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Sample records for monomeric outer-membrane porin

  1. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kelli L; Cahill, Bethaney K; Dilello, Sarah K; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N; Albertí, Sebastián; Ellis, Terri N

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host.

  2. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  3. Channel forming outer membrane porin protein in halophile: expressed as a soluble form in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Furukawa, Masafumi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2013-03-01

    We have previously found that the N-terminal sequence of the outer membrane protein from moderate halophile is similar to the sequence of the well-known pore forming porin proteins from other Gram-negative bacteria. This highly expressed outer membrane protein was purified from Halomonas sp. 40 and reconstituted into liposome. It showed a permeability activity in the liposome swelling assay. Based on the N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of this major outer membrane, we have cloned here the porin gene, hopP (halophilic outer membrane protein), from Halomonas sp. 40. The hopP gene encodes the porin precursor comprising 366 amino acid residues that include a 21 amino acid signal peptide. Mature porin (345 amino acids, 37,611 Da) is a highly acidic protein, just as is so for many halophilic proteins and was soluble when expressed in Escherichia coli with N-terminal His-tag. Purified recombinant His-porin was soluble even after heat-treatment at 95 °C for 5 min in the absence of salt. Circular dichroism analysis of His-porin showed conversion into a β-sheet rich structure by the addition of NaCl at 0.9-2.7 M.

  4. Flocculation and Membrane Binding of Outer Membrane Protein F, Porin, at Acidic pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Nakae, Taiji; Mitaku, Shigeki

    1998-04-01

    Outer membrane protein F (OmpF), porin, of Escherichia coli is an intrinsic membrane protein made of a β-sheet barrel, the amino acid sequence being as hydrophilic as many soluble proteins in spite of its location in the hydrophobic region of membrane. The binding of porin molecules with a lipid membrane and the flocculation of the protein were studied at various pH, using the combination of centrifugation and intrinsic fluorescence measurements. The binding of porin with the lipid membrane occurred in the pH range below 7, whereas the flocculation of porin in the absence of the membrane was observed only at pH below 5. Porin molecules in the pH range between 5 and 7 were stable as a colloid but spontaneously bound with the lipid membrane soon after the addition of lipid vesicles. The possible mechanism of the structural formation of porin in the outer membrane was discussed based on the pH dependence of the membrane binding ability of this protein.

  5. Structure-function studies of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae major outer membrane porin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Adrienne; Seifert, H Steven

    2013-12-01

    The major outer membrane porin (PorB) expressed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae plays multiple roles during infection, in addition to its function as an outer membrane pore. We have generated a panel of mutants of N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 expressing a variety of mutant porB genes that all function as porins. We identified multiple regions of porin that are involved in its binding to the complement regulatory factors C4b-binding protein and factor H and confirmed that the ability to bind at least one factor is required for FA1090 to survive the bactericidal effects of human serum. We tested the ability of these mutants to inhibit both apoptosis and the oxidative burst in polymorphonuclear leukocytes but were unable to identify the porin domains required for either function. This study has identified nonessential porin domains and some potentially essential portions of the protein and has further expanded our understanding of the contribution of the porin domains required for complement regulation.

  6. OmpC-like porin from outer membrane of Yersinia enterocolitica: molecular structure and functional activity.

    PubMed

    Vostrikova, O P; Isaeva, M P; Likhatskaya, G N; Novikova, O D; Kim, N Yu; Khomenko, V A; Solov'eva, T F

    2013-05-01

    OmpC-like porin was isolated from the outer membrane (OM) of Yersinia enterocolitica cultured at 37°C (the "warm" variant) and its physicochemical and functional properties were studied. The amino acid sequence of OmpC porin was established, and the primary structure and transmembrane topology of this protein were analyzed in comparison with the OmpF porin isolated from Y. enterocolitica cultured at 6°C (the "cold" variant). Both porins of Y. enterocolitica had a high homology degree (65%) between themselves and with OmpC and OmpF porins from OM of Escherichia coli (58 and 76% homology, respectively). The secondary structure of OmpC and OmpF porins from OM of Y. enterocolitica consists of 16 β-strands connected by short "periplasmic" and longer "extracellular" loops with disordered structure, according to the topological model developed for porins of E. coli. The molecular structures of OmpC and OmpF porins of Y. enterocolitica have significant differences in the structure of the "extracellular" loops and in the position of one of three tryptophan residues. Using the bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) technique, pores formed by OmpC porin of Y. enterocolitica were shown to differ in electrophysiological characteristics from channels of OmpF protein of this microorganism. The isolated OmpC porin reconstructed into BLM displayed functional plasticity similarly to OmpF protein and nonspecific porins of other enterobacteria. The conductivity level of the channels formed by this protein in the BLM was regulated by value of the applied potential.

  7. Subunit constituent of the porin trimers that form the permeability channels in the outer membrane of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1980-01-01

    The polypeptide composition of the functional porin trimers that produced the permeability channels in the outer membrane of Salmonella typhimurium was examined on two-dimensional slab gels. The results suggested that the majority of porin trimers from strains producing mixed species of porin polypeptides consisted of homologous subunit polypeptides. The present results do not exclude the possibility that a small fraction of porin trimer is constructed from heterologous subunit polypeptides. Images PMID:6246065

  8. Role of the mar-sox-rob regulon in regulating outer membrane porin expression.

    PubMed

    Chubiz, Lon M; Rao, Christopher V

    2011-05-01

    Multiple factors control the expression of the outer membrane porins OmpF and OmpC in Escherichia coli. In this work, we investigated the role of the mar-sox-rob regulon in regulating outer membrane porin expression in response to salicylate. We provide both genetic and physiological evidence that MarA and Rob can independently activate micF transcription in response to salicylate, leading to reduced OmpF expression. MarA was also found to repress OmpF expression through a MicF-independent pathway. In the case of OmpC, we found that its transcription was moderately increased in response to salicylate. However, this increase was independent of MarA and Rob. Finally, we found that the reduction in OmpF expression in a tolC mutant is due primarily to Rob. Collectively, this work further clarifies the coordinated role of MarA and Rob in regulating the expression of the outer membrane porins.

  9. Sequence and transcriptional start site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane porin protein F gene.

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, M; Schweizer, A; Lottspeich, F; Krauss, G; Marget, M; Vogel, K; von Specht, B U; Domdey, H

    1988-01-01

    Porin F is one of the major proteins of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It forms water-filled pores of variable size. Porin F is a candidate for a vaccine against P. aeruginosa because it antigenically cross-reacts in all serotype strains of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. We have isolated the gene for porin F from a lambda EMBL3 bacteriophage library by using oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization probes and have determined its nucleotide sequence. Different peptide sequences obtained from isolated porin F confirmed the deduced protein sequence. The mature protein consists of 326 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 35,250. The precursor contains an N-terminal signal peptide of 24 amino acid residues. S1 protection and primer extension experiments, together with Northern (RNA) blots, indicate that the mRNA coding for porin F is monocistronic with short untranslated regions of about 58 bases at the 5' end and about 47 bases at the 3' end. The sequences in the -10 and -35 regions upstream of the transcriptional start site are closely related to the Escherichia coli promoter consensus sequences, which explains why the porin F gene is expressed in E. coli under the control of its own promoter. The amino acid sequence of porin F is not homologous to the different E. coli porins OmpF, OmpC, LamB, and PhoE. On the other hand, a highly homologous region of 30 amino acids between the OmpA proteins of different enteric bacteria and porin F of P. aeruginosa was detected. The core region of the homology to E. coli OmpA had 11 of 12 amino acid residues in common. Images PMID:2447060

  10. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  11. Intrinsically disordered protein threads through the bacterial outer-membrane porin OmpF.

    PubMed

    Housden, Nicholas G; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Wojdyla, Justyna A; Klein, Alexander; Kaminska, Renata; Bayley, Hagan; Saibil, Helen R; Robinson, Carol V; Kleanthous, Colin

    2013-06-28

    Porins are β-barrel outer-membrane proteins through which small solutes and metabolites diffuse that are also exploited during cell death. We have studied how the bacteriocin colicin E9 (ColE9) assembles a cytotoxic translocon at the surface of Escherichia coli that incorporates the trimeric porin OmpF. Formation of the translocon involved ColE9's unstructured N-terminal domain threading in opposite directions through two OmpF subunits, capturing its target TolB on the other side of the membrane in a fixed orientation that triggers colicin import. Thus, an intrinsically disordered protein can tunnel through the narrow pores of an oligomeric porin to deliver an epitope signal to the cell to initiate cell death.

  12. Neutron diffraction on porin, a channel-forming protein in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischel, Maja; Hentschel, Manfred; Rosenbusch, Jüirg P.; BÜldt, Georg

    1986-02-01

    It is known from planar lipid membrane experiments that matrix porin from E. coli outer membrane forms large channels of about 10 Å diameter which open and close dependent on the trans-membrane potential. Transmission electron microscopy on negatively stained two-dimensional porin lattices showed a trimer in the elementary cell. A 3D analysis of these membranes suggests that the three channels per trimer converge as they traverse the membrane. The aim of our neutron diffraction experiments was to locate the channels independently using H 2O/D 2O exchange experiments and model calculations. The common feature of the best fits shows that the main part of the channels is concentrated at the centre of the trimer, in agreement with the EM result.

  13. Purification of Legionella pneumophila major outer membrane protein and demonstration that it is a porin.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, J E; Blake, M; Niles, W D; Horwitz, M A

    1985-01-01

    We have purified the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Legionella pneumophila, determined that it is associated with peptidoglycan, and characterized it as a porin. To purify the MOMP, we used a simple, rapid, three-step procedure that gave us the protein in high yield. The first step of the purification procedure involved selectively extracting the MOMP from whole bacterial cells with calcium and zwitterionic detergent. The second and third steps achieved purification by ion-exchange and molecular-sieve chromatography. The dissociation of the MOMP into monomers was dependent upon the presence of a reducing agent and was enhanced by treatment at 100 degrees C. To study the relationship of the MOMP to peptidoglycan, we extracted the protein by a modification of the Rosenbusch procedure. Like the Escherichia coli porins, the MOMP was peptidoglycan associated. The MOMP was at least partially dissociated from peptidoglycan in sodium dodecyl sulfate and a high salt concentration. To study the ion channel-forming properties of the MOMP, we reconstituted the MOMP in planar lipid membranes. The MOMP formed ion-permeable channels with a single-channel conductance size of 100 picoSiemens. The MOMP channels exhibited a fourfold selectivity for cations over anions and voltage-independent gating. These findings demonstrate that the MOMP is a porin with properties similar to those of E. coli porins. Images PMID:2579942

  14. Purification of Legionella pneumophila major outer membrane protein and demonstration that it is a porin.

    PubMed

    Gabay, J E; Blake, M; Niles, W D; Horwitz, M A

    1985-04-01

    We have purified the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Legionella pneumophila, determined that it is associated with peptidoglycan, and characterized it as a porin. To purify the MOMP, we used a simple, rapid, three-step procedure that gave us the protein in high yield. The first step of the purification procedure involved selectively extracting the MOMP from whole bacterial cells with calcium and zwitterionic detergent. The second and third steps achieved purification by ion-exchange and molecular-sieve chromatography. The dissociation of the MOMP into monomers was dependent upon the presence of a reducing agent and was enhanced by treatment at 100 degrees C. To study the relationship of the MOMP to peptidoglycan, we extracted the protein by a modification of the Rosenbusch procedure. Like the Escherichia coli porins, the MOMP was peptidoglycan associated. The MOMP was at least partially dissociated from peptidoglycan in sodium dodecyl sulfate and a high salt concentration. To study the ion channel-forming properties of the MOMP, we reconstituted the MOMP in planar lipid membranes. The MOMP formed ion-permeable channels with a single-channel conductance size of 100 picoSiemens. The MOMP channels exhibited a fourfold selectivity for cations over anions and voltage-independent gating. These findings demonstrate that the MOMP is a porin with properties similar to those of E. coli porins.

  15. Role of the Outer Membrane and Porins in Susceptibility of β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae to Ceftazidime-Avibactam.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Jean-Marie; Peslier, Sabine; Keating, Thomas A; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Nichols, Wright W

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the activity of the novel antimicrobial combination ceftazidime-avibactam against Enterobacteriaceae exhibiting different outer membrane permeability profiles, specifically with or without porins and with or without expression of the main efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC). The addition of the outer membrane permeabilizer polymyxin B nonapeptide increased the antibacterial activities of avibactam alone, ceftazidime alone, and ceftazidime-avibactam against the characterized clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. This enhancement of activities was mainly due to increased passive penetration of compounds since inhibition of efflux by the addition of phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide affected the MICs minimally. OmpF (OmpK35) or OmpC (OmpK36) pores were not the major route by which avibactam crossed the outer membranes of E. coli and K. pneumoniae. In contrast, Omp35 and Omp36 allowed diffusion of avibactam across the outer membrane of E. aerogenes, although other diffusion channels for avibactam were also present in that species. It was clear that outer membrane permeability and outer membrane pore-forming proteins play a key role in the activity of ceftazidime-avibactam. Nevertheless, the MICs of ceftazidime-avibactam (with 4 mg/liter avibactam) against the ceftazidime-resistant clinical isolates of the three species of Enterobacteriaceae studied were ≤ 8 mg/liter, regardless of outer membrane permeability changes resulting from an absence of defined porin proteins or upregulation of efflux.

  16. Directed epitope delivery across the Escherichia coli outer membrane through the porin OmpF.

    PubMed

    Housden, Nicholas G; Wojdyla, Justyna A; Korczynska, Justyna; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Kirkpatrick, Nadine; Brzozowski, A Marek; Kleanthous, Colin

    2010-12-14

    The porins OmpF and OmpC are trimeric β-barrel proteins with narrow channels running through each monomer that exclude molecules > 600 Da while mediating the passive diffusion of small nutrients and metabolites across the Gram-negative outer membrane (OM). Here, we elucidate the mechanism by which an entire soluble protein domain (> 6 kDa) is delivered through the lumen of such porins. Following high-affinity binding to the vitamin B(12) receptor in Escherichia coli, the bacteriocin ColE9 recruits OmpF or OmpC using an 83-residue intrinsically unstructured translocation domain (IUTD) to deliver a 16-residue TolB-binding epitope (TBE) in the center of the IUTD to the periplasm where it triggers toxin entry. We demonstrate that the IUTD houses two OmpF-binding sites, OBS1 (residues 2-18) and OBS2 (residues 54-63), which flank the TBE and bind with K(d)s of 2 and 24 μM, respectively, at pH 6.5 and 25 ºC. We show the two OBSs share the same binding site on OmpF and that the colicin must house at least one of them for antibiotic activity. Finally, we report the structure of the OmpF-OBS1 complex that shows the colicin bound within the porin lumen spanning the membrane bilayer. Our study explains how colicins exploit porins to deliver epitope signals to the bacterial periplasm and, more broadly, how the inherent flexibility and narrow cross-sectional area of an IUP domain can endow it with the ability to traverse a biological membrane via the constricted lumen of a β-barrel membrane protein.

  17. Directed epitope delivery across the Escherichia coli outer membrane through the porin OmpF

    PubMed Central

    Housden, Nicholas G.; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Korczynska, Justyna; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Kirkpatrick, Nadine; Brzozowski, A. Marek; Kleanthous, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The porins OmpF and OmpC are trimeric β-barrel proteins with narrow channels running through each monomer that exclude molecules > 600 Da while mediating the passive diffusion of small nutrients and metabolites across the Gram-negative outer membrane (OM). Here, we elucidate the mechanism by which an entire soluble protein domain (> 6 kDa) is delivered through the lumen of such porins. Following high-affinity binding to the vitamin B12 receptor in Escherichia coli, the bacteriocin ColE9 recruits OmpF or OmpC using an 83-residue intrinsically unstructured translocation domain (IUTD) to deliver a 16-residue TolB-binding epitope (TBE) in the center of the IUTD to the periplasm where it triggers toxin entry. We demonstrate that the IUTD houses two OmpF-binding sites, OBS1 (residues 2–18) and OBS2 (residues 54–63), which flank the TBE and bind with Kds of 2 and 24 μM, respectively, at pH 6.5 and 25 ºC. We show the two OBSs share the same binding site on OmpF and that the colicin must house at least one of them for antibiotic activity. Finally, we report the structure of the OmpF-OBS1 complex that shows the colicin bound within the porin lumen spanning the membrane bilayer. Our study explains how colicins exploit porins to deliver epitope signals to the bacterial periplasm and, more broadly, how the inherent flexibility and narrow cross-sectional area of an IUP domain can endow it with the ability to traverse a biological membrane via the constricted lumen of a β-barrel membrane protein. PMID:21098297

  18. Lysine residues at positions 234 and 236 in yeast porin are involved in its assembly into the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Smith, M D; Petrak, M; Boucher, P D; Barton, K N; Carter, L; Reddy, G; Blachly-Dyson, E; Forte, M; Price, J; Verner, K

    1995-11-24

    Various point mutations of lysyl residues in yeast mitochondrial porin (283 residues) were tested for their ability to assemble in vitro into the outer membranes of intact yeast mitochondria. Assembly was evaluated by protection from proteinases. The extent of assembly of two of the mutants, K234E and K236E porins, was much less than for wild-type in either post-translational or co-translational assembly assays. Lysine to glutamate mutants at other positions and K234R porin assembled as well as wild-type, but K234Q porin was poorly inserted. When both Lys-234 and Lys-236 were mutated, K234R/K236R porin was inserted better than K234Q/K236Q porin, which was inserted better than K234E/K236E; however, none of these mutants assembled as well as wild-type porin. It was concluded that optimal assembly of yeast porin depended on the presence of positively charged residues at both positions 234 and 236 and a lysine at one of these positions. After undergoing the assembly reaction, mutants that were vulnerable to proteinase K (i.e. K234E, K234Q, and K236E porins) seemed to be incompletely digested and were, to varying degrees, resistant to extraction by Na2CO3 (pH 11.5). These experiments suggested that these mutants were incompletely inserted into the outer membrane. Both Lys-234 and Lys-236 are included in an internal pentapeptide, VKAKV, that is conserved in porins from protists, plants, and animals, and it is possible that, at least, the lysines in this tract are one of the signals for the membrane assembly of these proteins.

  19. Bordetella pertussis major outer membrane porin protein forms small, anion-selective channels in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, S K; Parr, T R; Parker, C D; Hancock, R E

    1986-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein of molecular weight 40,000 (the 40K protein) of a virulent isolate of Bordetella pertussis was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified protein formed an oligomer band (of apparent molecular weight 90,000) on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after solubilization at low temperatures. The porin function of this protein was characterized by the black lipid bilayer method. The 40K protein formed channels smaller than all other constitutive major outer membrane porins studied to date. The average single-channel conductance in 1 M KCl was 0.56 nS. This was less than a third of the conductance previously observed for Escherichia coli porins. Zero-current potential measurements made of the porin to determine its ion selectivity revealed the porin to be more than 100-fold selective for anions over cations. The single-channel conductance was measured as a function of salt concentration. The data could be fitted to a Lineweaver-Burk plot suggesting an anion binding site with a Kd of 1.17 M Cl- and a maximum possible conductance through the channel of 1.28 nS. Images PMID:2420780

  20. Outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. XVIII. Electron microscopic studies on porin insertion sites and growth of cell surface of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, J; Nikaido, H

    1978-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium contains three "major proteins" or "porins" (34K, 35K, and 36K) in the outer membrane. A mutant strain producing only the 35K porin was first grown in media containing high concentrations of NaCl to "repress" the porin synthesis and then was shifted into a medium without NaCl. The newly made porin molecules were then labeled with the ferritin-coupled antibody at various times after the shift, and the samples were examined by whole-mount, freeze-etching, and thin-section electron microscopy. These experiments showed that newly inserted porins appeared as discrete patches uniformly distributed over the surface of the cell and, furthermore, that the sites of adhesion between the inner and outer membrane were most probably the pathway by which the newly made porin molecules appeared on cell surface. The 34K and 36K porins were also inserted in the same manner, since the appearance of new porins at discrete sites all over the cell surface was also observed when cells with wild-type porin phenotype were treated with unlabeled antibody to block existing antigenic sites, subsequently regrown, and labeled with the ferritin-coupled antibody. Since porins comprise a major portion of the densely packed, relatively immobile, "protein framework" of the outer membrane, these results lead us to conclude that the outer membrane grows predominantly by diffuse intercalation rather than by the zonal growth mechanism. Images PMID:355240

  1. Sialylation of outer membrane porin protein D: a mechanistic basis of antibiotic uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Biswajit; Van Vleet, Jeremy; Choudhury, Biswa Pronab; Chaudhry, Rama; Mandal, Chitra

    2014-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an environmentally ubiquitous, extracellular, opportunistic pathogen, associated with severe infections of immune-compromised host. We demonstrated earlier the presence of both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids (Sias) on PA (PA(+Sias)) and normal human serum is their source of Sias. PA(+Sias) showed decreased complement deposition and exhibited enhanced association with immune-cells through sialic acid binding immunoglobulin like lectins (Siglecs). Such Sias-siglec-9 interaction between PA(+Sias) and neutrophils helped to subvert host immunity. Additionally, PA(+Sias) showed more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics as reflected in their minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 50% than PA(-Sias). Accordingly, we have affinity purified sialoglycoproteins of PA(+Sias). They were electrophoresed and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Sequence study indicated the presence of a few α2,6-linked, α2,3-linked, and both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialylated proteins in PA. The outer membrane porin protein D (OprD), a specialized channel-forming protein, responsible for uptake of β-lactam antibiotics, is one such identified sialoglycoprotein. Accordingly, sialylated (OprD(+Sias)) and non-sialylated (OprD(-Sias)) porin proteins were separately purified by using anion exchange chromatography. Sialylation of purified OprD(+Sias) was confirmed by several analytical and biochemical procedures. Profiling of glycan structures revealed three sialylated N-glycans and two sialylated O-glycans in OprD(+Sias). In contrast, OprD(-Sias) exhibit only one sialylated N-glycans. OprD(-Sias) interacts with β-lactam antibiotics more than OprD(+Sias) as demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance study. Lyposome-swelling assay further exhibited that antibiotics have more capability to penetrate through OprD(-Sias) purified from four clinical isolates of PA

  2. Sialylation of Outer Membrane Porin Protein D: A Mechanistic Basis of Antibiotic Uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Khatua, Biswajit; Vleet, Jeremy Van; Choudhury, Biswa Pronab; Chaudhry, Rama; Mandal, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an environmentally ubiquitous, extracellular, opportunistic pathogen, associated with severe infections of immune-compromised host. We demonstrated earlier the presence of both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids (Sias) on PA (PA+Sias) and normal human serum is their source of Sias. PA+Sias showed decreased complement deposition and exhibited enhanced association with immune-cells through sialic acid binding immunoglobulin like lectins (Siglecs). Such Sias-siglec-9 interaction between PA+Sias and neutrophils helped to subvert host immunity. Additionally, PA+Sias showed more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics as reflected in their minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 50% than PA−Sias. Accordingly, we have affinity purified sialoglycoproteins of PA+Sias. They were electrophoresed and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Sequence study indicated the presence of a few α2,6-linked, α2,3-linked, and both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialylated proteins in PA. The outer membrane porin protein D (OprD), a specialized channel-forming protein, responsible for uptake of β-lactam antibiotics, is one such identified sialoglycoprotein. Accordingly, sialylated (OprD+Sias) and non-sialylated (OprD−Sias) porin proteins were separately purified by using anion exchange chromatography. Sialylation of purified OprD+Sias was confirmed by several analytical and biochemical procedures. Profiling of glycan structures revealed three sialylated N-glycans and two sialylated O-glycans in OprD+Sias. In contrast, OprD−Sias exhibit only one sialylated N-glycans. OprD−Sias interacts with β-lactam antibiotics more than OprD+Sias as demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance study. Lyposome-swelling assay further exhibited that antibiotics have more capability to penetrate through OprD−Sias purified from four clinical isolates of PA. Taken together, it

  3. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus J; Babauta, Jerome T; Kennedy, David W; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R; Clarke, Thomas A; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Rosso, Kevin M; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Shi, Liang

    2014-12-01

    The multi-heme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC) and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC) respectively. Here, we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.

  4. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang

    2014-09-24

    The multiheme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC), and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC), respectively. Here we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate, but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Finally, complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.

  5. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R.; et al

    2014-09-24

    The multiheme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC), and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC), respectively. Here we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pccmore » protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate, but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Finally, complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.« less

  6. Amelioration of the Fitness Costs of Antibiotic Resistance Due To Reduced Outer Membrane Permeability by Upregulation of Alternative Porins.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Michael; Andersson, Dan I

    2015-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance is a key parameter in determining the evolutionary success of resistant bacteria. Studies of the effect of antibiotic resistance on bacterial fitness are heavily biased toward target alterations. Here we investigated how the costs in the form of a severely impaired growth rate associated with resistance due to absence of two major outer membrane porins can be genetically compensated. We performed an evolution experiment with 16 lineages of a double mutant of Escherichia coli with the ompCF genes deleted, and reduced fitness and increased resistance to different classes of antibiotics, including the carbapenems ertapenem and meropenem. After serial passage for only 250 generations, the relative growth rate increased from 0.85 to 0.99 (susceptible wild type set to 1.0). Compensation of the costs followed two different adaptive pathways where upregulation of expression of alternative porins bypassed the need for functional OmpCF porins. The first compensatory mechanism involved mutations in the phoR and pstS genes, causing constitutive high-level expression of the PhoE porin. The second mechanism involved mutations in the hfq and chiX genes that disrupted Hfq-dependent small RNA regulation, causing overexpression of the ChiP porin. Although susceptibility was restored in compensated mutants with PhoE overexpression, evolved mutants with high ChiP expression maintained the resistance phenotype. Our findings may explain why porin composition is often altered in resistant clinical isolates and provide new insights into how bypass mechanisms may allow genetic adaptation to a common multidrug resistance mechanism.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Monomeric Porin OmpG

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao,G.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria contains a large number of channel proteins that mediate the uptake of ions and nutrients necessary for growth and functioning of the cell. An important group of OM channel proteins are the porins, which mediate the non-specific, diffusion-based passage of small (<600 Da) polar molecules. All porins of Gram-negative bacteria that have been crystallized to date form stable trimers, with each monomer composed of a 16-stranded {beta}-barrel with a relatively narrow central pore. In contrast, the OmpG porin is unique, as it appears to function as a monomer. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of OmpG from Escherichia coli to a resolution of 2.3 Angstroms. The structure shows a 14-stranded {beta}{beta}-barrel with a relatively simple architecture. Due to the absence of loops that fold back into the channel, OmpG has a large ({approx}13 Angstroms) central pore that is considerably wider than those of other E. coli porins, and very similar in size to that of the toxin a-hemolysin. The architecture of the channel, together with previous biochemical and other data, suggests that OmpG may form a non-specific channel for the transport of larger oligosaccharides. The structure of OmpG provides the starting point for engineering studies aiming to generate selective channels and for the development of biosensors.

  8. Use of a purified outer membrane protein F (porin) preparation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a protective vaccine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gilleland, H E; Parker, M G; Matthews, J M; Berg, R D

    1984-01-01

    The outer membrane protein F (porin) from the PAO1 strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was purified by two different methods. One procedure involved separation by column chromatography of proteins extracted from isolated outer membranes, whereas the other involved extraction from gels after slab polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins extracted from cell envelopes. Both procedures yielded protein F preparations which successfully immunized mice from subsequent challenge with the PAO1 strain. The protein F preparations contained small quantities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This level of LPS contamination protected immunized mice from challenge with the homologous LPS serotype strain. However, immunization of mice with protein F preparations from the PAO1 strain also afforded protection against challenge with two different LPS serotype strains. This protective ability was lost when the protein F preparation was treated with papain before use as a vaccine. These observations support the conclusion that protein F has protective ability, which is not due to LPS contamination, when given as a vaccine. After immunization with the protein F preparation, mice showed an increase in antibody titer to the purified protein F preparation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Mice were protected passively by administration of rabbit antisera raised to the protein F preparation. These results indicate that the protein F preparation elicits a specific humoral antibody response in immunized animals. Our results suggest that purified protein F has potential as an effective vaccine for P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:6323316

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ScrY, a specific bacterial outer membrane porin.

    PubMed

    Forst, D; Schülein, K; Wacker, T; Diederichs, K; Kreutz, W; Benz, R; Welte, W

    1993-01-01

    The sucrose-specific outer membrane porin ScrY of Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from Escherichia coli K-12 strain KS 26 containing the plasmid pPSO112. The protein was purified to homogeneity by differential extraction of the cell envelope in the presence of the detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate and lauryl (dimethyl)-amine oxide (LDAO). The porin had apparent molecular weights of 58 kDa and 120 kDa for the monomer and for the trimer, respectively, on SDS/PAGE. The purified trimers were crystallized using poly(ethylene glycol) 2000 and the detergents octylglucoside (OG) and hexyl-(dimethyl)-amine oxide (C6DAO). X-ray diffraction of the crystals showed reflections to 2.3 A. The space group of the crystals was R3 and the lattice constants of the hexagonal axes were a = b = 112.85 A and c = 149.9 A. The crystal volume per unit of protein molecular weight was 3.47 A3/Da.

  10. Transport across the outer membrane porin of mycolic acid containing actinomycetales: Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bajaj, Harsha; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2015-02-01

    The role of the outer-membrane channel from a mycolic acid containing Gram-positive bacteria Nocardia farcinica, which forms a hydrophilic pathway across the cell wall, was characterized. Single channel electrophysiology measurements and liposome swelling assays revealed the permeation of hydrophilic solutes including sugars, amino acids and antibiotics. The cation selective N. farcinica channel exhibited strong interaction with the positively charged antibiotics; amikacin and kanamycin, and surprisingly also with the negatively charged ertapenem. Voltage dependent kinetics of amikacin and kanamycin interactions were studied to distinguish binding from translocation. Moreover, the importance of charged residues inside the channel was investigated using mutational studies that revealed rate limiting interactions during the permeation.

  11. Identification and characterization of a novel porin family highlights a major difference in the outer membrane of chlamydial symbionts and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aistleitner, Karin; Heinz, Christian; Hörmann, Alexandra; Heinz, Eva; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Schulz, Frederik; Maier, Elke; Pichler, Peter; Benz, Roland; Horn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Chlamydiae constitute an evolutionary well separated group of intracellular bacteria comprising important pathogens of humans as well as symbionts of protozoa. The amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila lacks a homologue of the most abundant outer membrane protein of the Chlamydiaceae, the major outer membrane protein MOMP, highlighting a major difference between environmental chlamydiae and their pathogenic counterparts. We recently identified a novel family of putative porins encoded in the genome of P. amoebophila by in silico analysis. Two of these Protochlamydiaouter membrane proteins, PomS (pc1489) and PomT (pc1077), are highly abundant in outer membrane preparations of this organism. Here we show that all four members of this putative porin family are toxic when expressed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. Immunofluorescence analysis using antibodies against heterologously expressed PomT and PomS purified directly from elementary bodies, respectively, demonstrated the location of both proteins in the outer membrane of P. amoebophila. The location of the most abundant protein PomS was further confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy. We could show that pomS is transcribed, and the corresponding protein is present in the outer membrane throughout the complete developmental cycle, suggesting an essential role for P. amoebophila. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that PomS functions as a porin with anion-selectivity and a pore size similar to the Chlamydiaceae MOMP. Taken together, our results suggest that PomS, possibly in concert with PomT and other members of this porin family, is the functional equivalent of MOMP in P. amoebophila. This work contributes to our understanding of the adaptations of symbiotic and pathogenic chlamydiae to their different eukaryotic hosts.

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel porin family highlights a major difference in the outer membrane of chlamydial symbionts and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aistleitner, Karin; Heinz, Christian; Hörmann, Alexandra; Heinz, Eva; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Schulz, Frederik; Maier, Elke; Pichler, Peter; Benz, Roland; Horn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Chlamydiae constitute an evolutionary well separated group of intracellular bacteria comprising important pathogens of humans as well as symbionts of protozoa. The amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila lacks a homologue of the most abundant outer membrane protein of the Chlamydiaceae, the major outer membrane protein MOMP, highlighting a major difference between environmental chlamydiae and their pathogenic counterparts. We recently identified a novel family of putative porins encoded in the genome of P. amoebophila by in silico analysis. Two of these Protochlamydiaouter membrane proteins, PomS (pc1489) and PomT (pc1077), are highly abundant in outer membrane preparations of this organism. Here we show that all four members of this putative porin family are toxic when expressed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. Immunofluorescence analysis using antibodies against heterologously expressed PomT and PomS purified directly from elementary bodies, respectively, demonstrated the location of both proteins in the outer membrane of P. amoebophila. The location of the most abundant protein PomS was further confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy. We could show that pomS is transcribed, and the corresponding protein is present in the outer membrane throughout the complete developmental cycle, suggesting an essential role for P. amoebophila. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that PomS functions as a porin with anion-selectivity and a pore size similar to the Chlamydiaceae MOMP. Taken together, our results suggest that PomS, possibly in concert with PomT and other members of this porin family, is the functional equivalent of MOMP in P. amoebophila. This work contributes to our understanding of the adaptations of symbiotic and pathogenic chlamydiae to their different eukaryotic hosts. PMID:23383036

  13. Negative Regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Porin OprD Selective for Imipenem and Basic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Martina M.; McCusker, Matthew P.; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprD is a specific porin which facilitates the uptake of basic amino acids and imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. Resistance to imipenem due to the loss of OprD is an important mechanism for the loss of clinical effectiveness. To investigate the negative regulatory mechanisms influencing oprD expression, a gene upstream of the coregulated mexEF-oprN efflux operon, designated mexT, was cloned. The predicted 304-amino-acid mature MexT protein showed strong homology to LysR-type regulators. When overexpressed it induced the expression of the mexEF-oprN efflux operon while decreasing the level of expression of OprD. The use of an oprD::xylE transcriptional fusion indicated that it acted by repressing the transcription of oprD. Salicylate, a weak aromatic acid known to reduce porin expression and induce low levels of multiple antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli, was able to induce imipenem resistance and reduce the expression of OprD but not multiple antibiotic resistance or OprN expression in P. aeruginosa. This was also demonstrated to occur at the level of transcription. Acetyl salicylate and benzoate, but not catechol, were also able to reduce the levels of OprD in the P. aeruginosa outer membranes. These OprD-suppressing compounds increased imipenem resistance even in a mexT-overexpressing and nfxC mutant backgrounds, suggesting that such resistance is independent of the MexT repressor and that oprD is influenced by more than a single mechanism of repression. PMID:10223918

  14. A proteomic approach to understand the role of the outer membrane porins in the organic solvent-tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PseA.

    PubMed

    Hemamalini, R; Khare, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microbes have the unique ability to thrive in presence of organic solvents. The present study describes the effect of increasing hydrophobicity (log Pow values) of organic solvents on the outer membrane proteome of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PseA cells. The cells were grown in a medium containing 33% (v/v) alkanes of increasing log Pow values. The outer membrane proteins were extracted by alkaline extraction from the late log phase cells and changes in the protein expression were studied by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Seven protein spots showed significant differential expression in the solvent exposed cells. The tryptic digest of the differentially regulated proteins were identified by LC-ESI MS/MS. The identity of these proteins matched with porins OprD, OprE, OprF, OprH, Opr86, LPS assembly protein and A-type flagellin. The reported pI values of these proteins were in the range of 4.94-8.67 and the molecular weights were in the range of 19.5-104.5 kDa. The results suggest significant down-regulation of the A-type flagellin, OprF and OprD and up-regulation of OprE, OprH, Opr86 and LPS assembly protein in presence of organic solvents. OprF and OprD are implicated in antibiotic uptake and outer membrane stability, whereas A-type flagellin confers motility and chemotaxis. Up-regulated OprE is an anaerobically-induced porin while Opr86 is responsible for transport of small molecules and assembly of the outer membrane proteins. Differential regulation of the above porins clearly indicates their role in adaptation to solvent exposure.

  15. Chronic Infection by Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa Associated with Dysregulation in T-Cell Immunity to Outer Membrane Porin F

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Kathryn J.; Reynolds, Catherine J.; Goudet, Amelie; Raynsford, Eleanor J.; Sergeant, Ruhena; Quigley, Andrew; Worgall, Stefan; Bilton, Diana; Wilson, Robert; Loebinger, Michael R.; Maillere, Bernard; Altmann, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an environmental pathogen that commonly infects individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, impacting morbidity and mortality. To understand the pathobiology of interactions between the bacterium and host adaptive immunity and to inform rational vaccine design, it is important to understand the adaptive immune correlates of disease. Objectives: To characterize T-cell immunity to the PA antigen outer membrane porin F (OprF) by analyzing immunodominant epitopes in relation to infection status. Methods: Patients with non-CF bronchiectasis were stratified by frequency of PA isolation. T-cell IFN-γ immunity to OprF and its immunodominant epitopes was characterized. Patterns of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restriction of immunodominant epitopes were defined using HLA class II transgenic mice. Immunity was characterized with respect to cytokine and chemokine secretion, antibody response, and T-cell activation transcripts. Measurements and Main Results: Patients were stratified according to whether PA was never, sometimes (<50%), or frequently (≥50%) isolated from sputum. Patients with frequent PA sputum-positive isolates were more likely to be infected by mucoid PA, and they showed a narrow T-cell epitope response and a relative reduction in Th1 polarizing transcription factors but enhanced immunity with respect to antibody production, innate cytokines, and chemokines. Conclusions: We have defined the immunodominant, HLA-restricted T-cell epitopes of OprF. Our observation that chronic infection is associated with a response of narrowed specificity, despite strong innate and antibody immunity, may help to explain susceptibility in these individuals and pave the way for better vaccine design to achieve protective immunity. PMID:25789411

  16. Immunogenic characterization of outer membrane porins OmpC and OmpF of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Canying; Chen, Zhaohui; Tan, Chen; Liu, Wugang; Xu, Zhuofei; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2012-12-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is an important pathogen that can cause systemic infections in a broad spectrum of mammals and birds. To date, commercial vaccines against ExPEC infections in pigs are rare and antibiotic resistance has become a serious clinical problem. Identification of protective antigens is helpful for developing potentially effective vaccines. In this study, two outer membrane porins, OmpC and OmpF, of porcine ExPEC were cloned and expressed to investigate their immunogenicity. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with the purified recombinant proteins OmpC and OmpF stimulated strong immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses. Both IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses were induced, with a predominance of IgG1 production. After challenge with 2.5 × 10(7) CFU (5 × LD50 ) of the highly virulent ExPEC strain PCN033, 62.5% and 87.5% protection was observed in mice immunized with OmpC and OmpF, respectively. In addition, both anti-OmpC and anti-OmpF sera can mediate complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ompC gene was ubiquitously present in all E. coli strains, whereas the ompF gene was mutated in certain strains. Furthermore, the selection analysis indicated that gene ompC may be subject to strong immune pressure. Our results demonstrated that OmpC is a promising vaccine target against ExPEC infections in swine.

  17. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  18. Adaptive responses of outer membrane porin balance of Yersinia ruckeri under different incubation temperature, osmolarity, and oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Bystritskaya, Evgeniya; Stenkova, Anna; Chistuylin, Dmitriy; Chernysheva, Nadezhda; Khomenko, Valentina; Anastyuk, Stanislav; Novikova, Olga; Rakin, Alexander; Isaeva, Marina

    2016-08-01

    The capability of Yersinia ruckeri to survive in the aquatic systems reflects its adaptation (most importantly through the alteration of membrane permeability) to the unfavorable environments. The nonspecific porins are a key factor contributing to the permeability. Here we studied the influence of the stimuli, such as temperature, osmolarity, and oxygen availability on regulation of Y. ruckeri porins. Using qRT-PCR and SDS-PAGE methods we found that major porins are tightly controlled by temperature. Hyperosmosis did not repress OmpF production. The limitation of oxygen availability led to decreased expression of both major porins and increased transcription of the minor porin OmpY. Regulation of the porin balance in Y. ruckeri, in spite of some similarities, diverges from that system in Escherichia coli. The changes in porin regulation can be adapted in Y. ruckeri in a species-specific manner determined by its aquatic habitats. PMID:27038237

  19. Adaptive responses of outer membrane porin balance of Yersinia ruckeri under different incubation temperature, osmolarity, and oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Bystritskaya, Evgeniya; Stenkova, Anna; Chistuylin, Dmitriy; Chernysheva, Nadezhda; Khomenko, Valentina; Anastyuk, Stanislav; Novikova, Olga; Rakin, Alexander; Isaeva, Marina

    2016-08-01

    The capability of Yersinia ruckeri to survive in the aquatic systems reflects its adaptation (most importantly through the alteration of membrane permeability) to the unfavorable environments. The nonspecific porins are a key factor contributing to the permeability. Here we studied the influence of the stimuli, such as temperature, osmolarity, and oxygen availability on regulation of Y. ruckeri porins. Using qRT-PCR and SDS-PAGE methods we found that major porins are tightly controlled by temperature. Hyperosmosis did not repress OmpF production. The limitation of oxygen availability led to decreased expression of both major porins and increased transcription of the minor porin OmpY. Regulation of the porin balance in Y. ruckeri, in spite of some similarities, diverges from that system in Escherichia coli. The changes in porin regulation can be adapted in Y. ruckeri in a species-specific manner determined by its aquatic habitats.

  20. Saturating mutagenesis of an essential gene: a majority of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae major outer membrane porin (PorB) is mutable.

    PubMed

    Chen, Adrienne; Seifert, H Steven

    2014-02-01

    The major outer membrane porin (PorB) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an essential protein that mediates ion exchange between the organism and its environment and also plays multiple roles in human host pathogenesis. To facilitate structure-function studies of porin's multiple roles, we performed saturating mutagenesis at the porB locus and used deep sequencing to identify essential versus mutable residues. Random mutations in porB were generated in a plasmid vector, and mutant gene pools were transformed into N. gonorrhoeae to select for alleles that maintained bacterial viability. Deep sequencing of the input plasmid pools and the output N. gonorrhoeae genomic DNA pools identified mutations present in each, and the mutations in both pools were compared to determine which changes could be tolerated by the organism. We examined the mutability of 328 amino acids in the mature PorB protein and found that 308 of them were likely to be mutable and that 20 amino acids were likely to be nonmutable. A subset of these predictions was validated experimentally. This approach to identifying essential amino acids in a protein of interest introduces an additional application for next-generation sequencing technology and provides a template for future studies of both porin and other essential bacterial genes.

  1. Functional Characterization of a Novel Outer Membrane Porin KpnO, Regulated by PhoBR Two-Component System in Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vijaya Bharathi; Venkataramaiah, Manjunath; Mondal, Amitabha; Vaidyanathan, Vasanth; Govil, Tanvi; Rajamohan, Govindan

    2012-01-01

    Background The diffusion of antibiotics through the outer membrane is primarily affected by the porin super family, changes contribute to antibiotic resistance. Recently we demonstrated that the CpxAR two-component signaling system alters the expression of an uncharacterized porin OmpCKP, to mediate antimicrobial resistance in K. pneumoniae. Principal Findings In this study, functional characterization of the putative porin OmpCKP (denoted kpnO) with respect to antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence was evaluated by generating an isogenic mutant, ΔkpnO in a clinical isolate of K. pneumoniae. Estimation of uronic acid content confirmed that ΔkpnO produced ∼2.0 fold lesser capsular polysaccharide than the wild-type. The ΔkpnO displayed higher sensitivity to hyper osmotic and bile conditions. Disruption of kpnO increased the susceptibility of K. pneumoniae to oxidative and nitrostative stress by ∼1.6 fold and >7 fold respectively. The loss of the Klebsiella porin led to an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration of tetracycline (3-fold), nalidixic acid (4-fold), tobramycin (4-fold), streptomycin (10-fold), and spectinomycin (10-fold), which could be restored following complementation. The single deletion of kpnO reduced the survival of the pathogen by 50% when exposed to disinfectants. In Caenorhabditis elegans model, the kpnO mutant exhibited significantly (P<0.01) lower virulence. To dissect the role of PhoBR signaling system in regulating the expression of the kpnO, a phoBKP isogenic mutant was constructed. The phoBKP mutant exhibited impaired gastrointestinal stress response and decreased antimicrobial susceptibility. The mRNA levels of kpnO were found to be 4-fold less in phoBKP mutant compared to wild type. A regulatory role of PhoBKP for the expression of kpnO was further supported by the specific binding of PhoBKP to the putative promoter of kpnO. Conclusions and Significance Loss of PhoBR regulated porin KpnO resulted in increased

  2. Identification of outer membrane Porin D as a vitronectin-binding factor in cystic fibrosis clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Magnus; Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Su, Yu-Ching; Høiby, Niels; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that frequently colonizes patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several pathogens are known to bind vitronectin to increase their virulence. Vitronectin has been shown to enhance P. aeruginosa adhesion to host epithelial cells. Methods We screened clinical isolates from the airways of CF patients and from the bloodstream of patients with bacteremia for binding of vitronectin. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and a proteomic approach was used to identify vitronectin-receptors in P. aeruginosa. Results P. aeruginosa from the airways of CF patients (n=27) bound more vitronectin than bacteremic isolates (n=15, p=0.025). Porin D (OprD) was identified as a vitronectin-binding protein. A P. aeruginosa oprD transposon insertion mutant had a decreased binding to soluble and immobilized vitronectin (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from CF patients significantly bound vitronectin. Porin D was defined as a novel P. aeruginosa vitronectin-receptor, and we postulate that the Porin D-dependent interaction with vitronectin may be important for colonization. PMID:26047937

  3. The outer membrane porin OmpW of Acinetobacter baumannii is involved in iron uptake and colistin binding.

    PubMed

    Catel-Ferreira, Manuella; Marti, Sara; Guillon, Laurent; Jara, Luis; Coadou, Gaël; Molle, Virginie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Bou, German; Shalk, Isabelle; Jouenne, Thierry; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize functions of the outer membrane protein OmpW, which potentially contributes to the development of colistin- and imipenem-resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. Reconstitution of OmpW in artificial lipid bilayers showed that it forms small channels (23 pS in 1 m KCl) and markedly interacts with iron and colistin, but not with imipenem. In vivo, (55) Fe uptake assays comparing the behaviours of ΔompW mutant and wild-type strains confirmed a role for OmpW in A. baumannii iron homeostasis. However, the loss of OmpW expression did not have an impact on A. baumannii susceptibilities to colistin or imipenem.

  4. Phosphate-starvation-induced outer membrane proteins of members of the families Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonodaceae: demonstration of immunological cross-reactivity with an antiserum specific for porin protein P of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, K; Hancock, R E

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria from members of the families Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae were grown under phosphate-deficient (0.1 to 0.2 mM Pi) conditions and examined for the production of novel membrane proteins. Of the 17 strains examined, 12 expressed a phosphate-starvation-induced outer membrane protein which was heat modifiable in that after solubilization in sodium dodecyl sulfate at low temperature the protein ran on gels as a diffuse band of higher apparent molecular weight, presumably an oligomer form, which shifted to an apparent monomer form after solubilization at high temperature. These proteins fell into two classes based on their monomer molecular weights and the detergent conditions required to release the proteins from the peptidoglycan. The first class, expressed by species of the Pseudomonas fluorescens branch of the family Pseudomonadaceae, was similar to the phosphate-starvation-inducible, channel-forming protein P of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The second class resembled the major enterobacterial porin proteins and the phosphate-regulated PhoE protein of Escherichia coli. Using a protein P-trimer-specific polyclonal antiserum, we were able to demonstrate cross-reactivity of the oligomeric forms of both classes of these proteins on Western blots. However, this antiserum did not react with the monomeric forms of any of these proteins, including protein P monomers. With a protein P-monomer-specific antiserum, no reactivity was seen with any of the phosphate-starvation-inducible membrane proteins (in either oligomeric or monomeric form), with the exception of protein P monomers. These results suggest the presence of conserved antigenic determinants only in the native, functional proteins. Images PMID:2419313

  5. One-step purification and porin transport activity of the major outer membrane proteins P2 from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kattner, Christof; Pfennig, Sabrina; Massari, Paola; Tanabe, Mikio

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial porins are major outer membrane proteins that function as essential solute transporters between the bacteria and the extracellular environment. Structural features of porins are also recognized by eukaryotic cell receptors involved in innate and adaptive immunity. To better investigate the function of porins, proper refolding is necessary following purification from inclusion bodies [1, 2]. Using a single-step size exclusion chromatographic method, we have purified three major porins from pathogenic bacteria, the OmpP2 (P2) from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis, at high yield and report their unique solute transport activity with size exclusion limit. Furthermore, we have optimized their purification method and achieved improvement of their thermostability for facilitating functional and structural analyses.

  6. Induction of immune responses by two recombinant proteins of brucella abortus, outer membrane proteins 2b porin and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyung Yong; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Eui; Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-06-28

    The diagnosis of Brucella abortus is mainly based on serological methods using antibody against LPS, which has diagnostic problems. Therefore, to solve this problem, we evaluated two proteins of B. abortus, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SodC) and outer membrane proteins 2b porin (Omp2b). The genes were cloned and expressed in a pMAL system, and the recombinant proteins, rOmp2b and rSodC, were purified as fusion forms with maltosebinding protein. The identity of the proteins was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis with sera of mice infected with B. abortus. Production of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in RAW 264.7 cells and mouse splenocytes after stimulation with the proteins. Moreover, cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated in BALB/c mice after immunization with the proteins. TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were significantly inducible in RAW 264.7 cells. Splenocytes of naive mice produced IFN-γ and IL-4 significantly by stimulation. Moreover, number of IgG, IFN-γ, and IL-4 producing cells were increased in immunized mice with the two proteins. Production of IgG and IgM with rOmp2b was higher than those with rSodC in immunized mice. These results suggest that the two recombinant proteins of B. abortus may be potential LPS-free proteins for diagnosis.

  7. Pore-forming activity of Coxiella burnetii outer membrane protein oligomer comprised of 29.5- and 31-kDa polypeptides. Inhibition of porin activity by monoclonal antibodies 4E8 and 4D6.

    PubMed

    Banerjee-Bhatnagar, N; Bolt, C R; Williams, J C

    1996-07-23

    Envelopes of large-cell variant Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, were the starting material for purification of an outer membrane protein (OMP) oligomer with aggregate molecular mass of approximately 2 x 10(4) kDa. The oligomer was resistant to trypsin and dissociation by SDS at 100 degrees C. Reducing agents dissociated the oligomer into monomers of 29.5 and 31 kDa, which migrated as a doublet during SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both monomers were reactive in an immunoblot assay with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 4E8 and 4D6, which were previously selected for their reactivity with purified and SDS-denatured 29.5 kDa protein. Proteoliposomes were functional in an equilibrium assay at pH 7 and a swelling assay at pH 7 and 4.5. The pores in proteoliposomes allowed the passage of arabinose, glucose, and sucrose, but restricted stachyose. Polyclonal antibodies to C. burnetii cells and the mAbs were able to bind C. burnetii at pH 7 and 4.5. The uptake of 14C-glucose at pH 4.5 was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies and mAbs after binding to cells at pH 7. The mAbs did not inhibit 14C-glucose uptake at pH 4.5 after binding to cells at pH 4.5. Although the mAbs bind C. burnetii porin epitopes before and after acid activation, the mAbs bound under acidic conditions were unable to inhibit porin function. The inhibition of porin channel function by mAbs confirms the role of porin as a permeability barrier for the subsequent active transport of glucose by C. burnetii. In another study, we showed that the 29.5 kDa OMP antigen induced active immunity against virulent challenge. This information, combined with the recent confirmation that porins are important antigens in the induction of specific protective immune responses against infection by gram-negative bacteria, suggests that humoral immunity directed against C. burnetii porins might play an important role in immunity against Q fever (human infection) and coxiellosis (animal infection), global enzootic

  8. Lipopolysaccharide structure required for in vitro trimerization of Escherichia coli OmpF porin.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, K; Nikaido, H

    1991-01-01

    Deep rought mutants, which produce very defective lipopolysaccharides, are unable to export normal levels of porins into the outer membrane. In this study, we showed that lipopolysaccharides from such mutants were also unable to facilitate the trimerization, in vitro, of monomeric OmpF porin secreted by spheroplasts of Escherichia coli B/r. In contrast, lipopolysaccharides containing most or all of the core oligosaccharides were able to facilitate trimerization. Images PMID:1702785

  9. Outer Membrane Permeability and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Delcour, Anne H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary To date most antibiotics are targeted at intracellular processes, and must be able to penetrate the bacterial cell envelope. In particular, the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria provides a formidable barrier that must be overcome. There are essentially two pathways that antibiotics can take through the outer membrane: a lipid-mediated pathway for hydrophobic antibiotics, and general diffusion porins for hydrophilic antibiotics. The lipid and protein compositions of the outer membrane have a strong impact on the sensitivity of bacteria to many types of antibiotics, and drug resistance involving modifications of these macromolecules is common. This review will describe the molecular mechanisms for permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane, and the strategies that bacteria have deployed to resist antibiotics by modifications of these pathways. PMID:19100346

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of the Outer Membrane Porin Gene ompW Reveals its Physiological Role during the Transition from the Aerobic to the Anaerobic Lifestyle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Minfeng; Lai, Yong; Sun, Jian; Chen, Guanhua; Yan, Aixin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in Escherichia coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of the Outer Membrane Porin Gene ompW Reveals its Physiological Role during the Transition from the Aerobic to the Anaerobic Lifestyle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Minfeng; Lai, Yong; Sun, Jian; Chen, Guanhua; Yan, Aixin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in Escherichia coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli. PMID:27303386

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of the Outer Membrane Porin Gene ompW Reveals its Physiological Role during the Transition from the Aerobic to the Anaerobic Lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Minfeng; Lai, Yong; Sun, Jian; Chen, Guanhua; Yan, Aixin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in Escherichia coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli. PMID:27303386

  13. Biophysics of gating phenomena in voltage-dependent OmpC mutant porin channels (R74C and R37C) of Escherichia coli outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Hamid; Lea, Edward J A

    2002-09-01

    The mechanism by which the membrane potential closes and opens voltage-dependent beta-barrel membrane channels is not fully understood. OmpC porins form trimeric water-filled channels when incorporated into artificial bilayers, each monomer having a conductance of approximately 510 pS in 1 M KCl. These channels are relatively insensitive to membrane potential difference (pd) and close only when the pd exceeds +/-250 mV. Another well-known trimer, OmpF, has a monomer conductance of approximately 780 pS in 1 M NaCl, is more sensitive to pd, and can be closed reversibly when a pd of more than +/-150 mV is applied to the channel-containing membranes. With the aid of the 3D atomic structure of these channels determined by X-ray crystallography, and using site-directed mutagenesis, specific amino acids can be substituted in desired locations in the channel lumen. In this study we have used mutants 37C and 74C and attached fluorescence probes to them to monitor polarity changes in the channel lumen during gating. From the observed changes in polarity, we conclude that conformational changes occur in the channel which interrupt the electrolyte conducting pathway. PMID:12202916

  14. In vitro trimerization of OmpF porin secreted by spheroplasts of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, K; Nikaido, H

    1990-01-01

    It is not yet clear how bacterial outer membrane proteins reach their correct destination after they are secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane. We show here that porin OmpF is secreted into the medium as a water-soluble monomeric protein by spheroplasts of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, this monomeric porin is taken up by cell envelope preparations or purified lipopolysaccharides in the presence of 0.03% Triton X-100 and is converted correctly into the mature trimeric conformation. These results appear to reproduce a part of the physiological export and targeting steps of this protein. Images PMID:1689050

  15. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis. PMID:15449605

  16. Isolation of the outer membrane and characterization of the major outer membrane protein from Spirochaeta aurantia.

    PubMed Central

    Kropinski, A M; Parr, T R; Angus, B L; Hancock, R E; Ghiorse, W C; Greenberg, E P

    1987-01-01

    The outer membrane of Spirochaeta aurantia was isolated after cells were extracted with sodium lauryl sarcosinate and was subsequently purified by differential centrifugation and KBr isopycnic gradient centrifugation. The purified outer membrane was obtained in the form of carotenoid-containing vesicles. Four protein species with apparent molecular weights of 26,000 (26K), 36.5K, 41K, and 48.5K were readily observed as components of the vesicles. The 36.5K protein was the major polypeptide and constituted approximately 90% of the outer membrane protein observed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Under mild denaturing conditions the 36.5K major protein exhibited an apparent molecular weight of approximately 90,000. This, together with the results of protein cross-linking studies, indicates that the 36.5K polypeptide has an oligomeric conformation in the native state. Reconstitution of solubilized S. aurantia outer membrane into lipid bilayer membranes revealed the presence of a porin, presumably the 36.5K protein, with an estimated channel diameter of 2.3 nm based on the measured single channel conductance of 7.7 nS in 1 M KCl. Images PMID:3025168

  17. Why do the outer membrane proteins OmpF from E. coli and OprP from P. aeruginosa prefer trimers? Simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Niramitranon, Jitti; Sansom, Mark S P; Pongprayoon, Prapasiri

    2016-04-01

    Porins are water-filled protein channels across the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. They facilitate the uptake of nutrients and essential ions. Solutes are filtered by a constriction loop L3 at the mid of a pore. Porins are heat-stable and resistant to toxic agents and detergents. Most porins are trimer, but no clear explanation why trimeric form is preferable. In this work, we thus studied effects of oligomerization on porin structure and function in microscopic detail. A well-studied OmpF (general porin from Escherichia coli) and well-characterised OprP (phosphate-specific pore from Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are used as samples from 2 types of porins found in gram-negative bacteria. MD simulations of trimeric and monomeric pores in pure water and 1M NaCl solution were performed. With a salt solution, the external electric field was applied to mimic a transmembrane potential. Expectedly, OprP is more stable than OmpF. Interestingly, being a monomer turns OmpF into an anion-selective pore. The dislocation of D113's side chain on L3 in OmpF causes the disruption of cation pathway resulting in the reduction of cation influx. In contrast, OprP's structure and function are less dependent on oligomeric states. Both monomeric and trimeric OprP can maintain their anion selectivity. Our findings suggest that trimerization is crucial for both structure and function of general porin OmpF, whereas being trimer in substrate-specific channel OprP supports a pore function.

  18. Do Porins Pass CAPs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. B.; Pink, D. A.; Gill, T. A.; Beveridge, T. J.; Quinn, B. E.; Durrant, J. J.; Jericho, M. H.

    2008-03-01

    The cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP) protamine is known to inhibit bacterial survival (Pink et al., Langmuir 19, 8852 (2003), and references therein), but the mechanism of attack is as yet undetermined. For Gram-negative bacteria, two pathways have been proposed: (a) self-promoted uptake, and (b) passage through porins. Here, we study the latter possibility, and model part of the outer membrane of a Gram-negative bacterium in an aqueous solution containing multivalent ions and CAPs. The intent is to determine whether CAPs could pass through porins and, if so, what aspects of external (e.g., ionic concentration) and internal (e.g., porin and O-sidechain characteristics) parameters affect their passage. This study is accomplished via Monte Carlo computer simulations of a ``minimal model'' of the outer membrane of a Gram-negative bacterium with an embedded porin.

  19. Isolation and characterization of outer membrane permeability mutants in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, S A; Decloux, A

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli normally requires the lamB gene for the uptake of maltodextrins. We have identified and characterized three independent mutations that allow E. coli to grow on maltodextrin in the absence of a functional lamB gene by allowing maltodextrins with a molecular weight greater than 1,000 to cross the outer membrane barrier. Two of the mutations map to the structural gene for the outer membrane porin OmpF, and the remaining mutation maps to the structural gene for the second major outer membrane porin, OmpC. These mutations increase the permeability of the outer membrane to small hydrophilic substances, antibiotics, and detergents. These mutations alter the electrophoretic mobility of the respective porin proteins. Images PMID:2981807

  20. Identification of the Outer Membrane Porin of Thermus thermophilus HB8: the Channel-Forming Complex Has an Unusually High Molecular Mass and an Extremely Large Single-Channel Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Elke; Polleichtner, Georg; Boeck, Birgit; Schinzel, Reinhard; Benz, Roland

    2001-01-01

    The outer membrane of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus was isolated using sucrose step gradient centrifugation. Its detergent extracts contained an ion-permeable channel with an extremely high single-channel conductance of 20 nS in 1 M KCl. The channel protein was purified by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis. It has a high molecular mass of 185 kDa, and its channel-forming ability resists boiling in SDS for 10 min. PMID:11133980

  1. Purification, Refolding, and Crystallization of the Outer Membrane Protein OmpG from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Yildiz, Özkan

    2015-01-01

    OmpG is a pore-forming protein from E. coli outer membranes. Unlike the classical outer membrane porins, which are trimers, the OmpG channel is a monomeric β-barrel made of 14 antiparallel β-strands with short periplasmic turns and longer extracellular loops. The channel activity of OmpG is pH dependent and the channel is gated by the extracellular loop L6. At neutral/high pH, the channel is open and permeable for substrate molecules with a size up to 900 Da. At acidic pH, loop L6 folds across the channel and blocks the pore. The channel blockage at acidic pH appears to be triggered by the protonation of a histidine pair on neighboring β-strands, which repel one another, resulting in the rearrangement of loop L6 and channel closure. OmpG was purified by refolding from inclusion bodies and crystallized in two and three dimensions. Crystallization and analysis by electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed the fundamental mechanisms essential for the channel activity.

  2. The leptospiral outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Haake, David A; Zückert, Wolfram R

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) is the front line of leptospiral interactions with their environment and the mammalian host. Unlike most invasive spirochetes, pathogenic leptospires must be able to survive in both free-living and host-adapted states. As organisms move from one set of environmental conditions to another, the OM must cope with a series of conflicting challenges. For example, the OM must be porous enough to allow nutrient uptake, yet robust enough to defend the cell against noxious substances. In the host, the OM presents a surface decorated with adhesins and receptors for attaching to, and acquiring, desirable host molecules such as the complement regulator, Factor H.Factor H. On the other hand, the OM must enable leptospires to evade detection by the host's immune system on their way from sites of invasion through the bloodstream to the protected niche of the proximal tubule. The picture that is emerging of the leptospiral OM is that, while it shares many of the characteristics of the OMs of spirochetes and Gram-negative bacteria, it is also unique and different in ways that make it of general interest to microbiologists. For example, unlike most other pathogenic spirochetes, the leptospiral OM is rich in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Leptospiral LPS is similar to that of Gram-negative bacteria but has a number of unique structural features that may explain why it is not recognized by the LPS-specific Toll-like receptor 4 of humans. As in other spirochetes, lipoproteins are major components of the leptospiral OM, though their roles are poorly understood. The functions of transmembrane outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in many cases are better understood, thanks to homologies with their Gram-negative counterparts and the emergence of improved genetic techniques. This chapter will review recent discoveries involving the leptospiral OM and its role in leptospiral physiology and pathogenesis.

  3. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  4. Substrate Specificity within a Family of Outer Membrane Carboxylate Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Vijayaraghavan, Jagamya; Liu, Jiaming; Cheneke, Belete R.; Touw, Debra S.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Indic, Mridhu; Movileanu, Liviu; van den Berg, Bert; Dutzler, Raimund

    2012-01-17

    Many Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, do not have large-channel porins. This results in an outer membrane (OM) that is highly impermeable to small polar molecules, making the bacteria intrinsically resistant towards many antibiotics. In such microorganisms, the majority of small molecules are taken up by members of the OprD outer membrane protein family. Here we show that OprD channels require a carboxyl group in the substrate for efficient transport, and based on this we have renamed the family Occ, for outer membrane carboxylate channels. We further show that Occ channels can be divided into two subfamilies, based on their very different substrate specificities. Our results rationalize how certain bacteria can efficiently take up a variety of substrates under nutrient-poor conditions without compromising membrane permeability. In addition, they explain how channel inactivation in response to antibiotics can cause resistance but does not lead to decreased fitness.

  5. Major outer membrane proteins in moderately halophilic eubacteria of genera Chromohalobacter and Halomonas.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Mitsuo, Kenjiro; Kamekura, Masahiro; Tokunaga, Masao

    2004-01-01

    Outer and inner membrane fractions of Chromohalobacter marismortui and Halomonas elongata were isolated by differential detergent solubilization, and profiles of membrane proteins, especially major outer membrane proteins, were analyzed. These type strains possessed one extremely abundant outer membrane protein which showed similarity in amino-terminal amino acid sequence with the outer membrane porin proteins in other Gram-negative bacteria. Three halophilic eubacterial strains isolated from saline environments were also characterized. Strains 160 and 43 were found to be Chromohalobacter spp. and strain 40 to be a Halomonas sp. by sequence analysis of their 16 S ribosomal RNA genes. Extremely abundant porin proteins with an apparent molecular mass of 49 kDa were found in Chromohalobacter sp.160 and Halomonas sp. 40, but no major outer membrane protein was detected in Chromohalobacter sp. 43, suggesting strain 43 was most likely a naturally defective porin mutant. Porin proteins from Chromohalobacter spp. and Halomonas spp. showed the same migration on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with or without heat-treatment, indicating that these porin proteins did not form a SDS-resistant trimeric structure, which was detected in most of the Gram-negative bacterial porin proteins.

  6. The Leptospiral Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Haake, David A; Zückert, Wolfram R

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) is the front line of leptospiral interactions with their environment and the mammalian host. Unlike most invasive spirochetes, pathogenic leptospires must be able survive in both free-living and host-adapted states. As organisms move from one set of environmental conditions to another, the OM must cope with a series of conflicting challenges. For example, the OM must be porous enough to allow nutrient uptake, yet robust enough to defend the cell against noxious substances. In the host, the OM presents a surface decorated with adhesins and receptors for attaching to, and acquiring, desirable host molecules such as the complement regulator, Factor H. On the other hand, the OM must enable leptospires to evade detection by the host’s immune system on their way from sites of invasion through the bloodstream to the protected niche of the proximal tubule. The picture that is emerging of the leptospiral OM is that, while it shares many of the characteristics of the OMs of spirochetes and Gram-negative bacteria, it is also unique and different in ways that make it of general interest to microbiologists. For example, unlike most other pathogenic spirochetes, the leptospiral OM is rich in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Leptospiral LPS is similar to that of Gram-negative bacteria but has a number of unique structural features that may explain why it is not recognized by the LPS-specific Toll-like receptor 4 of humans. As in other spirochetes, lipoproteins are major components of the leptospiral OM, though their roles are poorly understood. The functions of transmembrane OMPs in many cases are better understood thanks to homologies with their Gram-negative counterparts and the emergence of improved genetic techniques. This chapter will review recent discoveries involving the leptospiral OM and its role in leptospiral physiology and pathogenesis. Readers are referred to earlier, excellent summaries related to this subject (Adler and de la Peña Moctezuma

  7. Virulent strain associated outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Skare, J T; Shang, E S; Foley, D M; Blanco, D R; Champion, C I; Mirzabekov, T; Sokolov, Y; Kagan, B L; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and purified outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Borrelia burgdorferi strain B31 based on methods developed for isolation of Treponema pallidum OMV. Purified OMV exhibited distinct porin activities with conductances of 0.6 and 12.6 nano-Siemen and had no detectable beta-NADH oxidase activity indicating their outer membrane origin and their lack of inner membrane contamination, respectively. Hydrophobic proteins were identified by phase partitioning with Triton X-114. Most of these hydrophobic membrane proteins were not acylated, suggesting that they are outer membrane-spanning proteins. Identification of palmitate-labeled lipoproteins revealed that several were enriched in the OMV, several were enriched in the protoplasmic cylinder inner membrane fraction, and others were found exclusively associated with the inner membrane. The protein composition of OMV changed significantly with successive in vitro cultivation of strain B31. Using antiserum with specificity for virulent strain B31, we identified OMV antigens on the surface of the spirochete and identified proteins whose presence in OMV could be correlated with virulence and protective immunity in the rabbit Lyme disease model. These virulent strain associated outer membrane-spanning proteins may provide new insight into the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Images PMID:7593626

  8. Molecular Basis of Bacterial Outer Membrane Permeability Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria characteristically are surrounded by an additional membrane layer, the outer membrane. Although outer membrane components often play important roles in the interaction of symbiotic or pathogenic bacteria with their host organisms, the major role of this membrane must usually be to serve as a permeability barrier to prevent the entry of noxious compounds and at the same time to allow the influx of nutrient molecules. This review summarizes the development in the field since our previous review (H. Nikaido and M. Vaara, Microbiol. Rev. 49:1-32, 1985) was published. With the discovery of protein channels, structural knowledge enables us to understand in molecular detail how porins, specific channels, TonB-linked receptors, and other proteins function. We are now beginning to see how the export of large proteins occurs across the outer membrane. With our knowledge of the lipopolysaccharide-phospholipid asymmetric bilayer of the outer membrane, we are finally beginning to understand how this bilayer can retard the entry of lipophilic compounds, owing to our increasing knowledge about the chemistry of lipopolysaccharide from diverse organisms and the way in which lipopolysaccharide structure is modified by environmental conditions. PMID:14665678

  9. [Structure and function of pore-forming proteins from bacteria of the genus Yersinia: I. Isolation and a comparison of physicochemical properties and functional activity of Yersinia porins].

    PubMed

    Vostrikova, O P; Kim, N Iu; Likhatskaia, G N; Guzev, K V; Vakorina, T I; Khomenko, V A; Novikova, O D; Solov'eva, T F

    2006-01-01

    The molecular organization and functional activity of porins isolated from the outer membrane (OM) of the Yersinia enterocolitica and three phylogenetically close nonpathogenic Yersinia species (Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, and Y. frederiksenii) cultured at 6-8 degrees C were comparatively studied for the first time. The proteins were isolated in two molecular forms (trimeric and monomeric), and their spatial structures were characterized by the methods of optical spectroscopy, CD and intrinsic protein fluorescence. The studied porins were shown to belong to the beta-structural proteins (they have 59-96% total beta structures and 0-17% alpha helices). The spatial structures of the proteins were demonstrated to depend on the nature of the detergent used for solubilization. Unlike the enterobacterial pore-forming proteins, the porin trimers are less stable to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The spatial structures of the porins become more compact after the substitution of octyl beta-D-glucoside for SDS: the content of beta structures increases and the accessibility of Trp residues to solvent decreases. It was established with the use of the technique of bilayer lipid membranes that the functional properties of the porins are similar to those of the OmpF proteins of Gram-negative bacteria. Trimers are functionally active forms of the porins. Special features of the pore-forming activity of the Yersinia porins were revealed to depend on the microorganism species and the value of the membrane potential.

  10. Loss of Elongation Factor P Disrupts Bacterial Outer Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Hersch, Steven J.; Roy, Hervé; Wiggers, J. Brad; Leung, Andrea S.; Buranyi, Stephen; Xie, Jinglin Lucy; Dare, Kiley; Ibba, Michael; Navarre, William Wiley

    2012-01-01

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is posttranslationally modified at a conserved lysyl residue by the coordinated action of two enzymes, PoxA and YjeK. We have previously established the importance of this modification in Salmonella stress resistance. Here we report that, like poxA and yjeK mutants, Salmonella strains lacking EF-P display increased susceptibility to hypoosmotic conditions, antibiotics, and detergents and enhanced resistance to the compound S-nitrosoglutathione. The susceptibility phenotypes are largely explained by the enhanced membrane permeability of the efp mutant, which exhibits increased uptake of the hydrophobic dye 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Analysis of the membrane proteomes of wild-type and efp mutant Salmonella strains reveals few changes, including the prominent overexpression of a single porin, KdgM, in the efp mutant outer membrane. Removal of KdgM in the efp mutant background ameliorates the detergent, antibiotic, and osmosensitivity phenotypes and restores wild-type permeability to NPN. Our data support a role for EF-P in the translational regulation of a limited number of proteins that, when perturbed, renders the cell susceptible to stress by the adventitious overexpression of an outer membrane porin. PMID:22081389

  11. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Spontaneous Outer Membrane Vesicles and Purified Outer Membranes of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; Vogel, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria receive increasing attention because of various biological functions and their use as vaccines. However, the mechanisms of OMV release and selective sorting of proteins into OMVs remain unclear. Comprehensive quantitative proteome comparisons between spontaneous OMVs (SOMVs) and the outer membrane (OM) have not been conducted so far. Here, we established a protocol for metabolic labeling of neisserial proteins with 15N. SOMV and OM proteins labeled with 15N were used as an internal standard for proteomic comparison of the SOMVs and OMs of two different strains. This labeling approach, coupled with high-sensitivity mass spectrometry, allowed us to comprehensively unravel the proteome of the SOMVs and OMs. We quantified the relative distribution of 155 proteins between SOMVs and the OM. Complement regulatory proteins, autotransporters, proteins involved in iron and zinc acquisition, and a two-partner secretion system were enriched in SOMVs. The highly abundant porins PorA and PorB and proteins connecting the OM with peptidoglycan or the inner membrane, such as RmpM, MtrE, and PilQ, were depleted in SOMVs. Furthermore, the three lytic transglycosylases MltA, MltB, and Slt were less abundant in SOMVs. In conclusion, SOMVs are likely to be released from surface areas with a low local abundance of membrane-anchoring proteins and lytic transglycosylases. The enrichment of complement regulatory proteins, autotransporters, and trace metal binding and transport proteins needs to be explored in the context of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease. PMID:23893116

  12. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations.

    PubMed

    Benz, Roland; Jones, Michael D; Younas, Farhan; Maier, Elke; Modi, Niraj; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Smit, John

    2015-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two known structures

  13. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Roland; Jones, Michael D.; Younas, Farhan; Maier, Elke; Modi, Niraj; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Smit, John

    2015-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two known structures

  14. Activation of the Complement Classical Pathway (C1q Binding) by Mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Nogueras, Maria Mercedes; Aguilar, Alicia; Rubires, Xavier; Albertí, Sebastian; Benedí, Vicente Javier; Tomás, Juan M.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of killing of Aeromonas hydrophila serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway has been studied. The bacterial cell surface component that binds C1q more efficiently was identified as a major outer membrane protein of 39 kDa, presumably the porin II described by D. Jeanteur, N. Gletsu, F. Pattus, and J. T. Buckley (Mol. Microbiol. 6:3355–3363, 1992), of these microorganisms. We have demonstrated that the purified form of porin II binds C1q and activates the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted of factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular to rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the outer membrane protein. The strains possessing O-antigen lipopolysaccharide bind less C1q than the serum-sensitive strains, because the outer membrane protein is less accessible, and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Finally, a similar or identical outer membrane protein (presumably porin II) that binds C1q was shown to be present in strains from the most common mesophilic Aeromonas O serogroups. PMID:9673268

  15. Purification, pore-forming ability, and antigenic relatedness of the major outer membrane protein of Shigella dysenteriae type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, S; Das, A B; Ghosh, A N; Biswas, T

    1994-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP), the most abundant outer membrane protein, was purified to homogeneity from Shigella dysenteriae type 1. The purification method involved selective extraction of MOMP with sodium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of 0.4 M sodium chloride followed by size exclusion chromatography with Sephacryl S-200 HR. MOMP was found to form hydrophilic diffusion pores by incorporation into artificial liposome vesicles composed of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and dicetylphosphate, indicating that MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 exhibited significant porin activity. However, the liposomes containing heat-denatured MOMP were barely active. The molecular weight of MOMP found by size exclusion chromatography was 130,000, and in sodium dodecyl sulfate-10% polyacrylamide gel it moved as an oligomer of 78,000 molecular weight. Upon boiling, fully dissociated monomers of 38,000 molecular weight were seen for S. dysenteriae type 1. However, among the four Shigella spp., the monomeric MOMP generated upon boiling ranged from 38,000 to 35,000 in molecular weight. Antibody raised in BALB/c mice immunized with MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 reacted strongly with purified MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antibody reacted with whole-cell preparations of S. dysenteriae type 1 in an ELISA, suggesting that MOMP possessed surface components. Moreover, MOMP could be visualized on the bacterial surface by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-MOMP antibody. S. dysenteriae type 1 MOMP-specific immunoglobulin eluted from MOMP bound to a nitrocellulose membrane was found to cross-react with MOMP preparations of S. flexneri, S. boydii, and S. sonnei, indicating that MOMPs were antigenically related among Shigella species. The strong immunogenicity, surface exposure, and antigenic relatedness make MOMP of Shigella species an immunologically significant macromolecule for study. Images PMID:7927692

  16. Structural Basis for Alginate Secretion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    J Whitney; I Hay; C Li; P Eckford; H Robinson; M Amaya; L Wood; D Ohman; C Bear; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  17. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  18. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  19. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis.

  20. Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, V J; Munson, R S; Ross, R F

    1986-01-01

    Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Cells were disrupted by sonication, and outer membrane-enriched fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation and selective solubilization of the inner membrane with sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate. Colony type, growth medium, time of harvest, and in vitro or in vivo passage had no appreciable effect on the protein profiles of the strains examined. Seven patterns were distinguished among the reference strains of the nine capsular serotypes. These patterns were based on the mobility of the major outer membrane proteins migrating in the 39,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight region of the gel, a 16K to 16.5K protein, and a heat-modifiable 29K protein. Strains of serotypes 1 and 9 had identical outer membrane protein profiles, as did strains of serotypes 2 and 6. The reference strains of the remaining five serotypes each had a distinct pattern. The outer membrane protein profiles of 95 field isolates belonging to serotypes 1, 5, 7, and 9 from swine in the midwestern United States were determined and compared with the reference patterns. The results indicate that the population of H. pleuropneumoniae is clonal, with three predominant clones distinguished by both serotype and outer membrane protein profile responsible for the majority of H. pleuropneumoniae disease occurring in swine in the United States. Images PMID:3699889

  1. Rv1698 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Represents a New Class of Channel-forming Outer Membrane Proteins*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Siroy, Axel; Mailaender, Claudia; Harder, Daniel; Koerber, Stephanie; Wolschendorf, Frank; Danilchanka, Olga; Wang, Ying; Heinz, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain an outer membrane composed of mycolic acids and a large variety of other lipids. Its protective function is an essential virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only OmpA, which has numerous homologs in Gram-negative bacteria, is known to form channels in the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis so far. Rv1698 was predicted to be an outer membrane protein of unknown function. Expression of rv1698 restored the sensitivity to ampicillin and chloramphenicol of a Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant lacking the main porin MspA. Uptake experiments showed that Rv1698 partially complemented the permeability defect of the M. smegmatis porin mutant for glucose. These results indicated that Rv1698 provides an unspecific pore that can partially substitute for MspA. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that purified Rv1698 is an integral membrane protein that indeed produces channels. The main single channel conductance is 4.5 ± 0.3 nanosiemens in 1 m KCl. Zero current potential measurements revealed a weak preference for cations. Whole cell digestion of recombinant M. smegmatis with proteinase K showed that Rv1698 is surface-accessible. Taken together, these experiments demonstrated that Rv1698 is a channel protein that is likely involved in transport processes across the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. Rv1698 has single homologs of unknown functions in Corynebacterineae and thus represents the first member of a new class of channel proteins specific for mycolic acid-containing outer membranes. PMID:18434314

  2. Cadaverine induces closing of E. coli porins.

    PubMed

    delaVega, A L; Delcour, A H

    1995-12-01

    We have used the electrophysiological technique of patch-clamp to study the modulation of Escherichia coli porins by cadaverine. Porin channels typically have a very high probability to be open, and were not known to be inhibited by specific compounds until the present study. Experiments performed on patches of outer membrane reconstituted in liposomes reveal that cadaverine applied to the periplasmic side increases the frequency of channel closures in a concentration-dependent fashion, and thereby decreases the total amount of ion flux through a porin-containing membrane. The positive charge on cadaverine is important for inhibition, because the effect is relieved at higher pH where fewer polyamine molecules are charged. Modulation is observed only at negative pipet voltages, and therefore confers voltage dependence to porin activity. Cadaverine increases the number and duration of cooperative closures of more than one channel, suggesting that it does not merely block the pore but exerts its kinetic effect allosterically. As a biological assay of porin inhibition, E. coli behavior in chemotaxis swarm plates was tested and found to be impaired in the presence of cadaverine. Polyamines are naturally found associated with the outer membrane of E.coli, but are lost upon fractionation. We postulate that cadaverine might be a natural regulator of porin activity.

  3. The role of outer membrane in Serratia marcescens intrinsic resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L; Ruiz, N; Leranoz, S; Viñas, M; Puig, M

    1997-09-01

    Three different porins from Serratia marcescens were described. They were named Omp1, Omp2 and Omp3 and their molecular weights were 42, 40 and 39 kDa respectively. Omp2 and Omp3 showed osmoregulation and thermoregulation in a similar way to OmpC and OmpF of Escherichia coli. Permeability coefficients of the outer membrane of this species were calculated following the Zimmermann and Rosselet method. P values were similar to those obtained in Escherichia coli, which suggests that the chromosomal beta-lactamase would play a major role in the resistance of Serratia marcescens to beta-lactam antibiotics. Both MIC values and permeabilities were modified by salycilates and acetylsalycilate. Synergism between the outer membrane and the beta-lactamase was also evaluated. When bacteria grew in the presence of a beta-lactam in the medium, the beta-lactamase accounted for most of the resistance.

  4. Restoration of antibody binding to blotted meningococcal outer membrane proteins using various detergents.

    PubMed

    Wedege, E; Bryn, K; Frøholm, L O

    1988-10-01

    Restoration of IgG antibody binding to heat-denatured meningococcal outer membrane proteins has been studied on immunoblots with a series of 14 detergents. Nitrocellulose strips with the blotted proteins were incubated with the detergents and sera from human volunteers vaccinated with meningococcal membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and ionic detergents, containing substituted quarternary ammonium or amino groups with a minimum of 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain, restored the antigenicity of the serotype-specific class 2 porin protein. The concentrations of the Zwittergent detergents necessary for activation decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the homologues. Only zwitterionic detergents renatured the class 1 protein. Both proteins were weakly antigenic in the presence of the nonionic detergents Triton X-100 and Tween 20. Meningococcal lipopolysaccharide restored antibody binding to the porin, but not to the class 1 protein. Similar concentrations of lipopolysaccharides from two other gram-negative bacteria had no effect.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance and Regulation of the Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Barrier by Host Innate Immune Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-negative outer membrane is an important barrier that provides protection against toxic compounds, which include antibiotics and host innate immune molecules such as cationic antimicrobial peptides. Recently, significant research progress has been made in understanding the biogenesis, regulation, and functioning of the outer membrane, including a recent paper from the laboratory of Dr. Brett Finlay at the University of British Columbia (J. van der Heijden et al., mBio 7:e01238-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01541-16). These investigators demonstrate that toxic oxygen radicals, such as those found in host tissues, regulate outer membrane permeability by altering the outer membrane porin protein channels to regulate the influx of oxygen radicals as well as β-lactam antibiotics. This commentary provides context about this interesting paper and discusses the prospects of utilizing increased knowledge of outer membrane biology to develop new antibiotics for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27677793

  6. Salicylate-inducible antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas cepacia associated with absence of a pore-forming outer membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J L; Clark, D K

    1992-01-01

    The most common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in multiply resistant Pseudomonas cepacia is decreased porin-mediated outer membrane permeability. In some gram-negative organisms this form of antibiotic resistance can be induced by growth in the presence of weak acids, such as salicylates, which suppress porin synthesis. To determine the effects of salicylates on outer membrane permeability of P. cepacia, a susceptible laboratory strain, 249-2, was grown in 10 mM sodium salicylate. Antibiotic susceptibility and uptake, as well as outer membrane protein patterns, were compared between strain 249-2 grown with and without salicylates. The MICs of chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, and ceftazidime were compared between organisms grown in standard and salicylate-containing medium and are as follows: chloramphenicol, 12.5 versus 100 micrograms/ml; trimethoprim, 0.78 versus 3.125 micrograms/ml; ciprofloxacin, 0.4 versus 1.56 micrograms/ml; ceftazidime, 3.125 versus 3.125 micrograms/ml. The permeability of beta-lactam antibiotics was calculated from the rate of hydrolysis of the chromogenic cephalosporin, PADAC. There was no significant difference between strains grown in the presence and absence of salicylate. By using high-pressure liquid chromatography quantitation of loss from culture medium, the effect of 10 mM salicylate on the cellular permeability of chloramphenicol was measured in strain 249-2 by introduction of a plasmid which encodes production of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. After 1 h of incubation, 18.5% +/- 1.54% versus 70.1% +/- 3.52%, and after 2 h, 4.20% +/- 1.65% versus 41.90% +/- 2.16% remained in supernatants from organisms grown in the absence and presence of 10 mM salicylate, respectively. Outer membrane protein pattern analysis demonstrated the absence of a protein of apparent molecular weight of 40,000 when strain 249-2 was grown in the presence of 10 mM salicylate. To determine whether this protein functioned as a porin

  7. Role of porins in intrinsic antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas cepacia.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, T R; Moore, R A; Moore, L V; Hancock, R E

    1987-01-01

    The measured outer membrane permeability of Pseudomonas cepacia to the beta-lactam nitrocefin was low: approximately 10 times less than that of Escherichia coli and comparable to that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The purified P. cepacia porin demonstrated an average single channel conductance in 1 M KCl of 0.23 nS. Images PMID:3032087

  8. Sequence and structural perspectives of bacterial β-stranded porins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Krishnaswamy, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Porins are integral membrane proteins found in the outer membrane of bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Herein, we have reviewed sequence and structural understanding about bacterial porins. The first porin structure from Rhodobacter capsulatus at 1.8 Å resolution in 1991 till the recent structural advancement, coupled by immunological properties, diffusion and ion permeation has been taken into account In the later part, we have presented our computational analysis of conformational mobility in selected porins. Atomic B-factors (in crystal structures) are indicative of the degree of intrinsic mobility associated with residues and secondary structural elements of a particular protein. We have explored and extended the intrinsic motilities within porins using selected six porins structures. These six porins were collected from PDB and B-factor analyses were performed using AWK scripts. Distributions of residues and mobilities were characteristic of different porins. These distribution patterns follow the level of homology at the sequence and structural level. The inner walls constituting the trimer interface were found to be more rigid than the outer walls. These mobility differences are intrinsic structural components of these porins.

  9. How Porin Heterogeneity and Trade-Offs Affect the Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ferenci, Thomas; Phan, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Variations in porin proteins are common in Gram-negative pathogens. Altered or absent porins reduce access of polar antibiotics across the outer membrane and can thus contribute to antibiotic resistance. Reduced permeability has a cost however, in lowering access to nutrients. This trade-off between permeability and nutritional competence is the source of considerable natural variation in porin gate-keeping. Mutational changes in this trade-off are frequently selected, so susceptibility to detergents and antibiotics is polymorphic in environmental isolates as well as pathogens. Understanding the mechanism, costs and heterogeneity of antibiotic exclusion by porins will be crucial in combating Gram negative infections. PMID:26506392

  10. Biogenesis of outer membranes in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-03-23

    The outer membrane, an essential organelle of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of four major components: lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, beta-barrel proteins, and lipoproteins. The mechanisms underlying the transport of these components to outer membranes are currently under extensive examination. Among them, the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been clarified in detail. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes outer membrane sorting of lipoproteins. Various Lpt proteins have recently been identified as factors involved in the transport of lipopolysaccharide to the outer membrane, although the mechanism remains largely unknown. Proteins with alpha-helical membrane spanning segments are found in the inner membrane, whereas amphipathic beta-barrel proteins span the outer membrane. These beta-barrel proteins are inserted into the outer membranes through a central core protein BamA (YaeT) with the help of four outer membrane lipoproteins. In contrast, little is known about how phospholipids are transported to the outer membrane. PMID:19270402

  11. Biogenesis of outer membranes in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-03-23

    The outer membrane, an essential organelle of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of four major components: lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, beta-barrel proteins, and lipoproteins. The mechanisms underlying the transport of these components to outer membranes are currently under extensive examination. Among them, the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been clarified in detail. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes outer membrane sorting of lipoproteins. Various Lpt proteins have recently been identified as factors involved in the transport of lipopolysaccharide to the outer membrane, although the mechanism remains largely unknown. Proteins with alpha-helical membrane spanning segments are found in the inner membrane, whereas amphipathic beta-barrel proteins span the outer membrane. These beta-barrel proteins are inserted into the outer membranes through a central core protein BamA (YaeT) with the help of four outer membrane lipoproteins. In contrast, little is known about how phospholipids are transported to the outer membrane.

  12. Radioiodination of an outer membrane protein in intact Rickettsia prowazekii

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.K.; Winkler, H.H.

    1980-08-01

    Intact Rickettsia prowazekii was radiolabeled with the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase method of iodination. Separation of the rickettsial extract into cytoplasmic, outer and inner membrane fractions demonstrated that the outer membrane was preferentially labeled. Analysis of the polypeptides of these fractions on high-resolution slab polyacrylamide gels showed that most of the /sup 125/I was in polypeptide T49, an outer membrane constituent. Additional outer membrane polypeptides were iodinated in broken envelope preparations, demonstrating that T49 is uniquely accessible to the external environment and the asymmetric polypeptide organization of the outer membrane.

  13. Refolding of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein F in detergent creates LPS-free trimers and asymmetric dimers.

    PubMed

    Visudtiphole, Virak; Thomas, Matthew B; Chalton, David A; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2005-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpF (outer-membrane protein F; matrix porin) is a homotrimeric beta-barrel and a member of the bacterial porin superfamily. It is the best characterized porin protein, but has resisted attempts to refold it efficiently in vitro. In the present paper, we report the discovery of detergent-based folding conditions, including dodecylglucoside, which can create pure samples of trimeric OmpF. Whereas outer membrane LPS (lipopolysaccharide) is clearly required for in vivo folding, the artificially refolded and LPS-free trimer has properties identical with those of the outer-membrane-derived form. Thus LPS is not required either for in vitro folding or for structural integrity. Dimeric forms of OmpF have been observed in vivo and are proposed to be folding intermediates. In vitro, dimers occur transiently in refolding of trimeric OmpF and, in the presence of dodecylmaltoside, pure dimer can be prepared. This form has less beta-structure by CD and shows lower thermal stability than the trimer. Study of these proteins at the single-molecule level is possible because each OmpF subunit forms a distinct ion channel. Whereas each trimer contains three channels of equal conductance, each dimer always contains two distinct channel sizes. This provides clear evidence that the two otherwise identical monomers adopt different structures in the dimer and indicates that the asymmetric interaction, characteristic of C3 symmetry, is formed at the dimer stage. This asymmetric dimer may be generally relevant to the folding of oligomeric proteins with odd numbers of subunits such as aspartate transcarbamoylase.

  14. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S; Le Brun, Anton P; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-08-23

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin-LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin-LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion.

  15. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S; Le Brun, Anton P; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-08-23

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin-LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin-LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion. PMID:27493217

  16. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A.; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  17. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram‐negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self‐adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV‐containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV‐producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well‐defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. PMID:26912077

  18. Periplasmic maltose-binding protein confers specificity on the outer membrane maltose pore of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Heuzenroeder, M W; Reeves, P

    1980-01-01

    ompB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 are markedly deficient in porin in their outer membrane. This results in a decreased rate of uptake for many substrates: the maltose pore (lambda receptor) can in some circumstances, in the absence of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein, compensate for the consequent defects in permeability to lactose, mannitol, glycylglycyl-L-valine, and tri-L-ornithine. It is postulated that the maltose-binding protein associates with the maltose pore and confers on it the specificity for maltose, and that the absence of the maltose-binding protein leaves the pore open and results in enhanced transmembrane diffusion of molecules other than maltose. This paper presents evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:6444941

  19. The role of porins in neisserial pathogenesis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Massari, Paola; Ram, Sanjay; Macleod, Heather; Wetzler, Lee M

    2003-02-01

    Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria responsible for bacterial meningitis and septicemia, and the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, respectively. Porins are the most represented outer membrane proteins in the pathogenic Neisseria species, functioning as pores for the exchange of ions, and are characterized by a trimeric beta-barrel structure. Neisserial porins have been shown to act as adjuvants in the immune response via activation of B cells and other antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Their effect on the immune response is mediated by upregulation of the costimulatory molecule B7-2 (CD86) on the surface of APCs, an effect that is Toll-like receptor 2- and MyD88-dependent. The effect of neisserial porins on the immune system also involves interaction with components of the complement cascade. Furthermore, neisserial porins co-localize with mitochondria of target cells, where they appear to modulate apoptosis.

  20. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Thatyane M; Martynowycz, Michael W; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-12-15

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted as monolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, as well as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region, but was prevented from this penetration into the modified lipopolysaccharides. Results correlate with behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains. PMID:26682812

  1. Increased outer membrane resistance to ethylenediaminetetraacetate and cations in novel lipid A mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, M

    1981-01-01

    Polymyxin-resistant pmrA mutants of Salmonella typhimurium differed from their parents in that they were resistant to tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate-lysozyme, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate-deoxycholate, and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate-bacitracin. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetate released about 50% less lipopolysaccharide from the pmrA strains than from the parental strains when the bacteria were grown in L-broth containing 2 mM Ca2+. Protamine, polylysine, octapeptin, benzalkonium chloride, cold NaCl, cold MgCl2, or cold tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride (pH 7.2) caused no leakage or markedly less leakage of periplasmic beta-lactamase from a pmrA mutant than from its parent strain. pmrA mutants were more resistant than their parent strains to protamine and polylysine but not to octapeptin or benzalkonium chloride, as measured by the ability of these agents to kill the bacteria or to sensitize them to deoxycholate-induced lysis. The pmrA strains did not differ from their parent strains in sensitivity to several antibiotics, in porin function (as measured by cephaloridine diffusion across the outer membrane), or in outer membrane-associated phospholipase A activity. PMID:6795177

  2. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  3. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  4. Importance of Porins for Biocide Efficacy against Mycobacterium smegmatis▿

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Elrike; Schmidt, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael; Steinhauer, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria are among the microorganisms least susceptible to biocides but cause devastating diseases, such as tuberculosis, and increasingly opportunistic infections. The exceptional resistance of mycobacteria to toxic solutes is due to an unusual outer membrane, which acts as an efficient permeability barrier, in synergy with other resistance mechanisms. Porins are channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of mycobacteria. In this study we used the alamarBlue assay to show that the deletion of Msp porins in isogenic mutants increased the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis to isothiazolinones (methylchloroisothiazolinone [MCI]/methylisothiazolinone [MI] and octylisothiazolinone [2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; OIT]), formaldehyde-releasing biocides {hexahydrotriazine [1,3,5-tris (2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydrotriazine; HHT] and methylenbisoxazolidine [N,N′-methylene-bis-5-(methyloxazolidine); MBO]}, and the lipophilic biocides polyhexamethylene biguanide and octenidine dihydrochloride 2- to 16-fold. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the porin triple mutant against a complex disinfectant was decreased 8-fold compared to wild-type (wt) M. smegmatis. Efficacy testing in the quantitative suspension test EN 14348 revealed 100-fold improved survival of the porin mutant in the presence of this biocide. These findings underline the importance of porins for the susceptibility of M. smegmatis to biocides. PMID:21398489

  5. Antigenic relationship and functional properties of Yersinia porins.

    PubMed

    Vostrikova, P; Likhatskaya, G N; Novikova, D; Solovyeva, T F

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the molecular structure and functional properties of major pore-forming proteins isolated as peptidoglycan (PG)-protein complexes from four Yersinia species (Y. intermedia, Y. enterocolitica, Y. kristensenii and Y. frederiksenii) cultured as various temperatures. Despite the close antigenic relationship, Yersinia porins revealed different functional properties. When reconstituted in model membranes, the PG-protein complexes induced conductance which was different for the "cold" (grown at 6-8 degrees C) and "warm" (grown at 37 degrees C) variants of microbial cultures. We conclude that the functional state of Yersinia porins in the outer membrane depends on the cultivation temperature.

  6. Crystal structures explain functional properties of two E. coli porins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, S. W.; Schirmer, T.; Rummel, G.; Steiert, M.; Ghosh, R.; Pauptit, R. A.; Jansonius, J. N.; Rosenbusch, J. P.

    1992-08-01

    Porins form aqueous channels that aid the diffusion of small hydrophilic molecules across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The crystal structures of matrix porin and phosphoporin both reveal trimers of identical subunits, each subunit consisting of a 16-stranded anti-parallel β-barrel containing a pore. A long loop inside the barrel contributes to a constriction of the channel where the charge distribution affects ion selectivity. The structures explain at the molecular level functional characteristics and their alterations by known mutations.

  7. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. PMID:26621472

  8. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.

  9. Effect of energy metabolism on protein motility in the bacterial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Winther, Tabita; Xu, Lei; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Brown, Stanley; Oddershede, Lene B

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate the energy dependence of the motion of a porin, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli by single molecule investigations. By poisoning the bacteria with arsenate and azide, the bacterial energy metabolism was stopped. The motility of individual lambda-receptors significantly and rapidly decreased upon energy depletion. We suggest two different causes for the ceased motility upon comprised energy metabolism: One possible cause is that the cell uses energy to actively wiggle its proteins, this energy being one order-of-magnitude larger than thermal energy. Another possible cause is an induced change in the connection between the lambda-receptor and the membrane structure, for instance by a stiffening of part of the membrane structure. Treatment of the cells with ampicillin, which directly targets the bacterial cell wall by inhibiting cross-linking of the peptidoglycan layer, had an effect similar to energy depletion and the motility of the lambda-receptor significantly decreased. Since the lambda-receptor is closely linked to the peptidoglycan layer, we propose that lambda-receptor motility is directly coupled to the constant and dynamic energy-consuming reconstruction of the peptidoglycan layer. The result of this motion could be to facilitate transport of maltose-dextrins through the porin.

  10. Quantification of Fluoroquinolone Uptake through the Outer Membrane Channel OmpF of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cama, Jehangir; Bajaj, Harsha; Pagliara, Stefano; Maier, Theresa; Braun, Yvonne; Winterhalter, Mathias; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-11-01

    Decreased drug accumulation is a common cause of antibiotic resistance in microorganisms. However, there are few reliable general techniques capable of quantifying drug uptake through bacterial membranes. We present a semiquantitative optofluidic assay for studying the uptake of autofluorescent drug molecules in single liposomes. We studied the effect of the Escherichia coli outer membrane channel OmpF on the accumulation of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic, norfloxacin, in proteoliposomes. Measurements were performed at pH 5 and pH 7, corresponding to two different charge states of norfloxacin that bacteria are likely to encounter in the human gastrointestinal tract. At both pH values, the porins significantly enhance drug permeation across the proteoliposome membranes. At pH 5, where norfloxacin permeability across pure phospholipid membranes is low, the porins increase drug permeability by 50-fold on average. We estimate a flux of about 10 norfloxacin molecules per second per OmpF trimer in the presence of a 1 mM concentration gradient of norfloxacin. We also performed single channel electrophysiology measurements and found that the application of transmembrane voltages causes an electric field driven uptake in addition to concentration driven diffusion. We use our results to propose a physical mechanism for the pH mediated change in bacterial susceptibility to fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

  11. Molecular Evolution of the Yersinia Major Outer Membrane Protein C (OmpC)

    PubMed Central

    Stenkova, Anna M.; Bystritskaya, Evgeniya P.; Guzev, Konstantin V.; Rakin, Alexander V.; Isaeva, Marina P.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Yersinia includes species with a wide range of eukaryotic hosts (from fish, insects, and plants to mammals and humans). One of the major outer membrane proteins, the porin OmpC, is preferentially expressed in the host gut, where osmotic pressure, temperature, and the concentrations of nutrients and toxic products are relatively high. We consider here the molecular evolution and phylogeny of Yersinia ompC. The maximum likelihood gene tree reflects the macroevolution processes occurring within the genus Yersinia. Positive selection and horizontal gene transfer are the key factors of ompC diversification, and intraspecies recombination was revealed in two Yersinia species. The impact of recombination on ompC evolution was different from that of another major porin gene, ompF, possibly due to the emergence of additional functions and conservation of the basic transport function. The predicted antigenic determinants of OmpC were located in rapidly evolving regions, which may indicate the evolutionary mechanisms of Yersinia adaptation to the host immune system. PMID:27578962

  12. Molecular Evolution of the Yersinia Major Outer Membrane Protein C (OmpC).

    PubMed

    Stenkova, Anna M; Bystritskaya, Evgeniya P; Guzev, Konstantin V; Rakin, Alexander V; Isaeva, Marina P

    2016-01-01

    The genus Yersinia includes species with a wide range of eukaryotic hosts (from fish, insects, and plants to mammals and humans). One of the major outer membrane proteins, the porin OmpC, is preferentially expressed in the host gut, where osmotic pressure, temperature, and the concentrations of nutrients and toxic products are relatively high. We consider here the molecular evolution and phylogeny of Yersinia ompC. The maximum likelihood gene tree reflects the macroevolution processes occurring within the genus Yersinia. Positive selection and horizontal gene transfer are the key factors of ompC diversification, and intraspecies recombination was revealed in two Yersinia species. The impact of recombination on ompC evolution was different from that of another major porin gene, ompF, possibly due to the emergence of additional functions and conservation of the basic transport function. The predicted antigenic determinants of OmpC were located in rapidly evolving regions, which may indicate the evolutionary mechanisms of Yersinia adaptation to the host immune system. PMID:27578962

  13. Characterization of the Outer Membrane Protein OprF of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Lipopolysaccharide Membrane by Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP; Soares, Thereza A.

    2009-02-01

    The N-terminal domain of outer membrane protein OprF of Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms a membrane spanning eight-stranded anti-parallel β-barrel domain that folds into a membrane channel with low conductance. The structure of this protein has been modeled after the crystal structure of the homologous protein OmpA of Escherichia coli. A number of molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out for the homology modeled structure of OprF in an explicit molecular model for the rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer membrane of P. aeruginosa. The structural stability of the outer membrane model as a result of the strong electrostatic interactions compared to simple lipid bilayers is restricting both the conformational flexibility and the lateral diffusion of the porin in the membrane. Constricting side-chain interactions within the pore are similar to those found in reported simulations of the protein in a solvated lipid bilayer membrane. Because of the strong interactions between the loop regions of OprF and functional groups in the saccharide core of the LPS, the entrance to the channel from the extracellular space is widened compared to the lipid bilayer simulations in which the loops are extruding in the solvent. The specific electrostatic signature of the LPS membrane, which results in a net intrinsic dipole across the membrane, is found to be altered by the presence of OprF, resulting in a small electrically positive patch at the position of the channel.

  14. Conformational analysis of the Campylobacter jejuni porin.

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, J M; Loret, E; Zalewski, M; Pagés, J M

    1995-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Campylobacter jejuni was purified to homogeneity by selective solubilization and fast protein liquid chromatography. The amino acid composition of the MOMP indicates the presence of cysteine residues. The amino-terminal sequence, determined over 31 residues, shows no significant homology with any other porin from gram-negative bacteria except in a discrete region. Immunocross-reactivity between Escherichia coli OmpC and the MOMP was analyzed, and a common antigenic site between these two porins was identified with an anti-peptide antibody. From circular dichroism and immunological investigations, the existence of a stable folded monomer, containing a high level of beta-sheet secondary structure, is evident. Conformational analyses show the presence of a native trimeric state generated by association of the three folded monomers; the stability of this trimer is reduced compared with that of E. coli porins. This study clearly reveals that the C. jejuni MOMP is related to the family of trimeric bacterial porins. PMID:7543469

  15. Synthesis of outer membrane proteins in cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, J; Sambucetti, L; Silverman, P M

    1983-01-01

    Two major proteins, the murein lipoprotein and the OmpF matrix porin, are deficient in the outer membrane of cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We present evidence that the cpx mutations prevent or retard the translocation of these proteins to the outer membrane. The mutations had no effect on the rate of lipoprotein synthesis. Mutant cells labeled for 5 min with radioactive arginine accumulated as much lipoprotein as otherwise isogenic cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. This lipoprotein accumulated as such; no material synthesized in mutant cells and reactive with antilipoprotein antibodies had the electrophoretic mobility of prolipoprotein. Hence, the initial stages of prolipoprotein insertion into the inner membrane leading to its cleavage to lipoprotein appeared normal. However, after a long labeling interval, mutant cells were deficient in free lipoprotein and lacked lipoprotein covalently bound to peptidoglycan, suggesting that little if any of the lipoprotein synthesized in mutant cells reaches the outer membrane. Immunoreactive OmpF protein could also be detected in extracts of mutant cells labeled for 5 min, but the amount that accumulated was severalfold less in mutant cells than in cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. Analysis of beta-galactosidase synthesis from ompF-lacZ fusion genes showed this difference to be the result of a reduced rate of ompF transcription in mutant cells. Even so, little or none of the ompF protein synthesized in mutant cells was incorporated into the outer membrane. Images PMID:6339479

  16. Understanding Voltage Gating of Providencia stuartii Porins at Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Song, Wanling; Bajaj, Harsha; Nasrallah, Chady; Jiang, Hualiang; Winterhalter, Mathias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Xu, Yechun

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial porins are water-filled β-barrel channels that allow translocation of solutes across the outer membrane. They feature a constriction zone, contributed by the plunging of extracellular loop 3 (L3) into the channel lumen. Porins are generally in the open state, but undergo gating in response to external voltages. To date the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report results from molecular dynamics simulations on the two porins of Providenica stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2, which display distinct voltage sensitivities. Voltage gating was observed in Omp-Pst2, where the binding of cations in-between L3 and the barrel wall results in exposing a conserved aromatic residue in the channel lumen, thereby halting ion permeation. Comparison of Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2 structures and trajectories suggests that their sensitivity to voltage is encoded in the hydrogen-bonding network anchoring L3 onto the barrel wall, as we observed that it is the strength of this network that governs the probability of cations binding behind L3. That Omp-Pst2 gating is observed only when ions flow against the electrostatic potential gradient of the channel furthermore suggests a possible role for this porin in the regulation of charge distribution across the outer membrane and bacterial homeostasis.

  17. Understanding Voltage Gating of Providencia stuartii Porins at Atomic Level

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wanling; Bajaj, Harsha; Nasrallah, Chady; Jiang, Hualiang; Winterhalter, Mathias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Xu, Yechun

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial porins are water-filled β-barrel channels that allow translocation of solutes across the outer membrane. They feature a constriction zone, contributed by the plunging of extracellular loop 3 (L3) into the channel lumen. Porins are generally in the open state, but undergo gating in response to external voltages. To date the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report results from molecular dynamics simulations on the two porins of Providenica stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2, which display distinct voltage sensitivities. Voltage gating was observed in Omp-Pst2, where the binding of cations in-between L3 and the barrel wall results in exposing a conserved aromatic residue in the channel lumen, thereby halting ion permeation. Comparison of Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2 structures and trajectories suggests that their sensitivity to voltage is encoded in the hydrogen-bonding network anchoring L3 onto the barrel wall, as we observed that it is the strength of this network that governs the probability of cations binding behind L3. That Omp-Pst2 gating is observed only when ions flow against the electrostatic potential gradient of the channel furthermore suggests a possible role for this porin in the regulation of charge distribution across the outer membrane and bacterial homeostasis. PMID:25955156

  18. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM.

  19. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  20. Recombinant outer membrane protein C of Aeromonas hydrophila elicits mixed immune response and generates agglutinating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Meena, Jitendra Kumar; Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium, also responsible for causing opportunistic pathological conditions in humans. It causes a number of diseases in fish due to which the fish industry incurs huge economic losses annually. Due to problems of antibiotic resistance, and the rapidity with which the infection spreads among fishes, vaccination remains the most effective strategy to combat this infection in fish populations. Among various virulence factors associated with bacterial virulence, outer membrane proteins have been widely evaluated for their vaccine potential owing to their surface exposure and related role in pathogenicity. In the present study, we have investigated the immunogenic potential of a non-specific porin, outer membrane protein C (OmpC) whose expression is regulated by the two-component regulatory system and plays a major role in the survival of A. hydrophila under different osmolaric conditions. The full-length gene (~1 kb) encoding OmpC of A. hydrophila was cloned, characterized and expressed in E. coli. High yield (~112 mg/L at shake flask level) of the recombinant OmpC (rOmpC) (~40 kDa) of A. hydrophila was obtained upon purification from inclusion bodies using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Immunization with purified rOmpC in murine model generated high endpoint (>1:40,000) titers. IgG isotyping, ELISA and ELISPOT assay indicated mixed immune response with a TH2 bias. Also, the anti-rOmpC antibodies were able to agglutinate A. hydrophila in vitro and exhibited specific cross-reactivity with different Aeromonas strains, which will facilitate easy detection of different Aeromonas isolates in infected samples. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that rOmpC could serve as an effective vaccine against different strains of Aeromonas, a highly heterogenous group of bacteria. PMID:27328672

  1. Outer membrane protein OmpQ of Bordetella bronchiseptica is required for mature biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Natalia; Villalba, María Inés; Parisi, Gustavo; Arnal, Laura; Serra, Diego Omar; Aguilar, Mario; Yantorno, Osvaldo

    2016-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica, an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, is capable of colonizing the respiratory tract of diverse animals and chronically persists inside the hosts by forming biofilm. Most known virulence factors in Bordetella species are regulated by the BvgAS two-component transduction system. The Bvg-activated proteins play a critical role during host infection. OmpQ is an outer membrane porin protein which is expressed under BvgAS control. Here, we studied the contribution of OmpQ to the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica. We found that the lack of expression of OmpQ did not affect the growth kinetics and final biomass of B. bronchiseptica under planktonic growth conditions. The ΔompQ mutant strain displayed no differences in attachment level and in early steps of biofilm formation. However, deletion of the ompQ gene attenuated the ability of B. bronchiseptica to form a mature biofilm. Analysis of ompQ gene expression during the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica showed a dynamic expression pattern, with an increase of biofilm culture at 48 h. Moreover, we demonstrated that the addition of serum anti-OmpQ had the potential to reduce the biofilm biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we showed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, evidence of the contribution of OmpQ to a process of importance for B. bronchiseptica pathobiology. Our results indicate that OmpQ plays a role during the biofilm development process, particularly at later stages of development, and that this porin could be a potential target for strategies of biofilm formation inhibition. PMID:26673448

  2. A conformational landscape for alginate secretion across the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jingquan; Rouse, Sarah L.; Li, Dianfan; Pye, Valerie E.; Vogeley, Lutz; Brinth, Alette R.; El Arnaout, Toufic; Whitney, John C.; Howell, P. Lynne; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Caffrey, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Crystal structures of the β-barrel porin AlgE reveal a mechanism whereby alginate is exported from P. aeruginosa for biofilm formation. The exopolysaccharide alginate is an important component of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major pathogen that contributes to the demise of cystic fibrosis patients. Alginate exits the cell via the outer membrane porin AlgE. X-ray structures of several AlgE crystal forms are reported here. Whilst all share a common β-barrel constitution, they differ in the degree to which loops L2 and T8 are ordered. L2 and T8 have been identified as an extracellular gate (E-gate) and a periplasmic gate (P-gate), respectively, that reside on either side of an alginate-selectivity pore located midway through AlgE. Passage of alginate across the membrane is proposed to be regulated by the sequential opening and closing of the two gates. In one crystal form, the selectivity pore contains a bound citrate. Because citrate mimics the uronate monomers of alginate, its location is taken to highlight a route through AlgE taken by alginate as it crosses the pore. Docking and molecular-dynamics simulations support and extend the proposed transport mechanism. Specifically, the P-gate and E-gate are flexible and move between open and closed states. Citrate can leave the selectivity pore bidirectionally. Alginate docks stably in a linear conformation through the open pore. To translate across the pore, a force is required that presumably is provided by the alginate-synthesis machinery. Accessing the open pore is facilitated by complex formation between AlgE and the periplasmic protein AlgK. Alginate can thread through a continuous pore in the complex, suggesting that AlgK pre-orients newly synthesized exopolysaccharide for delivery to AlgE.

  3. Deciphering the Function of the Outer Membrane Protein OprD Homologue of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Catel-Ferreira, Manuella; Nehmé, Rony; Molle, Virginie; Aranda, Jesús; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chevalier, Sylvie; Bou, Germán; Jouenne, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates is a major cause for concern which restricts therapeutic options to treat severe infections caused by this emerging pathogen. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved in carbapenem resistance, we studied the contribution of an outer membrane protein homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprD porin. Suspected to be the preferred pathway of carbapenems in A. baumannii, the oprD homologue gene was inactivated in strain ATCC 17978. Comparison of wild-type and mutant strains did not confirm the expected increased resistance to any antibiotic tested. OprD homologue sequence analysis revealed that this protein actually belongs to an OprD subgroup but is closer to the P. aeruginosa OprQ protein, with which it could share some functions, e.g., allowing bacterial survival under low-iron or -magnesium growth conditions or under poor oxygenation. We thus overexpressed and purified a recombinant OprD homologue protein to further examine its functional properties. As a specific channel, this porin presented rather low single-channel conductance, i.e., 28 pS in 1 M KCl, and was partially closed by micro- and millimolar concentrations of Fe3+ and Mg2+, respectively, but not by imipenem and meropenem or basic amino acids. The A. baumannii OprD homologue is likely not involved in the carbapenem resistance mechanism, but as an OprQ-like protein, it could contribute to the adaptation of this bacterium to magnesium- and/or iron-depleted environments. PMID:22564848

  4. Outer membrane protein OmpQ of Bordetella bronchiseptica is required for mature biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Natalia; Villalba, María Inés; Parisi, Gustavo; Arnal, Laura; Serra, Diego Omar; Aguilar, Mario; Yantorno, Osvaldo

    2016-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica, an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, is capable of colonizing the respiratory tract of diverse animals and chronically persists inside the hosts by forming biofilm. Most known virulence factors in Bordetella species are regulated by the BvgAS two-component transduction system. The Bvg-activated proteins play a critical role during host infection. OmpQ is an outer membrane porin protein which is expressed under BvgAS control. Here, we studied the contribution of OmpQ to the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica. We found that the lack of expression of OmpQ did not affect the growth kinetics and final biomass of B. bronchiseptica under planktonic growth conditions. The ΔompQ mutant strain displayed no differences in attachment level and in early steps of biofilm formation. However, deletion of the ompQ gene attenuated the ability of B. bronchiseptica to form a mature biofilm. Analysis of ompQ gene expression during the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica showed a dynamic expression pattern, with an increase of biofilm culture at 48 h. Moreover, we demonstrated that the addition of serum anti-OmpQ had the potential to reduce the biofilm biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we showed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, evidence of the contribution of OmpQ to a process of importance for B. bronchiseptica pathobiology. Our results indicate that OmpQ plays a role during the biofilm development process, particularly at later stages of development, and that this porin could be a potential target for strategies of biofilm formation inhibition.

  5. Outer membrane protein A and OprF – Versatile roles in Gram-negative bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Subramanian; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is an abundant protein of Escherichia coli and other enterobacteria with a multitude of functions. Although the structural features and porin function of OmpA were well studied, its role in the pathogenesis of various bacterial infections has been emerging for the past decade. The four extracellular loops of OmpA interact with a variety of host tissues for adhesion, invasion and evasion of host-defense mechanisms. This review describes how various regions present in the extracellular loops of OmpA contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal meningitis induced by E. coli K1 and for many other functions. In addition, the function of OmpA like proteins such as OprF of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is also discussed herein. PMID:22240162

  6. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.H.; Verma, A.; Trifiletti, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a site identified by its nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)diazepam, similar to the affinity of diazepam for the central-type benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor occurs in many peripheral tissues but has discrete localizations as indicated by autoradiographic studies showing uniquely high densities of the receptors in the adrenal cortex and in Leydig cells of the testes. Subcellular localization studies reveal a selective association of the receptors with the outer membrane of mitochondria. Photoaffinity labeling of the mitochondrial receptor with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam reveals two discrete labeled protein bands of 30 and 35 kDa, respectively. The 35-kDa band appears to be identical with the voltage-dependent anion channel protein porin. Fractionation of numerous peripheral tissues reveals a single principal endogenous ligand for the receptor, consisting of porphyrins, which display nanomolar affinity. Interactions of porphyrins with the mitochondrial receptor may clarify its physiological role and account for many pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane lipoprotein I gene: molecular cloning, sequence, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, M; Barron, C; Schweizer, A; von Specht, B U; Domdey, H

    1989-01-01

    Lipoprotein I (OprI) is one of the major proteins of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Like porin protein F (OprF), it is a vaccine candidate because it antigenically cross-reacts with all serotype strains of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. Since lipoprotein I was expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of its own promoter, we were able to isolate the gene by screening a lambda EMBL3 phage library with a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against lipoprotein I. The monocistronic OprI mRNA encodes a precursor protein of 83 amino acid residues including a signal peptide of 19 residues. The mature protein has a molecular weight of 6,950, not including bound glycerol and lipid. Although the amino acid sequences of protein I of P. aeruginosa and Braun's lipoprotein of E. coli differ considerably (only 30.1% identical amino acid residues), peptidoglycan in E. coli, are identical. Using lipoprotein I expressed in E. coli, it can now be tested whether this protein alone, without P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide contaminations, has a protective effect against P. aeruginosa infections. Images PMID:2502533

  8. Proteomic and functional characterization of the outer membrane vesicles from the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, Erica; Brown, Paul A; Smith, Sinead M; Botting, Catherine H; Yamaoka, Yoshio Y; Terres, Ana M; Kelleher, Dermot P; Windle, Henry J

    2009-07-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes a spectrum of gastro-duodenal diseases, which may be mediated in part by the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) constitutively shed by the pathogen. We aimed to determine the proteome of H. pylori OMV to help evaluate the mechanisms whereby these structures confer their known immuno-modulatory and cytotoxic activities to host cells, as such disease-associated activities are also conferred by the bacterium from which the vesicles are derived. We also evaluated the effect of the OMV on gastric/colonic epithelial cells, duodenal explants and neutrophils. A proteomic analysis of the OMV proteins separated by SDS-PAGE from two strains of H. pylori (J99 and NCTC 11637) was undertaken and 162 OMV-associated proteins were identified in J99 and 91 in NCTC 11637 by LC-MS/MS. The vesicles are rich in membrane proteins, porins, adhesins and several molecules known to modulate chemokine secretion, cell proliferation and other host cellular processes. Further, the OMVs are also vehicles for the carriage of the cytotoxin-associated gene A cytotoxin in addition to the previously documented toxin, vacuolating cytotoxin. Taken together, it is evident from the proteome of H. pylori OMV that these structures are equipped with the molecules required to interact with host cells in a manner not dissimilar from the intact pathogen.

  9. Bacterial Nanobioreactors--Directing Enzyme Packaging into Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nathan J; Turner, Kendrick B; Daniele, Michael A; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L; Walper, Scott A

    2015-11-11

    All bacteria shed outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) loaded with a diverse array of small molecules, proteins, and genetic cargo. In this study we sought to hijack the bacterial cell export pathway to simultaneously produce, package, and release an active enzyme, phosphotriesterase (PTE). To accomplish this goal the SpyCatcher/SpyTag (SC/ST) bioconjugation system was utilized to produce a PTE-SpyCatcher (PTE-SC) fusion protein and a SpyTagged transmembrane porin protein (OmpA-ST), known to be abundant in OMVs. Under a range of physiological conditions the SpyTag and SpyCatcher domains interact with one another and form a covalent isopeptide bond driving packaging of PTE into forming OMVs. The PTE-SC loaded OMVs are characterized for size distribution, number of vesicles produced, cell viability, packaged PTE enzyme kinetics, OMV loading efficiency, and enzyme stability following iterative cycles of freezing and thawing. The PTE-loaded OMVs exhibit native-like enzyme kinetics when assayed with paraoxon as a substrate. PTE is often toxic to expression cultures and has a tendency to lose activity with improper handling. The coexpression of OmpA-ST with PTE-SC, however, greatly improved the overall PTE production levels by mitigating toxicity through exporting of the PTE-SC and greatly enhanced packaged enzyme stability against iterative cycles of freezing and thawing. PMID:26479678

  10. Bacterial Nanobioreactors--Directing Enzyme Packaging into Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nathan J; Turner, Kendrick B; Daniele, Michael A; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L; Walper, Scott A

    2015-11-11

    All bacteria shed outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) loaded with a diverse array of small molecules, proteins, and genetic cargo. In this study we sought to hijack the bacterial cell export pathway to simultaneously produce, package, and release an active enzyme, phosphotriesterase (PTE). To accomplish this goal the SpyCatcher/SpyTag (SC/ST) bioconjugation system was utilized to produce a PTE-SpyCatcher (PTE-SC) fusion protein and a SpyTagged transmembrane porin protein (OmpA-ST), known to be abundant in OMVs. Under a range of physiological conditions the SpyTag and SpyCatcher domains interact with one another and form a covalent isopeptide bond driving packaging of PTE into forming OMVs. The PTE-SC loaded OMVs are characterized for size distribution, number of vesicles produced, cell viability, packaged PTE enzyme kinetics, OMV loading efficiency, and enzyme stability following iterative cycles of freezing and thawing. The PTE-loaded OMVs exhibit native-like enzyme kinetics when assayed with paraoxon as a substrate. PTE is often toxic to expression cultures and has a tendency to lose activity with improper handling. The coexpression of OmpA-ST with PTE-SC, however, greatly improved the overall PTE production levels by mitigating toxicity through exporting of the PTE-SC and greatly enhanced packaged enzyme stability against iterative cycles of freezing and thawing.

  11. Brucella outer membrane lipoprotein shares antigenic determinants with Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein and is exposed on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; López, J

    1987-01-01

    In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), purified Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins gave a strong cross-reaction with sera from rabbits hyperimmunized with the heterologous lipoprotein. When smooth E. coli cells were used as ELISA antigens, the immunological cross-reaction was not observed unless the cells were treated to remove lipopolysaccharide and other outer membrane components. In contrast, intact cells from smooth strains of B. abortus and Brucella melitensis bound anti-lipoprotein immunoglobulin G, and the controls performed by ELISA showed that this reaction was not due to antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide, group 3 outer membrane proteins, or porins. Electron microscopy of cells labeled with antilipoprotein serum and protein A-colloidal gold showed specific labeling of smooth cells from both B. abortus and B. melitensis, even though unspecific labeling by nonimmune serum was observed with rough B. abortus. These results confirm the close similarity between E. coli and Brucella peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins and show that, in contrast to E. coli, the lipoprotein of B. abortus and B. melitensis is partially exposed on the surface of smooth cells. Images PMID:2432014

  12. Surface hydrolysis of sphingomyelin by the outer membrane protein Rv0888 supports replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Alexander; Sun, Jim; Danilchanka, Olga; Meikle, Virginia; Rowland, Jennifer L.; Walter, Kerstin; Buck, Bradford R.; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Hölscher, Christoph; Ehrt, Sabine; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sphingomyelinases secreted by pathogenic bacteria play important roles in host-pathogen interactions ranging from interfering with phagocytosis and oxidative burst to iron acquisition. This study shows that the Mtb protein Rv0888 possesses potent sphingomyelinase activity cleaving sphingomyelin, a major lipid in eukaryotic cells, into ceramide and phosphocholine which are then utilized by Mtb as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus sources, respectively. An Mtb rv0888 deletion mutant did not grow on sphingomyelin as a sole carbon source anymore and replicated poorly in macrophages indicating that Mtb utilizes sphingomyelin during infection. Rv0888 is an unusual membrane protein with a surface-exposed C-terminal sphingomyelinase domain and a putative N-terminal channel domain that mediated glucose and phosphocholine uptake across the outer membrane in an M. smegmatis porin mutant. Hence, we propose to name Rv0888 as SpmT (sphingomyelinase of M. tuberculosis). Erythrocyte membranes contain up to 27% sphingomyelin. The finding that Rv0888 accounts for half of Mtb’s hemolysis is consistent with its sphingomyelinase activity and the observation that Rv0888 levels are increased in the presence of erythrocytes and sphingomyelin by 5- and 100-fold, respectively. Thus, Rv0888 is a novel outer membrane protein that enables Mtb to utilize sphingomyelin as a source of several essential nutrients during intracellular growth. PMID:26036301

  13. An Agrobacterium gene involved in tumorigenesis encodes an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y H; Li, L P; Hou, Q M; Pan, Shen Q

    2002-02-01

    A gene designated as aopB was identified which was involved in tumorigenesis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. aopB is located on the circular chromosome as a single copy. This gene shares high homology with ropB, a Rhizobium leguminosarum gene encoding an outer membrane protein. A transposon mutant CGI1 containing a gfp-tagged transposon insertion at aopB caused attenuated tumors on plants when inoculated at a low cell concentration (5x10(7) cells/ml). The mutation did not affect the bacterial growth on different media. A broad host range plasmid containing the wild type aopB could restore the tumor formation ability of CGI1 to the wild type level. When both aopB-gfp and aopB-phoA fusions were used to study the aopB gene expression, we found that the aopB gene was inducible by acidic pH but not by plant phenolic compound acetosyringone. aopB encodes a putative protein of 218 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 22.8 kDa. TnphoA transposon mutagenesis of aopB, subcellular fractionation and whole cell ELISA experiments indicated that AopB is an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface. It appeared that AopB was exclusively present in the outer membrane and not in other fractions. The vir gene induction assays showed that the aopB gene was not required for the expression of the Ti plasmid encoded vir genes that are essential for tumorigenesis. The C-terminal half of AopB is slightly homologous to some of the bacterial porin proteins and some of plant dehydrins. The role of AopB in Agrobacterium-plant interaction is discussed. PMID:11891052

  14. Localized translation near the mitochondrial outer membrane: An update

    PubMed Central

    Lesnik, Chen; Golani-Armon, Adi; Arava, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Local synthesis of proteins near their activity site has been demonstrated in many biological systems, and has diverse contributions to cellular functions. Studies in recent years have revealed that hundreds of mitochondria-destined proteins are synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes near the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that localized translation also occurs at this cellular locus. Furthermore, in the last year central factors that are involved in this process were identified in yeast, Drosophila, and human cells. Herein we review the experimental evidence for localized translation on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane; in addition, we describe the factors that are involved in this process and discuss the conservation of this mechanism among various species. We also describe the relationship between localized translation and import into the mitochondria and suggest avenues of study that look beyond cotranslational import. Finally we discuss future challenges in characterizing the mechanisms for localized translation and its physiological significance. PMID:26151724

  15. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M. Florencia; Wine, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:27406567

  16. Periplasmic quality control in biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Zhi Xin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-04-01

    The β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are integral membrane proteins that reside in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and perform a diverse range of biological functions. Synthesized in the cytoplasm, OMPs must be transported across the inner membrane and through the periplasmic space before they are assembled in the outer membrane. In Escherichia coli, Skp, SurA and DegP are the most prominent factors identified to guide OMPs across the periplasm and to play the role of quality control. Although extensive genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed many basic functions of these periplasmic proteins, the mechanism of their collaboration in assisting the folding and insertion of OMPs is much less understood. Recently, biophysical approaches have shed light on the identification of the intricate network. In the present review, we summarize recent advances in the characterization of these key factors, with a special emphasis on the multifunctional protein DegP. In addition, we present our proposed model on the periplasmic quality control in biogenesis of OMPs.

  17. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  18. Temperate bacteriophages collected by outer membrane vesicles in Komagataeibacter intermedius.

    PubMed

    Kharina, Alla; Podolich, Olga; Faidiuk, Iuliia; Zaika, Sergiy; Haidak, Andriy; Kukharenko, Olga; Zaets, Iryna; Tovkach, Fedor; Reva, Oleg; Kremenskoy, Maxim; Kozyrovska, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    The acetic acid bacteria have mainly relevance for bacterial cellulose production and fermented bio-products manufacture. The purpose of this study was to identify temperate bacteriophages in a cellulose-producing bacterial strain Komagataeibacter intermedius IMBG180. Prophages from K. intermedius IMBG180 were induced with mitomycin C and nalidixic acid. Transmission electron microscopy analysis exhibited tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses proved phylogenetic position of induced phages. Nalidixic acid was poor inducer of prophages, however, it induced the OMV-like particles release. Size of OMVs depended on an antibiotic applied for phage induction and varied in the range of 30-80 and 120-200 nm. Inside some of them, tails of phages have been visible. Under conditions, inducing prophages, OMVs acted as the collectors of formed phage particles, using outer membrane receptors for phage detection (in this case, outer membrane siderophore receptor), and fulfilled therefore "a cleaning," as well as defensive functions, preventing bacteriophage spread outside population. This is the first description of myoviruses affiliated to K. intermedius, as well as outer membrane vesicles interaction with phages within this host.

  19. Roles of the Mdm10, Tom7, Mdm12, and Mmm1 Proteins in the Assembly of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, Jeremy G.; Go, Nancy E.; Klein, Astrid; Redmond, Erin; Lackey, Sebastian W.K.; Tao, Tan; Kalbacher, Hubert; Rapaport, Doron; Neupert, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The Mdm10, Mdm12, and Mmm1 proteins have been implicated in several mitochondrial functions including mitochondrial distribution and morphology, assembly of β-barrel proteins such as Tom40 and porin, association of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and maintaining lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes. Here we show that loss of any of these three proteins in Neurospora crassa results in the formation of large mitochondrial tubules and reduces the assembly of porin and Tom40 into the outer membrane. We have also investigated the relationship of Mdm10 and Tom7 in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins. Previous work showed that mitochondria lacking Tom7 assemble Tom40 more efficiently, and porin less efficiently, than wild-type mitochondria. Analysis of mdm10 and tom7 single and double mutants, has demonstrated that the effects of the two mutations are additive. Loss of Tom7 partially compensates for the decrease in Tom40 assembly resulting from loss of Mdm10, whereas porin assembly is more severely reduced in the double mutant than in either single mutant. The additive effects observed in the double mutant suggest that different steps in β-barrel assembly are affected in the individual mutants. Many aspects of Tom7 and Mdm10 function in N. crassa are different from those of their homologues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:20335503

  20. Comparison of the polypeptide composition of Escherichia coli outer membranes prepared by two methods.

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, I; Shales, S W

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli outer membranes were prepared by centrifugation to equilibrium in sucrose gradients and then treated with Sarkosyl in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetate. The polypeptide profiles of the two outer membrane preparations were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The patterns obtained were not identical, and Sarkosyl removed several minor proteins from the outer membrane. Images PMID:6998960

  1. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore » from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  2. PLGA-microencapsulation protects Salmonella typhi outer membrane proteins from acidic degradation and increases their mucosal immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Juan Manuel; Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Printz, Andrea; Pastelin, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Chariatte, Dominic; Tanoue, Yutaka; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Gander, Bruno; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-07-29

    Salmonella (S.) enterica infections are an important global health problem with more than 20 million individuals suffering from enteric fever annually and more than 200,000 lethal cases per year. Although enteric fever can be treated appropriately with antibiotics, an increasing number of antibiotic resistant Salmonella strains is detected. While two vaccines against typhoid fever are currently on the market, their availability in subtropical endemic areas is limited because these products need to be kept in uninterrupted cold chains. Hence, the development of a thermally stable vaccine that induces mucosal immune responses would greatly improve human health in endemic areas. Here, we have combined the high structural stability of Salmonella typhi outer membrane proteins (porins) with their microencapsulation into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to generate an orally applicable vaccine. Encapsulated porins were protected from acidic degradation and exhibited enhanced immunogenicity following oral administration. In particular, the vaccine elicited strong S. typhi-specific B cell responses in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. In sum, PLGA microencapsulation substantially improved the efficacy of oral vaccination against S. typhi. PMID:27372155

  3. Repression of the glucose-inducible outer-membrane protein OprB during utilization of aromatic compounds and organic acids in Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Basu, Bhakti; Godbole, Ashwini; Mathew, M K; Apte, Shree K; Phale, Prashant S

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86 shows preferential utilization of aromatic compounds over glucose. Protein analysis and [¹⁴C]glucose-binding studies of the outer membrane fraction of cells grown on different carbon sources revealed a 40 kDa protein that was transcriptionally induced by glucose and repressed by aromatics and succinate. Based on 2D gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, the 40 kDa protein closely resembled the porin B of P. putida KT2440 and carbohydrate-selective porin OprB of various Pseudomonas strains. The purified native protein (i) was estimated to be a homotrimer of 125 kDa with a subunit molecular mass of 40 kDa, (ii) displayed heat modifiability of electrophoretic mobility, (iii) showed channel conductance of 166 pS in 1 M KCl, (iv) permeated various sugars (mono-, di- and tri-saccharides), organic acids, amino acids and aromatic compounds, and (v) harboured a glucose-specific and saturable binding site with a dissociation constant of 1.3 µM. These results identify the glucose-inducible outer-membrane protein of P. putida CSV86 as a carbohydrate-selective protein OprB. Besides modulation of intracellular glucose-metabolizing enzymes and specific glucose-binding periplasmic space protein, the repression of OprB by aromatics and organic acids, even in the presence of glucose, also contributes significantly to the strain's ability to utilize aromatics and organic acids over glucose.

  4. Mitogenic effects of purified outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y H; Hancock, R E; Mishell, R I

    1980-01-01

    Three major outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 were purified and tested for their ability to stimulate resting murine lymphocytes to proliferate. It was demonstrated that picomole amounts of all three proteins were mitogenic for both intact and T-lymphocyte-depleted populations of spleen cells from C3H/HeJ mice. In contrast, they had no activity against either mature or immature thymocytes. Since the strain of mice used is unable to respond to lipopolysaccharide, we condlude that the three proteins are B-cell mitogens. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6769818

  5. Characterization and Immunogenicity of Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Singh, Satparkash; Sunil Kumar, B V; Mahajan, Kanika; Verma, Ramneek

    2016-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic disease. The objectives of this study were characterization of outer membrane vesicles from B. abortus and to evaluate their immunogenicity in mice. For this purpose, OMVs were derived from B. abortus strain 99 using ultracentrifugation method. Isolated OMVs were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transmission electron microscopy which revealed spherical 20-300 nm structures rich in proteins. OMVs also showed immuno-reactivity with mice antisera in Western blot. Further, indirect ELISA showed specific and high-titer immune responses against the antigens present in OMVs suggesting their potential for a safe acellular vaccine candidate.

  6. Mutant OmpF porins of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with deletions of external loops: structure-functional and immunochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Sidorova, O V; Khomenko, V A; Portnyagina, O Yu; Likhatskaya, G N; Vakorina, T I; Kim, N Yu; Chistyulin, D K; Solov'eva, T F; Novikova, O D

    2014-03-01

    Recombinant mutant OmpF porins from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis outer membrane were obtained using site-directed mutagenesis. Here we used four OmpF mutants where single extracellular loops L1, L4, L6, and L8 were deleted one at a time. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli at levels comparable to full-sized recombinant OmpF porin and isolated from the inclusion bodies. Purified trimers of the mutant porins were obtained after dialysis and consequent ion-exchange chromatography. Changes in molecular and spatial structure of the mutants obtained were studied using SDS-PAGE and optical spectroscopy (circular dichroism and intrinsic protein fluorescence). Secondary and tertiary structure of the mutant proteins was found to have some features in comparison with that of the full-sized recombinant OmpF. As shown by bilayer lipid membrane technique, the pore-forming activity of purified mutant porins was identical to OmpF porin isolated from the bacterial outer membrane. Lacking of the external loops mentioned above influenced significantly upon the antigenic structure of the porin as demonstrated using ELISA.

  7. Structure of Escherichia coli OmpF porin from lipidic mesophase.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2012-06-01

    Outer membrane protein F, a major component of the Escherichia coli outer membrane, was crystallized for the first time in lipidic mesophase of monoolein in novel space groups, P1 and H32. Due to ease of its purification and crystallization OmpF can be used as a benchmark protein for establishing membrane protein crystallization in meso, as a "membrane lyzozyme". The packing of porin trimers in the crystals of space group H32 is similar to natural outer membranes, providing the first high-resolution insight into the close to native packing of OmpF. Surprisingly, interaction between trimers is mediated exclusively by lipids, without direct protein-protein contacts. Multiple ordered lipids are observed and many of them occupy identical positions independently of the space group, identifying preferential interaction sites of lipid acyl chains. Presence of ordered aliphatic chains close to a positively charged area on the porin surface suggests a position for a lipopolysaccharide binding site on the surface of the major E. coli porins.

  8. Galactosyltransferase activities in mitochondria outer membrane: biosynthesis of galactosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gasnier, F; Louisot, P; Gateau, O

    1989-01-01

    1. Mitochondria outer membranes prepared from mouse livers were purified on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. Control in electron microscopy and marker enzymes assays confirmed purity and homogeneity of this fraction. 2. Purified mitochondria outer membranes exhibited significant UDP-galactose: glycoprotein galactosyltransferase activities when incubated with endogenous or exogenous glycoprotein acceptors in presence of detergent (Nonidet P40). 3. Some properties of two distinct mitochondrial galactosyltransferases, acting respectively on ovomucoid and ovine asialo-mucin were investigated. 4. Transfer of galactose on ovomucoid was maximal for a pH of 7.6 at 33 degrees C whereas asialo-mucin galactosyltransferase exhibited an optimum pH of 5.6 for an optimal temperature of 46 degrees C. 5. These two distinct membrane-bound enzymes were both inhibited by diacylglycerophospholipids whereas lysophospholipids modulated both enzymes in a different way: at 5 mM lysophosphatidylcholine, asialo-mucin galactosyltransferase was slightly stimulated while ovomucoid galactosyltransferase was markedly activated. 6. The most important activating effect on ovomucoid galactosyltransferase was obtained with a phospholipid containing a long aliphatic side chain linked by an ester bond in sn-1 of glycerol, an hydroxyl group or hydrogen atoms in sn-2 and a phosphorylcholine head group in sn-3. PMID:2501112

  9. TonB-dependent outer membrane transport: going for Baroque?

    PubMed

    Wiener, Michael C

    2005-08-01

    The import of essential organometallic micronutrients (such as iron-siderophores and vitamin B(12)) across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria proceeds via TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs). The TBDT couples to the TonB protein, which is part of a multiprotein complex in the plasma (inner) membrane. Five crystal structures of TBDTs illustrate clearly the architecture of the protein in energy-independent substrate-free and substrate-bound states. In each of the TBDT structures, an N-terminal hatch (or plug or cork) domain occludes the lumen of a 22-stranded beta barrel. The manner by which substrate passes through the transporter (the "hatch-barrel problem") is currently unknown. Solution NMR and X-ray crystallographic structures of various TonB domains indicate a striking structural plasticity of this protein. Thermodynamic, biochemical and bacteriological studies of TonB and TBDTs indicate further that existing structures do not yet capture critical energy-dependent and in vivo conformations of the transport cycle. The reconciliation of structural and non-structural experimental data, and the unambiguous experimental elucidation of a detailed molecular mechanism of transport are current challenges for this field. PMID:16039843

  10. Biological activities of Eikenella corrodens outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Progulske, A; Mishell, R; Trummel, C; Holt, S C

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified preparations of the outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Eikenella corrodens strain ATCC 23834 and the outer membrane fraction (OMF) of strain 470 were tested in in vitro biological assays. The OMFs of both strains were found to be mitogenic for BDF and C3H/HeJ murine splenocytes. The E. corrodens LPS was mitogenic for BDF spleen cells; however, doses of LPS as high as 50 micrograms/ml failed to stimulate C3H/HeJ cells. When incubated with T-lymphocyte-depleted C3H/HeJ splenocytes, the strain 23834 OMF demonstrated significant mitogenic activity, indicating that the OMF is a B-cell mitogen by a mechanism other than that elicited by conventional LPS. The E. corrodens 23834 OMF and LPS were stimulators of bone resorption when tested in organ cultures of fetal rat long bones. In contrast, the strain 470 OMF was only weakly stimulatory. Both OMFs and LPSs demonstrated "endotoxic" activity, since as little as 0.062 micrograms of E. corrodens LPS and 0.015 micrograms of the OMFs induced gelation in the Limulus amebocyte clotting assay. Thus, despite having a "nonclassical" LPS biochemistry, the E. corrodens LPS elicits classical endotoxic activities. These results also indicate that the surface structures of E. corrodens have significant biological activities as measured in vitro. The expression of such activities in vivo may play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis as well as other E. corrodens infections. PMID:6360893

  11. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics. PMID:26640046

  12. A Molecularly Complete Planar Bacterial Outer Membrane Platform

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Chih-Yun; Chen, Linxiao; Singh, Rohit R.; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane (OM) is a barrier containing membrane proteins and liposaccharides that fulfill crucial functions for Gram-negative bacteria. With the advent of drug-resistant bacteria, it is necessary to understand the functional role of this membrane and its constituents to enable novel drug designs. Here we report a simple method to form an OM-like supported bilayer (OM-SB), which incorporates native lipids and membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria from outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). We characterize the formation of OM-SBs using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and fluorescence microscopy. We show that the orientation of proteins in the OM-SB matches the native bacterial membrane, preserving the characteristic asymmetry of these membranes. As a demonstration of the utility of the OM-SB platform, we quantitatively measure antibiotic interactions between OM-SBs and polymyxin B, a cationic peptide used to treat Gram-negative infections. This data enriches understanding of the antibacterial mechanism of polymyxin B, including disruption kinetics and changes in membrane mechanical properties. Combining OM-SBs with microfluidics will enable higher throughput screening of antibiotics. With a broader view, we envision that a molecularly complete membrane-scaffold could be useful for cell-free applications employing engineered membrane proteins in bacterial membranes for myriad technological purposes. PMID:27600663

  13. Outer membrane vesicles of Pasteurella multocida contain virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rojas, Miguel A; Vaca, Sergio; Reyes-López, Magda; de la Garza, Mireya; Aguilar-Romero, Francisco; Zenteno, Edgar; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (Pm) is a gram-negative bacterium able to infect different animal species, including human beings. This bacterium causes economic losses to the livestock industry because of its high morbidity and mortality in animals. In this work, we report the characterization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released into the culture medium by different Pm serogroups. Purified OMVs in the range of 50–300 nm were observed by electron microscopy. Serum obtained from chickens infected with Pm recognized several proteins from Pm OMVs. Additionally, rabbit antiserum directed against a secreted protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae recognized a similar protein in the Pm OVMs, suggesting that OMVs from these bacterial species contain common immunogenic proteins. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was identified in OMVs from different Pm serogroups, and its concentration was twofold higher in OMVs from Pm serogroups B and D than in OMVs from other serogroups. Three outer membrane proteins were also identified: OmpH, OmpW, and transferrin-binding protein. Three bands of 65, 110, and 250 kDa with proteolytic activity were detected in Pm OMVs of serogroups A and E. Additionally, β-lactamase activity was detected only in OMVs from Pm 12945 Ampr (serogroup A). Pm OMVs may be involved in different aspects of disease pathogenesis. PMID:25065983

  14. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  15. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics.

  16. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions.

  17. HHomp--prediction and classification of outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Remmert, Michael; Linke, Dirk; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2009-07-01

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are the transmembrane proteins found in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and plastids. Most prediction methods have focused on analogous features, such as alternating hydrophobicity patterns. Here, we start from the observation that almost all beta-barrel OMPs are related by common ancestry. We identify proteins as OMPs by detecting their homologous relationships to known OMPs using sequence similarity. Given an input sequence, HHomp builds a profile hidden Markov model (HMM) and compares it with an OMP database by pairwise HMM comparison, integrating OMP predictions by PROFtmb. A crucial ingredient is the OMP database, which contains profile HMMs for over 20,000 putative OMP sequences. These were collected with the exhaustive, transitive homology detection method HHsenser, starting from 23 representative OMPs in the PDB database. In a benchmark on TransportDB, HHomp detects 63.5% of the true positives before including the first false positive. This is 70% more than PROFtmb, four times more than BOMP and 10 times more than TMB-Hunt. In Escherichia coli, HHomp identifies 57 out of 59 known OMPs and correctly assigns them to their functional subgroups. HHomp can be accessed at http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/hhomp.

  18. A Molecularly Complete Planar Bacterial Outer Membrane Platform.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Chih-Yun; Chen, Linxiao; Singh, Rohit R; DeLisa, Matthew P; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane (OM) is a barrier containing membrane proteins and liposaccharides that fulfill crucial functions for Gram-negative bacteria. With the advent of drug-resistant bacteria, it is necessary to understand the functional role of this membrane and its constituents to enable novel drug designs. Here we report a simple method to form an OM-like supported bilayer (OM-SB), which incorporates native lipids and membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria from outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). We characterize the formation of OM-SBs using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and fluorescence microscopy. We show that the orientation of proteins in the OM-SB matches the native bacterial membrane, preserving the characteristic asymmetry of these membranes. As a demonstration of the utility of the OM-SB platform, we quantitatively measure antibiotic interactions between OM-SBs and polymyxin B, a cationic peptide used to treat Gram-negative infections. This data enriches understanding of the antibacterial mechanism of polymyxin B, including disruption kinetics and changes in membrane mechanical properties. Combining OM-SBs with microfluidics will enable higher throughput screening of antibiotics. With a broader view, we envision that a molecularly complete membrane-scaffold could be useful for cell-free applications employing engineered membrane proteins in bacterial membranes for myriad technological purposes. PMID:27600663

  19. Proteomic Profiling of the Outer Membrane Fraction of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia ruminantium

    PubMed Central

    Moumène, Amal; Marcelino, Isabel; Ventosa, Miguel; Gros, Olivier; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiéry, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria play a crucial role in virulence and pathogenesis. Identification of these proteins represents an important goal for bacterial proteomics, because it aids in vaccine development. Here, we have developed such an approach for Ehrlichia ruminantium, the obligate intracellular bacterium that causes heartwater. A preliminary whole proteome analysis of elementary bodies, the extracellular infectious form of the bacterium, had been performed previously, but information is limited about OMPs in this organism and about their role in the protective immune response. Identification of OMPs is also essential for understanding Ehrlichia’s OM architecture, and how the bacterium interacts with the host cell environment. First, we developed an OMP extraction method using the ionic detergent sarkosyl, which enriched the OM fraction. Second, proteins were separated via one-dimensional electrophoresis, and digested peptides were analyzed via nano-liquid chromatographic separation coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF). Of 46 unique proteins identified in the OM fraction, 18 (39%) were OMPs, including 8 proteins involved in cell structure and biogenesis, 4 in transport/virulence, 1 porin, and 5 proteins of unknown function. These experimental data were compared to the predicted subcellular localization of the entire E. ruminantium proteome, using three different algorithms. This work represents the most complete proteome characterization of the OM fraction in Ehrlichia spp. The study indicates that suitable subcellular fractionation experiments combined with straightforward computational analysis approaches are powerful for determining the predominant subcellular localization of the experimentally observed proteins. We identified proteins potentially involved in E. ruminantium pathogenesis, which are good novel targets for candidate vaccines. Thus, combining bioinformatics and proteomics, we discovered new OMPs

  20. Identification of Outer Membrane and Exoproteins of Carbapenem-Resistant Multilocus Sequence Type 258 Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Brinkworth, Amanda J.; Hammer, Carl H.; Olano, L. Renee; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains have emerged as a cause of life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals (e.g., transplant recipients and critically ill patients). Strains classified as multilocus sequence type (ST) 258 are among the most prominent causes of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae infections worldwide, but the basis for the success of this lineage remains incompletely determined. To gain a more comprehensive view of the molecules potentially involved in the success of ST258, we used a proteomics approach to identify surface-associated and culture supernatant proteins produced by ST258. Protein samples were prepared from varied culture conditions in vitro, and were analyzed by a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We identified a total of 193 proteins in outer membrane preparations from bacteria cultured in Luria-Bertani broth (LB) or RPMI 1640 tissue culture media (RPMI). Compared with LB, several iron-acquisition proteins, including IutA, HmuR, HmuS, CirA, FepA, FitA, FoxA, FhuD, and YfeX, were more highly expressed in RPMI. Of the 177 proteins identified in spent media, only the fimbrial subunit, MrkA, was predicted to be extracellular, a finding that suggests few proteins (or a limited quantity) are freely secreted by ST258. Notably, we discovered 203 proteins not reported in previous K. pneumoniae proteome studies. In silico modeling of proteins with unknown function revealed several proteins with beta-barrel transmembrane structures typical of porins, as well as possible host-interacting proteins. Taken together, these findings contribute several new targets for the mechanistic study of drug-resistance and pathogenesis by ST258 K. pneumoniae isolates. PMID:25893665

  1. Antibiotic trapping by plasmid-encoded CMY-2 β-lactamase combined with reduced outer membrane permeability as a mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goessens, Wil H F; van der Bij, Akke K; van Boxtel, Ria; Pitout, Johann D D; van Ulsen, Peter; Melles, Damian C; Tommassen, Jan

    2013-08-01

    A liver transplant patient was admitted with cholangitis, for which meropenem therapy was started. Initial cultures showed a carbapenem-susceptible (CS) Escherichia coli strain, but during admission, a carbapenem-resistant (CR) E. coli strain was isolated. Analysis of the outer membrane protein profiles showed that both CS and CR E. coli lacked the porins OmpF and OmpC. Furthermore, PCR and sequence analysis revealed that both CS and CR E. coli possessed bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(OXA-1). The CR E. coli strain additionally harbored bla(CMY-2) and demonstrated a >15-fold increase in β-lactamase activity against nitrocefin, but no hydrolysis of meropenem was detected. However, nitrocefin hydrolysis appeared strongly inhibited by meropenem. Furthermore, the CMY-2 enzyme demonstrated lower electrophoretic mobility after its incubation either in vitro or in vivo with meropenem, indicative of its covalent modification with meropenem. The presence of the acyl-enzyme complex was confirmed by mass spectrometry. By transformation of the CMY-2-encoding plasmid into various E. coli strains, it was established that both porin deficiency and high-level expression of the enzyme were needed to confer meropenem resistance. In conclusion, carbapenem resistance emerged by a combination of elevated β-lactamase production and lack of porin expression. Due to the reduced outer membrane permeability, only small amounts of meropenem can enter the periplasm, where they are trapped but not degraded by the large amount of the β-lactamase. This study, therefore, provides evidence that the mechanism of "trapping" by CMY-2 β-lactamase plays a role in carbapenem resistance.

  2. Refolding and functional assembly of the Vibrio cholerae porin OmpU recombinantly expressed in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid; Gupta, Shelly; Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2012-10-01

    OmpU is one of the major outer membrane porins of Vibrio cholerae. OmpU has been biochemically characterized previously for its 'porin'-property. However, previous studies have used the OmpU protein extracted from the bacterial outer membrane envelope fractions. Such method of isolation imposes limitations on the availability of the protein reagent, and also enhances the possibility of the OmpU preparation being contaminated with lipid molecules of bacterial outer membrane origin, especially lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Here we report a strategy of purifying the V. cholerae OmpU protein recombinantly overexpressed in heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli, without its being incorporated into the bacterial membrane fraction. In our strategy, the majority of the protein was expressed as insoluble inclusion body in the E. coli cytoplasm, the protein was dissolved by denaturation in 8M urea, refolded, and purified to homogeneity in presence of detergent. Our strategy allowed isolation of the recombinant OmpU protein with significantly enhanced yield as compared to that of the wild type protein extracted from the V. cholerae membrane fraction. The recombinant V. cholerae OmpU protein generated in our study displayed functional channel-forming property in the synthetic liposome membrane, thus confirming its 'porin'-property. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing an efficient refolding and functional assembly of the V. cholerae OmpU porin recombinantly expressed as inclusion body in the cytoplasm of a heterologous host E. coli.

  3. A Supercomplex Spanning the Inner and Outer Membranes Mediates the Biogenesis of β-Barrel Outer Membrane Proteins in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Rui; Jin, Feng; Liu, Yang; Yu, Jiayu; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2016-08-01

    β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are ubiquitously present in Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts, and function in a variety of biological processes. The mechanism by which the hydrophobic nascent β-barrel OMPs are transported through the hydrophilic periplasmic space in bacterial cells remains elusive. Here, mainly via unnatural amino acid-mediated in vivo photo-crosslinking studies, we revealed that the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA interacts with nascent β-barrel OMPs largely via its N-domain but with β-barrel assembly machine protein BamA mainly via its satellite P2 domain, and that the nascent β-barrel OMPs interact with SurA via their N- and C-terminal regions. Additionally, via dual in vivo photo-crosslinking, we demonstrated the formation of a ternary complex involving β-barrel OMP, SurA, and BamA in cells. More importantly, we found that a supercomplex spanning the inner and outer membranes and involving the BamA, BamB, SurA, PpiD, SecY, SecE, and SecA proteins appears to exist in living cells, as revealed by a combined analyses of sucrose-gradient ultra-centrifugation, Blue native PAGE and mass spectrometry. We propose that this supercomplex integrates the translocation, transportation, and membrane insertion events for β-barrel OMP biogenesis.

  4. A Supercomplex Spanning the Inner and Outer Membranes Mediates the Biogenesis of β-Barrel Outer Membrane Proteins in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Rui; Jin, Feng; Liu, Yang; Yu, Jiayu; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2016-08-01

    β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are ubiquitously present in Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts, and function in a variety of biological processes. The mechanism by which the hydrophobic nascent β-barrel OMPs are transported through the hydrophilic periplasmic space in bacterial cells remains elusive. Here, mainly via unnatural amino acid-mediated in vivo photo-crosslinking studies, we revealed that the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA interacts with nascent β-barrel OMPs largely via its N-domain but with β-barrel assembly machine protein BamA mainly via its satellite P2 domain, and that the nascent β-barrel OMPs interact with SurA via their N- and C-terminal regions. Additionally, via dual in vivo photo-crosslinking, we demonstrated the formation of a ternary complex involving β-barrel OMP, SurA, and BamA in cells. More importantly, we found that a supercomplex spanning the inner and outer membranes and involving the BamA, BamB, SurA, PpiD, SecY, SecE, and SecA proteins appears to exist in living cells, as revealed by a combined analyses of sucrose-gradient ultra-centrifugation, Blue native PAGE and mass spectrometry. We propose that this supercomplex integrates the translocation, transportation, and membrane insertion events for β-barrel OMP biogenesis. PMID:27298319

  5. Outer-membrane translocation of bulky small molecules by passive diffusion

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bert; Prathyusha Bhamidimarri, Satya; Dahyabhai Prajapati, Jigneshkumar; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria forms a protective layer around the cell that serves as a permeability barrier to prevent unrestricted access of noxious substances. The permeability barrier of the OM results partly from the limited pore diameters of OM diffusion channels. As a consequence, there is an “OM size-exclusion limit,” and the uptake of bulky molecules with molecular masses of more than ∼600 Da is thought to be mediated by TonB-dependent, active transporters. Intriguingly, the OM protein CymA from Klebsiella oxytoca does not depend on TonB but nevertheless mediates efficient OM passage of cyclodextrins with diameters of up to ∼15 Å. Here we show, by using X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and single-channel electrophysiology, that CymA forms a monomeric 14-stranded β-barrel with a large pore that is occluded on the periplasmic side by the N-terminal 15 residues of the protein. Representing a previously unidentified paradigm in OM transport, CymA mediates the passive diffusion of bulky molecules via an elegant transport mechanism in which a mobile element formed by the N terminus acts as a ligand-expelled gate to preserve the permeability barrier of the OM. PMID:26015567

  6. Study of effect of substitution of the penultimate amino acid residue on expression, structure, and functional properties of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis OmpY porin.

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, T F; Tischenko, N M; Khomenko, V A; Portnyagina, O Y; Kim, N Y; Likhatskaya, G N; Novikova, O D; Isaeva, M P

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the expression of two Yersinia pseudotuberculosis proteins, wild-type porin OmpY and the mutant porin OmpY designated as OmpY-Q having the uncharged amino acid residue Gln instead of positively charged Arg at the penultimate position in the same heterologous host. According to the literature, a similar substitution (Lys to Gln) of the penultimate amino acid residue in Neisseria meningitidis porin PorA drastically improved the assembly of the protein in the E. coli outer membrane in vivo. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Arg by Gln (R338Q) in OmpY, and the conditions for optimal expression and maturation of OmpY-Q were selected. It was found that the growth rates of E. coli strains producing OmpY and OmpY-Q and the expression levels of the porins were approximately equal. Comparative analysis of recombinant OmpY and OmpY-Q did not show significant differences in structure, antigenic, and functional properties of the porins, or any noticeable effect of the R338Q substitution in OmpY on its assembly in the E. coli outer membrane in vivo. The probable causes of discrepancies between our results and the previous data on porin PorA are discussed considering the known mechanisms of biogenesis of porins at the periplasmic stage.

  7. Gram-negative outer membrane vesicles: beyond the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    MASHBURN-WARREN, L.; MCLEAN, R. J. C.; WHITELEY, M.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable interest has recently mounted regarding the biological roles of Gram-negative outer membrane vesicles (MVs). The first discovery of MVs was made over four decades ago, and it is now clear that most Gram-negative bacteria produce MVs, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli as the most extensively studied. Much of our knowledge of the biological roles of MVs and mechanism of MV formation is due to T.J. Beveridge and colleagues. Beveridge pioneered the field of MV research not only by enhancing our understanding of MV function, but also through the application of a wide variety of physical, chemical, and genetic techniques to complement his elegant electron microscopy investigations. Here we review the contributions of Beveridge’s group to our understanding of MV biology. PMID:18459967

  8. Release of outer membrane vesicles from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Hozbor, D; Rodriguez, M E; Fernández, J; Lagares, A; Guiso, N; Yantorno, O

    1999-05-01

    The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the production of Bordetella pertussis outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Numerous vesicles released from cells grown in Stainer-Scholte liquid medium were observed. The formation of similar vesicle-like structures could also be artificially induced by sonication of concentrated bacterial suspensions. Immunoblot analysis showed that OMVs contain adenylate cyclase-hemolysin (AC-Hly), among other polypeptides, as well as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Experiments carried out employing purified AC-Hly and OMVs isolated from B. pertussis AC-Hly- showed that AC-Hly is an integral component of the vesicles. OMVs reported here contain several protective immunogens and might be considered a possible basic material for the development of acellular pertussis vaccines.

  9. Supramolecular assemblies underpin turnover of outer membrane proteins in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rassam, Patrice; Copeland, Nikki A.; Birkholz, Oliver; Tóth, Csaba; Chavent, Matthieu; Duncan, Anna L.; Cross, Stephen J.; Housden, Nicholas G.; Kaminska, Renata; Seger, Urban; Quinn, Diana M.; Garrod, Tamsin J.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Piehler, Jacob; Baumann, Christoph G.; Kleanthous, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria inhabit a broad range of ecological niches. For Escherichia coli, this includes river water as well as humans and animals where it can be both a commensal and a pathogen1–3. Intricate regulatory mechanisms ensure bacteria have the right complement of β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) to enable adaptation to a particular habitat4,5. Yet no mechanism is known for replacing OMPs in the outer membrane (OM), a biological enigma further confounded by the lack of an energy source and the high stability6 and abundance of OMPs5. Here, we uncover the process underpinning OMP turnover in E. coli and show it to be passive and binary in nature wherein old OMPs are displaced to the poles of growing cells as new OMPs take their place. Using fluorescent colicins as OMP-specific probes, in combination with ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy in vivo and in vitro, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we established the mechanism for binary OMP partitioning. OMPs clustered to form islands of ~0.5 μm diameter where their diffusion was restricted by promiscuous interactions with other OMPs. OMP islands were distributed throughout the cell and contained the Bam complex, which catalyses the insertion of OMPs in the OM7,8. However, OMP biogenesis occurred as a gradient that was highest at mid-cell but largely absent at cell poles. The cumulative effect is to push old OMP islands towards the poles of growing cells, leading to a binary distribution when cells divide. Hence the OM of a Gram-negative bacterium is a spatially and temporally organised structure and this organisation lies at the heart of how OMPs are turned over in the membrane. PMID:26061769

  10. Salmonella porins induce a sustained, lifelong specific bactericidal antibody memory response

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Ismael; López-Macías, Constantino; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ríos-Sarabia, Nora; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Angel Villasis-Keever, Miguel; Becker, Ingeborg; Luis Puente, José; Calva, Edmundo; Isibasi, Armando

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of porins from Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to induce a long-term antibody response in BALB/c mice. These porins triggered a strong lifelong production of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody in the absence of exogenous adjuvant. Analysis of the IgG subclasses produced during this antibody response revealed the presence of the subclasses IgG2b, IgG1, IgG2a and weak IgG3. Despite the high homology of porins, the long-lasting anti-S. typhi porin sera did not cross-react with S. typhimurium. Notably, the antiporin sera showed a sustained lifelong bactericidal-binding activity to the wild-type S. typhi strain, whereas porin-specific antibody titres measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) decreased with time. Because our porin preparations contained the outer membrane proteins C and F (OmpC and OmpF), we evaluated the individual contribution of each porin to the long-lasting antibody response. OmpC and OmpF induced long-lasting antibody titres, measured by ELISA, which were sustained for 300 days. In contrast, although OmpC induced sustained high bactericidal antibody titres for 300 days, postimmunization, the bactericidal antibody titre induced by OmpF was not detected at day 180. These results indicate that OmpC is the main protein responsible for the antibody-mediated memory bactericidal response induced by porins. Taken together, our results show that porins are strong immunogens that confer lifelong specific bactericidal antibody responses in the absence of added adjuvant. PMID:16423041

  11. Porin channels in Escherichia coli: studies with beta-lactams in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, H; Rosenberg, E Y; Foulds, J

    1983-01-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli K-12 produces two porins, OmpF (protein 1a) and OmpC (protein 1b). In mutants deficient in both of these "normal" porins, secondary mutants that produce a "new" porin, protein PhoE (protein E), are selected for. We determined the properties of the channels produced by each of these porins by measuring the rates of diffusion of various cephalosporins through the outer membrane in strains producing only one porin species. We found that all porin channels retarded the diffusion of more hydrophobic cephalosporins and that with monoanionic cephalosporins a 10-fold increase in the octanol-water partition coefficient of the solute produced a 5- to 6-fold decrease in the rate of penetration. Electrical charges of the solutes had different effects on different channels. Thus, with the normal porins (i.e., OmpF and OmpC proteins) additional negative charge drastically reduced the penetration rate through the channels, whereas additional positive charge significantly accelerated the penetration. In contrast, diffusion through the PhoE channel was unaffected by the presence of an additional negative charge. We hypothesize that the relative exclusion of hydrophobic and negatively charged solutes by normal porin channels is of ecological advantage to E. coli, which must exclude hydrophobic and anionic bile salts in its natural habitat. The properties of the PhoE porin are also consistent with the recent finding (M. Argast and W. Boos, J. Bacteriol. 143:142-150, 1980; J. Tommassen and B. Lugtenberg, J. Bacteriol. 143:151-157, 1980) that its biosynthesis is derepressed by phosphate starvation; the channel may thus act as an emergency pore primarily for the uptake of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds. Images PMID:6294048

  12. How β-Lactam Antibiotics Enter Bacteria: A Dialogue with the Porins

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Alexander; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Bessonov, Andrey N.; Winterhalter, Mathias; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide. This study investigates membrane translocation, which is the first step required for drug action on internal bacterial targets. β-lactams, a major antibiotic class, use porins to pass through the outer membrane barrier of Gram-negative bacteria. Clinical reports have linked the MDR phenotype to altered membrane permeability including porin modification and efflux pump expression. Methodology/Principal Findings Here influx of β-lactams through the major Enterobacter aerogenes porin Omp36 is characterized. Conductance measurements through a single Omp36 trimer reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer allowed us to count the passage of single β-lactam molecules. Statistical analysis of each transport event yielded the kinetic parameters of antibiotic travel through Omp36 and distinguishable translocation properties of β-lactams were quantified for ertapenem and cefepime. Expression of Omp36 in an otherwise porin-null bacterial strain is shown to confer increases in the killing rate of these antibiotics and in the corresponding bacterial susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance We propose the idea of a molecular “passport” that allows rapid transport of substrates through porins. Deciphering antibiotic translocation provides new insights for the design of novel drugs that may be highly effective at passing through the porin constriction zone. Such data may hold the key for the next generation of antibiotics capable of rapid intracellular accumulation to circumvent the further development MDR infections. PMID:19434239

  13. Imipenem- and meropenem-resistant mutants of Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus rettgeri lack porins.

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, A; Traverso, A; Nikaido, H

    1991-01-01

    Carbapenems such as imipenem and meropenem are not rapidly hydrolyzed by commonly occurring beta-lactamases. Nevertheless, it was possible, by mutagenesis and selection, to isolate mutant strains of Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus rettgeri that are highly resistant to meropenem and imipenem. Two alterations were noted in the E. cloacae mutants. First, the mutant strains appeared to be strongly derepressed in the production of beta-lactamases, which reached a very high level when the strains were grown in the presence of imipenem. Second, these mutants were deficient in the production of nonspecific porins, as judged by the pattern of outer membrane proteins as well as by reconstitution assays of permeability. As with most porin-deficient mutants, their cultures were unstable, and their cultivation in the absence of carbapenems rapidly led to an overgrowth of porin-producing revertants. Analysis of the data suggests that the synergism between the lowered outer membrane permeability and the slow but significant hydrolysis of carbapenems by the overproduced enzymes can explain the resistance phenotypes quantitatively, although the possibility of alteration of the target cannot be excluded at present. With P. rettgeri mutants, there was no indication of further derepression of beta-lactamase, but the enzyme hydrolyzed imipenem much more efficiently than the E. cloacae enzyme did. In addition, the major porin was absent in one mutant strain. These results suggest that a major factor for the carbapenem resistance of these enteric bacteria is the porin deficiency, and this conclusion forms a contrast to the situation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in which the most prevalent class of imipenem-resistant mutants appears to lack the specific channel protein D2 yet retains the major nonspecific porin F. Images PMID:1656855

  14. New Findings Concerning Vertebrate Porin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinnes, Friedrich P.; Reymann, Susanne

    Eukaryotic porin can be considered to be a good candidate for forming the channel component of the protein complex which, depending on the approach used, may realize its expression either as the outwardly-rectifying depolarization-induced chloride channel or as the volume-sensitive organic osmolyte-anion channel. As a basis for this proposition, we point to a series of correspondences in properties between mammalian porin and the ORDIC channel complex. Specifically, mammalian porin is expressed in the plasmalemma of different cells and chloride channels can be blocked by anti-human porin antibodies in astrocytes and endothelial cells. There is an indication of colocalisation of human porin and the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, CFTR, in the apical region of epithelial cells. The primary structure of porin from a CF patient was found to be normal. Cytosol and amniotic fluid fractions influence the channel characteristics of mammalian porin. Channel-active mammalian porin binds ATP and the stilbene disulphonate grouping of the chloride channel inhibitor DIDS. Human porin in black membranes is a pathway for taurine, and biogenic polyamines reduce the voltage dependence of human porin. Assuming the relationship between human porin and the ORDIC channel/VSOAC complex, studies on plasmalemma-integrated human porin have a relevance for CF research. In addition, we refer to a case study on a child with encephalomyopathy in which porin could not be detected using monoclonal anti-human porin antibodies. Our studies were based on purified and sequenced human porin from different cells and from different cell compartments. In addition, we raised antibodies against mature human porin or synthetic parts of the molecule. This provided a firm foundation for our topochemical work with which we were able to establish the multi-topological expression of eukaryotic porin channels. The data are summarized and discussed.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Enteritidis Strains with Different Sensitivity to Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Bartłomiej; Krzyżewska, Eva; Kapczyńska, Katarzyna; Rybka, Jacek; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Korzekwa, Kamila; Klausa, Elżbieta; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Differential analysis of outer membrane composition of S. Enteritidis strains, resistant to 50% normal human serum (NHS) was performed in order to find factors influencing the resistance to higher concentrations of NHS. Ten S. Enteritidis clinical strains, resistant to 50% NHS, all producing very long lipopolysaccharide, were subjected to the challenge of 75% NHS. Five extreme strains: two resistant and three sensitive to 75% NHS, were chosen for the further analysis of outer membrane proteins composition. Substantial differences were found in the levels of particular outer membrane proteins between resistant and sensitive strains, i.e. outer membrane protease E (PgtE) was present mainly in resistant strains, while sensitive strains possessed a high level of flagellar hook-associated protein 2 (FliD) and significantly higher levels of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). PMID:27695090

  16. The presequence pathway is involved in protein sorting to the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Opaliński, Lukasz; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Ellenrieder, Lars; Ieva, Raffaele; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; van der Laan, Martin; Wiedemann, Nils; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains integral α-helical and β-barrel proteins that are imported from the cytosol. The machineries importing β-barrel proteins have been identified, however, different views exist on the import of α-helical proteins. It has been reported that the biogenesis of Om45, the most abundant signal-anchored protein, does not depend on proteinaceous components, but involves direct insertion into the outer membrane. We show that import of Om45 occurs via the translocase of the outer membrane and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane. Assembly of Om45 in the outer membrane involves the MIM machinery. Om45 thus follows a new mitochondrial biogenesis pathway that uses elements of the presequence import pathway to direct a protein to the outer membrane.

  17. Function of the mitochondrial outer membrane as a diffusion barrier in health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gellerich, F N; Trumbeckaite, S; Opalka, J R; Seppet, E; Rasmussen, H N; Neuhoff, C; Zierz, S

    2000-02-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane separates the intermembrane space from the cytosol. The whole exchange of metabolites, cations and information between mitochondria and the cell occurs through the outer membrane. Experimental evidence is reviewed supporting the hypothesis of dynamic ADP compartmentation within the intermembrane space. The outer membrane creates a diffusion barrier for small molecules (adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, creatine etc.) causing rate-dependent concentration gradients as a prerequisite for the action of ADP shuttles via creatine kinases or adenylate kinases. If the outer membrane becomes leaky, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor can be released, leading to apoptosis, and as a bioenergetic consequence the cytosolic phosphorylation potential decreases. Leaky outer membranes can be detected in saponin-skinned fibres with spectrophotometric and oxygraphic methods. This is of special interest in respect to acute impairment of mitochondria during ischaemia/reperfusion.

  18. The lethal cargo of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Berleman, James E; Allen, Simon; Danielewicz, Megan A; Remis, Jonathan P; Gorur, Amita; Cunha, Jack; Hadi, Masood Z; Zusman, David R; Northen, Trent R; Witkowska, H Ewa; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a bacterial micro-predator known for hunting other microbes in a wolf pack-like manner. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in large quantities by M. xanthus and have a highly organized structure in the extracellular milieu, sometimes occurring in chains that link neighboring cells within a biofilm. OMVs may be a vehicle for mediating wolf pack activity by delivering hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics aimed at killing prey microbes. Here, both the protein and small molecule cargo of the OMV and membrane fractions of M. xanthus were characterized and compared. Our analysis indicates a number of proteins that are OMV-specific or OMV-enriched, including several with putative hydrolytic function. Secondary metabolite profiling of OMVs identifies 16 molecules, many associated with antibiotic activities. Several hydrolytic enzyme homologs were identified, including the protein encoded by MXAN_3564 (mepA), an M36 protease homolog. Genetic disruption of mepA leads to a significant reduction in extracellular protease activity suggesting MepA is part of the long-predicted (yet to date undetermined) extracellular protease suite of M. xanthus. PMID:25250022

  19. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  20. Glycoengineered Outer Membrane Vesicles: A Novel Platform for Bacterial Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Price, Nancy L.; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Nothaft, Harald; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Szymanski, Christine M.; Segura, Mariela; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization has indicated that we are entering into a post-antibiotic era in which infections that were routinely and successfully treated with antibiotics can now be lethal due to the global dissemination of multidrug resistant strains. Conjugate vaccines are an effective way to create a long-lasting immune response against bacteria. However, these vaccines present many drawbacks such as slow development, high price, and batch-to-batch inconsistencies. Alternate approaches for vaccine development are urgently needed. Here we present a new vaccine consisting of glycoengineered outer membrane vesicles (geOMVs). This platform exploits the fact that the initial steps in the biosynthesis of most bacterial glycans are similar. Therefore, it is possible to easily engineer non-pathogenic Escherichia coli lab strains to produce geOMVs displaying the glycan of the pathogen of interest. In this work we demonstrate the versatility of this platform by showing the efficacy of geOMVs as vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae in mice, and against Campylobacter jejuni in chicken. This cost-effective platform could be employed to generate vaccines to prevent infections caused by a wide variety of microbial agents in human and animals. PMID:27103188

  1. The lethal cargo of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Berleman, James E.; Allen, Simon; Danielewicz, Megan A.; Remis, Jonathan P.; Gorur, Amita; Cunha, Jack; Hadi, Masood Z.; Zusman, David R.; Northen, Trent R.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a bacterial micro-predator known for hunting other microbes in a wolf pack-like manner. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in large quantities by M. xanthus and have a highly organized structure in the extracellular milieu, sometimes occurring in chains that link neighboring cells within a biofilm. OMVs may be a vehicle for mediating wolf pack activity by delivering hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics aimed at killing prey microbes. Here, both the protein and small molecule cargo of the OMV and membrane fractions of M. xanthus were characterized and compared. Our analysis indicates a number of proteins that are OMV-specific or OMV-enriched, including several with putative hydrolytic function. Secondary metabolite profiling of OMVs identifies 16 molecules, many associated with antibiotic activities. Several hydrolytic enzyme homologs were identified, including the protein encoded by MXAN_3564 (mepA), an M36 protease homolog. Genetic disruption of mepA leads to a significant reduction in extracellular protease activity suggesting MepA is part of the long-predicted (yet to date undetermined) extracellular protease suite of M. xanthus. PMID:25250022

  2. Outer membrane vesicles - offensive weapons or good Samaritans?

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; Amano, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Gram-negative bacteria were first considered as artifacts and were followed with disbelief and bad reputation. Later, their existence was accepted and they became characterized as bacterial bombs, virulence bullets, and even decoys. Today, we know that OMVs also can be involved in cell-cell signaling/communication and be mediators of immune regulation and cause disease protection. Furthermore, OMVs represent a distinct bacterial secretion pathway selecting and protecting their cargo, and they can even be good Samaritans providing nutrients to the gut microbiota maintaining commensal homeostasis beneficial to the host. The versatility in functions of these nanostructures is remarkable and includes both defense and offense. The broad spectrum of usability does not stop with that, as it now seems that OMVs can be used as vaccines and adjuvants or vehicles engineered for drug treatment of emerging and new diseases not only caused by bacteria but also by virus. They may even represent new ways of selective drug treatment.

  3. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development

    PubMed Central

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that, within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid’s light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible program of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called hemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin (TCT) release by the symbionts, which can induce hemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that hemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. PMID:26399913

  4. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development.

    PubMed

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid's light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible programme of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called haemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin released by the symbionts, which can induce haemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that haemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host's detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. PMID:26399913

  5. Cell outer membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liang, Fei; Kong, Lingheng; Zheng, Lina; Fan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A negatively charged copolymer poly (MPC-co-AMPS) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-acrylamide-2-methyl propane sulfonic acid (AMPS) was designed and synthesized. Chitosan nanoparticles with cell outer membrane mimetic structure were prepared by electrostatic interaction between the sulfonic acid groups of poly (MPC-co-AMPS) and the protonated amino groups of chitosan. Effects of factors on influencing the particle size, distribution, and stability were investigated. The experimental results showed that cell membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles with controllable and homogeneous size ranged from 100 to 300 nm were prepared at the concentration of 0.1-2.0 mg/mL and the charge ratio of 0.5-1.1. Chitosan nanoparticles prepared can exist stably for more than 45 days when placed at 4 °C and pH < 7.5. The cytotoxicity of the chitosan nanoparticles reduced significantly after surface modification with cell membrane mimetic structure, meeting the basic requirements of biomedical materials. The results suggest cell membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles prepared with polyanion and polycation obtain good biological compatibility and immune stealth ability, which has important academic significance and great application prospects.

  6. Regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis by outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Typas, Athanasios; Banzhaf, Manuel; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Verheul, Jolanda; Biboy, Jacob; Nichols, Robert J.; Zietek, Matylda; Beilharz, Katrin; Kannenberg, Kai; von Rechenberg, Moritz; Breukink, Eefjan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Gross, Carol A.; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2011-01-01

    Summary Growth of the meshlike peptidoglycan (PG) sacculus located between the bacterial inner and outer membranes (OM) is tightly regulated to ensure cellular integrity, maintain cell shape and orchestrate division. Cytoskeletal elements direct placement and activity of PG synthases from inside the cell but precise spatiotemporal control over this process is poorly understood. We demonstrate that PG synthases are also controlled from outside the sacculus. Two OM lipoproteins, LpoA and LpoB, are essential for the function respectively of PBP1A and PBP1B, the major E. coli bifunctional PG synthases. Each Lpo protein binds specifically to its cognate PBP and stimulates its transpeptidase activity, thereby facilitating attachment of new PG to the sacculus. LpoB shows partial septal localization and our data suggest that the LpoB-PBP1B complex contributes to OM constriction during cell division. LpoA/ LpoB and their PBP docking regions are restricted to γ-proteobacteria, providing models for niche-specific regulation of sacculus growth. PMID:21183073

  7. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end

    PubMed Central

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  8. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology.

  9. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  10. MicL, a new σE-dependent sRNA, combats envelope stress by repressing synthesis of Lpp, the major outer membrane lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Monica S.; Updegrove, Taylor B.; Gogol, Emily B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Gross, Carol A.; Storz, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, the transcription factor σE maintains membrane homeostasis by inducing synthesis of proteins involved in membrane repair and two small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that down-regulate synthesis of abundant membrane porins. Here, we describe the discovery of a third σE-dependent sRNA, MicL (mRNA-interfering complementary RNA regulator of Lpp), transcribed from a promoter located within the coding sequence of the cutC gene. MicL is synthesized as a 308-nucleotide (nt) primary transcript that is processed to an 80-nt form. Both forms possess features typical of Hfq-binding sRNAs but surprisingly target only a single mRNA, which encodes the outer membrane lipoprotein Lpp, the most abundant protein of the cell. We show that the copper sensitivity phenotype previously ascribed to inactivation of the cutC gene is actually derived from the loss of MicL and elevated Lpp levels. This observation raises the possibility that other phenotypes currently attributed to protein defects are due to deficiencies in unappreciated regulatory RNAs. We also report that σE activity is sensitive to Lpp abundance and that MicL and Lpp comprise a new σE regulatory loop that opposes membrane stress. Together MicA, RybB, and MicL allow σE to repress the synthesis of all abundant outer membrane proteins in response to stress. PMID:25030700

  11. Klebsiella pneumoniae O antigen loss alters the outer membrane protein composition and the selective packaging of proteins into secreted outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Bethaney K; Seeley, Kent W; Gutel, Dedra; Ellis, Terri N

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a nosocomial pathogen which naturally secretes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cell envelope associated proteins into the environment through the production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The loss of the LPS O antigen has been demonstrated in other bacterial species to significantly alter the composition of OMVs. Therefore, this study aimed to comprehensively analyze the impact of O antigen loss on the sub-proteomes of both the outer membrane and secreted OMVs from K. pneumoniae. As determined by LC-MS/MS, OMVs were highly enriched with outer membrane proteins involved in cell wall, membrane, and envelope biogenesis as compared to the source cellular outer membrane. Deletion of wbbO, the enzyme responsible for O antigen attachment to LPS, decreased but did not eliminate this enrichment effect. Additionally, loss of O antigen resulted in OMVs with increased numbers of proteins involved in post-translational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones as compared to secreted vesicles from the wild type. This alteration of OMV composition may be a compensatory mechanism to deal with envelope stress. This comprehensive analysis confirms the highly distinct protein composition of OMVs as compared to their source membrane, and provides evidence for a selective sorting mechanism that involves LPS polysaccharides. These data support the hypothesis that modifications to LPS alters both the mechanics of protein sorting and the contents of secreted OMVs and significantly impacts the protein composition of the outer membrane.

  12. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular

  13. Delivery of foreign antigens by engineered outer membrane vesicle vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chen, David J; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Metzger, Stephan M; Buckles, Elizabeth; Doody, Anne M; DeLisa, Matthew P; Putnam, David

    2010-02-16

    As new disease threats arise and existing pathogens grow resistant to conventional interventions, attention increasingly focuses on the development of vaccines to induce protective immune responses. Given their admirable safety records, protein subunit vaccines are attractive for widespread immunization, but their disadvantages include poor immunogenicity and expensive manufacture. We show here that engineered Escherichia coli outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are an easily purified vaccine-delivery system capable of greatly enhancing the immunogenicity of a low-immunogenicity protein antigen without added adjuvants. Using green-fluorescent protein (GFP) as the model subunit antigen, genetic fusion of GFP with the bacterial hemolysin ClyA resulted in a chimeric protein that elicited strong anti-GFP antibody titers in immunized mice, whereas immunization with GFP alone did not elicit such titers. Harnessing the specific secretion of ClyA to OMVs, the ClyA-GFP fusion was found localized in OMVs, resulting in engineered recombinant OMVs. The anti-GFP humoral response in mice immunized with the engineered OMV formulations was indistinguishable from the response to the purified ClyA-GFP fusion protein alone and equal to purified proteins absorbed to aluminum hydroxide, a standard adjuvant. In a major improvement over current practice, engineered OMVs containing ClyA-GFP were easily isolated by ultracentrifugation, effectively eliminating the need for laborious antigen purification from cell-culture expression systems. With the diverse collection of heterologous proteins that can be functionally localized with OMVs when fused with ClyA, this work signals the possibility of OMVs as a robust and tunable technology platform for a new generation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:20133740

  14. Structural biology of membrane-intrinsic β-barrel enzymes: Sentinels of the bacterial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    The outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria are replete with integral membrane proteins that exhibit antiparallel β-barrel structures, but very few of these proteins function as enzymes. In Escherichia coli, only three β-barrel enzymes are known to exist in the outer membrane; these are the phospholipase OMPLA, the protease OmpT, and the phospholipid::lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP, all of which have been characterized at the structural level. Structural details have also emerged for the outer membrane β-barrel enzyme PagL, a lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lipid A can be further modified in the outer membrane by two β-barrel enzymes of unknown structure; namely, the Salmonella enterica 3′-acyloxyacyl hydrolase LpxR, and the Rhizobium leguminosarum oxidase LpxQ, which employs O2 to convert the proximal glucosamine unit of lipid A into 2-aminogluconate. Structural biology now indicates how β-barrel enzymes can function as sentinels that remain dormant when the outer membrane permeability barrier is intact. Host immune defenses and antibiotics that perturb this barrier can directly trigger β-barrel enzymes in the outer membrane. The ensuing adaptive responses occur instantaneously and rapidly outpace other signal transduction mechanisms that similarly function to restore the outer membrane permeability barrier. PMID:17880914

  15. Cell envelope of Bordetella pertussis: immunological and biochemical analyses and characterization of a major outer membrane porin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Surface molecules of Bordetella pertussis which may be important in metabolism, pathogenesis, and immunity to whooping cough were examined using cell fractionation and /sup 125/I cell surface labeling. Antigenic envelope proteins were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting procedures using monoclonal antibodies and convalescent sera. A surface protein with a high M/sub r/, missing in a mutant lacking the filamentous hemagglutinin, was identified in virulent Bordetella pertussis but was absent in virulent B. pertussis strains. At least three envelope proteins were found only in virulent B. pertussis strains and were absent or diminished in avirulent and most phenotypically modulated strains. Transposon-induced mutants unable to produce hemolysin, dermonecrotic toxin, pertussis toxin, and filamentous hemagglutinin also lacked these three envelope proteins, confirming that virulence-associated envelope proteins were genetically regulated with other virulence-associated traits. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed at least five heat modifiable proteins which migrated as higher or lower M/sub r/ moieties if solubilized at 25/sup 0/C instead of 100/sup 0/C.

  16. Protein–protein interactions and the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kleanthous, Colin; Rassam, Patrice; Baumann, Christoph G

    2015-01-01

    It has until recently been unclear whether outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria are organized or distributed randomly. Studies now suggest promiscuous protein–protein interactions (PPIs) between β-barrel OMPs in Escherichia coli govern their local and global dynamics, engender spatiotemporal patterning of the outer membrane into micro-domains and are the basis of β-barrel protein turnover. We contextualize these latest advances, speculate on areas of bacterial cell biology that might be influenced by the organization of OMPs into supramolecular assemblies, and highlight the new questions and controversies this revised view of the bacterial outer membrane raises. PMID:26629934

  17. Beef-heart submitochondrial particles: a mixture of mitochondrial inner and outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Albracht, S P; Heidrich, H G

    1975-02-17

    1. EPR spectra at 9 GHz and 83 degrees K of NADH-reduced anaerobic beef-heart submitochondrial particles, prepared from mitochondria by sonication and centrifugation, contain a signal (gz equals to 2.01, gy equals to 1.94, gx equals to 1.89) due to an iron-sulphur center of the mitochondrial outer membrane. 2. The ratio of inner and outer membranes in submitochondrial particles is not greatly different from that in beef-heart mitochondria. 3. Beef-heart submitochondrial particles free from outer-membrane contamination have been prepared by free-flow electrophoresis. EPR spectra at 83 degrees K of such particles are presented.

  18. An adaptive response of Enterobacter aerogenes to imipenem: regulation of porin balance in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Sotto, Albert; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Bouziges, Nicole; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Davin-Regli, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Imipenem (IPM) is a carbapenem antibiotic frequently used in severe hospital infections. Several reports have mentioned the emergence of resistant isolates exhibiting membrane modifications. A study was conducted between September 2005 and August 2007 to survey infections due to Enterobacter aerogenes in patients hospitalised in a French university hospital. Resistant E. aerogenes clinical isolates obtained from patients treated with IPM and collected during the 3 months following initiation of treatment were phenotypically and molecularly characterised for β-lactamases, efflux pumps activity and outer membrane proteins. Among the 339 patients infected with E. aerogenes during the study period, 41 isolates (12.1%) were resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and 17 patients (5.0%) were treated with IPM. The isolates from these 17 patients presented TEM-24 and basal efflux expression. Following IPM treatment, an IPM-intermediate-susceptible (IPM-I) isolate emerged in 11 patients and an IPM-resistant (IPM-R) isolate in 6 patients. A change in the porin balance (Omp35/Omp36) was observed in IPM-I isolates exhibiting ertapenem resistance. Finally, a porin deficiency (Omp35 and Omp36 absence) was detected in IPM-R isolates associated with efflux pump expression. This study indicates that the alteration in porin expression, including the shift of porin expression and lack of porins, contribute to the E. aerogenes adaptive response to IPM treatment.

  19. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a 21-kilodalton outer membrane protein from Bordetella avium and expression of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry-Weeks, C R; Hultsch, A L; Kelly, S M; Keith, J M; Curtiss, R

    1992-01-01

    Three gene libraries of Bordetella avium 197 DNA were prepared in Escherichia coli LE392 by using the cosmid vectors pCP13 and pYA2329, a derivative of pCP13 specifying spectinomycin resistance. The cosmid libraries were screened with convalescent-phase anti-B. avium turkey sera and polyclonal rabbit antisera against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. One E. coli recombinant clone produced a 56-kDa protein which reacted with convalescent-phase serum from a turkey infected with B. avium 197. In addition, five E. coli recombinant clones were identified which produced B. avium outer membrane proteins with molecular masses of 21, 38, 40, 43, and 48 kDa. At least one of these E. coli clones, which encoded the 21-kDa protein, reacted with both convalescent-phase turkey sera and antibody against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. The gene for the 21-kDa outer membrane protein was localized by Tn5seq1 mutagenesis, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by dideoxy sequencing. DNA sequence analysis of the 21-kDa protein revealed an open reading frame of 582 bases that resulted in a predicted protein of 194 amino acids. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the gene encoding the 21-kDa outer membrane protein with protein sequences in the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence data base indicated significant homology to the OmpA proteins of Shigella dysenteriae, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella typhimurium and to Neisseria gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein III, Haemophilus influenzae protein P6, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin protein F. The gene (ompA) encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein hybridized with 4.1-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and with 6.0- and 3.2-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of B. avium and B. avium-like DNA, respectively. A 6.75-kb DNA fragment encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein was subcloned into the

  20. Mitochondrial outer membrane forms bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are double-membrane organelles that move around and change their shapes dynamically. In plants, the dynamics of the outer membrane is not well understood. We recently demonstrated that mitochondria had tubular protrusions of the outer membrane with little or no matrix, called MOPs (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs). Here we show that a MOP can form a bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana. The bridge does not appear to involve the inner membranes. Live imaging revealed stretching of the MOP bridge, demonstrating the flexibility of the outer membrane. Mitochondria frequently undergo fission and fusion. These observations raise the possibility that MOPs bridges have a role in these processes. PMID:27031262

  1. Salmonellae PhoPQ regulation of the outer membrane to resist innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Miller, Samuel I

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellae sense host cues to regulate properties important for bacterial survival and replication within host tissues. The PhoPQ two-component regulatory system senses phagosome acidification and cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) to regulate the protein and lipid contents of the bacterial envelope that comprises an inner and outer membrane. PhoPQ-regulated lipid components of the outer membrane include lipopolysaccharides and glycerophospholipids. Envelope proteins regulated by PhoPQ, include: components of virulence associated secretion systems, the flagellar apparatus, membrane transport systems, and proteins that are likely structural components of the outer membrane. PhoPQ alteration of the bacterial surface results in increased bacterial resistance to CAMP and decreased detection by the innate immune system. This review details the molecular complexity of the bacterial cell envelope and highlights the outer membrane lipid bilayer as an environmentally regulated bacterial organelle.

  2. Methods of isolation and purification of outer membrane vesicles from gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Klimentová, Jana; Stulík, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles secreted by gram-negative bacteria play an important role in bacterial physiology as well as in virulence and host-pathogen interaction. Isolated vesicles of some bacteria have also been studied for their immunomodulatory potential in the vaccine development. However, the production of vesicles in sufficient amount, purity and reproducibility remains a critical challenge for subsequent analyses in most bacteria. In the present review methods of production, isolation, purification and quantification of outer membrane vesicles are summarized and discussed.

  3. Structure of the oligogalacturonate-specific KdgM porin.

    PubMed

    Hutter, C A J; Lehner, R; Wirth, Ch; Condemine, G; Peneff, C; Schirmer, T

    2014-06-01

    The phytopathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi) feeds on plant cell walls by secreting pectinases and utilizing the oligogalacturanate products. An outer membrane porin, KdgM, is indispensable for the uptake of these acidic oligosaccharides. Here, the crystal structure of KdgM determined to 1.9 Å resolution is presented. KdgM is folded into a regular 12-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a circular cross-section defining a transmembrane pore with a minimal radius of 3.1 Å. Most of the loops that would face the cell exterior in vivo are disordered, but nevertheless mediate contact between densely packed membrane-like layers in the crystal. The channel is lined by two tracks of arginine residues facing each other across the pore, a feature that is conserved within the KdgM family and is likely to facilitate the diffusion of acidic oligosaccharides.

  4. ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). β-Barreled outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins are embedded in the outer membrane. All of these constituents are essential to the function of the outer membrane. The transport systems for lipoproteins have been characterized in detail. An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, LolCDE, initiates sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane to form a water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex in the periplasm. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB at the outer membrane and are incorporated into the lipid bilayer. A model analogous to the Lol system has been suggested for the transport of LPS, where an ABC transporter, LptBFG, mediates the detachment of LPS from the inner membrane. Recent developments in the functional characterization of ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:21670534

  5. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane. PMID:20419407

  6. Interaction between Polyamines and Bacterial Outer Membranes as Investigated with Ion-Selective Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Katsu, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hideki; Yasuda, Keiko

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed the interaction between polyamines and the outer membrane of Escherichia coli cells using potentiometric measurements with Ca2+, tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+), and K+ electrodes. The Ca2+ electrode was used to examine the ability of the polyamines to release Ca2+ from the outer membrane. The TPP+ electrode was used to examine the ability to permeabilize the outer membrane, since the uptake of TPP+ was enhanced when the permeability barrier of the outer membrane was disrupted. The K+ electrode was used to examine permeabilization in the cytoplasmic membrane by monitoring the efflux of K+ in cytosol. Although Ca2+ release was remarkably enhanced by increasing the number of amino groups in polyamines, no TPP+ uptake was observed with polyamines of a simple structure, such as ethylenediamine, spermidine, and spermine. TPP+ uptake was observed when appropriate lipophilic moieties were further attached to the polyamines with three or four amino groups, indicating that the existence of bulky moieties as well as the number of amino groups is important to induce outer membrane permeabilization. Thus, 1-naphthylacetylspermine and N,N′-bis[6-[[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]hexyl]-1,8-octanediamine (methoctramine) were especially effective in increasing the permeability of the outer membrane of E. coli cells, being comparable to polymyxin B nonapeptide, a well-known cationic peptide showing such action. PMID:11897592

  7. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  8. Tied down: tethering redox proteins to the outer membrane in Neisseria and other genera.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Parker, Steven; Deeudom, Manu; Moir, James W

    2011-12-01

    Typically, the redox proteins of respiratory chains in Gram-negative bacteria are localized in the cytoplasmic membrane or in the periplasm. An alternative arrangement appears to be widespread within the betaproteobacterial genus Neisseria, wherein several redox proteins are covalently associated with the outer membrane. In the present paper, we discuss the structural properties of these outer membrane redox proteins and the functional consequences of this attachment. Several tethered outer membrane redox proteins of Neisseria contain a weakly conserved repeated structure between the covalent tether and the redox protein globular domain that should enable the redox cofactor-containing domain to extend from the outer membrane, across the periplasm and towards the inner membrane. It is argued that the constraints imposed on the movement and orientation of the globular domains by these tethers favours the formation of electron-transfer complexes for entropic reasons. The attachment to the outer membrane may also affect the exposure of the host to redox proteins with a moonlighting function in the host-microbe interaction, thus affecting the host response to Neisseria infection. We identify putative outer membrane redox proteins from a number of other bacterial genera outside Neisseria, and suggest that this organizational arrangement may be more common than previously recognized.

  9. Molecular Basis of Filtering Carbapenems by Porins from β-Lactam-resistant Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Harsha; Scorciapino, Mariano A; Moynié, Lucile; Page, Malcolm G P; Naismith, James H; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Integral membrane proteins known as porins are the major pathway by which hydrophilic antibiotics cross the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Single point mutations in porins can decrease the permeability of an antibiotic, either by reduction of channel size or modification of electrostatics in the channel, and thereby confer clinical resistance. Here, we investigate four mutant OmpC proteins from four different clinical isolates of Escherichia coli obtained sequentially from a single patient during a course of antimicrobial chemotherapy. OmpC porin from the first isolate (OmpC20) undergoes three consecutive and additive substitutions giving rise to OmpC26, OmpC28, and finally OmpC33. The permeability of two zwitterionic carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, measured using liposome permeation assays and single channel electrophysiology differs significantly between OmpC20 and OmpC33. Molecular dynamic simulations show that the antibiotics must pass through the constriction zone of porins with a specific orientation, where the antibiotic dipole is aligned along the electric field inside the porin. We identify that changes in the vector of the electric field in the mutated porin, OmpC33, create an additional barrier by "trapping" the antibiotic in an unfavorable orientation in the constriction zone that suffers steric hindrance for the reorientation needed for its onward translocation. Identification and understanding the underlying molecular details of such a barrier to translocation will aid in the design of new antibiotics with improved permeation properties in Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Carbapenem resistance in cystic fibrosis strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a result of amino acid substitutions in porin OprD.

    PubMed

    Richardot, Charlotte; Plésiat, Patrick; Fournier, Damien; Monlezun, Laura; Broutin, Isabelle; Llanes, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the impact of single amino acid substitutions occurring in specific porin OprD on carbapenem resistance of cystic fibrosis (CF) strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A PAO1ΔoprD mutant was complemented with the oprD genes from five carbapenem-resistant CF strains exhibiting very low amounts of mutated OprD porins in their outer membrane despite wild-type levels of oprD transcripts. Compared with wild-type porin from strain PAO1, single amino acid substitutions S403P (in periplasmic loop 8), Y242H, S278P and L345P (in β-sheets 10, 12 and 14, respectively) were found to result in reduced amounts of OprD in the outer membrane, increased carbapenem resistance, and slower growth in minimal medium containing gluconate, an OprD substrate, as the sole source of carbon and energy. This indicates that in CF strains of P. aeruginosa, loss of porin OprD may not only result from mutations downregulating the expression of or disrupting the oprD gene, but also from mutations generating deleterious amino acid substitutions in the porin structure.

  11. A protein export pathway involving Escherichia coli porins.

    PubMed

    Prehna, Gerd; Zhang, Guijin; Gong, Xiandi; Duszyk, Marek; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Weiner, Joel H; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2012-07-01

    Escherichia coli export the protein YebF into the extracellular medium by a two-step process. However, as no general outer membrane protein secretion system common to all E. coli strains has been reported, the mechanism of export has remained unclear. Herein, we identify the outer membrane proteins OmpF, OmpC, and OmpX as central to the YebF export mechanism using both genetic and planar lipid bilayer experiments. The nuclear magnetic resonance structural ensemble of YebF reveals a cystatin-like fold consisting of a structured core and an extended dynamic surface in a state of conformational exchange. This surface, conserved throughout YebF orthologs of Enterobacteriaceae, may facilitate the porin-mediated transport of YebF as amino acid substitutions of dynamic residues reduced secretion to the extracellular medium. Our results demonstrate that OmpF and OmpC not only operate to import ions and protein toxins but may also contribute to the export of the YebF protein family.

  12. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 protein is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brittany K; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa. PMID:25426629

  13. Genomic Analysis Indicates the Presence of an Asymmetric Bilayer Outer Membrane in Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia

    PubMed Central

    Speth, Daan R.; van Teeseling, Muriel C. F.; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the phylum Planctomycetes are of special interest for the study of compartmental cellular organization. Members of this phylum share a very unusual prokaryotic cell plan, featuring several membrane-bound compartments. Recently, it was shown that this cellular organization might extend to certain members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia. The Planctomycete cell plan has been defined as featuring a proteinaceous cell wall, a cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the paryphoplasm, and an intracytoplasmic membrane defining the riboplasm. So far it was presumed that Planctomycetes did not have an asymmetric bilayer outer membrane as observed in Gram-negative bacteria. However, recent work on outer membrane biogenesis has provided several marker genes in the outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) insertion complexes. Additionally, advances in computational prediction of OMPs provided new tools to perform more accurate genomic screening for such proteins. Here we searched all 22 Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia genomes available in GenBank, plus the recently published genome of “Candidatus Scalindua profunda,” for markers of outer membrane biogenesis and OMPs. We were able to identify the key components of LPS insertion, OMP assembly and at least eight OMPs in all genomes tested. Additionally, we have analyzed the transcriptome and proteome data of the Planctomycetes “Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis” and “Ca. S. profunda” and could confirm high expression of several predicted OMPs, including the biomarkers of outer membrane biogenesis. These analyses provide a strong indication that an asymmetrical outer membrane may be present in bacteria of both phyla. However, previous experiments have made obvious that the cell envelope of Planctomycetes is clearly divergent from both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive cell types. Thus, the functional implications of the presence of an outer membrane for the Planctomycete cell plan

  14. Structure of the outer membrane complex of a type IV secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Vidya; Fronzes, Rémi; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Cronin, Nora; Navaza, Jorge; Waksman, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Type IV secretion systems are secretion nanomachines spanning the two membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Three proteins, VirB7, VirB9, and VirB10 assemble into a 1.05 MDa core spanning the inner and outer membranes. This core consists of 14 copies of each of the proteins and forms two layers, the I and O layers, inserting in the inner and outer membrane, respectively. Here we present the crystal structure of a ~0.6 MDa outer membrane complex containing the entire O-layer. This structure is the largest determined for an outer membrane channel and is also unprecedented in being composed of three proteins. Unexpectedly, this structure identifies VirB10 as the outer membrane channel with a unique hydrophobic double helical trans-membrane region. This structure establishes VirB10 as the only known protein crossing both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Comparison of the cryo-EM and crystallographic structures point to conformational changes regulating channel opening and closing. PMID:19946264

  15. Presence of methyl sterol and bacteriohopanepolyol in an outer-membrane preparation from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Kato, Katharine; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic/intracytoplasmic and outer membrane preparations of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of a total membrane fraction prepared by disruption using a French pressure cell. The cytoplasmic and/or intracytoplasmic membrane fraction consisted of two distinct bands, Ia and Ib (buoyant densities 1.16 and 1.18 g ml (exp -1), respectively) that together contained 57% of the protein, 68% of the phospholipid, 73% of the ubiquinone and 89% of the CN-sensitive NADH oxidase activity. The only apparent difference between these two cytoplasmic bands was a much higher phospholipid content for Ia. The outer membrane fraction (buoyant density 1.23-1.24 g ml (exp -1)) contained 60% of the lipopolysaccharide-associated, beta-hydroxypalmitic acid, 74% of the methylsterol, and 66% of the bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP); phospholipid to methyl sterol or BHP ratios were 6:1. Methanol dehydrogenase activity and a c-type cytochrome were also present in this outer membrane fraction. Phospholipase A activity was present in borh the cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane fractions. The unique distribution of cyclic triterpenes may reflect a specific role in conferring outer membrane stability in this methanotrophic bacterium.

  16. A novel pathway for outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram‐negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jeeves, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary The understanding of the biogenesis of the outer membrane of Gram‐negative bacteria is of critical importance due to the emergence of bacteria that are becoming resistant to available antibiotics. A problem that is most serious for Gram‐negative bacteria, with essentially few antibiotics under development or likely to be available for clinical use in the near future. The understanding of the Gram‐negative bacterial outer membrane is therefore critical to developing new antimicrobial agents, as this membrane makes direct contact with the external milieu, and the proteins present within this membrane are the instruments of microbial warfare, playing key roles in microbial pathogenesis, virulence and multidrug resistance. To date, a single outer membrane complex has been identified as essential for the folding and insertion of proteins into the outer membrane, this is the β‐barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex, which in some cases is supplemented by the Translocation and Assembly Module (TAM). In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Dunstan et al. have identified a novel pathway for the insertion of a subset of integral membrane proteins into the Gram‐negative outer membrane that is independent of the BAM complex and TAM. PMID:26059329

  17. VCA1008: An Anion-Selective Porin of Vibrio Cholerae.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Carolina L; Bisch, Paulo M; von Krüger, Wanda M A; Homblé, Fabrice

    2015-02-01

    A putative porin function has been assigned to VCA1008 of Vibrio cholerae. Its coding gene, vca1008, is expressed upon colonization of the small intestine in infant mice and human volunteers, and is essential for infection. In vitro, vca1008 is expressed under inorganic phosphate limitation and, in this condition, VCA1008 is the major outer membrane protein of the bacterium. Here, we provide the first functional characterization of VCA1008 reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers. Our main findings were: 1) VCA1008 forms an ion channel that, at high voltage (~±100 mV), presents a voltage-dependent activity and displays closures typical of trimeric porins, with a conductance of 4.28±0.04 nS (n=164) in 1M KCl; 2) It has a preferred selectivity for anions over cations; 3) Its conductance saturates with increasing inorganic phosphate concentration, suggesting VCA1008 contains binding site(s) for this anion; 4) Its ion selectivity is controlled by both fixed charged residues within the channel and diffusion along the pore; 5) Partitioning of poly (ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) of different molecular mass suggests that VCA1008 channel has a pore exclusion limit of 0.9 nm.

  18. Roles of β-Lactamases and Porins in Activities of Carbapenems and Cephalosporins against Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Pascual, Alvaro; Hernández-Allés, Santiago; Alvarez-Díaz, Dolores; Suárez, Ana Isabel; Tran, John; Benedí, Vicente Javier; Jacoby, George A.

    1999-01-01

    Two clinical isolates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were noted to be less susceptible than expected to imipenem. Both were missing outer membrane proteins that serve as channels for antibiotic entry. The role of β-lactamase in resistance was investigated by eliminating the original ESBL and introducing plasmids encoding various ESBLs and AmpC β-lactamase types, by studying the effect of an increased inoculum, and by evaluating interactions with β-lactamase inhibitors. The contribution of porin deficiency was investigated by restoring a functional ompK36 gene on a plasmid. Plasmids encoding AmpC-type β-lactamases provided resistance to imipenem (up to 64 μg/ml) and meropenem (up to 16 μg/ml) in strains deficient in porins. Carbapenem resistance showed little inoculum effect, was not affected by clavulanate but was blocked by BRL 42715, and was diminished if OmpK36 porin was restored. Plasmids encoding TEM- and SHV-type ESBLs conferred resistance to cefepime and cefpirome, as well as to earlier oxyimino-β-lactams. This resistance was magnified with an increased inoculum, was blocked by clavulanate, and was also lowered by OmpK36 porin restoration. In addition, SHV-2 β-lactamase had a small effect on carbapenem resistance (imipenem MIC, 4 μg/ml, increasing to 16 μg/ml with a higher inoculum) when porins were absent. In K. pneumoniae porin loss can thus augment resistance provided either by TEM- or SHV-type ESBLs or by plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes to include the latest oxyimino-β-lactams and carbapenems. PMID:10390220

  19. Crystal structure of the open state of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrE outer membrane channel.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Chou, Tsung-Han; Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Do, Sylvia V; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important strategies used by bacteria to defend against antimicrobial factors present in their environment. Mediating many cases of antibiotic resistance are transmembrane efflux pumps, composed of one or more proteins. The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the hydrophobic and amphiphilic efflux resistance-nodulation-cell division (HAE-RND) family, spans both the inner and outer membranes of N. gonorrhoeae and confers resistance to a variety of antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here describe the crystal structure of N. gonorrhoeae MtrE, the outer membrane component of the MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux system. This trimeric MtrE channel forms a vertical tunnel extending down contiguously from the outer membrane surface to the periplasmic end, indicating that our structure of MtrE depicts an open conformational state of this channel.

  20. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Adam J; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J; Orench-Rivera, Nichole; Schmid, Amy K; Kuehn, Meta J

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli.

  1. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Adam J.; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J.; Orench-Rivera, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli. PMID:26406465

  2. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  3. Crystal structure of the open state of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrE outer membrane channel.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Chou, Tsung-Han; Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Do, Sylvia V; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important strategies used by bacteria to defend against antimicrobial factors present in their environment. Mediating many cases of antibiotic resistance are transmembrane efflux pumps, composed of one or more proteins. The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the hydrophobic and amphiphilic efflux resistance-nodulation-cell division (HAE-RND) family, spans both the inner and outer membranes of N. gonorrhoeae and confers resistance to a variety of antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here describe the crystal structure of N. gonorrhoeae MtrE, the outer membrane component of the MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux system. This trimeric MtrE channel forms a vertical tunnel extending down contiguously from the outer membrane surface to the periplasmic end, indicating that our structure of MtrE depicts an open conformational state of this channel. PMID:24901251

  4. The mechanisms of complement activation in normal bovine serum and normal horse serum against Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 strains with different outer membrane proteins content.

    PubMed

    Miętka, K; Brzostek, K; Guz-Regner, K; Bugla-Płoskońska, G

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a common zoonotic pathogen and facultative intracellular bacterium which can survive within blood cells. Cattle and horses are considered a reservoir of Y. enterocolitica which often causes several serious syndromes associated with yersiniosis such as abortions, premature births or infertility. The aim of our investigation was to determine the vitality of Y. enterocolitica O:9 strains (Ye9) in bovine and horse sera (NBS and NHrS) and explain the role of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in serum resistance of these bacteria. Our previous studies demonstrated moderate human serum (NHS) resistance of the wild type Ye9 strain, whereas mutants lacking YadA, Ail or OmpC remained sensitive to the bactericidal activity of NHS. The present study showed that the wild type of Ye9 strain was resistant to the bactericidal activity of both NHrS and NBS, while Ye9 mutants lacking the YadA, Ail and OmpC proteins were sensitive to NHrS and NBS as well as to NHS. The mechanisms of complement activation against Ye9 strains lacking Ail and YadA were distinguished, i.e. activation of the classical/lectin pathways decisive in the bactericidal mechanism of complement activation of NBS, parallel activation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of NHrS. In this research the mechanism of independent activation of the classical/lectin or the alternative pathway of NBS and NHrS against Ye9 lacking OmpC porin was also established. The results indicate that serum resistance of Ye9 is multifactorial, in which extracellular structures, i.e. outer membrane proteins (OMPs) such as Ail, OmpC or YadA, play the main role. PMID:27096793

  5. Identification of seven surface-exposed Brucella outer membrane proteins by use of monoclonal antibodies: immunogold labeling for electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; de Wergifosse, P; Dubray, G; Limet, J N

    1990-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to seven Brucella outer membrane proteins were characterized. These antibodies were obtained by immunizing mice with sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble (SDS-I) fractions, cell walls, or whole bacterial cells of Brucella abortus or B. melitensis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to screen the hybridoma supernatants and to determine their binding at the surface of rough and smooth B. abortus and B. melitensis cells. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) recognized by these antibodies were the proteins with molecular masses of 25 to 27 kDa and 36 to 38 kDa (porin) (major proteins) and the proteins with molecular masses of 10, 16.5, 19, 31 to 34, and 89 kDa (minor proteins). Surface exposure of these OMPs was visualized by electron microscopy by using the MAbs and immunogold labeling. Binding of the MAbs on whole rough bacterial cells indicates that the 10-, 16.5-, 19-, 25- to 27-, 31- to 34-, 36- to 38-, and 89-kDa OMPs are exposed at the cell surface. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicate a much better binding of the anti-OMP MAbs on rough strains than on the corresponding smooth strains except for the anti-19-kDa MAb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that on smooth B. abortus cells only the 89- and 31- to 34-kDa OMPs were not accessible to the MAbs tested. Binding of the anti-31- to 34-kDa MAb at the cell surface was observed for the rough B. abortus cells and for the rough and smooth B. melitensis cells. These results indicate the importance of steric hindrance due to the presence of the long lipopolysaccharide O side chains in the accessibility of OMPs on smooth Brucella strains and should be considered when undertaking vaccine development. Images PMID:1701417

  6. The mechanisms of complement activation in normal bovine serum and normal horse serum against Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 strains with different outer membrane proteins content.

    PubMed

    Miętka, K; Brzostek, K; Guz-Regner, K; Bugla-Płoskońska, G

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a common zoonotic pathogen and facultative intracellular bacterium which can survive within blood cells. Cattle and horses are considered a reservoir of Y. enterocolitica which often causes several serious syndromes associated with yersiniosis such as abortions, premature births or infertility. The aim of our investigation was to determine the vitality of Y. enterocolitica O:9 strains (Ye9) in bovine and horse sera (NBS and NHrS) and explain the role of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in serum resistance of these bacteria. Our previous studies demonstrated moderate human serum (NHS) resistance of the wild type Ye9 strain, whereas mutants lacking YadA, Ail or OmpC remained sensitive to the bactericidal activity of NHS. The present study showed that the wild type of Ye9 strain was resistant to the bactericidal activity of both NHrS and NBS, while Ye9 mutants lacking the YadA, Ail and OmpC proteins were sensitive to NHrS and NBS as well as to NHS. The mechanisms of complement activation against Ye9 strains lacking Ail and YadA were distinguished, i.e. activation of the classical/lectin pathways decisive in the bactericidal mechanism of complement activation of NBS, parallel activation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of NHrS. In this research the mechanism of independent activation of the classical/lectin or the alternative pathway of NBS and NHrS against Ye9 lacking OmpC porin was also established. The results indicate that serum resistance of Ye9 is multifactorial, in which extracellular structures, i.e. outer membrane proteins (OMPs) such as Ail, OmpC or YadA, play the main role.

  7. Involvement of a 43-kilodalton outer membrane protein in beta-lactam resistance of Shigella dysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Kar, A K; Ghosh, A S; Chauhan, K; Ahamed, J; Basu, J; Chakrabarti, P; Kundu, M

    1997-01-01

    A beta-lactam-sensitive strain (C152) of Shigella dysenteriae showed two major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) with M(r)s of 43,000 and 38,000, while the clinical isolate M2 lacked the 43,000-Mr OMP, which acted as a channel for beta-lactam antibiotics. Permeability of beta-lactams across the outer membrane (OM) of M2 was lower than that across the OM of C152. Mutants deficient in the 43-kDa OMP could be selected in vitro from strain C152 in the presence of cefoxitin. All beta-lactam-resistant strains were sensitive to imipenem. PMID:9333070

  8. Subdominant Outer Membrane Antigens in Anaplasma marginale: Conservation, Antigenicity, and Protective Capacity Using Recombinant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ducken, Deirdre R.; Brown, Wendy C.; Alperin, Debra C.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Reif, Kathryn E.; Turse, Joshua E.; Palmer, Guy H.; Noh, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are several knowledge gaps limiting progress in vaccine development. First, are these OMPs conserved among the diversity of A. marginale strains circulating in endemic regions? Second, are the most highly conserved outer membrane proteins in the immunogens recognized by immunized and protected animals? Lastly, can this subset of OMPs recognized by antibody from protected vaccinates and conserved among strains recapitulate the protection of outer membrane vaccines? To address the first goal, genes encoding OMPs AM202, AM368, AM854, AM936, AM1041, and AM1096, major subdominant components of the outer membrane, were cloned and sequenced from geographically diverse strains and isolates. AM202, AM936, AM854, and AM1096 share 99.9 to 100% amino acid identity. AM1041 has 97.1 to 100% and AM368 has 98.3 to 99.9% amino acid identity. While all four of the most highly conserved OMPs were recognized by IgG from animals immunized with outer membranes, linked surface protein complexes, or unlinked surface protein complexes and shown to be protected from challenge, the highest titers and consistent recognition among vaccinates were to AM854 and AM936. Consequently, animals were immunized with recombinant AM854 and AM936 and challenged. Recombinant vaccinates and purified outer membrane vaccinates had similar IgG and IgG2 responses to both proteins. However, the recombinant vaccinates developed higher bacteremia after challenge as compared to adjuvant-only controls and outer membrane vaccinates. These results provide the first evidence that vaccination with specific antigens may exacerbate disease. Progressing from the protective capacity of outer membrane formulations to recombinant vaccines

  9. Making a beta barrel: Assembly of Outer Membrane Proteins in Gram negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rigel, Nathan W.; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram negative bacteria is an essential organelle that serves as a selective permeability barrier by keeping toxic compounds out of the cell while allowing vital nutrients in. How the OM and its constituent lipid and protein components are assembled remains an area of active research. In this review, we describe our current understanding of how outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are delivered to and then assembled in the OM of the model Gram-negative organism Escherichia coli. PMID:22221898

  10. Lysyl-derived aldehydes in outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, D L; Schnaitman, C A

    1978-01-01

    The major outer membrane proteins from Escherichia coli K-12 are modified to contain alpha-aminoadipic acid delta-semialdehyde (allysine). The allysine was found to be derived from lysine and it was identified by derivatizing it to chloronorleucine by reduction, alpha-aminoadipic acid by oxidation, and to alpha,epsilon-diaminopimelic acid by reacting it with CN- and NH3. The alpha-aminoadipic acid was identified by mass spectrometry. Two major outer membrane proteins were found to possess allysine, a modified lysine characteristically found to connective tissue. PMID:358196

  11. VDAC and the bacterial porin PorB of Neisseria gonorrhoeae share mitochondrial import pathways.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne; Rassow, Joachim; Grimm, Jan; Machuy, Nikolaus; Meyer, Thomas F; Rudel, Thomas

    2002-04-15

    The human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae induces host cell apoptosis during infection by delivering the outer membrane protein PorB to the host cell's mitochondria. PorB is a pore-forming beta-barrel protein sharing several features with the mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Here we show that PorB of pathogenic Neisseria species produced by host cells is efficiently targeted to mitochondria. Imported PorB resides in the mitochondrial outer membrane and forms multimers with similar sizes as in the outer bacterial membrane. The mitochondria completely lose their membrane potential, a characteristic previously observed in cells infected with gonococci or treated with purified PorB. Closely related bacterial porins of non-pathogenic Neisseria mucosa or Escherichia coli remain in the cytosol. Import of PorB into mitochondria in vivo is independent of a linear signal sequence. Insertion of PorB into the mitochondrial outer membrane in vitro depends on the activity of Tom5, Tom20 and Tom40, but is independent of Tom70. Our data show that human VDAC and bacterial PorB are imported into mitochondria by a similar mechanism. PMID:11953311

  12. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  13. Subdominant outer membrane antigens in anaplasma marginale: conservation, antigenicity, and protective capacity using recombinant protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a well- defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are seve...

  14. Separation of inner and outer membranes of Rickettsia prowazeki and characterization of their polypeptide compositions.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D K; Winkler, H H

    1979-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazeki were disrupted in a French pressure cell and fractionated into soluble (cytoplasm) and envelope fractions. The envelope contained 25% of the cell protein, with the cytoplasm containing 75%. Upon density gradient centrifugation, the envelope fraction separated into a heavy band (1.23 g/cm3) and a lighter band (1.19 g/cm3). The heavy band had a high content of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid, a marker for bacterial lipopolysaccharide, but had no succinic dehydrogenase, a marker for cytoplasmic membrane activity, and therefore represented outer membrane. The lighter band exhibited a high succinate dehydrogenase activity, and thus contained inner (cytoplasmic) membrane. Outer membrane purified by this method was less than 5% contaiminated by cytoplasmic membrane; however, inner membrane from the gradient was as much as 30% contaminated by outer membrane. The protein composition of each cellular fraction was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate--polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The outer membrane contained four major proteins, which were also major proteins of the whole cell. The cytoplasmic membrane and soluble cytoplasm exhibited a more complex pattern on gels. Images PMID:106046

  15. TonB-Dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the ...

  16. TransportDB: a comprehensive database resource for cytoplasmic membrane transport systems and outer membrane channels.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qinghu; Chen, Kaixi; Paulsen, Ian T

    2007-01-01

    TransportDB (http://www.membranetransport.org/) is a comprehensive database resource of information on cytoplasmic membrane transporters and outer membrane channels in organisms whose complete genome sequences are available. The complete set of membrane transport systems and outer membrane channels of each organism are annotated based on a series of experimental and bioinformatic evidence and classified into different types and families according to their mode of transport, bioenergetics, molecular phylogeny and substrate specificities. User-friendly web interfaces are designed for easy access, query and download of the data. Features of the TransportDB website include text-based and BLAST search tools against known transporter and outer membrane channel proteins; comparison of transporter and outer membrane channel contents from different organisms; known 3D structures of transporters, and phylogenetic trees of transporter families. On individual protein pages, users can find detailed functional annotation, supporting bioinformatic evidence, protein/DNA sequences, publications and cross-referenced external online resource links. TransportDB has now been in existence for over 10 years and continues to be regularly updated with new evidence and data from newly sequenced genomes, as well as having new features added periodically.

  17. Resistance of Klebsiella Pneumoniae clinical isolates: linkage of outer membrane proteins (omps) with production esbls

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Lívia Érika Carlos; de Oliveira, Danielle Ferreira; Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Alves, Carlucio Roberto; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2011-01-01

    Three isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, collected from the University Hospital in Fortaleza, Brazil, were analyzed to determine their resistance to multiple antibiotics. The results of this study showed that the resistance of the clinically isolated bacteria is associated with the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESLBs) and loss of outer membrane proteins. PMID:24031656

  18. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  19. The Oms66 (p66) protein is a Borrelia burgdorferi porin.

    PubMed Central

    Skare, J T; Mirzabekov, T A; Shang, E S; Blanco, D R; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Bunikis, J; Bergström, S; Tempst, P; Kagan, B L; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1997-01-01

    In this study we report the purification and characterization of a 66-kDa protein, designated Oms66, for outer membrane-spanning 66-kDa protein, that functions as a porin in the outer membrane (OM) of Borrelia burgdorferi. Oms66 was purified by fast-performance liquid chromatography and exhibited an average single-channel conductance of 9.62 +/- 0.37 nS in 1 M KCl, as evidenced by 581 individual insertional events in planar lipid bilayers. Electrophysiological characterization indicated that Oms66 was virtually nonselective between cations and anions and exhibited voltage-dependent closure with multiple substates. The amino acid sequence of tryptic peptides derived from purified Oms66 was identical to the deduced amino acid sequence of p66, a previously described surface-exposed protein of B. burgdorferi. Purified Oms66 was recognized by antiserum specific for p66 and serum from rabbits immune to challenge with virulent B. burgdorferi, indicating that p66 and Oms66 were identical proteins and that Oms66/p66 is an immunogenic protein in infected rabbits. In a methodology that reduces liposomal trapping and nonspecific interactions, native Oms66 was incorporated into liposomes, confirming that Oms66 is an outer membrane-spanning protein. Proteoliposomes containing Oms66 exhibited porin activity nearly identical to that of native, purified Oms66, indicating that reconstituted Oms66 retained native conformation. The use of proteoliposomes reconstituted with Oms66 and other Oms proteins provides an experimental system for determinating the relationship between conformation, protection, and biological function of these molecules. PMID:9284133

  20. Role of porins in sensitivity of Escherichia coli to antibacterial activity of the lactoperoxidase enzyme system.

    PubMed

    De Spiegeleer, Philipp; Sermon, Jan; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2005-07-01

    Lactoperoxidase is an enzyme that contributes to the antimicrobial defense in secretory fluids and that has attracted interest as a potential biopreservative for foods and other perishable products. Its antimicrobial activity is based on the formation of hypothiocyanate (OSCN-) from thiocyanate (SCN-), using H2O2 as an oxidant. To gain insight into the antibacterial mode of action of the lactoperoxidase enzyme system, we generated random transposon insertion mutations in Escherichia coli MG1655 and screened the resultant mutants for an altered tolerance of bacteriostatic concentrations of this enzyme system. Out of the ca. 5,000 mutants screened, 4 showed significantly increased tolerance, and 2 of these had an insertion, one in the waaQ gene and one in the waaO gene, whose products are involved in the synthesis of the core oligosaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharides. Besides producing truncated lipopolysaccharides and displaying hypersensitivity to novobiocin and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), these mutants were also shown by urea-SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis to have reduced amounts of porins in their outer membranes. Moreover, they showed a reduced degradation of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and an increased resistance to ampicillin, two indications of a decrease in outer membrane permeability for small hydrophilic solutes. Additionally, ompC and ompF knockout mutants displayed levels of tolerance to the lactoperoxidase system similar to those displayed by the waa mutants. These results suggest that mutations which reduce the porin-mediated outer membrane permeability for small hydrophilic molecules lead to increased tolerance to the lactoperoxidase enzyme system because of a reduced uptake of OSCN-.

  1. OmpA is the principal nonspecific slow porin of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Etsuko; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    Acinetobacter species show high levels of intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. The major protein species in the outer membrane of Acinetobacter baumannii does not belong to the high-permeability trimeric porin family, which includes Escherichia coli OmpF/OmpC, and instead is a close homolog of E. coli OmpA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprF. We characterized the pore-forming function of this OmpA homolog, OmpA(Ab), by a reconstitution assay. OmpA(Ab) produced very low pore-forming activity, about 70-fold lower than that of OmpF and an activity similar to that of E. coli OmpA and P. aeruginosa OprF. The pore size of the OmpA(Ab) channel was similar to that of OprF, i.e., about 2 nm in diameter. The low permeability of OmpA(Ab) is not due to the inactivation of this protein during purification, because the permeability of the whole A. baumannii outer membrane was also very low. Furthermore, the outer membrane permeability to cephalothin and cephaloridine, measured in intact cells, was about 100-fold lower than that of E. coli K-12. The permeability of cephalothin and cephaloridine in A. baumannii was decreased 2- to 3-fold when the ompA(Ab) gene was deleted. These results show that OmpA(Ab) is the major nonspecific channel in A. baumannii. The low permeability of this porin, together with the presence of constitutive β-lactamases and multidrug efflux pumps, such as AdeABC and AdeIJK, appears to be essential for the high levels of intrinsic resistance to a number of antibiotics.

  2. Role of Porins in Sensitivity of Escherichia coli to Antibacterial Activity of the Lactoperoxidase Enzyme System

    PubMed Central

    De Spiegeleer, Philipp; Sermon, Jan; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W.

    2005-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase is an enzyme that contributes to the antimicrobial defense in secretory fluids and that has attracted interest as a potential biopreservative for foods and other perishable products. Its antimicrobial activity is based on the formation of hypothiocyanate (OSCN−) from thiocyanate (SCN−), using H2O2 as an oxidant. To gain insight into the antibacterial mode of action of the lactoperoxidase enzyme system, we generated random transposon insertion mutations in Escherichia coli MG1655 and screened the resultant mutants for an altered tolerance of bacteriostatic concentrations of this enzyme system. Out of the ca. 5,000 mutants screened, 4 showed significantly increased tolerance, and 2 of these had an insertion, one in the waaQ gene and one in the waaO gene, whose products are involved in the synthesis of the core oligosaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharides. Besides producing truncated lipopolysaccharides and displaying hypersensitivity to novobiocin and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), these mutants were also shown by urea-SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis to have reduced amounts of porins in their outer membranes. Moreover, they showed a reduced degradation of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and an increased resistance to ampicillin, two indications of a decrease in outer membrane permeability for small hydrophilic solutes. Additionally, ompC and ompF knockout mutants displayed levels of tolerance to the lactoperoxidase system similar to those displayed by the waa mutants. These results suggest that mutations which reduce the porin-mediated outer membrane permeability for small hydrophilic molecules lead to increased tolerance to the lactoperoxidase enzyme system because of a reduced uptake of OSCN−. PMID:16000755

  3. Purification and partial characterization of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, H.D.; Kromhout, J.; Schachter, J.

    1981-03-01

    Elementary bodies (EB) of Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes C, E, and L2 were extrinsically radioiodinated, and whole-cell lysates of these serotypes were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Autoradiography of the polypeptide profiles identified a major surface protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 39,500 that was common to each C. trachomatis serotype. The abilities of nonionic (Triton X-100), dipolar ionic (Zwittergent TM-314), mild (sodium deoxycholate and sodium N-lauroyl sarcosine), and strongly anionic (SDS) detergents to extract this protein from intact EB of the L2 serotype were investigated by SDS-PAGE analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions obtained after each detergent treatment. Only SDS readily extracted this protein from intact EB. Sarkosyl treatment selectively solubilized the majority of other EB proteins, leaving the 39,500-dalton protein associated with the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction. Ultrastructural studies of the Sarkosyl-insoluble EB pellet showed it to consist of empty EB particles possessing an apparently intact outer membrane. No structural evidence for a peptidoglycan-like cell wall was found. Morphologically these chlamydial outer membrane complexes (COMC) resembled intact chlamydial EB outer membranes. The 39,500-dalton outer membrane protein was quantitatively extracted from COMC by treating them with 2% SDS at 60 degrees C. This protein accounted for 61% of the total COMC-associated protein, and its extraction resulted in a concomitant loss of the COMC membrane structure and morphology. The 39,500-dalton major outer membrane protein is a serogroup antigen of C. trachomatis organisms.

  4. The OpdQ porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by environmental signals associated with cystic fibrosis including nitrate-induced regulation involving the NarXL two-component system.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Randal C; Hanson, Nancy D

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Multiple porins modulate outer membrane permeability under various environmental conditions. The lung environment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is unique with changes occurring in nutrient availability, osmolarity, and oxygen content. Although P. aeruginosa gene expression is modified under these conditions, little is known about how they influence porin regulation. In this study, we evaluated the regulation of the outer membrane porin OpdQ, a member of the OprD family of porins, with regard to oxygen, nitrate, and/or NaCl levels. We demonstrated using promoter::fusion clones of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and clinical strains collected from CF patients that OpdQ was transcriptionally repressed under low oxygen but increased in the presence of nitrate. The nitrate-induced regulation of OpdQ was found to be dependent on the transcription factor NarL via the NarXL two-component system. In addition, NaCl-induced osmotic stress increased OpdQ production among most of the clinical strains evaluated. In conclusion, these data identify for the first time that specific environmental cues associated with the CF microenvironment influence porin regulation, and that the nitrate-induced regulation of OpdQ is associated with nitrate metabolism via the NarXL two-component system of P. aeruginosa.

  5. High-resolution diffraction from crystals of a membrane-protein complex: bacterial outer membrane protein OmpC complexed with the antibacterial eukaryotic protein lactoferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Sundara Baalaji, N.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Singh, T. P.; Krishnaswamy, S. E-mail: mkukrishna@rediffmail.com

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of the complex formed between the bacterial membrane protein OmpC and the antibacterial protein lactoferrin suitable for high-resolution structure determination have been obtained. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å. Crystals of the complex formed between the outer membrane protein OmpC from Escherichia coli and the eukaryotic antibacterial protein lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius (camel) have been obtained using a detergent environment. Initial data processing suggests that the crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. This indicated a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a possible molecular complex involving four molecules of lactoferrin and two porin trimers in the unit cell (4832 amino acids; 533.8 kDa) with 63% solvent content. A complete set of diffraction data was collected to 3 Å resolution at 100 K. Structure determination by molecular replacement is in progress. Structural study of this first surface-exposed membrane-protein complex with an antibacterial protein will provide insights into the mechanism of action of OmpC as well as lactoferrin.

  6. The host outer membrane proteins OmpA and OmpC are associated with the Shigella phage Sf6 virion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Sequeira, Reuben D; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Tang, Liang

    2011-01-20

    Assembly of dsDNA bacteriophage is a precisely programmed process. Potential roles of host cell components in phage assembly haven't been well understood. It was previously reported that two unidentified proteins were present in bacteriophage Sf6 virion (Casjens et al, 2004, J.Mol.Biol. 339, 379-394, Fig. 2A). Using tandem mass spectrometry, we have identified the two proteins as outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OmpA and OmpC from its host Shigella flexneri. The transmission electron cryo-microscopy structure of Sf6 shows significant density at specific sites at the phage capsid inner surface. This density fit well with the characteristic beta-barrel domains of OMPs, thus may be due to the two host proteins. Locations of this density suggest a role in Sf6 morphogenesis reminiscent of phage-encoded cementing proteins. These data indicate a new, OMP-related phage:host linkage, adding to previous knowledge that some lambdoid bacteriophage genomes contain OmpC-like genes that express phage-encoded porins in the lysogenic state. PMID:21071053

  7. The host outer membrane proteins OmpA and OmpC are associated with the Shigella phage Sf6 virion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Haiyan; Sequeira, Reuben D.; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Tang Liang

    2011-01-20

    Assembly of dsDNA bacteriophage is a precisely programmed process. Potential roles of host cell components in phage assembly haven't been well understood. It was previously reported that two unidentified proteins were present in bacteriophage Sf6 virion (Casjens et al, 2004, J.Mol.Biol. 339, 379-394, Fig. 2A). Using tandem mass spectrometry, we have identified the two proteins as outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OmpA and OmpC from its host Shigella flexneri. The transmission electron cryo-microscopy structure of Sf6 shows significant density at specific sites at the phage capsid inner surface. This density fit well with the characteristic beta-barrel domains of OMPs, thus may be due to the two host proteins. Locations of this density suggest a role in Sf6 morphogenesis reminiscent of phage-encoded cementing proteins. These data indicate a new, OMP-related phage:host linkage, adding to previous knowledge that some lambdoid bacteriophage genomes contain OmpC-like genes that express phage-encoded porins in the lysogenic state.

  8. Two different centered monoclinic crystals of the E. coli outer-membrane protein OmpF originate from the same building block.

    PubMed

    Chaptal, Vincent; Kilburg, Arnaud; Flot, David; Wiseman, Benjamin; Aghajari, Nushin; Jault, Jean-Michel; Falson, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Macromolecule crystal formation can be divided in two major steps: 1. the formation of a nucleus and 2. the growth of this nucleus into a full mature crystal. The latter is well described and understood, while the former remains elusive due to the difficulty to study it and is described by nucleation theories. Here we report the structure of the Escherichia coli outer membrane porin OmpF in two centered monoclinic space groups. Strikingly, the two crystals originate from the same building block, made of two trimers of OmpF interacting via their rough side. The different crystallization conditions trigger the formation of distinct arrangement of these building blocks, leading to the formation of translational non-crystallographic symmetry (tNCS) in one case, made possible by the loose lateral packing mediated by detergents. In light of nucleation theories, these results allow us to speculate that these two crystals originate from nuclei made of either clusters of building blocks, or already forming columns that later associate laterally using detergents as glue.

  9. The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarmann, Raimund; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Stevanovic, Mara; Bredemeier, Rolf; Schleiff, Enrico

    2010-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are surrounded by a cell wall including the outer membrane. The outer membrane is composed of two distinct monolayers where the outer layer contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the non-phospholipid Lipid A as the core. The synthesis of Lipid A is initiated in the cytosol and thereby the molecule has to be transported across the inner and outer membranes. The β-barrel lipopolysaccharide-assembly protein D (LptD) was discovered to be involved in the transfer of Lipid A into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. At present the molecular procedure of lipid transfer across the outer membrane remains unknown. Here we approached the functionality of the transfer system by an electrophysiological analysis of the outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli named ecLptD. In vitro the protein shows cation selectivity and has an estimated pore diameter of about 1.8 nm. Addition of Lipid A induces a transition of the open state to a sub-conductance state with two independent off-rates, which might suggest that LptD is able to bind and transport the molecule in vitro. To generalize our findings with respect to the Lipid A transport system of other Gram-negative bacteria we have explored the existence of the proteins involved in this pathway by bioinformatic means. We were able to identify the membrane-inserted components of the Lipid A transport system in all Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the periplasmic components appear to be species-specific. The LptD proteins of different bacteria are characterized by their periplasmic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal barrel region. The latter shows distinct sequence properties, particularly in LptD proteins of cyanobacteria, and this specific domain can be found in plant proteins as well. By electrophysiological experiments on LptD from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we are able to confirm the functional relation of anaLptD to Lipid A transport.

  10. Imipenem resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae is associated to the combination of plasmid-mediated CMY-4 AmpC β-lactamase and loss of an outer membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Safia; Mansour, Wejdène; Charfi, Karama; Boujaafar, Noureddine; Arlet, Guillaume; Bouallègue, Olfa

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to identify the molecular mechanisms of imipenem resistance in a Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp16137) isolate recovered in August 2008 at the University Hospital Sahloul, Sousse, Tunisia. The strain was identified with the API 20E system; antibiotic-containing disks were used for detection of antibiotic susceptibility by a disk diffusion assay. We investigated the presence of β-lactamases by PCR, using specific primers for bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(CTX-M), bla(OXA), bla(CMY), bla(ACC), bla(FOX), bla(IMP), bla(KPC), bla(VIM), and by sequencing. Extraction of plasmid DNA from Kp16137 and the transconjugant was performed by the method of Kado. Southern transfer was performed on nylon. The membrane was hybridized with a specific probe for the bla(CMY-2) gene. Outer membrane proteins were isolated and were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on 12% polyacrylamide gel. K. pneumoniae Kp16137 was resistant to all available β-lactams, including third generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. The screening of β-lactamases showed the presence of three β-lactamases: TEM-1, SHV-61, and CMY-4. The CMY-4 β-lactamase was located on an 80-kb plasmid. An analysis of the outer membrane proteins of this isolate revealed that it lacked a porin of 42 kDa. The loss of this outer membrane protein band correlated with imipenem resistance in this strain. In K. pneumoniae 16137, synthesis of a plasmid-mediated β-lactamase: AmpC CMY-4, together with alteration in permeability led to resistance to all available β-lactams and carbapenems. PMID:22690752

  11. Molecular characterization of outer membrane vesicles released from Acinetobacter radioresistens and their potential roles in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fulsundar, Shweta; Kulkarni, Heramb M; Jagannadham, Medicharla V; Nair, Rashmi; Keerthi, Sravani; Sant, Pooja; Pardesi, Karishma; Bellare, Jayesh; Chopade, Balu Ananda

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter radioresistens is an important member of genus Acinetobacter from a clinical point of view. In the present study, we report that a clinical isolate of A. radioresistens releases outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) under in vitro growth conditions. OMVs were released in distinctive size ranges with diameters from 10 to 150 nm as measured by the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. Additionally, proteins associated with or present into OMVs were identified using LC-ESI-MS/MS. A total of 71 proteins derived from cytosolic, cell membrane, periplasmic space, outer membrane (OM), extracellular and undetermined locations were found in OMVs. The initial characterization of the OMV proteome revealed a correlation of some proteins to biofilm, quorum sensing, oxidative stress tolerance, and cytotoxicity functions. Thus, the OMVs of A. radioresistens are suggested to play a role in biofilm augmentation and virulence possibly by inducing apoptosis.

  12. The Design and Structure of Outer Membrane Receptors from Peroxisomes, Mitochondria, and Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Whelan, James; Vrielink, Alice

    2015-10-01

    The eukaryotic cell is defined by compartments that allow specialization of function. This compartmental structure generates a new concept in cell biology compared with the simpler prokaryotic cell structure, namely the specific targeting of proteins to intracellular compartments. Protein targeting is achieved by the action of specialized signals on proteins destined for organelles that are recognized by cognate receptors. An understanding of the specificity of targeting signal recognition leading to import requires an understanding of the receptor structures. Here, we focus on the structures of receptors of different import machineries located on the outer membrane of three organelles: peroxisomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. This review provides an overview of the structural features of outer membrane import receptors that recognize targeting signals. Finally, we briefly discuss combinatorial approaches that might aid in understanding the structural factors mediating receptor targeting signal recognition.

  13. Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II is associated with the outer membrane when overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abdeljabbar, Diya M; Song, Hank J; Link, A James

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is essential for the future production of many advanced biofuels. Cellulases from the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei are among the most efficient enzymes for the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials. One of the cellulases from T. reesei, cellobiohydrolase II (CBH2), was studied because of its industrial relevance and proven enzymatic activity. Using both crude and rigorous membrane fractionation methods we show that full length T. reesei CBH2 is exclusively localized to the outer membrane when expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli. Even fusing signal sequence-free maltose-binding protein to the N-terminus of CBH2, which has been shown to increase solubility of other proteins, did not prevent the outer membrane localization of CBH2. These results highlight the difficulties in producing fungal cellulases in bacterial hosts and provide a stepping stone for future cellulase engineering efforts.

  14. The molecular mechanism of Zinc acquisition by the neisserial outer-membrane transporter ZnuD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmettes, Charles; Ing, Christopher; Buckwalter, Carolyn M.; El Bakkouri, Majida; Chieh-Lin Lai, Christine; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Gray-Owen, Scott D.; Pomès, Régis; Moraes, Trevor F.

    2015-08-01

    Invading bacteria from the Neisseriaceae, Acinetobacteriaceae, Bordetellaceae and Moraxellaceae families express the conserved outer-membrane zinc transporter zinc-uptake component D (ZnuD) to overcome nutritional restriction imposed by the host organism during infection. Here we demonstrate that ZnuD is required for efficient systemic infections by the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, Neisseria meningitidis, in a mouse model. We also combine X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechanism of zinc recognition and transport across the bacterial outer-membrane by ZnuD. Because ZnuD is also considered a promising vaccine candidate against N. meningitidis, we use several ZnuD structural intermediates to map potential antigenic epitopes, and propose a mechanism by which ZnuD can maintain high sequence conservation yet avoid immune recognition by altering the conformation of surface-exposed loops.

  15. Permeation rates of penicillins indicate that Escherichia coli porins function principally as nonspecific channels.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    Small, hydrophilic compounds such as β-lactams diffuse across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels, which were originally thought to be nonspecific channels devoid of any specificity. However, since the discovery of an ampicillin-binding site within the OmpF channel in 2002, much attention has been focused on the potential specificity of the channel, where the binding site was assumed either to facilitate or to retard the penetration of β-lactams. Since the earlier studies on porin permeability were done without the knowledge of the contribution of multidrug efflux pumps in the overall flux process across the cell envelope, in this study we have carefully studied both the porin permeability and active efflux of ampicillin and benzylpenicillin. We found that the influx occurs apparently by a spontaneous passive diffusion without any indication of specific binding within the concentration range relevant to the antibiotic action of these drugs, and that the higher permeability for ampicillin is totally as expected from the gross property of this drug as a zwitterionic compound. The active efflux by AcrAB was more effective for benzylpenicillin due to the stronger affinity and high degree of positive cooperativity. Our data now give a complete quantitative picture of the influx, efflux, and periplasmic degradation (catalyzed by AmpC β-lactamase) of these two compounds, and correlate closely with the susceptibility of Escherichia coli strains used here, thus validating not only our model but also the parameters obtained in this study.

  16. Structure-based engineering of a minimal porin reveals loop-independent channel closure.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Wolfgang; Psakis, Georgios; Mertins, Barbara; Reiss, Philipp; Windisch, Dirk; Brademann, Felix; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne; Koert, Ulrich; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2014-07-29

    Porins, like outer membrane protein G (OmpG) of Escherichia coli, are ideal templates among ion channels for protein and chemical engineering because of their robustness and simple architecture. OmpG shows fast transitions between open and closed states, which were attributed to loop 6 (L6). As flickering limits single-channel-based applications, we pruned L6 by either 8 or 12 amino acids. While the open probabilities of both L6 variants resemble that of native OmpG, their gating frequencies were reduced by 63 and 81%, respectively. Using the 3.2 Å structure of the shorter L6 variant in the open state, we engineered a minimal porin (220 amino acids), where all remaining extramembranous loops were truncated. Unexpectedly, this minimized porin still exhibited gating, but it was 5-fold less frequent than in OmpG. The residual gating of the minimal pore is hence independent of L6 rearrangements and involves narrowing of the ion conductance pathway most probably driven by global stretching-flexing deformations of the membrane-embedded β-barrel.

  17. Analysis of Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane Proteins in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Bradley J.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2014-01-01

    More than 50 Helicobacter pylori genes are predicted to encode outer membrane proteins (OMPs), but there has been relatively little experimental investigation of the H. pylori cell surface proteome. In this study, we used selective biotinylation to label proteins localized to the surface of H. pylori, along with differential detergent extraction procedures to isolate proteins localized to the outer membrane. Proteins that met multiple criteria for surface-exposed outer membrane localization included known adhesins, as well as Cag proteins required for activity of the cag type IV secretion system, putative lipoproteins, and other proteins not previously recognized as cell surface components. We identified sites of nontryptic cleavage consistent with signal sequence cleavage, as well as C-terminal motifs that may be important for protein localization. A subset of surface-exposed proteins were highly susceptible to proteolysis when intact bacteria were treated with proteinase K. Most Hop and Hom OMPs were susceptible to proteolysis, whereas Hor and Hof proteins were relatively resistant. Most of the protease-susceptible OMPs contain a large protease-susceptible extracellular domain exported beyond the outer membrane and a protease-resistant domain at the C terminus with a predicted β-barrel structure. These features suggest that, similar to the secretion of the VacA passenger domain, the N-terminal domains of protease-susceptible OMPs are exported through an autotransporter pathway. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the repertoire of surface-exposed H. pylori proteins that may mediate bacterium-host interactions, as well as the cell surface topology of these proteins. PMID:24769695

  18. Adaptation of Salmonella enterica Hadar under static magnetic field: effects on outer membrane protein pattern

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Hadar (S. Hadar) is a highly prevalent foodborne pathogen and therefore a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Outer membrane proteins whose production is often regulated by environmental conditions also play important roles in the adaptability of bacterial pathogens to various environments. Results The present study investigated the adaptation of S. Hadar under the effect of acute static magnetic field exposure (200 mT, 9 h) and the impact on the outer membrane protein pattern. Via two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and LC-MS/MS spectrometry, we compared the proteome of enriched-outer membrane fraction before and after exposure to a magnetic field. A total of 11 proteins, displaying more than a two-fold change, were differentially expressed in exposed cells, among which 7 were up-regulated and 4 down-regulated. These proteins were involved in the integrity of cell envelope (TolB, Pal), in the response to oxidative stress (OmpW, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, UspF), in the oxidative stress status (bacterioferritin), in virulence (OmpX, Yfgl) or in motility (FlgE and UspF). Complementary experiments associated the down-regulation of FlgE and UspF with an alteration of swarming, a flagella-driven motility, under SMF. Furthermore, the antibiotic disc diffusion method confirmed a decrease of gentamicin susceptibility in exposed cells. This decrease could be partly associated with the up-regulation of TolC, outer membrane component of an efflux pump. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was up-regulated. Conclusions SMF (200 mT) seems to maintain the cell envelope integrity and to submit the exposed cells to an oxidative stress. Some alterations suggest an increase of the ability of exposed cells to form biofilms. PMID:22304719

  19. Proteome Profiles of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Extracellular Matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Schooling, Sarah R; Dutcher, John R; Barber, Jill

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, two different proteomic platforms, gel-based and gel-free, were used to map the matrix and outer membrane vesicle exoproteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. These two proteomic strategies allowed us a confident identification of 207 and 327 proteins from enriched outer membrane vesicles and whole matrix isolated from biofilms. Because of the physicochemical characteristics of these subproteomes, the two strategies showed complementarity, and thus, the most comprehensive analysis of P. aeruginosa exoproteome to date was achieved. Under our conditions, outer membrane vesicles contribute approximately 20% of the whole matrix proteome, demonstrating that membrane vesicles are an important component of the matrix. The proteomic profiles were analyzed in terms of their biological context, namely, a biofilm. Accordingly relevant metabolic processes involved in cellular adaptation to the biofilm lifestyle as well as those related to P. aeruginosa virulence capabilities were a key feature of the analyses. The diversity of the matrix proteome corroborates the idea of high heterogeneity within the biofilm; cells can display different levels of metabolism and can adapt to local microenvironments making this proteomic analysis challenging. In addition to analyzing our own primary data, we extend the analysis to published data by other groups in order to deepen our understanding of the complexity inherent within biofilm populations. PMID:26303878

  20. Comparative Genomics of Helicobacter pylori: Analysis of the Outer Membrane Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Richard A.; Bina, James; Andrews, Beth M.; Doig, Peter; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Trust, Trevor J.

    2000-01-01

    The two complete genomic sequences of Helicobacter pylori J99 and 26695 were used to compare the paralogous families (related genes within one genome, likely to have related function) of genes predicted to encode outer membrane proteins which were present in each strain. We identified five paralogous gene families ranging in size from 3 to 33 members; two of these families contained members specific for either H. pylori J99 or H. pylori 26695. Most orthologous protein pairs (equivalent genes between two genomes, same function) shared considerable identity between the two strains. The unusual set of outer membrane proteins and the specialized outer membrane may be a reflection of the adaptation of H. pylori to the unique gastric environment where it is found. One subfamily of proteins, which contains both channel-forming and adhesin molecules, is extremely highly related at the sequence level and has likely arisen due to ancestral gene duplication. In addition, the largest paralogous family contained two essentially identical pairs of genes in both strains. The presence and genomic organization of these two pairs of duplicated genes were analyzed in a panel of independent H. pylori isolates. While one pair was present in every strain examined, one allele of the other pair appeared partially deleted in several isolates. PMID:10858232

  1. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death.

  2. Assembly of β-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Höhr, Alexandra I C; Straub, Sebastian P; Warscheid, Bettina; Becker, Thomas; Wiedemann, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria evolved through endosymbiosis of a Gram-negative progenitor with a host cell to generate eukaryotes. Therefore, the outer membrane of mitochondria and Gram-negative bacteria contain pore proteins with β-barrel topology. After synthesis in the cytosol, β-barrel precursor proteins are first transported into the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Folding and membrane integration of β-barrel proteins depend on the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) located in the outer membrane, which is related to the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) in bacteria. The SAM complex recognizes β-barrel proteins by a β-signal in the C-terminal β-strand that is required to initiate β-barrel protein insertion into the outer membrane. In addition, the SAM complex is crucial to form membrane contacts with the inner mitochondrial membrane by interacting with the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) and shares a subunit with the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) that links the outer mitochondrial membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).

  3. Bacterial social networks: structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains.

    PubMed

    Remis, Jonathan P; Wei, Dongguang; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H Ewa; Costerton, J William; Berleman, James E; Auer, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviours, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of outer membrane vesicle chains and membrane tubes that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains, and increased abundance in biofilms compared with planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including three-dimensional (3D) focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, we determined these structures to range between 30 and 60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactoseamine carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl outer membrane proteins known to be transferable between cells in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and therefore could provide a mechanism for the coordination of social activities.

  4. Mitochondrial swelling and incipient outer membrane rupture in preapoptotic and apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Sesso, A; Belizário, J E; Marques, M M; Higuchi, M L; Schumacher, R I; Colquhoun, A; Ito, E; Kawakami, J

    2012-10-01

    Outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) rupture was first noted in isolated mitochondria in which the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) had lost its selective permeability. This phenomenon referred to as mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) refers to a permeabilized inner membrane that originates a large swelling in the mitochondrial matrix, which distends the outer membrane until it ruptures. Here, we have expanded previous electron microscopic observations that in apoptotic cells, OMM rupture is not caused by a membrane stretching promoted by a markedly swollen matrix. It is shown that the widths of the ruptured regions of the OMM vary from 6 to 250 nm. Independent of the perforation size, herniation of the mitochondrial matrix appeared to have resulted in pushing the IMM through the perforation. A large, long focal herniation of the mitochondrial matrix, covered with the IMM, was associated with a rupture of the OMM that was as small as 6 nm. Contextually, the collapse of the selective permeability of the IMM may precede or follow the release of the mitochondrial proteins of the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm. When the MPT is a late event, exit of the intermembrane space proteins to the cytoplasm is unimpeded and occurs through channels that transverse the outer membrane, because so far, the inner membrane is impermeable. No channel within the outer membrane can expose to the cytoplasm a permeable inner membrane, because it would serve as a conduit for local herniation of the mitochondrial matrix.

  5. Proteome analysis of outer membrane vesicles from a clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolate.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sang-Oh; Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Seung Il

    2009-08-01

    The secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is one of the major mechanisms by which Gram-negative bacteria deliver effector molecules to host cells. Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen in hospital-acquired infections, but the secretion system for effector molecules to induce host cell damage has not been characterized. In the present study, we investigated the secretion of OMVs from a clinical A. baumannii isolate and analyzed the comprehensive proteome of A. baumannii-derived OMVs. Acinetobacter baumannii secreted OMVs into the extracellular milieu during in vitro growth. Using 1-DE and LC-MS/MS protein identification and assignment analysis, 132 different proteins associated with OMVs were identified. These proteins were derived from outer membranes (n=26), periplasmic space (n=6), inner membranes (n=8), cytoplasm (n=43), and unknown localization or multiple localization sites (n=49) according to the cell location prediction programs. Among the proteins associated with OMVs, a potent cytotoxic molecule, outer membrane protein A, was highly enriched and several putative virulence-associated proteins were also identified. These results suggest that OMVs from A. baumannii are an important vehicle designed to deliver effector molecules to host cells.

  6. The participation of outer membrane proteins in the bacterial sensitivity to nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Kędziora, Anna; Krzyżewska, Eva; Dudek, Bartłomiej; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2016-06-13

    The presented study is to analyze the participation of outer membrane proteins of Gram- negative bacteria in sensitivity to silver nanomaterials. The mechanism of interaction of silver with the bacterial cell is best described in this group of microorganisms. There are several theories regarding the effectiveness of antimicrobial ions and nanosilver, and at the indicated differences in the way they work. Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria are involved in the procurement of silver from the environment and contribute to the development mechanisms of resistance to nanometals. They are measurable parameter in the field of cell phenotypic response to the presence of Gram-negative bacteria in the environment silver nanoforms: its properties, chemical composition, content or times of action. Proteomic methods (including two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI‑TOF MS) are therefore relevant techniques for determining the susceptibility of bacteria to silver and the changes taking place in the outer membrane under the influence: uptime/exposure and physical and chemical parameters of silver nanomaterials. Many products containing nanosilver is still in the research phase in terms of physico‑chemical characteristics and biological activity, others have been already implemented in many industries. During the very fast nanotechnology developing and introduction to the market products based on the nanosilver the bacterial answer to nanosilver is needed.

  7. Characterization of outer membrane vesicles released by the psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudoalteromonas antarctica NF3

    PubMed Central

    Nevot, Maria; Deroncelé, Víctor; Messner, Paul; Guinea, Jesús; Mercadé, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pseudoalteromonas antarctica NF3 is an Antarctic psychrotolerant Gram-negative bacterium that accumulates large amounts of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) with high protein content. Transmission electron microscopy analysis after high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution (HPF-FS) shows that the EPS is composed of a capsular polymer and large numbers of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). These vesicles are bilayered structures and predominantly spherical in shape, with an average diameter of 25–70 nm, which is similar to what has been observed in OMVs from other Gram-negative bacteria. Analyses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phospholipids and protein profiles of OMVs are consistent with the bacterial outer membrane origin of these vesicles. In an initial attempt to elucidate the functions of OMVs proteins, we conducted a proteomic analysis on 1D SDS-PAGE bands. Those proteins putatively identified match with outer membrane proteins and proteins related to nutrient processing and transport in Gram-negative bacteria. This approach suggests that OMVs present in the EPS from P. antarctica NF3, might function to deliver proteins to the external media, and therefore play an important role in the survival of the bacterium in the extreme Antarctic environment. PMID:16913913

  8. Outer Membrane Protein Folding and Topology from a Computational Transfer Free Energy Scale.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meishan; Gessmann, Dennis; Naveed, Hammad; Liang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the transfer free energy of amino acids from aqueous solution to a lipid bilayer is essential for understanding membrane protein folding and for predicting membrane protein structure. Here we report a computational approach that can calculate the folding free energy of the transmembrane region of outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) by combining an empirical energy function with a reduced discrete state space model. We quantitatively analyzed the transfer free energies of 20 amino acid residues at the center of the lipid bilayer of OmpLA. Our results are in excellent agreement with the experimentally derived hydrophobicity scales. We further exhaustively calculated the transfer free energies of 20 amino acids at all positions in the TM region of OmpLA. We found that the asymmetry of the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane as well as the TM residues of an OMP determine its functional fold in vivo. Our results suggest that the folding process of an OMP is driven by the lipid-facing residues in its hydrophobic core, and its NC-IN topology is determined by the differential stabilities of OMPs in the asymmetrical outer membrane. The folding free energy is further reduced by lipid A and assisted by general depth-dependent cooperativities that exist between polar and ionizable residues. Moreover, context-dependency of transfer free energies at specific positions in OmpLA predict regions important for protein function as well as structural anomalies. Our computational approach is fast, efficient and applicable to any OMP.

  9. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Aditya; Cox, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu), a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1–Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1–Parkin pathway. PMID:26834020

  10. Prediction of structural features and application to outer membrane protein identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renxiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Lanqing; Yan, Feidi; Xue, Xiaoyu; Cai, Weiwen

    2015-06-01

    Protein three-dimensional (3D) structures provide insightful information in many fields of biology. One-dimensional properties derived from 3D structures such as secondary structure, residue solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles are helpful to protein function prediction, fold recognition and ab initio folding. Here, we predict various structural features with the assistance of neural network learning. Based on an independent test dataset, protein secondary structure prediction generates an overall Q3 accuracy of ~80%. Meanwhile, the prediction of relative solvent accessibility obtains the highest mean absolute error of 0.164, and prediction of residue depth achieves the lowest mean absolute error of 0.062. We further improve the outer membrane protein identification by including the predicted structural features in a scoring function using a simple profile-to-profile alignment. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of outer membrane protein identification can be improved by ~3% at a 1% false positive level when structural features are incorporated. Finally, our methods are available as two convenient and easy-to-use programs. One is PSSM-2-Features for predicting secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles, the other is PPA-OMP for identifying outer membrane proteins from proteomes.

  11. Lipids assist the membrane insertion of a BAM-independent outer membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Huysmans, Gerard H. M.; Guilvout, Ingrid; Chami, Mohamed; Nickerson, Nicholas N.; Pugsley, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Like several other large, multimeric bacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs), the assembly of the Klebsiella oxytoca OMP PulD does not rely on the universally conserved β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) that catalyses outer membrane insertion. The only other factor known to interact with PulD prior to or during outer membrane targeting and assembly is the cognate chaperone PulS. Here, in vitro translation-transcription coupled PulD folding demonstrated that PulS does not act during the membrane insertion of PulD, and engineered in vivo site-specific cross-linking between PulD and PulS showed that PulS binding does not prevent membrane insertion. In vitro folding kinetics revealed that PulD is atypical compared to BAM-dependent OMPs by inserting more rapidly into membranes containing E. coli phospholipids than into membranes containing lecithin. PulD folding was fast in diC14:0-phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes but not diC14:0-phosphatidylglycerol liposomes, and in diC18:1-phosphatidylcholine liposomes but not in diC14:1-phosphatidylcholine liposomes. These results suggest that PulD efficiently exploits the membrane composition to complete final steps in insertion and explain how PulD can assemble independently of any protein-assembly machinery. Lipid-assisted assembly in this manner might apply to other large OMPs whose assembly is BAM-independent. PMID:26463896

  12. The outer membrane usher forms a twin-pore secretion complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Huilin; Qian, Luping; Chen, Zhiqiang; Thibault, Danielle; Liu, Guang; Liu, Tianbo; Thanassi, David G

    2004-12-10

    The PapC usher is an outer membrane protein required for assembly and secretion of P pili in uropathogenic Escherichia coli. P pilus biogenesis occurs by the chaperone/usher pathway, a terminal branch of the general secretory pathway. Periplasmic chaperone-subunit complexes target to the PapC usher for fiber assembly and secretion through the usher to the cell surface. The molecular details of pilus biogenesis at the usher, and protein secretion across the outer membrane in general, are unclear. We studied the structure and oligomeric state of PapC by gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy and image analysis. Two-dimensional crystals of wild-type PapC and a C-terminal deletion mutant of PapC were produced by reconstituting detergent purified usher into E.coli lipids. PapC formed a dimer both in detergent solution and in the phospholipid bilayer. Cryo-electron microscopy revealed that the usher forms a twin-pore complex. Removal of the C-terminal domain did not change the basic shape of the PapC molecule, but altered the dimeric association of the usher, suggesting that the C terminus forms part of the dimerization interface. The overall molecular size (11 nm), pore size (2 nm), and twin-pore configuration of PapC resemble that of the Tom40 complex, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein translocase.

  13. The Borrelia afzelii outer membrane protein BAPKO_0422 binds human factor-H and is predicted to form a membrane-spanning β-barrel

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Adam; Brown, Gemma; Stejskal, Lenka; Laity, Peter R.; Bingham, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The deep evolutionary history of the Spirochetes places their branch point early in the evolution of the diderms, before the divergence of the present day Proteobacteria. As a spirochete, the morphology of the Borrelia cell envelope shares characteristics of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A thin layer of peptidoglycan, tightly associated with the cytoplasmic membrane, is surrounded by a more labile outer membrane (OM). This OM is rich in lipoproteins but with few known integral membrane proteins. The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) domain is an eight-stranded membrane-spanning β-barrel, highly conserved among the Proteobacteria but so far unknown in the Spirochetes. In the present work, we describe the identification of four novel OmpA-like β-barrels from Borrelia afzelii, the most common cause of erythema migrans (EM) rash in Europe. Structural characterization of one these proteins (BAPKO_0422) by SAXS and CD indicate a compact globular structure rich in β-strand consistent with a monomeric β-barrel. Ab initio molecular envelopes calculated from the scattering profile are consistent with homology models and demonstrate that BAPKO_0422 adopts a peanut shape with dimensions 25×45 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm). Deviations from the standard C-terminal signature sequence are apparent; in particular the C-terminal phenylalanine residue commonly found in Proteobacterial OM proteins is replaced by isoleucine/leucine or asparagine. BAPKO_0422 is demonstrated to bind human factor H (fH) and therefore may contribute to immune evasion by inhibition of the complement response. Encoded by chromosomal genes, these proteins are highly conserved between Borrelia subspecies and may be of diagnostic or therapeutic value. PMID:26181365

  14. Linkage between anaplasma marginale outer membrane proteins enhances immunogenicity, but is not required for protection from challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prevention of bacterial infections via immunization presents particular challenges. While outer membrane extracts are often protective; they are difficult and expensive to isolate and standardize, and thus often impractical for development and implementation in vaccination programs. In contrast, ind...

  15. Molecular characterization of FrpB, the 70-kilodalton iron-regulated outer membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, A; Maas, A; van Wassenaar, D; van der Ley, P; Tommassen, J

    1995-01-01

    The structural gene encoding the 70-kDa outer membrane protein FrpB of Neisseria meningitidis was cloned and sequenced. A mutant lacking FrpB was constructed. No difference in iron utilization between the mutant and the parental strain was observed. A minor effect of the mutation on serum resistance was observed. A topology model for FrpB in the outer membrane is proposed. PMID:7558339

  16. Bacterial secretins form constitutively open pores akin to general porins.

    PubMed

    Disconzi, Elena; Guilvout, Ingrid; Chami, Mohamed; Masi, Muriel; Huysmans, Gerard H M; Pugsley, Anthony P; Bayan, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Proteins called secretins form large multimeric complexes that are essential for macromolecular transit across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Evidence suggests that the channels formed by some secretin complexes are not tightly closed, but their permeability properties have not been well characterized. Here, we used cell-free synthesis coupled with spontaneous insertion into liposomes to investigate the permeability of the secretin PulD. Leakage assays using preloaded liposomes indicated that PulD allows the efflux of small fluorescent molecules with a permeation cutoff similar to that of general porins. Other secretins were also found to form similar pores. To define the polypeptide region involved in determining the pore size, we analyzed a collection of PulD variants and studied the roles of gates 1 and 2, which were previously reported to affect the pore size of filamentous phage f1 secretin pIV, in assembly and pore formation. Liposome leakage and a novel in vivo assay showed that replacement of the conserved proline residue at position 443 in PulD by leucine increased the apparent size of the pore. The in vitro approach described here could be used to study the pore properties of membrane proteins whose production in vivo is toxic.

  17. Bacterial Secretins Form Constitutively Open Pores Akin to General Porins

    PubMed Central

    Disconzi, Elena; Guilvout, Ingrid; Chami, Mohamed; Masi, Muriel; Huysmans, Gerard H. M.; Pugsley, Anthony P.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins called secretins form large multimeric complexes that are essential for macromolecular transit across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Evidence suggests that the channels formed by some secretin complexes are not tightly closed, but their permeability properties have not been well characterized. Here, we used cell-free synthesis coupled with spontaneous insertion into liposomes to investigate the permeability of the secretin PulD. Leakage assays using preloaded liposomes indicated that PulD allows the efflux of small fluorescent molecules with a permeation cutoff similar to that of general porins. Other secretins were also found to form similar pores. To define the polypeptide region involved in determining the pore size, we analyzed a collection of PulD variants and studied the roles of gates 1 and 2, which were previously reported to affect the pore size of filamentous phage f1 secretin pIV, in assembly and pore formation. Liposome leakage and a novel in vivo assay showed that replacement of the conserved proline residue at position 443 in PulD by leucine increased the apparent size of the pore. The in vitro approach described here could be used to study the pore properties of membrane proteins whose production in vivo is toxic. PMID:24142256

  18. Structure and function of the PorB porin from disseminating Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Zeth, Kornelius; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Faulstich, Michaela; Fraunholz, Martin; Hurwitz, Robert; Kepp, Oliver; Rudel, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria contains a large number of channel-forming proteins, porins, for the uptake of small nutrient molecules. Neisseria gonorrhoeae PorBIA (PorB of serotype A) are associated with disseminating diseases and mediate a rapid bacterial invasion into host cells in a phosphate-sensitive manner. To gain insights into this structure-function relationship we analysed PorBIA by X-ray crystallography in the presence of phosphate and ATP. The structure of PorBIA in the complex solved at a resolution of 3.3 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) displays a surplus of positive charges inside the channel. ATP ligand-binding in the channel is co-ordinated by the positively charged residues of the channel interior. These residues ligate the aromatic, sugar and pyrophosphate moieties of the ligand. Two phosphate ions were observed in the structure, one of which clamped by two arginine residues (Arg92 and Arg124) localized at the extraplasmic channel exit. A short β-bulge in β2-strand together with the long L3 loop narrow the barrel diameter significantly and further support substrate specificity through hydrogen bond interactions. Interestingly the structure also comprised a small peptide as a remnant of a periplasmic protein which physically links porin molecules to the peptidoglycan network. To test the importance of Arg92 on bacterial invasion the residue was mutated. In vivo assays of bacteria carrying a R92S mutation confirmed the importance of this residue for host-cell invasion. Furthermore systematic sequence and structure comparisons of PorBIA from Neisseriaceae indicated Arg92 to be unique in disseminating N. gonorrhoeae thereby possibly distinguishing invasion-promoting porins from other neisserial porins.

  19. Influence of Core Oligosaccharide of Lipopolysaccharide to Outer Membrane Behavior of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhou; Wang, Jianli; Ren, Ge; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides, major molecules in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, play important roles on membrane integrity of the cell. However, how the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide affect the membrane behavior is not well understood. In this study, the relationship between the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide and the membrane behavior was investigated using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes to affect the biosynthesis of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide. Cell surface hydrophobicity, outer membrane permeability, biofilm formation and auto-aggregation of these mutant cells were compared. Compared to the wild type W3110, cell surface hydrophobicities of mutant ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaY and ΔwaaB were enhanced, outer membrane permeabilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG and ΔwaaP were significantly increased, abilities of biofilm formation by ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaQ and ΔwaaY decreased, and auto-aggregation abilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaU, ΔwaaP and ΔwaaY were strongly enhanced. These results give new insight into the influence of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide on bacterial cell membrane behavior. PMID:26023839

  20. Selective release of the Treponema pallidum outer membrane and associated polypeptides with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, T M; Walker, E M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1988-12-01

    The effects of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 on the ultrastructure of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum are presented in this study. Treatment of Percoll-purified motile T. pallidum with a 1% concentration of Triton X-114 resulted in cell surface blebbing followed by lysis of blebs and a decrease in diameter from 0.25-0.35 micron to 0.1-0.15 micron. Examination of thin sections of untreated Percoll-purified T. pallidum showed integrity of outer and cytoplasmic membranes. In contrast, thin sections of Triton X-114-treated treponemes showed integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane but loss of the outer membrane. The cytoplasmic cylinders generated by detergent treatment retained their periplasmic flagella, as judged by electron microscopy and immunoblotting. Recently identified T. pallidum penicillin-binding proteins also remained associated with the cytoplasmic cylinders. Proteins released by Triton X-114 at 4 degrees C were divided into aqueous and hydrophobic phases after incubation at 37 degrees C. The hydrophobic phase had major polypeptide constituents of 57, 47, 38, 33-35, 23, 16, and 14 kilodaltons (kDa) which were reactive with syphilitic serum. The 47-kDa polypeptide was reactive with a monoclonal antibody which has been previously shown to identify a surface-associated T. pallidum antigen. The aqueous phase contained the 190-kDa ordered ring molecule, 4D, which has been associated with the surface of the organisms. Full release of the 47- and 190-kDa molecules was dependent on the presence of a reducing agent. These results indicate that 1% Triton X-114 selectively solubilizes the T. pallidum outer membrane and associated proteins of likely outer membrane location.

  1. Aeromonas salmonicida possesses two genes encoding homologs of the major outer membrane protein, OmpA.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, G M; Vipond, R; MacIntyre, S

    1996-01-01

    Two homologs of the outer membrane protein OmpA were identified in Aeromonas salmonicida by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and amino-terminal sequence analyses. An A. salmonicida genomic DNA library was constructed by using lambda GEM-11 and recombinant phage carrying both genes ompAI and ompAII) selected by immunoscreening. A 5.0-kb BamHI fragment containing the two genes in tandem was subcloned in pBluescript and used for further subcloning and sequencing of the genes. The encoded proteins (Mr = 33,564 and 32,536 for mature OmpAI and OmpAII, respectively) had only 64% identity with each other and otherwise had the highest level of homology to OmpA proteins from the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Based on the Escherichia coli OmpA model, an eight-stranded amphipathic beta-barrel model for the membrane assembly of the N-terminal half of OmpAI and OmpAII was predicted. Most variation between the two proteins was localized to the predicted surface loops and periplasmic turns, while the transmembrane strands and C-terminals domains were highly conserved. Expression of ompAI and ompAII separately in E. coli indicated that both genes could be independently transcribed from their own promoters and that both gene products were assembled into the E. coli outer membrane. A survey of different Aeromonas spp. by PCR revealed that possession of two tandem ompA genes was widespread among this genus. This is the first report of any bacterial species possessing two genes for homologs of this major outer membrane protein. PMID:8626290

  2. Cloning of the outer membrane high-affinity Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Ankenbauer, R G

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces the phenolic siderophore pyochelin under iron-limiting conditions. In this study, an Fe(III)-pyochelin transport-negative (Fpt-) strain, IA613, was isolated and characterized. 55Fe(III)-pyochelin transport assays determined that no Fe(III)-pyochelin associated with the Fpt- IA613 cells while a significant amount associated with KCN-poisoned Fpt+ cells. A P. aeruginosa genomic library was constructed in the IncP cosmid pLAFR1. The genomic library was mobilized into IA613, and a recombinant cosmid, pCC41, which complemented the Fpt- phenotype of IA613, was isolated. pCC41 contained a 28-kb insert of P. aeruginosa DNA, and the Fpt(-)-complementing region was localized to a 3.6-kb BamHI-EcoRI fragment by deletion and subcloning of the insert. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of IA613 revealed that it lacked a 75-kDa outer membrane protein present in Fpt+ strains. IA613 strains bearing plasmid pRML303, which carries the 3.6-kb BamHI-EcoRI fragment of pCC41, expressed the 75-kDa outer membrane protein and demonstrated a 55Fe(III)-pyochelin transport phenotype identical to that of a wild-type Fpt+ strain. Minicell analysis demonstrated that the 3.6-kb BamHI-EcoRI fragment of pCC41 encoded a protein of approximately 75 kDa. The results presented here and in a previous report (D. E. Heinrichs, L. Young, and K. Poole, Infect. Immun. 59:3680-3684, 1991) lead to the conclusion that the 75-kDa outer membrane protein is the high-affinity receptor for Fe(III)-pyochelin in P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:1320609

  3. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death. PMID:24412217

  4. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutronmore » reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.« less

  5. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.

  6. Immunobiological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins.

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, M A; Rossano, F; Catalanotti, P; Liguori, G; Capasso, C; Ceccarelli, M T; Marinelli, P

    1994-01-01

    Studies were carried out on some biological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins in vitro. We extracted and purified a porin with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kDa. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes preincubated with H. pylori porins showed a decrease of chemotaxis, of adherence to nylon wool, and of chemiluminescence. Used as chemotaxins in place of zymosan-activated serum or as chemotaxinogens in place of zymosan, the porins induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration. Human monocytes and lymphocytes cultivated in the presence of H. pylori porins released cytokines. Release of the various cytokines studied was obtained with differentiated kinetics and at various porin concentrations. Starting only 3 h after culture, tumor necrosis factor alpha is released quickly, reaching a peak at 18 h, at a porin concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) appears later, with a peak at 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells. Lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori porins release gamma interferon after 18 h of culture at higher concentrations of porins (20 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells). Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is released from 6 to 48 h at a concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, while both IL-3 and IL-4 are released after 18 h of culture at different porin concentrations (0.1 and 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, respectively). Our results lead us to think that during H. pylori infection, surface components, porins in particular, are able to induce a series of chain reactions ranging from the inflammatory to the immunological responses. Images PMID:8132346

  7. Homogeneity of the major outer membrane protein gene of feline Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed

    Sayada, C; Andersen, A; Rodriguez, P; Eb, F; Milon, A; Elion, J; Denamur, E

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen feline Chlamydia psittaci strains isolated in various countries over a 50-year period were examined by restriction mapping of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) gene obtained after DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction and compared with avian, ovine and guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) C psittaci strains. All the feline isolates produced a unique AluI pattern distinct from the other C psittaci strains and were characterised by a typical fragment doublet of 185/180 base pairs. Such a homogeneity argues for their genetic relatedness and suggests their clonal origin. These data demonstrate the usefulness of MOMP-gene restriction mapping in C psittaci typing.

  8. Multiple tandem promoters of the major outer membrane protein gene (omp1) of Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Zhang, Y X; Manning, D S; Caldwell, H D

    1990-09-01

    The transcription of omp1, the gene encoding the major outer membrane protein, was studied for two strains of Chlamydia psittaci, guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) and mouse pneumonitis (Mn). The transcriptional initiation sites for the omp1 of each strain were mapped by S1 nuclease and primer extension analyses. Three different sizes of omp1 transcripts were observed for GPIC and four were observed for Mn. The production of these transcripts appeared to be the consequence of multiple tandem promoters. The order in which the omp1 RNA transcripts appeared during the growth cycle of the C. psittaci strains was found to differ from that of C. trachomatis.

  9. Emerging roles for anionic non-bilayer phospholipids in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Russell E

    2014-09-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214-3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics.

  10. Emerging Roles for Anionic Non-Bilayer Phospholipids in Fortifying the Outer Membrane Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214–3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics. PMID:25022852

  11. A putative porin gene of Burkholderia sp. NK8 involved in chemotaxis toward β-ketoadipate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Tamura, Kimiko; Kawagishi, Ikuro; Ogawa, Naoto; Fujii, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. NK8 can utilize 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) as a sole source of carbon because it has a megaplasmid (pNK8) that carries the gene cluster (tfdT-CDEF) encoding chlorocatechol-degrading enzymes. The expression of tfdT-CDEF is induced by 3CB. In this study, we found that NK8 cells were attracted to 3CB and its degradation products, 3- and 4-chlorocatechol, and β-ketoadipate. Capillary assays revealed that a pNK8-eliminated strain (NK82) was defective in chemotaxis toward β-ketoadipate. The introduction of a plasmid carrying a putative outer membrane porin gene, which we name ompNK8, into strain NK82 restored chemotaxis toward β-ketoadipate. RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the transcription of the ompNK8 gene was enhanced in the presence of 3CB.

  12. Wzi is an outer membrane lectin that underpins group 1 capsule assembly in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bushell, Simon R; Mainprize, Iain L; Wear, Martin A; Lou, Hubing; Whitfield, Chris; Naismith, James H

    2013-05-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria encase themselves in a polysaccharide capsule that provides a barrier to the physical and immunological challenges of the host. The mechanism by which the capsule assembles around the bacterial cell is unknown. Wzi, an integral outer-membrane protein from Escherichia coli, has been implicated in the formation of group 1 capsules. The 2.6 Å resolution structure of Wzi reveals an 18-stranded β-barrel fold with a novel arrangement of long extracellular loops that blocks the extracellular entrance and a helical bundle that plugs the periplasmic end. Mutagenesis shows that specific extracellular loops are required for in vivo capsule assembly. The data show that Wzi binds the K30 carbohydrate polymer and, crucially, that mutants functionally deficient in vivo show no binding to K30 polymer in vitro. We conclude that Wzi is a novel outer-membrane lectin that assists in the formation of the bacterial capsule via direct interaction with capsular polysaccharides.

  13. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  14. Interaction between bacterial outer membrane proteins and periplasmic quality control factors: a kinetic partitioning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si; Ge, Xi; Lv, Zhixin; Zhi, Zeyong; Chang, Zengyi; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2011-09-15

    The OMPs (outer membrane proteins) of Gram-negative bacteria have to be translocated through the periplasmic space before reaching their final destination. The aqueous environment of the periplasmic space and high permeability of the outer membrane engender such a translocation process inevitably challenging. In Escherichia coli, although SurA, Skp and DegP have been identified to function in translocating OMPs across the periplasm, their precise roles and their relationship remain to be elucidated. In the present paper, by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and single-molecule detection, we have studied the interaction between the OMP OmpC and these periplasmic quality control factors. The results of the present study reveal that the binding rate of OmpC to SurA or Skp is much faster than that to DegP, which may lead to sequential interaction between OMPs and different quality control factors. Such a kinetic partitioning mechanism for the chaperone-substrate interaction may be essential for the quality control of the biogenesis of OMPs.

  15. Refolding, purification and crystallization of the FrpB outer membrane iron transporter from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Prince, Stephen M; Patel, Hema; Chan, Hannah; Feavers, Ian M; Derrick, Jeremy P

    2012-02-01

    FrpB is an integral outer membrane protein from the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis. It is a member of the TonB-dependent transporter family and promotes the uptake of iron across the outer membrane. There is also evidence that FrpB is an antigen and hence a potential component of a vaccine against meningococcal meningitis. FrpB incorporating a polyhistidine tag was overexpressed in Escherichia coli into inclusion bodies. The protein was then solubilized in urea, refolded and purified to homogeneity. Two separate antigenic variants of FrpB were crystallized by sitting-drop vapour diffusion. Crystals of the F5-1 variant diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 176.5, b = 79.4, c = 75.9 Å, β = 98.3°. Crystal-packing calculations suggested the presence of a monomer in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of the F3-3 variant also diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 85.3, b = 104.6, c = 269.1 Å. Preliminary analysis suggested the presence of an FrpB trimer in the asymmetric unit.

  16. A discrete pathway for the transfer of intermembrane space proteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gornicka, Agnieszka; Bragoszewski, Piotr; Chroscicki, Piotr; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Schulz, Christian; Rehling, Peter; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2014-12-15

    Mitochondrial proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and imported into mitochondria with the help of protein translocases. For the majority of precursor proteins, the role of the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and mechanisms of their transport across the outer mitochondrial membrane are well recognized. However, little is known about the mode of membrane translocation for proteins that are targeted to the intermembrane space via the redox-driven mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly (MIA) pathway. On the basis of the results obtained from an in organello competition import assay, we hypothesized that MIA-dependent precursor proteins use an alternative pathway to cross the outer mitochondrial membrane. Here we demonstrate that this alternative pathway involves the protein channel formed by Tom40. We sought a translocation intermediate by expressing tagged versions of MIA-dependent proteins in vivo. We identified a transient interaction between our model substrates and Tom40. Of interest, outer membrane translocation did not directly involve other core components of the TOM complex, including Tom22. Thus MIA-dependent proteins take another route across the outer mitochondrial membrane that involves Tom40 in a form that is different from the canonical TOM complex.

  17. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space, divide caulobacter inner and outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Judd, Ellen M; Comolli, Luis R; Chen, Joseph C; Downing, Kenneth H; Moerner, W E; McAdams, Harley H

    2005-10-01

    Cryoelectron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner membrane (IM) and then the outer membrane (OM) in a manner distinctly different from that of septum-forming bacteria. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization (when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments) occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135-min cell cycle so the two constrictive processes are separated in both time and space. In the very latest stages of both IM and OM constriction, short membrane tether structures are observed. The smallest observed pre-fission tethers were 60 nm in diameter for both the inner and outer membranes. Here, we also used FLIP experiments to show that both membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins diffuse freely through the FtsZ ring during most of the constriction procession.

  18. Allosteric signalling in the outer membrane translocation domain of PapC usher

    PubMed Central

    Farabella, Irene; Pham, Thieng; Henderson, Nadine S; Geibel, Sebastian; Phan, Gilles; Thanassi, David G; Delcour, Anne H; Waksman, Gabriel; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    PapC ushers are outer-membrane proteins enabling assembly and secretion of P pili in uropathogenic E. coli. Their translocation domain is a large β-barrel occluded by a plug domain, which is displaced to allow the translocation of pilus subunits across the membrane. Previous studies suggested that this gating mechanism is controlled by a β-hairpin and an α-helix. To investigate the role of these elements in allosteric signal communication, we developed a method combining evolutionary and molecular dynamics studies of the native translocation domain and mutants lacking the β-hairpin and/or the α-helix. Analysis of a hybrid residue interaction network suggests distinct regions (residue ‘communities’) within the translocation domain (especially around β12–β14) linking these elements, thereby modulating PapC gating. Antibiotic sensitivity and electrophysiology experiments on a set of alanine-substitution mutants confirmed functional roles for four of these communities. This study illuminates the gating mechanism of PapC ushers and its importance in maintaining outer-membrane permeability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03532.001 PMID:25271373

  19. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    PubMed

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses.

  20. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control.

  1. Toward Understanding the Outer Membrane Uptake of Small Molecules by Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Elif; Parkin, Jamie; Adelanwa, Ayodele; Cheneke, Belete; Movileanu, Liviu; Khalid, Syma; van den Berg, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Because small molecules enter Gram-negative bacteria via outer membrane (OM) channels, understanding OM transport is essential for the rational design of improved and new antibiotics. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, most small molecules are taken up by outer membrane carboxylate channel (Occ) proteins, which can be divided into two distinct subfamilies, OccD and OccK. Here we characterize substrate transport mediated by Occ proteins belonging to both subfamilies. Based on the determination of the OccK2-glucuronate co-crystal structure, we identify the channel residues that are essential for substrate transport. We further show that the pore regions of the channels are rigid in the OccK subfamily and highly dynamic in the OccD subfamily. We also demonstrate that the substrate carboxylate group interacts with central residues of the basic ladder, a row of arginine and lysine residues that leads to and away from the binding site at the channel constriction. Moreover, the importance of the basic ladder residues corresponds to their degree of conservation. Finally, we apply the generated insights by converting the archetype of the entire family, OccD1, from a basic amino acid-specific channel into a channel with a preference for negatively charged amino acids. PMID:23467408

  2. The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2009-08-01

    As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

  3. Leptospiral outer membrane protein LipL32 induces inflammation and kidney injury in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Yang; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Shen-Hsing; Ma, Tsu-Lin; Chou, Li-Fang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Pan, Rong-Long; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an often overlooked cause of acute kidney injury that can lead to multiple organ failure and even death. The principle protein that conserved in many pathogenic leptospires is the outer membrane protein LipL32. However, the role of LipL32 in the pathogenesis of renal injury in leptospirosis is not entirely clear. Here we studied the effects of LipL32 on the developing kidney in zebrafish larvae. Incubation of zebrafish larvae with Leptospira santarosai serovar Shermani induced acute tubular injury predominantly in the proximal pronephric ducts. Furthermore, microinjection of lipl32 mRNA or recombinant LipL32 protein into zebrafish larvae increased macrophage accumulation and disrupted the basolateral location of NA-K-ATPase in pronephric ducts. These changes led to substantial impairment of the pronephric kidney structure. We further demonstrated that morpholino knockdown of tlr2, but not tlr4, reduced the LipL32-induced leukocyte infiltration and kidney injury. These data demonstrate that LipL32 contributes to the renal pathology in leptospirosis and gives some clues to the potential virulence of LipL32. Our results support the use of zebrafish as a model organism for studying the disease mechanism of leptospiral infection. This model might permit the future exploration of the virulence and molecular pathways of different leptospiral outer membrane proteins. PMID:27278903

  4. Induction and repression of outer membrane proteins by anaerobic growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, V L; Campbell, L A; Palermo, D A; Evans, T M; Klimpel, K W

    1987-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is generally considered to be an obligate aerobe; it can, however, grow in the absence of oxygen by anaerobic respiration by using nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. The outer membrane protein compositions of aerobically and anaerobically grown N. gonorrhoeae strains were compared by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Anaerobically grown strains expressed at least three proteins (Pan 1 to Pan 3) at much higher levels than did aerobically grown cells. Conversely, at least five other proteins (Pox 1 to Pox 5) were found to be expressed at significantly higher levels in aerobically grown cells. None of the Pan or Pox proteins were heat modifiable, and none of the heat-modifiable protein IIs or other major outer membrane proteins (protein I, protein III, pilin, or H-8 protein) were significantly altered in expression by anaerobic growth. There were also no apparent differences in lipopolysaccharide composition in aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci. The regulation of protein expression by oxygen availability suggests that anaerobic growth is a physiologically significant state for this organism. Images PMID:3106220

  5. Antigen-specific serotyping of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: characterization based upon principal outer membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, T M; Hildebrandt, J F

    1981-01-01

    Principal outer membrane protein (protein I) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was prepared nearly free of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and substantially purified from other membrane proteins by chromatography of partially purified gonococcal outer membranes over Sepharose 6B in the presence of deoxycholate at pH 9.0. This protein I of nine separate antigenic types was coated to polystyrene tubes and used in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibody to protein I or in inhibition tests to quantitate protein I antigen. No significant inhibition of the ELISA test was produced by purified LPS from the strain used to prepare each of the protein I types or by whole gonococci bearing the same LPS but different protein I antigens as the strain used to produce a given protein I antigen. Of 125 strains of gonococci used as whole organisms to inhibit the protein I ELISA, 124 (99%) typed with one or more of the nine protein I types, and 35% of these typed with a single protein I serotype. Sixty-one of 65 (94%) strains from Seattle and Atlanta patients with disseminated gonococcal infection contained protein I serotype 1, and 16 of 24 (64%) strains from Seattle patients with salpingitis bore one or both of protein I serotypes 1 and 2. Images PMID:6166568

  6. From Constructs to Crystals - Towards Structure Determination of β-barrel Outer Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Mayclin, Stephen; Stanley, Ann M; Jao, Christine C; Buchanan, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins serve important functions in cells such as nutrient transport, motility, signaling, survival and virulence, yet constitute only ~1% percent of known structures. There are two types of membrane proteins, α-helical and β-barrel. While α-helical membrane proteins can be found in nearly all cellular membranes, β-barrel membrane proteins can only be found in the outer membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts, and Gram-negative bacteria. One common bottleneck in structural studies of membrane proteins in general is getting enough pure sample for analysis. In hopes of assisting those interested in solving the structure of their favorite β-barrel outer membrane protein (OMP), general protocols are presented for the production of target β-barrel OMPs at levels useful for structure determination by either X-ray crystallography and/or NMR spectroscopy. Here, we outline construct design for both native expression and for expression into inclusion bodies, purification using an affinity tag, and crystallization using detergent screening, bicelle, and lipidic cubic phase techniques. These protocols have been tested and found to work for most OMPs from Gram-negative bacteria; however, there are some targets, particularly for mitochondria and chloroplasts that may require other methods for expression and purification. As such, the methods here should be applicable for most projects that involve OMPs from Gram-negative bacteria, yet the expression levels and amount of purified sample will vary depending on the target OMP. PMID:27404000

  7. Leptospiral outer membrane protein LipL32 induces inflammation and kidney injury in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Yang; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Shen-Hsing; Ma, Tsu-Lin; Chou, Li-Fang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Pan, Rong-Long; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an often overlooked cause of acute kidney injury that can lead to multiple organ failure and even death. The principle protein that conserved in many pathogenic leptospires is the outer membrane protein LipL32. However, the role of LipL32 in the pathogenesis of renal injury in leptospirosis is not entirely clear. Here we studied the effects of LipL32 on the developing kidney in zebrafish larvae. Incubation of zebrafish larvae with Leptospira santarosai serovar Shermani induced acute tubular injury predominantly in the proximal pronephric ducts. Furthermore, microinjection of lipl32 mRNA or recombinant LipL32 protein into zebrafish larvae increased macrophage accumulation and disrupted the basolateral location of NA-K-ATPase in pronephric ducts. These changes led to substantial impairment of the pronephric kidney structure. We further demonstrated that morpholino knockdown of tlr2, but not tlr4, reduced the LipL32-induced leukocyte infiltration and kidney injury. These data demonstrate that LipL32 contributes to the renal pathology in leptospirosis and gives some clues to the potential virulence of LipL32. Our results support the use of zebrafish as a model organism for studying the disease mechanism of leptospiral infection. This model might permit the future exploration of the virulence and molecular pathways of different leptospiral outer membrane proteins. PMID:27278903

  8. A novel Mitosomal β-barrel Outer Membrane Protein in Entamoeba.

    PubMed

    Santos, Herbert J; Imai, Kenichiro; Makiuchi, Takashi; Tomii, Kentaro; Horton, Paul; Nozawa, Akira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-25

    Entamoeba possesses a highly divergent mitochondrion-related organelle known as the mitosome. Here, we report the discovery of a novel protein in Entamoeba, which we name Mitosomal β-barrel Outer Membrane Protein of 30 kDa (MBOMP30). Initially identified through in silico analysis, we experimentally confirmed that MBOMP30 is indeed a β-barrel protein. Circular dichroism analysis showed MBOMP30 has a predominant β-sheet structure. Localization to Entamoeba histolytica mitosomes was observed through Percoll-gradient fractionation and immunofluorescence assay. Mitosomal membrane integration was demonstrated by carbonate fractionation, proteinase K digestion, and immunoelectron microscopy. Interestingly, the deletion of the putative β-signal, a sequence believed to guide β-barrel outer membrane protein (BOMP) assembly, did not affect membrane integration, but abolished the formation of a ~240 kDa complex. MBOMP30 represents only the seventh subclass of eukaryotic BOMPs discovered to date and lacks detectable homologs outside Entamoeba, suggesting that it may be unique to Entamoeba mitosomes.

  9. Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles by the Plague Pathogen Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, Adam J.; Rangel, Stephanie M.; Lathem, Wyndham W.

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during cell growth and division, and some bacterial pathogens deliver virulence factors to the host via the release of OMVs during infection. Here we show that Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the disease plague, produces and releases native OMVs under physiological conditions. These OMVs, approximately 100 nm in diameter, contain multiple virulence-associated outer membrane proteins including the adhesin Ail, the F1 outer fimbrial antigen, and the protease Pla. We found that OMVs released by Y. pestis contain catalytically active Pla that is competent for plasminogen activation and α2-antiplasmin degradation. The abundance of OMV-associated proteins released by Y. pestis is significantly elevated at 37°C compared to 26°C and is increased in response to membrane stress and mutations in RseA, Hfq, and the major Braun lipoprotein (Lpp). In addition, we show that Y. pestis OMVs are able to bind to components of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin and laminin. These data suggest that Y. pestis may produce OMVs during mammalian infection and we propose that dispersal of Pla via OMV release may influence the outcome of infection through interactions with Pla substrates such as plasminogen and Fas ligand. PMID:25198697

  10. Allosteric signalling in the outer membrane translocation domain of PapC usher.

    PubMed

    Farabella, Irene; Pham, Thieng; Henderson, Nadine S; Geibel, Sebastian; Phan, Gilles; Thanassi, David G; Delcour, Anne H; Waksman, Gabriel; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    PapC ushers are outer-membrane proteins enabling assembly and secretion of P pili in uropathogenic E. coli. Their translocation domain is a large β-barrel occluded by a plug domain, which is displaced to allow the translocation of pilus subunits across the membrane. Previous studies suggested that this gating mechanism is controlled by a β-hairpin and an α-helix. To investigate the role of these elements in allosteric signal communication, we developed a method combining evolutionary and molecular dynamics studies of the native translocation domain and mutants lacking the β-hairpin and/or the α-helix. Analysis of a hybrid residue interaction network suggests distinct regions (residue 'communities') within the translocation domain (especially around β12-β14) linking these elements, thereby modulating PapC gating. Antibiotic sensitivity and electrophysiology experiments on a set of alanine-substitution mutants confirmed functional roles for four of these communities. This study illuminates the gating mechanism of PapC ushers and its importance in maintaining outer-membrane permeability.

  11. Structure of BamA, an essential factor in outer membrane protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Faulstich, Michaela; Bermejo, Ivan; Rudel, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Zeth, Kornelius

    2014-06-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is an essential process for maintaining the bacterial cell envelope and involves the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for OMP recognition, folding and assembly. In Escherichia coli this function is orchestrated by five proteins: the integral outer membrane protein BamA of the Omp85 superfamily and four associated lipoproteins. To unravel the mechanism underlying OMP folding and insertion, the structure of the E. coli BamA β-barrel and P5 domain was determined at 3 Å resolution. These data add information beyond that provided in the recently published crystal structures of BamA from Haemophilus ducreyi and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and are a valuable basis for the interpretation of pertinent functional studies. In an `open' conformation, E. coli BamA displays a significant degree of flexibility between P5 and the barrel domain, which is indicative of a multi-state function in substrate transfer. E. coli BamA is characterized by a discontinuous β-barrel with impaired β1-β16 strand interactions denoted by only two connecting hydrogen bonds and a disordered C-terminus. The 16-stranded barrel surrounds a large cavity which implies a function in OMP substrate binding and partial folding. These findings strongly support a mechanism of OMP biogenesis in which substrates are partially folded inside the barrel cavity and are subsequently released laterally into the lipid bilayer. PMID:24914988

  12. Additive and Synergistic Bactericidal Activity of Antibodies Directed against Minor Outer Membrane Proteins of Neisseria meningitidis▿

    PubMed Central

    Weynants, Vincent E.; Feron, Christiane M.; Goraj, Karine K.; Bos, Martine P.; Denoël, Philippe A.; Verlant, Vincent G.; Tommassen, Jan; Peak, Ian R. A.; Judd, Ralph C.; Jennings, Michael P.; Poolman, Jan T.

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is a major cause of bacterial meningitis in younger populations. The available vaccines are based on outer membrane vesicles obtained from wild-type strains. In children less than 2 years old they confer protection only against strains expressing homologous PorA, a major, variable outer membrane protein (OMP). We genetically modified a strain in order to eliminate PorA and to overproduce one or several minor and conserved OMPs. Using a mouse model mimicking children's PorA-specific bactericidal activity, it was demonstrated that overproduction of more than one minor OMP is required to elicit antibodies able to induce complement-mediated killing of strains expressing heterologous PorA. It is concluded that a critical density of bactericidal antibodies needs to be reached at the surface of meningococci to induce complement-mediated killing. With minor OMPs, this threshold is reached when more than one antigen is targeted, and this allows cross-protection. PMID:17664268

  13. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  14. A novel mechanism for the biogenesis of outer membrane vesicles in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Zingl, Franz G.; Cakar, Fatih; Durakovic, Sanel; Kohl, Paul; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Klug, Lisa; Gadermaier, Bernhard; Weinzerl, Katharina; Prassl, Ruth; Lass, Achim; Daum, Günther; Reidl, Joachim; Feldman, Mario F.; Schild, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have important biological roles in pathogenesis and intercellular interactions, but a general mechanism of OMV formation is lacking. Here we show that the VacJ/Yrb ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system, a proposed phospholipid transporter, is involved in OMV formation. Deletion or repression of VacJ/Yrb increases OMV production in two distantly related Gram-negative bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae. Lipidome analyses demonstrate that OMVs from VacJ/Yrb-defective mutants in H. influenzae are enriched in phospholipids and certain fatty acids. Furthermore, we demonstrate that OMV production and regulation of the VacJ/Yrb ABC transport system respond to iron starvation. Our results suggest a new general mechanism of OMV biogenesis based on phospholipid accumulation in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. This mechanism is highly conserved among Gram-negative bacteria, provides a means for regulation, can account for OMV formation under all growth conditions, and might have important pathophysiological roles in vivo. PMID:26806181

  15. Outer Membrane Vesicle Biosynthesis in Salmonella: Is There More to Gram-Negative Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent research has focused on the biological role of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are derived from the outer membranes (OMs) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their potential exploitation as therapeutics. OMVs have been characterized in many ways and functions. Until recently, research focused on hypothetical and empirical models that addressed the molecular mechanisms of OMV biogenesis, such as vesicles bulging from the OM in various ways. The recently reported study by Elhenawy et al. (mBio 7:e00940-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00940-16) provided further insights into OMV biogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. That study showed that deacylation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) influences the level of OMV production and, furthermore, determines a sorting of high versus low acylated LPS in OMs and OMVs, respectively. Interestingly, deacylation may inversely correlate with other LPS modifications, suggesting some synergy toward optimized host resistance via best OM compositions for S. Typhimurium. PMID:27531914

  16. Isolation and characterization of an outer membrane protein of Salmonella paratyphi B: a mitogen and polyclonal activator of human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sager, S; Virella, G; Chen, W Y; Fudenberg, H H

    1984-01-01

    Salmonella paratyphi B (S. paratyphi B) has been previously characterized as a human T-independent polyclonal B cell activator. To define further the nature of the bacterial structure responsible for these properties, we studied the effects of autoclaving and enzyme treatment of S. paratyphi B on its stimulatory capacity. We found that both autoclaving and papain treatment decreased the ability of S. paratyphi B to induce B cell activation, while trypsin treatment did not affect this capacity. Neither type of treatment affected the binding of S. paratyphi B to lymphocytes, suggesting that binding and B cell stimulation are mediated by different structures. The observation that B cell stimulation was significantly reduced by papain treatment led us to attempt to purify membrane proteins so that we could investigate whether they shared the stimulating capacity of S. paratyphi B. A water-insoluble, 43-45,000 mol. wt. protein, rich in aspartic acid, glutamine, glycine, alanine and leucine, similar in mol. wt. and physicochemical chemical properties to the porins of other gram negative bacteria, was isolated and designated as outer membrane protein (OMP). This protein was equally efficient to S. paratyphi B in inducing T-independent B cell activation. By performing time-course studies of [3H]-thymidine incorporation we observed a burst of mitogenic activity after stimulation of PBL or purified B cells with both S. paratyphi B and OMP peaking at 48-96 hr of culture (compared to 96-120 hr for the PWM proliferation peak), and with a magnitude of roughly 10% of that observed after PWM stimulation. Given the fact that the proportion of B lymphocytes in PBL is 4-12%, it appears likely that the proliferation burst seen with S. paratyphi B and OMP corresponds to a mitogenic effect mainly restricted to the B cell population. Images Figure 1 PMID:6370841

  17. Role of outer membrane protein H (OmpH)- and OmpA-specific monoclonal antibodies from hybridoma tumors in protection of mice against Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Vasfi Marandi, M; Mittal, K R

    1997-01-01

    Two major outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella multocida, designated OmpH and OmpA, were characterized and shown to be related to the families of porin and heat-modifiable proteins, respectively. The backpack hybridoma tumor system in BALB/c mice was used to continuously deliver immunoglobulin G2b (IgG2b) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for OmpH (MAb MT1) and OmpA (MAb MT4.1). MAbs were detected in serum and peritoneal lavage samples of mice bearing hybridoma tumors by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an immunoblot assay. Highly significant protection was observed in mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors against both intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge infections with homologous nontoxigenic P. multocida strains possessing MAb MT1-reacting epitopes, whereas the mice bearing MT4.1 hybridoma tumors were not protected. The numbers of P. multocida organisms in the lungs of mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors were significantly less than those in lungs of mice bearing MT4.1 hybridoma tumors at 48 h postchallenge. These results indicate that the OmpH-specific MAb inhibited proliferation of P. multocida in the lungs. MAb MT1 was unable to kill P. multocida in vitro in the presence of complement. However, an enhanced phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) was observed in mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors. P. multocida induced a more extensive and rapid influx of PMNs into the peritoneal cavity of mice bearing MT1 hybridoma tumors than of mice bearing MT4.1 hybridoma tumors. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time that IgG MAbs against OmpH of P. multocida are involved in the protection of mice against lethal challenge infection by means of opsonization and inhibition of proliferation of P. multocida as a result of increased influx of PMNs into the infection site. PMID:9353026

  18. Proteomic and functional analyses of a novel porin-like protein in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jee; Lee, Sang-Won; Han, Sang-Wook

    2014-12-01

    Proteomic analysis is a useful technique for postulating and elucidating protein functions. In the present work, a shotgun proteomic analysis was used to identify functions of the PXO_03968 gene (previously known as the ax21) from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), a causal agent for bacterial blight disease in rice. Structural prediction performed on the protein sequence encoded by PXO_03968 reveals that it encodes a putative porin-like protein, possessing a β-barrel domain with 10 β-strands and a signal peptide at the N-terminus. We renamed the gene as an omp1X (outer membrane protein 1 in Xoo), generated its knock out mutant (XooΔomp1X), and compared the protein expression level in the mutant to that in the wild type. A total of 106 proteins displayed more than 1.5-fold difference in expression between the mutant and the wild type strains. COG analysis revealed that these proteins are involved in cell motility as well as signal transduction. In addition, phenotypic analysis demonstrated that motility and biofilm formation in XooΔomp1X are lower than the wild type. These results provide new insights into the functions of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. Preprotein transport machineries of yeast mitochondrial outer membrane are not required for Bax-induced release of intermembrane space proteins.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán Szklarz, Luiza K; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Vögtle, F-Nora; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Vogel, Sandra; Dürr, Mark; Westermann, Benedikt; Guiard, Bernard; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Borner, Christoph; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-04-20

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains protein import machineries, the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). It has been speculated that TOM or SAM are required for Bax-induced release of intermembrane space (IMS) proteins; however, experimental evidence has been scarce. We used isolated yeast mitochondria as a model system and report that Bax promoted an efficient release of soluble IMS proteins while preproteins were still imported, excluding an unspecific damage of mitochondria. Removal of import receptors by protease treatment did not inhibit the release of IMS proteins by Bax. Yeast mutants of each Tom receptor and the Tom40 channel were not impaired in Bax-induced protein release. We analyzed a large collection of mutants of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including SAM, fusion and fission components, but none of these components was required for Bax-induced protein release. The released proteins included complexes up to a size of 230 kDa. We conclude that Bax promotes efficient release of IMS proteins through the outer membrane of yeast mitochondria while the inner membrane remains intact. Inactivation of the known protein import and sorting machineries of the outer membrane does not impair the function of Bax at the mitochondria.

  20. Identification and characterization of an immunogenic outer membrane protein of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Burnens, A; Stucki, U; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1995-01-01

    We cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli a gene encoding an 18-kDa outer membrane protein (Omp18) from Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 29428. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding Omp18 was determined, and an open reading frame of 165 amino acids was revealed. The amino acid sequence had the typical features of a leader sequence and a signal peptidase II cleavage site at the N-terminal part of Omp18. Moreover, the sequence had a high degree of similarity to the peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane lipoprotein P6 of Haemophilus influenzae and the peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein PAL of E. coli. Southern blot analysis in which the cloned gene was used as a probe revealed genes similar to that encoding Omp18 in all species of the thermophilic group of campylobacters as well as Campylobacter sputorum. All campylobacters tested expressed a protein with a molecular mass identical to that of Omp18. The protein reacted immunologically with polyclonal antibodies directed against Omp18 from C. jejuni. PCR amplification of the gene encoding Omp18 with specific primers and subsequent restriction enzyme analysis of the amplified DNA fragments showed that the gene for Omp18 is highly conserved in C. jejuni strains isolated from humans, dogs, cats, calves, and chickens but is different in other Campylobacter species. In order to obtain pure recombinant Omp18 protein for serological assays, the cloned gene for Omp18 was genetically modified by replacing the signal sequence with a DNA segment encoding six adjacent histidine residues. Expression of this construct in E. coli allowed purification of the modified protein (Omp18-6xHis) by metal chelation chromatography. Sera from patients with past C. jejuni infection reacted positively with Omp18-6xHis, while sera from healthy blood donors showed no reaction with this antigen. Omp18, which is an outer membrane protein belonging to the family of PALs is well conserved in C. jejuni and is highly immunogenic. It is therefore a

  1. Identification of a Novel Bacterial Outer Membrane Interleukin-1Β-Binding Protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacteractinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  2. Hybrid Antibiotic Overcomes Resistance in P. aeruginosa by Enhancing Outer Membrane Penetration and Reducing Efflux.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Guchhait, Goutam; Goswami, Sudeep; Fernando, Dinesh M; Kumar, Ayush; Zhanel, George G; Schweizer, Frank

    2016-09-22

    Therapeutic interventions to treat multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are severely limited and often require the use of colistin as drug of last resort. The major challenges impeding the development of novel antipseudomonal agents are the lack of cell penetration and extensive efflux. We have discovered a tobramycin-moxifloxacin hybrid core structure which enhances outer membrane permeability and reduces efflux by dissipating the proton motive force of the cytoplasmic membrane in P. aeruginosa. The optimized hybrid protects Galleria mellonella larvae from the lethal effects of MDR P. aeruginosa. Attempts to select for resistance over a period of 25 days resulted in a 2-fold increase in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the hybrid, while moxifloxacin or tobramycin resulted in a 16- and 512-fold increase in MIC. Although the hybrid possesses potent activity against MDR, P. aeruginosa isolates the activity that can be synergized when used in combination with other classes of antibiotics.

  3. Immunoelectron microscopic demonstration of an esterase on the outer membrane of Xanthomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Debette, J; Prensier, G

    1989-01-01

    Xanthomonas maltophilia (later synonym of Pseudomonas maltophilia), an ubiquitous species, is known to show proteolytic and lipolytic activities. A cell-bound esterase which hydrolyzes beta-naphthyl acetate during growth has been extracted from a strain isolated from soil. Because of its strongly hydrophobic character, the enzyme could be efficiently solubilized only by Triton X-100. This nonionic detergent must be added in polyacrylamide gels to permit migration. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against the Triton-soluble esterase complex were used to localize the enzyme at the ultrastructural level. Electron microscopy of cell sections of this organism and immunogold labeling demonstrated that the enzyme was located on the outer membrane. Such an envelope-bound esterase may produce assimilable substrates for X. maltophilia which can grow in various environments. Images PMID:2495761

  4. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1.

  5. Pore-forming ability of major outer membrane proteins from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238.

    PubMed Central

    Kennell, W L; Egli, C; Hancock, R E; Holt, S C

    1992-01-01

    Three major outer membrane proteins with apparent molecular masses of 43, 45, and 51 kDa were purified from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238, and their pore-forming abilities were determined by the black lipid bilayer method. The non-heat-modifiable 45-kDa protein (Omp 45) showed no pore-forming activity even at high KCl concentrations. The single-channel conductances in 1 M KCl of the heat-modifiable proteins with apparent molecular masses of 43 kDa (Omp 43) and 51 kDa (Omp 51) were 0.49 and 0.60 nS, respectively. The proteins formed nonselective channels and, as determined by experiments of ion selectivity and zero-current potential, were weakly anion selective. Images PMID:1370429

  6. Discovery of an archetypal protein transport system in bacterial outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Selkrig, Joel; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Webb, Chaille T; Belousoff, Matthew J; Perry, Andrew J; Wells, Timothy J; Morris, Faye; Leyton, Denisse L; Totsika, Makrina; Phan, Minh-Duy; Celik, Nermin; Kelly, Michelle; Oates, Clare; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Ramarathinam, Sri Harsha; Purcell, Anthony W; Schembri, Mark A; Strugnell, Richard A; Henderson, Ian R; Walker, Daniel; Lithgow, Trevor

    2012-05-01

    Bacteria have mechanisms to export proteins for diverse purposes, including colonization of hosts and pathogenesis. A small number of archetypal bacterial secretion machines have been found in several groups of bacteria and mediate a fundamentally distinct secretion process. Perhaps erroneously, proteins called 'autotransporters' have long been thought to be one of these protein secretion systems. Mounting evidence suggests that autotransporters might be substrates to be secreted, not an autonomous transporter system. We have discovered a new translocation and assembly module (TAM) that promotes efficient secretion of autotransporters in proteobacteria. Functional analysis of the TAM in Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli showed that it consists of an Omp85-family protein, TamA, in the outer membrane and TamB in the inner membrane of diverse bacterial species. The discovery of the TAM provides a new target for the development of therapies to inhibit colonization by bacterial pathogens.

  7. Evaluation of a Burkholderia pseudomallei Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Hailey; Nieves, Wildaliz; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Roy, Chad J; Morici, Lisa A

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps)is the causative agent of melioidosis and is endemic in regions of northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Bps is inherently resistant to multiple antibiotics and is considered a potential biological warfare agent by the U.S. DHHS. Therefore, effective vaccines are necessary to prevent natural infection and to safeguard against biological attack with this organism. In our previous work we have shown that immunization with naturally derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Bps provides significant protection against lethal aerosol and systemic infection in BALB/c mice. In this work, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of escalating doses of OMV vaccine in rhesus macaques. We show that immunization of rhesus macaques with Bps OMVs generates humoral immuneresponses to protective protein and polysaccharide antigens without any associated toxicity or reactogenicity. These results lay the groundwork for evaluation of protective efficacy of the OMV vaccine in the nonhuman primate model of melioidosis.

  8. Evaluation of a Burkholderia pseudomallei Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hailey; Nieves, Wildaliz; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Roy, Chad J.; Morici, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps)is the causative agent of melioidosis and is endemic in regions of northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Bps is inherently resistant to multiple antibiotics and is considered a potential biological warfare agent by the U.S. DHHS. Therefore, effective vaccines are necessary to prevent natural infection and to safeguard against biological attack with this organism. In our previous work we have shown that immunization with naturally derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Bps provides significant protection against lethal aerosol and systemic infection in BALB/c mice. In this work, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of escalating doses of OMV vaccine in rhesus macaques. We show that immunization of rhesus macaques with Bps OMVs generates humoral immuneresponses to protective protein and polysaccharide antigens without any associated toxicity or reactogenicity. These results lay the groundwork for evaluation of protective efficacy of the OMV vaccine in the nonhuman primate model of melioidosis. PMID:25165491

  9. Phylogenomic analysis supports the ancestral presence of LPS-outer membranes in the Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Luisa Cs; Poppleton, Daniel; Klingl, Andreas; Criscuolo, Alexis; Dupuy, Bruno; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Beloin, Christophe; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    One of the major unanswered questions in evolutionary biology is when and how the transition between diderm (two membranes) and monoderm (one membrane) cell envelopes occurred in Bacteria. The Negativicutes and the Halanaerobiales belong to the classically monoderm Firmicutes, but possess outer membranes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-OM). Here, we show that they form two phylogenetically distinct lineages, each close to different monoderm relatives. In contrast, their core LPS biosynthesis enzymes were inherited vertically, as in the majority of bacterial phyla. Finally, annotation of key OM systems in the Halanaerobiales and the Negativicutes shows a puzzling combination of monoderm and diderm features. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the LPS-OMs of Negativicutes and Halanaerobiales are remnants of an ancient diderm cell envelope that was present in the ancestor of the Firmicutes, and that the monoderm phenotype in this phylum is a derived character that arose multiple times independently through OM loss. PMID:27580370

  10. Cloning and sequence analysis of the major outer membrane protein genes of two Chlamydia psittaci strains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y X; Morrison, S G; Caldwell, H D; Baehr, W

    1989-05-01

    We cloned and sequenced the gene encoding the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of two Chlamydia psittaci strains, guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) strain 1, and meningopneumonitis (Mn) strain Cal-10. Intraspecies alignment of the two C. psittaci MOMP genes revealed 80.6% similarity, and interspecies comparison of C. trachomatis and C. psittaci MOMP genes yielded about 68% similarity. As found previously for C. trachomatis MOMP sequences, stretches of predominantly conserved sequences of GPIC and Mn MOMPs were interrupted by four variable domains whose locations were identical to those of C. trachomatis MOMPs. Seven of eight cysteine residues were found at precisely the same positions in GPIC, Mn, and C. trachomatis MOMPs, emphasizing their importance in structure and function of the protein. Collectively, these results indicate that C. psittaci and C. trachomatis MOMP genes diverged from a common ancestor.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Simpson, Brent W; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM.

  12. Positional assembly of enzymes on bacterial outer membrane vesicles for cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Miso; Sun, Qing; Liu, Fang; DeLisa, Matthew P; Chen, Wilfred

    2014-01-01

    The systematic organization of enzymes is a key feature for the efficient operation of cascade reactions in nature. Here, we demonstrate a facile method to create nanoscale enzyme cascades by using engineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that are spheroid nanoparticles (roughly 50 nm in diameter) produced by Gram-negative bacteria during all phases of growth. By taking advantage of the fact that OMVs naturally contain proteins found in the outer cell membrane, we displayed a trivalent protein scaffold containing three divergent cohesin domains for the position-specific presentation of a three-enzyme cascade on OMVs through a truncated ice nucleation protein anchoring motif (INP). The positional assembly of three enzymes for cellulose hydrolysis was demonstrated. The enzyme-decorated OMVs provided synergistic cellulose hydrolysis resulting in 23-fold enhancement in glucose production than free enzymes. PMID:24820175

  13. Genetic Manipulation of Outer Membrane Permeability: Generating Porous Heterogeneous Catalyst Analogs in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, TN; Park, AHA; Bantat, S

    2014-12-01

    The limited permeability of the E. coli outer membrane can significantly hinder whole-cell biocatalyst performance. In this study, the SARS coronavirus small envelope protein (SCVE) was expressed in E. coli cells previously engineered for periplasmic expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. This maneuver increased small molecule uptake by the cells, resulting in increased apparent CA activity of the biocatalysts. The enhancements in activity were quantified using methods developed for traditional heterogeneous catalysis. The expression of the SCVE protein was found to significantly reduce the Thiele moduli (phi), as well as increase the effectiveness factors (eta), effective diffusivities (D-e), and permeabilities (P) of the biocatalysts. These catalytic improvements translated into superior performance of the biocatalysts for the precipitation of calcium carbonate from solution which is an attractive strategy for long-term sequestration of captured carbon dioxide. Overall, these results demonstrate that synthetic biology approaches can be used to enhance heterogeneous catalysts incorporated into microbial whole-cell scaffolds.

  14. An outer membrane channel protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with exotoxin activity

    PubMed Central

    Danilchanka, Olga; Sun, Jim; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Maueröder, Christian; Speer, Alexander; Siroy, Axel; Marrero, Joeli; Trujillo, Carolina; Mayhew, David L.; Doornbos, Kathryn S.; Muñoz, Luis E.; Herrmann, Martin; Ehrt, Sabine; Berens, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the timing and mode of host cell death plays a pivotal role in microbial infections. Many bacteria use toxins to kill host cells and evade immune responses. Such toxins are unknown in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Virulent M. tuberculosis strains induce necrotic cell death in macrophages by an obscure molecular mechanism. Here we show that the M. tuberculosis protein Rv3903c (channel protein with necrosis-inducing toxin, CpnT) consists of an N-terminal channel domain that is used for uptake of nutrients across the outer membrane and a secreted toxic C-terminal domain. Infection experiments revealed that CpnT is required for survival and cytotoxicity of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CpnT causes necrotic cell death in eukaryotic cells. Thus, CpnT has a dual function in uptake of nutrients and induction of host cell death by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24753609

  15. A growing toolbox of techniques for studying β-barrel outer membrane protein folding and biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Jim E.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2016-01-01

    Great strides into understanding protein folding have been made since the seminal work of Anfinsen over 40 years ago, but progress in the study of membrane protein folding has lagged behind that of their water soluble counterparts. Researchers in these fields continue to turn to more advanced techniques such as NMR, mass spectrometry, molecular dynamics (MD) and single molecule methods to interrogate how proteins fold. Our understanding of β-barrel outer membrane protein (OMP) folding has benefited from these advances in the last decade. This class of proteins must traverse the periplasm and then insert into an asymmetric lipid membrane in the absence of a chemical energy source. In this review we discuss old, new and emerging techniques used to examine the process of OMP folding and biogenesis in vitro and describe some of the insights and new questions these techniques have revealed. PMID:27284045

  16. Lipopolysaccharide transport and assembly at the outer membrane: the PEZ model.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Sherman, David J; Silhavy, Thomas J; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have a double-membrane cellular envelope that enables them to colonize harsh environments and prevents the entry of many clinically available antibiotics. A main component of most outer membranes is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a glycolipid containing several fatty acyl chains and up to hundreds of sugars that is synthesized in the cytoplasm. In the past two decades, the proteins that are responsible for transporting LPS across the cellular envelope and assembling it at the cell surface in Escherichia coli have been identified, but it remains unclear how they function. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in this area and present a model that explains how energy from the cytoplasm is used to power LPS transport across the cellular envelope to the cell surface. PMID:27026255

  17. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1. PMID:26950402

  18. Bacterial 'histone-like protein I' (HLP-I) is an outer membrane constituent?

    PubMed

    Hirvas, L; Coleman, J; Koski, P; Vaara, M

    1990-03-12

    The nucleoid-associated 'histone-like protein I' (HLP-I) protein of E. coli was found to be homologous with the cationic 16-kDa outer membrane protein OmpH of Salmonella typhimurium. Deduced from the nucleotide sequence, the HLP-I protein has 91% identical residues with the OmpH protein. Both proteins have very similar cleavable signal sequences. The nucleotide sequence similarity between the corresponding genes hlpA and ompH is 87%. The ompH gene is located in a gene cluster resembling the hlpA-ORF17 region of E. coli which is close to the Ipx genes involved in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides. The localization of the OmpH/HLP-I protein in the cell is discussed.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Simpson, Brent W.; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370939

  20. Characteristics of the molecular diversity of the outer membrane protein A gene of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Yue, Hua; Yang, Falong; Shao, Guoqing; Hai, Quan; Chen, Xiaofei; Guo, Dingqian

    2010-01-01

    The molecular diversity of the gene encoding the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Haemophilus parasuis has been unclear. In this study, the structural characteristics, sequence types, and genetic diversity of ompA were investigated in 15 H. parasuis reference strains of different serovars and 20 field isolates. Three nucleotide lengths of the complete open reading frame (ORF) of ompA were found: 1098 base pairs (bp), 1104 bp, and 1110 bp. The OmpA contained 4 hypervariable domains, mainly encoding the 4 putative surface-exposed loops, which makes it a potential molecular marker for genotyping. Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant OmpAs of serovars 4 and 5 could cross-react with antiserum to all 15 serovars. Hence, although ompA of H. parasuis exhibited high variation among serovars, this variation did not seem to affect the strong antigenic characteristics of OmpA. PMID:20885850

  1. Study of the stability of proteoliposomes as vehicles for vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis based on recombinant porin complexes.

    PubMed

    Freixeiro, Paula; Diéguez-Casal, Ernesto; Costoya, Liliana; Seijo, Begoña; Ferreirós, Carlos M; Criado, María Teresa; Sánchez, Sandra

    2013-02-25

    Although effective against epidemic serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis strains, vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles continue to present important limitations, and great efforts are currently being focused in the development of a variety of new vaccine candidates and in the reformulation of currently existing ones. In this work, three N. meningitidis proteins, the PorA and PorB porins and the RmpM protein, were cloned, purified and incorporated into liposomes to build defined systems. The ability of proteoliposomes to allow the refolding porin complexes, and their stability during storage at 4°C and after lyophilization in presence of two cryoprotection agents, glucose and trehalose, were evaluated. This approach allowed to mimic the porin complexes present in natural OMVs, reducing the content of hypervariable protein PorA. During storage at 4°C, our systems showed some changes in the morphology and aggregation after three months, while after lyophilization the systems maintained their properties during the whole nine months of storage checked, with glucose allowing the best preservation of the antigenic properties of the proteins in the proteoliposomes.

  2. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-09-18

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression.

  3. Epoxide-Mediated Differential Packaging of Cif and Other Virulence Factors into Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, Alicia E.; Filkins, Laura M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain a number of secreted bacterial proteins, including phospholipases, alkaline phosphatase, and the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Previously, Cif, an epoxide hydrolase, was shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level by epoxides, which serve as ligands of the repressor, CifR. Here, we tested whether epoxides have an effect on Cif levels in OMVs. We showed that growth of P. aeruginosa in the presence of specific epoxides but not a hydrolysis product increased Cif packaging into OMVs in a CifR-independent fashion. The outer membrane protein, OprF, was also increased under these conditions, but alkaline phosphatase activity was not significantly altered. Additionally, we demonstrated that OMV shape and density were affected by epoxide treatment, with two distinct vesicle fractions present when cells were treated with epibromohydrin (EBH), a model epoxide. Vesicles isolated from the two density fractions exhibited different protein profiles in Western blotting and silver staining. We have shown that a variety of clinically or host-relevant treatments, including antibiotics, also alter the proteins packaged in OMVs. Proteomic analysis of purified OMVs followed by an analysis of transposon mutant OMVs yielded mutants with altered vesicle packaging. Finally, epithelial cell cytotoxicity was reduced in the vesicles formed in the presence of EBH, suggesting that this epoxide alters the function of the OMVs. Our data support a model whereby clinically or host-relevant signals mediate differential packaging of virulence factors in OMVs, which results in functional consequences for host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25112474

  4. Dual orientation of the outer membrane lipoprotein P6 of nontypeable haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Michel, Lea Vacca; Snyder, Joy; Schmidt, Rachel; Milillo, Jennifer; Grimaldi, Kyle; Kalmeta, Breanna; Khan, M Nadeem; Sharma, Sharad; Wright, Leslie Kate; Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-07-01

    The majority of outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins in Gram-negative bacteria are tethered to the membrane via an attached lipid moiety and oriented facing in toward the periplasmic space; a few lipoproteins have been shown to be surface exposed. The outer membrane lipoprotein P6 from the Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is surface exposed and a leading vaccine candidate for prevention of NTHi infections. However, we recently found that P6 is not a transmembrane protein as previously thought (L. V. Michel, B. Kalmeta, M. McCreary, J. Snyder, P. Craig, M. E. Pichichero, Vaccine 29:1624-1627, 2011). Here we pursued studies to show that P6 has a dual orientation, existing infrequently as surface exposed and predominantly as internally oriented toward the periplasmic space. Flow cytometry using three monoclonal antibodies with specificity for P6 showed surface staining of whole NTHi cells. Confocal microscopy imaging confirmed that antibodies targeted surface-exposed P6 of intact NTHi cells and not internal P6 in membrane-compromised or dead cells. Western blots of two wild-type NTHi strains and a mutant NTHi strain that does not express P6 showed that P6 antibodies do not detect a promiscuous epitope on NTHi. Depletion of targets to nonlipidated P6 significantly decreased bactericidal activity of human serum. Protease digestion of surface-exposed P6 demonstrated that P6 is predominantly internally localized in a manner similar to its homologue Pal in Escherichia coli. We conclude that P6 of NTHi is likely inserted into the OM in two distinct orientations, with the predominant orientation facing in toward the periplasm.

  5. Crosstalk between the lipopolysaccharide and phospholipid pathways during outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Emiola, Akintunde; Andrews, Steven S.; Heller, Carolin; George, John

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is composed of phospholipids in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer leaflet. LPS is an endotoxin that elicits a strong immune response from humans, and its biosynthesis is in part regulated via degradation of LpxC (EC 3.5.1.108) and WaaA (EC 2.4.99.12/13) enzymes by the protease FtsH (EC 3.4.24.-). Because the synthetic pathways for both molecules are complex, in addition to being produced in strict ratios, we developed a computational model to interrogate the regulatory mechanisms involved. Our model findings indicate that the catalytic activity of LpxK (EC 2.7.1.130) appears to be dependent on the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. This is biologically important because it assists in maintaining LPS/phospholipids homeostasis. Further crosstalk between the phospholipid and LPS biosynthetic pathways was revealed by experimental observations that LpxC is additionally regulated by an unidentified protease whose activity is independent of lipid A disaccharide concentration (the feedback source for FtsH-mediated LpxC regulation) but could be induced in vitro by palmitic acid. Further experimental analysis provided evidence on the rationale for WaaA regulation. Overexpression of waaA resulted in increased levels of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) sugar in membrane extracts, whereas Kdo and heptose levels were not elevated in LPS. This implies that uncontrolled production of WaaA does not increase the LPS production rate but rather reglycosylates lipid A precursors. Overall, the findings of this work provide previously unidentified insights into the complex biogenesis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane. PMID:26929331

  6. Can direct extracellular electron transfer occur in the absence of outer membrane cytochromes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris?

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Zane, Mr. Grant M.; Auer, Dr. Manfred; Fields, Dr. Matthew Wayne; Wall, Judy D.; Gorby, Dr. Yuri A.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer has been investigated over several decades via forms of soluble electron transfer proteins that are exported for extracellular reoxidation. More recently, several organisms have been shown to reduce extracellular metals via the direct transfer of electron through appendages; also known as nanowires. They have been reported most predominantly in Shewanella and Geobacter. While the relevancy and composition of these structures in each genus has been debated, both possess outer membrane cytochrome complexes that could theoretically come into direct contact with solid phase oxidized metals. Members of the genus Desulfovibrio apparently have no such cytochromes although similar appendages are present, are electrically conductive, and are different from flagella. Upon U(VI)-reduction, the structures in Desulfovibrio become coated with U(IV). Deletion of flagellar genes did not alter soluble or amorphous Fe(III) or U(VI) reduction, or appendage appearance. Removal of the chromosomal pilA gene hampered amorphous Fe(III)-reduction by ca. 25%, but cells lacking the native plasmid, pDV1, reduced soluble Fe(III) and U(VI) at ca. 50% of the wild type rate while amorphous Fe(III)-reduction slowed to ca. 20% of the wild type rate. Appendages were present in all deletions as well as pDV1, except pilA. Gene complementation restored all activities and morphologies to wild type levels. This suggests that pilA encodes the structural component, whereas genes within pDV1 may provide the reactive members. How such appendages function without outer membrane cytochromes is under investigation.

  7. Characterization of outer membrane proteins of Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from India.

    PubMed

    Khushiramani, Rekha; Tuteja, Urmil; Shukla, Jyoti; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2004-05-01

    The majority of virulence factors including the 12 Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops), 29 Yop secretion proteins (Ysc) and few specific Yop chaperone (Syc) are contributed by the 70 kb LCR middle plasmid of Yersinia pestis. Yersinia pestis isolates recovered during 1994 plague outbreak and rodent surveillance samples of Southern states of India were studied for the presence of important Yops by the conventional procedure of partially purifying outer membrane proteins (Omps) after cultivation in calcium deficient media. Prominent bands numbering 4-5 between 34-42 kDa region corresponding to important Yops were seen in all the isolates as well as in other Yersinia and non-Yersinia species by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting with the polyclonal antisera raised against these Omp preparations revealed few immuno-reactive bands that appeared to be shared among Y. pestis, Y. pseudotruberculosis, Y. enterocolitica, Y. fredrocksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii and E. coli. Three recombinant Yop proteins namely, YopM, YopB and LcrV were produced and antisera to these proteins could reveal presence of these Yops in the Y. pestis Omp preparations. In order to further characterize the important Yops among Omps, attempts were made to generate monoclonal antibodies against Omp preparation. Three of the 4 stable reactive clones that were obtained, when tested, had extensive cross-reactions among pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates, other Yersinia species and the members of Enterobacteriaceae in dot-ELISA and Western blotting. One of the monoclonal antibodies, YP1, exhibited reaction to all the pathogenic Yersinia species and the isolates, with restricted cross-reactivity to Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, K. pneumoniae. None of the 4 monoclonal antibodies had reactions with the 3 recombinant Yop proteins. It appears that under low calcium response, the Y. pestis not only activates secretion of Yops but also a large number of other proteins

  8. Dissociation of immune determinants of outer membrane proteins of Chlamydia psittaci strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Westbay, T D; Dascher, C C; Hsia, R C; Bavoil, P M; Zauderer, M

    1994-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an important human pathogen. Research to develop a Chlamydia vaccine has focused on the major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Determinants of this protein elicit serovar-specific neutralizing antibodies which are thought to play a critical role in protective immunity. MOMP-specific antibody responses are highly variable in the polymorphic population. Genetic factors which might influence the MOMP-specific immune response are consequently of particular interest. The C. psittaci strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) is a natural pathogen of the guinea pig that causes both ocular and genital tract infections that closely resemble those caused by C. trachomatis in humans. As such, it provides an excellent model for disease. In this report, we explore the influence of major histocompatibility complex-linked genes on the MOMP-specific antibody response in mice immunized with either whole GPIC elementary bodies or recombinant GPIC MOMP. Our results indicate that the MOMP-specific antibody response is major histocompatibility complex linked such that mice of the H-2d haplotype are high responders while mice of the H-2k haplotype are low responders. We demonstrate that MOMP-specific B cells are present in H-2k strains which are, however, deficient in MOMP-specific helper T cells. Although immunization of low-MOMP-responder strains with whole chlamydial elementary bodies induces high levels of immunoglobulin G antibody specific for Omp2, the cysteine-rich outer membrane protein, MOMP-specific B cells are unable to receive help from Omp2-specific T cells. The failure of intermolecular help from Omp2-specific T cells and related observations raise important issues regarding the processing and presentation of chlamydial antigens and the design of optimal subunit vaccines.

  9. The β-Barrel Outer Membrane Protein Assembly Complex of Neisseria meningitidis▿

    PubMed Central

    Volokhina, Elena B.; Beckers, Frank; Tommassen, Jan; Bos, Martine P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein Omp85 is required for outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly in gram-negative bacteria and in mitochondria. Its Escherichia coli homolog, designated BamA, functions with four accessory lipoproteins, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE, together forming the β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam). Here, we addressed the composition of this machinery and the function of its components in Neisseria meningitidis, a model organism for outer membrane biogenesis studies. Analysis of genome sequences revealed homologs of BamC, BamD (previously described as ComL), and BamE and a second BamE homolog, Mlp. No homolog of BamB was found. As in E. coli, ComL/BamD appeared essential for viability and for OMP assembly, and it could not be replaced by its E. coli homolog. BamE was not essential but was found to contribute to the efficiency of OMP assembly and to the maintenance of OM integrity. A bamC mutant showed only marginal OMP assembly defects, but the impossibility of creating a bamC bamE double mutant further indicated the function of BamC in OMP assembly. An mlp mutant was unaffected in OMP assembly. The results of copurification assays demonstrated the association of BamC, ComL, and BamE with Omp85. Semi-native gel electrophoresis identified the RmpM protein as an additional component of the Omp85 complex, which was confirmed in copurification assays. RmpM was not required for OMP folding but stabilized OMP complexes. Thus, the Bam complex in N. meningitidis consists of Omp85/BamA plus RmpM, BamC, ComL/BamD, and BamE, of which ComL/BamD and BamE appear to be the most important accessory components for OMP assembly. PMID:19767435

  10. The Metal Dependence of Pyoverdine Interactions with Its Outer Membrane Receptor FpvA▿

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Jason; Zeder-Lutz, Gabrielle; Hagege, Agnès; Celia, Hervé; Pattus, Franc

    2008-01-01

    To acquire iron, Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine (Pvd), which chelates iron and shuttles it into the cells via the specific outer membrane transporter FpvA. We studied the role of iron and other metals in the binding and transport of Pvd by FpvA and conclude that there is no significant affinity between FpvA and metal-free Pvd. We found that the fluorescent in vivo complex of iron-free FpvA-Pvd is in fact a complex with aluminum (FpvA-Pvd-Al) formed from trace aluminum in the growth medium. When Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured in a medium that had been treated with a metal affinity resin, the in vivo formation of the FpvA-Pvd complex and the recycling of Pvd on FpvA were nearly abolished. The accumulation of Pvd in the periplasm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also reduced in the treated growth medium, while the addition of 1 μM AlCl3 to the treated medium restored the effects of trace metals observed in standard growth medium. Using fluorescent resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance techniques, the in vitro interactions between Pvd and detergent-solubilized FpvA were also shown to be metal dependent. We demonstrated that FpvA binds Pvd-Fe but not Pvd and that Pvd did not compete with Pvd-Fe for FpvA binding. In light of our finding that the Pvd-Al complex is transported across the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a model for siderophore recognition based on a metal-induced conformation followed by redox selectivity for iron is discussed. PMID:18641139

  11. Temperate Bacteriophage Which Causes the Production of a New Major Outer Membrane Protein by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schnaitman, Carl; Smith, Deborah; de Salsas, Montserrat Forn

    1975-01-01

    Under most conditions of growth, the most abundant protein in the outer membrane of most strains of Escherichia coli is a protein designated as “protein 1” or “matrix protein”. In E. coli B, this protein has been shown to be a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 36,500 and it may account for more than 50% of the total outer membrane protein. E. coli K-12 contains a very similar, although probably not identical, species of protein 1. Some pathogenic E. coli strains contain very little protein 1 and, in its place, make a protein designated as protein 2 which migrates faster on alkaline polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate and which gives a different spectrum of CNBr peptides. An E. coli K-12 strain which had been mated with a pathogenic strain was found to produce protein 2, and a temperate bacteriophage was isolated from this K-12 strain after induction with UV light. This phage, designated as PA-2, is similar in morphology and several other properties to phage lambda. When strains of E. coli K-12 are lysogenized by phage PA-2, they produce protein 2 and very little protein 1. Adsorption to lysogenic strains grown under conditions where they produce little protein 1 and primarily protein 2 is greatly reduced as compared to non-lysogenic strains which produce only protein 1. However, when cultures are grown under conditions of catabolite repression, protein 2 is reduced and protein 1 is increased, and lysogenic and non-lysogenic cultures grown under these conditions exhibit the same rate of adsorption. Phage PA-2 does not adsorb to E. coli B, which appears to have a slightly different protein 1 from K-12. These results suggest that protein 1 is the receptor for PA-2, and that protein 2 is made to reduce the superinfection of lysogens. Images PMID:16789148

  12. Stereospecificity of the siderophore pyochelin outer membrane transporters in fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Hoegy, Françoise; Lee, Xiaoyun; Noel, Sabrina; Rognan, Didier; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Reimmann, Cornelia; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2009-05-29

    Pyochelin (Pch) and enantio-pyochelin (EPch) are enantiomer siderophores that are produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, under iron limitation. Pch promotes growth of P. aeruginosa when iron is scarce, and EPch carries out the same biological function in P. fluorescens. However, the two siderophores are unable to promote growth in the heterologous species, indicating that siderophore-mediated iron uptake is highly stereospecific. In the present work, using binding and iron uptake assays, we found that FptA, the Fe-Pch outer membrane transporter of P. aeruginosa, recognized (K(d) = 2.5 +/- 1.1 nm) and transported Fe-Pch but did not interact with Fe-EPch. Likewise, FetA, the Fe-EPch receptor of P. fluorescens, was specific for Fe-EPch (K(d) = 3.7 +/- 2.1 nm) but did not bind and transport Fe-Pch. Growth promotion experiments performed under iron-limiting conditions confirmed that FptA and FetA are highly specific for Pch and EPch, respectively. When fptA and fetA along with adjacent transport genes involved in siderophore uptake were swapped between the two bacterial species, P. aeruginosa became able to utilize Fe-EPch as an iron source, and P. fluorescens was able to grow with Fe-Pch. Docking experiments using the FptA structure and binding assays showed that the stereospecificity of Pch recognition by FptA was mostly due to the configuration of the siderophore chiral centers C4'' and C2'' and was only weakly dependent on the configuration of the C4' carbon atom. Together, these findings increase our understanding of the stereospecific interaction between Pch and its outer membrane receptor FptA. PMID:19297329

  13. Stereospecificity of the Siderophore Pyochelin Outer Membrane Transporters in Fluorescent Pseudomonads*

    PubMed Central

    Hoegy, Françoise; Lee, Xiaoyun; Noel, Sabrina; Rognan, Didier; Mislin, Gaëtan L. A.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Schalk, Isabelle J.

    2009-01-01

    Pyochelin (Pch) and enantio-pyochelin (EPch) are enantiomer siderophores that are produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, under iron limitation. Pch promotes growth of P. aeruginosa when iron is scarce, and EPch carries out the same biological function in P. fluorescens. However, the two siderophores are unable to promote growth in the heterologous species, indicating that siderophore-mediated iron uptake is highly stereospecific. In the present work, using binding and iron uptake assays, we found that FptA, the Fe-Pch outer membrane transporter of P. aeruginosa, recognized (Kd = 2.5 ± 1.1 nm) and transported Fe-Pch but did not interact with Fe-EPch. Likewise, FetA, the Fe-EPch receptor of P. fluorescens, was specific for Fe-EPch (Kd = 3.7 ± 2.1 nm) but did not bind and transport Fe-Pch. Growth promotion experiments performed under iron-limiting conditions confirmed that FptA and FetA are highly specific for Pch and EPch, respectively. When fptA and fetA along with adjacent transport genes involved in siderophore uptake were swapped between the two bacterial species, P. aeruginosa became able to utilize Fe-EPch as an iron source, and P. fluorescens was able to grow with Fe-Pch. Docking experiments using the FptA structure and binding assays showed that the stereospecificity of Pch recognition by FptA was mostly due to the configuration of the siderophore chiral centers C4″ and C2″ and was only weakly dependent on the configuration of the C4′ carbon atom. Together, these findings increase our understanding of the stereospecific interaction between Pch and its outer membrane receptor FptA. PMID:19297329

  14. Two protein lysine methyltransferases methylate outer membrane protein B from Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Abeykoon, Amila H; Chao, Chien-Chung; Wang, Guanghui; Gucek, Marjan; Yang, David C H; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2012-12-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the etiologic agent of epidemic typhus, is a potential biological threat agent. Its outer membrane protein B (OmpB) is an immunodominant antigen and plays roles as protective envelope and as adhesins. The observation of the correlation between methylation of lysine residues in rickettsial OmpB and bacterial virulence has suggested the importance of an enzymatic system for the methylation of OmpB. However, no rickettsial lysine methyltransferase has been characterized. Bioinformatic analysis of genomic DNA sequences of Rickettsia identified putative lysine methyltransferases. The genes of the potential methyltransferases were synthesized, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli, and expressed proteins were purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) affinity chromatography. The methyltransferase activities of the purified proteins were analyzed by methyl incorporation of radioactively labeled S-adenosylmethionine into recombinant fragments of OmpB. Two putative recombinant methyltransferases (rRP789 and rRP027-028) methylated recombinant OmpB fragments. The specific activity of rRP789 is 10- to 30-fold higher than that of rRP027-028. Western blot analysis using specific antibodies against trimethyl lysine showed that both rRP789 and rRP027-028 catalyzed trimethylation of recombinant OmpB fragments. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) analysis showed that rRP789 catalyzed mono-, di-, and trimethylation of lysine, while rRP027-028 catalyzed exclusively trimethylation. To our knowledge, rRP789 and rRP027-028 are the first biochemically characterized lysine methyltransferases of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. The production and characterization of rickettsial lysine methyltransferases provide new tools to investigate the mechanism of methylation of OmpB, effects of methylation on the structure and function of OmpB, and development of methylated OmpB-based diagnostic assays and vaccine candidates.

  15. Molecular Interactions of Lipopolysaccharide with an Outer Membrane Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Probed by Solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Iga; Liang, Binyong; Ursini, Nicholas; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-09-13

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen causing pneumonias that are particularly severe in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. The outer membrane (OM) of P. aeruginosa is much less permeable to nutrients and other chemical compounds than that of Escherichia coli. The low permeability of the OM, which also contributes to Pseudomonas' significant antibiotic resistance, is augmented by the presence of the outer membrane protein H (OprH). OprH directly interacts with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that constitute the outer leaflet of the OM and thus contributes to the structural stability of the OM. In this study, we used solution NMR spectroscopy to characterize the interactions between LPS and OprH in molecular detail. NMR chemical shift perturbations observed upon the addition of LPS to OprH in DHPC micelles indicate that this interaction is predominantly electrostatic and localized to the extracellular loops 2 and 3 and a number of highly conserved basic residues near the extracellular barrel rim of OprH. Single-site mutations of these residues were not enough to completely abolish binding, but OprH with cumulative mutations of Lys70, Arg72, and Lys103 no longer binds LPS. The dissociation constant (∼200 μM) measured by NMR is sufficient to efficiently bind LPS to OprH in the OM. This work highlights that solution NMR is suitable to study specific interactions of lipids with integral membrane proteins and provides a detailed molecular model for the interaction of LPS with OprH; i.e., an interaction that contributes to the integrity of the OM of P. aeruginosa under low divalent cation and antibiotic stress conditions. These methods should thus be useful for screening antibiotics that might disrupt OprH-LPS interactions and thereby increase the permeability of the OM of P. aeruginosa. PMID:27532487

  16. Discovery of Salmonella virulence factors translocated via outer membrane vesicles to murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, an intracellular pathogen and leading cause of food-borne illness, encodes a plethora of virulence effectors. Salmonella virulence factors are translocated into host cells and manipulate host cellular activities, providing a more hospitable environment for bacterial proliferation. In this study, we report a new set of virulence factors that is translocated into the host cytoplasm via bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV). PagK (or PagK1), PagJ, and STM2585A (or PagK2) are small proteins composed of ∼70 amino acids and have high sequence homology to each other (>85% identity). Salmonella lacking all three homologues was attenuated for virulence in a mouse infection model, suggesting at least partial functional redundancy among the homologues. While each homologue was translocated into the macrophage cytoplasm, their translocation was independent of all three Salmonella gene-encoded type III secretion systems (T3SSs)-Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) T3SS, SPI-2 T3SS, and the flagellar system. Selected methods, including direct microscopy, demonstrated that the PagK-homologous proteins were secreted through OMV, which were enriched with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and outer membrane proteins. Vesicles produced by intracellular bacteria also contained lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), suggesting the possibility of OMV convergence with host cellular components during intracellular trafficking. This study identified novel Salmonella virulence factors secreted via OMV and demonstrated that OMV can function as a vehicle to transfer virulence determinants to the cytoplasm of the infected host cell.

  17. Characterization of an outer membrane protein of Pasteurella multocida belonging to the OmpA family.

    PubMed

    Marandi, M; Mittal, K R

    1996-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicle and N-lauroylsarcosine-insoluble protein preparations of Pasteurella multocida 656 were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A major outer membrane protein (OMP) was found to be heat-modifiable, having a molecular mass of 28 kDa when the OMP preparation was solubilized at 60 degrees C and a molecular mass of 37 kDa when it was solubilized at 100 degrees C. A monoclonal antibody, designated mAb MT4.1, was generated against heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida. This mAb reacted with the heat-modifiable OMP irrespective of the temperature at which it was solubilized, as demonstrated by immunoblot results. The heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida showed a significant N-terminal amino acid sequence homology with OmpA family. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that the mAb Mt4.1 epitope was not surface exposed on the intact bacterium. The mAb MT4.1 reacted with all the reference strains of 5 capsular and 16 somatic serotypes, as well as with 75 field strains of P. multocida in immunoblot assay. This mAb MT4.1 also reacted with strains of various other Pasteurella species such as P. stomatis, P. aerogenes P. gallinarum, P. betti, P. sp, B, P. SP-g and P. canis, but not with strains of 12 other Gram-negative bacteria. These results indicated that this protein carried a genus-specific epitope and mAb MT4.1 may be useful for identification of Pasteurella species. This is the first report in which a major heat-modifiable OMP has been identified and characterized using a mAb, and has been shown belonging to the OmpA family. PMID:9008341

  18. Decoration of outer membrane vesicles with multiple antigens by using an autotransporter approach.

    PubMed

    Daleke-Schermerhorn, Maria H; Felix, Tristan; Soprova, Zora; Ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M; Vikström, David; Majlessi, Laleh; Beskers, Joep; Follmann, Frank; de Punder, Karin; van der Wel, Nicole N; Baumgarten, Thomas; Pham, Thang V; Piersma, Sander R; Jiménez, Connie R; van Ulsen, Peter; de Gier, Jan-Willem; Leclerc, Claude; Jong, Wouter S P; Luirink, Joen

    2014-09-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical nanoparticles that naturally shed from Gram-negative bacteria. They are rich in immunostimulatory proteins and lipopolysaccharide but do not replicate, which increases their safety profile and renders them attractive vaccine vectors. By packaging foreign polypeptides in OMVs, specific immune responses can be raised toward heterologous antigens in the context of an intrinsic adjuvant. Antigens exposed at the vesicle surface have been suggested to elicit protection superior to that from antigens concealed inside OMVs, but hitherto robust methods for targeting heterologous proteins to the OMV surface have been lacking. We have exploited our previously developed hemoglobin protease (Hbp) autotransporter platform for display of heterologous polypeptides at the OMV surface. One, two, or three of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT6, Ag85B, and Rv2660c were targeted to the surface of Escherichia coli OMVs upon fusion to Hbp. Furthermore, a hypervesiculating ΔtolR ΔtolA derivative of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 was generated, enabling efficient release and purification of OMVs decorated with multiple heterologous antigens, exemplified by the M. tuberculosis antigens and epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Also, we showed that delivery of Salmonella OMVs displaying Ag85B to antigen-presenting cells in vitro results in processing and presentation of an epitope that is functionally recognized by Ag85B-specific T cell hybridomas. In conclusion, the Hbp platform mediates efficient display of (multiple) heterologous antigens, individually or combined within one molecule, at the surface of OMVs. Detection of antigen-specific immune responses upon vesicle-mediated delivery demonstrated the potential of our system for vaccine development. PMID:25038093

  19. Crosstalk between the lipopolysaccharide and phospholipid pathways during outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Emiola, Akintunde; Andrews, Steven S; Heller, Carolin; George, John

    2016-03-15

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is composed of phospholipids in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer leaflet. LPS is an endotoxin that elicits a strong immune response from humans, and its biosynthesis is in part regulated via degradation of LpxC (EC 3.5.1.108) and WaaA (EC 2.4.99.12/13) enzymes by the protease FtsH (EC 3.4.24.-). Because the synthetic pathways for both molecules are complex, in addition to being produced in strict ratios, we developed a computational model to interrogate the regulatory mechanisms involved. Our model findings indicate that the catalytic activity of LpxK (EC 2.7.1.130) appears to be dependent on the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. This is biologically important because it assists in maintaining LPS/phospholipids homeostasis. Further crosstalk between the phospholipid and LPS biosynthetic pathways was revealed by experimental observations that LpxC is additionally regulated by an unidentified protease whose activity is independent of lipid A disaccharide concentration (the feedback source for FtsH-mediated LpxC regulation) but could be induced in vitro by palmitic acid. Further experimental analysis provided evidence on the rationale for WaaA regulation. Overexpression of waaA resulted in increased levels of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) sugar in membrane extracts, whereas Kdo and heptose levels were not elevated in LPS. This implies that uncontrolled production of WaaA does not increase the LPS production rate but rather reglycosylates lipid A precursors. Overall, the findings of this work provide previously unidentified insights into the complex biogenesis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane. PMID:26929331

  20. Voltage-induced "gating" of bacterial porin as reversible protein denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2004-05-01

    General porin OmpF forms water-filled channels in the outer membrane of E. coli bacteria. When reconstituted into planar bilayer lipid membranes, these channels can be closed (or "gated") by high electric fields. We discover that: (i) channel gating is sensitive to the type of cations in the membrane-bathing solution according to their position in the Hofmeister series; (ii) channel gates to a "closed" state that is represented by a set of multiple sub-conformations with at least three distinctly different conformations contributing to the closed-state conductance histogram. Taken together with the nearly symmetric response to the applied voltage of changing polarity and the hysteresis phenomena reported previously by others and reproduced here, these findings suggest that the voltage-induced closure of the OmpF channel is a consequence of reversible denaturation of the protein by the high electric field. If so, the voltage-induced gating of bacterial porins can serve as an instructive model to study the physics of protein folding at the single-molecule level.

  1. Modular NRPSs are monomeric.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stuart

    2002-09-01

    NRPSs, PKSs, and hybrid NRPS/PKSs are modular proteins with similar assembly-line organizations. Although PKSs function as dimers, new data demonstrate that functional NRPSs are monomeric. This discovery has significant implications for engineering artificial assemblies for the production of novel biotherapeutics.

  2. Neisseria meningitidis Lacking the Major Porins PorA and PorB Is Viable and Modulates Apoptosis and the Oxidative Burst of Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Peak, Ian R; Chen, Adrienne; Jen, Freda E-C; Jennings, Courtney; Schulz, Benjamin L; Saunders, Nigel J; Khan, Arshad; Seifert, H Steven; Jennings, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    The bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis expresses two major outer-membrane porins. PorA expression is subject to phase-variation (high frequency, random, on-off switching), and both PorA and PorB are antigenically variable between strains. PorA expression is variable and not correlated with meningococcal colonisation or invasive disease, whereas all naturally-occurring strains express PorB suggesting strong selection for expression. We have generated N. meningitidis strains lacking expression of both major porins, demonstrating that they are dispensable for bacterial growth in vitro. The porAB mutant strain has an exponential growth rate similar to the parental strain, as do the single porA or porB mutants, but the porAB mutant strain does not reach the same cell density in stationary phase. Proteomic analysis suggests that the double mutant strain exhibits compensatory expression changes in proteins associated with cellular redox state, energy/nutrient metabolism, and membrane stability. On solid media, there is obvious growth impairment that is rescued by addition of blood or serum from mammalian species, particularly heme. These porin mutants are not impaired in their capacity to inhibit both staurosporine-induced apoptosis and a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced oxidative burst in human neutrophils suggesting that the porins are not the only bacterial factors that can modulate these processes in host cells.

  3. Interaction of non-classical detergents with the mitochondrial porin. A new purification procedure and characterization of the pore-forming unit.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, V; Benz, R; Palmieri, F

    1989-07-15

    The effect of different families of detergents on the solubilization and purification of the pore-forming protein (porin) of the mitochondrial outer membrane of bovine heart was investigated in detail. With Tritons, dimethylamine oxides and zwittergents, porin solubilization with respect to total mitochondrial membrane protein was more efficient with the more hydrophobic members of each series. With most detergents the protein eluted as protein-detergent micelles in the void volume of hydroxyapatite/celite columns. In contrast, the protein was bound to the column material and was eluted after the addition of salt to the elution buffer when the detergents octylglucoside, zwittergent Z-314 and lauryl(dimethyl)-amine oxide were used. The protein purified in the presence of the latter detergent had a higher pore-forming activity in lipid bilayer membranes compared to porin isolated in the presence of Triton X-100. The binding of porin to the hydroxyapatite/celite column was used to study the lipid content of the active pore-forming complex. The analysis revealed that the complex contained no phospholipid but rather five molecules of cholesterol/polypeptide chain.

  4. Porin differentiates TLR mediated proinflammatory response of follicular zone B cell from TLR-unresponsive IL-10 expressing marginal zone B cell.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Debolina; Ghosh, Amlan Kanti; Mukherjee, Subhadeep; Biswas, Ratna; Biswas, Tapas

    2015-12-01

    TLR-ligands are frequently chosen as candidates for vaccine or adjuvant development because they can primarily bridge innate signaling with adaptive immune responses. Since the adjuvant action of porin, the major outer membrane protein commonly present on Gram-negative bacteria, has been tested on several antigen-presenting cells, we investigated its role in driving systemic immunity which is considered a benchmark for a successful adjuvant. Here, we show porin differentially regulated splenic marginal zone (MZ) and follicular zone (FO) B cell responses in contrast to other classical TLR2-ligands FSL-1 and Pam3CSK4. The protein up-regulated TLR2 and TLR6 and stimulated the activation and costimulatory molecules on FO B cells skewing the cells toward TLR-dependent type-1 cytokine response. However, porin could not up-regulate the TLRs and activate MZ B cells. These cells responded to porin by expressing toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP), the TLR2 and -4 signaling inhibitor along with stimulation of the intracellular pathogen recognition receptor NLR caspase recruitment domain containing protein 5 (NLRC5). The CD1d(hi) MZ B cells released IL-10 unequivocally demonstrating regulatory B cell feature. Immunization with porin also resulted in transient IL-10 expression by the CD19(+)CD21(hi) B cells prior to plasma cell formation. Moreover, the plasma cells developed from the B-2 cell subsets show marked variation in generation of immunoglobulin subclasses. The work delineates multi-faceted role of B cell subsets induced by porin for robust immunity without compromising with the checks and controls.

  5. The translocation kinetics of antibiotics through porin OmpC: insights from structure-based solvation mapping using WaterMap.

    PubMed

    Tran, Que-Tien; Williams, Sarah; Farid, Ramy; Erdemli, Gül; Pearlstein, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Poor permeability of the lipopolysaccharide-based outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is compensated by the existence of protein channels (porins) that selectively admit low molecular weight substrates, including many antibiotics. Improved understanding of the translocation mechanisms of porin substrates could help guide the design of antibiotics capable of achieving high intracellular exposure. Energy barriers to channel entry and exit govern antibiotic fluxes through porins. We have previously reported a hypothesis that the costs of transferring protein solvation to and from bulk medium underlie the barriers to protein-ligand association and dissociation, respectively, concomitant with the gain and loss of protein-ligand interactions during those processes. We have now applied this hypothesis to explain the published rates of entry (association) and exit (dissociation) of six antibiotics to/from reconstituted E. coli porin OmpC. WaterMap was used to estimate the total water transfer energies resulting from transient occupation by each antibiotic. Our results suggest that solvation within the porin cavity is highly energetically favorable, and the observed moderately fast entry rates of the antibiotics are consistent with replacement of protein-water H-bonds. The observed ultrafast exit kinetics is consistent with the lack of intrachannel solvation sites that convey unfavorable resolvation during antibiotic dissociation. These results are aligned with known general relationships between antibiotic efficacy and physicochemical properties, namely unusually low logP, reflecting an abundance of H-bond partners. We conclude that antibiotics figuratively "melt" their way through porin solvation at a rate determined by the cost of exchanging protein-solvent for protein-antibiotic H-bonds.

  6. Key diffusion mechanisms involved in regulating bidirectional water permeation across E. coli outer membrane lectin.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Kolimi, Narendar; Nair, Sanjana Anilkumar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2016-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are major bacterial virulent determinants that facilitate host immune evasion. E. coli group1 K30CPS is noncovalently attached to bacterial surface by Wzi, a lectin. Intriguingly, structure based phylogenetic analysis indicates that Wzi falls into porin superfamily. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further shed light on dual role of Wzi as it also functions as a bidirectional passive water specific porin. Such a functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier, due to the occluded pore. While five water specific entry points distributed across extracellular &periplasmic faces regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms, a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Coincidently, MD observed open state structure of "YQF" triad is seen in sugar-binding site of sodium-galactose cotransporters, implicating its involvement in K30CPS surface anchorage. Importance of Loop 5 (L5) in membrane insertion is yet another highlight. Change in water diffusion pattern of periplasmic substitution mutants suggests Wzi's role in osmoregulation by aiding in K30CPS hydration, corroborating earlier functional studies. Water molecules located inside β-barrel of Wzi crystal structure further strengthens the role of Wzi in osmoregulation. Thus, interrupting water diffusion or L5 insertion may reduce bacterial virulence.

  7. Key diffusion mechanisms involved in regulating bidirectional water permeation across E. coli outer membrane lectin

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Kolimi, Narendar; Nair, Sanjana Anilkumar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2016-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are major bacterial virulent determinants that facilitate host immune evasion. E. coli group1 K30CPS is noncovalently attached to bacterial surface by Wzi, a lectin. Intriguingly, structure based phylogenetic analysis indicates that Wzi falls into porin superfamily. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further shed light on dual role of Wzi as it also functions as a bidirectional passive water specific porin. Such a functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier, due to the occluded pore. While five water specific entry points distributed across extracellular & periplasmic faces regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms, a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Coincidently, MD observed open state structure of “YQF” triad is seen in sugar-binding site of sodium-galactose cotransporters, implicating its involvement in K30CPS surface anchorage. Importance of Loop 5 (L5) in membrane insertion is yet another highlight. Change in water diffusion pattern of periplasmic substitution mutants suggests Wzi’s role in osmoregulation by aiding in K30CPS hydration, corroborating earlier functional studies. Water molecules located inside β-barrel of Wzi crystal structure further strengthens the role of Wzi in osmoregulation. Thus, interrupting water diffusion or L5 insertion may reduce bacterial virulence. PMID:27320406

  8. Porin Involvement in Cephalosporin and Carbapenem Resistance of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Aunkham, Anuwat; Schulte, Albert; Winterhalter, Mathias; Suginta, Wipa

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps) is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes frequently lethal melioidosis, with a particularly high prevalence in the north and northeast of Thailand. Bps is highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents and this resistance may result from the low drug permeability of outer membrane proteins, known as porins. Principal Findings Microbiological assays showed that the clinical Bps strain was resistant to most antimicrobial agents and sensitive only to ceftazidime and meropenem. An E. coli strain defective in most porins, but expressing BpsOmp38, exhibited considerably lower antimicrobial susceptibility than the control strain. In addition, mutation of Tyr119, the most prominent pore-lining residue in BpsOmp38, markedly altered membrane permeability, substitution with Ala (mutant BpsOmp38Y119A) enhanced uptake of the antimicrobial agents, while substitution with Phe (mutant BpsOmp38Y119F) inhibited uptake. Channel recordings of BpsOmp38 reconstituted in a planar black lipid membrane (BLM) suggested that the higher permeability of BpsOmp38Y119A was caused by widening of the pore interior through removal of the bulky side chain. In contrast, the lower permeability of BpsOmp38Y119F was caused by introduction of the hydrophobic side chain (Phe), increasing the ‘greasiness’ of the pore lumen. Significantly, liposome swelling assays showed no permeation through the BpsOmp38 channel by antimicrobial agents to which Bps is resistant (cefoxitin, cefepime, and doripenem). In contrast, high permeability to ceftazidime and meropenem was observed, these being agents to which Bps is sensitive. Conclusion/Significance Our results, from both in vivo and in vitro studies, demonstrate that membrane permeability associated with BpsOmp38 expression correlates well with the antimicrobial susceptibility of the virulent bacterium B. pseudomallei, especially to carbapenems and cephalosporins. In addition, substitution of the residue Tyr119 affects

  9. Channel-tunnels: outer membrane components of type I secretion systems and multidrug efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andersen, C

    2003-01-01

    For translocation across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria, substances have to overcome two permeability barriers, the inner and outer membrane. Channel-tunnels are outer membrane proteins, which are central to two distinct export systems: the type I secretion system exporting proteins such as toxins or proteases, and efflux pumps discharging antibiotics, dyes, or heavy metals and thus mediating drug resistance. Protein secretion is driven by an inner membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter while drug efflux occurs via an inner membrane proton antiporter. Both inner membrane transporters are associated with a periplasmic accessory protein that recruits an outer membrane channel-tunnel to form a functional export complex. Prototypes of these export systems are the hemolysin secretion system and the AcrAB/TolC drug efflux pump of Escherichia coli, which both employ TolC as an outer membrane component. Its remarkable conduit-like structure, protruding 100 A into the periplasmic space, reveals how both systems are capable of transporting substrates across both membranes directly from the cytosol into the external environment. Proteins of the channel-tunnel family are widespread within Gram-negative bacteria. Their involvement in drug resistance and in secretion of pathogenic factors makes them an interesting system for further studies. Understanding the mechanism of the different export apparatus could help to develop new drugs, which block the efflux pumps or the secretion system.

  10. Two bacteriophages which utilize a new Escherichia coli major outer membrane protein as part of their receptor.

    PubMed

    Chai, T J; Foulds, J

    1978-07-01

    Escherichia coli strain JF694 contains a new major outer membrane protein which we have called protein E (J. Foulds, and T. Chai, J. Bacteriol. 133:1478-1483). Two new bacteriophages, TC45 and TC23, were isolated that require the presence of protein E in the outer membrane of host cells for growth. Both of these bacteriophages have a morphology similar to T-even bacteriophages but are distinct in properties such as plaque morphology, buoyant density, and burst size. Although strain JF694, containing protein E, adsorbs bacteriophage TC45 efficiently, cells killed with heat or chloroform are unable to inactivate this bacteriophage. Purified protein E either in the presence or absence of additional probable cofactors such as lipopolysaccharide was also unable to inactivate bacteriophage TC45. Both bacteriophages probably use protein E as at least part of their receptor but require, in addition, other outer membrane components or a specific orientation or organization of this protein in the outer membrane.

  11. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    PubMed

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane. PMID:21338419

  12. Role of MINOS in mitochondrial membrane architecture: cristae morphology and outer membrane interactions differentially depend on mitofilin domains.

    PubMed

    Zerbes, Ralf M; Bohnert, Maria; Stroud, David A; von der Malsburg, Karina; Kram, Anita; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; Becker, Thomas; Wiedemann, Nils; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-09-14

    The mitochondrial inner membrane contains a large protein complex crucial for membrane architecture, the mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). MINOS is required for keeping cristae membranes attached to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions and interacts with protein complexes of the mitochondrial outer membrane. To study if outer membrane interactions and maintenance of cristae morphology are directly coupled, we generated mutant forms of mitofilin/Fcj1 (formation of crista junction protein 1), a core component of MINOS. Mitofilin consists of a transmembrane anchor in the inner membrane and intermembrane space domains, including a coiled-coil domain and a conserved C-terminal domain. Deletion of the C-terminal domain disrupted the MINOS complex and led to release of cristae membranes from the inner boundary membrane, whereas the interaction of mitofilin with the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) were enhanced. Deletion of the coiled-coil domain also disturbed the MINOS complex and cristae morphology; however, the interactions of mitofilin with TOM and SAM were differentially affected. Finally, deletion of both intermembrane space domains disturbed MINOS integrity as well as interactions with TOM and SAM. Thus, the intermembrane space domains of mitofilin play distinct roles in interactions with outer membrane complexes and maintenance of MINOS and cristae morphology, demonstrating that MINOS contacts to TOM and SAM are not sufficient for the maintenance of inner membrane architecture.

  13. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer membrane protein OmpL32

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immu...

  14. Diversity of TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins in plant-associated strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic sequences of ten strains of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp. were surveyed for the presence of TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins (TBDPs), which function in the uptake of substrates from the environment by many Gram-negative bacteria. The ten strains, representing P. fluorescens, P. ch...

  15. Identification and Comparative Analysis of Genes Encoding Outer Membrane Proteins P2 and P5 in Haemophilus parsuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a serious swine pathogen but little is known about how it causes disease. A related human pathogen, Haemophilus influenzae, has been better studied and many of its virulence factors have been identified. Two of these, outer membrane proteins P2 and P5, have been shown to ha...

  16. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry.

  17. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry. PMID:26791981

  18. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    PubMed

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane.

  19. An ABC transporter and an outer membrane lipoprotein participate in posttranslational activation of type VI secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Casabona, Maria G; Silverman, Julie M; Sall, Khady M; Boyer, Frédéric; Couté, Yohann; Poirel, Jessica; Grunwald, Didier; Mougous, Joseph D; Elsen, Sylvie; Attree, Ina

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of injecting protein toxins into other bacterial cells through one of its three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs). The activity of this T6SS is tightly regulated on the posttranslational level by phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways. The phosphorylation-dependent pathway consists of a Threonine kinase/phosphatase pair (PpkA/PppA) that acts on a forkhead domain-containing protein, Fha1, and a periplasmic protein, TagR, that positively regulates PpkA. In the present work, we biochemically and functionally characterize three additional proteins of the phosphorylation-dependent regulatory cascade that controls T6S activation: TagT, TagS and TagQ. We show that similar to TagR, these proteins act upstream of the PpkA/PppA checkpoint and influence phosphorylation of Fha1 and, apparatus assembly and effector export. Localization studies demonstrate that TagQ is an outer membrane lipoprotein and TagR is associated with the outer membrane. Consistent with their homology to lipoprotein outer membrane localization (Lol) components, TagT and TagS form a stable inner membrane complex with ATPase activity. However, we find that outer membrane association of T6SS lipoproteins TagQ and TssJ1, and TagR, is unaltered in a ΔtagTS background. Notably, we found that TagQ is indispensible for anchoring of TagR to the outer membrane fraction. As T6S-dependent fitness of P. aeruginosa requires TagT, S, R and Q, we conclude that these proteins likely participate in a trans-membrane signalling pathway that promotes H1-T6SS activity under optimal environmental conditions. PMID:22765374

  20. Outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, and Helicobacter pylori: paradigm deviations in H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Liechti, George; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is capable of colonizing the gastric mucosa of the human stomach using a variety of factors associated with or secreted from its outer membrane (OM). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and numerous OM proteins have been shown to be involved in adhesion and immune stimulation/evasion. Many of these factors are essential for colonization and/or pathogenesis in a variety of animal models. Despite this wide array of potential targets present on the bacterial surface, the ability of H. pylori to vary its OM profile limits the effectiveness of vaccines or therapeutics that target any single one of these components. However, it has become evident that the proteins comprising the complexes that transport the majority of these molecules to the OM are highly conserved and often essential. The field of membrane biogenesis has progressed remarkably in the last few years, and the possibility now exists for targeting the mechanisms by which β-barrel proteins, lipoproteins, and LPS are transported to the OM, resulting in loss of bacterial fitness and significant altering of membrane permeability. In this review, the OM transport machinery for LPS, lipoproteins, and outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are discussed. While the principal investigations of these transport mechanisms have been conducted in Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, here these systems will be presented in the genetic context of ε proteobacteria. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that minimalist genomes, such as that of Helicobacter pylori, offer insight into the smallest number of components required for these essential pathways to function. Interestingly, in the majority of ε proteobacteria, while the inner and OM associated apparatus of LPS, lipoprotein, and OMP transport pathways appear to all be intact, most of the components associated with the periplasmic compartment are either missing or are almost unrecognizable when compared to their E. coli counterparts. Eventual

  1. Outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, and Helicobacter pylori: paradigm deviations in H. pylori

    PubMed Central

    Liechti, George; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is capable of colonizing the gastric mucosa of the human stomach using a variety of factors associated with or secreted from its outer membrane (OM). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and numerous OM proteins have been shown to be involved in adhesion and immune stimulation/evasion. Many of these factors are essential for colonization and/or pathogenesis in a variety of animal models. Despite this wide array of potential targets present on the bacterial surface, the ability of H. pylori to vary its OM profile limits the effectiveness of vaccines or therapeutics that target any single one of these components. However, it has become evident that the proteins comprising the complexes that transport the majority of these molecules to the OM are highly conserved and often essential. The field of membrane biogenesis has progressed remarkably in the last few years, and the possibility now exists for targeting the mechanisms by which β-barrel proteins, lipoproteins, and LPS are transported to the OM, resulting in loss of bacterial fitness and significant altering of membrane permeability. In this review, the OM transport machinery for LPS, lipoproteins, and outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are discussed. While the principal investigations of these transport mechanisms have been conducted in Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, here these systems will be presented in the genetic context of ε proteobacteria. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that minimalist genomes, such as that of Helicobacter pylori, offer insight into the smallest number of components required for these essential pathways to function. Interestingly, in the majority of ε proteobacteria, while the inner and OM associated apparatus of LPS, lipoprotein, and OMP transport pathways appear to all be intact, most of the components associated with the periplasmic compartment are either missing or are almost unrecognizable when compared to their E. coli counterparts. Eventual

  2. Small RNA Regulation of TolC, the Outer Membrane Component of Bacterial Multidrug Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria use multidrug efflux pumps to export drugs and toxic compounds out of the cell. One of the most important efflux pumps in Escherichia coli is the AcrAB-TolC system. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are known to be major posttranscriptional regulators that can enhance or repress translation by binding to the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of mRNA targets with the help of a chaperone protein, Hfq. In this study, we investigated the expression of acrA, acrB, and tolC translational fusions using 27 Hfq-dependent sRNAs overexpressed from plasmids. No significant sRNA regulation of acrA or acrB was detected. SdsR (also known as RyeB), an abundant and well-conserved stationary-phase sRNA, was found to repress the expression of tolC, the gene encoding the outer membrane protein of many multidrug resistance efflux pumps. This repression was shown to be by direct base pairing occurring upstream from the ribosomal binding site. SdsR overexpression and its regulation of tolC were found to reduce resistance to novobiocin and crystal violet. Our results suggest that additional targets for SdsR exist that contribute to increased antibiotic sensitivity and reduced biofilm formation. In an effort to identify phenotypes associated with single-copy SdsR and its regulation of tolC, the effect of a deletion of sdsR or mutations in tolC that should block SdsR pairing were investigated using a Biolog phenotypic microarray. However, no significant phenotypes were identified. Therefore, SdsR appears to modulate rather than act as a major regulator of its targets. IMPORTANCE AcrAB-TolC is a major efflux pump present in E. coli and Gram-negative bacteria used to export toxic compounds; the pump confers resistance to many antibiotics of unrelated classes. In this study, we found that SdsR, a small RNA expressed in stationary phase, repressed the expression of tolC, resulting in increased sensitivity to some antibiotics. This extends the findings of previous studies showing that

  3. Porin alterations present in non-carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae with high and intermediate levels of carbapenem resistance in Chile.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Aniela; Villagra, Nicolás A; Undabarrena, Agustina; Gallardo, Natalia; Keller, Nicole; Moraga, Marcela; Román, Juan C; Mora, Guido C; García, Patricia

    2012-09-01

    The main goal of this work was to identify the mechanisms responsible for carbapenem resistance in 61 Chilean clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae (Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, Morganella morganii, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) with reduced susceptibility to at least one carbapenem (ertapenem, imipenem or meropenem). All of the isolates were analysed for the presence of carbapenemases, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC enzymes and outer-membrane proteins. None of the isolates exhibited carbapenemase activity nor did they have any of the carbapenemase genes that were screened for. Most of the 61 strains produced at least one ESBL and/or one AmpC enzyme and either lost their porins or had altered porins according to sequence analysis. The distribution of ESBLs and AmpC enzymes was different among the species studied. Resistance in K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates was associated with ESBLs; in M. morganii isolates, resistance was attributed to overexpression of an AmpC enzyme; and in Enterobacter spp. isolates, resistance was associated with both types of enzymes. In K. pneumoniae isolates, porin integrity was more a determinant of carbapenem resistance than the presence of ESBLs, whereas in isolates of Enterobacter spp., M. morganii and S. marcescens, the presence of an overexpressed AmpC enzyme was associated with higher imipenem and meropenem MIC values. Therefore, carbapenem resistance in Chilean isolates is not due to true carbapenemases but rather to a combination of porin loss/alteration and β-lactamase activity. The fact that carbapenemases were not detected in this study is unique, given that many countries in the region have already reported the presence of these enzymes.

  4. Solutes alter the conformation of the ligand binding loops in outer membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miyeon; Xu, Qi; Murray, David; Cafiso, David S

    2008-01-15

    The binding and recognition of ligands by bacterial outer membrane transport proteins is mediated in part by interactions made through their extracellular loops. Here, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy were used to examine the effect of stabilizing solutes on the extracellular loops in BtuB, the vitamin B12 transporter, and FecA, the ferric citrate transporter. EPR spectra from the extracellular loops of FecA and BtuB arise from dynamic backbone segments, and distance measurements made by double electron-electron resonance indicate that the second extracellular loop in BtuB samples a wide range of conformations. These conformations are dramatically restricted upon substrate binding. In addition, the EPR spectra from nitroxide labels attached to the extracellular loops in BtuB and FecA are highly sensitive to solutes, and at every site examined the motion of the label is significantly reduced in the presence of stabilizing osmolytes, such as polyethylene glycols. For the second extracellular loop in BtuB, the solute-induced structural changes are small, but they are sufficient to bring spin-labeled side chains into tertiary contact with other portions of the protein. The spectroscopic changes seen by SDSL suggest that high concentrations of stabilizing solutes, such as those used to generate membrane protein crystals, result in a more compact and ordered state of the protein than is seen under more physiological conditions.

  5. Proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from the probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Laura; Toloza, Lorena; Giménez, Rosa; Odena, Antonia; Oliveira, Eliandre; Aguilar, Juan; Badia, Josefa; Baldomà, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a probiotic used for the treatment of intestinal disorders. EcN improves gastrointestinal homeostasis and microbiota balance; however, little is known about how this probiotic delivers effector molecules to the host. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria and have a relevant role in bacteria-host interactions. Using 1D SDS-PAGE and highly sensitive LC-MS/MS analysis we identified in this study 192 EcN vesicular proteins with high confidence in three independent biological replicates. Of these proteins, 18 were encoded by strain-linked genes and 57 were common to pathogen-derived OMVs. These proteins may contribute to the ability of this probiotic to colonize the human gut as they fulfil functions related to adhesion, immune modulation or bacterial survival in host niches. This study describes the first global OMV proteome of a probiotic strain and provides evidence that probiotic-derived OMVs contain proteins that can target these vesicles to the host and mediate their beneficial effects on intestinal function. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000367 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000367). PMID:24307187

  6. Outer-membrane Transport of Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a First Step in Biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn,E.; Patel, D.; van den Berg, B.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biodegradation of hydrocarbons, an important process for environmental remediation, requires the passage of hydrophobic substrates across the cell membrane. Here, we report crystal structures of two outer membrane proteins, Pseudomonas putida TodX and Ralstonia pickettii TbuX, which have been implicated in hydrocarbon transport and are part of a subfamily of the FadL fatty acid transporter family. The structures of TodX and TbuX show significant differences with those previously determined for Escherichia coli FadL, which may provide an explanation for the substrate-specific transport of TodX and TbuX observed with in vivo transport assays. The TodX and TbuX structures revealed 14-stranded {beta}-barrels with an N-terminal hatch domain blocking the barrel interior. A hydrophobic channel with bound detergent molecules extends from the extracellular surface and is contiguous with a passageway through the hatch domain, lined by both hydrophobic and polar or charged residues. The TodX and TbuX structures support a mechanism for transport of hydrophobic substrates from the extracellular environment to the periplasm via a channel through the hatch domain.

  7. Electron tunneling properties of outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wigginton, Nicholas S; Rosso, Kevin M; Lower, Brian H; Shi, Liang; Hochella, Michael F

    2007-02-01

    In this report, we describe the characterization of two outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes OmcA and MtrC purified from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS). OmcA and MtrC were solubilized with a common detergent and irreversibly bound to Au (111) substrates as self-assembled cytochrome films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified that OmcA and MtrC were covalently bound to the Au surface via thiol bonds to cysteine residues. Initial STM images show that a layer of detergent covers and protects the cytochrome films. Temporary application of high bias voltage causes the detergent film to reorganize around the tip, opening a window for direct STM imaging of the cytochrome layer underneath. The STM apparent sizes of both OmcA and MtrC are 58 nanometers in diameter consistent with expectations from their molecular masses. Current-voltage TS over individual cytochromes showed that OmcA and MtrC have different abilities to mediate the tunneling current, reflecting differences in their electronic structures. The data suggest that the two cytochromes could have different roles in the electron transport chain during metal reduction.

  8. Phylogenomic analysis supports the ancestral presence of LPS-outer membranes in the Firmicutes

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Luisa CS; Poppleton, Daniel; Klingl, Andreas; Criscuolo, Alexis; Dupuy, Bruno; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Beloin, Christophe; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    One of the major unanswered questions in evolutionary biology is when and how the transition between diderm (two membranes) and monoderm (one membrane) cell envelopes occurred in Bacteria. The Negativicutes and the Halanaerobiales belong to the classically monoderm Firmicutes, but possess outer membranes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-OM). Here, we show that they form two phylogenetically distinct lineages, each close to different monoderm relatives. In contrast, their core LPS biosynthesis enzymes were inherited vertically, as in the majority of bacterial phyla. Finally, annotation of key OM systems in the Halanaerobiales and the Negativicutes shows a puzzling combination of monoderm and diderm features. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the LPS-OMs of Negativicutes and Halanaerobiales are remnants of an ancient diderm cell envelope that was present in the ancestor of the Firmicutes, and that the monoderm phenotype in this phylum is a derived character that arose multiple times independently through OM loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14589.001 PMID:27580370

  9. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Charbit, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structuresmore » has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Lastly, vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria.« less

  10. The motion of a single molecule, the lambda-receptor, in the bacterial outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Oddershede, Lene; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Grego, Sonia; Brown, Stanley; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2002-01-01

    Using optical tweezers and single particle tracking, we have revealed the motion of a single protein, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli bacteria. We genetically modified the lambda-receptor placing a biotin on an extracellular site of the receptor in vivo. The efficiency of this in vivo biotinylation is very low, thus enabling the attachment of a streptavidin-coated bead binding specifically to a single biotinylated lambda-receptor. The bead was used as a handle for the optical tweezers and as a marker for the single particle tracking routine. We propose a model that allows extraction of the motion of the protein from measurements of the mobility of the bead-molecule complex; these results are equally applicable to analyze bead-protein complexes in other membrane systems. Within a domain of radius approximately 25 nm, the receptor diffuses with a diffusion constant of (1.5 +/- 1.0) x 10(-9) cm(2)/s and sits in a harmonic potential as if it were tethered by an elastic spring of spring constant of ~1.0 x 10(-2) pN/nm to the bacterial membrane. The purpose of the protein motion might be to facilitate transport of maltodextrins through the outer bacterial membrane. PMID:12496085

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of protective outer membrane protein P.69 from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, I G; Dougan, G; Pickard, D; Chatfield, S; Smith, M; Novotny, P; Morrissey, P; Fairweather, N F

    1989-01-01

    Protein P.69 is localized on the outer membrane of Bordetella pertussis and is one of the virulence factors believed to contribute to the disease state of whooping cough. We demonstrate that protein synthesis of P.69 is under genetic control of the vir locus. Using oligonucleotide probes derived from the protein sequence of a cyanogen bromide fragment, we have cloned the gene for P.69 from B. pertussis CN2992. Analysis of the DNA sequence reveals a G + C-rich gene capable of encoding a protein of 910 amino acids with a Mr of 93,478, suggesting that P.69 is a processed form of a larger precursor. In common with some of the genes in the pertussis toxin operon, the sequence CCTGG was found 5' to the ATG initiation codon. At the 3' end, 29 bases after the TAA stop codon, the sequence GTTTTTCCT was found and may have some function in transcription termination. A full-length clone of the gene for P.69 carried by the cosmid pBPI69 was unable to direct the expression of P.69 protein in an Escherichia coli host. The generation of P.69-fusion products allowed the detection of P.69-specific protein products synthesized in E. coli. Images PMID:2542937

  12. Cristae remodeling causes acidification detected by integrated graphene sensor during mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ted D.; Pham, Phi Q.; Li, Jinfeng; Letai, Anthony G.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic apoptotic pathway and the resultant mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) via BAK and BAX oligomerization, cytochrome c (cytc) release, and caspase activation are well studied, but their effect on cytosolic pH is poorly understood. Using isolated mitochondria, we show that MOMP results in acidification of the surrounding medium. BAK conformational changes associated with MOMP activate the OMA1 protease to cleave OPA1 resulting in remodeling of the cristae and release of the highly concentrated protons within the cristae invaginations. This was revealed by utilizing a nanomaterial graphene as an optically clear and ultrasensitive pH sensor that can measure ionic changes induced by tethered mitochondria. With this platform, we have found that activation of mitochondrial apoptosis is accompanied by a gradual drop in extra-mitochondrial pH and a decline in membrane potential, both of which can be rescued by adding exogenous cytc. These findings have importance for potential pharmacological manipulation of apoptosis, in the treatment of cancer. PMID:27786282

  13. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; Holden, James A.; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T.; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis. PMID:27035339

  14. Early diagnosis of typhoid fever by an enzyme immunoassay using Salmonella typhi outer membrane protein preparations.

    PubMed

    Verdugo-Rodríguez, A; López-Vidal, Y; Puente, J L; Ruíz-Placios, G M; Calva, E

    1993-04-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for detection of serum antibodies in patients with typhoid fever was developed using Salmonella typhi outer membrane protein (OMP) preparations as antigen. Acute phase (first week) sera from adult typhoid fever patients were tested as well as sera from the following control groups: adult travellers with diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, children infected with Campylobacter jejuni, healthy Mexican adult blood donors, and adults with septicemia caused by other organisms. At a 1:3,125 serum dilution, the mean absorbance values were 1.41 in the typhoid fever patients, and 0.57, 0.55, 0.51 and 0.52 in the respective control groups. Inhibition EIA studies using OMP preparations or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as free antigen indicated that proteins can play an important role in the detection of antibodies in early typhoid fever. This EIA may be useful for the diagnosis of typhoid fever since results were obtained within about five hours and in an endemic area antibodies against Salmonella typhi OMP preparations appear early in the course of the disease.

  15. Protecting enzymatic function through directed packaging into bacterial outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nathan J; Turner, Kendrick B; Medintz, Igor L; Walper, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess innate machinery to transport extracellular cargo between cells as well as package virulence factors to infect host cells by secreting outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain small molecules, proteins, and genetic material. These robust proteoliposomes have evolved naturally to be resistant to degradation and provide a supportive environment to extend the activity of encapsulated cargo. In this study, we sought to exploit bacterial OMV formation to package and maintain the activity of an enzyme, phosphotriesterase (PTE), under challenging storage conditions encountered for real world applications. Here we show that OMV packaged PTE maintains activity over free PTE when subjected to elevated temperatures (>100-fold more activity after 14 days at 37 °C), iterative freeze-thaw cycles (3.4-fold post four-cycles), and lyophilization (43-fold). We also demonstrate how lyophilized OMV packaged PTE can be utilized as a cell free reagent for long term environmental remediation of pesticide/chemical warfare contaminated areas. PMID:27117743

  16. Bovine lactogenic immunity against cholera toxin-related enterotoxins and Vibrio cholerae outer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Boesman-Finkelstein, M; Walton, N E; Finkelstein, R A

    1989-01-01

    The newly parturient cow secretes large quantities of immunoglobulin G1, a relatively protease- and heat-resistant immunoglobulin, in its colostrum and milk. This study establishes the feasibility of producing protective colostral immunoglobulins by immunizing pregnant cows with cholera toxin (CT), a CT-related enterotoxin from Escherichia coli, and Vibrio cholerae outer membranes (OMs). The OMs were prepared from bacteria grown under iron-replete or iron-deficient (to simulate the in vivo environment) conditions. Immunoglobulins were purified from the colostrum of newly parturient control and immunized cows. The bovine anti-CT and anti-H-LT (CT-related heat-labile enterotoxin produced by diarrheogenic E. coli strains of human origin) antibodies were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and by neutralization of toxin activity in both Y-1 adrenal cell and infant rabbit assays. The bovine anti-OM antibodies from both high-iron-grown and low-iron-grown vibrios were assessed by bacterial agglutination and by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of high-iron-grown and low-iron-grown OMs. To test their protective effect, immunoglobulin preparations were administered orally in infant feeding formula to 6-day-old rabbits. Anti-CT and anti-OM immunoglobulins elicited statistically significant protection against diarrhea in infant rabbits challenged intraintestinally with virulent cholera vibrios. Images PMID:2925248

  17. Outer Membrane Vesicle-Mediated Export of Processed PrtV Protease from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Duperthuy, Marylise; Johnson, Tanya L.; Åhlund, Monika; Lundmark, Richard; Oscarsson, Jan; Sandkvist, Maria; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are known to release from almost all Gram-negative bacteria during normal growth. OMVs carry different biologically active toxins and enzymes into the surrounding environment. We suggest that OMVs may therefore be able to transport bacterial proteases into the target host cells. We present here an analysis of the Vibrio cholerae OMV-associated protease PrtV. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrated that PrtV was secreted from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 via the type II secretion system in association with OMVs. By immunoblotting and electron microscopic analysis using immunogold labeling, the association of PrtV with OMVs was examined. We demonstrated that OMV-associated PrtV was biologically active by showing altered morphology and detachment of cells when the human ileocecum carcinoma (HCT8) cells were treated with OMVs from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 whereas cells treated with OMVs from the prtV isogenic mutant showed no morphological changes. Furthermore, OMV-associated PrtV protease showed a contribution to bacterial resistance towards the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that OMVs released from V. cholerae can deliver a processed, biologically active form of PrtV that contributes to bacterial interactions with target host cells. PMID:26222047

  18. Immunoproteomic Profiling of Bordetella pertussis Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Reveals Broad and Balanced Humoral Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Raeven, René H M; van der Maas, Larissa; Tilstra, Wichard; Uittenbogaard, Joost P; Bindels, Tim H E; Kuipers, Betsy; van der Ark, Arno; Pennings, Jeroen L A; van Riet, Elly; Jiskoot, Wim; Kersten, Gideon F A; Metz, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    The current resurgence of whooping cough is alarming, and improved pertussis vaccines are thought to offer a solution. Outer membrane vesicle vaccines (omvPV) are potential vaccine candidates, but omvPV-induced humoral responses have not yet been characterized in detail. The purpose of this study was to determine the antigen composition of omvPV and to elucidate the immunogenicity of the individual antigens. Quantitative proteome analysis revealed the complex composition of omvPV. The omvPV immunogenicity profile in mice was compared to those of classic whole cell vaccine (wPV), acellular vaccine (aPV), and pertussis infection. Pertussis-specific antibody levels, antibody isotypes, IgG subclasses, and antigen specificity were determined after vaccination or infection by using a combination of multiplex immunoassays, two-dimensional immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. The vaccines and infection raised strong antibody responses, but large quantitative and qualitative differences were measured. The highest antibody levels were obtained by omvPV. All IgG subclasses (IgG1/IgG2a/IgG2b/IgG3) were elicited by omvPV and in a lower magnitude by wPV, but not by aPV (IgG1) or infection (IgG2a/b). The majority of omvPV-induced antibodies were directed against Vag8, BrkA, and LPS. The broad and balanced humoral response makes omvPV a promising pertussis vaccine candidate.

  19. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

    PubMed

    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed. PMID:27098257

  20. Expression and translocation of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dascher, C; Roll, D; Bavoil, P M

    1993-12-01

    The entire gene encoding the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from Chlamydia psittaci strain GPIC has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A tightly regulated T7 promoter is used to control expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Upon induction of expression, the precursor (pre-MOMP) is synthesized in the cell. This is followed by the appearance of a lower molecular weight protein that comigrates with mature MOMP from chlamydial elementary bodies by both one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. When E. coli cells expressing MOMP are converted to spheroplasts and subjected to protease treatment, MOMP is quantitatively degraded while cytoplasmic pre-MOMP is protected from degradation. Whole cells subjected to the same protease treatment show no degradation of MOMP. Furthermore, MOMP is not detected in surface-labeling experiments using several MOMP-specific antibodies. These data indicate that pre-MOMP is translocated to the periplasmic space and processed but is not surface exposed in E. coli. Expression of MOMP in this system causes a significant reduction in cell viability. In addition, coexpression in E. coli of MOMP or a MOMP-PhoA fusion with various chaperone proteins does not alter the level of MOMP translocation.

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of the major outer membrane protein gene of Chlamydia psittaci 6BC.

    PubMed

    Everett, K D; Andersen, A A; Plaunt, M; Hatch, T P

    1991-08-01

    The gene encoding the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of the psittacine Chlamydia psittaci strain 6BC was cloned and sequenced. N-terminal protein sequencing of the mature MOMP indicated that it is posttranslationally processed at a site identical to the site previously identified in the MOMP of Chlamydia trachomatis L2. The nucleotide sequence of the C. psittaci 6BC MOMP gene was found to be 67 to 68% identical to those of human C. trachomatis strains, 73% identical to that of Chlamydia pneumoniae IOL-207, 79% identical to that of the C. psittaci guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis strain, GPIC, and 83% identical to that of the C. psittaci ovine abortion strain S26/3. In contrast, the 6BC sequence was found to be greater than 99% identical to the sequences reported for two strains of C. psittaci, A22/M and Cal-10 meningopneumonitis, believed to be of nonpsittacine avian origin. Monoclonal antibody analysis confirmed the nonpsittacine avian origin of A22/M but identified the Cal-10 strain from which the MOMP gene was previously sequenced as a psittacine strain. These results confirm that psittacine and nonpsittacine avian strains of C. psittaci are closely related and distinct from the mammalian guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis and ovine abortion strains of C. psittaci.

  2. Immunodetection of Outer Membrane Proteins by Flow Cytometry of Isolated Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, Sarah; Arbour, Nathalie; Vande Velde, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Methods to detect and monitor mitochondrial outer membrane protein components in animal tissues are vital to study mitochondrial physiology and pathophysiology. This protocol describes a technique where mitochondria isolated from rodent tissue are immunolabeled and analyzed by flow cytometry. Mitochondria are isolated from rodent spinal cords and subjected to a rapid enrichment step so as to remove myelin, a major contaminant of mitochondrial fractions prepared from nervous tissue. Isolated mitochondria are then labeled with an antibody of choice and a fluorescently conjugated secondary antibody. Analysis by flow cytometry verifies the relative purity of mitochondrial preparations by staining with a mitochondrial specific dye, followed by detection and quantification of immunolabeled protein. This technique is rapid, quantifiable and high-throughput, allowing for the analysis of hundreds of thousands of mitochondria per sample. It is applicable to assess novel proteins at the mitochondrial surface under normal physiological conditions as well as the proteins that may become mislocalized to this organelle during pathology. Importantly, this method can be coupled to fluorescent indicator dyes to report on certain activities of mitochondrial subpopulations and is feasible for mitochondria from the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) as well as liver. PMID:25285411

  3. TSPO, a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein, Controls Ethanol-Related Behaviors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ran; Rittenhouse, Danielle; Sweeney, Katelyn; Potluri, Prasanth; Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-08-01

    The heavy consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs) which impact patients, their families, and societies. Yet the genetic and physiological factors that predispose humans to AUDs remain unclear. One hypothesis is that alterations in mitochondrial function modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol exposure. Using Drosophila genetics we report that inactivation of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, affects ethanol sedation and tolerance in male flies. Knockdown of dTSPO in adult male neurons results in increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation, and this effect requires the dTSPO depletion-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of caspase activity in fly heads. Systemic loss of dTSPO in male flies blocks the development of tolerance to repeated ethanol exposures, an effect that is not seen when dTSPO is only inactivated in neurons. Female flies are naturally more sensitive to ethanol than males, and female fly heads have strikingly lower levels of dTSPO mRNA than males. Hence, mitochondrial TSPO function plays an important role in ethanol sensitivity and tolerance. Since a large array of benzodiazepine analogues have been developed that interact with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, the mitochondrial TSPO might provide an important new target for treating AUDs.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Proteins in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, Seul I; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary cause of enteric diseases and has acquired a variety of virulence factors during its evolution into a pathogen. Secreted virulence factors interact with commensal flora and host cells and enable Salmonella to survive and thrive in hostile environments. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from many Gram-negative bacteria function as a mechanism for the secretion of complex mixtures, including virulence factors. We performed a proteomic analysis of OMVs that were isolated under standard laboratory and acidic minimal medium conditions and identified 14 OMV-associated proteins that were observed in the OMV fraction isolated only under the acidic minimal medium conditions, which reproduced the nutrient-deficient intracellular milieu. The inferred roles of these 14 proteins were diverse, including transporter, enzyme, and transcriptional regulator. The absence of these proteins influenced Salmonella survival inside murine macrophages. Eleven of these proteins were predicted to possess secretion signal sequences at their N termini, and three (HupA, GlnH, and PhoN) of the proteins were found to be translocated into the cytoplasm of host cells. The comparative proteomic profiling of OMVs performed in this study revealed different protein compositions in the OMVs isolated under the two different conditions, which indicates that the OMV cargo depends on the growth conditions and provides a deeper insight into how Salmonella utilizes OMVs to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:24935973

  5. Insertion Mutagenesis and Membrane Topology Model of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Protein OprM

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kendy K. Y.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprM is a protein involved in multiple-antibiotic resistance as the outer membrane component for the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux system. Planar lipid bilayer experiments showed that OprM had channel-forming activity with an average single-channel conductance of only about 80 pS in 1 M KCl. The gene encoding OprM was subjected to insertion mutagenesis by cloning of a foreign epitope from the circumsporozoite form of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum into 11 sites. In Escherichia coli, 8 of the 11 insertion mutant genes expressed proteins at levels comparable to those obtained with the wild-type gene and the inserted malarial epitopes were surface accessible as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence. When moved to a P. aeruginosa OprM-deficient strain, seven of the insertion mutant genes expressed proteins at variable levels comparable to that of wild-type OprM and three of these reconstituted MIC profiles resembling those of the wild-type protein, while the other mutant forms showed variable MIC results. Utilizing the data from these experiments, in conjunction with multiple sequence alignments and structure predictions, an OprM topology model with 16 β strands was proposed. PMID:10762238

  6. Characterization and Vaccine Potential of Outer Membrane Vesicles Produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structures has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria. PMID:26930282

  7. Adhesion of Fusobacterium necrophorum to bovine endothelial cells is mediated by outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Gart, Elena; Nagaraja, T G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2013-03-23

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is frequently associated with suppurative and necrotic infections of animals and humans. The organism is a major bovine pathogen, and in cattle, the common fusobacterial infections are hepatic abscesses, foot rot, and necrotic laryngitis. The species comprises two subspecies: F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Bacterial adhesion to the host cell surface is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis, and outer membrane proteins (OMP) play an important role in adhesion and establishment of certain Gram-negative bacterial infections. The means by which F. necrophorum attaches to epithelial or endothelial cells has not been determined. We evaluated whether OMP of F. necrophorum, isolated from a liver abscess, mediated adhesion to bovine endothelial cells (adrenal gland capillary endothelial cell line). The extent of binding of subsp. necrophorum to the endothelial cells was higher than that of F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Trypsin treatment of bacterial cells decreased their binding to endothelial cells indicating the protein nature of adhesins. Preincubation of endothelial cells with OMP extracted from F. necrophorum decreased the binding of bacterial cells. In addition, binding of each subspecies to endothelial cells was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies raised against respective OMP and the antibody-mediated inhibition was subspecies specific. The western blot analysis of OMP bound to endothelial cells with anti-OMP antibodies showed four OMP of 17, 24, 40 and 74 kDa. We conclude that OMP of F. necrophorum play a role in adhesion of bacterial cells to the endothelial cells.

  8. Outer membrane proteins of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Peterson, Greg; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2014-08-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, classified into subsp. necrophorum (Fnn) and subsp. funduliforme (Fnf), is frequently associated with necrotic infections of animals and humans. The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of many Gram negative bacteria play an important role in bacterial adhesion and establishment of infection. The OMP profile of F. necrophorum has not been well characterized. We analyzed OMP of bovine strains of Fnn and Fnf and human strains of F. necrophorum. Electrophoretic separations of extracted OMP of Fnn and Fnf strains of cattle showed a total of 19 and 20 protein bands, respectively. The most prominent protein band was 40 kDa in Fnn and 37.5 kDa in Fnf. The four human clinical strains examined had more heterogeneous banding patterns and had different profiles than those of bovine Fnf strains. A total of 11 protein bands in Fnn and 13 protein bands in Fnf were recognized by sera from cattle with liver abscesses. The intensities of many of the bands in Fnn were higher than that of Fnf. We conclude that the two subspecies of F. necrophorum differ in their OMP profiles and the difference may account for differences in their virulence and involvement in the pathogenesis of necrotic infections.

  9. A Shigella flexneri virulence plasmid encoded factor controls production of outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Saima; Kottwitz, Haila; Benjamin, Jeremy; Ryu, Julie; Jarrar, Ameer; Garduno, Rafael; Rohde, John R

    2014-12-01

    Shigella spp. use a repertoire of virulence plasmid-encoded factors to cause shigellosis. These include components of a Type III Secretion Apparatus (T3SA) that is required for invasion of epithelial cells and many genes of unknown function. We constructed an array of 99 deletion mutants comprising all genes encoded by the virulence plasmid (excluding those known to be required for plasmid maintenance) of Shigella flexneri. We screened these mutants for their ability to bind the dye Congo red: an indicator of T3SA function. This screen focused our attention on an operon encoding genes that modify the cell envelope including virK, a gene of partially characterized function. We discovered that virK is required for controlled release of proteins to the culture supernatant. Mutations in virK result in a temperature-dependent overproduction of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The periplasmic chaperone/protease DegP, a known regulator of OMV production in Escherichia coli (encoded by a chromosomal gene), was found to similarly control OMV production in S. flexneri. Both virK and degP show genetic interactions with mxiD, a structural component of the T3SA. Our results are consistent with a model in which VirK and DegP relieve the periplasmic stress that accompanies assembly of the T3SA. PMID:25378474

  10. A Shigella flexneri Virulence Plasmid Encoded Factor Controls Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sidik, Saima; Kottwitz, Haila; Benjamin, Jeremy; Ryu, Julie; Jarrar, Ameer; Garduno, Rafael; Rohde, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Shigella spp. use a repertoire of virulence plasmid-encoded factors to cause shigellosis. These include components of a Type III Secretion Apparatus (T3SA) that is required for invasion of epithelial cells and many genes of unknown function. We constructed an array of 99 deletion mutants comprising all genes encoded by the virulence plasmid (excluding those known to be required for plasmid maintenance) of Shigella flexneri. We screened these mutants for their ability to bind the dye Congo red: an indicator of T3SA function. This screen focused our attention on an operon encoding genes that modify the cell envelope including virK, a gene of partially characterized function. We discovered that virK is required for controlled release of proteins to the culture supernatant. Mutations in virK result in a temperature-dependent overproduction of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The periplasmic chaperone/protease DegP, a known regulator of OMV production in Escherichia coli (encoded by a chromosomal gene), was found to similarly control OMV production in S. flexneri. Both virK and degP show genetic interactions with mxiD, a structural component of the T3SA. Our results are consistent with a model in which VirK and DegP relieve the periplasmic stress that accompanies assembly of the T3SA. PMID:25378474

  11. Interaction of TonB with the Outer Membrane Receptor FpvA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Hendrik; Zeder-Lutz, Gabrielle; Schalk, Isabelle; Pattus, Franc; Celia, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake by the FpvA receptor in the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is dependent on the inner membrane protein TonB1. This energy transducer couples the proton-electrochemical potential of the inner membrane to the transport event. To shed more light upon this process, a recombinant TonB1 protein lacking the N-terminal inner membrane anchor (TonBpp) was constructed. This protein was, after expression in Escherichia coli, purified from the soluble fraction of lysed cells by means of an N-terminal hexahistidine or glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag. Purified GST-TonBpp was able to capture detergent-solubilized FpvA, regardless of the presence of pyoverdine or pyoverdine-Fe. Targeting of the TonB1 fragment to the periplasm of P. aeruginosa inhibited the transport of ferric pyoverdine by FpvA in vivo, indicating an interference with endogenous TonB1, presumably caused by competition for binding sites at the transporter or by formation of nonfunctional TonB heterodimers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that the FpvA-TonBpp interactions have apparent affinities in the micromolar range. The binding of pyoverdine or ferric pyoverdine to FpvA did not modulate this affinity. Apparently, the presence of either iron or pyoverdine is not essential for the formation of the FpvA-TonB complex in vitro. PMID:16885443

  12. Vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV)

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Johan; Oster, Philipp; Arnold, Richard; Tatley, Michael V.; Næss, Lisbeth M.; Aaberge, Ingeborg S.; Galloway, Yvonne; McNicholas, Anne; O’Hallahan, Jane; Rosenqvist, Einar; Black, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The utility of wild-type outer membrane vesicle (wtOMV) vaccines against serogroup B (MenB) meningococcal disease has been explored since the 1970s. Public health interventions in Cuba, Norway and New Zealand have demonstrated that these protein-based vaccines can prevent MenB disease. Data from large clinical studies and retrospective statistical analyses in New Zealand give effectiveness estimates of at least 70%. A consistent pattern of moderately reactogenic and safe vaccines has been seen with the use of approximately 60 million doses of three different wtOMV vaccine formulations. The key limitation of conventional wtOMV vaccines is their lack of broad protective activity against the large diversity of MenB strains circulating globally. The public health intervention in New Zealand (between 2004–2008) when MeNZB was used to control a clonal MenB epidemic, provided a number of new insights regarding international and public-private collaboration, vaccine safety surveillance, vaccine effectiveness estimates and communication to the public. The experience with wtOMV vaccines also provide important information for the next generation of MenB vaccines designed to give more comprehensive protection against multiple strains. PMID:23857274

  13. Flocculation of Escherichia coli Cells in Association with Enhanced Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Yoshihiro; Nguyen, Minh Hong; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    Microbial flocculation is a phenomenon of aggregation of dispersed bacterial cells in the form of flocs or flakes. In this study, the mechanism of spontaneous flocculation of Escherichia coli cells by overexpression of the bcsB gene was investigated. The flocculation induced by overexpression of bcsB was consistent among the various E. coli strains examined, including the K-12, B, and O strains, with flocs that resembled paper scraps in structure being about 1 to 2 mm. The distribution of green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli cells within the floc structure was investigated by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy. Flocs were sensitive to proteinase K, indicating that the main component of the flocs was proteinous. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the flocs strongly suggested the involvement of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in E. coli flocculation. The involvement of OMVs in flocculation was supported by transmission electron microscopy observation of flocs. Furthermore, bcsB-induced E. coli flocculation was greatly suppressed in strains with hypovesiculation phenotypes (ΔdsbA and ΔdsbB strains). Thus, our results demonstrate the strong correlation between spontaneous flocculation and enhanced OMV production of E. coli cells.

  14. Molecular recognition in myxobacterial outer membrane exchange: Functional, social and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Through cooperative interactions, bacteria can build multicellular communities. To ensure that productive interactions occur, bacteria must recognize their neighbors and respond accordingly. Molecular recognition between cells is thus a fundamental behavior, and in bacteria important discoveries have been made. This MicroReview focuses on a recently described recognition system in myxobacteria that is governed by a polymorphic cell surface receptor called TraA. TraA regulates outer membrane exchange (OME), whereby myxobacterial cells transiently fuse their OMs to efficiently transfer proteins and lipids between cells. Unlike other transport systems, OME is rather indiscriminate in what OM goods are transferred. In contrast, the recognition of partnering cells is discriminatory and only occurs between cells that bear identical or closely related TraA proteins. Therefore TraA functions in kin recognition and, in turn, OME helps regulate social interactions between myxobacteria. Here, I discuss and speculate on the social and evolutionary implications of OME and suggest it helps to guide their transition from free-living cells into coherent and functional populations. PMID:24261719

  15. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Jessica D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis.

  16. Antibody response to Brucella ovis outer membrane proteins in ovine brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Riezu-Boj, J I; Moriyón, I; Blasco, J M; Gamazo, C; Díaz, R

    1990-01-01

    Hot saline extracts of Brucella ovis were composed of vesicles with outer membrane proteins (OMPs), lipopolysaccharide, and phospholipid as constituents. Extraction with petroleum ether-chloroform-phenol yielded a protein fraction free of detectable lipopolysaccharide, in which group 3 OMPs (28,500 apparent molecular weight [28.5K], 27.0K, and 25.5K) represented 81% of the total. Group 1 OMPs and 67.0K, 22.5K to 21.5K, and 19.5K to 18.0K proteins were also detected. Adsorption of immune sera with whole bacteria suggested that group 3 OMPs and 67.0K, 22.5K to 21.5K, and 19.5K to 18.0K proteins had antigenic determinants exposed on the surfaces of both B. ovis and rough B. melitensis cells but not on smooth B. melitensis cells. Antibodies to group 3 OMPs and the 67.0K protein in the sera of 93 and 87%, respectively, of B. ovis-infected rams were found by immunoblotting. Antibodies to other proteins were present in 67% of these animals. Compared with B. ovis-infected rams which had not developed lesions, rams with epididymo-orchitis had antibodies to a larger variety of proteins. Although ewes infected with B. melitensis also showed antibodies to OMPs, the immunoblot reactions were less intense. Images PMID:2298488

  17. Ferric-Pyoverdine Recognition by Fpv Outer Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Hartney, Sierra L.; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K.; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W.; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  18. Conservation of Outer Membrane Protein E among Strains of Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Brauer, Aimee L.; Yuskiw, Norine; McNamara, Erin R.; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2001-01-01

    Outer membrane protein E (OMP E) is a 50-kDa protein of Moraxella catarrhalis which has several features that suggest that the protein may be an effective vaccine antigen. To assess the conservation of OMP E among strains of M. catarrhalis, 22 isolates were studied with eight monoclonal antibodies which recognize epitopes on different regions of the protein. Eighteen of 22 strains were reactive with all eight antibodies. The sequences of ompE from 16 strains of M. catarrhalis were determined, including the 4 strains which were nonreactive with selected monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of sequences indicate a high degree of conservation among strains, with sequence differences clustered in limited regions of the gene. To assess the stability of ompE during colonization of the human respiratory tract, the sequences of ompE of isolates collected from patients colonized with the same strain for 3 to 9 months were determined. The sequences remained unchanged. These results indicate that OMP E is highly conserved among strains of M. catarrhalis, and preliminary studies indicate that the gene which encodes OMP E remains stable during colonization of the human respiratory tract. PMID:11349016

  19. Differences in outer membrane proteins of the lymphogranuloma venereum and trachoma biovars of Chlamydia trachomatis

    SciTech Connect

    Batteiger, B.E.; Jones, R.B.

    1985-11-01

    The lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) and trachoma biovars of Chlamydia trachomatis exhibit differences in biological properties both in vivo and in vitro. To identify analogous biochemical differences, the authors studied the molecular charges of chlamydial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) by means of isoelectric focusing and nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis. Analysis of proteins of whole elementary bodies biosynthetically labeled with L-(35S)cysteine revealed that most chlamydial proteins were neutral or acidic. The major OMPs (MOMPs) of all strains tested were acidic and had apparent isoelectric points (pIs) that varied within narrow limits despite differences in molecular mass of up to 3,000 daltons (Da). However, a low-molecular-mass cysteine-rich OMP analogous to that previously described for Chlamydia psittaci varied consistently in molecular mass (12,500 versus 12,000 Da) and pI (5.4 versus 6.9) between LGV strains and trachoma strains, respectively. OMPs with a molecular mass of 60,000 Da in the trachoma biovar strains had pIs in the 7.3 to 7.7 range. However, analogous OMPs in the LGV strains existed as a doublet with a molecular mass of about 60,000 Da. These data indicate substantial differences in biochemical characteristics of analogous OMPs in the LGV and trachoma biovars. Such differences are the first structural differences described between LGV and trachoma strains which support their distinction into separate biovars and may be related to some of their biological differences.

  20. Vaccination with major outer membrane protein proteosomes elicits protection in mice against a Chlamydia respiratory challenge.

    PubMed

    Tifrea, Delia F; Pal, Sukumar; Toussi, Deana N; Massari, Paola; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-11-01

    Vaccines formulated with the Chlamydia muridarum native major outer membrane protein (nMOMP) have so far been shown to elicit the most robust protection against this pathogen. nMOMP is a membrane protein and therefore, detergents are used to keep it in solution. Detergents however, have toxic effects. To address this limitation, we tested a nMOMP proteosome vaccine and compared its ability to elicit protection against nMOMP solubilized in the detergent Z3-14. The two preparations were formulated with or without CpG + Montanide (C/M). As a control antigen we used ovalbumin. Mice vaccinated with nMOMP developed strong humoral and cell mediated Chlamydia-specific immune responses. Based on the IgG2a/IgG1 levels in serum and amounts of IFN-γ in splenocytes supernatants the immune responses were predominantly Th1-biased. The animals were subsequently challenged intranasally with 2 × 10(3)Chlamydia inclusion forming units (IFU) and the course of the infection was followed for 10 days when the mice were euthanized. Based on changes in body weight, weight of the lungs and number of IFU recovered from the lungs, mice immunized with nMOMP-Ps and nMOMP + Z3-14 adjuvanted with C/M showed the most robust protection. In summary, nMOMP-Ps should be considered as Chlamydia vaccine candidates.

  1. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Jessica D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis. PMID:27035339

  2. Salmonella enterica delivers its genotoxin through outer membrane vesicles secreted from infected cells.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Riccardo; Levi, Laura; Rouf, Syed Fazle; Puiac, Speranta; Rhen, Mikael; Frisan, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    Cytolethal-distending toxins (CDTs) belong to a family of DNA damage inducing exotoxins that are produced by several Gram-negative bacteria. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses its CDT (named as Typhoid toxin) only in the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) of infected cells, which requires its export for cell intoxication. The mechanisms of secretion, release in the extracellular space and uptake by bystander cells are poorly understood. We have addressed these issues using a recombinant S. Typhimurium strain, MC71-CDT, where the genes encoding for the PltA, PltB and CdtB subunits of the Typhoid toxin are expressed under control of the endogenous promoters. MC71-CDT grown under conditions that mimic the SCV secreted the holotoxin in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Epithelial cells infected with MC71-CDT also secreted OMVs-like vesicles. The release of these extracellular vesicles required an intact SCV and relied on anterograde transport towards the cellular cortex on microtubule and actin tracks. Paracrine internalization of Typhoid toxin-loaded OMVs by bystander cells was dependent on dynamin-1, indicating active endocytosis. The subsequent induction of DNA damage required retrograde transport of the toxin through the Golgi complex. These data provide new insights on the mode of secretion of exotoxins by cells infected with intracellular bacteria.

  3. Immunochemical analysis of inner and outer membranes of Escherichia coli by crossed immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, C J; Siegel, J; Salton, M R; Owen, P

    1978-01-01

    Isolated membrane fractions of Escherichia coli K-12 yielded complex immunoprecipitate patterns when Triton X-100 and sodium dodecyl sulfate extracts were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis with antienvelope immunoglobulins. Twelve of the 46 antigens in the immunoprecipitate patterns of inner (plasma) membranes were identified by zymograms and/or by the use of specific antisera. The following enzyme activities were detected in immunoprecipitates: 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.43); adenosine triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3); glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.4), two separate components; malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37); dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.3.1); succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1); lactate dehydrogeanse (EC 1.1.1.27); reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (EC 1.6.99.3); protease (EC 3.4.21.1); and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.5). The corresponding immunoprecipitate pattern for isolated outer membranes consisted of at least 25 discrete antigens and differed strikingly from that obtained with inner membranes. Two major immunogens were identified as lipopolysaccharide and Braun lipoprotein. A protease-active immunoprecipitate was also detected in this fraction, but attempts to identify the Rosenbusch matrix protein in the crossed immunoelectrophoretic profile were unsuccessful. Images PMID:338583

  4. Focus on the Outer Membrane Factor OprM, the Forgotten Player from Efflux Pumps Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Gilles; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been used extensively during several decades and we are now facing the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. It has become a major public concern, urging the need to discover new strategies to combat them. Among the different ways used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, the active efflux is one of the main mechanisms. In Gram-negative bacteria the efflux pumps are comprised of three components forming a long edifice crossing the complete cell wall from the inside to the outside of the cell. Blocking these pumps would permit the restoration of the effectiveness of the current antibiotherapy which is why it is important to increase our knowledge on the different proteins involved in these complexes. A tremendous number of experiments have been performed on the inner membrane protein AcrB from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, the protein partners forming the AcrAB-TolC pump, but less information is available concerning the efflux pumps from other virulent Gram-negative bacteria. The present review will focus on the OprM outer membrane protein from the MexAB-OprM pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, highlighting similarities and differences compare to the archetypal AcrAB-TolC in terms of structure, function, and assembly properties. PMID:27025640

  5. Ferric-pyoverdine recognition by Fpv outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2013-02-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  6. TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2011-04-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the conserved β-barrel and plug domains of TonB-dependent proteins but only 18 of them have an N-terminal signaling domain characteristic of TonB-dependent transducers (TBDTs), which participate in cell-surface signaling systems. Phylogenetic analyses of the 18 TBDTs and 27 TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which lack the N-terminal signaling domain, suggest a complex evolutionary history including horizontal transfer among different microbial lineages. Putative functions were assigned to certain TBDRs and TBDTs in clades including well-characterized orthologs from other Pseudomonas spp. A mutant of Pf-5 with deletions in pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis genes was constructed and characterized for iron-limited growth and utilization of a spectrum of siderophores. The mutant could utilize as iron sources a large number of pyoverdines with diverse structures as well as ferric citrate, heme, and the siderophores ferrichrome, ferrioxamine B, enterobactin, and aerobactin. The diversity and complexity of the TBDTs and TBDRs with roles in iron uptake clearly indicate the importance of iron in the fitness and survival of Pf-5 in the environment. PMID:21080032

  7. Trapped translocation intermediates establish the route for export of capsular polysaccharides across Escherichia coli outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Nicholas N; Mainprize, Iain L; Hampton, Lauren; Jones, Michelle L; Naismith, James H; Whitfield, Chris

    2014-06-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is designed to exclude potentially harmful molecules. This property presents a challenge for bacteria that must secrete proteins and large glycoconjugates to grow, divide, and persist. Proteins involved in trafficking such molecules have been identified, but their precise roles are often unresolved due to the difficulty in capturing "snapshots" during the export pathway. Wza is the prototype for the large family of OM polysaccharide export proteins. In Escherichia coli, Wza is essential for the assembly of a capsule, a protective surface coat composed of long-chain polysaccharides. Wza creates an octameric α-helical channel spanning the OM, but the bulk of the protein exists as a large periplasmic structure enclosing an extensive lumen. Residues within the lumen of Wza were targeted for site-specific incorporation of the UV photo-cross-linkable unnatural amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine. Using this in vivo photo-cross-linking strategy, we were able to trap polysaccharide translocation intermediates within the lumen of Wza, providing the first unequivocal evidence to our knowledge that nascent capsular polysaccharide chains exit the cell through the Wza portal.

  8. Bacterial Social Networks: Structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains

    PubMed Central

    Remis, Jonathan P.; Wei, Doug; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Costerton, J. William; Berleman, James E.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviors, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of vesicles and vesicle chains that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains and increased abundance in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including 3D Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined these structures to range between 30-60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactoseamine (GalNAc) carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl membrane proteins transferred in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and likely provides a mechanism for the coordination of social activities. PMID:23848955

  9. Dual orientation of the outer membrane lipoprotein Pal in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Juliana; MacPherson, Victoria; Barnard, David; Bettinger, John; D'Arcy, Brooke; Surendran, Naveen; Hellman, Judith; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein (Pal) of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a characteristic bacterial lipoprotein, with an N-terminal lipid moiety anchoring it to the outer membrane. Since its discovery over three decades ago, Pal has been well studied for its participation in the Tol–Pal complex which spans the periplasm and has been proposed to play important roles in bacterial survival, pathogenesis and virulence. Previous studies of Pal place the lipoprotein in the periplasm of E. coli, allowing it to interact with Tol proteins and the peptidoglycan layer. Here, we describe for the first time, a subpopulation of Pal which is present on the cell surface of E. coli. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy detect anti-Pal antibodies on the surface of intact E. coli cells. Interestingly, Pal is surface exposed in an ‘all or nothing’ manner, such that most of the cells contain only internal Pal, with fewer cells ( < 20  %) exhibiting surface Pal. PMID:25808171

  10. Comparison of the outer membrane protein and lipopolysaccharide profiles of mucoid and nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, N M; MacDonald, M H; Martin, N; Nicas, T; Hancock, R E

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory-derived mucoid variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were selected by plating the standard PAO1 laboratory strain with bacteriophage. These mucoid variants formed two distinct groups of strains on the basis of phage typing. The first group had the same phage-typing pattern as the parent PAO1 strain, while the second group had a distinctly different phage-typing pattern. One strain from each group was assessed along with the parent PAO1 strain for its outer membrane protein (OMP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiles by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis followed by appropriate staining. The mucoid derivatives were found to differ from the parent PAO1 nonmucoid strain in having lost a high-molecular-weight LPS species. Furthermore, the reversion of the mucoid strains to the nonmucoid phenotype was accompanied by a return of the missing high-molecular-weight LPS species. No observable difference between the mucoid derivatives and the parent nonmucoid strain was noted in the OMP profiles. The opposite was found in the case of four isolates of mucoid P. aeruginosa from patients with cystic fibrosis. Two OMP bands (of approximately 55 and 25 kilodaltons) were present in the mucoid isolates but missing in their sister nonmucoid strains. In the case of the cystic fibrosis isolates, no difference in the LPS profiles within mucoid-nonmucoid pairs was noted. Images PMID:2121789

  11. Coordination of peptidoglycan synthesis and outer membrane constriction during Escherichia coli cell division

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Andrew N; Egan, Alexander JF; van't Veer, Inge L; Verheul, Jolanda; Colavin, Alexandre; Koumoutsi, Alexandra; Biboy, Jacob; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Damen, Mirjam J; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Breukink, Eefjan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Typas, Athanasios; Gross, Carol A; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    To maintain cellular structure and integrity during division, Gram-negative bacteria must carefully coordinate constriction of a tripartite cell envelope of inner membrane, peptidoglycan (PG), and outer membrane (OM). It has remained enigmatic how this is accomplished. Here, we show that envelope machines facilitating septal PG synthesis (PBP1B-LpoB complex) and OM constriction (Tol system) are physically and functionally coordinated via YbgF, renamed CpoB (Coordinator of PG synthesis and OM constriction, associated with PBP1B). CpoB localizes to the septum concurrent with PBP1B-LpoB and Tol at the onset of constriction, interacts with both complexes, and regulates PBP1B activity in response to Tol energy state. This coordination links PG synthesis with OM invagination and imparts a unique mode of bifunctional PG synthase regulation by selectively modulating PBP1B cross-linking activity. Coordination of the PBP1B and Tol machines by CpoB contributes to effective PBP1B function in vivo and maintenance of cell envelope integrity during division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07118.001 PMID:25951518

  12. Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella melitensis and Protection Induced in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Calderón, Eric Daniel; Lopez-Merino, Ahidé; Jain, Neeta; Peralta, Humberto; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.; Witonsky, Sharon; Contreras-Rodríguez, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from smooth B. melitensis 16 M and a derived rough mutant, VTRM1 strain, were purified and characterized with respect to protein content and induction of immune responses in mice. Proteomic analysis showed 29 proteins present in OMVs from B. melitensis 16 M; some of them are well-known Brucella immunogens such as SOD, GroES, Omp31, Omp25, Omp19, bp26, and Omp16. OMVs from a rough VTRM1 induced significantly higher expression of IL-12, TNFα, and IFNγ genes in bone marrow dendritic cells than OMVs from smooth strain 16 M. Relative to saline control group, mice immunized intramuscularly with rough and smooth OMVs were protected from challenge with virulent strain B. melitensis 16 M just as well as the group immunized with live strain B. melitensis Rev1 (P < 0.005). Additionally, the levels of serum IgG2a increased in mice vaccinated with OMVs from rough strain VTRM1 consistent with the induction of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:22242036

  13. Structural characterization of outer membrane components of the type IV pili system in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Samta; Mościcka, Katarzyna B; Bos, Martine P; Pachulec, Emilia; Stuart, Marc C A; Keegstra, Wilko; Boekema, Egbert J; van der Does, Chris

    2011-01-31

    Structures of the type IV pili secretin complexes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis, embedded in outer membranes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Single particle averaging revealed additional domains not observed previously. Secretin complexes of N. gonorrhoeae showed a double ring structure with a 14-15-fold symmetry in the central ring, and a 14-fold symmetry of the peripheral ring with 7 spikes protruding. In secretin complexes of N. meningitidis, the spikes were absent and the peripheral ring was partly or completely lacking. When present, it had a 19-fold symmetry. The structures of the complexes in several pil mutants were determined. Structures obtained from the pilC1/C2 adhesin and the pilW minor pilin deletion strains were similar to wild-type, whereas deletion of the homologue of N. meningitidis PilW resulted in the absence of secretin structures. Remarkably, the pilE pilin subunit and pilP lipoprotein deletion mutants showed a change in the symmetry of the peripheral ring from 14 to 19 and loss of spikes. The pilF ATPase mutant also lost the spikes, but maintained 14-fold symmetry. These results show that secretin complexes contain previously unidentified large and flexible extra domains with a probable role in stabilization or assembly of type IV pili.

  14. Flocculation of Escherichia coli Cells in Association with Enhanced Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Yoshihiro; Nguyen, Minh Hong; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    Microbial flocculation is a phenomenon of aggregation of dispersed bacterial cells in the form of flocs or flakes. In this study, the mechanism of spontaneous flocculation of Escherichia coli cells by overexpression of the bcsB gene was investigated. The flocculation induced by overexpression of bcsB was consistent among the various E. coli strains examined, including the K-12, B, and O strains, with flocs that resembled paper scraps in structure being about 1 to 2 mm. The distribution of green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli cells within the floc structure was investigated by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy. Flocs were sensitive to proteinase K, indicating that the main component of the flocs was proteinous. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the flocs strongly suggested the involvement of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in E. coli flocculation. The involvement of OMVs in flocculation was supported by transmission electron microscopy observation of flocs. Furthermore, bcsB-induced E. coli flocculation was greatly suppressed in strains with hypovesiculation phenotypes (ΔdsbA and ΔdsbB strains). Thus, our results demonstrate the strong correlation between spontaneous flocculation and enhanced OMV production of E. coli cells. PMID:26092467

  15. Protecting enzymatic function through directed packaging into bacterial outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Nathan J.; Turner, Kendrick B.; Medintz, Igor L.; Walper, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess innate machinery to transport extracellular cargo between cells as well as package virulence factors to infect host cells by secreting outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain small molecules, proteins, and genetic material. These robust proteoliposomes have evolved naturally to be resistant to degradation and provide a supportive environment to extend the activity of encapsulated cargo. In this study, we sought to exploit bacterial OMV formation to package and maintain the activity of an enzyme, phosphotriesterase (PTE), under challenging storage conditions encountered for real world applications. Here we show that OMV packaged PTE maintains activity over free PTE when subjected to elevated temperatures (>100-fold more activity after 14 days at 37 °C), iterative freeze-thaw cycles (3.4-fold post four-cycles), and lyophilization (43-fold). We also demonstrate how lyophilized OMV packaged PTE can be utilized as a cell free reagent for long term environmental remediation of pesticide/chemical warfare contaminated areas. PMID:27117743

  16. Virulence characteristics of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli deletion of gene encoding the outer membrane protein X

    PubMed Central

    MENG, Xianrong; LIU, Xueling; ZHANG, Liyuan; HOU, Bo; LI, Binyou; TAN, Chen; LI, Zili; ZHOU, Rui; LI, Shaowen

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and its homologues have been proposed to contribute to the virulence in various bacterial species. But, their role in virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is yet to be determined. This study evaluates the role of OmpX in ExPEC virulence in vitro and in vivo using a clinical strain PPECC42 of porcine origin. The ompX deletion mutant exhibited increased swimming motility and decreased adhesion to, and invasion of pulmonary epithelial A549 cell, compared to the wild-type strain. A mild increase in LD50 and distinct decrease in bacterial load in such organs as heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney were observed in mice infected with the ompX mutant. Complementation of the complete ompX gene in trans restored the virulence of mutant strain to the level of wild-type strain. Our results reveal that OmpX contributes to ExPEC virulence, but may be not an indispensable virulence determinant. PMID:27149893

  17. Population genetics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a high-prevalence community using a hypervariable outer membrane porB and 13 slowly evolving housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Viscidi, Raphael P; Demma, James C; Zenilman, Jonathan; Crandall, Keith A

    2005-09-01

    Baltimore, Md., is an urban community with a high prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Due to partially protective immune responses, introduction of new strains from other host populations, and exposure of N. gonorrhoeae to antibiotics, the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the circulating strains can fluctuate over time. Understanding the overall genetic diversity and population structure of N. gonorrhoeae is essential for informing public health interventions to eliminate this pathogen. We studied gonococci population genetics in Baltimore by analyzing a hypervariable and strongly selected outer membrane porB gene and 13 slowly evolving and presumably neutral housekeeping genes (abcZ, adk, aroE, fumC, gdh, glnA, gnd, pdhC, pgm, pilA, ppk, pyrD, and serC) in 204 isolates collected in 1991, 1996, and 2001 from male and female patients of two public sexually transmitted diseases clinics. Genetic diversity (), recombination (C), growth (g), population structure, and adaptive selection under codon-substitution and amino acid property models were estimated and compared between these two gene classes. Estimates of the F(ST) fixation index and the chi(2) test of sequence absolute frequencies revealed significant temporal substructuring for both gene types. Baltimore's N. gonorrhoeae populations have increased since 1991 as indicated by consistent positive values of g. Female patients showed similar or lower levels of and C than male patients. Within the MLST housekeeping genes, levels of and C ranged from 0.001-0.013 and 0.000-0.018, respectively. Overall recombination seems to be the dominant force driving evolution in these populations. All loci showed amino acid sites and physicochemical properties under adaptive (or positive-destabilizing) selection, rejecting the generally assumed hypothesis of stabilizing selection for these MLST genes. Within the porB gene, protein I B showed higher and C values than protein I A. Directional positive selection possibly

  18. The toxR Gene of Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum Controls Expression of the Major Outer Membrane Proteins but Not Virulence in a Natural Host Model

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Jun; Nakai, Toshihiro; Chang, Park Se; Oh, Takanori; Nishino, Takeshi; Koitabashi, Tsutomu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2001-01-01

    To examine the hypothesis that the ancestral role of the toxR gene in the family Vibrionaceae is control of the expression of outer membrane protein (OMP)-encoding genes for adaptation to environmental change, we investigated the role of the toxR gene in Vibrio anguillarum, an important fish pathogen. The toxR gene of V. angullarum (Va-toxR) was cloned from strain PT-87050 isolated from diseased ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis), and the sequence was analyzed. The toxR sequence was 63 to 51% identical to those reported for other species of the family Vibrionaceae. Distribution of the Va-toxR gene sequence in V. anguillarum strains of various serotypes was confirmed by using DNA probe and PCR methods. An isogenic toxR mutant of V. anguillarum PT-24, isolated from diseased ayu, was constructed by using an allelic exchange method. The wild-type strain and the toxR mutant did not differ in the ability to produce a protease(s) and a hemolysin(s) or in pathogenicity for ayu when examined by the intramuscular injection and immersion methods. A 35-kDa major OMP was not produced by the toxR mutant. However, a 46-kDa OMP was hardly detected in the wild-type strain but was produced as the major OMP by the toxR mutant. For the toxR mutant, the MICs of two β-lactam antibiotics were higher and the minimum bactericidal concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate was lower than for the wild-type strain. Analysis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the 35- and 46-kDa OMPs indicated that these proteins are the porin-like OMPs and are related to the toxR-regulated major OMPs of the family Vibrionaceae. The results indicate that the toxR gene is not involved in virulence expression in V. anguillarum PT-24 and that toxR regulation of major OMPs is universal in the family Vibrionaceae. These results support the hypothesis that the ancestral role of the toxR gene is regulation of OMP gene expression and that only in some Vibrio species has ToxR been appropriated for the regulation of a

  19. Structure of a putative BenF-like porin from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 at 2.6 A resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, P.; Swaminathan, S.; Lu, F.; Zhao, X.; Li, Z.; Gilmore, J.; Bain, K.; Rutter, M. E.; Gheyi, T.; Schwinn, D.; Bonanno, J. B.; Pieper, U.; Fajardo, J. E.; Fiser, A.; Almo, S. C.; Chance, M. R.; Baker, D.; Atwell, S.; Thompson, D. A.; Emtage, J. S.; Wasserman, S. R.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria typically overcome poor permeability of outer membranes through general porins like OmpF and OmpC, which form water-filled transmembrane pores permitting diffusion of hydrophilic molecules with no particular selectivity. Many bacteria lacking such general porins use substrate-specific porins to overcome growth-limiting conditions and facilitate selective transport of metabolites. Exclusive reliance on substrate-specific porins yields lower membrane permeability to small molecules (<600 Da) versus that seen for Escherichia coli. In Pseudomonads, transit of most small molecules across the cell membrane is thought to be mediated by substrate-specific channels of the OprD superfamily. This property explains, at least in part, the high incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the P. aeruginosa chromosome revealed the presence of 19 genes encoding structurally related, substrate-specific porins (with 30-45% pairwise amino acid sequence identity) that mediate transmembrane passage of small, water-soluble compounds. The OprD superfamily encompasses the eponymous OprD subfamily, which includes 9 P. aeruginosa proteins that convey basic amino acids and carbapenem antibiotics, and the OpdK subfamily, which includes 11 P. aeruginosa proteins that convey aromatic acids and other small aromatic compounds. Genome sequencing of other gram-negative bacteria has revealed additional members of the OprD and OpdK subfamilies in various organisms, including other pseudomonads. Among the many bacteria in which OprD superfamily members have been identified are P. putida, P. fluorescens Pf-5, P. syringae, and Azotobacter vinelandii, all of which share closely related genes that encode the so-called BenF-like porins. In P. putida, benF is part of an operon involved in benzoate catabolism regulated by benR. Within this operon, benK, benE, and benF genes have been suggested to contribute toward either influx or efflux

  20. Purification and Bicelle Crystallization for Structure Determination of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein TamA.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Fabian; Hiller, Sebastian; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    TamA is an Omp85 protein involved in autotransporter assembly in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. It comprises a C-terminal 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel as well as three periplasmic POTRA domains, and is a challenging target for structure determination. Here, we present a method for crystal structure determination of TamA, including recombinant expression in E. coli, detergent extraction, chromatographic purification, and bicelle crystallization in combination with seeding. As a result, crystals in space group P21212 are obtained, which diffract to 2.3 Å resolution. This protocol also serves as a template for structure determination of other outer membrane proteins, in particular of the Omp85 family.

  1. Temperature-inducible outer membrane protein of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica is associated with the virulence plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Bölin, I; Norlander, L; Wolf-Watz, H

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis which harbors a 63-kilobase plasmid was found to cause a lethal infection in Swiss albino mice. The rate of infection paralleled the ability of the pathogenic organism to attach to a monolayer of HeLa cells. One novel outer membrane protein (protein 1) with a molecular weight of 140,000 was found to be associated with the possession of the 63-kilobase plasmid not at 26 degrees C, and expression was moderately affected by the concentration of calcium in the growth medium. Moreover, it was found that synthesis of protein 1 associated outer membrane protein showing similar properties was also found to be expressed in plasmid-containing strains of Yersinia enterocolitica. The properties of protein 1 indicate that it could be identical to the previously described virulence W antigen. Images PMID:6749681

  2. Genetic and biochemical characterization of ISP6, a small mitochondrial outer membrane protein associated with the protein translocation complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kassenbrock, C K; Cao, W; Douglas, M G

    1993-01-01

    To search genetically for additional components of the protein translocation apparatus of mitochondria, we have used low fidelity PCR mutagenesis to generate temperature-sensitive mutants in the outer membrane translocation pore component ISP42. A high copy number suppressor of temperature-sensitive isp42 has been isolated and sequenced. This novel gene, denoted ISP6, encodes a 61 amino acid integral membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which is oriented with its amino-terminus facing the cytosol. Disruption of the ISP6 gene is without apparent effect in wild type yeast cells, but is lethal in temperature-sensitive isp42 mutants. Immunoprecipitation of the gene product, ISP42p, from mitochondria solubilized under mild conditions reveals a multi-protein complex containing ISP6p and ISP42p. Images PMID:8344244

  3. Study of the protein complex, pore diameter, and pore-forming activity of the Borrelia burgdorferi P13 porin.

    PubMed

    Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Thein, Marcus; Barbot, Mariam; Sans-Serramitjana, Eulalia; Bonde, Mari; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Bergström, Sven; Benz, Roland

    2014-07-01

    P13 is one of the major outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi. Previous studies described P13 as a porin. In the present study some structure and function aspects of P13 were studied. P13 showed according to lipid bilayer studies a channel-forming activity of 0.6 nanosiemens in 1 m KCl. Single channel and selectivity measurements demonstrated that P13 had no preference for either cations or anions and showed no voltage-gating up to ±100 mV. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to isolate and characterize the P13 protein complex in its native state. The complex had a high molecular mass of about 300 kDa and was only composed of P13 monomers. The channel size was investigated using non-electrolytes revealing an apparent diameter of about 1.4 nm with a 400-Da molecular mass cut-off. Multichannel titrations with different substrates reinforced the idea that P13 forms a general diffusion channel. The identity of P13 within the complex was confirmed by second dimension SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and the use of a p13 deletion mutant strain. The results suggested that P13 is the protein responsible for the 0.6-nanosiemens pore-forming activity in the outer membrane of B. burgdorferi.

  4. Transport rectification in nanopores with outer membranes modified with surface charges and polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-10-22

    This work reports a comprehensive theoretical study of the transport-rectification properties of cylindrical nanopores with neutral inner walls and chemically modified outer membrane. The chemical species on the two outer sides of the membrane have charges of opposite sign and can be either surface-confined species (i.e., surface charges) or polyelectrolyte brushes. The advantage of this design over other types of rectifying nanopores is that it requires controlling the composition of the outer walls of the pore (which are easy to access) rather than the inner walls, thus simplifying the fabrication process. Ion-current rectification in nanopores with charged outer walls is ascribed to applied-potential-induced changes in the ionic concentration within the pore. The rectification efficiency is studied as a function of pore length, radius, surface charge and bulk electrolyte concentration. An analytical model is derived for the case of surface-confined charges that predicts the current-potential curves in very good agreement with the numerical calculations. Neutral nanopores with polyelectrolyte-modified outer walls have two distinct advantages compared to surface-charged systems: (i) they exhibit higher rectification factors due to the large charge density immobilized by the polyelectrolyte brushes, and (ii) the applied potential deforms the polyelectrolyte chains toward the oppositely charged electrode. This deformation brings the polyelectrolyte brushes into the pore in the low conductivity state and expels them from the pore in the high conductivity regime. Calculations of the potentials of mean-force suggest that the applied-field-induced conformational changes can be used to control the translocation of cargoes larger than ions, such as proteins and nanoparticles.

  5. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  6. Characterization of a heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of Haemophilus somnus.

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Y; Haritani, M; Ishikawa, H; Yuasa, N

    1993-01-01

    In immunoblot analysis, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), 27-1, which was produced to an outer membrane protein (OMP) of Haemophilus somnus, showed that a major OMP is heat modifiable, having a molecular mass of 28 kDa when the N-lauroylsarcosine-insoluble OMP preparation was solubilized at 60 degrees C and a mass of 37 kDa when the OMP preparation was solubilized at 100 degrees C. The heat-modifiable OMP reacted intensely with convalescent sera obtained from calves with experimental H. somnus pneumonia in immunoblot analysis. Immunoelectron microscopic and antibody absorption studies revealed that the MAb 27-1 epitope was not surface exposed on the intact bacterium. However, a decrease in antibody reactivity to the heat-modifiable OMP in immunoblot analysis after absorption of convalescent serum with intact bacterial cells of H. somnus suggests that a surface-exposed portion of the heat-modifiable OMP is expressed on the intact bacterium. MAb 27-1 reacted with 45 of 45 strains of H. somnus tested in immunoblot analysis. The apparent molecular mass of the antigen varied among strains, and five reactivity patterns demonstrated by MAb 27-1 were observed. MAb 27-1 also reacted with six species in the family Pasteurellaceae, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella dublin, but not with the other eight species of gram-negative bacteria. The heat-modifiable OMP of H. somnus showed immunological cross-reactivity with the OmpA protein of E. coli K-12 and significant N-terminal amino acid sequence homology with the OmpA proteins of gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that a major, 37-kDa heat-modifiable OMP of H. somnus, which elicits an antibody response in H. somnus-infected animals, is a common antigen among H. somnus strains tested and is structurally related to the OmpA protein of E. coli. Images PMID:8478064

  7. Monoclonal antibody binding to the major outer membrane protein of Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hongliang; Pang, Ervinna; Chang, Jason; Toh, Say Ling; Ng, Fook Kheong; Tan, Ai Ling; Kwang, Jimmy

    2008-11-30

    Campylobacter species are major enteric pathogens causing diarrhea illness in humans and animals. Immunological tests are needed for accurate and rapid identification of C. coli, in conjunction with the use of standard biochemical tests. We initiated the creation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) using whole C. coli cells as antigen. Four positive clones were identified, namely MAb2G6, MAb3B9, MAb4A10 and MAb5B9. Dot-blot assay and ELISA revealed that only MAb2G6 did not cross react with C. jejuni and other Campylobacter isolates. As demonstrated by dot-blot assay, MAb2G6 reacted with all 23 C. coli isolates tested but did not react with 29 isolates of C. jejuni, 3 other Campylobacter spp. isolates and 19 non-Campylobacter isolates, with the lowest detection limit was in the range of 10(3) to 10(4) bacteria. Western blots and dot blots showed that the antigen of MAb2G6 was a native protein, with immunoprecipitation assay showed that MAb2G6 bound to a protein band of approximately 43 kDa in size, corresponding to major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. coli revealed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed that MOMP of C. coli was indeed the antigen of MAb2G6, with immunogold-electron microscopy demonstrated that MAb2G6 conjugated with immunogold particles bound to all over the surface of C. coli cells. MAb2G6 also showed potential usage in direct detection of C. coli in faecal samples.

  8. Discovery of Salmonella Virulence Factors Translocated via Outer Membrane Vesicles to Murine Macrophages.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    We have previously shown that the regulators SpvR, FruR, IHF, PhoP/PhoQ, SsrA/SsrB, SlyA, Hnr, RpoE, SmpB, CsrA, RpoS, Crp, OmpR/EnvZ, and Hfq are essential for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in mice. Here we use quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics profiling of in-frame deletion mutants of these 14 regulators to identify proteins that are coordinately regulated by these virulence regulators and are thus presumably novel factors contributing to Salmonella pathogenesis. Putative candidate proteins from proteomics analysis were determined, which exhibited similar abundance profiles to those of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 type III secretion system (TTSS) proteins. A subset of 5 proteins including STM0082, STM1548, PdgL, STM1633, and STM3595 was selected for further analysis. All 5 proteins were expressed inside macrophage cells and STM0082 (SrfN) was secreted into host cytoplasm. Furthermore, deletion of STM0082 attenuated virulence in mice when administered intraperitoneally as determined by competitive index. srfN transcription was positively regulated by SsrAB, however, secretion was independent of SPI-2 TTSS as well as SPI-1 TTSS and flagella. Proteins including PagK and STM2585A, which are positively regulated by PhoP/PhoQ, have sec signal peptides as predicted for SrfN and were secreted into macrophage cytoplasm regardless of SPI-2 TTSS. Isolation of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) revealed the presence of SrfN, PagK, and STM2585A inside vesicle compartments. This result is the first case showing delivery of virulence effectors via OMVs in S. Typhimurium. Moreover, Hfq regulation of SrfN translation suggests that small non-coding RNAs may be responsible for regulating effector protein expression.

  9. Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Composition-Dependent Activation of the Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Zariri, Afshin; Beskers, Joep; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Bindels, Tim H E; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P M; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated and successfully implemented as vaccines. They contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capable of triggering innate immunity. However, Neisseria meningitidis contains an extremely potent hexa-acylated LPS, leading to adverse effects when its OMVs are applied as vaccines. To create safe OMV vaccines, detergent treatment is generally used to reduce the LPS content. While effective, this method also leads to loss of protective antigens such as lipoproteins. Alternatively, genetic modification of LPS can reduce its toxicity. In the present study, we have compared the effects of standard OMV isolation methods using detergent or EDTA with those of genetic modifications of LPS to yield a penta-acylated lipid A (lpxL1 and pagL) on the in vitro induction of innate immune responses. The use of detergent decreased both Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 activation by OMVs, while the LPS modifications reduced only TLR4 activation. Mutational removal of PorB or lipoprotein factor H binding protein (fHbp), two proteins known to trigger TLR2 signaling, had no effect, indicating that multiple TLR2 ligands are removed by detergent treatment. Detergent-treated OMVs and lpxL1 OMVs showed similar reductions of cytokine profiles in the human monocytic cell line MM6 and human dendritic cells (DCs). OMVs with the alternative penta-acylated LPS structure obtained after PagL-mediated deacylation showed reduced induction of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1β but not of IP-10, a typical TRIF-dependent chemokine. Taken together, these data show that lipid A modification can be used to obtain OMVs with reduced activation of innate immunity, similar to what is found after detergent treatment. PMID:27481244

  10. A combined vaccine approach against Vibrio cholerae and ETEC based on outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Deborah R.; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Temel, Philipp; Zingl, Franz G.; Ratzberger, Desiree; Roier, Sandro; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feichter, Sandra; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Enteric infections induced by pathogens like Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain a massive burden in developing countries with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Previously, we showed that the immunization with genetically detoxified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from V. cholerae elicits a protective immune response based on the generation of O antigen antibodies, which effectively block the motility by binding to the sheathed flagellum. In this study, we investigated the potential of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-modified and toxin negative OMVs isolated from V. cholerae and ETEC as a combined OMV vaccine candidate. Our results indicate that the immunization with V. cholerae or ETEC OMVs induced a species-specific immune response, whereas the combination of both OMV species resulted in a high-titer, protective immune response against both pathogens. Interestingly, the immunization with V. cholerae OMVs alone resulted in a so far uncharacterized and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) independent protection mechanism against an ETEC colonization. Furthermore, we investigated the potential use of V. cholerae OMVs as delivery vehicles for the heterologously expression of the ETEC surface antigens, CFA/I, and FliC. Although we induced a detectable immune response against both heterologously expressed antigens, none of these approaches resulted in an improved protection compared to a simple combination of V. cholerae and ETEC OMVs. Finally, we expanded the current protection model from V. cholerae to ETEC by demonstrating that the inhibition of motility via anti-FliC antibodies represents a relevant protection mechanism of an OMV-based ETEC vaccine candidate in vivo. PMID:26322032

  11. A combined vaccine approach against Vibrio cholerae and ETEC based on outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Deborah R; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Temel, Philipp; Zingl, Franz G; Ratzberger, Desiree; Roier, Sandro; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feichter, Sandra; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Enteric infections induced by pathogens like Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain a massive burden in developing countries with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Previously, we showed that the immunization with genetically detoxified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from V. cholerae elicits a protective immune response based on the generation of O antigen antibodies, which effectively block the motility by binding to the sheathed flagellum. In this study, we investigated the potential of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-modified and toxin negative OMVs isolated from V. cholerae and ETEC as a combined OMV vaccine candidate. Our results indicate that the immunization with V. cholerae or ETEC OMVs induced a species-specific immune response, whereas the combination of both OMV species resulted in a high-titer, protective immune response against both pathogens. Interestingly, the immunization with V. cholerae OMVs alone resulted in a so far uncharacterized and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) independent protection mechanism against an ETEC colonization. Furthermore, we investigated the potential use of V. cholerae OMVs as delivery vehicles for the heterologously expression of the ETEC surface antigens, CFA/I, and FliC. Although we induced a detectable immune response against both heterologously expressed antigens, none of these approaches resulted in an improved protection compared to a simple combination of V. cholerae and ETEC OMVs. Finally, we expanded the current protection model from V. cholerae to ETEC by demonstrating that the inhibition of motility via anti-FliC antibodies represents a relevant protection mechanism of an OMV-based ETEC vaccine candidate in vivo. PMID:26322032

  12. Nitazoxanide Inhibits Pilus Biogenesis by Interfering with Folding of the Usher Protein in the Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Chahales, Peter; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens assemble surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae that facilitate attachment to host cells and colonization of host tissues. The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is a conserved secretion system that is responsible for the assembly of virulence-associated pili by many different Gram-negative bacteria. Pilus biogenesis by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and an integral outer membrane (OM) assembly and secretion platform termed the usher. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic drug, was previously shown to inhibit the function of aggregative adherence fimbriae and type 1 pili assembled by the CU pathway in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, an important causative agent of diarrhea. We show here that NTZ also inhibits the function of type 1 and P pili from uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). UPEC is the primary causative agent of urinary tract infections, and type 1 and P pili mediate colonization of the bladder and kidneys, respectively. By analysis of the different stages of the CU pilus biogenesis pathway, we show that treatment of bacteria with NTZ causes a reduction in the number of usher molecules in the OM, resulting in a loss of pilus assembly on the bacterial surface. In addition, we determine that NTZ specifically prevents proper folding of the usher β-barrel domain in the OM. Our findings demonstrate that NTZ is a pilicide with a novel mechanism of action and activity against diverse CU pathways. This suggests that further development of the NTZ scaffold may lead to new antivirulence agents that target the usher to prevent pilus assembly. PMID:26824945

  13. Cellular immunity to the P6 outer membrane protein of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, H; Faden, H

    1995-01-01

    Cellular immunity to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in a population of 10 healthy, immune adults was determined by measuring lymphocyte blast transformation and antibody secretion in response to the P6 outer membrane protein. P6 (200 microliters/ml) induced lymphocyte blast transformation that peaked on day 10 of incubation. The peak induction of antibody-secreting cells occurred on day 8 of incubation. In comparison with the response to tetanus toxoid stimulation, the peak lymphocyte blast transformation response to P6 was reduced (mean counts per minute +/- standard error of the mean [SEM], 3,457 +/- 503 versus 9,414 +/- 1,464; P = 0.0051) and delayed (mean days +/- SEM, 10.3 +/- 0.4 versus 8.4 +/- 0.5; P = 0.0169); however, P6 was a better stimulus of antibody secretion from lymphocytes, particularly antibody of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) class (mean peak numbers of antibody-secreting cells per 10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells +/- SEM: IgG, 85 +/- 29 versus 42 +/- 16 [P = 0.0469]; IgM, 81 +/- 20 versus 25 +/- 7 [P = 0.0125]; IgA, 24 +/- 8 versus 16 +/- 6 [P = 0.0526]). Thus, lymphocytes from immune individuals recognize P6 of nontypeable H. influenzae as an immunogen. These data provide a basis for future studies with otitis-prone children who fail to develop a normal antibody response to P6 antigen (N. Yamanaka and H. Faden, J. Pediatr. 122:212-218, 1993). PMID:7790058

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Liguo; Fu, Hua; Wei, Candong Jin, Qi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. • A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. • Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. • The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. • Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein–protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Xylella fastidiosa outer membrane vesicles modulate plant colonization by blocking attachment to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Michael; Zaini, Paulo A; Baccari, Clelia; Tran, Sophia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-09-16

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria have been studied intensively in recent years, primarily in their role in delivering virulence factors and antigens during pathogenesis. However, the near ubiquity of their production suggests that they may play other roles, such as responding to envelope stress or trafficking various cargoes to prevent dilution or degradation by other bacterial species. Here we show that OMVs produced by Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-colonizing plant pathogenic bacterium, block its interaction with various surfaces such as the walls of xylem vessels in host plants. The release of OMVs was suppressed by the diffusible signal factor-dependent quorum-sensing system, and a X. fastidiosa ΔrpfF mutant in which quorum signaling was disrupted was both much more virulent to plants and less adhesive to glass and plant surfaces than the WT strain. The higher virulence of the ΔrpfF mutant was associated with fivefold higher numbers of OMVs recovered from xylem sap of infected plants. The frequency of attachment of X. fastidiosa to xylem vessels was 20-fold lower in the presence of OMVs than in their absence. OMV production thus is a strategy used by X. fastidiosa cells to adjust attachment to surfaces in its transition from adhesive cells capable of insect transmission to an "exploratory" lifestyle for systemic spread within the plant host which would be hindered by attachment. OMV production may contribute to the movement of other bacteria in porous environments by similarly reducing their contact with environmental constituents. PMID:25197068

  16. Gene Transfer Potential of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Acinetobacter baylyi and Effects of Stress on Vesiculation

    PubMed Central

    Fulsundar, Shweta; Harms, Klaus; Flaten, Gøril E.; Johnsen, Pål J.; Chopade, Balu Ananda

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are continually released from a range of bacterial species. Numerous functions of OMVs, including the facilitation of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) processes, have been proposed. In this study, we investigated whether OMVs contribute to the transfer of plasmids between bacterial cells and species using Gram-negative Acinetobacter baylyi as a model system. OMVs were extracted from bacterial cultures and tested for the ability to vector gene transfer into populations of Escherichia coli and A. baylyi, including naturally transformation-deficient mutants of A. baylyi. Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies were used to determine the movement of DNA into OMVs. We also determined how stress affected the level of vesiculation and the amount of DNA in vesicles. OMVs were further characterized by measuring particle size distribution (PSD) and zeta potential. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunogold labeling were performed using anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate (anti-FITC)-conjugated antibodies and anti-dsDNA antibodies to track the movement of FITC-labeled and DNA-containing OMVs. Exposure to OMVs isolated from plasmid-containing donor cells resulted in HGT to A. baylyi and E. coli at transfer frequencies ranging from 10−6 to 10−8, with transfer efficiencies of approximately 103 and 102 per μg of vesicular DNA, respectively. Antibiotic stress was shown to affect the DNA content of OMVs as well as their hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential. Morphological observations suggest that OMVs from A. baylyi interact with recipient cells in different ways, depending on the recipient species. Interestingly, the PSD measurements suggest that distinct size ranges of OMVs are released from A. baylyi. PMID:24657872

  17. Outer Membrane Vesicles Mediate Transport of Biologically Active Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin (VCC) from V. cholerae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Elluri, Sridhar; Enow, Constance; Vdovikova, Svitlana; Rompikuntal, Pramod K.; Dongre, Mitesh; Carlsson, Sven; Pal, Amit; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2014-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from Gram-negative bacteria can serve as vehicles for the translocation of virulence factors. Vibrio cholerae produce OMVs but their putative role in translocation of effectors involved in pathogenesis has not been well elucidated. The V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC), is a pore-forming toxin that lyses target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel channels. It is considered a potent toxin that contributes to V. cholerae pathogenesis. The mechanisms involved in the secretion and delivery of the VCC have not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings OMVs from V. cholerae strains were isolated and purified using a differential centrifugation procedure and Optiprep centrifugation. The ultrastructure and the contents of OMVs were examined under the electron microscope and by immunoblot analyses respectively. We demonstrated that VCC from V. cholerae strain V:5/04 was secreted in association with OMVs and the release of VCC via OMVs is a common feature among V. cholerae strains. The biological activity of OMV-associated VCC was investigated using contact hemolytic assay and epithelial cell cytotoxicity test. It showed toxic activity on both red blood cells and epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the OMVs architecture might play a role in stability of VCC and thereby can enhance its biological activities in comparison with the free secreted VCC. Furthermore, we tested the role of OMV-associated VCC in host cell autophagy signalling using confocal microscopy and immunoblot analysis. We observed that OMV-associated VCC triggered an autophagy response in the target cell and our findings demonstrated for the first time that autophagy may operate as a cellular defence mechanism against an OMV-associated bacterial virulence factor. Conclusion/Significance Biological assays of OMVs from the V. cholerae strain V:5/04 demonstrated that OMV-associated VCC is indeed biologically active and

  18. The outer membranes of Brucella spp. are resistant to bactericidal cationic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Tejada, G; Pizarro-Cerdá, J; Moreno, E; Moriyón, I

    1995-01-01

    The actions of polymyxin B, rabbit polymorphonuclear lysosome extracts, 14 polycationic peptides (including defensin NP-2, cecropin P1, lactoferricin B, and active peptides from cationic protein 18 and bactenecin), EDTA, and Tris on Brucella spp. were studied, with other gram-negative bacteria as controls. Brucella spp. were comparatively resistant to all of the agents listed above and bound less polymyxin B, and their outer membranes (OMs) were neither morphologically altered nor permeabilized to lysozyme by polymyxin B concentrations, although both effects were observed for controls. EDTA and peptides increased or accelerated the partition of the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-naphthylamine into Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae OMs but had no effect on Brucella OMs. Since Brucella and H. influenzae OMs are permeable to hydrophobic compounds (G. Martínez de Tejada and I. Moriyón, J. Bacteriol. 175:5273-5275, 1993), the results show that such unusual permeability is not necessarily related to resistance to polycations. Although rough (R) B. abortus and B. ovis were more resistant than the controls were, there were qualitative and quantitative differences with smooth (S) brucellae; this may explain known host range and virulence differences. Brucella S-lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) had reduced affinities for polycations, and insertion of Brucella and Salmonella montevideo S-LPSs into the OM of a Brucella R-LPS mutant increased and decreased, respectively, its resistance to cationic peptides. The results show that the core lipid A of Brucella LPS plays a major role in polycation resistance and that O-chain density also contributes significantly. It is proposed that the features described above contribute to Brucella resistance to the oxygen-independent systems of phagocytes. PMID:7622230

  19. Immunogenicity and Cross-Protective Efficacy Induced by Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Typhimurium Mutants with Truncated LPS in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Zhao, Xinxin; Liu, Tian; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major virulence factor present in the outer membrane of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from Salmonella show high immunogenicity and provide protection against Salmonella infection, and truncated LPS alters the outer membrane composition of the cell wall. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Salmonella mutants carrying truncated LPS failed to induce strong immune responses and cross-reaction to other enteric bacteria, due to their high attenuation and low colonization in the host. Therefore, we plan to investigate whether outer membrane proteins from Salmonella mutants with truncated LPS resulting from a series of nonpolar mutations, including ∆waaC12, ∆waaF15, ∆waaG42, ∆rfaH49, ∆waaI43, ∆waaJ44, ∆waaL46, ∆wbaP45 and ∆wzy-48, affect immunogenicity and provide protection against diverse Salmonella challenge. In this study, the immunogenicity and cross-protection efficiency of purified OMPs from all mutants were investigated to explore a potential OMP vaccine to protect against homologous or heterologous serotype Salmonella challenge. The results demonstrated that OMPs from three Salmonella mutants (∆waaC12, ∆waaJ44 and ∆waaL46) induced higher immune responses and provided good protection against homologous S. Typhimurium. The OMPs from these three mutants were also selected to determine the cross-protective efficacy against homologous and heterologous serotype Salmonella. Our results indicated that the mutant ∆waaC12 can elicit higher cross-reactivity and can provide good protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis infection and that the cross-reactivity may be ascribed to an antigen of approximately 18.4–30 kDa. PMID:27011167

  20. Bordetella pertussis lipid A glucosamine modification confers resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and increases resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nita R; Hancock, Robert E W; Fernandez, Rachel C

    2014-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, has many strategies for evading the human immune system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important Gram-negative bacterial surface structure that activates the immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 and enables susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). We show modification of the lipid A region of LPS with glucosamine increased resistance to numerous CAMPs, including LL-37. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this glucosamine modification increased resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

  1. Plasmolysis and cell shape depend on solute outer-membrane permeability during hyperosmotic shock in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pilizota, Teuta; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2013-06-18

    The concentration of chemicals inside the bacterial cytoplasm generates an osmotic pressure, termed turgor, which inflates the cell and is necessary for cell growth and survival. In Escherichia coli, a sudden increase in external concentration causes a pressure drop across the cell envelope that drives changes in cell shape, such as plasmolysis, where the inner and outer membranes separate. Here, we use fluorescence imaging of single cells during hyperosmotic shock with a time resolution on the order of seconds to examine the response of cells to a range of different conditions. We show that shock using an outer-membrane impermeable solute results in total cell volume reduction with no plasmolysis, whereas a shock caused by outer-membrane permeable ions causes plasmolysis immediately upon shock. Slowly permeable solutes, such as sucrose, which cross the membrane in minutes, cause plasmolysis to occur gradually as the chemical potential equilibrates. In addition, we quantify the detailed morphological changes to cell shape during osmotic shock. Nonplasmolyzed cells shrink in length with an additional lateral size reduction as the magnitude of the shock increases. Quickly plasmolyzing cells shrink largely at the poles, whereas gradually plasmolyzing cells invaginate along the cell cylinder. Our results give a comprehensive picture of the initial response of E. coli to hyperosmotic shock and offer explanations for seemingly opposing results that have been reported previously.

  2. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer-membrane protein OmpL32

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Pinne, Marija; Haake, David A.; Zuerner, Richard L.; Frank, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer-membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immune response. In this study, 2D gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS identified a Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 protein, corresponding to ORF LIC11848, which undergoes extensive and differential methylation of glutamic acid residues. Immunofluorescence microscopy implicated LIC11848 as a surface-exposed outer-membrane protein, prompting the designation OmpL32. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of golden Syrian hamster liver and kidney sections revealed expression of OmpL32 during colonization of these organs. Identification of methylated surface-exposed outer-membrane proteins, such as OmpL32, provides a foundation for delineating the role of this post-translational modification in leptospiral virulence. PMID:22174381

  3. Localization of cytochromes in the outer membrane of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) and their role in anaerobic biocorrosion.

    PubMed

    Van Ommen Kloeke, F; Bryant, R D; Laishley, E J

    1995-12-01

    A protocol was developed whereby the outer and cytoplasmic membranes of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) were isolated and partially characterized. The isolated outer membrane fractions from cultures grown under high (100 ppm) and low (5 ppm) Fe2+ conditions were compared by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and showed that several protein bands were derepressed under the low iron conditions, most notably at 50 kDa, and 77.5 kDa. Outer membrane isolated from low iron cultured cells was found to contain two proteins, 77.5 kDa and 62.5 kDa in size, that reacted with a heme-specific stain and were referred to as high molecular weight cytochromes. Studies conducted on the low iron isolated outer membrane by a phosphate/mild steel hydrogen evolution system showed that addition of the membrane fraction caused an immediate acceleration in H2 production. A new model for the anaerobic biocorrosion of mild steel is proposed.

  4. Plasmolysis and cell shape depend on solute outer-membrane permeability during hyperosmotic shock in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pilizota, Teuta; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2013-06-18

    The concentration of chemicals inside the bacterial cytoplasm generates an osmotic pressure, termed turgor, which inflates the cell and is necessary for cell growth and survival. In Escherichia coli, a sudden increase in external concentration causes a pressure drop across the cell envelope that drives changes in cell shape, such as plasmolysis, where the inner and outer membranes separate. Here, we use fluorescence imaging of single cells during hyperosmotic shock with a time resolution on the order of seconds to examine the response of cells to a range of different conditions. We show that shock using an outer-membrane impermeable solute results in total cell volume reduction with no plasmolysis, whereas a shock caused by outer-membrane permeable ions causes plasmolysis immediately upon shock. Slowly permeable solutes, such as sucrose, which cross the membrane in minutes, cause plasmolysis to occur gradually as the chemical potential equilibrates. In addition, we quantify the detailed morphological changes to cell shape during osmotic shock. Nonplasmolyzed cells shrink in length with an additional lateral size reduction as the magnitude of the shock increases. Quickly plasmolyzing cells shrink largely at the poles, whereas gradually plasmolyzing cells invaginate along the cell cylinder. Our results give a comprehensive picture of the initial response of E. coli to hyperosmotic shock and offer explanations for seemingly opposing results that have been reported previously. PMID:23790382

  5. Outer membrane protein mediating iron uptake via pyoverdinpss, the fluorescent siderophore produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Y S; Gross, D C

    1987-01-01

    In an iron-limited environment Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B301D produces a yellow-green fluorescent siderophore called pyoverdinpss which functions in high-affinity iron transport. Two-dimensional electrophoretic comparisons of the outer membrane proteins of strain B301D identified nine proteins which were expressed at low (50 nM) but not at high (10 microM) iron concentrations. Except for the minor protein 8e, the iron-regulated proteins exhibited high molecular weights ranging from approximately 74,000 to 80,000. A mutant of strain B301D incapable of iron uptake (Iu-) from ferric pyoverdinpss lacked the 74,000-molecular-weight protein 4a, which was the major iron-regulated outer membrane protein. In contrast, a nonfluorescent mutant (Flu-) unable to synthesize pyoverdinpss showed no quantitative or qualitative difference in its outer membrane profile from that of the wild-type strain. In plant pathogenicity tests the Iu- and Flu- strains caused typical brown necrotic and sunken lesions in immature sweet cherry fruit which were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. Thus, excretion of pyoverdinpss and subsequent Fe(III) uptake do not have a determinative role in the pathogenicity or virulence of P. syringae pv. syringae. Images PMID:3032911

  6. High-throughput Isolation and Characterization of Untagged Membrane Protein Complexes: Outer Membrane Complexes of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes represent the “front line” of cellular defense and the interface between a cell and its environment. To determine the range of proteins and protein complexes that are present in the cell membranes of a target organism, we have utilized a “tagless” process for the system-wide isolation and identification of native membrane protein complexes. As an initial subject for study, we have chosen the Gram-negative sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. With this tagless methodology, we have identified about two-thirds of the outer membrane- associated proteins anticipated. Approximately three-fourths of these appear to form homomeric complexes. Statistical and machine-learning methods used to analyze data compiled over multiple experiments revealed networks of additional protein–protein interactions providing insight into heteromeric contacts made between proteins across this region of the cell. Taken together, these results establish a D. vulgaris outer membrane protein data set that will be essential for the detection and characterization of environment-driven changes in the outer membrane proteome and in the modeling of stress response pathways. The workflow utilized here should be effective for the global characterization of membrane protein complexes in a wide range of organisms. PMID:23098413

  7. Plasmolysis and Cell Shape Depend on Solute Outer-Membrane Permeability during Hyperosmotic Shock in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Pilizota, Teuta; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of chemicals inside the bacterial cytoplasm generates an osmotic pressure, termed turgor, which inflates the cell and is necessary for cell growth and survival. In Escherichia coli, a sudden increase in external concentration causes a pressure drop across the cell envelope that drives changes in cell shape, such as plasmolysis, where the inner and outer membranes separate. Here, we use fluorescence imaging of single cells during hyperosmotic shock with a time resolution on the order of seconds to examine the response of cells to a range of different conditions. We show that shock using an outer-membrane impermeable solute results in total cell volume reduction with no plasmolysis, whereas a shock caused by outer-membrane permeable ions causes plasmolysis immediately upon shock. Slowly permeable solutes, such as sucrose, which cross the membrane in minutes, cause plasmolysis to occur gradually as the chemical potential equilibrates. In addition, we quantify the detailed morphological changes to cell shape during osmotic shock. Nonplasmolyzed cells shrink in length with an additional lateral size reduction as the magnitude of the shock increases. Quickly plasmolyzing cells shrink largely at the poles, whereas gradually plasmolyzing cells invaginate along the cell cylinder. Our results give a comprehensive picture of the initial response of E. coli to hyperosmotic shock and offer explanations for seemingly opposing results that have been reported previously. PMID:23790382

  8. Alr0397 Is an Outer Membrane Transporter for the Siderophore Schizokinen in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaisen, Kerstin; Moslavac, Suncana; Samborski, Anastazia; Valdebenito, Marianne; Hantke, Klaus; Maldener, Iris; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Flores, Enrique; Schleiff, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Iron uptake in proteobacteria by TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters represents a well-explored subject. In contrast, the same process has been scarcely investigated in cyanobacteria. The heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is known to secrete the siderophore schizokinen, but its transport system has remained unidentified. Inspection of the genome of strain PCC 7120 shows that only one gene encoding a putative TonB-dependent iron transporter, namely alr0397, is positioned close to genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of a hydroxamate siderophore. The expression of alr0397, which encodes an outer membrane protein, was elevated under iron-limited conditions. Inactivation of this gene caused a moderate phenotype of iron starvation in the mutant cells. The characterization of the mutant strain showed that Alr0397 is a TonB-dependent schizokinen transporter (SchT) of the outer membrane and that alr0397 expression and schizokinen production are regulated by the iron homeostasis of the cell. PMID:18805987

  9. The outer membrane phospholipase A is essential for membrane integrity and type III secretion in Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Jiang, Feng; Zheng, Jianhua; Chen, Lihong; Dong, Jie; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Liu, Bo; Yang, Jian; Yang, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane phospholipase A (OMPLA) is an enzyme located in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. OMPLA exhibits broad substrate specificity, and some of its substrates are located in the cellular envelope. Generally, the enzymatic activity can only be induced by perturbation of the cell envelope integrity through diverse methods. Although OMPLA has been thoroughly studied as a membrane protein in Escherichia coli and is constitutively expressed in many other bacterial pathogens, little is known regarding the functions of OMPLA during the process of bacterial infection. In this study, the proteomic and transcriptomic data indicated that OMPLA in Shigella flexneri, termed PldA, both stabilizes the bacterial membrane and is involved in bacterial infection under ordinary culture conditions. A series of physiological assays substantiated the disorganization of the bacterial outer membrane and the periplasmic space in the ΔpldA mutant strain. Furthermore, the ΔpldA mutant strain showed decreased levels of type III secretion system expression, contributing to the reduced internalization efficiency in host cells. The results of this study support that PldA, which is widespread across Gram-negative bacteria, is an important factor for the bacterial life cycle, particularly in human pathogens. PMID:27655730

  10. A comparison of the haemagglutinating and enzymic activities of Bacteroides fragilis whole cells and outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Patrick, S; McKenna, J P; O'Hagan, S; Dermott, E

    1996-04-01

    The haemagglutinating and enzymic activities of the obligately anaerobic pathogenic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis were examined. Outer membrane vesicles are released from the surface of B. fragilis. They can be detected by electron microscopy in ultrathin sections and bacterial suspensions after negative staining. Electron microscopy and immunogold labelling with a MAb specific for surface polysaccharide of B. fragilis confirmed that the vesicles carried outer membrane associated epitopes. The haemagglutinating activity of whole cells from populations of B. fragilis strains NCTC9343, BE3 and LS66 enriched by Percoll density gradient centrifugation for a large capsule (LC), electron dense layer (EDL); non-capsulate by light microscopy) and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) which had been purified by centrifugation from EDL-enriched populations were compared using human and horse erythrocytes. The enzymic activity of OMV, LC- and EDL-enriched populations, as detected by the API ZYM kit, was compared for strains NCTC 9343 and BE3. Purified OMV from the strains examined exhibited both haemagglutinating and enzymatic activity. Haemagglutination by the EDL-enriched population was sensitive to treatment with sodium periodate. The LC-enriched population haemagglutinated only after ultrasonic removal of the capsule. This indicates that the LC masks a haemagglutinin. The results suggest a potential role for OMV in the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:8737489

  11. 125I-labeled peptide mapping of some heat-modifiable proteins of the gonococcal outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J

    1980-01-01

    Gonococci from opaque colonies have cell wall outer membrane proteins that are lacking from organisms which form transparent colonies. These "colony opacity-associated" proteins are among a group of "minor" proteins that exhibit heat modification of their apparent subunit molecular sizes, are easily extracted by deoxycholate, have apparent subunit molecular weights varying from 24,000 to 29,000 and are exposed on the surfaces of gonococci. Other minor proteins found on gonococci are the "leukocyte association proteins," whose presence correlates with reactivities of gonococci with human neutrophils. Several of the colony opacity-associated proteins and leukocyte association proteins were subjected to 125I-peptide mapping of protein bands separated by polyacrylamide electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The structural similarities and differences among these heat-modifiable surface proteins were studied, as well as their similarities with the major protein of the gonococcal outer membrane. A relatively high apparent degree of structural homology is found among the heat-modifiable proteins from different strains of opaque colony gonococcal forms. There is also some apparent structural homology for 125I-peptides of heat-modifiable versus major proteins of the gonococcal outer membrane. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6769820

  12. Molecular parasitism in the Escherichia coli-Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus system: translocation of the matrix protein from the host to the parasite outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, F; Romano, V; Valenzi, M; Di Giulio, M; Mupo, M R; Sacco, M

    1982-01-01

    During the intracellular maturation in Escherichia coli of the parasite Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus the outer membrane, major protein I of E. coli (i.e., the matrix protein) becomes associated with the outer membrane of the emerging parasite cells. The binding properties of this protein with the outer membrane of the host and of the parasite are identical. An analogous phenomenon also occurs during Bdellovibrio parasitism on Klebsiella pneumoniae and on Salmonella typhimurium. Possible roles for this scavenging action of Bdellovibrio, and similar phenomena in other parasitic systems, are discussed. Images Fig.