; it may be idiopathic or secondary to a number of conditions. The mainstay of diagnosis and to exclude structural abnormalities is echocardiography. Brain type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels are elevated in PPHN, but are insufficiently sensitive to contribute to routine diagnosis. Management includes improving oxygenation by optimising lung volume by ventilatory techniques and/or surfactant and administering pulmonary vasodilator agents. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), a selective pulmonary vasodilator, reduces the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in term infants; it does not, however, improve mortality or have any long term positive effects in prematurely born infants or infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Other pulmonary vasodilators have been reported in case series to be efficacious alone or in combination with iNO. Randomised trials with long term follow up are required to identify the optimum therapeutic strategies in PPHN.

  15. miR-29a-3p attenuates hypoxic pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting pulmonary adventitial fibroblast activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Dong, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Zhao; Liu, Yi; Gao, Yu-Qi; Dong, Ming-Qing; Li, Zhi-Chao

    2015-02-01

    Activation of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts plays a key role in the pulmonary vascular remodeling in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Previous studies showed that miRNAs participated in the regulation of fibroblast activation. This study explored the role of miR-29 in the activation of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts and the therapeutic potential in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. We found that hypoxia-induced pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts activation was accompanied with a drastic decrease of miR-29a-3p expression. Knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α or Smad3 reversed the hypoxia-induced decrease of miR-29-3p in cultured pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts. In vitro, miR-29a-3p mimic inhibited the hypoxia-induced proliferation, migration, and secretion of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts, suppressed the hypoxia-induced expression of α-smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix collagen in pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts; however, miR-29a-3p inhibitor mimicked the effect of hypoxia on the activation of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts. Further studies revealed that preventative or therapeutic administration of miR-29a-3p significantly decreased pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricle hypertrophy index and ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension rats. These findings suggest that miR-29a-3p regulates the activation and phenotype of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts in hypoxia and has preventative and therapeutic potential in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  16. Lineage Analysis in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    SMA with some globular domains, predominantly colocalizing with GFP endothelial lineage-marked cells in the neointima (Figure 4F). Figure 4. VE...whether the neointima arises from a small population of apoptosis- resistant pulmonary artery endothelial cells that proliferate after injury to produce

  17. Two Cases of Late Shone Syndrome With Pulmonary Hypertension: Heart-Lung Transplant or Valve Surgery?

    PubMed

    Robich, Michael P; Stewart, Robert D; Zahka, Kenneth G; Krasuski, Richard A; Hanna, Mazen; Blackstone, Eugene H; Pettersson, Gosta B

    2016-01-01

    Two cases of Shone syndrome with severe mitral and aortic valve problems and pulmonary hypertension were referred for heart-lung transplantation. Severely elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was confirmed as was severe periprosthetic mitral and aortic regurgitation. Based on the severity of the valve lesions in both patients, surgery was decided upon and undertaken. Both experienced early pulmonary hypertensive crises, one more than the other, that gradually subsided, followed by excellent recovery and reversal of pulmonary hypertension and PVR. These cases illustrate Braunwald's concept that pulmonary hypertension secondary to left-sided valve disease is reversible.

  18. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bobhate, Prashant; Guo, Long; Jain, Shreepal; Haugen, Richard; Coe, James Y; Cave, Dominic; Rutledge, Jennifer; Adatia, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The risks associated with cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are increased compared with adults. We reviewed retrospectively all clinical data in children with PH [mean pulmonary artery pressure (mean PAp) ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) ≥3 Wood units m(2)] undergoing cardiac catheterization between 2009 and 2014. Our strategy included a team approach, minimal catheter manipulation and sildenafil administration prior to extubation. Adverse events occurring within 48 h were noted. Seventy-five patients (36 males), median age 4 years (0.3-17) and median weight 14.6 kg (2.6-77 kg), underwent 97 cardiac catheterizations. Diagnoses included idiopathic or heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (29 %), PAH associated with congenital heart disease (52 %), left heart disease (5 %) and lung disease (14 %). Mean PAp was 43 ± 19 mmHg; mean PVRI was 9.7 ± 6 Wood units m(2). There were no deaths or serious arrhythmias. No patient required cardiac massage. Three patients who suffered adverse events had suprasystemic PAp (3/3), heritable PAH (2/3), decreased right ventricular function (3/3), and pulmonary artery capacitance index <1 ml/mmHg/m(2) (3/3) and were treatment naïve (3/3). No patient undergoing follow-up cardiac catheterization suffered a complication. In 45 % of cases, the data acquired from the follow-up cardiac catheterization resulted in an alteration of therapy. Three percent of children with PH undergoing cardiac catheterization suffered adverse events. However, there were no intra or post procedural deaths and no one required cardiac massage or cardioversion. Follow-up cardiac catheterization in patients receiving pulmonary hypertensive targeted therapy is safe and provides useful information.

  19. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular failure. The complex molecular mechanisms involved in the pathobiology of PAH are the limiting factors in the development of potential therapeutic interventions for PAH. Over the years, our group and others have demonstrated the critical implication of lipids in the pathogenesis of PAH. This review specifically focuses on the current understanding of the role of oxidized lipids, lipid metabolism, peroxidation, and oxidative stress in the progression of PAH. This review also discusses the relevance of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides and microRNA-193, which are known to regulate the levels of oxidized lipids, as potential therapeutics in PAH. PMID:27683603

  20. Monoclonal endothelial cells in appetite suppressant-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tuder, R M; Radisavljevic, Z; Shroyer, K R; Polak, J M; Voelkel, N F

    1998-12-01

    Anorexigens such as aminorex fumarate and dexfenfluramine are associated with the development of severe pulmonary hypertension (PH), which clinically and histopathologically is considered indistinguishable from idiopathic or primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). For the current study, we asked whether anorexigen-associated PH is characterized by monoclonal pulmonary endothelial cell proliferation (such as in PPH) or, alternatively, is associated with a polyclonal endothelial cell proliferation as found in secondary PH. Analysis of clonality by the human androgen receptor assay was performed in microdissected endothelial cells of plexiform lesions of two patients with anorexigen-associated PH. The four plexiform lesions of Patient 1 and the six of Patient 2 with anorexigen-associated PH exhibited a monoclonal expansion of pulmonary endothelial cells, with a mean clonality ratio of 0.03 +/- 0.01 SE. Our results indicate that appetite suppressant-associated PH is identical to PPH not only in clinical and histopathologic features but also, at a molecular level, in terms of the monoclonal nature of the endothelial cell proliferation. The anorexigens may accelerate the growth of pulmonary endothelial cells in patients with predisposition to develop PPH.

  1. [Medical treatment in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Subias, Pilar Escribano; Cano, María José Ruiz; Flox, Angela

    2009-06-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is the treatment of choice in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). However, specific medical treatment of pulmonary hypertension (PH) can be an alternative or play a complementary role to surgery. Thus, in patients unsuitable for surgery due to distal thrombotic obstruction, residual or persistent PH after surgery or very severe PH and a high-risk hemodynamic profile, medical treatment may improve their clinical course and the outcome of thromboendarterectomy. Patients with distal obstruction in the pulmonary tree and those with residual PH after surgery show clinical and hemodynamic deterioration due to progression of the pulmonary vascular disease in the smallcaliber arterioles. Conventional treatment with diuretics, anticoagulants and oxygen therapy has been demonstrated to have little effectiveness. In the last decade, numerous drugs have been developed for the treatment of PH: prostacyclin analogs, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors acting principally in vascular remodelling of small-caliber arterioles. Although evidence of the effectiveness of these drugs in PH and the histological similarity of small-vessel vasculopathy in CTEPH to that of other forms of PH provide the main rationale for the use of these drugs in patients with CTEPH, the evidence from clinical trials is still limited.

  2. Arginase inhibitor attenuates pulmonary artery hypertension induced by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chu, YanBiao; XiangLi, XiaoYing; Niu, Hu; Wang, HongChao; Jia, PingDong; Gong, WenBin; Wu, DaWei; Qin, WeiDong; Xing, ChunYan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) is a refractory disease characterized by increased proliferation of pulmonary vascular smooth cells and progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling. The level of nitric oxide (NO), a potential therapeutic vasodilator, is low in PAH patients. L-arginine can be converted to either beneficial NO by nitric oxide synthases or to harmful urea by arginase. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether an arginase inhibitor, S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine ameliorates HPAH in vivo and vitro. In a HPAH mouse model, we assessed right ventricle systolic pressure (RVSP) by an invasive method, and found that RSVP was elevated under hypoxia, but was attenuated upon arginase inhibition. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) were cultured under hypoxic conditions, and their proliferative capacity was determined by cell counting and flow cytometry. The levels of cyclin D1, p27, p-Akt, and p-ERK were detected by RT-PCR or Western blot analysis. Compared to hypoxia group, arginase inhibitor inhibited HPASMCs proliferation and reduced the levels of cyclin D1, p-Akt, p-ERK, while increasing p27 level. Moreover, in mouse models, compared to control group, hypoxia increased cyclin D1 expression but reduced p27 expression, while arginase inhibitor reversed the effects of hypoxia. Taken together, these results suggest that arginase plays an important role in increased proliferation of HPASMCs induced by hypoxia and it is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of pulmonary hypertensive disorders.

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Focus on Infused Prostacyclins.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Traci

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vasoconstriction and cell proliferation in the pulmonary vasculature. Guideline-driven interventions with infused prostacyclin treatment are the mainstay for patients with advanced symptoms. Infused prostacyclin therapy is complex. It is critical to manage prostacyclin therapy with precision because boluses or interruptions can be fatal. Education of patients and inpatient staff nurses is necessary to prevent negative outcomes. Nurses are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team caring for patients with PAH. The diagnostic evaluation and treatment of PAH are reviewed here, and challenges associated with the care of patients on prostacyclin therapy are discussed.

  4. Therapies for scleroderma-related pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Paul M

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a common complication of systemic sclerosis, carries a very severe prognosis and is one of the leading causes of death in patients who suffer from it. Indeed, response to modern medical therapy has been disappointing in scleroderma-related PAH compared with other forms of PAH from the WHO group 1 classification of diseases, despite similar histological changes involving the pulmonary vasculature. This review discusses specific features of scleroderma-related PAH, currently available and US FDA-approved therapy for this syndrome, as well as potential future therapeutic developments based on newly acquired knowledge of this disorder. PMID:19885388

  5. Effects of bosentan on peripheral endothelial function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hirashiki, Akihiro; Adachi, Shiro; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Kamimura, Yoshihiro; Shimokata, Shigetake; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kondo, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve the prognosis of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the effect of the oral dual ERA bosentan on peripheral endothelial dysfunction (PED), as assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), in patients with pulmonary hypertension is not well characterized. We investigated the effect of bosentan on PED in patients with PAH or inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). A total of 18 patients with PAH and 8 with CTEPH were treated with bosentan. All patients underwent FMD assessment before and after 3 months of bosentan treatment. Whereas FMD increased from 6.01% ± 2.42% at baseline to 8.07% ± 3.18% after 3 months (P < 0.0001) in patients with PAH, those with CTEPH showed no change in FMD after bosentan therapy. In addition, FMD at baseline showed no correlation with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.09) or plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels (r = -0.23) in patients with PAH. Bosentan treatment ameliorated PED in patients with PAH but not in those with inoperable CTEPH. In addition, FMD did not correlate with PAH severity.

  6. Cardio-pulmonary interactions at high altitude. Pulmonary hypertension as a common denominator.

    PubMed

    Maggiorini, Marco

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to find the evidence that a disproportionate pulmonary vasoconstriction persisting for days, weeks and years during residence at high altitude is the common pathophysiologic mechanism of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), subacute mountain sickness and chronic mountain sickness. A recent finding in early HAPE suggests that transmission of excessively elevated pulmonary artery pressure to the pulmonary capillaries leading to alveolar hemorrhage as the pathophysiologic mechanism of HAPE. The elevated incidence of HAPE in Indian soldiers led the Indian Army to extend the acclimatization period from a few days to 5 weeks. Using this protocol, HAPE was prevented, but after several weeks of residence at an altitude of 6000m dyspnea, anasarca and pleuro-pericardial effusion developed. Clinical examination revealed severe congestive right heart failure. This condition has been previously described in long-term high altitude residents of the Himalaya and the Andes. In rats, smooth muscle cells appear in normally non-muscular arterioles within days of simulated altitude. Rapid remodeling of the small precapillary arteries may prevent HAPE but increase pulmonary vascular resistance leading to pulmonary hypertension in long-term high altitude residents. Symptoms and signs of HAPE, subacute mountain sickness and chronic mountain sickness reverse completely after residents are transfered to low altitude. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that pulmonary hypertension at high altitude, which could be named "high altitude pulmonary hypertension", is the principal and common pathogenic factor of all three cardio-pulmonary manifestations of high altitude illness. Accordingly, subacute mountain sickness and chronic mountain sickness could be renamed in "acute-" and "chronic right heart failure of high altitude", respectively.

  7. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Fukuda, Asami; Kusunoki, Yuji; Narato, Ritsuko; Saito, Hitoshi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is one of the leading causes of severe pulmonary hypertension. According to previously reported studies in the pertinent literature, chronic inflammatory conditions may be implicated in the development of CTEPH. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CTEPH in association with chronic infection. The patient had experienced five episodes of pneumonia in the five years prior to the diagnosis of CTEPH. Blood tests from the previous five years of outpatient follow-up demonstrated that the C-reactive protein level was slightly elevated. This case suggests that a relationship exists between chronic inflammation and CTEPH, and furthermore, may contribute towards elucidating the pathophysiology of CTEPH.

  8. Birth control and pregnancy management in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Karen M; Jais, Xavier

    2013-10-01

    Pregnancies in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are associated with serious complications and mortality rates of more than 50%. Advanced medical therapies for PAH have been developed during the past years resulting in improved hemodynamics, exercise capacity, quality of life, and outcome. However, despite these advances, pregnancy in women with PAH is still associated with excessive maternal mortality. Consequently, all current guidelines strongly discourage pregnancy and recommend an effective method of contraception in women of childbearing age. If this fails, early pregnancy termination is advised. Those patients who choose to continue pregnancy should be treated with targeted PAH therapies including prostacyclin analogues and/or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. The care of the pregnant women with PAH requires a planned, multidisciplinary approach, preferably in a dedicated pulmonary hypertension referral center, focusing on close monitoring before, during and after delivery.

  9. Macitentan for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kholdani, Cyrus A; Fares, Wassim H; Trow, Terence K

    2014-01-01

    Macitentan is the most recently approved dual endothelin-receptor antagonist (ERA) for the treatment of symptomatic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Compared to other available ERAs, it demonstrates superior receptor-binding properties, with consequently improved tissue penetration, and a longer duration of action allowing for once-daily dosing. It has a favorable adverse-effect profile, with notably no demonstrable increase in the risk of hepatotoxicity or peripheral edema, but like other ERAs, it is potentially limited by significant anemia. Phase I data have demonstrated a favorable drug–drug interaction profile and no need for dose adjustment with hepatic and renal impairment. In the pivotal SERAPHIN study, treatment of symptomatic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients with macitentan led to statistically significant improvements in functional class, exercise tolerance, and hemodynamic parameters, in addition to a reduction in morbidity in an event-driven long-term trial. PMID:25473292

  10. A rare reason for pulmonary hypertension: primary sarcoma of the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Kaderli, Aysel Aydin; Baran, Ibrahim; Sağ, Saim; Biçer, Murat; Aker, Sibel

    2010-02-01

    Primary sarcoma of the pulmonary artery (PSPA) is an extremely rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. The prognosis is very poor. The clinical symptoms and imaging findings imitate those of pulmonary emboli, causing delays in diagnosis. In this case report, we describe a 73-year-old man with PSPA who initially was admitted with exertional shortness of breath. Transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation revealed 2 masses in the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary hypertension. The patient underwent operation, but he could not be weaned off cardiopulmonary bypass at the end of the operation and died. Pathologic examination of the masses revealed pulmonary sarcoma. Although this patient was admitted to our clinic only 2 weeks after the initial symptoms, he already had distal metastases.

  11. Altered Immune Phenotype in Peripheral Blood Cells of Patients with Scleroderma-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Risbano, Michael G; Meadows, Christina A; Coldren, Christopher D; Jenkins, Tiffany J.; Edwards, Michael G; Collier, David; Huber, Wendy; Mack, Douglas G; Fontenot, Andrew P; Geraci, Mark W; Bull, Todd M

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common and fatal complication of scleroderma that may involve inflammatory and autoimmune mechanisms. Alterations in the gene expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been previously described in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Our goal is to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in scleroderma patients with and without pulmonary hypertension as biomarkers of disease. Gene expression analysis was performed on a Microarray Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=10) and without (n=10) pulmonary hypertension. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed in the Microarray Cohort and validated in a Validation Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=15) and without (n=19) pulmonary hypertension by RT-qPCR. We identified inflammatory and immune-related genes including interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) and chemokine receptor 7 as differentially expressed in patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension. Flow cytometry confirmed decreased expression of IL-7R on circulating CD4+ T-cells from scleroderma patients with pulmonary hypertension. Differences exist in the expression of inflammatory and immune-related genes in peripheral blood cells from patients with scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension compared to those with normal pulmonary artery pressures. These findings may have implications as biomarkers to screen at-risk populations for early diagnosis and provide insight into mechanisms of scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20973920

  12. Quality of life in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Mayer, Eckhard; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Nikkho, Sylvia; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) experience debilitating symptoms that have a negative impact on their quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical capability, psychological wellbeing and social relationships. The use of QoL measurement tools is important in the assessment of treatment efficacy and in guiding treatment decisions. However, despite the importance of QoL, particularly to the patient, it remains under-reported in clinical studies of CTEPH therapy. CTEPH is unique in pulmonary hypertension in that it is potentially curable by surgery; however, a proportion of patients either have residual PH following surgery or are not operable. Although some patients with CTEPH have been treated off-label with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, there have been few randomised controlled trials of these therapies in patients with CTEPH. Moreover, in these trials QoL outcomes are variably assessed, and there is little consistency in the tools used. Here we review the assessment of QoL in patients with CTEPH and the tools that have been used. We also discuss the effect of surgical intervention and medical therapies on QoL. We conclude that further studies of QoL in patients with CTEPH are needed to further validate the optimal QoL tools. PMID:27076580

  13. Vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Potoka, Karin P; Gladwin, Mark T

    2015-02-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the gene encoding the β-chain of hemoglobin. Deoxygenation causes the mutant hemoglobin S to polymerize, resulting in rigid, adherent red blood cells that are entrapped in the microcirculation and hemolyze. Cardinal features include severe painful crises and episodic acute lung injury, called acute chest syndrome. This population, with age, develops chronic organ injury, such as chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension. A major risk factor for developing chronic organ injury is hemolytic anemia, which releases red blood cell contents into the circulation. Cell free plasma hemoglobin, heme, and arginase 1 disrupt endothelial function, drive oxidative and inflammatory stress, and have recently been referred to as erythrocyte damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (eDAMPs). Studies suggest that in addition to effects of cell free plasma hemoglobin on scavenging nitric oxide (NO) and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme released from plasma hemoglobin can bind to the toll-like receptor 4 to activate the innate immune system. Persistent intravascular hemolysis over decades leads to chronic vasculopathy, with ∼10% of patients developing pulmonary hypertension. Progressive obstruction of small pulmonary arterioles, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, decreased cardiac output, and eventual right heart failure causes death in many patients with this complication. This review provides an overview of the pathobiology of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction and eDAMPs and a summary of our present understanding of diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease, including a review of recent American Thoracic Society (ATS) consensus guidelines for risk stratification and management.

  14. Pulmonary veins in the normal lung and pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, James M; Bethea, Brian; Liu, Xiang; Gandjeva, Aneta; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Stacher, Elvira; Gandjeva, Marina R; Parish, Elisabeth; Perez, Mario; Smith, Lynelle; Graham, Brian B; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Tuder, Rubin M

    2013-11-15

    Despite the importance of pulmonary veins in normal lung physiology and the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD), pulmonary veins remain largely understudied. Difficult to identify histologically, lung venous endothelium or smooth muscle cells display no unique characteristic functional and structural markers that distinguish them from pulmonary arteries. To address these challenges, we undertook a search for unique molecular markers in pulmonary veins. In addition, we addressed the expression pattern of a candidate molecular marker and analyzed the structural pattern of vascular remodeling of pulmonary veins in a rodent model of PH-LHD and in lung tissue of patients with PH-LHD obtained at time of placement on a left ventricular assist device. We detected urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression preferentially in normal pulmonary veins of mice, rats, and human lungs. Expression of uPAR remained elevated in pulmonary veins of rats with PH-LHD; however, we also detected induction of uPAR expression in remodeled pulmonary arteries. These findings were validated in lungs of patients with PH-LHD. In selected patients with sequential lung biopsy at the time of removal of the left ventricular assist device, we present early data suggesting improvement in pulmonary hemodynamics and venous remodeling, indicating potential regression of venous remodeling in response to assist device treatment. Our data indicate that remodeling of pulmonary veins is an integral part of PH-LHD and that pulmonary veins share some key features present in remodeled yet not normotensive pulmonary arteries.

  15. [Chronic administration of estradiol to ovariectomized female Wistar rats causes development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Iu O; Artem'eva, M M; Medvedev, O S; Medvedeva, N A

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the role of female sex hormone estradiol in the development of hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Previously, it was shown that the development of pulmonary hypertension in Wistar female rats is accompanied by a twofold increase in the estradiol level. Ovariectomy reduces the degree of pulmonary hypertension in these animals. In this work, the effect of various chronic doses of exogenous estradiol (5 and 15 microg/kg per day) on the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in Wistar female rats has been studied. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (10 h a day for 2 weeks) at simulated altitude of 5000 m (O2 concentration reduced to 10%). The administration of estradiol in different doses (5 and 15 microg/kg per day) for 21 day initiated the development of pulmonary hypertension in ovariectomized Wistar female rats.

  16. Delayed onset of pulmonary hypertension associated with an appetite suppressant, mazindol: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, M; Tsuchida, A; Hyakkoku, M; Nishizato, K; Asai, T; Nozawa, Y; Tsuchihashi, K; Shimamoto, K

    2000-03-01

    The use of the appetite suppressant agents aminorex and fenfluramine derivatives has been reported as a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. A 29-year-old female developed pulmonary hypertension suspected to be due to an amphetamine-like appetite suppressant agent, mazindol ((+/-)-5-(p-chlorophenyl)-2,5-dihydro-3H-imidazo [2,1-a] isoindol-5-ol). She was admitted to Sapporo Medical University Hospital with dyspnea due to severe pulmonary hypertension. Twelve months prior to admission, she had taken mazindol continuously for a period of 10 weeks. As yet, her pulmonary hypertension has not completely improved. This is the first reported case of mazindol-associated pulmonary hypertension, which developed after a long latent interval, and it suggests that mazindol is also a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension, making long-term follow-up necessary for patients taking this anorectic agent.

  17. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents.

  18. Under pressure: pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Farber, Harrison W; Gibbs, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common type of PH, but its natural history is not well understood. PH-LHD is diagnosed by right heart catheterisation with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure >15 mmHg. The primary causes of PH-LHD are left ventricular dysfunction of systolic and diastolic origin, and valvular disease. Prognosis is poor and survival rates are low. Limited progress has been made towards specific therapies for PH-LHD, and management focuses on addressing the underlying cause of the disease with supportive therapies, surgery and pharmacological treatments. Clinical trials of therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with PH-LHD have thus far been limited and have provided disappointing or conflicting results. Robust, long-term clinical studies in appropriate target populations have the potential to improve the outlook for patients with PH-LHD. Herein, we discuss the knowledge gaps in our understanding of PH-LHD, and describe the current unmet needs and challenges that are faced by clinicians when identifying and managing patients with this disease.

  19. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by fibrotic obstruction of the proximal pulmonary arteries, and it is believed to result from incomplete thrombus resolution after acute pulmonary embolism. While treatment for this condition with surgery and medical therapy has improved outcomes, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CTEPH is incomplete. Numerous risk factors have been associated with the development of CTEPH, including but not limited to acquired thrombophilias and chronic inflammatory states. A minority of patients with CTEPH have an abnormal fibrin structure that may delay thrombus resolution. Recently, examination of resected scar material in patients with CTEPH has suggested that deficient angiogenesis may play a role in thrombus nonresolution, and there is increasing interest in factors that drive intravascular scar formation. An additional challenge in CTEPH research is understanding the etiology and implications of the small-vessel disease present in many patients. Future work will likely be directed at understanding the pathways important to disease pathogenesis through further examinations of resected tissue material, continued work on animal models, and genomic approaches to identify alterations in gene expression or gene variants that may distinguish CTEPH from other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27252839

  20. Inhaled therapy for the management of perioperative pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, C. A.; Morozowich, S. T.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are at high risk for complications in the perioperative setting and often receive vasodilators to control elevated pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). Administration of vasodilators via inhalation is an effective strategy for reducing PAP while avoiding systemic side effects, chiefly hypotension. The prototypical inhaled pulmonary-specific vasodilator, nitric oxide (NO), has a proven track record but is expensive and cumbersome to implement. Alternatives to NO, including prostanoids (such as epoprostenol, iloprost, and treprostinil), NO-donating drugs (sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, and nitrite), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (milrinone, sildenafil) may be given via inhalation for the purpose of treating elevated PAP. This review will focus on the perioperative therapy of PH using inhaled vasodilators. PMID:26139748

  1. Immune and Inflammatory Mechanisms in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    El Chami, Hala; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Altered immunity and inflammation are increasingly recognized features of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This is suggested by infiltration of various inflammatory cells (e.g., macrophages, T and B lymphocytes), increased cytokine and growth factor (e.g., VEGF and PDGF) expression in remodeled pulmonary vessels, and the presence of circulating chemokines and cytokines. In certain diseases associated with PAH, increased expression of growth and transcriptional (e.g., Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells or NFAT) factors, and viral protein components (e.g., HIV-1 Nef), appear to contribute directly to recruitment of inflammatory cells in remodeled vessels, and may potentially serve as specific therapeutic targets. This section provides an overview of inflammatory pathways highlighting their potential role in pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH and the possibility of future targeted therapy. PMID:23009917

  2. Right heart function and haemodynamics in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hemnes, A R; Champion, H C

    2008-07-01

    The primary challenge in the care of the patient with advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is right ventricular dysfunction with concomitant right heart failure. Right heart function is closely tied to survival in this disease, and there is a growing interest in the study of this unique structure. While echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) have augmented our ability to image the right ventricle (RV), the primary means of assessing right heart function remains right heart catheterisation. Several of the currently available treatments for PAH have been shown to have effects on the RV, not just the pulmonary vasculature, and, in future, therapies aimed at optimizing right ventricular function may allow better outcomes in this challenging disease. New directions in right ventricular assessment including measurement of pulmonary vascular impedance and more widespread availability of CMR may allow greater knowledge about this little studied, yet highly important, right side of the heart.

  3. Pharmacologic strategies in neonatal pulmonary hypertension other than nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Mathew, Bobby; Leach, Corinne L

    2016-04-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is approved for use in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) but does not lead to sustained improvement in oxygenation in one-third of patients with PPHN. Inhaled NO is less effective in the management of PPHN secondary to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), extreme prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Intravenous pulmonary vasodilators such as prostacyclin, alprostadil, sildenafil, and milrinone have been successfully used in PPHN resistant to iNO. Oral pulmonary vasodilators such as endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil and tadalafil are used both during acute and chronic phases of PPHN. In the absence of infection, glucocorticoids may also be effective in PPHN. Many of these pharmacologic agents are not approved for use in PPHN and our knowledge is based on case reports and small trials. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up are required to evaluate alternate pharmacologic strategies in PPHN.

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction: Contemporary Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravi V.; Semigran, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction is often a poor prognostic marker in chronic heart failure. In this article, we review evidence supporting modern strategies addressing pulmonary hypertension in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, including right-sided heart catheterization with vasoreactivity testing and subsequent parenteral, oral, and inhaled therapy. We delineate a diagnostic approach to secondary pulmonary hypertension and outline evidence-based therapeutic strategies for management in acute and chronic heart failure. PMID:19032918

  5. ["Flash" pulmonary edema as a clinical manifestation of renovascular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kalimonovska-Ostrić, Dimitra; Ivanović, Branislava; Ostrić, Vladimir; Knezivić, Vesna; Stojanov, Vesna; Simić, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    One of the clinical manifestations of renovascular hypertension (RVH) may be a recurrent pulmonary oedema both in the absence or in the presence of systolic left ventricular dysfunction. This type of pulmonary oedema characterized as "flash" pulmonary oedema is ascribed to elevated angiotensin II concentrations with consequent hypertension as well as to volume overload resulting from decreased pressor natriuresis when there are significant stenoses of both or one renal arteries. The investigation included 30 patients with RVH treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the stenosed renal artery (PTRA) and/or stent implantation (PTR-ST) and 30 patients with surgical resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The first group was divided in two subgroups according to the etiology of renal artery stenosis (RAS). In the subgroup with fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) the mean age was 37.5 years, in the subgroup with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) 54.8 years and in the group with operated AAA 68.6 years. There were more females than males only in the FMD subgroup (10:3). Two patients of the first group experienced pulmonary oedema, both in the subgroup with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis associated with atherosclerosis of other arteries. Normalization of the blood pressure following PTRA in both and an uncomplicated course after a surgical myocardial revascularization in one of them illustrates the importance of renal revascularization. Pulmonary oedema occurred preoperatively in four out of 30 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm in whom significant renal artery stenoses coexisted. Two patients died despite surgery, one patient is clinically stable and the medicament treatment of heart failure is inevitable in the fourth with a left ventricular aneurysm following myocardial infarction. The occurrence or recurrence of pulmonary oedema in the absence of other explanation should suggest the possibility of bilateral or unilateral renal

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension Among End-Stage Renal Failure Patients Following Hemodialysis Access Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Richard J.; Stavropoulos, S. William; Wasserstein, Alan G.; Clark, Timothy W.I.

    2005-01-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous hemodialysis thrombectomy causes subclinical pulmonary emboli without short-term clinical consequence; the long-term effects on the pulmonary arterial vasculature are unknown. We compared the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension between patients who underwent one or more hemodialysis access thrombectomy procedures with controls without prior thrombectomy.Methods: A retrospective case-control study was performed. Cases (n = 88) had undergone one or more hemodialysis graft thrombectomy procedures, with subsequent echocardiography during routine investigation of comorbid cardiovascular disease. Cases were compared with controls without end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (n = 100, group 1), and controls with ESRD but no prior thrombectomy procedures (n = 117, group 2). The presence and velocity of tricuspid regurgitation on echocardiography was used to determine the prevalence and grade of pulmonary hypertension; these were compared between cases and controls using the chi-square test and logistic regression.Results: The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension among cases was 52% (46/88), consisting of mild, moderate and severe in 26% (n = 23), 10% (n = 9) and 16% (n = 14), respectively. Prevalence of pulmonary hypertension among group 1 controls was 26% (26/100), consisting of mild, moderate and severe pulmonary hypertension in 14%, 5% and 7%, respectively. Cases had 2.7 times greater odds of having pulmonary hypertension than group 1 controls (p = 0.002). The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension among group 2 controls was 42% (49/117), consisting of mild, moderate and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension in 25% (n = 49), 10% (n = 12) and 4% (n = 5), respectively. Cases were slightly more likely to have pulmonary hypertension than group 2 controls (OR = 1.5), although this failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.14).Conclusion: Prior hemodialysis access thrombectomy does not appear to be a risk factor for pulmonary arterial hypertension

  7. Epoprostenol treatment in children with severe pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Astrid E; Hislop, Alison A; Flynn, Yvette; Haworth, Sheila G

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Severe, sustained pulmonary arterial hypertension leads to a progressive reduction in exercise capacity, right heart failure and death. Use of intravenous epoprostenol has improved survival in adults, but data are limited in children. Patients and methods This study included all 39 children treated with continuous intravenous epoprostenol since November 1997 at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (London, UK). Patients were aged 4 months to 17 years (median 5.4 years) at the onset of therapy. The male:female ratio was 1:1.3. 25 patients had idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and 14 had pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease, connective tissue disease, chronic lung disease or HIV. All were in WHO functional class III and IV. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (SD) was 59 (17) mmHg and mean pulmonary vascular resistance was 23.3 (11.6) units×m2. Patients were assessed regularly (2–3 monthly intervals) by physical examination, electrocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography and a 6‐min walk test, when practicable. Results The mean duration of follow‐up was 27 (21) months. 7 patients died and 8 underwent transplantation. Cumulative survival at 1, 2 and 3 years was 94, 90 and 84%. The 6‐min walking distance improved by a mean of 77 m (p<0.003). WHO functional class improved during the first year (p<0.001) and improvement was maintained for up to 3 years. Weight improved significantly from a baseline z score of −1.55 (1.74) to −1.16 (1.8) (p<0.03). 28 children had additional oral specific therapy. Hickman line changes were 0.33/patient year. Conclusions Epoprostenol therapy improved survival, WHO functional class, exercise tolerance and ability to thrive in children with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Epoprostenol represents an effective and feasible therapy even in young children. PMID:17065181

  8. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boueiz, Adel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive growth of medical literature on pulmonary hypertension (PH) has led to a steady increase in awareness of this disease within the medical community during the past decade. The recent revision of the classification of PH is presented in in the main guidelines. Group 1 PH or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous group and includes PH due to inheritable, drug-induced, and toxin-induced causes and to such underlying systemic causes as connective tissue diseases, human immunodeficiency viral infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, and schistosomiasis. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune multisystem disorder, which affects over 240 persons per million in the United States.[1] Its manifestations are not confined to the skin but may also involve the lungs, kidneys, peripheral circulation, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The outcome of PAH associated with SSc is worse when compared to other subtypes of PAH. In this review, we summarize available information about the pulmonary vascular and cardiac manifestations of SSc with special emphasis on their prognostic implications as well as the peculiarity of their detection. PMID:25076994

  9. Pulmonary hypertension, systemic lupus erythematosus, and the contraceptive pill: another report.

    PubMed

    Miller, M H

    1987-02-01

    I report the case of a woman with systemic lupus erythematosus who had pulmonary hypertension unassociated with chronic interstitial lung disease or pulmonary emboli. She had started taking the contraceptive pill seven months previously.

  10. Irreversible pulmonary hypertension associated with Troglostrongylus brevior infection in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Crisi, Paolo E; Traversa, Donato; Di Cesare, Angela; Luciani, Alessia; Civitella, Carla; Santori, Domenico; Boari, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    A four month-old kitten was referred at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Teramo, Italy. Physical examination, echocardiography, thoracic radiography, copromicroscopy and biomolecular assays led to a diagnosis of severe parasitic bronchopneumonia by Troglostrongylus brevior complicated by pulmonary hypertension. A single administration of a spot on solution containing imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 1% was effective in stopping larval shedding but clinical, radiographic and echocardiographic signs of bronchopneumonia and pulmonary hypertension still persisted after further follow-ups.While cases of pulmonary hypertension are known in infections by Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, this is the first report of irreversible pulmonary hypertension in a kitten with troglostrongylosis.

  11. [From acute pulmonary embolism to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: Pathobiology and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) represents a unique subtype of pulmonary hypertension characterized by the presence of mechanical obstruction of the major pulmonary vessels caused by venous thromboembolism. CTEPH is a progressive and devastating disease if not treated, and is the only subset of PH potentially curable by a surgical procedure known as pulmonary endarterectomy. The clot burden and pulmonary embolism recurrence may contribute to the development of CTEPH however only few thrombophilic factors have been found to be associated. A current hypothesis is that CTEPH results from the incomplete resolution and organization of thrombus modified by inflammatory, immunologic and genetic mechanisms, leading to the development of fibrotic stenosis and adaptive vascular remodeling of resistance vessels. The causes of thrombus non-resolution have yet to be fully clarified. CTEPH patients often display severe PH that cannot be fully explained by the degree of pulmonary vascular obstruction apparent on imaging studies. In such cases, the small vessel disease and distal obstructive thrombotic lesions beyond the sub-segmental level may contribute for out of proportion elevated PVR. The processes implicated in the development of arteriopathy and micro-vascular changes might explain the progressive nature of PH and gradual clinical deterioration with poor prognosis, as well as lack of correlation between measurable hemodynamic parameters and vascular obstruction even in the absence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. This review summarizes the most relevant up-to-date aspects on pathobiology and pathophysiology of CTEPH.

  12. Recent advances of pulmonary endarterectomy for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension including Japanese experiences.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) remains challenging with some difficulties, although it has been a well-established procedure. Its current situation including indications, surgical techniques with perioperative management, early and late outcome, and risk factors for mortality and poor hemodynamic improvement are reviewed. With the recent advancement of PEA including perioperative management and the accumulation of experiences, early outcome has been improved with low mortality rates, which are 5-10 % in most or <5 % in experienced centers. The risk factors for mortality were high pulmonary vascular resistance before and immediately after surgery, poor preoperative exercise capacity (NYHA-class IV), and advanced age. Reperfusion lung injury and residual pulmonary hypertension remain problematic as the most serious complications. The latter occurs in cases with surgically inaccessible distal lesions. For them, more careful perioperative management using pharmacological agents in conjunction with skillful PEA is required, occasionally with prompt use of percutaneous cardiopulmonary support. Although there have been a few reports on the long-term outcome, it is also favorable with good survival and event-free rates, which are affected by residual pulmonary hypertension. The recurrence of CTEPH after PEA is extremely rare. Consequently, as the first-line treatment for CTEPH, PEA can be performed safely with hemodynamic improvement and favorable early and long-term outcomes, except for potentially high-risk patients with distal lesions, elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, poor exercise capacity, and advanced age. Recently advanced balloon pulmonary angioplasty might be a promising alternative for such difficult patients.

  13. Carvedilol inhibits proliferation of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Hideki; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Nagase, Satoshi; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Aiko; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Miura, Daiji; Miura, Aya; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Date, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru

    2006-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is associated with proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in small pulmonary arteries. Inhibition of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) may be an effective treatment of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Recent studies have shown that carvedilol, an alpha- and beta-blocker with antioxidant and calcium channel blocking properties, inhibits the proliferation of cultured normal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that carvedilol has antiproliferative effects on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from six idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients who had undergone lung transplantation were cultured. To determine cell proliferation, H-thymidine incorporation was measured. Platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs was significantly greater than that of normal control pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Carvedilol (0.1 microM to 10 microM) inhibited the proliferation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension-pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Prazosin (an alpha-blocker) and N-acetyl L cysteine (an antioxidant agent) (0.1 microM to 10 microM) did not inhibit their proliferation, but the high concentration of propranolol (a beta-blocker) and nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker) (10 microM) inhibited the proliferation. The combination of propranolol and nifedipine inhibited the proliferation but only at a high concentration (10 microM) combination. Cell cycle analysis revealed that carvedilol (10 microM) significantly decreased the number of cells in S and G2/M phases. These results indicate that carvedilol inhibits the exaggerated proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

  14. Management of pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gien, J; Kinsella, J P

    2016-06-01

    In infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a posterolateral diaphragmatic defect results in herniation of abdominal contents into the chest and compression of the intrathoracic structures. In the most severe cases, hypoplasia of the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular (LV) hypoplasia/dysfunction all contribute to increased mortality. The management of PH in CDH is complicated by structural and functional changes in the heart, pulmonary vasculature, airways and lung parenchyma; consequently, determining optimal management strategies is challenging. Treatment of PH in patients with CDH changes as the underlying pathophysiology evolves in the days and weeks after birth. During the early transition, the use of pulmonary vasodilators is limited by LV structural and functional abnormalities, and pulmonary vasodilators such as inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) may have a limited role (for example, stabilization for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), treatment of marked preductal desaturation and treatment of PH as LV performance improves). In contrast, subacute treatment of PH in CDH with iNO has an important role in recurrent or persistent PH and potentially improves survival. Chronic PH and vascular abnormalities may persist into childhood in patients with CDH, contributing to late mortality. It is unclear how pulmonary vasodilator therapies, such as iNO, sildenafil and bosentan, will modulate late outcomes in CDH with late/chronic PH.

  15. Computational Simulation of the Pulmonary Arteries and its Role in the Study of Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic state of the pulmonary arteries is challenging to routinely measure in children due to the vascular circuit's position in the lungs. The resulting relative scarcity of quantitative clinical diagnostic and prognostic information impairs management of diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, or high blood pressure of the pulmonary circuit, and invites new techniques of measurement. Here we examine recent applications of macro-scale computational mechanics methods for fluids and solids – traditionally used by engineers in the design and virtual testing of complex metal and composite structures – applied to study the pulmonary vasculature, both in healthy and diseased states. In four subject areas, we briefly outline advances in computational methodology and provide examples of clinical relevance. PMID:21499523

  16. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F J; Lossnitzer, D; Kristen, A V; Schoene, A M; Kübler, W; Katus, H A; Borst, M M

    2005-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a pulmonary vasculopathy of unknown aetiology. Dyspnoea, peripheral airway obstruction and inefficient ventilation are common in IPAH. Data on respiratory muscle function are lacking. This prospective single-centre study included 26 female and 11 male patients with IPAH in World Health Organization functional classes II-IV. Mean+/-SD pulmonary artery pressure was 48.6+/-16.9 in females and 53.1+/-22.9 mmHg in males; cardiac output was 3.7+/-1.3 and 4.2+/-1.7 L x min(-1). Maximal inspiratory pressure (PI,max) was lower in the female patients than in 20 controls (5.3+/-2.0 versus 8.2+/-2.0 kPa). In the male patients, PI,max was lower than in 25 controls (6.8+/-2.2 versus 10.5+/-3.7 kPa). Maximal expiratory pressure (PE,max) was lower in the female patients than in controls (6.2+/-2.6 versus 9.5+/-2.1 kPa), and in male patients as compared to controls (7.1+/-1.6 versus 10.3+/-3.9 kPa). There was no correlation between PI,max or PE,max and parameters of pulmonary haemodynamics or exercise testing. The ratio of mouth occlusion pressure within the first 0.1 s of inspiration and PI,max was higher in IPAH than in controls (females 0.067+/-0.066 versus 0.021+/-0.008; males 0.047+/-0.061 versus 0.023+/-0.016). In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of inspiratory and expiratory muscle weakness in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. The pathomechanisms and the prognostic significance should be further investigated.

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Fibrosing Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hoeper, Marius M.; Behr, Juergen; Held, Matthias; Grunig, Ekkehard; Vizza, C. Dario; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Lange, Tobias J.; Claussen, Martin; Grohé, Christian; Klose, Hans; Olsson, Karen M.; Zelniker, Thomas; Neurohr, Claus; Distler, Oliver; Wirtz, Hubert; Opitz, Christian; Huscher, Doerte; Pittrow, David; Gibbs, J. Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common finding in patients with chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP). Little is known about the response to pulmonary vasodilator therapy in this patient population. COMPERA is an international registry that prospectively captures data from patients with various forms of PH receiving pulmonary vasodilator therapies. Methods We retrieved data from COMPERA to compare patient characteristics, treatment patterns, response to therapy and survival in newly diagnosed patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and PH associated with IIP (PH-IIP). Results Compared to patients with IPAH (n = 798), patients with PH-IIP (n = 151) were older and predominantly males. Patients with PH-IIP were treated predominantly with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (88% at entry, 87% after 1 year). From baseline to the first follow-up visit, the median improvement in 6MWD was 30 m in patients with IPAH and 24.5 m in patients with PH-IIP (p = 0.457 for the difference between both groups). Improvements in NYHA functional class were observed in 22.4% and 29.5% of these patients, respectively (p = 0.179 for the difference between both groups). Survival rates were significantly worse in PH-IIP than in IPAH (3-year survival 34.0 versus 68.6%; p<0.001). Total lung capacity, NYHA class IV, and mixed-venous oxygen saturation were independent predictors of survival in patients with PH-IIP. Conclusions Patients with PH-IIP have a dismal prognosis. Our results suggest that pulmonary vasodilator therapy may be associated with short-term functional improvement in some of these patients but it is unclear whether this treatment affects survival. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01347216 PMID:26630396

  18. Use of inhaled iloprost in children with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Galdó, Antonio; Torrent-Vernetta, Alba; de Mir Messa, Inés; Rovira Amigo, Sandra; Gran Piña, Ferran; Gartner, Silvia; Albert Brotons, Dimpna

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in children is a serious disorder, for which the major goal of treatment is to prevent progressive vascular remodeling, and improve clinical status and survival. Iloprost is approved for the treatment of PH in adults; however, few studies have evaluated its effects in children. The objective of this study is to analyze the long-term effects of inhaled iloprost treatment in children with PH. A retrospective study was conducted in patients treated with iloprost between 2000 and 2012. Patients with left-right cardiac shunt and persistent PH of the newborn were excluded. The cohort comprised 22 patients (15 females) with a median age of 2.6 years. Twelve patients had pulmonary arterial hypertension including idiopathic (n = 6), hereditary (n = 2) and associated (congenital heart disease [n = 3], and schistosomiasis [n = 1]). One patient had pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, six patients had PH secondary to lung disease and three had multifactorial PH. Median mean pulmonary arterial pressure was 55 mmHg and median pulmonary vascular resistance was 15.5 Wood units. Good tolerability was observed, with the exception of one case of recurring abdominal pain. PH resolved in two patients, with functional capacity improvement in 10 patients and stabilization in three patients. The clinical condition of six patients deteriorated; two died, and two received lung transplants. In conclusion, the results of this uncontrolled study showed that iloprost was effective and well tolerated in children. However, further research is needed to support this study, as PH is a serious condition that can require organ transplantation or result in death.

  19. Metabolic Profiling of Right Ventricular-Pulmonary Vascular Function Reveals Circulating Biomarkers of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gregory D.; Ngo, Debby; Hemnes, Anna R.; Farrell, Laurie; Domos, Carly; Pappagianopoulos, Paul P.; Dhakal, Bishnu P.; Souza, Amanda; Shi, Xu; Pugh, Meredith E.; Beloiartsev, Arkadi; Sinha, Sumita; Clish, Clary B.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pulmonary hypertension and associated right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are important determinants of morbidity and mortality, which are optimally characterized by invasive hemodynamic measurements. OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine whether metabolite profiling could identify plasma signatures of right ventricular-pulmonary vascular (RV-PV) dysfunction. METHODS We measured plasma concentrations of 105 metabolites using targeted mass spectrometry in 71 individuals (discovery cohort) who underwent comprehensive physiological assessment with right-sided heart catheterization and radionuclide ventriculography at rest and during exercise. Our findings were validated in a second cohort undergoing invasive hemodynamic evaluations (n = 71), as well as in an independent cohort with or without known pulmonary arterial (PA) hypertension (n = 30). RESULTS In the discovery cohort, 21 metabolites were associated with 2 or more hemodynamic indicators of RV-PV function (i.e., resting right atrial pressure, mean PA pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance [PVR], and PVR and PA pressure-flow response [ΔPQ] during exercise). We identified novel associations of RV-PV dysfunction with circulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)–dependent tryptophan metabolites (TMs), tricarboxylic acid intermediates, and purine metabolites and confirmed previously described associations with arginine–nitric oxide metabolic pathway constituents. IDO-TM levels were inversely related to RV ejection fraction and were particularly well correlated with exercise PVR and ΔPQ. Multisite sampling demonstrated transpulmonary release of IDO-TMs. IDO-TMs also identified RV-PV dysfunction in a validation cohort with known risk factors for pulmonary hypertension and in patients with established PA hypertension. CONCLUSIONS Metabolic profiling identified reproducible signatures of RV-PV dysfunction, highlighting both new biomarkers and pathways for further functional characterization. PMID

  20. The influence of nifedipine (Corinfar) on pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Schauer, J; Orschekowski, H; Steiniger, L; Winkler, J; Schilling, W; Harzbecker, K; Evers, H

    1990-01-01

    Calcium antagonists may provide an effective approach to the treatment of pulmonary hypertension disorders. Under this aspect we examined 44 patients by right heart catheterisation at rest and at exercise before and after sublingual application of a single dose of 20 mg nifedipine (Corinfar) as well as under continuous dosage of 30-60 mg daily. In patients with latent pulmonary hypertension we ascertained an efficient significant decrease of PAP, 15 of 18 patients were responders. This protective effect persists in the longterm studies after 1 year as well as after 2 years at equal magnitude. In patients with manifest pulmonary hypertension the influence on pulmonary hemodynamics was not so efficient. This behaviour is caused by morphological fixation of pulmonary hypertension. Therefore the determination of magnitude of pulmonary hypertension by right heart catheterisation is necessary for evaluation of nifedipine therapy.

  1. Progressive pulmonary hypertension: another criterion for expeditious renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Lunawat, Deepika; Abraham, Georgi; Matthew, Milly; Mullasari, Ajith; Nagarajan, Prethivee; Reddy, Yuvaram N V

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in a cohort of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prior to and following renal transplantation and to identify the possible risk factors. Of the 425 renal transplantations performed between 2001 and 2007, Doppler echocardiographic findings were available in 124. The echocardiographic data, collected both pre- and post-transplant, included the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), ejection fraction and left ventricular hypertrophy. The data analyzed included age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, along with blood urea, creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin, hemodialysis duration, urine albumin, arterio-venous access and body mass index (BMI). Chi-square test was used for discrete variables and ANOVA was used for continuous variables. Of the patients studied, males comprised 72%; the mean age was 43.3 ± 13.02 years; 87% were hypertensive, 30% were diabetic and 4% were smokers. Statistical analysis revealed a significant reduction of the PAP, irrespective of its severity, following renal transplantation (P <0.05). The PAP had no significant correlation with any of the parameters analyzed, with the exception of BMI (P <0.05). Our study suggests that the PAP gets reduced in patients with ESRD after renal transplantation.

  2. Pathophysiological basis for anticoagulant and antithrombotic therapy in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Antonio Augusto

    2006-01-01

    In pulmonary hypertension (PH), thrombosis and thromboembolism may occur as primary events associated with inherited or acquired thrombophilia. Alternatively, in situ thrombosis may develop as a complication of pre-existing vasculopathy as in the case of idiopathic PH and related disorders (so called pulmonary arterial hypertension). In these disorders, a number of abnormalities has been described involving endothelial cells, platelets and other circulating cellular and soluble elements. These abnormalities are suggestive of a shift of pulmonary vascular microenvironment toward a procoagulant, prothrombotic and antifibrinolytic pattern. The abnormalities described so far include circulating antiphospholipid antibodies, increased plasma levels of platelet aggregating agents (serotonin, thromboxane), adhesion molecules (P-selectin, von Willebrand factor), antifibrinolytic enzymes (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1) and cytokines. Also, decreased endothelial production of natural anticoagulants (thrombomodulin) and platelet antiaggregating substances (nitric oxide, prostacyclin) have been demonstrated. The present review is focused on the procoagulant, prothrombotic and antifibrinolytic mechanisms so far identified in PH, in both clinical setting and animal models. Understanding of these mechanisms is crucial for a proper selection of anticoagulant and antithrombotic therapies and provides the rationale for development of novel therapeutic options.

  3. MURC deficiency in smooth muscle attenuates pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ogata, Takehiro; Naito, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Takuya; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that caveolin-1 (Cav1) is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. MURC (also called Cavin-4) is a member of the cavin family, which regulates caveolar formation and functions together with caveolins. Here, we show that hypoxia increased Murc mRNA expression in the mouse lung, and that Murc-null mice exhibited attenuation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) accompanied by reduced ROCK activity in the lung. Conditional knockout mice lacking Murc in smooth muscle also resist hypoxia-induced PH. MURC regulates the proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through Rho/ROCK signalling. Cav1 suppresses RhoA activity in PASMCs, which is reversed by MURC. MURC binds to Cav1 and inhibits the association of Cav1 with the active form of Gα13, resulting in the facilitated association of the active form of Gα13 with p115RhoGEF. These results reveal that MURC has a function in the development of PH through modulating Rho/ROCK signalling. PMID:27546070

  4. Possible role of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Guerreso, Kelsey; Conner, Edward Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are many different causes of pulmonary hypertension and the pathogenesis of the disease is still being elucidated. Although they are not the most common, autoimmunity and inflammation have been identified as possible causes. No one autoantibody has been identified as the definite cause of pulmonary hypertension. We present a rare association of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies and isolated pulmonary hypertension. Case presentation A 53 year old African American female presented with abdominal pain, nausea, weight loss, dyspnea and fatigue. Upon further exam she was found to have high titers of antinuclear antibodies and anti-SSA/Ro antibodies. This antibody profile would typically be suggestive of Sjögren's Syndrome, which is characterized by dry eyes and poor salivary gland function. However, since this patient did not have any symptoms consistent with the disease a diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome could not be made. A combination of laboratory, imaging and diagnostic studies were done that revealed a final diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion It is known that pulmonary hypertension has association with autoimmune diseases, however no clear markers yet exist. Anti-SSA/Ro antibodies have been rarely described in cases of pulmonary disease, and less so in pulmonary hypertension. This case describes a unique association between isolated pulmonary hypertension and anti-SSA/Ro antibody, thereby illustrating the need to investigate this autoantibody and others in the pathogenesis of autoimmune pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27222785

  5. Lung tissues in systemic sclerosis have gene expression patterns unique to pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Eileen; Shi, Haiwen; Jordan, Rick M.; Lyons-Weiler, James; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary complications in systemic sclerosis (SSc), including pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), are the leading cause of mortality. We compared the molecular fingerprint of SSc lung tissues and matching primary lung fibroblasts to those of normal donors, and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Methods Lung tissues were obtained from 33 patients with SSc who underwent lung transplantation. Tissues and cells from a subgroup of SSc patients with predominantly PF or PAH were compared to those from normal donors, patients with IPF, or IPAH. Microarray data was analyzed using Efficiency Analysis for determination of optimal data processing methods. Real time PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm differential levels of mRNA and protein, respectively. Results We identified a consensus of 242 and 335 genes that were differentially expressed in lungs and primary fibroblasts, respectively. Enriched function groups in SSc-PF and IPF lungs included fibrosis, insulin-like growth factor signaling and caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Functional groups shared by SSc-PAH and IPAH lungs included antigen presentation, chemokine activity, and IL-17 signaling. Conclusion Using microarray analysis on carefully phenotyped SSc and comparator lung tissues, we demonstrated distinct molecular profiles in tissues and fibroblasts of patients with SSc-associated lung disease compared to idiopathic forms of lung disease. Unique molecular signatures were generated that are disease- (SSc) and phenotype- (PF vs PAH) specific. These signatures provide new insights into pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets for SSc lung disease. PMID:21360508

  6. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension for lobectomy-anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Chiluveru, Swapna A; Dave, Nandini M; Dias, Raylene J; Garasia, Madhu B

    2016-01-01

    The association of congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) with congenital heart disease is rare. We present the case of a 6-month-old child with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension (PH) who presented with severe respiratory distress and hypoxia. The patient underwent right lobectomy for CPAM. With timely management, real-time monitoring, one lung ventilation, and adequate analgesia, we were able to extubate the child in the immediate postoperative period. We conclude that with meticulous planning and multidisciplinary team approach, such complex cases can be managed successfully.

  7. [Problems of Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension in Old Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Baturin, V A

    2016-03-01

    The article contains consideration of risk factors of pulmonary hypertension (PH), clinical states associated with PH, and effect of age on susceptibility to PH in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We have analyzed the prevalence of PH associated with COPD, its importance in the structure of diseases in patients of older age groups. Frequency of PH in old patients is associated with prevalence of concomitant diseases. Addition of LH to polymorbid complex of old age worsens quality of life and increases mortality. We also present in this article data on the use of modern drugs for the treatment of LH in COPD patients aged 60 years and older.

  8. Pulmonary pulse wave transit time is associated with right ventricular–pulmonary artery coupling in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Weir, E. Kenneth; Archer, Stephen L.; Markowitz, Jeremy; Rose, Lauren; Pritzker, Marc; Madlon-Kay, Richard; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary pulse wave transit time (pPTT), defined as the time for the systolic pressure pulse wave to travel from the pulmonary valve to the pulmonary veins, has been reported to be reduced in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however, the underlying mechanism of reduced pPTT is unknown. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that abbreviated pPTT in PAH results from impaired right ventricular–pulmonary artery (RV-PA) coupling. We quantified pPTT using pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound from 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls and 36 patients with PAH. pPTT was reduced in patients with PAH compared with controls. Univariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of reduced pPTT: age, right ventricular fractional area change (RV FAC), tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE), pulmonary arterial pressures (PAP), diastolic pulmonary gradient, transpulmonary gradient, pulmonary vascular resistance, and RV-PA coupling (defined as RV FAC/mean PAP or TAPSE/mean PAP). Although the correlations between pPTT and invasive markers of pulmonary vascular disease were modest, RV FAC (r = 0.64, P < 0.0001), TAPSE (r = 0.67, P < 0.0001), and RV-PA coupling (RV FAC/mean PAP: r = 0.72, P < 0.0001; TAPSE/mean PAP: r = 0.74, P < 0.0001) had the strongest relationships with pPTT. On multivariable analysis, only RV FAC, TAPSE, and RV-PA coupling were independent predictors of pPTT. We conclude that shortening of pPTT in patients with PAH results from altered RV-PA coupling, probably occurring as a result of reduced pulmonary arterial compliance. Thus, pPTT allows noninvasive determination of the status of both the pulmonary vasculature and the response of the RV in patients with PAH, thereby allowing monitoring of disease progression and regression. PMID:28090301

  9. The Pulmonary Hypertension Consult: Clinical and Coding Considerations.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jason S; Smith, K Akaya

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an increasingly recognized cause of morbidity and mortality, and in the past 20 years, there has been a rapid expansion in research and available therapies. Although it is defined quite simply as a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of ≥ 25 mm Hg, PH encompasses a heterogeneous group of disease processes. In the past, PH was classified as primary or secondary, but as understanding of the various contributing diseases has increased, classification systems have attempted to group these diseases by clinical features and disease mechanism. The evaluation of patients with suspected PH can be cumbersome, and a careful and methodical approach is needed to ensure timely and accurate diagnosis, correct physiological classification, and appropriate treatment. In this review, we discuss the classification and diagnostic evaluation of PH in adults as well as some of the billing and coding considerations involved in this evaluation.

  10. Discerning functional hierarchies of microRNAs in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Vinny; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a multifaceted vascular disease where development and severity are determined by both genetic and environmental factors. Over the past decade, there has been an acceleration of the discovery of molecular effectors that mediate PH pathogenesis, including large numbers of microRNA molecules that are expressed in pulmonary vascular cell types and exert system-wide regulatory functions in all aspects of vascular health and disease. Due to the inherent pleiotropy, overlap, and redundancy of these molecules, it has been challenging to define their integrated effects on overall disease manifestation. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the roles of microRNAs in PH with an emphasis on potential methods to discern the hierarchical motifs governing their multifunctional and interconnected activities. Deciphering this higher order of regulatory structure will be crucial for overcoming the challenges of developing these molecules as biomarkers or therapeutic targets, in isolation or combination. PMID:28289720

  11. Primary pulmonary hypertension, Castleman's disease and human herpesvirus-8.

    PubMed

    Bull, T M; Cool, C D; Serls, A E; Rai, P R; Parr, J; Neid, J M; Geraci, M W; Campbell, T B; Voelkel, N F; Badesch, D B

    2003-09-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and Castleman's disease (CD) are rare conditions infrequently encountered in clinical practice. In this paper, two patients diagnosed with both of these diseases are reported. The authors speculate that rather than being a chance occurrence, these conditions are linked by a common angio-proliferative mechanism. Therefore, an association between infection with the human herpesvirus-8 and the diseases of PPH and CD was sought. Evidence of human herpesvirus-8 infection was found in the lung tissue and, specifically, in the plexiform lesions from one of the patients.

  12. Genomics of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Mark W.; Bull, Todd M.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a vexing clinical disease with no cure. Despite advances and the discovery of a gene (BMPR2) associated with many of the hereditary forms of the disease, and some cases not previously known to be inherited, the reasons for mutations in this gene as a cause remain somewhat elusive. Clearly, a complex interplay exists between genetic alterations, environmental exposures (including infections) and disease development. This article addresses the advances in the genetics of PAH, including the identification of genetic etiologies and modulators, and the role of genetics in predicting disease progression and targeting therapeutics. PMID:19945066

  13. The study of risk in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Lewis J; Simonneau, Gerald; Badesch, David; Galiè, Nazzareno; Humbert, Marc; Keogh, Anne; Massaro, Joseph; Matucci Cerinic, Marco; Sitbon, Olivier; Kymes, Steven

    2012-09-01

    A growing body of published evidence exists on the risk factors for disease progression in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The Scientific Steering Committee for the Study of Risk in PAH was established to bring together leading clinical and statistical experts in PAH and risk modelling, for the purpose of advancing the understanding of the risk of development and progression of PAH. Herein, we discuss the impact of this information on three key areas: 1) clinical decision-making; 2) policy and reimbursement; and 3) future trials and research.

  14. [Relevant issues in the pathology and pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Tuder, Rubin M; Archer, Stephen L; Dorfmüller, Peter; Erzurum, Serpil C; Guignabert, Christophe; Michelakis, Evangelos; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stenmark, Kurt R; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to accelerate. However, fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying pathological changes in pulmonary arteries and veins in the different forms of this syndrome. Although PH primarily affects the arteries, venous disease is increasingly recognized as an important entity. Moreover, prognosis in PH is determined largely by the status of the right ventricle, rather than the levels of pulmonary artery pressures. It is increasingly clear that although vasospasm plays a role, PH is an obstructive lung panvasculopathy. Disordered metabolism and mitochondrial structure, inflammation, and dysregulation of growth factors lead to a proliferative, apoptosis-resistant state. These abnormalities may be acquired, genetically mediated as a result of mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2 or activin-like kinase-1, or epigenetically inherited (as a result of epigenetic silencing of genes such as superoxide dismutase-2). There is a pressing need to better understand how the pathobiology leads to severe disease in some patients versus mild PH in others. Recent recognition of a potential role of acquired abnormalities of mitochondrial metabolism in the right ventricular myocytes and pulmonary vascular cells suggests new therapeutic approaches, diagnostic modalities, and biomarkers. Finally, dissection of the role of pulmonary inflammation in the initiation and promotion of PH has revealed a complex yet fascinating interplay with pulmonary vascular remodeling, promising to lead to novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Emerging concepts are also relevant to the pathobiology of PH, including a role for bone marrow and circulating progenitor cells and microribonucleic acids. Continued interest in the interface of the genetic basis of PH and cellular and molecular pathogenetic links should further expand our understanding of the disease. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:D4-12) a 2013 by the

  15. Relevant issues in the pathology and pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tuder, Rubin M; Archer, Stephen L; Dorfmüller, Peter; Erzurum, Serpil C; Guignabert, Christophe; Michelakis, Evangelos; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stenmark, Kurt R; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2013-12-24

    Knowledge of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to accelerate. However, fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying pathological changes in pulmonary arteries and veins in the different forms of this syndrome. Although PH primarily affects the arteries, venous disease is increasingly recognized as an important entity. Moreover, prognosis in PH is determined largely by the status of the right ventricle, rather than the levels of pulmonary artery pressures. It is increasingly clear that although vasospasm plays a role, PH is an obstructive lung panvasculopathy. Disordered metabolism and mitochondrial structure, inflammation, and dysregulation of growth factors lead to a proliferative, apoptosis-resistant state. These abnormalities may be acquired, genetically mediated as a result of mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2 or activin-like kinase-1, or epigenetically inherited (as a result of epigenetic silencing of genes such as superoxide dismutase-2). There is a pressing need to better understand how the pathobiology leads to severe disease in some patients versus mild PH in others. Recent recognition of a potential role of acquired abnormalities of mitochondrial metabolism in the right ventricular myocytes and pulmonary vascular cells suggests new therapeutic approaches, diagnostic modalities, and biomarkers. Finally, dissection of the role of pulmonary inflammation in the initiation and promotion of PH has revealed a complex yet fascinating interplay with pulmonary vascular remodeling, promising to lead to novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Emerging concepts are also relevant to the pathobiology of PH, including a role for bone marrow and circulating progenitor cells and microribonucleic acids. Continued interest in the interface of the genetic basis of PH and cellular and molecular pathogenetic links should further expand our understanding of the disease.

  16. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  17. Pulmonary hypertension and right heart dysfunction in chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Zangiabadi, Amirmasoud; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Sajkov, Dimitar

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD), including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV) range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH.

  18. Management of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Alexander; Schroetter, Hagen; Braun-Dulleaus, Ruediger C

    2013-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to left heart disease is classified as group II according to the Dana Point classification, which includes left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic left heart failure, and left-sided valvular disease. PH due to left heart disease is the most common cause and when present, especially with right ventricular dysfunction, is associated with a worse prognosis. Left heart disease with secondary PH is associated with increased left atrial pressure, which causes a passive increase in pulmonary pressure. Passive PH could be superimposed by an active protective, and in some patients by an 'out of proportion', elevated precapillary pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodelling which leads to greater or lesser further increase of the pulmonary artery pressure. In this review, epidemiological and pathophysiologic mechanisms for the development of group II PH are summarized. The conflicting data about the haemodynamic and possible parameters to diagnose passive versus reactive and 'out of proportion' PH are presented. The different therapeutic concepts, along with novel treatment strategies, are reviewed in detail and critically discussed regarding their effectiveness and safety.

  19. Platelets from pulmonary hypertension patients show increased mitochondrial reserve capacity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quyen L.; Corey, Catherine; White, Pamela; Watson, Annie; Gladwin, Mark T.; Simon, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that altered cellular metabolism is systemic in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and central to disease pathogenesis. However, bioenergetic changes in PH patients and their association with disease severity remain unclear. Here, we hypothesize that alteration in bioenergetic function is present in platelets from PH patients and correlates with clinical parameters of PH. Platelets isolated from controls and PH patients (n = 28) were subjected to extracellular flux analysis to determine oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates. Platelets from PH patients showed greater glycolytic rates than controls. Surprisingly, this was accompanied by significant increases in the maximal capacity for oxygen consumption, leading to enhanced respiratory reserve capacity in PH platelets. This increased platelet reserve capacity correlated with mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and right ventricular stroke work index in PH patients and was abolished by the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Consistent with a shift to FAO, PH platelets showed augmented enzymatic activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and electron transport chain complex II. These data extend the observation of a metabolic alteration in PH from the pulmonary vascular axis to the hematologic compartment and suggest that measurement of platelet bioenergetics is potentially useful in assessment of disease progression and severity. PMID:28289721

  20. Left ventricular dysfunction in patients with suspected pulmonary arterial hypertension*

    PubMed Central

    Gavilanes, Francisca; Jr, José Leonidas Alves; Fernandes, Caio; Prada, Luis Felipe Lopes; Jardim, Carlos Viana Poyares; Morinaga, Luciana Tamie Kato; Dias, Bruno Arantes; Hoette, Susana; Souza, Rogerio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of right heart catheterization in the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). METHODS: We evaluated clinical, functional, and hemodynamic data from all patients who underwent right heart catheterization because of diagnostic suspicion of PAH-in the absence of severe left ventricular dysfunction (LVD), significant changes in pulmonary function tests, and ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy findings consistent with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism-between 2008 and 2013 at our facility. RESULTS: During the study period, 384 patients underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization at our facility. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was confirmed in 302 patients (78.6%). The mean age of those patients was 48.7 years. The patients without PH showed better hemodynamic profiles and lower levels of B-type natriuretic peptide. Nevertheless, 13.8% of the patients without PH were categorized as New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. Of the 218 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 40 (18.3%) and 178 (81.7%) were diagnosed with PH associated with LVD (PH-LVD) and with PAH, respectively. The patients in the HP-LVD group were significantly older than were those in the PAH group (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The proportional difference between the PAH and PH-LVD groups was quite significant, considering the absence of echocardiographic signs suggestive of severe LVD during the pre-catheterization investigation. Our results highlight the fundamental role of cardiac catheterization in the diagnosis of PAH, especially in older patients, in whom the prevalence of LVD that has gone undiagnosed by non-invasive tests is particularly relevant. PMID:25610501

  1. Caffeine causes pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Kamely, M; Torshizi, M A Karimi; Rahimi, S; Wideman, R F

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), or ascites, is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity. Experimental models are required for triggering PHS to study the pathogenesis of this syndrome and to select resistant genetic lines. Caffeine increases vascular resistance and promotes systemic hypertension in mammals, but a similar effect of caffeine on the pulmonary circulation had not previously been demonstrated. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of caffeine alone (Exp. 1) or in combination with cold temperature (Exp. 2) on parameters associated with PHS in young broiler chicks. In Exp. 1, 288 chicks were distributed among 24 pens and brooded at standard environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 2, 192 chicks were distributed among 16 pens and brooded at cool environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 15, 30, and 45 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 1 caffeine administered at or above 12.5 mg/(kg BW·d) induced severe PHS and resulted in acute mortality and RVH ( < 0.05). Hematocrit also slightly increased by caffeine supplementation ( = 0.07). In Exp. 2 caffeine-treated broilers exposed to cold temperatures remarkably exhibited PHS incidences and developed RVH with right ventricular to total ventricular weight ratios of 30% or greater. Moreover, hematocrit significantly increased because of caffeine supplementation in cool ambient temperature ( = 0.002). Our data demonstrate that caffeine induces high incidences of PHS in broilers, which is exacerbated by exposure to low temperatures.

  2. [A case of primary pulmonary hypertension in a patient with Raynaud's disease].

    PubMed

    Tłustochowicz, W; Cwetsch, A

    A case of a 50-year female patient with Raynaud's disease is presented. The primary pulmonary hypertension accompanying the underlying condition suggests that the excessive contractibility of the vessels, typical for the Raynaud's disease, may play a role in the etiology of the primary pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Common Respiratory Conditions: Classification, Evaluation and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fein, Daniel G.; Zaidi, Ali N.; Sulica, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to chronic respiratory disease and/or hypoxia is classified as World Health Organization (WHO) Group III pulmonary hypertension. The patients most commonly encountered in clinical practice with group III PH include those with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), diffuse parenchymal lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. The purpose of this review is to outline the variable clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in the most common pulmonary disease states and how a clinician may approach the management of these patients. PMID:27571110

  4. The Post-Anesthetic Care of Pediatric Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chau, Destiny F; Gangadharan, Meera; Hartke, Lopa P; Twite, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    Few conditions make even the most experienced pediatric anesthesiologists take pause. Pulmonary hypertension is one such condition due to the associated high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Much is written about the intraoperative management of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This article will instead focus on postoperative care and review the evidence in support of a risk stratification approach for the post-anesthetic disposition of these patients. The total risk for post-anesthetic adverse events includes the patient's baseline risk factors and the incremental risks imposed by the procedure and anesthetic. A proposal with recommendations to guide practitioners and a table summarizing relevant factors are provided. Last, the readers' attention is drawn to the heterogeneity of pulmonary hypertensive disease. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (precapillary) differs significantly from pulmonary venous hypertension (postcapillary); the anesthetic management for one may be relatively contraindicated in the other. Their dissimilarities justify the need to distinguish them for study and research endeavors.

  5. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance of pulmonary remodelling in pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jocelyn; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in left heart disease, classified as group II, is the most common form of PH that occurs in approximately 60% of cases of reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Although relatively much is known about hemodynamic stages (passive or reactive) and their consequences on the right ventricle (RV) there is no consensus on the best hemodynamic definition of group II PH. In addition, the main pathways that lead to lung capillary injury and impaired biology of small artery remodelling processes are largely unknown. Typical lung manifestations of an increased pulmonary pressure and progressive RV-pulmonary circulation uncoupling are an abnormal alveolar capillary gas diffusion, impaired lung mechanics (restriction), and exercise ventilation inefficiency. Of several classes of pulmonary vasodilators currently clinically available, oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition, because of its strong selectivity for targeting the cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the pulmonary circulation, is increasingly emerging as an attractive opportunity to reach hemodynamic benefits, reverse capillary injury, and RV remodelling, and improve functional capacity. Guanylate cyclase stimulators offer an additional intriguing opportunity but the lack of selectivity and systemic effects might preclude some of the anticipated benefits on the pulmonary circulation. Future trials will determine whether new routes of pharmacologic strategy aimed at targeting lung structural and vascular remodelling might affect morbidity and mortality in left heart disease populations. We believe that this therapeutic goal rather than a pure hemodynamic effect might ultimately emerge as an important challenge for the clinician.

  6. Pulmonary vascular pressure profiles in broilers selected for susceptibility to pulmonary hypertension syndrome: age and sex comparisons.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Eanes, M L; Hamal, K R; Anthony, N B

    2010-09-01

    Broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) have an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) when compared with PHS-resistant broilers. Two distinctly different syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH), both are associated with increases in PAP. Pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs when the right ventricle must elevate the PAP to overcome increased resistance to flow through restrictive pulmonary arterioles upstream from the pulmonary capillaries. In contrast, PVH is commonly caused by increased downstream (postcapillary) resistance. The sites of resistance to pulmonary blood flow are deduced by making contemporaneous measurements of the PAP and the wedge pressure (WP) and calculating the transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG) (TPG = PAP - WP). We obtained PAP and WP values from 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, and 24-wk-old anesthetized male and female broilers from a PHS-susceptible line. Pressures were recorded as a catheter was advanced through a wing vein to the pulmonary artery and onward until the WP was obtained. In addition to sex and age comparisons of vascular pressure gradients, the data also were pooled to obtain 3 cohorts for broilers having the lowest PAP values (n = 52; range: 12 to 22.9 mmHg), intermediate PAP values (n = 63; range: 23 to 32.9 mmHg), and highest PAP values (n = 62; range: 33 to 62 mmHg) independent of age or sex. Within each of the age, sex, and PAP cohort comparisons, broilers with elevated PAP consistently exhibited the hemodynamic characteristics of pulmonary arterial hypertension (elevated PAP and TPG combined with a normal WP) and not PVH (elevated PAP and WP combined with a normal or reduced TPG). Susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased precapillary (arteriole) resistance.

  7. Severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity are not associated with worse functional outcomes after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Le, Catherine N.; Robbins, Ivan M.; Petracek, Michael R.; Pugh, Meredith E.; Brittain, Evan L.; Hemnes, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Predictors of functional outcomes in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) are important to identify preoperatively. We hypothesized that baseline severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity would not be associated with 6-month functional outcomes after PTE. Clinical and hemodynamic data were collected on consecutive patients undergoing PTE from 2008 to 2014. Patients were stratified according to baseline pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and body mass index (BMI). Six-minute walk distance (6MWD), New York Heart Association functional class (FC), and echocardiography were assessed in each group at baseline and 6 months after PTE. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate for associations between functional outcomes and baseline PVR and BMI. Forty-two patients underwent PTE and had 6-month follow up data. In comparisons of patients with high and low baseline PVR, the baseline characteristics, distribution of disease, 6MWD, and FC were similar. Postoperative hemodynamics for both groups were similar. At 6 months, both groups achieved improvements in FC, and there were no between-group differences in the change in 6MWD or FC. In comparisons of obese and nonobese patients, perioperative and FC improvement were similar; however, obese patients achieved a greater improvement in 6MWD than nonobese patients (P = 0.04). In conclusion, our data suggest that baseline severity of CTEPH and obesity were not associated with worse functional outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these results, as these findings could have implications for patient selection for PTE. PMID:27252843

  8. [Successful pregnancy in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Case report].

    PubMed

    Szenczi, Orsolya; Karlócai, Kristóf; Bucsek, László; Rigó, János

    2016-04-10

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by progressive increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance which lead to right ventricular failure and death. Pregnancy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is contraindicated because of the high maternal and fetal mortality. The authors present a case of successful pregnancy and delivery of a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in Hungary for the first time. The aim of the report was to demonstrate that management and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in a pregnant woman is a complex and multidisciplinary task that should involve obstetrician, cardiologist and anesthesiologist. Those patients who become pregnant and do not wish to terminate the pregnancy must be referred to obstetric centers where a multidiciplinary approach is taken.

  9. Development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in women: interplay of sex hormones and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Meredith E; Hemnes, Anna R

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature, ultimately resulting in right heart failure and death. This disease is strongly predominant in females, although little is known regarding how sex influences disease development. Recent developments highlighting the importance of estrogen metabolites in both animal models and human disease have substantially increased our understanding of PAH in women. This review will focus on general knowledge of PAH, translational and basic science data regarding sex hormones in the pulmonary vasculature and on clinical issues that are particular to women with PAH. Future directions for study include the influence of sex hormones on right ventricular responses, improving the understanding of the influence of estrogen exposure in human disease and the study of dehydroepiandrosterone in basic science and human disease. PMID:20187732

  10. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection with suspected pulmonary hypertension in a cat.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, Geoff; Daley, Michael; Makara, Mariano; Beijerink, Niek

    2015-12-01

    Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection has previously been reported in the dog, but never in a cat. A 14-month-old Devon Rex cat was presented for echocardiography to evaluate a heart murmur noticed during a routine examination. The pertinent finding was right-sided cardiomegaly in the absence of an atrial septal defect or tricuspid regurgitation; pulmonary hypertension was suspected. A thoracic computed tomographic angiography study identified a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection with the lobar veins of the left caudal, right middle, right caudal and accessory lung lobes draining into the caudal vena cava. The resultant volume overload is an easily overlooked differential diagnosis for right-sided cardiac enlargement. This is the first such report of this anomaly in a cat.

  11. Hypoxia Does neither Stimulate Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Proliferation in Mice and Rats with Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Remodeling nor in Human Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lunyin; Hales, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypoxia results in pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling due to induction of pulmonary artery cell proliferation. Besides pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) are also involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension, but the effect of hypoxia on PAEC proliferation has not been completely understood. Methods We investigated PAEC proliferation in mice and rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling as well as in human PAECs under hypoxia. Results and Conclusion We did not find significant PAEC proliferation in chronically hypoxic rats or mice. There was a slight decrease in proliferation in mice and rats with pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. We also did not find significant human PAEC proliferation and cell cycle progression under different levels of oxygen (1, 2, 3, 5 and 10%) for one day, although the same conditions of hypoxia induced significant proliferation and cell cycle progression in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery fibroblasts. Exposure to hypoxia for 7 days also did not increase PAEC proliferation. These results demonstrated that hypoxia alone is not a stimulus to PAEC proliferation in vivo and in vitro. The present study provides a novel role for PAECs in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. PMID:21691120

  12. [Female gender and pulmonary arterial hypertension: a complex relationship].

    PubMed

    Manes, Alessandra; Palazzini, Massimiliano; Dardi, Fabio; D'Adamo, Antonio; Rinaldi, Andrea; Galiè, Nazzareno

    2012-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe clinical condition defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (≤15 mmHg). In PAH the increase in pulmonary pressure is due to an intrinsic disease of the small pulmonary arteries (resistance vessels) characterized by vascular proliferation and remodeling. The increase in pulmonary vascular resistance with subsequent elevation of the right ventricular afterload leads to right ventricular failure after variable periods of time. Although targeted disease therapies have been developed over the last decade that resulted in improved quality of life and outcome for PAH patients, the prognosis is still severe and there remains no cure for this disease. From a clinical standpoint, PAH includes a group of heterogeneous pathological conditions: in idiopathic, heritable and drug- and toxin-induced PAH, since there are no predisposing clinical conditions, the structural changes in pulmonary circulation are "isolated"; on the other hand, PAH may be associated with some predisposing diseases such as connective tissue disease, HIV infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, schistosomiasis, and chronic hemolytic anemia. PAH can affect individuals of all age groups, and mean age at diagnosis is around 50 years. Epidemiological data show a great preponderance of females in PAH; the high prevalence of females is particularly evident in the so-called "isolated" PAH forms, whereas in PAH associated with other diseases the female:male ratio is strongly influenced by the epidemiological features of the specific predisposing condition. The reason for the higher female prevalence in PAH has never been clarified: some hypotheses involve the role of sexual hormones (estrogens), autoimmunity, or an X-linked locus in disease predisposition. Female gender is not associated with a different clinical presentation. However, the age of onset tends to be earlier in females than

  13. Incidence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ranju; Perumandla, Sirisha; Patsiornik, Yelena; Niranjan, Selvanayagam; Ohri, Anju

    2006-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD). METHOD: Twenty-seven patients with a diagnosis of CMPD were included in the study. Patients were excluded if they had a secondary cause of PH. Diagnosis of PH was established if right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was >35 mmHg. RESULTS: Diagnosis of PH was established in 14 out of 27 patients. Two patients were excluded from analysis because of poor ejection fraction on TTE, resulting in a final diagnosis of PH in 12 of 25 (48%) patients. Of these 25 patients, seven of nine with essential thrombocytosis (ET), five of 14 with polycythemia vera (PV), and 0 out of two with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) had PH. All patients were asymptomatic at the time of their most recent visit. There was no relationship between PH and age at diagnosis, duration of disease, platelet count and hematocrit at diagnosis or during follow-up, both for the entire cohort or for specific diagnosis of ET or PV. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary hypertension appears to be common in patients with CMPD. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of treatment on PH and long-term survival in these patients. PMID:17128687

  14. Echocardiographic study of pulmonary hypertension syndrome in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lemus, L A; Miller, M W; Jeffrey, J S; Odom, T W

    2000-01-01

    Echocardiography was used to study cardiovascular structure and function during the development of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS) in broiler chickens. Body weight-normalized right and left ventricular diameters at both end-diastole (RVDD, LVDD) and end-systole (RVDS, LVDS) were determined weekly in broilers reared under either normobaric (altitude, 96.7 m) or hypobaric conditions (simulated altitude, 2900 m) until 5 wk of age. Hypobaric-exposed broilers had larger RVDD at 3 and 4 wk of age and larger RVDS at 3, 4, and 5 wk of age. Hypobaric-exposed broilers also had larger LVDD at 2, 3, 4, and 5 wk of age and larger LVDS at 4 wk of age. Right (RVFS) and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) were smaller in hypobaric- vs. normobaric-exposed broilers at 3, 4, and 5 wk of age and at 4 wk of age, respectively. Among hypobaric-exposed birds, PHS-positive (+) broilers had larger RVDD and RVDS than PHS-negative (-) broilers on week 3 and on weeks 1 and 3 after hypobaric exposure, respectively. PHS-positive (+) broilers also had smaller RVFS on week 1 after hypobaric exposure. Electrocardiographic and post-mortem data indicated that PHS+ broilers also developed right ventricular hypertrophy when compared with PHS-negative (-) broilers. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PHS develops as a result of pulmonary hypertension and cardiac overload and suggest that PHS+ broilers have a greater and more persistent reaction to hypoxia than PHS- broilers.

  15. An international physician survey of pulmonary arterial hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Hinzmann, Barbara; Heinz, Sabina; Gall, Henning; Jenkins, David; Kim, Nick H.; Lang, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We conducted an international study to evaluate practices in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) globally across different geographic regions. Between July and October 2012, PAH-treating physicians completed a 15-minute online questionnaire and provided patient record data for their 3 or 5 most recent patients with PAH. Overall, 560 physicians (Europe: 278; United States: 160; Argentina: 53; Japan: 69) completed the questionnaire and provided data for 2,618 patients. The proportion of physicians who described themselves as working in or affiliated with a specialized pulmonary hypertension center ranged from 13% in Argentina to 74% in the United States. At the time of diagnosis, patients’ New York Heart Association functional class differed significantly between regions. At the time of last assessment, functional class had improved overall, and differences between regions had largely disappeared. A large proportion of patients did not undergo right heart catheterization for the diagnosis of PAH (Europe: 7%–21%; United States: 21%; Japan: 19%; Argentina: 51%). Variations in management included greater use of phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors in the United States than in Europe and Japan and greater use of triple or greater combination therapy in Japan than in other regions. Results from this study, which includes a global aspect of PAH care, demonstrate that there are significant differences in PAH management between regions and low adherence to guidelines recommending right heart catheterization for the diagnosis of PAH. PMID:27683611

  16. Review of bosentan in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay, Eli; Fraser, John; McNeil, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The dual endothelin receptor antagonist, bosentan, is an orally active therapy, which is effective in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This review critically appraises the evidence for the efficacy of bosentan in idiopathic and familial PAH, in PAH associated with connective tissue disease and in PAH which may develop in association with other conditions. Data from the pivotal placebo controlled studies and their open labeled extensions as well as long term survival and quality of life data is presented. Data is also presented on the potential benefit of bosentan in patients with inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The safety and tolerability of bosentan as well as drug interactions are discussed. Dosage recommendations in adults and pediatrics are presented. An algorithm is provided to guide the reader in monitoring potential increases in alanine and aspartate transaminase levels that may occur with bosentan use and the dose adjustments that are recommended as a result of any increase in the levels of these enzymes are shown. Finally, the role of bosentan as part of combination therapy in PAH is examined. PMID:18200808

  17. MR phase-contrast imaging in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening, multifactorial pathophysiological haemodynamic condition, diagnosed when the mean pulmonary arterial pressure equals or exceeds 25 mmHg at rest during right heart catheterization. Cardiac MRI, in general, and MR phase-contrast (PC) imaging, in particular, have emerged as potential techniques for the standardized assessment of cardiovascular function, morphology and haemodynamics in PH. Allowing the quantification and characterization of macroscopic cardiovascular blood flow, MR PC imaging offers non-invasive evaluation of haemodynamic alterations associated with PH. Techniques used to study the PH include both the routine two-dimensional (2D) approach measuring predominant velocities through an acquisition plane and the rapidly evolving four-dimensional (4D) PC imaging, which enables the assessment of the complete time-resolved, three-directional blood-flow velocity field in a volume. Numerous parameters such as pulmonary arterial mean velocity, vessel distensibility, flow acceleration time and volume and tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity, as well as the duration and onset of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery, have been explored to either diagnose PH or find non-invasive correlates to right heart catheter parameters. Furthermore, PC imaging-based analysis of pulmonary arterial pulse-wave velocities, wall shear stress and kinetic energy losses grants novel insights into cardiopulmonary remodelling in PH. This review aimed to outline the current applications of 2D and 4D PC imaging in PH and show why this technique has the potential to contribute significantly to early diagnosis and characterization of PH.

  18. Galectin-3 inhibition ameliorates hypoxia-induced pulmonary artery hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Mingwen; Li, Miaomiao; Li, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which is important in inflammation, fibrosis and heart failure. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of Gal-3 in hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Male C57BL/6J and Gal-3−/− mice were exposed to hypoxia, then the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and Fulton's index were measured, and Gal-3 mRNA and protein expression in the pulmonary arteries was analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Compared with the control, hypoxia increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of Gal-3 in wild type murine pulmonary arteries. Gal-3 deletion reduced the hypoxia-induced upregulation of RVSP and Fulton's index. Furthermore, human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAECs) and human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) were stimulated by hypoxia in vitro, and Gal-3 expression was inhibited by small interfering RNA. The inflammatory response of HPAECs, and the proliferation and cell cycle distribution of HPASMCs was also analyzed. Gal-3 inhibition alleviated the hypoxia-induced inflammatory response in HPAECs, including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 secretion, expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and adhesion of THP-1 monocytes. Gal-3 inhibition also reduced hypoxia-induced proliferation of HPASMCs, partially by reducing cyclin D1 expression and increasing p27 expression. Furthermore, Gal-3 inhibition suppressed HPASMC switching from a ‘contractile’ to a ‘synthetic’ phenotype. In conclusion, Gal-3 serves a fundamental role in hypoxia-induced PAH, and inhibition of Gal-3 may represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxia-induced PAH. PMID:27959409

  19. Endothelial GATA-6 deficiency promotes pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ghatnekar, Angela; Chrobak, Izabela; Reese, Charlie; Stawski, Lukasz; Seta, Francesca; Wirrig, Elaine; Paez-Cortez, Jesus; Markiewicz, Margaret; Asano, Yoshihide; Harley, Russell; Silver, Richard; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Trojanowska, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by pulmonary vasculopathy with elevation of pulmonary artery pressure, often culminating in right ventricular failure. GATA-6, a member of the GATA family of zinc-finger transcription factors, is highly expressed in quiescent vasculature and is frequently lost during vascular injury. We hypothesized that endothelial GATA-6 may play a critical role in the molecular mechanisms underlying endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction in PAH. Here we report that GATA-6 is markedly reduced in pulmonary ECs lining both occluded and nonoccluded vessels in patients with idiopathic and systemic sclerosis-associated PAH. GATA-6 transcripts are also rapidly decreased in rodent PAH models. Endothelial GATA-6 is a direct transcriptional regulator of genes controlling vascular tone [endothelin-1, endothelin-1 receptor type A, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)], pro-inflammatory genes, CX3CL1 (fractalkine), 5-lipoxygenease-activating protein, and markers of vascular remodeling, including PAI-1 and RhoB. Mice with the genetic deletion of GATA-6 in ECs (Gata6-KO) spontaneously develop elevated pulmonary artery pressure and increased vessel muscularization, and these features are further exacerbated in response to hypoxia. Furthermore, innate immune cells including macrophages (CD11b(+)/F4/80(+)), granulocytes (Ly6G(+)/CD45(+)), and dendritic cells (CD11b(+)/CD11c(+)) are significantly increased in normoxic Gata6-KO mice. Together, our findings suggest a critical role of endothelial GATA-6 deficiency in development and disease progression in PAH.

  20. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma: An Uncommon Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in a Newborn Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chatmethakul, Trassanee; Bhat, Ramachandra; Alkaabi, Maryam; Siddiqui, Abdul; Peevy, Keith; Zayek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal and diffuse infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas commonly present with signs of high-output congestive heart failure. In addition, prolonged persistent pulmonary overcirculation eventually leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension at a later age. We report a 2-day old, full-term infant with multifocal, large infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, who presented with an early onset of pulmonary hypertension, managed successfully with supportive care and systemic therapy directed toward the involution of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma. PMID:27468364

  1. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma: An Uncommon Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in a Newborn Infant.

    PubMed

    Chatmethakul, Trassanee; Bhat, Ramachandra; Alkaabi, Maryam; Siddiqui, Abdul; Peevy, Keith; Zayek, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Multifocal and diffuse infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas commonly present with signs of high-output congestive heart failure. In addition, prolonged persistent pulmonary overcirculation eventually leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension at a later age. We report a 2-day old, full-term infant with multifocal, large infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, who presented with an early onset of pulmonary hypertension, managed successfully with supportive care and systemic therapy directed toward the involution of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension: Scientometric Analysis and Density-Equalizing Mapping.

    PubMed

    Götting, Michael; Schwarzer, Mario; Gerber, Alexander; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by the increase of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the lung circulation. Despite the large number of experimental and clinical studies conducted on pulmonary hypertension, there is no comprehensive work that analyzed the global research activity on PH so far. We retrieved the bibliometric data of the publications on pulmonary hypertension for two periods from the Web of science database. Here, we set the first investigation period from 1900 to 2007 (t1) due to the cited half life of articles and the relating difficulties to interpret the citation parameters. The second evaluation period (t2) covers the time interval from 2008 onwards including the year 2015. The data were analyzed and processed to density-equalizing maps using the NewQIS platform. A total number of 18,986 publications were identified in t1 that come from 85 countries. The US published the highest number of publications (n = 7,290), followed by the UK, Germany, Japan and France. In t2 19,676 items could be found worked out by 130 countries. The raking started just the same with the USA as most publishing nation with 7,127 publications on PH, followed by the UK and Germany. Japan fell back on 6th place, whereas China came into view on the 5th position. Analyzing the average citation rate as a parameter for research quality, Mexico reached the highest value in t1 and Ireland in t2. While, the country specific h-index underlined the leading position of the US research in both evaluation periods again. The average number of international collaboration items was expanding from none in 1978 to 530 items in 2015 with the USA as the country with the highest number of collaboration articles. The present study is the first large scale density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of global PH research activity. Our data draw a sketch of the global research architecture in this field, indicating a need for specific research programs in countries with

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension: Scientometric Analysis and Density-Equalizing Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Götting, Michael; Schwarzer, Mario; Gerber, Alexander; Groneberg, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by the increase of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the lung circulation. Despite the large number of experimental and clinical studies conducted on pulmonary hypertension, there is no comprehensive work that analyzed the global research activity on PH so far. We retrieved the bibliometric data of the publications on pulmonary hypertension for two periods from the Web of science database. Here, we set the first investigation period from 1900 to 2007 (t1) due to the cited half life of articles and the relating difficulties to interpret the citation parameters. The second evaluation period (t2) covers the time interval from 2008 onwards including the year 2015. The data were analyzed and processed to density-equalizing maps using the NewQIS platform. A total number of 18,986 publications were identified in t1 that come from 85 countries. The US published the highest number of publications (n = 7,290), followed by the UK, Germany, Japan and France. In t2 19,676 items could be found worked out by 130 countries. The raking started just the same with the USA as most publishing nation with 7,127 publications on PH, followed by the UK and Germany. Japan fell back on 6th place, whereas China came into view on the 5th position. Analyzing the average citation rate as a parameter for research quality, Mexico reached the highest value in t1 and Ireland in t2. While, the country specific h-index underlined the leading position of the US research in both evaluation periods again. The average number of international collaboration items was expanding from none in 1978 to 530 items in 2015 with the USA as the country with the highest number of collaboration articles. The present study is the first large scale density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of global PH research activity. Our data draw a sketch of the global research architecture in this field, indicating a need for specific research programs in countries with

  4. The role of inflammation and autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kherbeck, Nada; Tamby, Mathieu C; Bussone, Guillaume; Dib, Hanadi; Perros, Frederic; Humbert, Marc; Mouthon, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by a remodeling of pulmonary arteries with endothelial cell, fibroblast, and vascular smooth muscle cell activation and proliferation. Since pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs frequently in autoimmune conditions such as systemic sclerosis, inflammation and autoimmunity have been suspected to play a critical role in both idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension. High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and interleukin-6, platelet-derived growth factor, or macrophage inflammatory protein 1 have been found in lung samples of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, along with inflammatory cell infiltrates mainly composed of macrophages and dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes. In addition, circulating autoantibodies are found in the peripheral blood of patients. Thus, autoimmunity and inflammation probably play a role in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this setting, it would be important to set-up new experimental models of pulmonary arterial hypertension, in order to define novel therapeutics that specifically target immune disturbances in this devastating condition.

  5. The effect of nifedipine [correction of nifidipine] and cimetidine on the haemodynamics of Egyptian bilharzial pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    el Hawy, A M; Negm, I A; el-Rakaybe, A; Abdel-Maged, A I; Mansour, R E

    1993-04-01

    The pathogenesis of bilharzial pulmonary hypertension differs from the hypoxic type of pulmonary hypertension. Nifedipine [corrected] a calcium channel blocker was tried as a treatment for lowering pulmonary artery pressure. Nifedipine [corrected] 20 mg sublingually was found to lower the pulmonary artery pressure but not to a statistically significant level. No significant changes before and after 200 mg cimetidine intravenous, were seen.

  6. [Treatment of compression of the left main coronary artery in patients with pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Talavera, María L; Diez, Mirta; Cáneva, Jorge O; Boughen, Roberto P; Valdivieso, León; Mendiz, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Chest pain is a frequent symptom in patients with pulmonary hypertension of any etiology. Its pathophysiology has not been clearly established, the proposed causes are ischemia due to increased right ventricle wall stress, transient increased pulmonary hypertension resulting in acute pulmonary artery dilatation and external compression of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) by a dilated pulmonary artery. We report and discuss here three cases where the association between chest pain and compression of the LMCA by a dilated pulmonary artery could be shown, and they were treated with coronary stenting.

  7. [Pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale complicating ventricular vascular shunting for hydrocephalus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Keck, E W; Feige, M; Riesner, K

    1978-04-01

    Obstructive pulmonary vascular disease and pulmonary hypertension are facts daily encountered by pediatric cardiologists. However longterm thromboembolism, pulmonary vascular obstruction and cor pulmonale are rare conditions in children. The case report of a four years old child treated by a Pudenz ventriculo venous shunt for hydrocephalus is presented. Due to fibrin thromboembolism from the Pudenz shunting tube pulmonary vascular obliteration, pulmonary hypertension and chronic cor pulmonale developed. The autopsy findings are in agreement with the ECG, x-ray, cardiac catheterization data and the angiocardiogram.

  8. Copper dependence of angioproliferation in pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Harm J; Mizuno, Shiro; Guignabert, Christophe; Al Hussaini, Aysar A; Farkas, Daniela; Ruiter, Gerrina; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Fadel, Elie; Allegood, Jeremy C; Humbert, Marc; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Spiegel, Sarah; Farkas, Laszlo; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2012-05-01

    Obliteration of the vascular lumen by endothelial cell growth is a hallmark of many forms of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copper plays a significant role in the control of endothelial cell proliferation in cancer and wound-healing. We sought to determine whether angioproliferation in rats with experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell proliferation in humans depend on the proangiogenic action of copper. A copper-depleted diet prevented, and copper chelation with tetrathiomolybdate reversed, the development of severe experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension. The copper chelation-induced reopening of obliterated vessels was caused by caspase-independent apoptosis, reduced vessel wall cell proliferation, and a normalization of vessel wall structure. No evidence was found for a role of super oxide-1 inhibition or lysyl-oxidase-1 inhibition in the reversal of angioproliferation. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibited the proliferation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from explanted lungs from control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. These data suggest that the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation by a copper-restricting strategy could be explored as a new therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It remains to be determined, however, whether potential toxicity to the right ventricle is offset by the beneficial pulmonary vascular effects of antiangiogenic treatment in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  9. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-1 attenuates cold-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Sun, Zhongjie

    2013-03-01

    Chronic exposure to cold caused pulmonary arterial hypertension (cold-induced pulmonary hypertension [CIPH]) and increased phosphodiesterase-1C (PDE-1C) expression in pulmonary arteries (PAs) in rats. The purpose of this study is to investigate a hypothesis that inhibition of PDE-1 would decrease inflammatory infiltrates and superoxide production leading to attenuation of CIPH. Three groups of male rats were exposed to moderate cold (5±1°C) continuously, whereas 3 groups were maintained at room temperature (23.5±1°C, warm; 6 rats/group). After 8-week exposure to cold, 3 groups in each temperature condition received continuous intravenous infusion of 8-isobutyl-methylxanthine (8-IBMX) (PDE-1 inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or vehicle, respectively, for 1 week. Cold exposure significantly increased right-ventricular systolic pressure compared with warm groups (33.8±3.2 versus 18.6±0.3 mm Hg), indicating that animals developed CIPH. Notably, treatment with 8-IBMX significantly attenuated the cold-induced increase in right ventricular pressure (23.5±1.8 mm Hg). Cold exposure also caused right-ventricular hypertrophy, whereas 8-IBMX reversed cold-induced right ventricular hypertrophy. Cold exposure increased PDE-1C protein expression, macrophage infiltration, NADPH oxidase activity, and superoxide production in PAs and resulted in PA remodeling. 8-IBMX abolished cold-induced upregulation of PDE-1C in PAs. Interestingly, inhibition of PDE-1 eliminated cold-induced macrophage infiltration, NADPH oxidase activation, and superoxide production in PAs and reversed PA remodeling. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin abolished cold-induced superoxide production and attenuated CIPH and PA remodeling. In conclusion, inhibition of PDE-1 attenuated CIPH and reversed cold-induced PA remodeling by suppressing macrophage infiltration and superoxide production, suggesting that upregulation of PDE-1C expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of CIPH.

  10. An international physician survey of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Henning; Hinzmann, Barbara; Heinz, Sabina; Jenkins, David; Kim, Nick H.; Lang, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We conducted an international study to evaluate practices in the diagnosis and management of patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) globally across different regions. Between August and October 2012, CTEPH-treating physicians completed a 15-minute online questionnaire and provided patient record data for their 2–5 most recent patients with CTEPH. Overall, 496 physicians (Europe: 260; United States: 152; Argentina: 52; Japan: 32) completed the questionnaire and provided patient record data for 1,748 patients. The proportion of physicians who described themselves as working in or affiliated with a specialized pulmonary hypertension (PH) center ranged from 38% in France and Italy to 83% in the United States. A large proportion of patients did not undergo ventilation/perfusion scanning (46%–67%) or right heart catheterization (24%–57%) for the diagnosis of CTEPH. Referral rates for pulmonary endarterectomy evaluation ranged from 25% in Japan to 44% in Europe, with higher referral rates in PH centers; the main reasons for lack of referral were that surgery was not considered unless medical treatment was failing and patient refusal. Other variations in management included greater use of phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors in the United States than in Europe and Japan and greater use of combination treatment in the United States than in Europe. Physicians’ perceptions of their treatment strategy were generally consistent with patient record data. Results from this study, which includes a global aspect of CTEPH care, demonstrate not only regional differences in CTEPH management but, more importantly, considerable nonadherence to the diagnosis and treatment guidelines for CTEPH, even in PH centers. PMID:28090289

  11. Prognostic Significance of Biomarkers in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naamani, Nadine; Palevsky, Harold I.; Lederer, David J.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Mathai, Stephen C.; Roberts, Kari E.; Tracy, Russell P.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Girgis, Reda E.; Shimbo, Daichi; Post, Wendy S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature that is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and right ventricular dysfunction. Objectives: The main objective was to determine whether endothelial, inflammatory, and cardiac biomarkers would be associated with the World Health Organization functional assessment and survival in patients with PAH. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with PAH enrolled in the Randomized Clinical Trial of Aspirin and Simvastatin for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (ASA-STAT). Biomarkers (N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP [NT-pro-BNP], von Willebrand factor [vWF], soluble P selectin, C-reactive protein, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, tumor necrosis factor, IL-6, β-thromboglobulin, and thromboxane B2) were measured at baseline. Patients from the study were followed until lung transplantation, death, or August 1, 2013. Ordinal logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were performed. Measurements and Main Results: Sixty-five patients with PAH were enrolled. The mean age was 51 years, and 86% were women. Higher vWF activity, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and higher thromboxane B2 levels were associated with worse World Health Organization functional class after adjustment for age, sex, and etiology of PAH. Higher NT-pro-BNP levels, lower vWF activity, and lower total cholesterol were associated with an increased risk of death or lung transplant after adjustment for age, sex, etiology of PAH, and 6-minute-walk distance. Conclusions: In patients with PAH, lower vWF activity and cholesterol levels and higher NT-pro-BNP levels at baseline were associated with an increased risk of death or transplantation. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00384865). PMID:26501464

  12. Endothelin-1 Pathway Polymorphisms and Outcomes in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Demarco, Teresa; Frost, Adaani E.; Torbicki, Adam; Langleben, David; Pulido, Tomas; Correa-Jaque, Priscilla; Passineau, Michael J.; Wiener, Howard W.; Tamari, Mayumi; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; Tiwari, Hemant K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive fatal disease. Variable response and tolerability to PAH therapeutics suggests that genetic differences may influence outcomes. The endothelin pathway is central to pulmonary vascular function, and several polymorphisms and/or mutations in the genes coding for endothelin (ET)-1 and its receptors correlate with the clinical manifestations of other diseases. Objectives: To examine the interaction of ET-1 pathway polymorphisms and treatment responses of patients with PAH treated with ET receptor antagonists (ERAs). Methods: A total of 1,198 patients with PAH were prospectively enrolled from 45 U.S. and Canadian pulmonary hypertension centers or retrospectively from global sites participating in the STRIDE (Sitaxsentan To Relieve Impaired Exercise) trials. Comprehensive objective measures including a 6-minute-walk test, Borg dyspnea score, functional class, and laboratory studies were completed at baseline, before the initiation of ERAs, and repeated serially. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms from ET-1 pathway candidate genes were selected from a completed genome-wide association study performed on the study cohort. Measurements and Main Results: Patient efficacy outcomes were analyzed for a relationship between ET-1 pathway polymorphisms and clinical efficacy using predefined, composite positive and negative outcome measures in 715 European descent samples. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs11157866) in the G-protein alpha and gamma subunits gene was significantly associated, accounting for multiple testing, with a combined improvement in functional class and 6-minute-walk distance at 12 and 18 months and marginally significant at 24 months. Conclusions: ET-1 pathway associated polymorphisms may influence the clinical efficacy of ERA therapy for PAH. Further prospective studies are needed. PMID:26252367

  13. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440

  14. Complex inheritance in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension patients with several mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pousada, Guillermo; Baloira, Adolfo; Valverde, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) is a rare and progressive disease with low incidence and prevalence, and elevated mortality. PAH is characterized by increased mean pulmonary artery pressure. The aim of this study was to analyse patients with combined mutations in BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG and KCNA5 genes and to establish a genotype-phenotype correlation. Major genes were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing. Genotype-phenotype correlation was performed. Fifty-seven (28 idiopathic PAH, 29 associated PAH group I) were included. Several mutations in different genes, classified as pathogenic by in silico analysis, were present in 26% of PAH patients. The most commonly involved gene was BMPR2 (12 patients) followed by ENG gene (9 patients). ACVRL1 and KCNA5 genes showed very low incidence of mutations (5 and 1 patients, respectively). Genotype-phenotype correlation showed statistically significant differences for gender (p = 0.045), age at diagnosis (p = 0.035), pulmonary vascular resistance (p = 0.030), cardiac index (p = 0.035) and absence of response to treatment (p = 0.011). PAH is consequence of a heterogeneous constellation of genetic arrangements. Patients with several pathogenic mutations seem to display a more severe phenotype. PMID:27630060

  15. Right Ventricular Hemodynamics in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, James; Fenster, Brett; Hertzberg, Jean; Schroeder, Joyce

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) have allowed for characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV), including calculation of vorticity and circulation, and qualitative visual assessment of coherent flow patterns. In this study, we investigate qualitative and quantitative differences in right ventricular hemodynamics between subjects with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal controls. Fifteen (15) PH subjects and 10 age-matched controls underwent same day 3D time resolved CMR and echocardiography. Echocardiography was used to determine right ventricular diastolic function as well as pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). Velocity vectors, vorticity vectors, and streamlines in the RV were visualized in Paraview and total RV Early (E) and Atrial (A) wave diastolic vorticity was quantified. Visualizations of blood flow in the RV are presented for PH and normal subjects. The hypothesis that PH subjects exhibit different RV vorticity levels than normals during diastole is tested and the relationship between RV vorticity and PASP is explored. The mechanics of RV vortex formation are discussed within the context of pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular diastolic function coincident with PH.

  16. Cavitating Lung Lesions in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Heather; Barraclough, Richard; Davies, Christine; Armstrong, Iain; Kiely, David G; van Beek, Edwin JR

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to assess the incidence and natural history of cavitating lung lesions in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), note thrombus position between patients with and without a cavity and determine whether their development is a predictor of mortality. Materials & Methods All patients with confirmed CTEPH attending our Pulmonary Vascular Unit between February 1998 and January 2006 were identified, and a review of their notes and imaging was performed. Thrombus position, pre-disposing factors, cavity progression and mortality were noted, and comparisons made between those with and without a cavity. Results 11 of 104 patients had a cavity (10.6%). Thrombus distribution was similar between those with and those without a cavity. Preceding infection was not proven in most cases. 27.3% of patients with a cavity died compared to 26.8% of those without. Conclusion Cavity formation in CTEPH is 3 times more common than in acute pulmonary embolism. Thrombus position does not predict cavity development, and the presence of a cavity may serve as an indicator of disease severity but does not appear to predict mortality. PMID:22470592

  17. Peripheral airways obstruction in idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (primary).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bonetti, P; Lupi-Herrera, E; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Barrios, R; Seoane, M; Sandoval, J

    1983-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung were studied in ten nonsmokers with idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (IPAH) (mean pulmonary artery pressure 65.7 +/- 30 mm Hg). In the routine lung test, residual volume was found to be abnormal (greater than 120 percent of the predicted) in seven patients, and measured airway resistance was normal in eight out of the ten patients. A decreased FEF 75-85 percent, abnormal values for the helium-air flow ratios and increased closing capacities were documented in eight of ten patients in whom lung elastic recoil was normal (six of ten) or increased (four of ten). These features suggest peripheral airways obstruction (PAO) which was also supported by histopathologic findings in three cases (one biopsy and two necropsies). The observed changes in lung compliance could be related to the behavior of the coupling of the air-space and vascular compartments. The etiology of PAO in IPAH patients is not known, but our results indicate that both the peripheral airways and the pulmonary circulation are affected. The knowledge of PAO in IPAH patients could help to better understand the observed V/Q inequality in this entity.

  18. Vascular narrowing in pulmonary arterial hypertension is heterogeneous: rethinking resistance.

    PubMed

    Rol, Nina; Timmer, Esther M; Faes, Theo J C; Noordegraaf, Anton Vonk; Grünberg, Katrien; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Westerhof, Nico

    2017-03-01

    In idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), increased pulmonary vascular resistance is associated with structural narrowing of small (resistance) vessels and increased vascular tone. Current information on pulmonary vascular remodeling is mostly limited to averaged increases in wall thickness, but information on number of vessels affected and internal diameter decreases for vessels of different sizes is limited. Our aim was to quantify numbers of affected vessels and their internal diameter decrease for differently sized vessels in PAH in comparison with non-PAH patients. Internal and external diameters of transversally cut vessels were measured in five control subjects and six PAH patients. Resistance vessels were classified in Strahler orders, internal diameters 13 μm (order 1) to 500 μm (order 8). The number fraction, that is, percentage of affected vessels, and the internal diameter fraction, that is, percentage diameter of normal diameter, were calculated. In PAH, not all resistance vessels are affected. The number fraction is about 30%, that is, 70% of vessels have diameters not different from vessels of control subjects. Within each order, the decrease in diameter of affected vessels is variable with an averaged diameter fraction of 50-70%. Narrowing of resistance vessels is heterogeneous: not all vessels are narrowed, and the decrease in internal diameters, even within a single order, vary largely. This heterogeneous narrowing alone cannot explain the large resistance increase in PAH We suggest that rarefaction could be an important contributor to the hemodynamic changes.

  19. Bone Mineral Density and Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Silvia; Hersberger, Martin; Fischler, Manuel; Huber, Lars C; Senn, Oliver; Treder, Ursula; Speich, Rudolf; Schmid, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low bone mineral density (BMD) is common in chronic lung diseases and associated with reduced quality of life. Little is known about BMD in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Methods: Steroid-naïve patients with PH (n=34; 19 idiopathic, 15 chronic thromboembolic) had BMD measured by DXA at the time of diagnostic right heart catheterization. Exercise capacity, quality of life and various parameters related to PH severity and bone metabolism were also assessed. 24 patients with left heart failure (LHF) were similarly assessed as controls. Results: The prevalence of osteopenia was high both in PH (80%) and in controls with LHF (75%). Low BMD was associated with lean body mass, age, lower BMI, impaired exercise capacity and in PH with higher pulmonary vascular resistance. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) was elevated and considerably higher in PH than in LHF (above normal, in 55 vs 29%). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was not related to impaired renal function but possibly to low vitamin D status. Conclusions: Osteopenia is common in PH and in chronically ill patients with LHF. Osteopenia is associated with known risk factors but in PH also with disease severity. Preventive measures in an increasingly chronic ill PH population should be considered. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is highly prevalent in PH and might contribute to bone and possibly pulmonary vascular disease. Whether adequate vitamin D substitution could prevent low BMD in PH remains to be determined. PMID:19461899

  20. Initial experience with tadalafil in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Calderbank, Michelle; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the safety, tolerability, and effects of tadalafil on children with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) after transition from sildenafil or after tadalafil received as initial therapy. A total of 33 pediatric patients with PAH were retrospectively evaluated. Of the 33 patients, 29 were switched from sildenafil to tadalafil. The main reason for the change from sildenafil was once-daily dosing. The average dose of sildenafil was 3.4 ± 1.1 mg/kg/day, and that of tadalafil was 1.0 ± 0.4 mg/kg/day. For 14 of the 29 patients undergoing repeat catheterization, statistically significant improvements were observed after transition from sildenafil to tadalafil in terms of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (53.2 ± 18.3 vs. 47.4 ± 13.7 mmHg; p < 0.05) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (12.2 ± 7.0 vs 10.6 ± 7.2 Units/m(2); p < 0.05). Clinical improvement was noted for four patients treated with tadalafil as initial therapy. The side effect profiles were similar for the patients who had transitioned from sildenafil to tadalafil including headache, nausea, myalgia, nasal congestion, flushing, and allergic reaction. Two patients discontinued tadalafil due to migraine or allergic reaction. One patient receiving sildenafil had no breakthrough syncope after transition to tadalafil. Tadalafil can be safely used for pediatric patients with PAH and may prevent disease progression.

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension and Indicators of Right Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    von Siebenthal, Célia; Aubert, John-David; Mitsakis, Periklis; Yerly, Patrick; Prior, John O.; Nicod, Laurent Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disease, whose underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. It is characterized by pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction and vessels wall thickening, mainly intimal and medial layers. Several molecular pathways have been studied, but their respective roles remain unknown. Cardiac repercussions of PH are hypertrophy, dilation, and progressive right ventricular dysfunction. Multiple echocardiographic parameters are being used, in order to assess anatomy and cardiac function, but there are no guidelines edited about their usefulness. Thus, it is now recommended to associate the best-known parameters, such as atrial and ventricular diameters or tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion. Cardiac catheterization remains necessary to establish the diagnosis of PH and to assess pulmonary hemodynamic state. Concerning energetic metabolism, free fatty acids, normally used to provide energy for myocardial contraction, are replaced by glucose uptake. These abnormalities are illustrated by increased 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography, which seems to be correlated with echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters. PMID:27376066

  2. Prostanoid therapies in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LeVarge, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin is an endogenous eicosanoid produced by endothelial cells; through actions on vascular smooth-muscle cells, it promotes vasodilation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevated mean pulmonary artery pressure due to a high pulmonary vascular resistance state. A relative decrease in prostacyclin presence has been associated with PAH; this pathway has thus become a therapeutic target. Epoprostenol, the synthetic equivalent of prostacyclin, was first utilized as short-term or bridging therapy in the 1980s. Further refinement of its long-term use via continuous intravenous infusion followed. A randomized controlled trial by Barst et al in 1996 demonstrated functional, hemodynamic, and mortality benefits of epoprostenol use. This work was a groundbreaking achievement in the management of PAH and initiated a wave of research that markedly altered the dismal prognosis previously associated with PAH. Analogs of prostacyclin, including iloprost and treprostinil, exhibit increased stability and allow for an extended array of parenteral and non-parenteral (inhaled and oral) therapeutic options. This review further examines the pharmacology and clinical use of epoprostenol and its analogs in PAH. PMID:25848300

  3. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Medical and surgical management for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Majdy M.; Swiston, John; Nizami, Imran; Al Dalaan, Abdullah; Levy, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the availability of the pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapy, PAH was a dreadful disease with a very poor prognosis. Better understanding of the complex pathobiology of PAH has led to a major therapeutic evolution. International regulatory agencies have approved many specific drugs with different pharmacologic pathways and routes of administration. In the year 2013, two new drugs with great potentials in managing PAH have been added to the treatment options, macitentan and riociguat. Additional drugs are expected to come in the near future. A substantial body of evidence has confirmed the effectiveness of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapies in improving the patients’ symptomatic status and slowing down the rate of clinical deterioration. Although the newer modern medications have significantly improved the survival of patients with PAH, it remains a non-curable and fatal disease. Lung transplantation (LT) remains the only therapeutic option for selected patients with advanced disease who continue to deteriorate despite optimal therapy. PMID:25077002

  4. Perceptions of Received Information, Social Support, and Coping in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension or Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Bodil; Ekmehag, Björn; Hesselstrand, Roger; Rådegran, Göran; Sjöberg, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    Patients with a life-limiting diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) need disease-specific information, ability to cope, and functioning social networks. This cohort study investigated the experiences of PAH and CTEPH patients who received information about their diagnosis, treatment, and management, in addition to coping and social support. Sixty-eight adult patients (mean ± SD, age 67 ± 14; 66% women) were included. A total of 54% of the patients wanted more information. Patients received information mostly in areas concerning medical test procedures, the diagnosis, disease severity, possible disease causes, and how to manage their disease. Coping ability was significantly better in patients who were satisfied with the received information (P = 0.0045). The information given to PAH or CTEPH patients and their communication with healthcare professionals can be greatly improved. Gaps in information and misunderstandings can be avoided by working in cooperation with the patients, their relatives, and within the PAH team. PMID:25374462

  5. Prediction of moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension by main pulmonary artery diameter and main pulmonary artery diameter/ascending aorta diameter in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Shirin; Aronow, Wilbert S; Ravipati, Gautham; Maguire, George P; Belkin, Robert N; Lehrman, Stuart G

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the accuracy of computed tomographic measurements of main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAD) and of MPAD/ascending aorta diameter (AAD) in predicting moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension in 190 patients with acute pulmonary embolism. A pulmonary artery systolic pressure of > or = 50 mm Hg measured by Doppler echocardiography was considered moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension. A MPAD of > 28.6 mm and a MPAD/AAD ratio of > or = 1.00 measured by computed tomography were considered abnormal. A MPAD of > 28.6 mm had a 75% sensitivity and specificity, a 52% positive predictive value, a 89% negative predictive value, a 3.0 likelihood ratio for a positive test, and a 0.33 likelihood ratio for a negative test in predicting moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension. A MPAD/AAD ratio of > or = 1.00 had a 59% sensitivity, a 82% specificity, a 55% positive predictive value, a 84% negative predictive value, a 3.3 likelihood ratio for a positive test, and a 0.50 likelihood ratio for a negative test.

  6. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  7. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J. Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S.; Fenster, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m2; P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = −0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = −0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = −0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = −0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR–based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  8. Pulmonary vascular effects of pulsed inhaled nitric oxide in COPD patients with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hajian, Bita; De Backer, Jan; Vos, Wim; Van Holsbeke, Cedric; Ferreira, Francisca; Quinn, Deborah A; Hufkens, Annemie; Claes, Rita; De Backer, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with secondary pulmonary hypertension (PH), which worsens prognosis. PH can be lowered by oxygen, but also by inhaled nitric oxide (NO), which has the potential to improve the health status of these patients. NO is an important mediator in vascular reactions in the pulmonary circulation. Oral compounds can act through NO-mediated pathways, but delivering pulsed inhaled NO (iNO) directly to the airways and pulmonary vasculature could equally benefit patients. Therefore, a proof-of-concept study was performed to quantify pulmonary blood vessel caliber changes after iNO administration using computed tomography (CT)-based functional respiratory imaging (FRI). Methods Six patients with secondary PH due to COPD received “pulsed” iNO in combination with oxygen for 20 minutes via a nasal cannula. Patients underwent a high-resolution CT scan with contrast before and after iNO. Using FRI, changes in volumes of blood vessels and associated lobes were quantified. Oxygen saturation and blood pressure were monitored and patients were asked about their subjective feelings. Results Pulmonary blood vessel volume increased by 7.06%±5.37% after iNO. A strong correlation (Ω20=0.32, P=0.002) was obtained between ventilation and observed vasodilation, suggesting that using the pulsed system, iNO is directed toward the ventilated zones, which consequently experience more vasodilation. Patients did not develop oxygen desaturation, remained normotensive, and perceived an improvement in their dyspnea sensation. Conclusion Inhalation of pulsed NO with oxygen causes vasodilation in the pulmonary circulation of COPD patients, mainly in the well-ventilated areas. A high degree of heterogeneity was found in the level of vasodilation. Patients tend to feel better after the treatment. Chronic use trials are warranted. PMID:27462149

  9. Pulmonary Arterial Capacitance Predicts Cardiac Events in Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Koichi; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Jin, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Misaka, Tomofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background Although pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (LHD-PH) accounts for the largest proportion of pulmonary hypertension, few reports on the epidemiological analysis of LHD-PH exist. Recently, pulmonary arterial capacitance (PAC) has attracted attention as a possible factor of right ventricular afterload along with pulmonary vascular resistance. We therefore investigated the clinical significance of PAC in LHD-PH. Methods The subject consisted of 252 LHD-PH patients (145 men, mean age 63.4 ± 14.7 years) diagnosed by right heart catheterization. PAC was estimated by the ratio between stroke volume and pulmonary arterial pulse pressure. Patients were classified into four groups according to the PAC (1st quartile was 0.74 to 1.76 ml/mmHg, the 2nd quartile 1.77 to 2.53 ml/mmHg, the 3rd quartile 2.54 to 3.59 ml/mmHg, and the 4th quartile 3.61 to 12.14 ml/mmHg). The end-points were defined as rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure and/or cardiac death. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to determine what variables were associated with cardiac events. Results The patients in the 1st quartile had the lowest cardiac index and stroke volume index, and the highest mean pulmonary arterial pressure, mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance compared with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles. Fifty-four patients experienced cardiac events during the follow-up period (median 943 days). The event-free rate of the 1st quartile was significantly lower than that of the 3rd and 4th quartiles (66.7% vs 82.5% [3rd quartile], P = 0.008; and 92.1% [4th quartile], P < 0.001). The Cox hazard analysis revealed that PAC was significantly associated with cardiac events (HR 0.556, 95% CI 0.424–0.730, P < 0.001). Conclusion PAC is useful in the prediction of cardiac event risk in LHD-PH patients. PMID:27875533

  10. Supplementation of iron in pulmonary hypertension: Rationale and design of a phase II clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Howard, Luke S G E; Watson, Geoffrey M J; Wharton, John; Rhodes, Christopher J; Chan, Kakit; Khengar, Rajeshree; Robbins, Peter A; Kiely, David G; Condliffe, Robin; Elliott, Charlie A; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Sheares, Karen; Morrell, Nicholas W; Davies, Rachel; Ashby, Deborah; Gibbs, J Simon R; Wilkins, Martin R

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to assess the safety and potential clinical benefit of intravenous iron (Ferinject) infusion in iron deficient patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Iron deficiency in the absence of anemia (1) is common in patients with IPAH; (2) is associated with inappropriately raised levels of hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis; and (3) correlates with disease severity and worse clinical outcomes. Oral iron absorption may be impeded by reduced absorption due to elevated hepcidin levels. The safety and benefits of parenteral iron replacement in IPAH are unknown. Supplementation of Iron in Pulmonary Hypertension (SIPHON) is a Phase II, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial of iron in IPAH. At least 60 patients will be randomized to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject) or saline placebo with a crossover point after 12 weeks of treatment. The primary outcome will be the change in resting pulmonary vascular resistance from baseline at 12 weeks, measured by cardiac catheterization. Secondary measures include resting and exercise hemodynamics and exercise performance from serial bicycle incremental and endurance cardiopulmonary exercise tests. Other secondary measurements include serum iron indices, 6-Minute Walk Distance, WHO functional class, quality of life score, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and cardiac anatomy and function from cardiac magnetic resonance. We propose that intravenous iron replacement will improve hemodynamics and clinical outcomes in IPAH. If the data supports a potentially useful therapeutic effect and suggest this drug is safe, the study will be used to power a Phase III study to address efficacy.

  11. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christina K.; Eriksson, Inger; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Cao, Xiaofang; Westöö, Christian; Norvik, Christian; Andersson-Sjöland, Annika; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Johansson, Staffan; Hedin, Ulf; Kjellén, Lena; Wight, Thomas N.; Tran-Lundmark, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a lethal condition for which there is no effective curative pharmacotherapy. PAH is characterized by vasoconstriction, wall thickening of pulmonary arteries, and increased vascular resistance. Versican is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the vascular extracellular matrix that accumulates following vascular injury and promotes smooth-muscle cell proliferation in systemic arteries. Here, we investigated whether versican may play a similar role in PAH. Paraffin-embedded lung sections from patients who underwent lung transplantation to treat PAH were used for immunohistochemistry. The etiologies of PAH in the subjects involved in this study were idiopathic PAH, scleroderma, and congenital heart disease (atrial septal defect) with left-to-right shunt. Independent of the underlying etiology, increased versican immunostaining was observed in areas of medial thickening, in neointima, and in plexiform lesions. Western blot of lung tissue lysates confirmed accumulation of versican in patients with PAH. Double staining for versican and CD45 showed only occasional colocalization in neointima of high-grade lesions and plexiform lesions. In vitro, metabolic labeling with [35S]sulfate showed that human pulmonary artery smooth-muscle cells (hPASMCs) produce mainly chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. In addition, hypoxia, but not cyclic stretch, was demonstrated to increase both versican messenger RNA expression and protein synthesis by hPASMCs. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions of PAH, and the amount of versican correlates more with lesion severity than with underlying etiology or inflammation. Hypoxia is a possible regulator of versican accumulation, which may promote proliferation of pulmonary smooth-muscle cells and vascular remodeling in PAH. PMID:27683612

  12. Tadalafil therapy for sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Baughman, R. P.; Aris, R.; Engel, P.; Donohue, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) is estimated to occur in at least 5% or more of sarcoidosis patients, and it contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. Optimal therapy for SAPH is not well established. We performed a 24-week open-label trial of tadalafil for SAPH at 2 academic medical centers. Subjects were required to have confirmed sarcoidosis plus a right heart catheterization within 12 months of enrollment showing a mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg, a pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg, and a calculated pulmonary vascular resistance ≥ 3 Wood units. Subjects received 20 mg/day of tadalafil for the first 4 weeks and then 40 mg/day for the subsequent 20 weeks. Sixteen patients were screened, 12 of whom met criteria for enrollment. At 24 weeks, there was no overall improvement in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Five of the 12 subjects dropped out of the study early (2 for social reasons, 3 for medical reasons). There was no significant change in short form 36, St. George’s respiratory questionnaire, or maximum Borg dyspnea scores over the 24 weeks. There were no significant adverse events or laboratory abnormalities clearly related to tadalafil in the cohort. The study did not meet the primary end point of change in 6MWD because of the small sample size. Tadalafil was generally safely administered in this cohort of SAPH patients. There was a relatively high dropout rate but no major adverse events and no clinical worsening. Larger studies are needed to explore this question further. (Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01324999) PMID:28090299

  13. Chronic Embolic Pulmonary Hypertension Caused by Pulmonary Embolism and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Neto-Neves, Evandro M; Brown, Mary B; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Rezania, Samin; Goodwill, Adam G; McCarthy, Brian P; Persohn, Scott A; Territo, Paul R; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2017-04-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) will be accelerated by an animal model that replicates the phenotype of human CTEPH. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered a combination of a single dose each of plastic microspheres and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor antagonist in polystyrene microspheres (PE) + tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU5416 (SU) group. Shams received volume-matched saline; PE and SU groups received only microspheres or SU5416, respectively. PE + SU rats exhibited sustained pulmonary hypertension (62 ± 13 and 53 ± 14 mmHg at 3 and 6 weeks, respectively) with reduction of the ventriculoarterial coupling in vivo coincident with a large decrement in peak rate of oxygen consumption during aerobic exercise, respectively. PE + SU produced right ventricular hypokinesis, dilation, and hypertrophy observed on echocardiography, and 40% reduction in right ventricular contractile function in isolated perfused hearts. High-resolution computed tomographic pulmonary angiography and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry revealed abundant lung neovascularization and cellular proliferation in PE that was distinctly absent in the PE + SU group. We present a novel rodent model to reproduce much of the known phenotype of CTEPH, including the pivotal pathophysiological role of impaired vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent vascular remodeling. This model may reveal a better pathophysiological understanding of how PE transitions to CTEPH in human treatments.

  14. A Non-Invasive Assessment of Cardiopulmonary Hemodynamics with MRI in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Octavia; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Selvaraj, Senthil; Chatterjee, Neil R.; Guetter, Christoph; Carr, James C.; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We propose a method for non-invasive quantification of hemodynamic changes in the pulmonary arteries resulting from pulmonary hypertension (PH). Methods Using a two-element windkessel model, and input parameters derived from standard MRI evaluation of flow, cardiac function and valvular motion, we derive: pulmonary artery compliance (C), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), time-averaged intra-pulmonary pressure waveforms and pulmonary artery pressures (systolic (sPAP) and diastolic (dPAP)). MRI results were compared directly to reference standard values from right heart catheterization (RHC) obtained in a series of patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension (PH). Results In 7 patients with suspected PH undergoing RHC, MRI and echocardiography, there was no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between parameters measured by MRI and RHC. Using standard clinical cutoffs to define PH (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg), MRI was able to correctly identify all patients as having pulmonary hypertension, and to correctly distinguish between pulmonary arterial (mPAP≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP<15 mmHg) and venous hypertension (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP ≥ 15 mmHg) in 5 of 7 cases. Conclusions We have developed a mathematical model capable of quantifying physiological parameters that reflect the severity of PH. PMID:26283577

  15. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D.; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A.; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A2BR or treatment with the A2BR antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A2BR attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A2BR activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A2BR antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Zhong, H., Acero, L., Weng, T., Melicoff, E., West, J. D., Hemnes, A., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackwell, T. S., Xia, Y., Johnston, R. A., Zeng, D., Belardinelli, L., Blackburn, M. R. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  16. Intravascular Talcosis due to Intravenous Drug Use Is an Underrecognized Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Christopher C.; Raval, Jay S.; Nichols, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of illegal drugs or medications meant for oral administration can cause granulomatous disease of the lung. This intravascular talcosis results in pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Nine cases of histologically confirmed intravascular talcosis were reviewed with specific attention given to the clinical histories in these patients. Five autopsy cases were included in this series with detailed investigation in the anatomic features associated with intravascular talcosis and pulmonary hypertension. All nine patients showed perivascular and/or intravascular deposition of polarizable foreign material in their lungs. Intravascular talcosis as a result of previous intravenous drug use was not clinically suspected in any patient despite clinically diagnosed pulmonary hypertension in five. All patients showed dilatation of the right and left heart, but none had dilatation of the aortic valve. Congestive heart failure with hepatosplenomegaly was also common. We conclude that intravascular talcosis is an underdiagnosed cause of pulmonary hypertension in patients with known history of intravenous drug use. PMID:22645680

  17. Intravascular Talcosis due to Intravenous Drug Use Is an Underrecognized Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher C; Raval, Jay S; Nichols, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of illegal drugs or medications meant for oral administration can cause granulomatous disease of the lung. This intravascular talcosis results in pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Nine cases of histologically confirmed intravascular talcosis were reviewed with specific attention given to the clinical histories in these patients. Five autopsy cases were included in this series with detailed investigation in the anatomic features associated with intravascular talcosis and pulmonary hypertension. All nine patients showed perivascular and/or intravascular deposition of polarizable foreign material in their lungs. Intravascular talcosis as a result of previous intravenous drug use was not clinically suspected in any patient despite clinically diagnosed pulmonary hypertension in five. All patients showed dilatation of the right and left heart, but none had dilatation of the aortic valve. Congestive heart failure with hepatosplenomegaly was also common. We conclude that intravascular talcosis is an underdiagnosed cause of pulmonary hypertension in patients with known history of intravenous drug use.

  18. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension.

  19. Perioperative management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation (a lesson for other anaesthesia settings).

    PubMed

    Rabanal, J M; Real, M I; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension are some of the most challenging for an anaesthesiologist to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing surgical procedures is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias and ischaemia leading to haemodynamic instability. Lung transplantation is the only therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease. Patients undergoing lung transplantation present a variety of challenges for anaesthesia team, but pulmonary hypertension remains the most important. The purpose of this article is to review the anaesthetic management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation, with particular emphasis on the choice of anaesthesia, pulmonary vasodilator therapy, inotropic and vasopressor therapy, and the most recent intraoperative monitoring recommendations to optimize patient care.

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension and Computed Tomography Measurement of Small Pulmonary Vessels in Severe Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Shin; Washko, George R.; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Estepar, Raul San Jose; Diaz, Alejandro; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hoffman, Eric; Fessler, Henry E.; Criner, Gerard J.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Scharf, Steven M.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Reilly, John J.; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Vascular alteration of small pulmonary vessels is one of the characteristic features of pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The in vivo relationship between pulmonary hypertension and morphological alteration of the small pulmonary vessels has not been assessed in patients with severe emphysema. Objectives: We evaluated the correlation of total cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) assessed on computed tomography (CT) scans with the degree of pulmonary hypertension estimated by right heart catheterization. Methods: In 79 patients with severe emphysema enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT), we measured CSA less than 5 mm2 (CSA<5) and 5 to 10 mm2 (CSA5−10), and calculated the percentage of total CSA for the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5–10, respectively). The correlations of %CSA<5 and %CSA5–10 with pulmonary arterial mean pressure (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{Ppa}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) obtained by right heart catheterization were evaluated. Multiple linear regression analysis using \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{Ppa}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} as the dependent outcome was also performed. Measurements and Main Results: The %CSA<5 had a significant negative correlation with \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage

  1. Anaesthetic Management of Caesarean Section in a Term Pregnancy with Ventricular Septal Defect and Pulmonary Hypertension with Severe Pulmonary Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaeley, Nidhi; Bhatia, Ruby

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy with pulmonary hypertension – WHO risk class IV cardiac disease is associated with significant haemodynamic burden due to cardiocirculatory changes which is a significant indirect cause of maternal mortality. We report a very rare case – primigravida term pregnancy with pulmonary hypertension, large ventricular septal defect (2.4 cm2), bidirectional shunt mainly left to right with severe pulmonary stenosis with peak gradient of 144mmHg. Caesarean section was done under general anaesthesia with successful maternal and neonatal outcome. PMID:27504386

  2. Persistent pulmonary artery hypertension in patients undergoing balloon mitral valvotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Krishna Kumar Mohanan; Pillai, Harikrishnan Sivadasan; Titus, Thomas; Varaparambil, Ajitkumar; Sivasankaran, Sivasubramonian; Krishnamoorthy, Kavassery Mahadevan; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Sasidharan, Bijulal; Thajudeen, Anees; Ganapathy, Sanjay; Tharakan, Jaganmohan

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) is known to regress after successful balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV). Data of persistent pulmonary artery hypertension (PPAH) following BMV is scarce. We analyzed the clinical, echocardiographic, and hemodynamic data of 701 consecutive patients who have undergone successful BMV in our institute from 1997 to 2003. Data of 287 patients who had PPAH (defined by pulmonary artery systolic pressure [PASP] of ≥ 40 mmHg at one year following BMV) were compared to the data of 414 patients who did not have PPAH. Patients who had PPAH were older (39.9 ± 9.9 years vs. 29.4 ± 10.1; P < 0.001). They had higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF; 21.9 vs. 12.1%, P < 0.05), moderate or severe pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) defined as PASP more than 50 mmHg (43.5 vs. 33.8%, P = 0.00), anatomically advanced mitral valve disease as assessed by Wilkin's echocardiographic score > 8 (33.7 vs. 23.2%, P < 0.001), and coexistent aortic valve disease (45.6 vs. 37.9%, P < 0.001) at the baseline. Those patients with PPAH had comparatively lower immediate postprocedural mitral valve area (MVA). On follow-up of more than five years, the occurrence of restenosis (39.3 vs. 10.1%, P = 0.000), new onset heart failure (14% vs. 4%, P < 0.05) and need for reinterventions (9.5% vs. 2.8%, P < 0.05) were higher in the PPAH group. Patients with PPAH were older, sicker, and had advanced rheumatic mitral valve disease. They had higher incidence of restenosis, new onset heart failure, and need for reinterventions on long term follow-up. PPAH represents an advanced stage of rheumatic valve disease and indicates chronicity of the disease, which may be the reason for the poorer prognosis of these patients. Patients with PPAH requires intense and more frequent follow-up. PMID:24015345

  3. High prevalence of occult left heart disease in scleroderma-pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin D; Shimony, Avi; Langleben, David; Hirsch, Andrew; Rudski, Lawrence; Schlesinger, Robert; Eisenberg, Mark J; Joyal, Dominique; Hudson, Marie; Boutet, Kim; Serban, Alexandrina; Masetto, Ariel; Baron, Murray

    2013-10-01

    Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult left-heart disease in patients with scleroderma and pulmonary hypertension. In patients with pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure (mean PAP)≥25 mmHg), differentiation between pre- and post-capillary pulmonary hypertension has been made according to pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) less than or more than 15 mmHg, respectively. We performed a retrospective chart review of 107 scleroderma patients. All patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension had routine right or left heart catheterisation with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) measurement pre-/post-fluid challenge. We extracted demographic, haemodynamic and echocardiographic data. Patients were classified into one of four groups: haemodynamically normal (mean PAP<25 mmHg); pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP>15 mmHg); occult PVH (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP≤15 mmHg, LVEDP>15 mmHg before or after fluid challenge); and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP≤15 mmHg and LVEDP≤15 mmHg before or after fluid challenge). 53 out of 107 patients had pulmonary hypertension. Based on the PAWP-based definition, 29 out of 53 had PAH and 24 out of 53 had PVH. After considering the resting and post-fluid-challenge LVEDP, 11 PAH patients were reclassified as occult PVH. The occult PVH group was haemodynamically, echocardiographically and demographically closer to the PVH group than the PAH group. PVH had high prevalence in our scleroderma-pulmonary hypertension population. Distinguishing PAH from PVH with only PAWP may result in some PVH patients being misclassified as having PAH.

  4. Cromolyn sodium does not prevent hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn and young lambs.

    PubMed

    Frantz, E G; Schreiber, M D; Soifer, S J

    1988-12-01

    Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension may be mediated by leukotrienes. Pulmonary mast cells produce leukotrienes, histamine and prostaglandin D2, and degranulate in response to hypoxia. Cromolyn sodium, a mast cell membrane stabilizing agent, may prevent hypoxia-induced mast cell degranulation. To investigate the role of mast cell products in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, we studied the haemodynamic responses to alveolar hypoxia before and during an intravenous infusion of 3-5 mg/min per kg of cromolyn sodium in 6 chronically instrumented, spontaneously breathing lambs. Since there are age-dependent differences in the response of the pulmonary circulation to some mast cell products, we studied the effects of cromolyn sodium on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn (4-7 days) and young lambs (15-18 days). During alveolar hypoxia, mean pulmonary arterial pressure increased by 68% (P less than 0.05) and 59% (P less than 0.05) in the newborn and young lambs, respectively. With alveolar hypoxia during cromolyn sodium infusion, mean pulmonary arterial pressure increased by 71% (P less than 0.05) and 42% (P less than 0.05) in the newborn and young lambs, respectively. Cromolyn sodium did blunt the hypoxia-induced release of histamine into the circulation. Because hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was not inhibited by cromolyn sodium in either age group, mast cell products are not important mediators of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  5. Inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension treated with riociguat: A case study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Ochoa-Parra, Nuria; Navas-Tejedor, Paula; Morán-Fernández, Laura; Gómez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2015-12-01

    A 51-year-old woman presented with a one-year history of progressive dyspnea, WHO functional class III-IV and exercise-related syncope. Transthoracic echocardiography and computed tomography pulmonary angiography were performed, leading to a diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension. She was referred to our pulmonary hypertension unit, where a complete study was performed, including ventilation/perfusion scan, which was consistent with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Risk factors for this condition were excluded and therapeutic options were evaluated. Imaging studies showed distal pulmonary disease so pulmonary endarterectomy was rejected. Further therapeutic options were evaluated and the patient was subsequently enrolled in an open-label uncontrolled trial with riociguat. After one year of treatment, significant improvement in functional class, 6-minute walk test and NT-proBNP were seen, without significant secondary effects.

  6. The anesthetic management of children with pulmonary hypertension in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Twite, Mark D; Friesen, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    Children need cardiac catheterization to establish the diagnosis and monitor the response to treatment when undergoing drug therapy for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Children with PAH receiving general anesthesia for cardiac catheterization procedures are at significantly increased risk of perioperative complications in comparison with other children. The most acute life-threatening complication is a pulmonary hypertensive crisis. It is essential that the anesthesiologist caring for these children understands the pathophysiology of the disease, how anesthetic medications may affect the patient's hemodynamics, and how to manage an acute pulmonary hypertensive crisis.

  7. Optimising the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients: emergency treatments.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, M; Naeije, R

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and potentially fatal disease whose management is usually restricted to a few specialised centres. As patients do not necessarily live in the neighbourhood of these centres, daily care and emergencies have to be delegated to first and second lines. Treatment guidelines do not usually provide recommendations for acute emergency situations as evidence is scarce. This short review provides a description of our therapeutic protocols based on available data. A model of transmural organisation of care for PAH patients, currently applied in Belgium, is described. Thereafter, based on an analysis of the reasons of death in the PAH population, a review of the main emergencies is provided. Cardiac arrest and resuscitation, decompensated right heart failure, respiratory failure, arrhythmia, pericardial effusion, haemoptysis, surgery and drug-related adverse events will be discussed successively. Case reports showing the precariousness of PAH patients will enforce our thesis of the need for optimal patient management organisation.

  8. Electrocardiographic signs of pulmonary hypertension in children who snore.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, A R; McCormick, M S; Freeland, A P; Pickering, D

    1981-01-01

    Two children presented with sleep disturbances due to enlarged tonsils and adenoids. One child died during induction of anaesthesia, and postmortem examination showed hypertrophy of the right ventricle and atrium. As a result a prospective survey was carried out of children undergoing tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, or both. During a nine-month period an electrocardiogram was taken in 92 children. Three electrocardiograms (3.3%) showed evidence of right heart strain. The children with abnormal electrocardiograms had symptoms of sleep disturbance with apnoea, snoring, and daytime somnolence. These symptoms and the electrocardiographic changes were reserved by adenotonsillectomy. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in children with enlarged tonsils and adenoids is still underestimated. When signs and symptoms of sleep disturbance, particularly snoring, are present an electrocardiogram should be obtained and a cardiologist's opinion sought before embarking on routine surgery in view of the potentially fatal consequences. Images FIG 2 PMID:6786567

  9. The role of endothelin-1 in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Adrian H.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare but debilitating disease, which if left untreated rapidly progresses to right ventricular failure and eventually death. In the quest to understand the pathogenesis of this disease differences in the profile, expression and action of vasoactive substances released by the endothelium have been identified in patients with PAH. Of these, endothelin-1 (ET-1) is of particular interest since it is known to be an extremely powerful vasoconstrictor and also involved in vascular remodelling. Identification of ET-1 as a target for pharmacological intervention has lead to the discovery of a number of compounds that can block the receptors via which ET-1 mediates its effects. This review sets out the evidence in support of a role for ET-1 in the onset and progression of the disease and reviews the data from the various clinical trials of ET-1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25405182

  10. Translating Research into Improved Patient Care in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Sebastien; Provencher, Steeve; Guignabert, Christophe; Perros, Frédéric; Boucherat, Olivier; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Hassoun, Paul M; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Nicolls, Mark R; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-20

    Despite important advances in its therapeutic management, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains an incurable disease. Although numerous drugs exhibited beneficial effects in preclinical settings, only few have reached clinical trial phases, highlighting the challenges of translating preclinical investigations into clinical trials. Potential reasons for delayed PAH drug development may include the inherent limitations of the currently available animal and in vitro models, potential lack of appropriate standardization of the experimental design, regulatory agencies requirements, competing clinical trials and insufficient funding. Although this is not unique to PAH, there is urgency for reducing the number of false positive signals in preclinical studies and optimizing the development of innovative therapeutic targets through performance of clinical trials based on more robust experimental data. The current review discusses the challenges and opportunities in preclinical research to foster drug development in PAH.

  11. [Experience with imatinib to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    García Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo Palma, María Jesús; González León, Rocío; Garrido Rasco, Rocío; Ocaña Medina, Celia; Sánchez Román, Julio

    2008-12-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), survival has not improved greatly (is still very affected). Imatinib, an antagonist of platelet-derived growth factor with antiproliferative activity, has been effective in experimental models and clinically in several published reports. We report the results of imatinib therapy in 4 patients with PAH (functional class IV) who were refractory to treatment with drug combinations for this condition. The final outcome was favorable in only 1 of the 4 cases. In this case, the patient was in functional class III and his hemodynamic parameters had improved significantly within 5 months after starting therapy. However, the patient died as a result of severe toxic hepatitis in which imatinib may have played a role. The present report adds to the few already in the literature (4 cases) and suggests that care should continue to be shown when using imatinib to treat PAH.

  12. Black lung persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Alnemri, AbdulRahman M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment outcome of Saudi infants with black lung persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Methods: This is a retrospective review of all neonates with PPHN presented to the Armed Force Hospital Southern Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2012 to December 2014. Results: Ten term and near term infants presented with PPHN were included. Maternal diabetes and Down syndrome were the most common identified risk factors for PPHN in the study group. Nine infants were treated with oral sildenafil and did not require mechanical ventilation. Only one infant required mechanical ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide in addition to oral sildenafil. Conclusion: Most of the patients in this cohort with PPHN had risk factors, they did not require mechanical ventilation and responded well to oral sildenafil. PMID:28042638

  13. Cell Permeable Peptide Conjugated Nanoerythrosomes of Fasudil Prolong Pulmonary Arterial Vasodilation in PAH Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilesh; Patel, Brijeshkumar; Nahar, Kamrun; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a cell permeable peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), conjugated nanoerythrosomes (NERs) containing fasudil, a rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, produces prolonged pulmonary preferential vasodilation. CAR conjugated NERs containing fasudil were prepared by hypotonic lysis and extrusion method, optimized for various physicochemical properties in-vitro. The formulations were then used to study the hemodynamic efficacy in a monocrotaline-induced rodent model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CAR-NERs-Fasudil was spherical in shape with an average vesicle size and entrapment efficiency of 161.3±1.37nm and 48.81±1.96%, respectively. Formulations were stable for ~3 weeks when stored at 4°C and the drug was released in a controlled fashion for >48 hrs. The uptake of CAR-NERs-Fasudil by TGF-β activated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell was ~1.5 fold greater than the uptake of NERs-Fasudil. CAR-NERs-Fasudil inhibited ROCK activity and 5-hydroxytryptamine induced cell proliferation. In terms of reduction of pulmonary arterial pressure, intratracheal administration of CAR-NERs-Fasudil was ~2-fold more specific to the lungs compared with plain fasudil. Overall, CAR peptide grafted nanoerythrosomes offers a new platform for improving the therapeutic efficacy of a rho-kinase inhibitor, fasudil, without affecting peripheral vasodilation. PMID:25460151

  14. Baseline Characteristics of the Korean Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wook-Jin; Park, Yong Bum; Jeon, Chan Hong; Jung, Jo Won; Ko, Kwang-Phil; Choi, Sung Jae; Seo, Hye Sun; Lee, Jae Seung; Jung, Hae Ok

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the pathobiology and targeted treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), epidemiologic data from large populations have been limited to western countries. The aim of the Korean Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (KORPAH) was to examine the epidemiology and prognosis of Korean patients with PAH. KORPAH was designed as a nationwide, multicenter, prospective data collection using an internet webserver from September 2008 to December 2011. A total of 625 patients were enrolled. The patients' mean age was 47.6 ± 15.7 yr, and 503 (80.5%) were women. The diagnostic methods included right heart catheterization (n = 249, 39.8%) and Doppler echocardiography (n = 376, 60.2%). The etiologies, in order of frequency, were connective tissue disease (CTD), congenital heart disease, and idiopathic PAH (IPAH) (49.8%, 25.4%, and 23.2%, respectively). Patients with WHO functional class III or IV at diagnosis were 43.4%. In total, 380 (60.8%) patients received a single PAH-specific treatment at the time of enrollment, but only 72 (18.9%) patients received combination therapy. Incident cases during the registry represented 297 patients; therefore, the incidence rate of PAH was 1.9 patients/yr/million people. The 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-yr estimated survival rates were 90.8%, 87.8%, and 84.4%, respectively. Although Korean PAH patients exhibited similar age, gender, and survival rate compared with western registries, they showed relatively more CTD-PAH in the etiology and also systemic lupus erythematosus among CTD-PAH. The data suggest that earlier diagnosis and more specialized therapies should be needed to improve the survival of PAH patients.

  15. Pulmonary Arterial Stiffness: Toward a New Paradigm in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Pathophysiology and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Myers, Cynthia; Brown, R Dale; Frid, Maria G; Tan, Wei; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of the pulmonary arterial bed with the subsequent increased load on the right ventricle is a paramount feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pathophysiology of vascular stiffening is a complex and self-reinforcing function of extracellular matrix remodeling, driven by recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells and their interactions with resident vascular cells, and mechanotransduction of altered hemodynamic forces throughout the ventricular-vascular axis. New approaches to understanding the cell and molecular determinants of the pathophysiology combine novel biopolymer substrates, controlled flow conditions, and defined cell types to recapitulate the biomechanical environment in vitro. Simultaneously, advances are occurring to assess novel parameters of stiffness in vivo. In this comprehensive state-of-art review, we describe clinical hemodynamic markers, together with the newest translational echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging methods, to assess vascular stiffness and ventricular-vascular coupling. Finally, fluid-tissue interactions appear to offer a novel route of investigating the mechanotransduction processes and disease progression.

  16. The effect of sildenafil on right ventricular remodeling in a rat model of monocrotaline-induced right ventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Hyeryon; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) leads to right ventricular failure (RVF) as well as an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Our purpose was to study the effect of sildenafil on right ventricular remodeling in a rat model of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced RVF. Methods The rats were distributed randomly into 3 groups. The control (C) group, the monocrotaline (M) group (MCT 60 mg/kg) and the sildenafil (S) group (MCT 60 mg/kg+ sildenafil 30 mg/kg/day for 28 days). Masson Trichrome staining was used for heart tissues. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining were performed. Results The mean right ventricular pressure (RVP) was significantly lower in the S group at weeks 1, 2, and 4. The number of intra-acinar arteries and the medial wall thickness of the pulmonary arterioles significantly lessened in the S group at week 4. The collagen content also decreased in heart tissues in the S group at week 4. Protein expression levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X, caspase-3, Bcl-2, interleukin (IL)-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin (ET)-1 and ET receptor A (ERA) in lung tissues greatly decreased in the S group at week 4 according to immunohistochemical staining. According to Western blotting, protein expression levels of troponin I, brain natriuretic peptide, caspase-3, Bcl-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, MMP-2, eNOS, ET-1, and ERA in heart tissues greatly diminished in the S group at week 4. Conclusion Sildenafil alleviated right ventricular hypertrophy and mean RVP. These data suggest that sildenafil improves right ventricular function. PMID:27462355

  17. Dramatic response of a patient with pregnancy induced idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension to sildenafil treatment.

    PubMed

    Taçoy, Gülten; Ekim, Numan Nadir; Cengel, Atiye

    2010-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, which may lead to right ventricular failure and death. Major cardiovascular and pulmonary alterations occur during pregnancy and therefore worsen or increase the complications of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). A patient diagnosed with IPAH after a successful full-term pregnancy and cesarean section with epidural anesthesia is presented. The postoperative course was complicated by progressive dyspnea, and lower limb edema. The outcome of treatment with sildenafil during puerperium was favorable in this patient. The clinical course was complicated by an unexpected spontaneous pregnancy after primary infertility.

  18. Clinical and pathological characterisation of primary pulmonary hypertension in a dog.

    PubMed

    Glaus, T M; Soldati, G; Maurer, R; Ehrensperger, F

    2004-06-19

    Primary pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed in an eight-year-old labrador retriever on the basis of echocardiographic findings of severe right ventricular eccentric hypertrophy, abnormally high systolic and diastolic pulmonary arterial pressures calculated by applying the modified Bernoulli equation to the tricuspid and pulmonary insufficiency peak velocities, and the absence of any underlying disease known to cause secondary pulmonary hypertension. The clinical abnormalities developed gradually, from exercise intolerance starting early in life to terminal right-sided congestive heart failure. Consistent histopathological findings were severe intimal and medial thickening of small arteries and arterioles that led to vascular obliteration.

  19. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively.

  20. Recent advances in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Perez, Vinicio

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been an explosion in the development of therapeutics to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rare but life-threatening disorder associated with progressive elevation of pulmonary pressures and severe right heart failure. Recently, the field has seen the introduction of riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, a new endothelin receptor antagonist (macitentan), and oral prostanoids (treprostinil and selexipag). Besides new drugs, there have been significant advances in defining the role of upfront combination therapy in treatment-naïve patients as well as proposed methods to deliver systemic prostanoids by use of implantable pumps. In this review, we will touch upon the most important developments in PAH therapeutics over the last three years and how these have changed the guidelines for the treatment of PAH. These exciting developments herald a new era in the treatment of PAH which will be punctuated by the use of more clinically relevant endpoints in clinical research trials and a novel treatment paradigm that may involve upfront double- or triple-combination therapy. We anticipate that the future will make use of these strategies to test the efficacy of upcoming new drugs that aspire to reduce disease progression and improve survival in patients afflicted with this devastating disease. PMID:27990270

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension – New Trends of Diagnostic and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pesto, Senad; Begic, Zijo; Prevljak, Sabina; Pecar, Ehlimana; Kukavica, Nihad; Begic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a pathophysiological state hemodynamically defined as the increase of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure above 25, or 30 mmHg at rest, measured by catheterization of the right heart. Laboratory findings usually reveals polycythemia, the ECG right ventricle hypertrophy, and x-ray characteristic of diseased branches (echocardiography and biomarkers such as B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP hormones are potentially helpful tools in identifying PH). Echocardiography can be found the increase of the right atrium and ventricle, right ventricular hypertrophy, abnormal contraction of the interventricular septum, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and decreased left ventricular size, with reduced volumes of systole and end diastole. Doppler confirming tricuspid regurgitation. Pharmacological therapy would represent a use: Calcium Channel Blockers, Prostacyclin Analogues, Endothelin Receptor Antagonists and Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors. Alpha adrenergic antagonists, endothelial receptor subtype A (Bosentan, Tracller) with treatment of the underlying disease or anticongestive therapy, are recommended. In case of inadequate response to treatment with a specific drug, guidelines recommend the combined use of drugs from the basic three groups, using their synergism. PMID:27703295

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Hilberg, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2013-10-03

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge on PH in relation to COPD and ILD from a clinical perspective with emphasis on diagnosis, biomarkers, prevalence, impact, treatment, and practical implications. PH in COPD and ILD is associated with a poor prognosis, and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which is not systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However, treatment with systemically administered pulmonary vasodilators implies the risk of worsening the ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with lung disease. Inhaled vasodilators may be better suited for PH in lung disease, but new treatment modalities are also required.

  3. Pathophysiology of infantile pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by monocrotaline.

    PubMed

    Dias-Neto, Marina; Luísa-Neves, Ana; Pinho, Sónia; Gonçalves, Nádia; Mendes, Maria; Eloy, Catarina; Lopes, José M; Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira-Pinto, Manuel; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) presents certain specific features. In this specific age group, experimental models to study the pathophysiology of PAH are lacking. To characterize hemodynamic, morphometric, and histological progression as well as the expression of neurohumoral factors and regulators of cardiac transcription in an infantile model of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT), eight-day-old Wistar rats were randomly injected with MCT (30 mg/kg, sc, n = 95) or equal volume of saline solution (n = 92). Animals were instrumented for biventricular hemodynamic recording 7, 14, and 21 days after MCT, whereas samples were collected at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after MCT. Different time point postinjections were defined for further analysis. Hearts and lungs were collected for morphometric characterization, assessment of right- and left-ventricle (RV and LV) cardiomyocyte diameter and collagen type-I and type-III ratio, RV collagen volume fraction, and pulmonary vessels wall thickness. mRNA quantification was undertaken for brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and for cardiac transcription regulators (HOP and Islet1). Animals treated with MCT at the 8th day of life presented RV hypertrophy since day 14 after MCT injection. There were no differences on the RV collagen volume fraction or collagen type-I and type-III ratio. Pulmonary vascular remodelling and PAH were present on day 21, which were accompanied by an increased expression of BNP, ET-1, HOP, and Islet1. The infantile model of MCT-induced PAH can be useful for the study of its pathophysiology and to test new therapeutic targets in pediatric age group.

  4. Are Hemodynamics Surrogate Endpoints in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Fritz, Jason S.; Smith, K. Akaya; Palevsky, Harold I.; Klinger, James R.; Halpern, Scott D.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background While frequently assessed in trials and clinical practice, hemodynamic response to therapy has never been validated as a surrogate endpoint for clinical events in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods and Results We performed a patient-level pooled analysis of four randomized placebo-controlled trials to determine if treatment-induced changes in hemodynamic values at 12 weeks accounted for the relationship between treatment assignment and the probability of early clinical events (death, lung transplantation, atrial septostomy, PAH hospitalization, withdrawal for clinical worsening, escalation in PAH therapy). We included 1119 subjects with PAH. The median (interquartile range) age was 48 (37 – 59), and 23% were men. 656 (59%) received active therapy (101 [15%] iloprost, 118 [18%] sitaxsentan, 204 [31%] sildenafil, and 233 [36%] subcutaneous treprostinil). Active treatment significantly lowered right atrial pressure (RAP), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output and index (p < 0.01 for all). Changes in hemodynamic values (except for RAP and mPAP) were significantly associated with the risk of a clinical event (p ≤ 0.01 for all). While active treatment approximately halved the odds of a clinical event compared to placebo (p < 0.001), changes in hemodynamics accounted for only 1.2 – 13.9% of the overall treatment effect. Conclusions Treatment-induced changes in hemodynamics at 12 weeks only partially explain the impact of therapy on the probability of early clinical events in PAH. These findings suggest that resting hemodynamics are not valid surrogate endpoints for short-term events in PAH clinical trials. PMID:24951771

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in critically ill elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-yun; Xu, Fan; Chu, Ming; Bi, Li-qing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the incidence, possible risk factors and prognosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in critically ill elderly patients. Methods: We selected 122 cases admitted to the ICU, ages 60–93 years old. An echocardiography examination was performed within four days after admission to the ICU. PAH is usually suspected if the patient’s pulmonary artery systolic pressure ≥ 40 mmHg. We collected echocardiography data, relevant clinical data and routine laboratory data; we then used a statistical method to analyze the risk factors for PAH in critically ill elderly patients and examined its impact on the prognosis. Results: Total 51 patients were diagnosed with PAH. The prevalence of critically ill elderly patients with PAH was 41.8%. The ANOVA analysis showed that if patients had COPD (P = 0.031) and/or respiratory failure (P = 0.021), they were more prone to PAH. An enlarged left atrium (P = 0.038) and/or right ventricle (P = 0.029), a declining left ventricle fractional shortening rate (P = 0.038), and an elevated amount of the brain natriuretic peptides (P = 0.046) were all associated with the occurrence of PAH. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the left atrial diameter (P = 0.045) was the risk factor in critically ill elderly patients with PAH. The 30-day mortality rate was 33.3% for elderly patients with PAH, which is statistically significant (P = 0.035) when compared with the mortality rate of patients with normal pulmonary artery pressure. Our multivariate regression analysis also showed that, for critically ill elderly patients admitted in the ICU, PAH (P = 0.039) is risk factor for increased mortality. Conclusions: A higher incidence of PAH occurs in critically ill elderly patients. PAH is more likely to occur in patients with an enlarged left atrium, and these problems adversely impact the prognosis. PMID:28367167

  6. [Pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure. Part X. Prostanoids in the treatment of primary pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Batyraliev, T A; Makhmutkhodzhaev, S A; Ekinci, E; Pataraia, S A; Pershukov, I V; Sidorenko, B A; Preobrazhenskiĭ, D V

    2007-01-01

    In a series of articles the authors discuss literature data concerning epidemiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), its modern classification; peculiarities of its pathogenesis and treatment in various diseases and conditions. The tenth communication contains consideration of results of controlled trials of prostacyclin and its synthetic analogues in patients with primary (idiopathic) PAH, and PAH associated with diffuse diseases of connective tissue, congenital heart disease, HIV-infection. Continuous intravenous infusion of prostacyclin (epoprostenol) has made a revolution in the treatment of patient with severe PAH because its long-term use is associated with improvement of survival of patients refractory to high doses of calcium antagonists. Subcutaneous administration of treprostinil and especially inhaled iloprost substantially widen possibilities of prolonged use of prostanoids in patients with various forms of PAH. Literature data on application of different prostanoids for long term treatment of patients with PAH, their side effects, indications and counterindications for their administration are analyzed in this communication.

  7. [Sildenafil reduces pressure and pulmonary resistance and increases susceptibility of pulmonary arteries to nitric oxide in primary pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Wodniecki, Jan; Jacheć, Wojciech; Poloński, Lech; Tomasik, Andrzej Robert; Wojciechowska, Celina; Foremny, Ala

    2005-01-01

    Primary pulmonary arterial hypertension (PPH) is a rare disease of undetermined origin and fatal prognosis. A better prognosis is associated with at least 20% reduction of either pulmonary artery pressure or pulmonary vascular resistance ("responders") in acute vasodilatory trials. Prostacycline (PGI2) or nitric oxide (NO) administration promises valuable results. NO is one of the most powerful vasodilating agents, endogenously produced by endothelial cells. It migrates from these cells to smooth muscle cells and stimulates production of cGMP, that induces smooth muscle relaxation. cGMP is hydrolyzed by 5-phopshodiesterase (PDE-5). Several papers documenting hypotensive effect in pulmonary circulation of specific PDE5 inhibitor--sildenafil (Viagra--Pfizer) have been published recently. We present a case report of a 26 year old female patient with PPH--"nonresponder" in a trial with NO--and NO responder after sildenafil administration. Initial values were: mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was 58 mmHg, pulmonary vascular resistance was 10.9 Wood's units. mPAP and PVR during NO inhalation (40 ppm) decrease from 62 to 54 mmHg and from 11.4 to 10.3 Wood's units, respectively. Measurements performed 60 minutes after 50 mg of sildenafil orally disclosed a 19% reduction of mPAP and 21% reduction of PVR. NO inhalation caused further decrease of both parameters: mPAP was decreased for additional 28% and PVR for additional 36% in comparison to initial results. Neither peripheral hypotension nor other side effects were observed. A month-long administration of sildenafil in a dose 2 x 25 mg daily reduced mPAP and PVR to values reported for the acute trial. Physical capability improved also. It was assessed as increased distance in a six-minute-walk test (280 vs. 400 m in the first week of treatment, and 330 m in a fourth week of treatment). Echocardiography showed moderate decrease of right ventricle and right atrium diameters, along with decrease of the degree of relative

  8. Long-Term Health Outcomes in High-Altitude Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Abbott, Cheryl; Meadows, Christina A; Roach, Robert C; Honigman, Benjamin; Bull, Todd M

    2017-03-01

    Robinson, Jeffrey C., Cheryl Abbott, Christina A. Meadows, Robert C. Roach, Benjamin Honigman, and Todd M. Bull. Long-term health outcomes in high-altitude pulmonary hypertension. High Alt Med Biol. 18:61-66, 2017.

  9. HIF2α–arginase axis is essential for the development of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cowburn, Andrew S.; Crosby, Alexi; Macias, David; Branco, Cristina; Colaço, Renato D. D. R.; Southwood, Mark; Toshner, Mark; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is correlated with pulmonary vascular remodeling. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) HIF-1α and HIF-2α are known to contribute to the process of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling; however, the specific role of pulmonary endothelial HIF expression in this process, and in the physiological process of vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia, remains unclear. Here we show that pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α is a critical regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. The rise in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) normally observed following chronic hypoxic exposure was absent in mice with pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α deletion. The RVSP of mice lacking HIF-2α in pulmonary endothelium after exposure to hypoxia was not significantly different from normoxic WT mice and much lower than the RVSP values seen in WT littermate controls and mice with pulmonary endothelial deletion of HIF-1α exposed to hypoxia. Endothelial HIF-2α deletion also protected mice from hypoxia remodeling. Pulmonary endothelial deletion of arginase-1, a downstream target of HIF-2α, likewise attenuated many of the pathophysiological symptoms associated with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. We propose a mechanism whereby chronic hypoxia enhances HIF-2α stability, which causes increased arginase expression and dysregulates normal vascular NO homeostasis. These data offer new insight into the role of pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α in regulating the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. PMID:27432976

  10. Response to pulmonary arterial hypertension drug therapies in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Luke S.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Grapsa, Julia; Wilkins, Martin R.; Davies, Rachel J.; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Connolly, Susan B.; Gibbs, J. Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The age at diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors are increasing. We sought to determine whether the response to drug therapy was influenced by CV risk factors in PAH patients. We studied consecutive incident PAH patients (n = 146) between January 1, 2008, and July 15, 2011. Patients were divided into two groups: the PAH–No CV group included patients with no CV risk factors (obesity, systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, permanent atrial fibrillation, mitral and/or aortic valve disease, and coronary artery disease), and the PAH-CV group included patients with at least one. The response to PAH treatment was analyzed in all the patients who received PAH drug therapy. The PAH–No CV group included 43 patients, and the PAH-CV group included 69 patients. Patients in the PAH–No CV group were younger than those in the PAH-CV group (P < 0.0001). In the PAH–No CV group, 16 patients (37%) improved on treatment and 27 (63%) did not improve, compared with 11 (16%) and 58 (84%) in the PAH-CV group, respectively (P = 0.027 after adjustment for age). There was no difference in survival at 30 months (P = 0.218). In conclusion, in addition to older age, CV risk factors may predict a reduced response to PAH drug therapy in patients with PAH. PMID:25610602

  11. Response to pulmonary arterial hypertension drug therapies in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Charalampopoulos, Athanasios; Howard, Luke S; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Grapsa, Julia; Wilkins, Martin R; Davies, Rachel J; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Connolly, Susan B; Gibbs, J Simon R

    2014-12-01

    The age at diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors are increasing. We sought to determine whether the response to drug therapy was influenced by CV risk factors in PAH patients. We studied consecutive incident PAH patients (n = 146) between January 1, 2008, and July 15, 2011. Patients were divided into two groups: the PAH-No CV group included patients with no CV risk factors (obesity, systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, permanent atrial fibrillation, mitral and/or aortic valve disease, and coronary artery disease), and the PAH-CV group included patients with at least one. The response to PAH treatment was analyzed in all the patients who received PAH drug therapy. The PAH-No CV group included 43 patients, and the PAH-CV group included 69 patients. Patients in the PAH-No CV group were younger than those in the PAH-CV group (P < 0.0001). In the PAH-No CV group, 16 patients (37%) improved on treatment and 27 (63%) did not improve, compared with 11 (16%) and 58 (84%) in the PAH-CV group, respectively (P = 0.027 after adjustment for age). There was no difference in survival at 30 months (P = 0.218). In conclusion, in addition to older age, CV risk factors may predict a reduced response to PAH drug therapy in patients with PAH.

  12. Which prognostic factors should be used in pulmonary arterial hypertension in elderly patients?

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Bahri; Ozpelit, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, the prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is more commonly seen among elderly populations. The increased prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, obesity, arterial stiffness, as well as diastolic dysfunction, may cause endothelial dysfunction and affect pulmonary vasculature. Furthermore, older patients have certain differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes. In this article, the special characteristics of aging in PAH patients have been reviewed, while the risk predictors of elderly patients are also discussed. PMID:28270839

  13. Sildenafil as treatment for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-related pulmonary hypertension in a child.

    PubMed

    Wong, Abdul Rahim; Rasool, Aida Hanum G; Abidin, Nik Zainal; Noor, Abdul Rahmand; Quah, Ban Seng

    2006-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-related pulmonary hypertension is a relatively rare disease that can affect HIV sufferers. This is almost always associated with a poor outcome and death. An 18 month-old girl, probably the youngest on record, was diagnosed to have pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and retrospectively found to have HIV infection. Sildenafil was used to control her PHT and she remains alive even after 2 years.

  14. [Transition from prostacyclin to bosentan in five patients with severe pulmonary hypertension: the switch is possible].

    PubMed

    Flox Camacho, Angela; Escribano Subías, Pilar; Tello de Meneses, Rocío; Delgado Jiménez, Juan; Gómez Sánchez, Miguel A; Sáenz de la Calzada, Carlos

    2006-07-01

    Prostacyclin improves symptoms, exercise tolerance, and survival in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the difficulty of administration (whether intravenous, subcutaneous, or by inhalation) often causes side effects that can reduce the patient's quality of life and which may sometimes be serious. Bosentan, an orally active endothelin receptor antagonist, improves functional class and exercise tolerance in these patients. We describe the successful transition from prostacyclin to bosentan in five patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who suffered serious side effects with prostacyclin treatment.

  15. Hyperoxia Reduces Oxygen Consumption in Children with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long; Bobhate, Prashant; Kumar, Shine; Vadlamudi, Karunakar; Kaddoura, Tarek; Elgendi, Mohamed; Holinski, Paula; Coe, James Y; Rutledge, Jennifer; Adatia, Ian

    2017-03-18

    High inspired oxygen concentration (FiO2 > 0.85) is administered to test pulmonary vascular reactivity in children with pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is difficult to measure oxygen consumption (VO2) if the subject is breathing a hyperoxic gas mixture so the assumption is made that baseline VO2 does not change. We hypothesized that hyperoxia changes VO2. We sought to compare the VO2 measured by a thermodilution catheter in room air and hyperoxia. A retrospective review of the hemodynamic data obtained in children with PH who underwent cardiac catheterization was conducted between 2009 and 2014. Cardiac index (CI) was measured by a thermodilution catheter in room air and hyperoxia. VO2 was calculated using the equation CI = VO2/arterial-venous oxygen content difference. Data were available in 24 subjects (males = 10), with median age 8.3 years (0.8-17.6 years), weight 23.3 kg (7.5-95 kg), and body surface area 0.9 m(2) (0.4-2.0 m(2)). In hyperoxia compared with room air, we measured decreased VO2 (154 ± 38 to 136 ± 34 ml/min/m(2), p = 0.007), heart rate (91 [Formula: see text] 20 to 83 [Formula: see text] 21 beats/minute, p=0.005), mean pulmonary artery pressure (41 [Formula: see text] 16 to 35 [Formula: see text] 14 mmHg, p=0.024), CI (3.6 [Formula: see text] 0.8 to 3.3 [Formula: see text] 0.9 L/min/m(2), p = 0.03), pulmonary vascular resistance (9 [Formula: see text] 6 to 7 [Formula: see text] 3 WU m(2), p = 0.029), increased mean aortic (61 [Formula: see text] 11 to 67 [Formula: see text] 11 mmHg, p = 0.005), pulmonary artery wedge pressures (11 [Formula: see text] 8 to 13 [Formula: see text] 9 mmHg, p = 0.006), and systemic vascular resistance (12 [Formula: see text] 6 to 20 [Formula: see text] 7 WU m(2), p=0.001). Hyperoxia decreased VO2 and CI and caused pulmonary vasodilation and systemic vasoconstriction in children with PH. The assumption that VO

  16. Brain Abscess as A Complication of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension – A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K, Lakshmi; R, Santhanam; S, Chitralekha

    2013-01-01

    A brain abscess is a life threatening condition which can occur as a complication of various clinical conditions. An intra–cerebral abscess which occurs as a complication of pulmonary arterial hypertension is extremely rare. The present report has described such an uncommon case of an intra–cerebral abscess in a chronic pulmonary thrombo embolism patient with pulmonary hypertension. A–34–year old male who was a known case of chronic pulmonary thrombo embolism with pulmonary artery hypertension, who was diagnosed 6 months back, presented to the Out Patients Department (OPD) with headache and vomiting. He had right homonymous hemianopia. Contrast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) of brain showed a peripherally enhancing lesion in the left temporo-occipital lobe, with oedema and a mass effect. Left parieto–occipital craniotomy and excision of the abscess was done. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the aspirated pus. PMID:24179934

  17. Oral sildenafil for treatment of severe pulmonary hypertension in an infant.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam-lun Ellis; Cheung, Kam-lau; Siu, Kiu-lok; Leung, Ting-fan; Yam, Man-ching; Fok, Tai-fai; Ng, Pak-cheung

    2005-01-01

    We report the use of oral sildenafil in a 5-month-old preterm infant with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary arterial hypertension refractory to inhaled nitric oxide treatment, maximal ventilatory support and conventional vasodilator therapy. Sildenafil was prepared as a liquid suspension by the method of trituration and administered via an orogastric tube to the patient. Forty-eight hours after sildenafil treatment, echocardiography revealed that the tricuspid incompetence was substantially diminished and the contractility of both ventricles improved, indicating a marked reduction in pulmonary arterial pressure. Oral sildenafil treatment was continued for 6 months until complete resolution of pulmonary arterial hypertension, and oxygen supplement was weaned off. There was no adverse effect during the treatment period. Oral sildenafil may be useful in reducing pulmonary vascular resistance and can be considered for treatment of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  18. MicroRNA Delivery Strategies to the Lung in a Model of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Baker, Andrew H; Bradshaw, Angela C

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by enhanced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells associated with obliteration of small pulmonary arterioles and formation of plexiform lesions. To date, no curative treatments have been identified for pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are various therapeutic options, including conventional medical therapies and oral, subcutaneous, intravenous, and inhalation delivery. We have previously shown that miR-143/145 knockout can prevent the development of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) in mice. Here, we use chronic hypoxia-induced PH as a disease model to evaluate miR-143/145 inhibition after delivery of antimiRNAs via the subcutaneous or intranasal routes. We use qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence to confirm that both delivery strategies efficiently inhibit miR-143/145 in lung tissue from mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH.

  19. Effects of sildenafil on pulmonary hypertension and exercise tolerance in severe cystic fibrosis-related lung disease.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Gregory S; Sagel, Scott D; Taylor, Amy L; Abman, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with advanced lung disease are at risk for developing pulmonary vascular disease and pulmonary hypertension, characterized by progressive exercise intolerance beyond the exercise-limiting effects of airways disease in CF. We report on a patient with severe CF lung disease who experienced clinically significant improvements in exercise tolerance and pulmonary hypertension without changing lung function during sildenafil therapy.

  20. Postadulticide pulmonary hypertension of canine heartworm disease: successful treatment with oxygen and failure of antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, C A; Tackett, R L

    1990-10-01

    Postadulticide pulmonary hypertension mechanisms and treatment with antihistamines and supplemental oxygen were studied in eight dogs with heartworm disease. To ensure severe postadulticide thromboembolism, additional heartworms (either 20 or 40 into 4 dogs each) were transplanted into naturally infected dogs before thiacetarsamide treatment. During pentobarbital anesthesia, 2 pulmonary hemodynamic studies were conducted on each dog with a sequence of baseline, hypoxia with FlO2 = 10%, hyperoxia with FlO2 = 100%, a second baseline, treatment with either diphenhydramine (D) or cimetidine (C), and another hypoxia. All dogs were pulmonary hypertensive, with each dog having a mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PPA) greater than 20 mm of Hg. Mean PPA increased from baseline conditions (25.0 +/- 4.5 SD for D and 24.3 +/- 4.4 for C) to hypoxia (28.5 +/- 4.7 for D and 28.4 +/- 3.7 for C), and decreased during hyperoxia (16.9 +/- 3.0 for D and 17.4 +/- 3.0 for C), respectively. Neither antihistamine reduced PPA at normoxia. The degree of pulmonary hypertension when breathing room air increased even more during hypoxia, and this increase was not attenuated by either antihistamine. Histamine did not appear to mediate pulmonary hypertension during postadulticide thromboembolism, nor to modify the hypoxia-mediated pulmonary hypertension at this disease stage. Because baseline PO2 was low (66.6 +/- 11.7 mm of Hg for D and 69.4 +/- 14.2 for C) and because PPA decreased during administration of oxygen, the pulmonary hypertension was mostly hypoxia-induced. In addition to the arterial lesions, much of the pulmonary hypertensive mechanism was an active and reversible vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia caused by the secondary lung disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Isorhynchophylline protects against pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppresses PASMCs proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Haipeng; Zhang, Xin; Cui, Yuqian; Deng, Wei; Xu, Dachun; Han, Hui; Wang, Hao; Chen, Yuguo; Li, Yu; Wu, Dawei

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We focus on PASMCs proliferation in the pathogenesis of PAH. • Isorhynchophylline inhibited PASMCs proliferation and alleviated PAH. • IRN blocked PDGF-Rβ phosphorylation and its downstream signal transduction. • IRN regulated cyclins and CDKs to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. • We reported IRN has the potential to be a candidate for PAH treatment. - Abstract: Increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Isorhynchophylline (IRN) is a tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla. It has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little is known about whether IRN can influence the development of PAH. Here we examined the effect of IRN on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. Our data demonstrated that IRN prevented MCT induced PAH in rats, as assessed by right ventricular (RV) pressure, the weight ratio of RV to (left ventricular + septum) and RV hypertrophy. IRN significantly attenuated the percentage of fully muscularized small arterioles, the medial wall thickness, and the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro studies, IRN concentration-dependently inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of PASMCs. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis showed that IRN caused G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. IRN-induced growth inhibition was associated with downregulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK6 as well as an increase in p27Kip1 levels in PDGF-BB-stimulated PASMCs. Moreover, IRN negatively modulated PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, ERK1/2, Akt/GSK3β, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). These results demonstrate that IRN could inhibit PASMCs proliferation and

  2. Effects of Different Pulmonary Vasodilators on Arterial Saturation in a Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Eva Maria; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Bechem, Martin; Keldenich, Jörg; Klipp, Alexandra; Schaefer, Katja; Ulbrich, Hannes-Friedrich; Truebel, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Background Approved therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension can induce oxygen desaturation when administered to patients with secondary forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH), probably due to an increase in ventilation/perfusion mismatch. Thus, so far these treatments have largely failed in secondary forms of PH. Methods We established an animal model of heterogeneous lung ventilation to evaluate the desaturation potential of mechanistically distinct vasoactive drugs launched or currently in clinical development for the treatment of PH. Single-lung ventilation was induced in five groups (N = 6) of anesthetized minipigs (7 weeks, 4 to 5 kg BW), and their hemodynamic parameters were monitored before and after intravenous injection of control (vehicle only), endothelin antagonist (bosentan; 0.3, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (sildenafil; 3, 10, 30, 100 µg/kg), and soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators (BAY 41–8543 and riociguat; 1, 3, 10, 30 µg/kg). Cumulative doses were administered before successive unilateral ventilation cycles. The doses were chosen to achieve equal effect on blood pressure by the different pharmacologic principles. Results Single-lung ventilation resulted in transient increases in mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and desaturation. In contrast to control, all drugs dose-dependently decreased hypoxic mPAP (a positive treatment effect) and increased area under the arterial hemoglobin saturation curve (unwanted desaturation effect). Riociguat and bosentan reduced hypoxic mPAP to the greatest extent, while the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators riociguat and BAY 41–8543 lowered arterial oxygen saturation of hemoglobin the least. Conclusions Future investigations will be required to confirm these findings in clinical settings. PMID:24015306

  3. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackwell, Timothy S; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R

    2012-06-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A(2B)R) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A(2B)R or treatment with the A(2B)R antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A(2B)R attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A(2B)R activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A(2B)R antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.

  4. Pulmonary vasoreactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats - Effects of endothelin-1 and leptin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic hypertension may be associated with an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, which we hypothesized could be, at least in part, mediated by increased leptin. Methods Vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (1 μmol/L), endothelin-1 (10 nmol/L) and leptin (0.001–100 nmol/L) was evaluated in endothelium-intact and -denuded isolated thoracic aorta and pulmonary arteries from spontaneously hypertensive versus control Wistar rats. Arteries were sampled for pathobiological evaluation and lung tissue for morphometric evaluation. Results In control rats, endothelin-1 induced a higher level of contraction in the pulmonary artery than in the aorta. After phenylephrine or endothelin-1 precontraction, leptin relaxed intact pulmonary artery and aortic rings, while no response was observed in denuded arteries. Spontaneously hypertensive rats presented with increased reactivity to phenylephrine and endothelin-1 in endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries. After endothelin-1 precontraction, endothelium-dependent relaxation to leptin was impaired in pulmonary arteries from hypertensive rats. In both strains of rats, aortic segments were more responsive to leptin than pulmonary artery. In hypertensive rats, pulmonary arteries exhibited increased pulmonary artery medial thickness, associated with increased expressions of preproendothelin-1, endothelin-1 receptors type A and B, inducible nitric oxide synthase and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase, together with decreased leptin receptor and increased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expressions. Conclusions Altered pulmonary vascular reactivity in hypertension may be related to a loss of endothelial buffering of vasoconstriction and decreased leptin-induced vasodilation in conditions of increased endothelin-1. PMID:24499246

  5. Sildenafil and an early stage of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Binns-Loveman, Karen M; Kaplowitz, Mark R; Fike, Candice D

    2005-07-01

    Devising therapies that might prevent the onset or progression of pulmonary hypertension in newborns has received little attention. Our major objective was to determine whether sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, prevents the development of an early stage of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn pigs. Another objective was to determine whether sildenafil causes pulmonary vasodilation without systemic vasodilation in piglets with chronic pulmonary hypertension. Piglets were raised in room air (control, n = 5) or 10-11% O(2) (hypoxic, n = 17) for 3 days. Some piglets (n = 4) received oral sildenafil, 12 mg/kg/day, throughout exposure to hypoxia. All piglets were anesthetized and catheterized, and pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa), pulmonary wedge pressure (Pw), aortic pressure (Ao), and cardiac output (CO) were measured. Then for some piglets raised in hypoxia for 3 days, a single oral sildenafil dose (3 mg/kg, n = 6) or placebo (n = 5) was given, and hemodynamic measurements were repeated. For piglets raised in hypoxia for 3 days, mean Ppa and calculated PVR were elevated above respective values in control piglets. Mean Ppa and PVR did not differ between piglets that received sildenafil throughout exposure to hypoxia and those that did not. For piglets with chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension that received a single oral dose of sildenafil, mean Ppa and PVR decreased, while mean Pw, CO, mean Ao, and systemic vascular resistance remained the same. All hemodynamic measurements were unchanged after placebo. Oral sildenafil did not influence the early stage of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets. However, a single oral dose of sildenafil caused pulmonary vasodilation, without systemic vasodilation, in piglets with chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, which may have therapeutic implications.

  6. World Health Organization Pulmonary Hypertension group 2: pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease in the adult--a summary statement from the Pulmonary Hypertension Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fang, James C; DeMarco, Teresa; Givertz, Michael M; Borlaug, Barry A; Lewis, Gregory D; Rame, J Eduardo; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Murali, Srinivas; Frantz, Robert P; McGlothlin, Dana; Horn, Evelyn M; Benza, Raymond L

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension encountered in clinical practice today. Although frequently a target of therapy, its pathophysiology remains poorly understood and its treatment remains undefined. Pulmonary hypertension in the context of left heart disease is a marker of worse prognosis and disease severity, but whether its primary treatment is beneficial or harmful is unknown. An important step to the future study of this important clinical problem will be to standardize definitions across disciplines to facilitate an evidence base that is interpretable and applicable to clinical practice. In this current statement, we provide an extensive review and interpretation of the current available literature to guide current practice and future investigation. At the request of the Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT), a writing group was assembled and tasked to put forth this document as described above. The review process was facilitated through the peer review process of the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation and ultimately endorsed by the leadership of the ISHLT PH Council.

  7. Sodium hydrosulfide prevents hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Zhang, B K; Liu, D; Nie, W; Yuan, J M; Wang, Z; Guo, Y M

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to determine if H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers, a condition frequently observed in a variety of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. 2. Two-week-old broilers were reared under normoxic conditions or exposed to normobaric hypoxia (6 h/day) with tissue levels of H(2)S adjusted by administering sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, 10 µmol/kg body weight/day). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular mass, plasma and tissue H(2)S levels, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CSE) and vascular remodeling were determined at 35 d of age. 3. Exposure to hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension was characterized by elevated pulmonary pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and vascular remodeling. This was accompanied by decreased expression of CSE and decreased concentrations of plasma and tissue H(2)S. 4. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was significantly reduced by administration of NaHS but this protective effect was largely abolished by D, L-propargylglycerine, an inhibitor of CSE. 5. The results indicate that H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Supplementing NaHS or H(2)S could be a strategy for reducing hypoxia-induced hypertension in broilers.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension: Clinical challenges reflecting the diversity of pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, Evangelia; Sourla, Evdokia; Kotoulas, Serafim Xrisovalantis; Akritidou, Sofia; Bikos, Vasileios; Bagalas, Vasileios; Stanopoulos, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    The present article reports three clinical cases in order to elucidate the diversity of the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension. The condition's three major causes are: interstitial lung disease, vasculitis, and chronic thromboembolic disease, but it should be noted that the multiple pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, can all contribute to chronic lung disease or hypoxia. The first patient in this report suffered from moderate restriction due to fibrosis and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension during an episode of life threatening hypoxia. Early upfront combination therapy prevented intubation and reversed hypoxia to adequate levels. The second presented patient was a case of isolated pulmonary hypertension attributable to vasculopathy. The patient maintained normal lung volumes but low diffusion capacity and echocardiography dictated the need for right heart catheterization. Finally, the third patient presented severe functional limitation due to several manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, but a past episode of acute pulmonary embolism was also reported although it had never been evaluated. Chronic thromboembolic disease was eventually proved to be one major cause of the patient's pulmonary hypertension. The importance of early identification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is therefore e