Science.gov

Sample records for monomethylarsonous acid toxicity

  1. Nrf2 protects human bladder urothelial cells from arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaojun; Sun Zheng; Chen Weimin; Eblin, Kylee E.; Gandolfi, Jay A.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2007-12-01

    Arsenic is widely spread in our living environment and imposes a big challenge on human health worldwide. Arsenic damages biological systems through multiple mechanisms including the generation of reactive oxygen species. The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the cellular antioxidant response that protects cells from various insults. In this study, the protective role of Nrf2 in arsenic toxicity was investigated in a human bladder urothelial cell line, UROtsa. Using a UROtsa cell line stably infected with Nrf2-siRNA, we clearly demonstrate that compromised Nrf2 expression sensitized the cells to As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity. On the other hand, the activation of the Nrf2 pathway by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) and sulforaphane (SF), the known Nrf2-inducers, rendered UROtsa cells more resistant to As(III) and MMA(III). Furthermore, the wild-type mouse embryo fibroblast (WT-MEF) cells were protected from As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity following Nrf2 activation by tBHQ or SF, whereas neither tBHQ nor SF conferred protection in the Nrf2{sup -/-}MEF cells, demonstrating that tBHQ- or SF-mediated protection against As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity depends on Nrf2 activation. These results, obtained by both loss of function and gain of function analyses, clearly demonstrate the protective role of Nrf2 in arsenic-induced toxicity. The current work lays the groundwork for using Nrf2 activators for therapeutic and dietary interventions against adverse effects of arsenic.

  2. Biokinetics and subchronic toxic effects of oral arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid in v-Ha-ras transgenic (Tg.AC) mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yaxiong; Trouba, Kevin J; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P; Germolec, Dori R

    2004-08-01

    Previous research demonstrated that 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment increased the number of skin papillomas in v-Ha-ras transgenic (Tg.AC) mice that had received sodium arsenite [(As(III)] in drinking water, indicating that this model is useful for studying the toxic effects of arsenic in vivo. Because the liver is a known target of arsenic, we examined the pathophysiologic and molecular effects of inorganic and organic arsenical exposure on Tg.AC mouse liver in this study. Tg.AC mice were provided drinking water containing As(III), sodium arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid [(MMA(V)], and 1,000 ppm dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] at dosages of 150, 200, 1,500, or 1,000 ppm as arsenic, respectively, for 17 weeks. Control mice received unaltered water. Four weeks after initiation of arsenic treatment, TPA at a dose of 1.25 microg/200 microL acetone was applied twice a week for 2 weeks to the shaved dorsal skin of all mice, including the controls not receiving arsenic. In some cases arsenic exposure reduced body weight gain and caused mortality (including moribundity). Arsenical exposure resulted in a dose-dependent accumulation of arsenic in the liver that was unexpectedly independent of chemical species and produced hepatic global DNA hypomethylation. cDNA microarray and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that all arsenicals altered the expression of numerous genes associated with toxicity and cancer. However, organic arsenicals [MMA(V) and DMA(V)] induced a pattern of gene expression dissimilar to that of inorganic arsenicals. In summary, subchronic exposure of Tg.AC mice to inorganic or organic arsenicals resulted in toxic manifestations, hepatic arsenic accumulation, global DNA hypomethylation, and numerous gene expression changes. These effects may play a role in arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity and carcinogenesis and may be of particular toxicologic relevance.

  3. Anaerobic biotransformation of organoarsenical pesticides monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Yenal, U.; Feld, J.A.; Kopplin, M.; Gandolfi, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) are extensively utilized as pesticides, introducing large quantities of arsenic into the environment. Once released into the environment, these organoarsenicals are subject to microbial reactions. Aerobic biodegradation of MMAV and DMAV has been evaluated, but little is known about their fate in anaerobic environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biotransformation of MMAV and DMAV in anaerobic sludge. Biologically mediated conversion occurred under methanogenic or sulfate-reducing conditions but not in the presence of nitrate. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) was consistently observed as an important metabolite of MMAV degradation, and it was recovered in molar yields ranging from 5 to 47%. The main biotransformation product identified from DMAV metabolism was MMAV, which was recovered in molar yields ranging from 8 to 65%. The metabolites indicate that reduction and demethylation are important steps in the anaerobic bioconversion of MMAV and DMAV, respectively. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  4. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  5. Monomethylarsonous acid induces transformation of human bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bredfeldt, Tiffany G.; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Eblin, Kylee E.; Mash, Eugene A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay . E-mail: gandolfi@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic is a human bladder carcinogen. Arsenic is methylated to both monomethyl and dimethyl metabolites which have been detected in human urine. The trivalent methylated arsenicals are more toxic than inorganic arsenic. It is unknown if these trivalent methylated metabolites can directly cause malignant transformation in human cells. The goal of this study is determine if monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) can induce malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line. To address this goal, a non-tumorigenic human urothelial cell line (UROtsa) was continuously exposed to 0.05 {mu}M MMA{sup III} for 52 weeks. Hyperproliferation was the first phenotypic change observed in exposed UROtsa (URO-MSC). After 12 weeks of exposure, doubling time had decreased from 42 h in unexposed control cells to 27 h in URO-MSC. Hyperproliferation continued to be a quality possessed by the URO-MSC cells after both 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III}, which had a 40-50% reduction in doubling time. Throughout the 52-week exposure, URO-MSC cells retained an epithelial morphology with subtle morphological differences from control cells. 24 weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure was required to induce anchorage-independent growth as detected by colony formation in soft agar, a characteristic not found in UROtsa cells. To further substantiate that malignant transformation had occurred, URO-MSC cells were tested after 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III} for the ability to form tumors in SCID mice. Enhanced tumorigenicity in SCID mouse xenografts was observed after 52 weeks of treatment with MMA{sup III}. These observations are the first demonstration of MMA{sup III}-induced malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line and provide important evidence that MMA{sup III} may be carcinogenic in human tissues.

  6. Effects of monomethylarsonic and monomethylarsonous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of adult and young rats.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Katharina; Straub, Heidrun; Hirner, Alfred V; Hippler, Jörg; Binding, Norbert; Musshoff, Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    Arsenite and its metabolites, dimethylarsinic or dimethylarsinous acid, have previously been shown to disturb synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices of rats (Krüger, K., Gruner, J., Madeja, M., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Binding, N., Mubetahoff, U., 2006a. Blockade and enhancement of glutamate receptor responses in Xenopus oocytes by methylated arsenicals. Arch. Toxicol. 80, 492-501, Krüger, K., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mubetahoff, U., 2006b. Effects of arsenite on long-term potentiation in hippocampal slices from adult and young rats. Toxicol. Lett. 165, 167-173, Krüger, K., Repges, H., Hippler, J., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mubetahoff, U., 2007. Effects of dimethylarsinic and dimethylarsinous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of young and adult rats. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 225, 40-46). The present experiments investigate, whether the important arsenic metabolites monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) also influence the synaptic functions of the hippocampus. In hippocampal slices of young (14-21 days-old) and adult (2-4 months-old) rats, evoked synaptic field potentials from the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse were measured under control conditions and during and after 30 and 60 min of application of the arsenic compounds. MMA(V) had no effect on the synapse functions neither in slices of adult nor in those from young rats. However, MMA(III) strongly influenced the synaptic transmission: it totally depressed the amplitudes of fEPSPs at concentrations of 50 micromol/l (adult rats) and 25 micromol/l (young rats) and LTP amplitudes at concentrations of 25 micromol/l (adult rats) and 10 micromol/l (young rats), respectively. In contrast, application of 1 micromol/l MMA(III) led to an enhancement of the LTP amplitude in young rats, which is interpretable by an enhancing effect on NMDA receptors and a lack of the blocking effect on AMPA receptors at this concentration (Kr

  7. Effects of monomethylarsonic and monomethylarsonous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of adult and young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Katharina Straub, Heidrun; Hirner, Alfred V.; Hippler, Joerg; Binding, Norbert; Musshoff, Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    Arsenite and its metabolites, dimethylarsinic or dimethylarsinous acid, have previously been shown to disturb synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices of rats (Krueger, K., Gruner, J., Madeja, M., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2006a. Blockade and enhancement of glutamate receptor responses in Xenopus oocytes by methylated arsenicals. Arch. Toxicol. 80, 492-501, Krueger, K., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2006b. Effects of arsenite on long-term potentiation in hippocampal slices from adult and young rats. Toxicol. Lett. 165, 167-173, Krueger, K., Repges, H., Hippler, J., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2007. Effects of dimethylarsinic and dimethylarsinous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of young and adult rats. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 225, 40-46). The present experiments investigate, whether the important arsenic metabolites monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) also influence the synaptic functions of the hippocampus. In hippocampal slices of young (14-21 days-old) and adult (2-4 months-old) rats, evoked synaptic field potentials from the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse were measured under control conditions and during and after 30 and 60 min of application of the arsenic compounds. MMA{sup V} had no effect on the synapse functions neither in slices of adult nor in those from young rats. However, MMA{sup III} strongly influenced the synaptic transmission: it totally depressed the amplitudes of fEPSPs at concentrations of 50 {mu}mol/l (adult rats) and 25 {mu}mol/l (young rats) and LTP amplitudes at concentrations of 25 {mu}mol/l (adult rats) and 10 {mu}mol/l (young rats), respectively. In contrast, application of 1 {mu}mol/l MMA{sup III} led to an enhancement of the LTP amplitude in young rats, which is interpretable by an enhancing effect on NMDA receptors and a lack of the blocking effect on AMPA receptors at

  8. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR THE PESTICIDE MONOMETHYLARSONIC ACID (MMA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The monosodium salt of monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] is a widely used organoarsenical herbicide. In lifetime feeding studies with MMA(V), the large intestine (focal muscosal ulceration) was the primary target organ in both male and female mice and rats and no treatment-related...

  9. Inhibition of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cell malignant transformation through restoring dysregulated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yichen; Gong, Zhihong; Olson, James R; Xu, Peilin; Buck, Michael J; Ren, Xuefeng

    2013-10-04

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its high toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), are able to induce malignant transformation of human cells. Chronic exposure to these chemicals is associated with an increased risk of developing multiple cancers in human. However, the mechanisms contributing to iAs/MMA(III)-induced cell malignant transformation and carcinogenesis are not fully elucidated. We recently showed that iAs/MMA(III) exposure to human cells led to a decreased level of histone acetylation globally, which was associated with an increased sensitivity to arsenic cytotoxicity. In the current study, it demonstrated that prolonged exposure to low-level MMA(III) in human urothelial cells significantly increased the expression and activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) with an associated reduction of histone acetylation levels both globally and lysine specifically. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), at 4 weeks after the initial MMA(III) treatment inhibited the MMA(III)-mediated up-regulation of the expression and activities of HDACs, leading to increase histone acetylation and prevention of MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation. These new findings suggest that histone acetylation dysregulation may be a key mechanism in MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation and carcinogenesis, and that HDAC inhibitors could be targeted to prevent or treat iAs-related cancers.

  10. Potentiation of vasoconstriction and pressor response by low concentration of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)).

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Shin, Yoo-Sun; Kang, Seojin; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Keunyoung; Chung, Seung-Min; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2011-09-10

    A close link between arsenic exposure and hypertension has been well-established through many epidemiological reports, yet the mechanism underlying it remains unclear. Here we report that nanomolar concentrations of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a toxic trivalent methylated arsenic metabolite, can potentiate agonist-induced vasoconstriction and pressor responses. In freshly isolated rat aortic ring, exposure to nanomolar MMA(III) (100-500 nM) potentiated phenylephrine (PE)-induced vasoconstriction while at higher concentrations (≥2.5 μM), suppression of vasoconstriction and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle were observed. Potentiation of agonist-induced vasoconstriction was also observed with other contractile agonists and it was retained in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, suggesting that these events are agonist-independent and smooth muscle cell dependent. Interestingly, exposure to MMA(III) resulted in increased myosin light chain phosphorylation while PE-induced Ca2+ influx was not affected, reflecting that Ca2+ sensitization is involved. In line with this, MMA(III) enhanced agonist-induced activation of small GTPase RhoA, a key contributor to Ca2+ sensitization. Of note, treatment of MMA(III) to rats induced significantly higher pressor responses in vivo, demonstrating that this event can occur in vivo indeed. We believe that RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization and the resultant potentiation of vasoconstriction by MMA(III) may shed light on arsenic-associated hypertension.

  11. Cardiac Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Is Blocked by Monomethylarsonous Acid (III)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tianfang; Barnett, Joey V.; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic exposure during embryonic development can cause ischemic heart pathologies later in adulthood which may originate from impairment in proper blood vessel formation. The arsenic-associated detrimental effects are mediated by arsenite (iAsIII) and its most toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid [MMA (III)]. The impact of MMA (III) on coronary artery development has not yet been studied. The key cellular process that regulates coronary vessel development is the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During cardiac EMT, activated epicardial progenitor cells transform to mesenchymal cells to form the cellular components of coronary vessels. Smad2/3 mediated TGFβ2 signaling, the key regulator of cardiac EMT, is disrupted by arsenite exposure. In this study, we compared the cardiac toxicity of MMA (III) with arsenite. Epicardial progenitor cells are 15 times more sensitive to MMA (III) cytotoxicity when compared with arsenite. MMA (III) caused a significant blockage in epicardial cellular transformation and invasion at doses 10 times lower than arsenite. Key EMT genes including TGFβ ligands, TβRIII, Has2, CD44, Snail1, TBX18, and MMP2 were down regulated by MMA (III) exposure. MMA (III) disrupted Smad2/3 activation at a dose 20 times lower than arsenite. Both arsenite and MMA (III) significantly inhibited Erk1/2 and Erk5 phosphorylation. Nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and Erk5 was also blocked by arsenical exposure. However, p38 activation, as well as smooth muscle differentiation, was refractory to the inhibition by the arsenicals. Collectively, these findings revealed that MMA (III) is a selective disruptor of cardiac EMT and as such may predispose to arsenic-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25145660

  12. Determination of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in cereals by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos Reyes, M. N.; Cervera, M. L.; Campos, R. C.; de la Guardia, M.

    2007-09-01

    A fast, sensitive and simple non-chromatographic analytical method was developed for the speciation analysis of toxic arsenic species in cereal samples, namely rice and wheat semolina. An ultrasound-assisted extraction of the toxic arsenic species was performed with 1 mol L - 1 H 3PO 4 and 0.1% (m/v) Triton XT-114. After extraction, As(III), As(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) concentrations were determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry using a series of proportional equations corresponding to four different experimental reduction conditions. The detection limits of the method were 1.3, 0.9, 1.5 and 0.6 ng g - 1 for As(III), As(V), DMA and MMA, respectively, expressed in terms of sample dry weight. Recoveries were always greater than 90%, and no species interconversion occurred. The speciation analysis of a rice flour reference material certified for total arsenic led to coherent results, which were also in agreement with other speciation studies made on the same certified reference material.

  13. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA+3) Inhibits IL-7 Signaling in Mouse Pre-B Cells.

    PubMed

    Ezeh, Peace C; Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-02-01

    Our previously published data show that As(+3) in vivo and in vitro, at very low concentrations, inhibits lymphoid, but not myeloid stem cell development in mouse bone marrow. We also showed that the As(+3) metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)), was responsible for the observed pre-B cell toxicity caused by As(+3). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is the primary growth factor responsible for pre-lymphoid development in mouse and human bone marrow, and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) is a transcriptional factor in the IL-7 signaling pathway. We found that MMA(+3) inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation at a concentration as low as 50 nM in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells. Inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by As(+3) occurred only at a concentration of 500 nM. In the IL-7 dependent mouse pre-B 2E8 cell line, we also found selective inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by MMA(+3), and this inhibition was dependent on effects on JAK3 phosphorylation. IL-7 receptor expression on 2E8 cell surface was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+3) at 18 h. As further evidence for the inhibition of STAT5, we found that the induction of several genes required in B cell development, cyclin D1, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5, were selectively inhibited by MMA(+3). Since 2E8 cells lack the enzymes responsible for the conversion of As(+3) to MMA(+3) in vitro, the results of these studies suggest that As(+3) induced inhibition of pre-B cell formation in vivo is likely dependent on the formation of MMA(+3) which in turn inhibits IL-7 signaling at several steps in mouse pre-B cells.

  14. Mitochondria are the main target organelle for trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Sawata, Takashi; Hao, Wen Hui; Liu, Huan; Bu, Na; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Lou, Yi Jia; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2011-07-18

    Excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered to play an important role in arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in the liver, lungs, and urinary bladder. However, little is known about the mechanism of ROS-based carcinogenicity, including where the ROS are generated, and which arsenic species are the most effective ROS inducers. In order to better understand the mechanism of arsenic toxicity, rat liver RLC-16 cells were exposed to arsenite (iAs(III)) and its intermediate metabolites [i.e., monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III))]. MMA(III) (IC(50) = 1 μM) was found to be the most toxic form, followed by DMA(III) (IC(50) = 2 μM) and iAs(III) (IC(50) = 18 μM). Following exposure to MMA(III), ROS were found to be generated primarily in the mitochondria. DMA(III) exposure resulted in ROS generation in other organelles, while no ROS generation was seen following exposures to low levels of iAs(III). This suggests the mechanisms of induction of ROS are different among the three arsenicals. The effects of iAs(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III) on activities of complexes I-IV in the electron transport chain (ETC) of rat liver submitochondrial particles and on the stimulation of ROS production in intact mitochondria were also studied. Activities of complexes II and IV were significantly inhibited by MMA(III), but only the activity of complexes II was inhibited by DMA(III). Incubation with iAs(III) had no inhibitory effects on any of the four complexes. Generation of ROS in intact mitochondria was significantly increased following incubation with MMA(III), while low levels of ROS generation were observed following incubation with DMA(III). ROS was not produced in mitochondria following exposure to iAs(III). The mechanism underlying cell death is different among As(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III), with mitochondria being one of the primary target organelles for MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity.

  15. Determination of monomethylarsonous acid, a key arsenic methylation intermediate, in human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Le, X C; Ma, M; Cullen, W R; Aposhian, H V; Lu, X; Zheng, B

    2000-01-01

    In this study we report on the finding of monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] in human urine. This newly identified arsenic species is a key intermediate in the metabolic pathway of arsenic biomethylation, which involves stepwise reduction of pentavalent to trivalent arsenic species followed by oxidative addition of a methyl group. Arsenic speciation was carried out using ion-pair chromatographic separation of arsenic compounds with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Speciation of the inorganic arsenite [As(III)], inorganic arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)], dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)], and MMA(III) in a urine sample was complete in 5 min. Urine samples collected from humans before and after a single oral administration of 300 mg sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate (DMPS) were analyzed for arsenic species. MMA(III) was found in 51 out of 123 urine samples collected from 41 people in inner Mongolia 0-6 hr after the administration of DMPS. MMA(III )in urine samples did not arise from the reduction of MMA(V) by DMPS. DMPS probably assisted the release of MMA(III) that was formed in the body. Along with the presence of MMA(III), there was an increase in the relative concentration of MMA(V) and a decrease in DMA(V) in the urine samples collected after the DMPS ingestion. PMID:11102289

  16. Arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid generate oxidative stress response in human bladder cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Eblin, K.E. . E-mail: eblin@pharmacy.arizona.edu; Bowen, M.E.; Cromey, D.W.; Bredfeldt, T.G.; Mash, E.A.; Lau, S.S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2006-11-15

    Arsenicals have commonly been seen to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can lead to DNA damage and oxidative stress. At low levels, arsenicals still induce the formation of ROS, leading to DNA damage and protein alterations. UROtsa cells, an immortalized human urothelial cell line, were used to study the effects of arsenicals on the human bladder, a site of arsenical bioconcentration and carcinogenesis. Biotransformation of As(III) by UROtsa cells has been shown to produce methylated species, namely monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], which has been shown to be 20 times more cytotoxic. Confocal fluorescence images of UROtsa cells treated with arsenicals and the ROS sensing probe, DCFDA, showed an increase of intracellular ROS within five min after 1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M As(III) treatments. In contrast, 50 and 500 nM MMA(III) required pretreatment for 30 min before inducing ROS. The increase in ROS was ameliorated by preincubation with either SOD or catalase. An interesting aspect of these ROS detection studies is the noticeable difference between concentrations of As(III) and MMA(III) used, further supporting the increased cytotoxicity of MMA(III), as well as the increased amount of time required for MMA(III) to cause oxidative stress. These arsenical-induced ROS produced oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by an increase in 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) with either 50 nM or 5 {mu}M MMA(III) exposure. These findings provide support that MMA(III) cause a genotoxic response upon generation of ROS. Both As(III) and MMA(III) were also able to induce Hsp70 and MT protein levels above control, showing that the cells recognize the ROS and respond. As(III) rapidly induces the formation of ROS, possibly through it oxidation to As(V) and further metabolism to MMA(III)/(V). These studies provide evidence for a different mechanism of MMA(III) toxicity, one that MMA(III) first interacts with cellular components before an ROS response is generated, taking longer

  17. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and arsenite: LD(50) in hamsters and in vitro inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Petrick, J S; Jagadish, B; Mash, E A; Aposhian, H V

    2001-06-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a metabolite of inorganic arsenic, has received very little attention from investigators of arsenic metabolism in humans. MMA(III), like sodium arsenite, contains arsenic in the +3 oxidation state. Although we have previously demonstrated that it is more toxic than arsenite in cultured Chang human hepatocytes, there are no data showing in vivo toxicity of MMA(III). When MMA(III) or sodium arsenite was administered intraperitoneally to hamsters, the LD(50)s were 29.3 and 112.0 micromol/kg of body wt, respectively. In addition, inhibition of hamster kidney or purified porcine heart pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity by MMA(III) or arsenite was determined. To inhibit hamster kidney PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide, MMA(III) as diiodomethylarsine, and arsenite were 59.9 +/- 6.5, 62.0 +/- 1.8, and 115.7 +/- 2.3 microM, respectively. To inhibit activity of purified porcine heart PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide and arsenite were 17.6 +/- 4.1 and 106.1 +/- 19.8 microM, respectively. These data demonstrate that MMA(III) is more toxic than inorganic arsenite, both in vivo and in vitro, and call into question the hypothesis that methylation of inorganic arsenic is a detoxication process.

  18. Mechanisms of photocatalytical degradation of monomethylarsonic and dimethylarsinic acids using nanocrystalline titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhonghou; Jing, Chuanyong; Li, Fasheng; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2008-04-01

    Photodegradation mechanisms of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) with nanocrystalline titanium dioxide under UV irradiation were investigated. In the presence of UV irradiation and 0.02 g/L TiO2, 93% MMA (initial concentration is 10 mg-As/L) was transformed into inorganic arsenate, [As(V)], after 72 h of a batch reaction. The mineralization of DMA to As(V) occurred in two steps with MMA as an intermediate product. The photodegradation rate of MMA and DMA could be described using first-order kinetics, where the apparent rate constant is 0.033/h and 0.013/h for MMA and DMA, respectively. Radical scavengers, including superoxide dimutase (SOD), sodium bicarbonate, tert-butanol, and sodium azide, were used to study the photodegradation mechanisms of MMA and DMA. The results showed that hydroxyl radicals (HO*) was the primary reactive oxygen species for the photodegradation of MMA and DMA. The methyl groups in MMA and DMAweretransformed into organic carbon, including formic acid and possibly methanol, also through photochemical reactions. The results showed that nanocrystalline TiO2 can be used for the photocatalytical degradation of MMA and DMA and subsequent removal of the converted As(V), since the high adsorption capacity of the material for inorganic arsenic species has been demonstrated in previous studies.

  19. Differential Binding of Monomethylarsonous Acid Compared to Arsenite and Arsenic Trioxide with Zinc Finger Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV–vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis. PMID:24611629

  20. Differential binding of monomethylarsonous acid compared to arsenite and arsenic trioxide with zinc finger peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xixi; Sun, Xi; Mobarak, Charlotte; Gandolfi, A Jay; Burchiel, Scott W; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-04-21

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV-vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  1. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  2. Activation of Nrf2 by arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid is independent of Keap1-C151: enhanced Keap1-Cul3 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaojun; Sun Zheng; Chen Weimin; Li Yanjie; Villeneuve, Nicole F.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2008-08-01

    Drinking water contaminated with arsenic, a human carcinogen, is a worldwide health issue. An understanding of cellular signaling events in response to arsenic exposure and rational designing of strategies to reduce arsenic damages by modulating signaling events are important to fight against arsenic-induced diseases. Previously, we reported that activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense pathway confers protection against toxic effects induced by sodium arsenite [As(III)] or monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]. Paradoxically, arsenic has been reported to induce the Nrf2-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we report the unique mechanism of Nrf2 induction by arsenic. Similar to tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) or sulforaphane (SF), arsenic induced the Nrf2-dependent response through enhancing Nrf2 protein levels by inhibiting Nrf2 ubiquitination and degradation. However, the detailed action of arsenic in Nrf2 induction is different from that of tBHQ or SF. Arsenic markedly enhanced the interaction between Keap1 and Cul3, subunits of the E3 ubiquitin ligase for Nrf2, which led to impaired dynamic assembly/disassembly of the E3 ubiquitin ligase and thus decreased its ligase activity. Furthermore, induction of Nrf2 by arsenic is independent of the previously identified C151 residue in Keap1 that is required for Nrf2 activation by tBHQ or SF. Distinct mechanisms of Nrf2 activation by seemingly harmful and beneficial reagents provide a molecular basis to design Nrf2-activating agents for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMAIII) Has an Adverse Effect on the Innate Immune Response of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Notch, Emily G.; Goodale, Britton C.; Barnaby, Roxanna; Coutermarsh, Bonita; Berwin, Brent; Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the number one contaminant of concern with regard to human health according to the World Health Organization. Epidemiological studies on Asian and South American populations have linked arsenic exposure with an increased incidence of lung disease, including pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both of which are associated with bacterial infection. However, little is known about the effects of low dose arsenic exposure, or the contributions of organic arsenic to the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This study examined the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) induced cytokine secretion by human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) by inorganic sodium arsenite (iAsIII) and two major metabolites, monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMAV), at concentrations relevant to the U.S. population. Neither iAsIII nor DMAV altered P. aeruginosa induced cytokine secretion. By contrast, MMAIII increased P. aeruginosa induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6 and CXCL2. A combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV (10 pbb total) reduced IL-8 and CXCL1 secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that exposure to MMAIII alone, and a combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV at levels relevant to the U.S. may have negative effects on the innate immune response of human bronchial epithelial cells to P. aeruginosa. PMID:26554712

  4. Oxidative DNA damage after acute exposure to arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid in biomethylation-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Ruben; Kojima, Chikara; Tokar, Erik J; Person, Rachel J; Xu, Yuanyuan; Qu, Wei; Waalkes, Michael P

    2013-07-01

    The carcinogen inorganic arsenic (iAs) undergoes biomethylation (BMT) in some cells. The methylated metabolite, monomethylarsonous (MMA(3+)), may cause oxidative DNA damage (ODD). With chronic iAs exposure, BMT-competent cells show ODD while BMT-deficient do not. To further define these events, we studied ODD produced by acute iAs or MMA(3+) in the BMT-deficient human prostate cell line, RWPE-1. ODD, measured by the immuno-spin trapping method, was assessed after exposure to iAs or MMA(3+) alone, with the arsenic BMT inhibitor selenite or after glutathione (GSH) depletion. The expression of oxidative stress-related genes (HO-1, SOD-1, SOD-2, Nrf2 and Keap-1) was also assessed. Exposure to iAs at 24 h (0-20 µM), stimulated ODD only at levels above the LC50 of a 48 h exposure (17 µM). If iAs induced ODD, it also activated oxidative stress-related genes. Selenium did not alter iAs-induced ODD. MMA(3+) at 24 h (0-0.5 µM) caused ODD at levels below the LC50 of a 48 h exposure (1.5 µM), which were greatly increased by GSH depletion but not selenite. MMA(3+) induced ODD at levels not activating oxidant stress response genes. Overall, iAs induced ODD in BMT-deficient cells only at toxic levels. MMA(3+) caused ODD at non-toxic levels, independently of cellular BMT capacity and in a fashion not requiring further BMT.

  5. Urinary arsenic and porphyrin profile in C57BL/6J mice chronically exposed to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) for two years

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamohan, Manonmanii; Qi, Lixia; Lam, Paul K.S.; Moore, Michael R.; Ng, Jack C.

    2007-10-01

    Arsenicals are proven carcinogens in humans and it imposes significant health impacts on both humans and animals. Recently monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), the toxic metabolite of arsenic has been identified in human urine and believed to be more acutely toxic than arsenite and arsenate. Arsenic also affects the activity of a number of haem biosynthesis enzymes. As a part of 2-year arsenic carcinogenicity study, young female C57BL/6J mice were given drinking water containing 0, 100, 250 and 500 {mu}g/L arsenic as MMA{sup III}ad libitum. 24 h urine samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks and every 8 weeks for up to 104 weeks. Urinary arsenic speciation and porphyrins were measured using HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC with fluorescence detection respectively. DMA{sup V} was a major urinary metabolite detected. Significant dose-response relationship was observed between control and treatment groups after 1, 4, 24, 32, 48, 56, 88, 96 and 104 weeks. The level of uroporphyrin in 250 and 500 {mu}g As/L group is significantly different from the control group after 4, 8, 16, 32, 56, 72, 80, 96 and 104 weeks. Coproporphyrin I level in 500 {mu}As/L group is significantly different from control group after 8, 24, 32, 40, 56, 72, 80, 88 and 104 weeks. After 4 weeks the level of coproporphyrin III concentration significantly increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control except week 16 and 48. Our results show urinary DMA{sup V} and porphyrin profile can be used as an early warning biomarker for chronic MMA{sup III} exposure before the onset of cancer.

  6. Effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid on the risk of arsenic-associated carotid atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.-M.; Chiou, H.-Y. . E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.tw; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Hong, C.-T.; Su, C.-L.; Chang, S.-F.; Huang, W.-L.; Wang, H.-T.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-J.

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic-contaminated well water has been shown to increase the risk of atherosclerosis. Because of involving S-adenosylmethionine, homocysteine may modify the risk by interfering with the biomethylation of ingested arsenic. In this study, we assessed the effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) on the risk of atherosclerosis associated with arsenic. In total, 163 patients with carotid atherosclerosis and 163 controls were studied. Lifetime cumulative arsenic exposure from well water for study subjects was measured as index of arsenic exposure. Homocysteine level was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Proportion of MMA{sup V} (MMA%) was calculated by dividing with total arsenic species in urine, including arsenite, arsenate, MMA{sup V}, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}). Results of multiple linear regression analysis show a positive correlation of plasma homocysteine levels to the cumulative arsenic exposure after controlling for atherosclerosis status and nutritional factors (P < 0.05). This correlation, however, did not change substantially the effect of arsenic exposure on the risk of atherosclerosis as analyzed in a subsequent logistic regression model. Logistic regression analyses also show that elevated plasma homocysteine levels did not confer an independent risk for developing atherosclerosis in the study population. However, the risk of having atherosclerosis was increased to 5.4-fold (95% CI, 2.0-15.0) for the study subjects with high MMA% ({>=}16.5%) and high homocysteine levels ({>=}12.7 {mu}mol/l) as compared to those with low MMA% (<9.9%) and low homocysteine levels (<12.7 {mu}mol/l). Elevated homocysteinemia may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure in individuals with high levels of MMA% in urine.

  7. A biological indicator of inorganic arsenic exposure using the sum of urinary inorganic arsenic and monomethylarsonic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Akihisa; Kurosawa, Hidetoshi; Endo, Yoko; Yamanaka, Kenzo; Fujitani, Noboru; Endo, Ginji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The sum of urinary inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) concentrations is used for the biological monitoring of occupational iAs exposure. Although DMA is a major metabolite of iAs, it is an inadequate index because high DMA levels are present in urine after seafood consumption. We estimated the urinary iAs+MMA concentration corresponding to iAs exposure. Methods: We used data from two arsenic speciation analyses of urine samples from 330 Bangladeshi with oral iAs exposure and 172 Japanese workers without occupational iAs exposure using high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: iAs, MMA, and DMA, but not arsenobetaine (AsBe), were detected in the urine of the Bangladeshi subjects. The correlation between iAs+MMA+DMA and iAs+MMA was obtained as log (iAs+MMA) = 1.038 log (iAs+MMA+DMA) -0.658. Using the regression formula, the iAs+MMA value was calculated as 2.15 and 7.5 μg As/l, corresponding to 3 and 10 μg As/m3 of exposures, respectively. In the urine of the Japanese workers, arsenic was mostly excreted as AsBe. We used the 95th percentile of iAs+MMA (12.6 μg As/l) as the background value. The sum of the calculated and background values can be used as a biological indicator of iAs exposure. Conclusion: We propose 14.8 and 20.1 μg As/l of urinary iAs+MMA as the biological indicators of 3 and 10 μg As/m3 iAs exposure, respectively. PMID:27010090

  8. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Meno, Sarah R.; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J.; Self, William T.

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA{sup III} is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA{sup III} on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA{sup III} resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA{sup III} treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA{sup III}, as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA{sup III} induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA{sup III} alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  9. Vascular smooth muscle dysfunction induced by monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III): a contributing factor to arsenic-associated cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Lim, Kyung-Min; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Chung, Seung-Min; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Lee, Jun-Ho; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2008-11-01

    While arsenic in drinking water is known to cause various cardiovascular diseases in human, exact mechanism still remains elusive. Recently, trivalent-methylated arsenicals, the metabolites of inorganic arsenic, were shown to have higher cytotoxic potential than inorganic arsenic. To study the role of these metabolites in arsenic-induced cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effect of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III), a major trivalent-methylated arsenical, on vasomotor tone of blood vessels. In isolated rat thoracic aorta and small mesenteric arteries, MMA III irreversibly suppressed normal vasoconstriction induced by three distinct agonists of phenylephrine (PE), serotonin and endothelin-1. Inhibition of vasoconstriction was retained in aortic rings without endothelium, suggesting that MMA III directly impaired the contractile function of vascular smooth muscle. The effect of MMA III was mediated by inhibition of PE-induced Ca2+ increase as found in confocal microscopy and fluorimeter in-lined organ chamber technique. The attenuation of Ca2+ increase was from concomitant inhibition of release from intracellular store and extracellular Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channel, which was blocked by MMA III as shown in voltage-clamp assay in Xenopus oocytes. MMA III did not affect downstream process of Ca2+, as shown in permeabilized arterial strips. In in vivo rat model, MMA III attenuated PE-induced blood pressure increase indeed, supporting the clinical relevance of these in vitro findings. In conclusion, MMA III-induced smooth muscle dysfunction through disturbance of Ca2+ regulation, which results in impaired vasoconstriction and aberrant blood pressure change. This study will provide a new insight into the role of trivalent-methylated arsenicals in arsenic-associated cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model.

    PubMed

    Meno, Sarah R; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J; Self, William T

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA(III) on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA(III) resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA(III) treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA(III), as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA(III) induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA(III) alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  11. A genetic approach to elucidate the genotoxic pathway of monomethylarsonous acid suggests a key role for catalase

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although it is widely known that arsenic-contaminated drinking water causes many diseases, arsenic's exact mode of action (MOA) is not fully understood. Induction of oxidative stress has been proposed as an important key event in the toxic MOA of arsenic. Our studies are centered...

  12. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  13. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K.; Liu, Ke J.; Lau, Serrine S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  14. Catalase Has a Key Role in Protecting Cells from the Genotoxic Effects of Monomethylarsonous Acid, a Highly Active Metabolite of Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Although it is widely known that arsenic-contaminated drinking water causes many diseases, arsenic’s exact mode of action (MOA) is not fully understood. Induction of oxidative stress has been proposed as an important key event in the toxic MOA of arsenic. The author's...

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFUR CONTAINING ANALOGS OF MONOMETHYLARSONIC ACID IN AQUEOUS PHASE STANDARDS AND CARROT EXTRACTS BY IC-ICP-MS AND IC-ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, sulfur analogs of well known arsenicals have been identified, generating a need for stable species-specific standards. This presentation will focus on the identification and characterization of a novel species, monomethylthioarsonic acid (MMTA), in carrots. A standard...

  16. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF MOUSE SKIN AND PAPILLOMAS FOLLOWING CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO MONOMETHYLARSONOUS ACID IN K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], a common metabolite of inorganic arsenic metabolism, increases tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice following a chronic exposure. To characterize gene expression profiles predictive of MMA(III) exposure and mode of action of carcin...

  17. Environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid inhibit IL-7/STAT5 cytokine signaling pathways in mouse CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative thymus cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-04-15

    Environmental arsenic exposure is a public health issue. Immunotoxicity induced by arsenic has been reported in humans and animal models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanisms of As(+3) and MMA(+3) toxicity in mouse thymus cells. Because we know that MMA(+3) inhibits IL-7 signaling in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells, we studied the influence of As(+3) and MMA(+3) on T cell development in the thymus at the earliest stage of T cell development (CD4-CD8-, double negative, DN) which requires IL-7 dependent signaling. We found in a DN thymus cell line (D1) that a low concentration of MMA(+3) (50 nM) suppressed IL-7 dependent JAK1, 3 and STAT5 signaling. As(+3) suppressed STAT5 and JAK3 at higher concentrations (500 nM). Cell surface expression of the IL-7 receptor (CD127) was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+)3, but was increased by 500 NM As(+3), indicating possible differences in the mechanisms of action of these agents. A decrease in cyclin D1 protein expression was observed in D1 cells exposed to As(+3) at 500 nM and MMA(+3) starting at 50 nM, suggesting that arsenic at these environmentally-relevant doses suppresses early T cell development through the inhibition of IL-7 signaling pathway.

  18. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) over-production and autocrine cell activation are key factors in monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]-induced malignant transformation of urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Lourdes, C; Wu, T; Camarillo, J M; Gandolfi, A J

    2012-01-01

    The association between chronic human exposure to arsenicals and bladder cancer development is well recognized; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully determined. We propose that inflammatory responses can play a pathogenic role in arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis. In previous studies, it was demonstrated that chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsenous acid [MMA(III)] leads to malignant transformation of an immortalized model of urothelial cells (UROtsa), with only 3 mo of exposure necessary to trigger the transformation-related changes. In the three-month window of exposure, the cells over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8), consistent with the sustained activation of NFKβ and AP1/c-jun, ERK2, and STAT3. IL-8 was over-expressed within hours after exposure to MMA(III), and sustained over-expression was observed during chronic exposure. In this study, we profiled IL-8 expression in UROtsa cells exposed to 50 nM MMA(III) for 1 to 5 mo. IL-8 expression was increased mainly in cells after 3 mo MMA(III) exposure, and its production was also found increased in tumors derived from these cells after heterotransplantation in SCID mice. UROtsa cells do express both receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, suggesting that autocrine cell activation could be important in cell transformation. Supporting this observation and consistent with IL-8 over-expression, CXCR1 internalization was significantly increased after three months of exposure to MMA(III). The expression of MMP-9, cyclin D1, bcl-2, and VGEF was significantly increased in cells exposed to MMA(III) for 3 mo, but these mitogen-activated kinases were significantly decreased after IL-8 gene silencing, together with a decrease in cell proliferation rate and in anchorage-independent colony formation. These results suggest a relevant role of IL-8 in MMA(III)-induced UROtsa cell transformation.

  19. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) over-production and autocrine cell activation are key factors in monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]-induced malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Wu, T.; Camarillo, J.M.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The association between chronic human exposure to arsenicals and bladder cancer development is well recognized; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully determined. We propose that inflammatory responses can play a pathogenic role in arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis. In previous studies, it was demonstrated that chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsenous acid [MMA(III)] leads to malignant transformation of an immortalized model of urothelial cells (UROtsa), with only 3 mo of exposure necessary to trigger the transformation-related changes. In the three-month window of exposure, the cells over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8), consistent with the sustained activation of NFKβ and AP1/c-jun, ERK2, and STAT3. IL-8 was over-expressed within hours after exposure to MMA(III), and sustained over-expression was observed during chronic exposure. In this study, we profiled IL-8 expression in UROtsa cells exposed to 50 nM MMA(III) for 1 to 5 mo. IL-8 expression was increased mainly in cells after 3 mo MMA(III) exposure, and its production was also found increased in tumors derived from these cells after heterotransplantation in SCID mice. UROtsa cells do express both receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, suggesting that autocrine cell activation could be important in cell transformation. Supporting this observation and consistent with IL-8 over-expression, CXCR1 internalization was significantly increased after three months of exposure to MMA(III). The expression of MMP-9, cyclin D1, bcl-2, and VGEF was significantly increased in cells exposed to MMA(III) for 3 mo, but these mitogen-activated kinases were significantly decreased after IL-8 gene silencing, together with a decrease in cell proliferation rate and in anchorage-independent colony formation. These results suggest a relevant role of IL-8 in MMA(III)-induced UROtsa cell transformation. -- Highlights: ► IL-8 is over-expressed in human MMA(III)-exposed urothelial

  20. Lacosamide-induced valproic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gina L; Popli, Gautam S; Silvia, Mary T

    2013-04-01

    Valproic acid is commonly used in the treatment of both focal and generalized epilepsies and is often well tolerated. There are many reported cases of hyperammonemic encephalopathy and other well-known side effects reported during use of valproic acid either alone or in combination with other antiepileptics. This case report demonstrates valproic acid toxicity in the presence of lacosamide, which has not previously been reported. Full recovery occurred after withdrawal of both valproic acid and lacosamide.

  1. Cortical Astrocytes Acutely Exposed to the Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMA(III)) Show Increased Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Gene Expression that is Consistent with APP and BACE-1: Over-expression.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Lourdes, C; Uresti-Rivera, E E; Oliva-González, C; Torres-Ramos, M A; Aguirre-Bañuelos, P; Gandolfi, A J

    2016-10-01

    Long-term exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water has been associated with cognitive impairment in children and adults; however, the related pathogenic mechanisms have not been completely described. Increased or chronic inflammation in the brain is linked to impaired cognition and neurodegeneration; iAs induces strong inflammatory responses in several cells, but this effect has been poorly evaluated in central nervous system (CNS) cells. Because astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS and play a critical role in brain homeostasis, including regulation of the inflammatory response, any functional impairment in them can be deleterious for the brain. We propose that iAs could induce cognitive impairment through inflammatory response activation in astrocytes. In the present work, rat cortical astrocytes were acutely exposed in vitro to the monomethylated metabolite of iAs (MMA(III)), which accumulates in glial cells without compromising cell viability. MMA(III) LD50 in astrocytes was 10.52 μM, however, exposure to sub-toxic MMA(III) concentrations (50-1000 nM) significantly increased IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, and MIF-1 gene expression. These effects were consistent with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase (BACE-1) increased gene expression, mainly for those MMA(III) concentrations that also induced TNF-α over-expression. Other effects of MMA(III) on cortical astrocytes included increased proliferative and metabolic activity. All tested MMA(III) concentrations led to an inhibition of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Results suggest that MMA(III) induces important metabolic and functional changes in astrocytes that may affect brain homeostasis and that inflammation may play a major role in cognitive impairment-related pathogenicity in As-exposed populations.

  2. A review of toxicity from topical salicylic acid preparations.

    PubMed

    Madan, Raman K; Levitt, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    Topical salicylic acid is often used in dermatologic conditions because of its keratolytic, bacteriostatic, fungicidal, and photoprotective properties. The bioavailability of salicylic acid differs depending on the vehicle used and pH of transcellular fluids. Although rare, salicylic acid toxicity (salicylism) can occur from topical application. Physicians should be mindful of the potential for salicylism or even death from topically applied salicylic acid.

  3. Severe Hyponatremia Due to Valproic Acid Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ena; Kunjal, Ryan; Cury, James D

    2015-09-01

    Hyponatremia is a very commonly encountered clinical entity with potentially dangerous effects and for which many precipitating factors have been identified. We present a case of valproic acid (VPA) overdose causing profound hyponatremia, with one of the lowest serum sodium levels ever documented in literature. A 54-year-old woman with hypothyroidism, hypertension and bipolar disorder presented with somnolence after intentionally ingesting 7,500 mg VPA. She was drowsy but easily arousable with no hemodynamic compromise and an unremarkable physical exam. There was no clinical suspicion for organic neurological or pulmonary disease, adrenal insufficiency or volume depletion. She was found to have a serum sodium of 99 mEq/L, low plasma osmolality (211 mOsm/kg H2O), and high urine osmolality (115 mOsm/kg H2O). Her urine sodium was 18 mEq/L. She was euthyroid (TSH: 3.06 mIU/L) and compliant with thyroxine replacement. She was admitted to the intensive care unit for close monitoring and VPA was withheld. Over 36 hours her VPA level fell from 59.3 mg/L to 22.8 mg/L, serum sodium steadily rose to 125 mEq/L and there was concomitant improvement in her mental status. At 72 hours, she was transferred for an inpatient psychiatric evaluation and her sodium level was 135 mEq/L. She luckily did not experience any seizures or decline in neurological function. The clinical presentation in this patient is consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) leading to a dramatic fall in sodium to a level of 99 mEq/L. Chronic VPA use has been associated with SIADH and chronic hyponatremia. Review of records in this patient from 1 year prior revealed that her last measured sodium level was 127 mEq/L. It is therefore most likely that our case is one of acute on chronic hyponatremia provoked by VPA overdose in the setting of chronic VPA use. Whilst our patient's course was relatively benign, this case illustrates a rare consequence of VPA toxicity, which

  4. Fatal Folic Acid Toxicity in Humans.

    PubMed

    Devnath, Gerard Pradeep; Kumaran, Senthil; Rajiv, R; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Nagaraj, Ashok

    2017-03-06

    Folic acid is B-9 vitamin. Folic acid is prescribed commonly for pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects in the fetus, patients under chemotherapy, pernicious anemia and to reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. Acute or chronic ingestion of a large dose of folic acid generally manifests as neurological complications, which are reversible. In this present case, a 23-year-old pregnant woman committed suicide by consuming folic acid tablets and succumbed to death within 36 h. Postmortem toxicological analysis detected folic acid in viscera. Death following acute consumption of folic acid is rare and has been not reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge.

  5. Haloacetic acids in the aquatic environment. Part I: macrophyte toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-08-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are contaminants of aquatic ecosystems with numerous sources, both anthropogenic and natural. The toxicity of HAAs to aquatic plants is generally uncharacterized. Laboratory tests were conducted with three macrophytes (Lemna gibba, Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum) to assess the toxicity of five HAAs. Myriophyllum spp. has been proposed as required test species for pesticide registration in North America, but few studies have been conducted under standard test conditions. The HAAs in the present experiments were monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA). MCA was the most toxic to Myriophyllum spp. with EC50 values ranging from 8 to 12.4 mg/l depending on the endpoint, followed by DCA (EC50 range 62-722.5 mg/l), TCA (EC50 range 49.5-1702.6 mg/l), CDFA (EC50 range 105.3 to >10,000 mg/l) and with TFA (EC50 range 222.1 to 10,000 mg/l) the least toxic. Generally, L. gibba was less sensitive to HAA toxicity than Myriophyllum spp., with the difference in toxicity between them approximately threefold. The range of toxicity within Myriophyllum spp. was normally less than twofold. Statistically, plant length and node number were the most sensitive endpoints as they had the lowest observed coefficients of variation, but they were not the most sensitive to HAA toxicity. Toxicological sensitivity of endpoints varied depending on the measure of effect chosen and the HAA, with morphological endpoints usually an order of magnitude more sensitive than pigments for all plant species. Overall, mass and root measures tended to be the most sensitive indicators of HAA toxicity. The data from this paper were subsequently used in an ecological risk assessment for HAAs and aquatic plants. The assessment found HAAs to be of low risk to aquatic macrophytes and the results are described in the second manuscript of this series.

  6. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid to fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA; also called peroxyacetic acid) is a stabilized mixture of acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and water that does not leave dangerous residues in the environment when it breaks down as most compounds do. PAA is a promising disinfectant in the US aquaculture industry to control paras...

  7. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid to fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA; also called peroxyacetic acid) is a promising new therapeutant for parasites and fungus. It is registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an antimicrobial compound approved for indoor use on hard, non-porous surfaces. This study determined the acute toxi...

  8. Developmental Toxicity of Perfluoronanoic Acid in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a ubiquitous and persistent environmental contaminant. Although its levels in the environment and in humans are lower than those of perfluorooctane sulfonate(PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a steady trend of increases in the general popula...

  9. New highly toxic bile acids derived from deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid.

    PubMed

    Májer, Ferenc; Sharma, Ruchika; Mullins, Claire; Keogh, Luke; Phipps, Sinead; Duggan, Shane; Kelleher, Dermot; Keely, Stephen; Long, Aideen; Radics, Gábor; Wang, Jun; Gilmer, John F

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared a new panel of 23 BA derivatives of DCA, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) in order to study the effect of dual substitution with 3-azido and 24-amidation, features individually associated with cytotoxicity in our previous work. The effect of the compounds on cell viability of HT-1080 and Caco-2 was studied using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthizol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Compounds with high potency towards reduction of cell viability were further studied using flow cytometry in order to understand the mechanism of cell death. Several compounds were identified with low micromolar IC₅₀ values for reducing cell viability in the Caco-2 and HT1080 cell lines, making them among the most potent BA apoptotic agents reported to date. There was no evidence of relationship between overall hydrophobicity and cytotoxicity supporting the idea that cell death induction by BAs may be structure-specific. Compounds derived from DCA caused cell death through apoptosis. There was some evidence of selectivity between the two cell lines studied which may be due to differing expression of CD95/FAS. The more toxic compounds increased ROS production in Caco-2 cells, and co-incubation with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine blunted pro-apoptotic effects. The properties these compounds suggest that there may be specific mechanism(s) mediating BA induced cell death. Compound 8 could be useful for investigating this phenomenon.

  10. Interaction of Humic Acids with Organic Toxicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Yudina, N. V.; Maltseva, E. V.; Nechaev, L. V.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Interaction of humic acids with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (naphthalene and anthracene) and triazole series fungicides (cyproconazole (CC) and tebuconazole (TC)) is investigated by the method of fluorescence quenching depending on the concentration of substances in solutions and their structural features. Humic acids were modified by mechanochemical activation in a planetary mill. The complex character of intermolecular interactions between PAH and fungicides with humic acids, including donor-acceptor and hydrophobic binding, is established. Thermodynamically stable conformations of biocide molecules were estimated using ChemOffice CS Chem3D 8.0 by methods of molecular mechanics (MM2) and molecular dynamics. Biocide molecules with pH 7 are in energetically favorable position when the benzene and triazole rings are almost parallel to each other. After acidification of solutions to pH 4.5, the CC molecule retains the geometry for which donor-acceptor interactions are possible: the benzene ring in the molecule represents the electron donor, and triazole is the acceptor. In this case, the electron density in CC is redistributed easier, which is explained by a smaller number of carbon atoms between the triazole and benzene rings, unlike TC. As a result, the TC triazole ring is protonated to a greater degree, acquiring a positive charge, and enters into donoracceptor interactions with humic acid (HA) samples. The above-indicated bond types allow HA to participate actively in sorption processes and to provide their interaction with biocides and PAH and hence, to act as detoxifying agents for recultivation of the polluted environment.

  11. Toxicity of fatty acid salts to German and American cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, R W; Koehler, P G; Pereira, R M

    2008-08-01

    The toxicity of fatty acid salts to German, Blattella germanica (L.), and American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana (L.), was evaluated. Potassium and sodium laurate caused up to 95% mortality of German cockroaches and 100% mortality of American cockroaches. Even-numbered potassium fatty acid salts, C8-C18 were assessed for toxicity at 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2% concentrations by a 30-s immersion of cockroaches. The more soluble of the fatty acid salts at 2% concentration caused 65-95% mortality of German cockroaches and 100% mortality of American cockroaches. Potassium oleate, C18, was most toxic to both German (LC50 = 0.36%) and American (LC50 = 0.17%) cockroaches. Fatty acid salt solutions on a substrate were tested by placing cockroaches in contact with treated floor tiles immediately after application (wet) or after the solutions had dried. Sodium laurate and potassium caprate caused mortality of German (62 +/- 17.4 and 58 +/- 12.6%, respectively) and American cockroaches (52 +/- 18.5 and 28 +/- 4.9%, respectively) on wet tiles, whereas potassium oleate caused mortality of German cockroaches (67 +/- 14.1%) only. Dry fatty acids caused no mortality among exposed cockroaches. Fatty acid salt solutions can be effective in killing German and American cockroaches but only when insects are thoroughly wetted with 1-2% fatty acid salt solutions.

  12. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE TESTICULAR TOXICITY OF HALOACETIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic analysis of the testicular toxicity of haloacetic acids

    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, R...

  13. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid (PAA) to Ichthyophthirius multifiliis theronts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is an antimicrobial disinfectant used in agriculture, food processing and medical facilities. It has recently been suggested as a means to control infestations of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of two products contai...

  14. Ninety day toxicity study of chloroacetic acids in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhat, H K; Kanz, M F; Campbell, G A; Ansari, G A

    1991-08-01

    Chloroacetic acids are produced in drinking water as a result of disinfection processes. Chloroacetic acids are also metabolites of widely used and toxic halogenated hydrocarbons. Thus, chronic human exposure to these chemicals is likely to occur. The objective of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in a 90-day subchronic study in rats via oral exposure by drinking water. Chloroacetic acid solutions were prepared at concentrations which provided an approximate intake of 1/4 the LD50 dose per day: MCA, 1.9 mM; DCA, 80.5 mM; TCA, 45.8 mM. Control rats received distilled water only. After 90 days, major organs were removed, fixed, paraffin embedded, and stained. Light microscopic examination of the major organs revealed variable degrees of alterations in the lung and liver of all three treated groups. In the liver, morphological changes were predominantly localized to the portal triads, which were mildly to moderately enlarged with random bile duct proliferation, extension of portal veins, fibrosis, edema, and occasional foci of inflammation. In the lungs, minimal alterations were observed as foci of perivascular inflammation on small pulmonary veins. Morphological changes in the testes and brain were seen only in the DCA treated group. Testes were atrophic with few spermatocytes and no mature spermatozoa. Focal vacuolation and gliosis were present in the forebrain and brainstem. The results of these studies indicate that, relative to their respective LD50 values, DCA given at 80.5 mM is more toxic than TCA given at 45.8 mM and MCA at 1.9 mM is least toxic.

  15. Acid volatile sulphide as an indicator for sediment toxicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Goyvaerts, M.P.; Brucker, N. De; Geuzens, P.

    1995-12-31

    The ratio SEM (Simultaneously Extracted Metals) to AVS (Acid Volatile Sulfide) is considered to be a measure for heavy metal bioavailability for benthic species. When the SEM/AVS ratio exceeds 1 heavy metal toxicity for the benthic organisms is expected. The correlation between the SEM/AVS and the toxicity for the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum is investigated. Freshwater sediments originating from different locations with high and low heavy metal contamination are tested. The toxicity test is performed according to the Solid Phase Microtox test (SPT). Unexpectedly, negative correlation between SEM/AVS and SPT toxicity was found (r = {minus}0.82, n = 44). However, sediments with a high sulphide content show a correlation between AVS and toxicity determined by SPT (r = 0.90, n = 18). Comparison with literature data and possible hypothesis for the discrepancies with the data will be presented. Additionally, a validation study concerning the AVS determination has been performed. Some of the aspects involved are: the sampling technique preserving the anoxic conditions of the sediment, the influence of the storage time and storage conditions on the AVS content of the standard conditions and the recovery of the metal sulphides used for the SEM calculation.

  16. Toxic bile acids in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: influence of gastric acidity

    PubMed Central

    Nehra, D; Howell, P; Williams, C; Pye, J; Beynon, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Bile acid toxicity has been shown in the gastric, colonic, and hepatic tissues; the effect on oesophageal mucosa is less well known. 
AIMS—To determine the spectrum of bile acids refluxing in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and its relation to oesophageal pH using a new technique of combined oesophageal aspiration and pH monitoring. 
METHODS—Ten asymptomatic subjects and 30 patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (minimal mucosal injury, erosive oesophagitis (grade 2 or 3 Savary-Miller), Barrett's oesophagus/stricture; n=10 in each group) underwent 15 hour continuous oesophageal aspiration with simultaneous pH monitoring. Bile acid assay of the oesophageal samples was performed using modified high performance liquid chromatography. 
RESULTS—The peak bile acid concentration and DeMeester acid scores were significantly higher in the patients with oesophagitis (median bile acid concentration 124 µmol/l; acid score 20.2) and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture (181 µmol/l; 43.3) than patients with minimal injury (14 µmol/l; 12.5) or controls (0 µmol/l; 11.1). The predominant bile acids detected were cholic, taurocholic, and glycocholic acids but there was a significantly greater proportion of secondary bile acids, deoxycholic and taurodeoxycholic acids, in patients with erosive oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture. Although bile acid reflux episodes occurred at variable pH, a temporal relation existed between reflux of taurine conjugates and oesophageal acid exposure (r=0.58, p=0.009). 
CONCLUSION—Toxic secondary bile acid fractions have been detected in patients with extensive mucosal damage. Mixed reflux is more harmful than acid reflux alone with possible toxic synergism existing between the taurine conjugates and acid. 

 Keywords: bile acids; reflux oesophagitis; Barrett's oesophagus PMID:10205192

  17. Comparative toxicity of hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ions to mosquitofish

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.S.; Tsai, S.C.; Burch, M.B.

    1981-07-01

    We examined the relative toxicity of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and the hypochlorite ion (OCl/sup -/) by exposing mosquitofish Gambusia affinis for 1 hour to predominantly free residual chlorine (FRC) at six levels of pH following a 7-day acclimation to the test pH. Median lethal concentrations (LC50), in terms of total residual chlorine (TRC), increased with increasing pH. Because of the influence of hydrogen ion concentration on dissociation of HOCl, the percent of FRC present as HOCl is about 97% and 13%, respectively, at the low and high pH. Cursory examination of toxicity of monochloramine (NH/sub 2/Cl) and mixtures of NH/sub 2/Cl and dichloramine (NHCl/sub 2/) suggested that their contributions to toxicity were negligible at any test pH. Free residual chlorine concentrations at the LC50 for each pH were fitted to a theoretical model derived from an assumption that toxicities of HOCl and OCl/sup -/ were additive.

  18. Fatty Acid-Derived Pro-Toxicants of the Rat Selective Toxicant Norbormide.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hans; Conole, Daniel; Atkinson, Darcy J; Laita, Olivia; Jay-Smith, Morgan; Pagano, Mario Angelo; Ribaudo, Giovanni; Cavalli, Maurizio; Bova, Sergio; Hopkins, Brian; Brimble, Margaret A; Rennison, David

    2016-06-01

    Norbormide [5-(α-hydroxy-α-2-pyridylbenzyl)-7-(α-2-pyridylbenzylidene)-5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboximide] (NRB), an existing but infrequently used rodenticide, is known to be uniquely toxic to rats but relatively harmless to other rodents and mammals. However, as an acute vasoactive, NRB has a rapid onset of action which makes it relatively unpalatable to rats, often leading to sublethal uptake and accompanying bait shyness. A series of NRB-derived pro-toxicants (3a - i, 4a - i, and 5a - i) were prepared in an effort to 'mask' this acute response and improve both palatability and efficacy. Their synthesis, in vitro biological evaluation (vasocontractile response in rat vasculature, stability in selected rat media) and palatability/efficacy in Sprague-Dawley, wild Norway, and wild ship rats is described. Most notably, pro-toxicant 3d was revealed to be free of all pre-cleavage vasoconstrictory activity in rat caudal artery and was subsequently demonstrated to release NRB in the presence of rat blood, liver, and pancreatic enzymes. Moreover, it consistently displayed a high level of acceptance by rats in a two-choice bait-palatability and efficacy trial, with accompanying high mortality. On this evidence, fatty acid ester prodrugs would appear to offer a promising platform for the further development of NRB-derived toxicants with enhanced palatability and efficacy profiles.

  19. Folic acid improve developmental toxicity induced by aluminum sulphates.

    PubMed

    Yassa, Heba A; George, Safaa M; Mohamed, Heba K

    2017-03-01

    Aluminum sulphate has a significant toxic effects for humans. Aluminum is one of the most abundant metal on the Earth crust. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of short term exposure to aluminum sulphate on the bone development of the fetuses in rats, and if folic acid has a protective role upon that effects or not. Forty female rats were used, ten per group, GI served as negative control (receive nothing except normal feeding and water), GII served as positive control (receive water by gastric gavage), GIII treated with aluminum sulphate orally by gastric gavage and GIV treated with aluminum sulphate with folic acid. Mating occurred and known by presence of vaginal plug in the female rats. Rats were killed on day 18 of gestation.

  20. Cellular response of freshwater green algae to perfluorooctanoic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongmei; Li, Chandan; Chen, Hong; Shao, Bo

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a kind of persistent organic pollutants and its aquatic eco-toxicity has attracted wide attention; however, the mechanism involved in its toxicity as well as the cell response against PFOA have not been well established. Herein, using single-celled green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum capricornutum at the logarithmic growth stage as test organisms, we studied the toxic effects of PFOA on the cell permeability, The 96 h-EC(50) values of PFOA for C. pyrenoidosa and S. capricornutum were 207.46 mg L(-1) and 190.99 mg L(-1), respectively, lower than the 96 h-EC(50) values reported in the literatures. After 96 h of PFOA exposure, the permeability of the cell membranes of both algae was significantly decreased, and the chlorophyll concentration mirrored the trends of algal growth. In both algal species, after a 192-h exposure to a low concentration of PFOA, the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were greater than those of the control. At higher concentrations of PFOA, activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were strongly inhibited. These results indicate that long-term exposure to low levels of PFOA may induce excessive generation of reactive oxygen species in algal cells, causing oxidative damage to cells.

  1. Assessing aluminium toxicity in streams affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Waters, A S; Webster-Brown, J G

    2013-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has degraded water quality and ecology in streams on the Stockton Plateau, the site of New Zealand's largest open-cast coal mining operation. This has previously been attributed largely to the effects of acidity and elevated aluminium (Al) concentrations. However, the toxicity of dissolved Al is dependent on speciation, which is influenced by pH which affects Al hydrolysis, as well as the concentrations of organic carbon and sulphate which complex Al. Methods for the assessment of the toxic fraction of Al, by chemical analysis and geochemical modelling, have been investigated in selected streams on the Stockton Plateau, where dissolved Al concentrations ranged from 0.034 to 27 mg L(-1). Modelling using PHREEQC indicated that between 0.2 and 85% of the dissolved Al was present as the free ion Al(3+), the most toxic Al species, which dominated in waters of pH = 3.8-4.8. Al-sulphate complexation reduced the Al(3+) concentration at lower pH, while Al-organic and -hydroxide complexes dominated at higher pH. Macroinvertebrate richness in the streams identified an Al(3+) 'threshold' of approximately 0.42 mg/L, above which taxa declined rapidly. Colorimetric 'Aluminon' analysis on unpreserved, unfiltered waters provided a better estimation of Al(3+) concentrations than inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) on filtered, acidified waters. The Aluminon method does not react with particulate Al or strong Al complexes, often registering as little as 53% of the dissolved Al concentration determined by ICP-MS.

  2. Humic acid toxicity in biologically treated soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Nieman, J K C; Sims, R C; Sorensen, D L; McLean, J E

    2005-10-01

    Contaminated soil from a land treatment unit at the Libby Groundwater Superfund Site in Libby, MT, was amended with 14C pyrene and incubated for 396 days to promote biodegradation and the formation of soil-associated bound residues. Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from the treated soil microcosms and analyzed for the presence of pyrene residues. Biologic activity promoted 14C association with the fulvic acid fraction, but humic acid-associated 14C did not increase with biologic activity. The Aboatox flash toxicity assay was used to assess the toxicity of humic and fulvic acid fractions. The fulvic acid gave no toxic response, but the humic acid showed significant toxicity. The observed toxicity was likely associated with pentachlorophenol, a known contaminant of the soil that was removed by solvent extraction of the humic acid and that correlated well with toxicity reduction.

  3. Impact of effects of acid precipitation on toxicity of metals.

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, G F; Goyer, R A; Clarkson, T W

    1985-01-01

    Acid precipitation may increase human exposure to several potentially toxic metals by increasing metal concentrations in major pathways to man, particularly food and water, and in some instances by enhancing the conversion of metal species to more toxic forms. Human exposures to methylmercury are almost entirely by way of consumption of fish and seafood. In some countries, intakes by this route may approach the levels that can give rise to adverse health effects for population groups with a high consumption of these food items. A possible increase in methylmercury concentrations in fish from lakes affected by acid precipitation may thus be of concern to selected population groups. Human exposures to lead reach levels that are near those associated with adverse health effects in certain sensitive segments of the general population in several countries. The possibility exists that increased exposures to lead may be caused by acid precipitation through a mobilization of lead from soils into crops. A route of exposure to lead that may possibly be influenced by acid precipitation is an increased deterioration of surface materials containing lead and a subsequent ingestion by small children. A similar situation with regard to uptake from food exists for cadmium (at least in some countries). Human metal exposures via drinking water may be increased by acid precipitation. Decreasing pH increases corrosiveness of water enhancing the mobilization of metal salts from soil; metallic compounds may be mobilized from minerals, which may eventually reach drinking water. Also, the dissolution of metals (Pb, Cd, Cu) from piping systems for drinking water by soft acidic waters of high corrosivity may increase metal concentrations in drinking water. Exposures have occasionally reached concentrations which are in the range where adverse health effects may be expected in otherwise healthy persons. Dissolution from piping systems can be prevented by neutralizing the water before

  4. Toxicity of formic acid against red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Formic acid is a common defensive chemical of formicine ants. Ants often compete with other ants for resources. However, the toxicity of formic acid to any ant species has not been well understood. This study examined the toxicity of formic acid against the red imported fire ants, Sole...

  5. Changes in poultry litter toxicity with simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Krishnamurthy, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The Delmarva Peninsula on the Eastern Shore of Maryland ranks 4th in the nation in poultry production and generates 9,500 metric tons of poultry manure/litter per day. The poultry litter contains many macro and micro nutrients and is an excellent source of fertilizer. The litter also contains antibiotics, heavy metals, hormones and many microorganisms. Land application of this litter has been the only means of its utilization and disposal. With rainfall, surface water run-off (leachate), from land on which litter has been applied, reaches the Cheasapeake Bay from this region. This leachate with its high organic and inorganic salt contents and high biochemical oxygen demand can severely disrupt the aquatic life and cause fish kills. The objective of this research was to study the effect of simulated acid rain (pH 3, 4 and 5) on the toxicity of poultry litter extracts.

  6. Alteration of kainic acid and quinolinic acid toxicity by neostriatal transplants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Whetsell, W O; Allen, G S; Tulipan, N B

    1989-01-02

    Mature (greater than 21 days in vitro) organotypic corticostriatal cultures prepared from newborn rat brain were incubated in either kainic acid (KA) 10(-3) M or quinolinic acid (QUIN) 10(-3) M for up to 48 h. Other identical cultures were similarly incubated immediately after they had received one or two additional explants of neonatal striatal tissue placed beside each corticostriatal culture. The cultures incubated with either KA or QUIN in the presence of the neonatal striatal tissue showed better preservation than cultures incubated with KA or QUIN alone. Results suggest that the neonatal striatal explants or 'transplants' afford some protective effect against the toxicity or either KA or QUIN.

  7. Toxic Effects of Domoic Acid in the Seabream Sparus aurata

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Isabel; Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Afonso, António; Rivera, Socorro; Azevedo, Joana; Monteiro, Rogério; Cervantes, Rosa; Gago-Martinez, Ana; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2010-01-01

    Neurotoxicity induced in fish by domoic acid (DA) was assessed with respect to occurrence of neurotoxic signs, lethality, and histopathology by light microscopy. Sparus aurata were exposed to a single dose of DA by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 0, 0.45, 0.9, and 9.0 mg DA kg−1 bw. Mortality (66.67 ± 16.67%) was only observed in dose of 9.0 mg kg−1 bw. Signs of neurological toxicity were detected for the doses of 0.9 and 9.0 mg DA kg−1 bw. Furthermore, the mean concentrations (±SD) of DA detected by HPLC-UV in extracts of brain after exposure to 9.0 mg DA kg−1 bw were 0.61 ± 0.01, 0.96 ± 0.00, and 0.36 ± 0.01 mg DA kg−1 tissue at 1, 2, and 4 hours. The lack of major permanent brain damage in S. aurata, and reversibility of neurotoxic signs, suggest that lower susceptibility to DA or neuronal recovery occurs in affected individuals. PMID:21116416

  8. Hydroxycitric acid does not promote inflammation or liver toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Clouatre, Dallas L; Preuss, Harry G

    2013-01-01

    Garcinia cambogia extract (GC) with its active component consisting of hydroxycitric acid (HCA) is widely utilized for weight loss. Various HCA salts are available, including calcium, magnesium, potassium and mixtures of these. Experimentally, these salts exhibit different properties with some, but not all, improving glucose tolerance and blood pressure. Recently, obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD, 45 kcal% fat) with or without GC (1%, w/w) for 16 wk. The active arm reduced visceral fat, adipocyte size and serum glucose, yet purportedly also exhibited hepatic collagen accumulation, lipid peroxidation and increased mRNA levels of genes related to oxidative stress. The latter findings are at odds with a large body of animal and human studies that have been conducted on the safety and efficacy of HCA. This literature shows HCA to be protective against the liver toxicity associated with ethanol and dexamethasone administration, and to maintain serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase at near normal levels. In both animal and clinical literature, elevated intakes of HCA per se have not led to signs of inflammation or hepatotoxicity. The compound has been found to reduce markers of inflammation in brain, intestines, kidney and serum. PMID:24307814

  9. Nickel toxicity to microbes: effect of pH and implications for acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

    1982-12-01

    A broad spectrum of microorganisms, including eubacteria (nonmarine and marine), actinomycetes, yeasts, and filamentous fungi, were evaluated for their sensitivities to nickel. Wide extremes in sensitivity to Ni were noted among the filamentous fungi, whereas the range of tolerance to Ni of the yeasts, eubacteria, and actinomycetes was narrower. With all microorganisms, the toxicity of Ni has not been defined, although the formation of hydroxylated Ni species with differing toxicities was not involved. The enhanced toxicity of Ni at acidic levels may have implications for the toxicity of Ni in environments stressed by acid precipitation.

  10. Metabolism and toxicity of arsenicals in mammals.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Adeel; Xie, Shuyu; Hafeez, Mian Abdul; Wang, Xu; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Iqbal, Zahid; Pan, Yuanhu; Iqbal, Mujahid; Shabbir, Muhammad Abubakr; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a metalloid usually found in organic and inorganic forms with different oxidation states, while inorganic form (arsenite As-III and arsenate As-v) is considered to be more hazardous as compared to organic form (methylarsonate and dimethylarsinate), with mild or no toxicity in mammals. Due to an increasing trend to using arsenicals as growth promoters or for treatment purposes, the understanding of metabolism and toxicity of As gets vital importance. Its toxicity is mainly depends on oxi-reduction states (As-III or As-v) and the level of methylation during the metabolism process. Currently, the exact metabolic pathways of As have yet to be confirmed in humans and food producing animals. Oxidative methylation and glutathione conjugation is believed to be major pathways of As metabolism. Oxidative methylation is based on conversion of Arsenite in to mono-methylarsonic acid and di-methylarsenic acid in mammals. It has been confirmed that As is only methylated in the presence of glutathione or thiol compounds, suggesting that As is being methylated in trivalent states. Subsequently, non-conjugated trivalent arsenicals are highly reactive with thiol which converts the trivalent arsenicals in to less toxic pentavalent forms. The glutathione conjugate stability of As is the most important factor for determining the toxicity. It can lead to DNA damage by alerting enzyme profile and production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which causes the oxidative stress. Moreover, As causes immune-dysfunction by hindering cellular and humeral immune response. The present review discussed different metabolic pathways and toxic outcomes of arsenicals in mammals which will be helpful in health risk assessment and its impact on biological world.

  11. Surfactant toxicity to Artemia Franciscana and the influence of humic acid and chemical composition

    PubMed Central

    Deese, Rachel D.; LeBlanc, Madeline R.

    2016-01-01

    Surfactants can be extremely toxic to aquatic species and are introduced to the environment in a variety of ways. It is thus important to understand how other environmental constituents, in this case humic acids (HAs), may alter the toxicity of anthropogenic surfactants. Hatching and mortality assays of Artemia Franciscana were performed for three different toxic surfactants: Triton X-100 (Tx-100, non-ionic), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC, cationic), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, anionic). Humic acids of varying composition and concentrations were added to the assays to determine the toxicity mitigating ability of the HAs. Tx-100 had a significant toxic effect on Artemia mortality rates and HAs from terrestrial sources were able to mitigate the toxicity, but an aquatic HA did not. CPC and SDS limited hatching success of the Artemia and, as HAs were added, the hatching percentages increased for all HA sources, indicating toxicity mitigation. In order to determine which functional groups within HAs were responsible for the interaction with the surfactants, the HAs were chemically modified by: (i) bleaching to reduce aromatics, (ii) Soxhlet extraction to reduce lipids, and (iii) acid hydrolysis to reduce O- and N-alkyl groups. Although most of the modified HAs had some toxicity mitigating ability for each of the surfactants, there were two notable differences: 1) the lipid-extracted HA did not reduce the toxicity of Tx-100 and 2) the bleached HA had a lower toxicity mitigating ability for CPC than the other modified HAs. PMID:27453688

  12. Effect of hardness on acute toxicity of metal mixtures using Daphnia magna: prediction of acid mine drainage toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jin Hee; Kim, Kyoung W; Kim, Sang D

    2006-11-02

    In this study, the effect of hardness on the combined outcome of metal mixtures was investigated using Daphnia magna. The toxic unit (TU) was calculated using modified LC(50) values based on the hardness (i.e., LC(50-soft) and LC(50-hard)). From a bioassay test, the degree of sensitivity to hardness on the toxicity changes was in the order: Cdtoxicity tests, the difference in the test solution hardness was found to clearly cause different toxicities, as determined by the TU calculated by the LC(50-hard), using the toxicity of a standard culture medium as the reference. That is, approximately four to five times higher toxicity was observed in soft (i.e., 44+/-4 mg/L as CaCO(3)) rather than hard water (i.e., 150+/-10mg/L as CaCO(3)) test solutions. In the tests where the modified reference toxicity values (i.e., LC(50-soft) and LC(50-hard) for soft and hard test solution, respectively) obtained from the individual metal toxicity tests with different hardness were used to calculate the TU, the results showed very similar D. magna toxicities to those of the TU from the mixture of soft and hard test solutions, regardless of the hardness. According to the toxicity results of the mixture, the aquatic toxic effects of the acid mine drainage (AMD) collected from mine areas that contained metal mixtures were investigated using Daphnia magna and the modified LC(50) value of the TU hardness function calculated for varying solution hardness. The results of the biological WET test closely matched our overall prediction, with significant correlation, having a p-value of 0.513 in one way ANOVA test (n=19). Therefore, this study revealed that the predicted toxicity of the metal mixture agreed well with the biological toxicity test when the modified LC(50) value was employed as the basis of hardness in the TU calculation.

  13. Developmental Toxicity of Perfluoroalkyl Acid Mixtures in CD-1 Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) belong to a family of fluoro-organic compounds known as perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). PFAAs have been widely used in industrial and commercial applications, and have been found to be...

  14. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child).

  15. Topical and vapor toxicity of saturated fatty acids to the German cockroach (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Sims, Steven R; Balusu, Rammohan R; Ngumbi, Esther N; Appel, Arthur G

    2014-04-01

    Topical and fumigant toxicity of saturated aliphatic fatty acids with chain lengths of C1 through C14 were determined against the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.). In the C1 to C11 series, topical toxicity (LD50 in milligram per adult male) ranged from 0.145 (C1) to 0.322 mg (C2). Toxicity declined dramatically with C12 and C14 acids whose LD50 values could not be calculated. The relative fumigation toxicity (LC50 in microliter per liter) of C1 through C5 acids was positively correlated with topical toxicity with values ranging from 6.159 (C3) to 12.302 microl/liter (C2). Fumigant toxicity decreased sharply with C6 (LC50 = 37.691 microl/liter) and there was no mortality of cockroaches exposed to vapors from C7 to C14 acids. The low fumigant toxicity of the C6 to C11 acids was correlated with their relatively low vapor pressure, but differences in diffusion of the vapors into the spiracles and subsequent passage to the target sites may have also been involved.

  16. Developmental Toxicity of Perfluorinated Phosphonic Acids in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) are a third member of the perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) family, and are structurally similar to the perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates. PFPAs are used primarily as a surfactant defoaming agent in pesticide production. Re...

  17. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid in the mouse.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicology Curriculum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a persistent environmental contaminant. Although its levels in the environment are lower than those of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), its pre...

  18. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid to various fish species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA; also called peroxyacetic acid) is a promising disinfectant in the US aquaculture industry to control parasites and fungus. It is a stabilized mixture of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide that does not leave dangerous residues in the environment when it breaks down as most compo...

  19. Evaluation of the toxic and genotoxic potential of acid mine drainage using physicochemical parameters and bioassays.

    PubMed

    Netto, E; Madeira, R A; Silveira, F Z; Fiori, M A; Angioleto, E; Pich, C T; Geremias, R

    2013-05-01

    Carboniferous activity generates acid mine drainage (AMD) which is capable of unleashing toxic effects on the exposed biota. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic and genotoxic potential of untreated-AMD and AMD treated with calcinated sediment, using physicochemical parameters and bioassays. Results revealed that untreated-AMD presented low pH values and elevated concentrations of the metals Fe, Al, Mn, Zn and Cu. High acute toxicity was observed in Artemia sp. and Daphnia magna, and sub-chronic toxicity and genotoxicity in Allium cepa L. as well as scission of plasmid DNA exposed to untreated-AMD. Treatment of AMD with calcinated sediment promoted the reduction of acidity and the removal of metals, as well as a reduction in toxic and genotoxic effects. In conclusion, the calcinated sediment can be used as an alternative AMD treatment.

  20. Toxicity of ethacrynic acid in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2002-04-01

    Ethacrynic acid, a loop diuretic drug, caused lipid peroxidation in isolated rat hepatocytes. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation showed a good correlation with the leakage of glutamic-oxaloacetic acid transaminase (GOT) from the hepatocytes. The addition of antioxidants such as N, N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) and promethazine to the isolated rat hepatocyte suspension containing ethacrynic acid prevented the lipid peroxidation and decreased the GOT leakage to some extent. SKF-525A inhibited the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid and decreased the TBARS formation, suggesting that the lipid peroxidation was caused by the oxidative metabolism. The intracellular reduced glutathione markedly decreased in the hepatocyte suspension containing ethacrynic acid and the hepatocellular protein sulfhydryls were decreased, which was negatively correlated with the GOT leakage. Thus the ethacrynic acid-induced hepatotoxicity was found to be related to the lipid peroxidation and the decrease of cellular protein sulfhydryls.

  1. Draft Test Guideline: Fish Acute Toxicity Mitigated By Humic Acid

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  2. Toxicity of peracetic acid (PAA) to tomonts of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The free-living infective theront of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis historically has been thought to be the only stage susceptible to treatment. A technique is introduced to determine the toxicity of compounds to the detached trophont, the settled tomont and the developing tomites within the tomont t...

  3. Evaluation of toxicity of capsaicin and zosteric acid and their potential application as antifoulants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingwei; Barrios, Carlos A; Cutright, Teresa; Zhang Newby, Bi-min

    2005-10-01

    The toxicity of two natural product antifoulants, capsaicin and zosteric acid, was evaluated using the Microtox assay and a static toxicity test. The EC50 values obtained from the Microtox assay for capsaicin and zosteric acid were 11.75 +/- 1.02 and 442 +/- 100 mg/L, respectively. The static toxicity test, conducted with freshwater organisms, yielded capsaicin EC50 values of 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 23 +/- 2.0 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 +/- 3.9 and 375 +/- 10 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Tests with marine organisms resulted in capsaicin EC50 values of 6.9 +/- 0.2 and 15.6 +/- 0.4 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively; whereas zosteric acid EC50 values were 7.4 +/- 0.1 and 18 +/- 0.6 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. These results indicate that zosteric acid is much less toxic than capsaicin and that both are substantially less toxic than the currently used antifoulants, such as TBT (EC50 < 0.01 ppb). Their effectiveness as natural antifoulants was demonstrated by preliminary attachments studies. As the aqueous antifoulant concentration increased, significant inhibition of bacteria attachment or prevention of biofilm formation was achieved. Hence, both capsaicin and zosteric acid could be attractive alternatives as new antifouling compounds.

  4. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Are Less Toxic Than Their Parent Fatty Acids Generated during Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Trivedi, Ram N.; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-01-01

    Although ethanol causes acute pancreatitis (AP) and lipolytic fatty acid (FA) generation worsens AP, the contribution of ethanol metabolites of FAs, ie, FA ethyl esters (FAEEs), to AP outcomes is unclear. Previously, pancreata of dying alcoholics and pancreatic necrosis in severe AP, respectively, showed high FAEEs and FAs, with oleic acid (OA) and its ethyl esters being the most abundant. We thus compared the toxicities of FAEEs and their parent FAs in severe AP. Pancreatic acini and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to FAs or FAEEs in vitro. The triglyceride of OA (i.e., glyceryl tri-oleate) or OAEE was injected into the pancreatic ducts of rats, and local and systemic severities were studied. Unsaturated FAs at equimolar concentrations to FAEEs induced a larger increase in cytosolic calcium, mitochondrial depolarization, and necro-apoptotic cell death. Glyceryl tri-oleate but not OAEE resulted in 70% mortality with increased serum OA, a severe inflammatory response, worse pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Our data show that FAs are more likely to worsen AP than FAEEs. Our observations correlate well with the high pancreatic FAEE concentrations in alcoholics without pancreatitis and high FA concentrations in pancreatic necrosis. Thus, conversion of FAs to FAEE may ameliorate AP in alcoholics. PMID:26878214

  5. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid (PAA) to fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA; also called peroxyacetic acid) is a promising new aquatic disinfectant that has also been used to treat parasites and fungus. It is registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an antimicrobial compound approved for indoor use on hard, non-porous surfaces. T...

  6. Biological mechanism for the toxicity of haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Pals, Justin A; Ang, Justin K; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    The halogenated acetic acids are a major class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) with five haloacetic acids regulated by the U.S. EPA. These agents are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. The decreasing toxicity rank order of the monohalogenated acetic acids (monoHAAs) is iodo- > bromo- > chloroacetic acid. We present data that the monoHAAs inhibit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity in a concentration-dependent manner with the same rank order as above. The rate of inhibition of GAPDH and the toxic potency of the monoHAAs are highly correlated with their alkylating potential and the propensity of the halogen leaving group. This strong association between GAPDH inhibition and the monoHAA toxic potency supports a comprehensive mechanism for the adverse biological effects by this widely occurring class of regulated DBPs.

  7. Toxicity of the lichen secondary metabolite (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Dailey, R N; Montgomery, D L; Ingram, J T; Siemion, R; Vasquez, M; Raisbeck, M F

    2008-01-01

    Toxicity following ingestion of the vagrant, foliose lichen Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa was identified as the putative etiology in the death of an estimated 400-500 elk on the Red Rim-Daley Wildlife Habitat Management Area in Wyoming during the winter of 2004. A single, unsubstantiated report in 1939 attributed toxicity of X. chlorochroa in cattle and sheep to usnic acid, a common lichen secondary metabolite. To test the hypothesis that usnic acid is the proximate cause of death in animals poisoned by lichen, domestic sheep were dosed PO with (+)-usnic acid. Clinical signs in symptomatic ewes included lethargy, anorexia, and signs indicative of abdominal discomfort. Serum creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase activities were considerably elevated in symptomatic sheep. Similarly, only symptomatic ewes exhibited appreciable postmortem lesions consisting of severe degenerative appendicular skeletal myopathy. The median toxic dose (ED(50)) of (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep was estimated to be between 485 and 647 mg/kg/day for 7 days.

  8. Catalase can protect cells against the genotoxic effects of monomethylarsonous acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although it is widely known that arsenic-contaminated drinking water causes cancer and other health effects, its exact mode of action (MOA) is not fully understood. Induction of oxidative stress has been proposed as a key event in the MOA of arsenic. Our studies are centered on i...

  9. Reduction of dimethylarsinic acid to the highly toxic dimethylarsinous acid by rats and rat liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Németi, Balázs; Gregus, Zoltán

    2013-03-18

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)), the major urinary metabolite of inorganic arsenic, is weakly cytotoxic, whereas its reduced form, dimethylarsinous acid (DMAs(III)), is highly toxic. Although glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and arsenic methyltransferase have been shown or thought to catalyze DMAs(V) reduction, their role in DMAs(V) reduction in vivo, or in cell extracts is uncertain. Therefore, the reduction of DMAs(V) to DMAs(III) in rats and in rat liver cytosol was studied to better understand its mechanism. To assess DMAs(V) reduction in rats, a novel procedure was devised based on following the accumulation of red blood cell (RBC)-bound dimethylarsenic (DMAs), which represents DMAs(III), in the blood of DMAs(V)-injected anesthetized rats. These studies indicated that rats reduced DMAs(V) to DMAs(III) to a significant extent, as in 90 min 31% of the injected 50 μmol/kg DMAs(V) dose was converted to DMAs(III) that was sequestered by the circulating erythrocytes. Pretreatment of rats with glutathione (GSH) depletors (phorone or BSO) delayed the elimination of DMAs(V) and the accumulation of RBC-bound DMAs, whereas the indirect methyltransferase inhibitor periodate-oxidized adenosine was without effect. Assessment of DMAs(V)-reducing activity of rat liver cytosol revealed that reduction of DMAs(V) required cytosolic protein and GSH and was inhibited by thiol reagents, GSSG and dehydroascorbate. Although thioredoxin reductase (TRR) inhibitors (aurothioglucose and Sb(III)) inhibited cytosolic DMAs(V) reduction, recombinant rat TRR plus NADPH, alone or when added to the cytosol, failed to support DMAs(V) reduction. On ultrafiltration of the cytosol through a 3 kDa filter, the reducing activity in the retentate was lost but was largely restored by NADPH. Such experiments also suggested that the reducing enzyme was larger than 100 kDa and was not GSTO1. In summary, reduction of DMAs(V) to the highly toxic DMAs(III) in rats and rat liver cytosol is a GSH

  10. Elevation of serum levels of beta-aminoisobutyric acid in uremic patients and the toxicity of the amino acid.

    PubMed

    Gejyo, F; Kinoshita, Y; Ikenaka, T

    1977-12-01

    A reliable method for the determination of beta-aminoisobutyric acid in serum was developed utilizing an automated amino acid analyzer. The serum concentrations of beta-aminoisobutyric acid were determined in 20 normal subjects and in 71 uremic patients. The mean serum level of beta-aminoisobutyric acid was markedly increased in the uremic patients to 0.856 +/- 0.910 (mean +/- SD) mg/100 ml as compared with a normal value of 0.026 +/- 0.027 mg/100 ml. The distribution of serum beta-aminoisobutyric acid level in uremic patients was wide-spread, and there was no correlation between the serum levels of the amino acid and those of urea nitrogen, creatinine and uric acid. The toxicity of beta-aminoisobutyric acid on mice with acute renal failure induced by uranyl acetate was investigated and compared with that of alpha-amino-n-butyric acid and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid. All mice given more than 4 g/kg body wt of beta-aminoisobutyric acid showed twitching and cramps, and some of them died. However, the control mice given an equivalent dose of alpha-amino-n-butyric acid or gamma-amino-n-butyric acid showed no change. These results suggest that beta-aminoisobutyric acid might be a factor influencing the development and progression of uremic toxemia.

  11. Toxicity of aqueous C70-gallic acid suspension in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Seda, Brandon C; Ke, Pu-Chun; Mount, Andrew S; Klaine, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the toxic effects of stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of gallic-acid-stabilized C(70) fullerene on Daphnia magna. The suspensions were stabilized through noncovalent surface modification with gallic acid. In addition to whole-organism responses, changes in antioxidative processes in D. magna were quantified. Acute toxicity was observed with 96LC50 for C(70) -gallic acid of 0.4 ± 0.1 mg/L C(70) . Daphnia magna fecundity was significantly reduced in 21-d bioassays at C(70) -gallic aqcid concentrations below quantifiable limits. Antioxidant enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as well as lipid peroxidation suggested that exposed organisms experienced oxidative stress. Microscopic techniques used to determine cellular toxicity via apoptosis proved unsuccessful.

  12. Effects of toxic work environments on sperm quality and ascorbic acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, E.B.; Harris, W.A.; Powell, L.C. )

    1990-02-26

    Surveys have shown that toxic work environments lower sperm quality, and controlled studies indicate that ascorbic acid supplementation improves sperm viability and agglutination. The sperm quality of 50 subjects each from: (1) office workers, (2) a lead smelter, (3) petroleum refineries, and (4) a herbicide plant were compared with serum and semen ascorbic acid levels. The sperm characteristics studied were: count as million/ml and as percent; viability, motility, clumping, and abnormal morphology. The serum ascorbic acid levels were directly proportional to sperm viability and inversely correlated to clumping of all groups. Moreover, serum ascorbic acid levels were also inversely correlated to twin tail and amorphous forms of abnormal sperm morphology. The results of the study indicate that toxic environments depress sperm quality and suggest that ascorbic acid supplementation will improve sperm quality and fertility.

  13. Macroinvertebrate response to acid mine drainage: community metrics and on-line behavioural toxicity bioassay.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, A; Janssens De Bisthoven, L; Soares, A M V M

    2004-07-01

    The hypothesis is tested that toxicity of acid mine drainage can be detected by a selection of existing macroinvertebrate community and bioindicator metrices supplemented by toxicity tests with the local mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki Girard and the shrimp Atyaephyra desmaresti Millet. The behavioural responses of A. desmaresti to acid mine drainage were recorded in the Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor, based on behaviour and survival as parameters. Bioassessment methods were based on community diversity, structure, function, and bioindicators and supplemented by chemical analysis (temperature, pH, metals). The Biological Monitoring Working Party adapted for the Iberian Peninsula, the number of predators (Coleoptera, Hemiptera) and the number of Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera taxa differentiated the sites well. The on-line toxicity test revealed pH-dependent acute toxicity of the acid mine drainage for the shrimp (LC(50)-48 h: pH-AMD=5.8) and a pH- dependent decrease in locomotory activity with the lowest-observed-response-times (LORTs) within 5 h of exposure. Shrimp were more sensitive to acid mine drainage than fish (LC(50)-48 h: pH-AMD=4.9). A new multimetric index combining toxicity testing and bioassessment methods is proposed.

  14. Resazurin reduction assay, a useful tool for assessment of heavy metal toxicity in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammadreza; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Bina, Bijan; Pourzamani, Hamidreza; Fatehizadeh, Ali; Taheri, Ensieh

    2015-05-01

    Almost all bioassays have been designed only for pH levels around 7; however, some toxicant characteristics may be different at lower pH values. In this study, a modified resazurin reduction method was used to evaluate the toxicity of heavy metals and metal plating wastewater on acid-tolerant (AT) and conventional bacteria at the natural and acidic pH conditions. According to our optimized protocol, resazurin was rapidly reduced by both conventional and AT active microorganisms. Considering the 30-min median effective concentration (30 min EC₅₀) values, conventional bacteria were comparatively more resistant than the acid-tolerant bacteria (ATB) in the case of exposure to Cd, Pb, Cr, and Zn, but the reverse case was found for Hg. After an exposure of 30 min, Cr and Hg showed the highest toxicity to ATB (30 min EC₅₀ values were 0.34 and 17.02 μmol/L, respectively), while Zn and Pb had a considerably lower toxicity. The modified resazurin reduction method successfully assessed the impact of metal plating wastewaters on the activities of conventional and AT bacteria. According to the findings where the wastewaters contain heavy metals, wastewater treatment facilities, which are dependent on ATB activity, should use bioassays at acidic pH values for better understanding of the effects of toxicants.

  15. Acute Inhalation Toxicity of Pyrotechnically Disseminated Terephthalic Acid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    calcium concentrations in the bladder, followed by urolithiasis with irritation induced hyperplasia and neoplasms. However, these effects only occur...R.W., Popp, J.A., Heck, H., "Chemical Urolithiasis , 1. Characteristics of Bladder Stone Induction by Terephthalic Acid and Dimethyl Terephthalate in

  16. Molecular and Therapeutic Potential and Toxicity of Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Morceau, Franck; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a branched short-chain fatty acid, is widely used as an antiepileptic drug and a mood stabilizer. Antiepileptic properties have been attributed to inhibition of Gamma Amino Butyrate (GABA) transaminobutyrate and of ion channels. VPA was recently classified among the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, acting directly at the level of gene transcription by inhibiting histone deacetylation and making transcription sites more accessible. VPA is a widely used drug, particularly for children suffering from epilepsy. Due to the increasing number of clinical trials involving VPA, and interesting results obtained, this molecule will be implicated in an increasing number of therapies. However side effects of VPA are substantially described in the literature whereas they are poorly discussed in articles focusing on its therapeutic use. This paper aims to give an overview of the different clinical-trials involving VPA and its side effects encountered during treatment as well as its molecular properties. PMID:20798865

  17. Boric acid ingestion clinically mimicking toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Webb, David V; Stowman, Anne M; Patterson, James W

    2013-11-01

    The ingestion of large amounts of boric acid, a component of household insecticides, is a rare occurrence, characterized by a diffuse desquamative skin eruption, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, delirium, acute renal failure and prolonged ileus. A 56-year-old male with a history of multiple previous suicide attempts was witnessed ingesting household roach killer and 4 days later presented to the hospital with lethargy, stiffness and a diffuse erythematous and desquamative eruption with bullous formation. He subsequently developed erythema of both palms as well as alopecia totalis. Histopathology from a right arm shave biopsy revealed a mostly intact epidermis with subtle vacuolar alteration of the basal layer, scattered intraepidermal apoptotic keratinocytes, parakeratosis with alternating layers of orthokeratosis and considerable superficial exfoliation; accompanying dermal changes included vasodilatation and mild perivascular inflammation. This report describes the cutaneous and systemic complications in a rare case of boric acid ingestion. There is little published material on the symptoms and histopathology following boric acid ingestion, but knowledge of this entity is important, both to differentiate it from other causes of desquamative skin rashes and to allow the initiation of appropriate clinical care.

  18. Nanocellulose coated with various free fatty acids can adsorb fumonisin B1, and decrease its toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Mohammad Hossein Balal; Shahdadi, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adsorption and biological properties of nanocellulose coated with free fatty acids (NCCFFAs). At first, nanocellulose was synthesized by acid hydrolysis, and then separately coated with different free fatty acids (FFAs), including lauric acid, alpha linoleic acid, oleic acid, and palmitic acid. Next, the serial concentrations of NCCFFAs (1, 10, 100, and 1000 μg/mL) was separately added to fumonisin B1 (FB1) at 1000 μg/mL, and separately incubated at 37 °C for 1, 2, and 3h. Then, the percentage of adsorption was calculated. In the next experiment, the viability of mouse liver cells was measured when they exposed to serial concentrations of NCCFFAs, FFAs, and FB1. This study showed that the increase of incubation time and concentration of NCCFFAs led to increase of FB1 adsorption. Although FFAs and NCCFFAs had no remarkable toxicity, the high toxicity was observed for FB1. Importantly, the toxicity of FB1 was highly decreased, when incubated together with FFAs or NCCFFAs. These novel adsorbents, NCCFFAs, can be used together with different foodstuffs to remove FB1.

  19. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids.

  20. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  1. Toxicity and metal speciation in acid mine drainage treated by passive bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Neculita, C.M.; Vigneaul, B.; Zagury, G.J.

    2008-08-15

    Sulfate-reducing passive bioreactors treat acid mine drainage (AMD) by increasing its pH and alkalinity and by removing metals as metal sulfide precipitates. In addition to discharge limits based on physicochemical parameters, however, treated effluent is required to be nontoxic. Acute and sublethal toxicity was assessed for effluent from 3.5-L column bioreactors filled with mixtures of natural organic carbon sources and operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) for the treatment of a highly contaminated AMD. Effluent was first tested for acute (Daphnia magna and Oncorhynchus mykiss) and sublethal (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Ceriodaphnia dabia, and Lemna minor) toxicity. Acute toxicity was observed for D. magna, and a toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedure was then performed to identify potential toxicants. Finally, metal speciation in the effluent was determined using ultrafiltration and geochemical modeling for the interpretation of the toxicity results. The 10-d HRT effluent was nonacutely lethal for 0. mykiss but acutely lethal for D. magna. The toxicity to D. magna, however, was removed by 2 h of aeration, and the TIE procedure suggested iron as a cause of toxicity. Sublethal toxicity of the 10-d HRT effluent was observed for all test species, but it was reduced compared to the raw AMD and to a 7.3-d HRT effluent. Data regarding metal speciation indicated instability of both effluents during aeration and were consistent with the toxicity being caused by iron. Column bioreactors in operation for more than nine months efficiently improved the physicochemical quality of highly contaminated AMD at different HRTs.

  2. Low molecular weight chemicals, hypersensitivity, and direct toxicity: the acid anhydrides.

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K M

    1989-01-01

    The acid anhydrides are a group of reactive chemicals used widely in alkyd and epoxy resins. The major hazards to health are mucosal and skin irritation and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. Most occupational asthma caused by acid anhydrides appears to be immunologically mediated. Immunological mechanisms have been proposed to explain an influenza-like syndrome and pulmonary haemorrhage, but direct toxicity may also be important in the aetiology of these conditions. PMID:2653411

  3. Acute and Subacute Oral Toxicity Evaluation of Eriobotrya japonica Leaf Triterpene Acids in ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianai

    2017-01-01

    The interest focusing on Eriobotrya japonica leaf triterpene acid (ELTA) has increased recently because of its beneficial effects on health. However, there has been a lack of experimental data on its toxicity. The present study therefore was conducted to evaluate its toxicity in ICR mice. The results showed that ELTA produced neither mortality nor toxicity of the main organs in ICR male and female mice in both acute (0.30, 0.65, 1.39, and 3.00 g·kg−1 body weight) and subacute (150, 300, and 600 mg·kg−1 BW) 28-day toxicity studies. Because of lacking apparently adverse effects found in the hematology, clinical biochemistry, and histopathology evaluation, results of the present study together with the beneficial effects make ELTA as a promising dietary supplement and indicated that ELTA administered orally might have a large safety margin for human.

  4. Toxic Acid Gas Absorber Design Considerations for Air Pollution Control in Process Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyele, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the design parameters for an absorber used for removal of toxic acid gas (in particular sulfur dioxide) from a process gas stream for environmental health protection purposes. Starting from the equilibrium data, Henry's law constant was determined from the slope of the y-x diagram. Based on mass balances across the absorber,…

  5. Mechanisms of perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) toxicity: Involvement of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor alpha (PPAR) molecular signals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are members of a family of environmentally persistent perfluorinated compounds and are found in the serum of wildlife and humans. PFOS and PFOA are developmentally toxic in rats and mice. Exposure in utero reduces...

  6. Acute toxicity and histopathology of channel catfish fry exposed to peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus yolk-sac fry and swim-up fry were exposed to peracetic acid (PAA) for 48h in static toxicity bioassays at 23C. The test water was 217 and 126 mg/L (as CaCO3) total alkalinity and total hardness, respectively. Probit LC50 values were estimated with the trimmed Sp...

  7. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid (PAA) formulations to Ichthyophthirius multifiliis theronts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is an antimicrobial disinfectant used in agriculture, food processing and medical facilities. It has recently been suggested as a means to control infestations of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of two products contai...

  8. Production, Identification, and Toxicity of (gamma)-Decalactone and 4-Hydroxydecanoic Acid from Sporidiobolus spp

    PubMed Central

    Feron, G.; Dufosse, L.; Pierard, E.; Bonnarme, P.; Quere, J. L.; Spinnler, H.

    1996-01-01

    During the bioconversion of ricinoleic acid to (gamma)-decalactone under controlled pH conditions, Sporidiobolus salmonicolor produced only the lactone form, while Sporidiobolus ruinenii produced both the lactone form and a precursor. By using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared analysis techniques, the precursor was identified as 4-hydroxydecanoic acid. The levels of production in the presence of high concentrations of ricinoleic acid methyl ester differed in the two Sporidiobolus species. This difference was due on the one hand to the high sensitivity of S. salmonicolor to the lactone and on the other hand to the high level of 4-hydroxydecanoic acid produced by S. ruinenii. 4-Hydroxydecanoic acid is much less toxic to the microorganisms than the lactone. In contrast to S. ruinenii, S. salmonicolor is not able to catabolize 4-hydroxydecanoic acid. PMID:16535376

  9. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Mancozeb-Induced Toxicity in Rat Thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, V; Cekic, S; Kamenov, B; Ciric, M; Krtinic, D

    2015-01-01

    Mancozeb, as a dithiocarbamate fungicide, has been found to exhibit toxicological manifestations in different cells, mainly by generation of free radicals which may alter antioxidant defence systems in cells. The effect of mancozeb on the cells of a primary lymphoid organ has not been studied. In the present study, the effects of mancozeb (0.2, 2 and 5 μg/ml) or mancozeb+ascorbic acid (100 μg/ml), or ascorbic acid alone or control medium alone on the levels of cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species production (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels in rat thymocytes were examined in vitro. Cells treated with mancozeb displayed a concentration-dependent increase of hypodiploid cells and ROS production followed by markedly decreased viability of the cells, MMP and ATP levels. Application of ascorbic acid significantly reduced cytotoxicity in cell cultures treated with 0.2 and 2 μg/ml of mancozeb, together with significantly decreased ROS levels and increased MMP and ATP levels. In cells treated with 5 μg/ml of mancozeb, ascorbic acid failed to reduce toxicity while simultaneously increasing the apoptosis rate of thymocytes. These results suggest that ROS plays a significant role in mancozeb-induced toxicity, through alteration of mitochondrial function. Ascorbic acid administration reduced the toxicity rate in cells treated with lower mancozeb concentrations, while it may have the ability to shift cells from necrosis to apoptosis in the presence of highest mancozeb concentrations.

  10. Cadmium toxicity in tadpoles of Rhinella arenarum in relation to calcium and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Mastrángelo, Martina; Afonso, María Dos Santos; Ferrari, Lucrecia

    2011-08-01

    Bioassays were carried out to study the differences in cadmium (Cd) toxicity to premetamorphic tadpoles of Rhinella arenarum, in aqueous solutions with variable contents of calcium in the presence and absence of humic acids, and to analyze the relationship between the free Cd(2+) ion concentrations calculated by chemical modeling and the biological results. The correlation analysis of the free Cd(2+) concentration calculated by chemical speciation and the analytical Cd yielded a direct relationship between the degree of toxicity and the slope value. The lowest slope was obtained from the treatments with lowest free Cd(2+) ion concentration and lowest toxicity, whereas the highest slope was obtained from the most toxic treatment. At comparable concentrations of free Cd(2+), intralarval Cd increased as the Ca in the solution decreased. At equal contents of Ca, in the presence of humic acids, the content of Cd in larvae was higher and the toxicity values lower. The results obtained in this study show that waterborne Ca could offer some protection from metal uptake and accumulation by competitive inhibition in the uptake mechanism that involves active transport via cell membrane. In the systems with humic materials, a certain proportion of the Cd present in the solution was associated to them and thus became less bioavailable.

  11. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Raftery, Tara D.; Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M.; Volz, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5-72 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite - were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may interact with human RARs, we then exposed Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with chimeric human RARα-, RARβ-, or RARγ to TPP in the presence of RA, and found that TPP significantly inhibited RA-induced luciferase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, our findings suggest that zebrafish RARs may be involved in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity, a mechanism of action that may have relevance to humans. PMID:25725299

  12. Aluminium-phosphorus interactions in plants growing on acid soils: does phosphorus always alleviate aluminium toxicity?

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong Fu; Zhang, Fu Lin; Zhang, Qi Ming; Sun, Qing Bin; Dong, Xiao Ying; Shen, Ren Fang

    2012-03-30

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity and phosphorus (P) deficiency are considered to be the main constraints for crop production in acid soils, which are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Conventionally, P addition is regarded as capable of alleviating Al toxicity in plants. However, this field is still rife with unsubstantiated theories, especially for different plant species growing on acid soils. In this review, the responses of plants to different methods of Al-P treatments are briefly summarized, and possible reasons are proposed by considering recent results from our laboratory. It is shown that: (1) long-term Al-P alternate treatment is advantageous for studying Al-P interactions in plants; (2) under the long-term Al-P alternate treatment, the roles of P in Al phytotoxicity might be associated with the Al resistance capability and P use efficiency of the plant, and a P/Al molar ratio exceeding 5 in roots may be the threshold of P alleviating Al toxicity based on the calculation of the tested plants; (3) in acid soils, P application may be effective only after Al stress is overcome for Al-sensitive species. Thus it is concluded that P application does not always alleviate Al toxicity under long-term Al-P alternate treatment.

  13. On the early toxic effect of quinolinic acid: involvement of RAGE.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan; Newport, Glenn; Divine, Becky; Wu, Qiangen; Paule, Merle G; Tobón-Velasco, J César; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-04-26

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN)-induced toxicity is characterized by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors over-activation, excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. The characterization of toxic cascades produced by QUIN during the first hours after its striatal infusion is relevant for understanding toxic mechanisms. The role of the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE) in the early toxic pattern induced by QUIN was evaluated. RAGE expression - assessed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence - was enhanced in the striata of QUIN-lesioned rats at 2h post-lesion. QUIN-induced RAGE up-regulation was accompanied by expression of a RAGE target molecule, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), and genes encoding for different enzymes. Other toxic markers linked to RAGE activation were increased by QUIN, including NO formation, premature glial response, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear condensation. Our results suggest that RAGE up-regulation may play a role in the early stages of QUIN toxicity.

  14. Hydrophobicity-dependent QSARs to predict the toxicity of perfluorinated carboxylic acids and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Lin, Zhifen; Yin, Daqiang; Tian, Dayong; Zhang, Yalei; Kong, Deyang

    2011-09-01

    Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) have wide industrial applications because of their unique physicochemical characteristics. However, data on the toxicity of much of this chemical class is lacking, particularly with regard to mixture toxicity. In this study, the toxicity of individual PFCAs and their mixtures to Photobacterium phosphoreum were observed. There was a tendency of increasing toxicity from C3 to C14 PFCA and a tendency of decreasing toxicity from C14 to C18 PFCA because of "the maximum tolerance of the cell membrane". Using the equivalent logK(OW) (octanol-water partition coefficient) and logK(SD) (C(18)-Empore™ disks/water partition coefficient), two linear quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were formulated. This indicated both K(SD) and K(OW) can describe the hydrophobicity of a single chemical. However, for the PFCA mixtures, K(MD) is the more reasonable parameter than K(owmix) to describe the hydrophobicity because only the equivalent logK(MD) could be used to predict the mixture toxicity.

  15. Evaluation of toxic effects of several carboxylic acids on bacterial growth by toxicodynamic modelling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of organic acids on microbial fermentation are commonly tested in investigations about metabolic behaviour of bacteria. However, they typically provide only descriptive information without modelling the influence of acid concentrations on bacterial kinetics. Results We developed and applied a mathematical model (secondary model) to capture the toxicological effects of those chemicals on kinetic parameters that define the growth of bacteria in batch cultures. Thus, dose-response kinetics were performed with different bacteria (Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Carnobacterium pisicola, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Listonella anguillarum) exposed at increasing concentrations of individual carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic). In all bioassays the acids affected the maximum bacterial load (Xm) and the maximum growth rate (vm) but only in specific cases the lag phase (λ) was modified. Significance of the parameters was always high and in all fermentations the toxicodynamic equation was statistically consistent and had good predictability. The differences between D and L-lactic acid effects were significant for the growth of E. coli, L. mesenteroides and C. piscicola. In addition, a global parameter (EC50,τ) was used to compare toxic effects and provided a realistic characterization of antimicrobial agents using a single value. Conclusions The effect of several organic acids on the growth of different bacteria was accurately studied and perfectly characterized by a bivariate equation which combines the basis of dose-response theory with microbial growth kinetics (secondary model). The toxicity of carboxylic acids was lower with the increase of the molecular weight of these chemicals. PMID:22118421

  16. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Koriem, Khaled M M; Soliman, Rowan E

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine intoxication can cause acute hepatic failure. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids are the major dietary polyphenols present in various foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine in rats. Thirty-two male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Group 1, which was control group, was injected (i.p) with saline (1 mL/kg) twice a day over seven-day period. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were injected (i.p) with methamphetamine (10 mg/kg) twice a day over seven-day period, where groups 3 and 4 were injected (i.p) with 60 mg/kg chlorogenic acid and 40 mg/kg caftaric acid, respectively, one day before methamphetamine injections. Methamphetamine increased serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Also, malondialdehyde in serum, liver, and brain and plasma and liver nitric oxide levels were increased while methamphetamine induced a significant decrease in serum total protein, albumin, globulin, albumin/globulin ratio, brain serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, blood and liver superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids prior to methamphetamine injections restored all the above parameters to normal values. In conclusion, chlorogenic and caftaric acids before methamphetamine injections prevented liver toxicity and oxidative stress where chlorogenic acid was more effective.

  17. Toxicity of penicillic acid for rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. [Aspergillus; Penicillium

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Simpson, J.

    1985-12-01

    Penicillic acid (PA) is a polyketide mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. This mycotoxin is toxic in experimental animals and has also been reported to be carcinogenic. The cytotoxicity of penicillic acid was studied in rat albeolar macrophages (AM) in vitro. The effects of penicillic acid on membrane integrity were studied by measuring cell volume changes and /sup 51/Cr release. There was a significant decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cell cultures exposed to 1.0 mM penicillic acid for 4 hr. Inhibition of the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into protein was both dose- and time-dependent and protein synthesis was inhibited significantly after 2 hr exposure to greater than or equal to0.1 mM penicillic acid. RNA synthesis was inhibited to a lesser extent than protein synthesis. There was significant inhibition of phagocytosis after 2 hr exposure at greater than or equal to0.3 mM penicillic acid and the ED/sub 50/ for phagocytosis was 0.09 mM. Thus phagocytosis was more sensitive to the toxic effects of penicillic acid than any other cellular process studied. The data suggest the possibility of a respiratory hazard to agricultural workers exposed to contaminated grain.

  18. Biochemical mechanism of Caffeic Acid Phenylethyl Ester (CAPE) selective toxicity towards melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kudugunti, Shashi K.; Vad, Nikhil M.; Whiteside, Amanda J.; Naik, Bhakti U.; Yusuf, Mohd. A.; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.; Moridani, Majid Y.

    2010-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated the in-vitro biochemical mechanism of caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE) toxicity and eight hydroxycinnamic/caffeic acid derivatives in-vitro, using tyrosinase enzyme as a molecular target in human SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells. Enzymatic reaction models using tyrosinase/O2 and HRP/H2O2 were used to delineate the role of one- and two-electron oxidation. Ascorbic acid (AA), NADH and GSH depletion were used as markers of quinone formation and oxidative stress in CAPE induced toxicity in melanoma cells. Ethylenediamine, an o-quinone trap, prevented the formation of o-quinone and oxidations of AA and NADH mediated by tyrosinase bioactivation of CAPE. The IC50 of CAPE towards SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells was 15μM. Dicoumarol, a diaphorase inhibitor, and 1-bromoheptane, a GSH depleting agent, increased CAPE’s toxicity towards SK-MEL-28 cells indicating quinone formation played an important role in CAPE induced cell toxicity. Cyclosporin-A and trifluoperazine, inhibitors of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (PTP), prevented CAPE toxicity towards melanoma cells. We further investigated the role of tyrosinase in CAPE toxicity in the presence of a shRNA plasmid, targeting tyrosinase mRNA. Results from tyrosinase shRNA experiments showed that CAPE led to negligible anti-proliferative effect, apoptotic cell death and ROS formation in shRNA plasmid treated cells. Furthermore, it was also found that CAPE selectively caused escalation in the ROS formation and intracellular GSH (ICG) depletion in melanocytic human SK-MEL-28 cells which express functional tyrosinase. In contrast, CAPE did not lead to ROS formation and ICG depletion in amelanotic C32 melanoma cells, which do not express functional tyrosinase. These findings suggest that tyrosinase plays a major role in CAPE’s selective toxicity towards melanocytic melanoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms of CAPE toxicity in SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells

  19. Fractionation of fulvic acid by iron and aluminum oxides: influence on copper toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathleen S.; James F. Ranville,; Emily K. Lesher,; Daniel J. Diedrich,; Diane M. McKnight,; Ruth M. Sofield,

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect on aquatic copper toxicity of the chemical fractionation of fulvic acid (FA) that results from its association with iron and aluminum oxyhydroxide precipitates. Fractionated and unfractionated FAs obtained from streamwater and suspended sediment were utilized in acute Cu toxicity tests on ,i>Ceriodaphnia dubia. Toxicity test results with equal FA concentrations (6 mg FA/L) show that the fractionated dissolved FA was 3 times less effective at reducing Cu toxicity (EC50 13 ± 0.6 μg Cu/L) than were the unfractionated dissolved FAs (EC50 39 ± 0.4 and 41 ± 1.2 μg Cu/L). The fractionation is a consequence of preferential sorption of molecules having strong metal-binding (more aromatic) moieties to precipitating Fe- and Al-rich oxyhydroxides, causing the remaining dissolved FA to be depleted in these functional groups. As a result, there is more bioavailable dissolved Cu in the water and hence greater potential for Cu toxicity to aquatic organisms. In predicting Cu toxicity, biotic ligand models (BLMs) take into account dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration; however, unless DOC characteristics are accounted for, model predictions can underestimate acute Cu toxicity for water containing fractionated dissolved FA. This may have implications for water-quality criteria in systems containing Fe- and Al-rich sediment, and in mined and mineralized areas in particular. Optical measurements, such as specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), show promise for use as spectral indicators of DOC chemical fractionation and inferred increased Cu toxicity.

  20. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  1. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  2. Role of Oxalic Acid Overexcretion in Transformations of Toxic Metal Minerals by Beauveria caledonica

    PubMed Central

    Fomina, M.; Hillier, S.; Charnock, J. M.; Melville, K.; Alexander, I. J.; Gadd, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    The fungus Beauveria caledonica was highly tolerant to toxic metals and solubilized cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc minerals, converting them into oxalates. This fungus was found to overexcrete organic acids with strong metal-chelating properties (oxalic and citric acids), suggesting that a ligand-promoted mechanism was the main mechanism of mineral dissolution. Our data also suggested that oxalic acid was the main mineral-transforming agent. Cadmium, copper, and zinc oxalates were precipitated by the fungus in the local environment and also in association with the mycelium. The presence of toxic metal minerals often led to the formation of mycelial cords, and in the presence of copper-containing minerals, these cords exhibited enhanced excretion of oxalic acid, which resulted in considerable encrustation of the cords by copper oxalate hydrate (moolooite). It was found that B. caledonica hyphae and cords were covered by a thick hydrated mucilaginous sheath which provided a microenvironment for chemical reactions, crystal deposition, and growth. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed that mycogenic metal oxalates overgrew parental fungal hyphae, leaving a labyrinth of fungal tunnels within the newly formed mineral matter. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that oxygen ligands played a major role in metal coordination within the fungal biomass during the accumulation of mobilized toxic metals by B. caledonica mycelium; these ligands were carboxylic groups in copper phosphate-containing medium and phosphate groups in pyromorphite-containing medium. PMID:15640211

  3. Characterization of Renal Toxicity in Mice Administered the Marine Biotoxin Domoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jason A.; Janech, Michael G.; Dillon, Joshua C.; Bissler, John J.; Siroky, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA), an excitatory amino acid produced by diatoms belonging to the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, is a glutamate analog responsible for the neurologic condition referred to as amnesic shellfish poisoning. To date, the renal effects of DA have been underappreciated, although renal filtration is the primary route of systemic elimination and the kidney expresses ionotropic glutamate receptors. To characterize the renal effects of DA, we administered either a neurotoxic dose of DA or doses below the recognized limit of toxicity to adult Sv128/Black Swiss mice. DA preferentially accumulated in the kidney and elicited marked renal vascular and tubular damage consistent with acute tubular necrosis, apoptosis, and renal tubular cell desquamation, with toxic vacuolization and mitochondrial swelling as hallmarks of the cellular damage. Doses≥0.1 mg/kg DA elevated the renal injury biomarkers kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and doses≥0.005 mg/kg induced the early response genes c-fos and junb. Coadministration of DA with the broad spectrum excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid inhibited induction of c-fos, junb, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. These findings suggest that the kidney may be susceptible to excitotoxic agonists, and renal effects should be considered when examining glutamate receptor activation. Additionally, these results indicate that DA is a potent nephrotoxicant, and potential renal toxicity may require consideration when determining safe levels for human exposure. PMID:24511141

  4. Influence of humic acid on the toxicity of copper, cadmium and lead to the unicellular alga, Synechosystis aquatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmukhappa, H.; Neelakantan, K. )

    1990-06-01

    Humic acids are known to play a significant role in phytoplankton productivity by regulating the trace metals required for plant growth. Although few attempts have been made to evaluate the influence of humic acids on heavy metal toxicity to aquatic organisms, their interaction in natural waters is well documented. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of humic acids (HA) extracted from mangrove sediments on Cu, Cd and Pb toxicity to the unicellular alga, Synechosystis aquatilis.

  5. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  6. Eliminating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using plant growth promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Radziah, Othman; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Razi, Ismail Mohd

    2015-02-20

    Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ground magnesium limestone (GML) and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM). Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB), GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha-1 each). Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  7. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Mousavi, Maral P. S.; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag+ influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM’s chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  8. APPLICATION OF THE HARD AND SOFT, ACIDS AND BASES (HSAB) THEORY TO TOXICANT-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    LoPachin, Richard M.; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony; Barber, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Many chemical toxicants and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that cause cell injury by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic targets on biological macromolecules. Covalent reactions between nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are however discriminatory, since there is a significant degree of selectivity associated with these interactions. Over the course of the past few decades, the theory of Hard and Soft, Acid and Bases (HSAB) has proven to be a useful tool in predicting the outcome of such reactions. This concept utilizes the inherent electronic characteristic of polarizability to define, for example, reacting electrophiles and nucleophiles as either hard or soft. These HSAB definitions have been successfully applied to chemical-induced toxicity in biological systems. Thus, according to this principle, a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with biological targets of similar hardness or softness. The soft/hard classification of a xenobiotic electrophile has obvious utility in discerning plausible biological targets and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this Perspective is to discuss the HSAB theory of electrophiles and nucleophiles within a toxicological framework. In principle, covalent bond formation can be described by using the properties of their outermost or frontier orbitals. Because these orbital energies for most chemicals can be calculated using quantum mechanical models, it is possible to quantify the relative softness (σ) or hardness (η) of electrophiles or nucleophiles and to subsequently convert this information into useful indices of reactivity. This atomic level information can provide insight into the design of corroborative laboratory research and thereby help investigators discern corresponding molecular sites and mechanisms of toxicant action. The use of HSAB parameters has also been instrumental in the development and identification of potential nucleophilic cytoprotectants that can scavenge toxic

  9. Application of the Hard and Soft, Acids and Bases (HSAB) theory to toxicant--target interactions.

    PubMed

    Lopachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence; Decaprio, Anthony; Barber, David S

    2012-02-20

    Many chemical toxicants and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that cause cell injury by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic targets on biological macromolecules. Covalent reactions between nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are, however, discriminatory since there is a significant degree of selectivity associated with these interactions. Over the course of the past few decades, the theory of Hard and Soft, Acids and Bases (HSAB) has proven to be a useful tool in predicting the outcome of such reactions. This concept utilizes the inherent electronic characteristic of polarizability to define, for example, reacting electrophiles and nucleophiles as either hard or soft. These HSAB definitions have been successfully applied to chemical-induced toxicity in biological systems. Thus, according to this principle, a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with biological targets of similar hardness or softness. The soft/hard classification of a xenobiotic electrophile has obvious utility in discerning plausible biological targets and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this perspective is to discuss the HSAB theory of electrophiles and nucleophiles within a toxicological framework. In principle, covalent bond formation can be described by using the properties of their outermost or frontier orbitals. Because these orbital energies for most chemicals can be calculated using quantum mechanical models, it is possible to quantify the relative softness (σ) or hardness (η) of electrophiles or nucleophiles and to subsequently convert this information into useful indices of reactivity. This atomic level information can provide insight into the design of corroborative laboratory research and thereby help investigators discern corresponding molecular sites and mechanisms of toxicant action. The use of HSAB parameters has also been instrumental in the development and identification of potential nucleophilic cytoprotectants that can scavenge toxic

  10. Quinolinic Acid, an endogenous molecule combining excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and other toxic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD) etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS) has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity.

  11. Quinolinic Acid, an Endogenous Molecule Combining Excitotoxicity, Oxidative Stress and Other Toxic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD) etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS) has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity. PMID:22408367

  12. Alleviating aluminium toxicity on an acid sulphate soils in Peninsular Malaysia with application of calcium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2015-10-01

    A study was conducted to alleviate Al toxicity of an acid sulphate soils collected from paddy cultivation area in Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia. For this purpose, the collected acid sulphate soils were treated with calcium silicate. The treated soils were incubated for 120 days in submerged condition in a glasshouse. Subsamples were collected every 30 days throughout the incubation period. Soil pH and exchangeable Al showed positive effect; soil pH increased from 2.9 to 3.5, meanwhile exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 to 0.82 cmolc kg-1, which was well below the critical Al toxicity level for rice growth of 2 cmolc kg-1. It was noted that the dissolution of calcium silicate (CaSiO3) supplied substantial amount of Ca2+ and H4SiO42- ions into the soil, noted with increment in Si (silicate) content from 21.21 to 40 mg kg-1 at day 30 and reduction of exchangeable Al at day 90 from 4.26 to below 2 cmolc kg-1. During the first 60 days of incubation, Si content was positively correlated with soil pH, while the exchangeable Al was negatively correlated with Si content. It is believed that the silicate anions released by calcium silicate were active in neutralizing H+ ions that governs the high acidity (pH 2.90) of the acid sulphate soils. This scenario shows positive effect of calcium silicate to reduce soil acidity, therefore creates a favourable soil condition for good rice growth during its vegetative phase (30 days). Thus, application of calcium silicate to alleviate Al toxicity of acid sulphate soils for rice cultivation is a good soil amendment.

  13. Role of glucuronidation for hepatic detoxification and urinary elimination of toxic bile acids during biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Martin; Białek, Andrzej; Trottier, Jocelyn; Verreault, Mélanie; Caron, Patrick; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Barbier, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Biliary obstruction, a severe cholestatic condition, results in a huge accumulation of toxic bile acids (BA) in the liver. Glucuronidation, a conjugation reaction, is thought to protect the liver by both reducing hepatic BA toxicity and increasing their urinary elimination. The present study evaluates the contribution of each process in the overall BA detoxification by glucuronidation. Glucuronide (G), glycine, taurine conjugates, and unconjugated BAs were quantified in pre- and post-biliary stenting urine samples from 12 patients with biliary obstruction, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The same LC-MS/MS procedure was used to quantify intra- and extracellular BA-G in Hepatoma HepG2 cells. Bile acid-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells was evaluated using MTS reduction, caspase-3 and flow cytometry assays. When compared to post-treatment samples, pre-stenting urines were enriched in glucuronide-, taurine- and glycine-conjugated BAs. Biliary stenting increased the relative BA-G abundance in the urinary BA pool, and reduced the proportion of taurine- and glycine-conjugates. Lithocholic, deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids were the most cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic/necrotic BAs for HepG2 cells. Other species, such as the cholic, hyocholic and hyodeoxycholic acids were nontoxic. All BA-G assayed were less toxic and displayed lower pro-apoptotic/necrotic effects than their unconjugated precursors, even if they were able to penetrate into HepG2 cells. Under severe cholestatic conditions, urinary excretion favors the elimination of amidated BAs, while glucuronidation allows the conversion of cytotoxic BAs into nontoxic derivatives.

  14. Role of Glucuronidation for Hepatic Detoxification and Urinary Elimination of Toxic Bile Acids during Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Martin; Białek, Andrzej; Trottier, Jocelyn; Verreault, Mélanie; Caron, Patrick; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Barbier, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Biliary obstruction, a severe cholestatic condition, results in a huge accumulation of toxic bile acids (BA) in the liver. Glucuronidation, a conjugation reaction, is thought to protect the liver by both reducing hepatic BA toxicity and increasing their urinary elimination. The present study evaluates the contribution of each process in the overall BA detoxification by glucuronidation. Glucuronide (G), glycine, taurine conjugates, and unconjugated BAs were quantified in pre- and post-biliary stenting urine samples from 12 patients with biliary obstruction, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The same LC-MS/MS procedure was used to quantify intra- and extracellular BA-G in Hepatoma HepG2 cells. Bile acid-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells was evaluated using MTS reduction, caspase-3 and flow cytometry assays. When compared to post-treatment samples, pre-stenting urines were enriched in glucuronide-, taurine- and glycine-conjugated BAs. Biliary stenting increased the relative BA-G abundance in the urinary BA pool, and reduced the proportion of taurine- and glycine-conjugates. Lithocholic, deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids were the most cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic/necrotic BAs for HepG2 cells. Other species, such as the cholic, hyocholic and hyodeoxycholic acids were nontoxic. All BA-G assayed were less toxic and displayed lower pro-apoptotic/necrotic effects than their unconjugated precursors, even if they were able to penetrate into HepG2 cells. Under severe cholestatic conditions, urinary excretion favors the elimination of amidated BAs, while glucuronidation allows the conversion of cytotoxic BAs into nontoxic derivatives. PMID:24244729

  15. [Study advance on reproductive and developmental toxicity of haloacetic acids in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hong; Lu, Xiwu

    2008-03-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are major by-products of water disinfection of chlorination, Health effects on reproductive and developmental toxicities of haloacetic acids may be pay more attention to and may be interested in due to their high stability. In recent years numerous toxicological studies indicated that some HAAs could affect reproductive system and fertilizing capacity, inducing fetal anomaly and growth retardation in experimental animals. The recent studies on the reproductive and developmental effects of HAAs were discussed in this paper, the informations may be available for further study on reproductive and developmental effects of HAAs in drinking water.

  16. Toxicity of a dental adhesive compared with ionizing radiation and zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Miguel; Olivares, Amparo; Achel, Daniel-Giyngiri; García-Cruz, Emilio; Fondevilla-Soler, Adriana; Canteras-Jordana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the toxicity of aqueous dilutions of a universal self-priming dental adhesive (DA) and comparing these with those elicited by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), Zoledronic acid (Z) treatment and the synergic effects of the combined treatment with IR+Z. Material and Methods The genotoxic effect of DA was determined by the increase in the frequency of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked in cultured human lymphocytes before and after exposure to 2Gy of X-rays. The cytotoxic effect was studied by using the MTT cell viability test in normal prostate cell lines (PNT2) after exposure to different X-ray doses (0Gy-20Gy). The cell lines divided into different groups and treated with different test substances: DA in presence of O2, DA in absence of O2, Z-treated and control. Results An in vitro dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxic effect of DA, Z and IR on PNT2 cells (p>0.001) was demonstrated. DA without-O2, following the recommendations of manufacturers, had a more pronounced effect of increasing cell death than DA with-O2 (p<0.001). In the genotoxicity assay, DA at 25% of its original concentration significantly increased chromosome damage (p<0.001). The samples studied were found to be toxic, and the samples photo-polymerized in absence of O2 showed a bigger cytotoxic effect comparable to the additive toxic effect showed by the combined treatment of IR+Z. Conclusions Additional effort should be carried out to develop adhesives, which would reduce the release of hazardous substances; since toxic effects are similar to that reported by other agents whose clinical use is controlled by the health authorities. Key words: Micronucleus, toxicity, dental adhesive, zolendronic acid, radiation effects. PMID:26034923

  17. Ameliorative Effect of Chronic Supplementation of Protocatechuic Acid Alone and in Combination with Ascorbic Acid in Aniline Hydrochloride Induced Spleen Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Upasana; Upaganlawar, Aman; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Present study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of protocatechuic acid alone and in combination with ascorbic acid in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Male Wistar rats of either sex (200-250 g) were used and divided into different groups. Spleen toxicity was induced by aniline hydrochloride (100 ppm) in drinking water for a period of 28 days. Treatment group received protocatechuic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), ascorbic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), and combination of protocatechuic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and ascorbic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) followed by aniline hydrochloride. At the end of treatment period serum and tissue parameters were evaluated. Result. Rats supplemented with aniline hydrochloride showed a significant alteration in body weight, spleen weight, feed consumption, water intake, hematological parameters (haemoglobin content, red blood cells, white blood cells, and total iron content), tissue parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, and nitric oxide content), and membrane bound phosphatase (ATPase) compared to control group. Histopathology of aniline hydrochloride induced spleen showed significant damage compared to control rats. Treatment with protocatechuic acid along with ascorbic acid showed better protection as compared to protocatechuic acid or ascorbic acid alone in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity. Conclusion. Treatment with protocatechuic acid and ascorbic acid in combination showed significant protection in aniline hydrochloride induced splenic toxicity in rats.

  18. Effect of kinetics of complexation by humic acid on toxicity of copper to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Kim, S.D.; Cha, D.K.; Allen, H.E.

    1999-05-01

    The rate of reaction of trace metal ions is an important consideration when studying the chemistry of trace metals in natural waters. The application of speciation models to natural water systems requires knowledge of kinetics if reactions are slow. Most bioassay and toxicity tests conducted in static and flow-through systems have not taken reaction kinetics into account. Therefore, results from these studies may overestimate the toxicity in the receiving waters. In the present study, the kinetics of the interaction of Cu(II) with humic acid (HA) and its influence on the toxicity of copper to Ceriodaphnia dubia were investigated by both chemical kinetic studies using a copper ion selective electrode and bioassay tests using a continuous flow-through bioassay system. A two-ligand site, with fist-order rate constants, model gave a very good description of experimental kinetic data of the change of free Cu{sup 2+} concentration. Average k{sub 1} was 1.85/h and average k{sub 2} was 0.094/h. Bioassay tests indicated that different reaction times of copper with HA solution produced different toxic effects to organisms. The authors determined the hydrodynamic characteristics of the bioassay chambers to better describe the exposure of the organisms to free Cu{sup 2+}. The bioassays supported the free ion activity model that the bioavailability and therefore toxicity of copper was directly correlated to the free Cu{sup 2+} concentration rather than to the total copper concentration. It was further shown that conventional chemical kinetics can be used to predict the toxicity of copper in these bioassays. This study supports the importance of considering reaction kinetics when studying the chemistry of trace metals in natural waters.

  19. Naphthenic acids degradation and toxicity mitigation in tailings wastewater systems and aquatic environments: a review.

    PubMed

    Kannel, Prakash R; Gan, Thian Y

    2012-01-01

    Naphthenic acids, NAs (classical formula C(n)H(2n+z)O(2), where n is the carbon numbers, z represents zero or negative even integers), found in oil sands process waters (OSPWs), are toxic to aquatic environments depending upon several factors such as pH, salinity, molecular size and chemical structure of NAs. Among various available methods, biodegradation seems to be generally the most cost-effective method for decreasing concentrations of NAs (n ≤ 21) and reducing their associated toxicity in OSPW, however the mechanism by which the biodegradation of NAs occurs are poorly understood. Ozonation is superior over biodegradation in decreasing higher molecular weight alkyl branched NAs (preferentially, n ≥ 22, -6 ≥ z ≥ -12) as well as enabling accelerated biodegradation and reducing toxicity. Photolysis (UV at 254 nm) is effective in cleaving higher molecular weight NAs into smaller fragments that will be easier for microorganisms to degrade, whereas photocatalysis can metabolize selective NAs (0 ≥ z ≥ -6) efficiently and minimize their associated toxicity. Phytoremediation is applicable for metabolizing specific NAs (O(2), O(3), O(4), and O(5) species) and minimizing their associated toxicities. Petroleum coke (PC) adsorption is effective in reducing the more structurally complex NAs (preferentially 12 ≥ n ≥ 18 and z = -10, -12) and their toxicity in OSPWs, depending upon the PC content, pH and temperature. Several factors have influence on the degradation of NAs in OSPWs and aquatic environments, which include molecular mass and chemical structure of NAs, sediment structure, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and bacteria types.

  20. Aminomethylphosphonic acid has low chronic toxicity to Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Levine, Steven L; von Mérey, Georg; Minderhout, Tui; Manson, Philip; Sutton, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is the simplest member of a class of compounds known as aminomethylenephosphonates and the only environmental metabolite measured in significant amounts during the degradation of the herbicide glyphosate in soil. However, there are additional sources of AMPA in the environment, originating from organic phosphonates which are used in water treatment to inhibit scale formation and corrosion. Like glyphosate, AMPA has low acute toxicity to aquatic animals, and the no-observed-adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) obtained from a fish full-life cycle study for glyphosate was determined to be 26 mg/L. However, the chronic toxicity of AMPA to aquatic animals has not been evaluated before. The purpose of the present study was to assess the potential for chronic toxicity of AMPA to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Daphnia magna. Chronic toxicity to P. promelas was evaluated in a fish early-life stage study. The primary endpoints were larval survival, growth, and development. The NOAEC for P. promelas was determined to be 12 mg/L, the highest concentration tested. The chronic toxicity to D. magna was evaluated in a Daphnia reproduction test. The primary endpoints were survival, growth, and reproduction. The no-observed-effect concentration for D. magna was determined to be 15 mg/L. Conservatively predicted environmental surface water concentrations for AMPA from typical foliar agricultural application rates and values from surface water monitoring programs are 100 to 1000 times less than the NOAEC values from both studies. Consequently, there is a large and highly protective margin of safety between realistic environmental exposures to AMPA and chronic toxicity to aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates.

  1. Boric acid: a potential chemoprotective agent against aflatoxin b1 toxicity in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Geyikoglu, Fatime

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent pulmonary and hepatic carcinogen. Since the eradication of Aflatoxin B1 contamination in agricultural products has been difficult, the use of natural or synthetic free radical scavengers could be a potential chemopreventive strategy. Boric acid is the major component of industry and its antioxidant role has recently been reported. The present study assessed, for the first time, the effectiveness of boric acid following exposure to Aflatoxin B1 on human whole blood cultures. The biochemical characterizations of glutathione and some enzymes have been carried out in erythrocytes. Alterations in malondialdehyde level were determined as an index of oxidative stress. The sister-chromatid exchange and micronucleus tests were performed to assess DNA damages in lymphocytes. Aflatoxin B1 treatment significantly reduced the activities of antioxidants by increasing malondialdehyde level (30.53 and 51.43%) of blood, whereas, the boric acid led to an increased resistance of DNA to oxidative damage induced by Aflatoxin B1 in comparison with control values (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the support of boric acid was especially useful in Aflatoxin-toxicated blood. Thus the risk on tissue targeting of Aflatoxin B1 could be reduced ensuring early recovery from its toxicity. PMID:20431944

  2. Fate and effects of picric acid and 2,6-DNT in marine environments: toxicity of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Nipper, Marion; Carr, R Scott; Biedenbach, James M; Hooten, Russell L; Miller, Karen

    2005-11-01

    The toxicity of transformation products of 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (picric acid) were assessed in spiked sandy and fine-grained marine sediments and in seawater. Toxicity of pore water from sediments spiked with 2,6-DNT decreased for the macro-alga, Ulva fasciata, zoospores as biotransformation proceeded, but increased for the copepod, Schizopera knabeni, nauplii. The primary biotransformation product of 2,6-DNT, 2-amino-6-nitrotoluene, was also more toxic than the parent compound to copepod nauplii, but not to alga zoospores, in spiked seawater tests. Two biotransformation products of picric acid, picramic acid and 2,4-DNP, were more toxic than their parent compound. Porewater toxicity from picric acid-spiked sediments decreased significantly at the end of six-months incubation. Fine-grained sediment spiked with either ordnance compound had lower toxicity than its sandy counterpart after six months, suggesting faster microbial transformation in the former and production of less toxic products. Photo-transformation of 2,6-DNT in seawater resulted in a reduction in toxicity.

  3. Neuroprotective role of lipoic acid against acute toxicity of N-acetylaspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Pederzolli, Carolina Didonet; Rosa, Andrea Pereira; de Oliveira, Amanda Szekir; Coelho, Juliana G; Becker, Débora da Luz; Dalazen, Giovana Reche; Moraes, Tarsila Barros; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S

    2010-11-01

    N-Acetylaspartic acid (NAA) accumulates in Canavan disease, a severe inherited neurometabolic disorder clinically characterized by mental retardation, hypotonia, macrocephaly, and seizures. The mechanisms of brain damage in this disease remain poorly understood. Recent studies developed by our research group showed that NAA induces oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo in cerebral cortex of rats. Lipoic acid is considered as an efficient antioxidant which can easily cross the blood-brain barrier. Considering the absence of specific treatment to Canavan disease, this study evaluates the possible prevention of the oxidative stress promoted by NAA in vivo by the antioxidant lipoic acid to preliminarily evaluate lipoic acid efficacy against pro-oxidative effects of NAA. Fourteen-day-old Wistar rats received an acute administration of 0.6 mmol NAA/g body weight with or without lipoic acid (40 mg/kg body weight). Catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, hydrogen peroxide content, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), spontaneous chemiluminescence, protein carbonyl content, total antioxidant potential, and DNA-protein cross-links were assayed in the cerebral cortex of rats. CAT, GPx activities, and total antioxidant potential were significantly reduced, while hydrogen peroxide content, TBA-RS, spontaneous chemiluminescence, and protein carbonyl content were significantly enhanced by acute administration of NAA. Those effects were all prevented by lipoic acid pretreatment. Our results clearly show that lipoic acid may protect against the oxidative stress promoted by NAA. This could represent a new therapeutic approach to the patients affected by Canavan disease.

  4. Biodegradation and aquatic toxicity of beta-alaninediacetic acid (beta-ADA).

    PubMed

    Nitschke, L; Wilk, A; Cammerer, C; Lind, G; Metzner, G

    1997-02-01

    The aquatic toxicity and biodegradability of the new chelating agent beta-alaninediacetic acid (beta-ADA) were investigated. There is no inhibition effect of beta-ADA in the daphnia magna 24 h test up to a concentration of 1000 mg/L. The algal growth inhibition test resulted in an EC 50 of 19.7 mg/L. An EC 20 of 740 mg/L was determined in the luminescent bacteria test. An EC 50 was not obtained in this test up to a concentration of 2000 mg/L beta-ADA. The degree of biodegradation of beta-ADA was determined in a static and a continuous test. The beta-ADA removal reached 98% at the end of the test after eight weeks in the continuous test which was carried out with laboratory activated sludge units simulating a waste water treatment plant. Further, biodegradation and toxicity tests were coupled, i.e. the effluents of the laboratory activated sludge units were applied in the toxicity tests. A higher toxicity of the effluents of the test units in comparison with the control unit was not observed.

  5. Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Prorocentrum and Dinophysis, are responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. In laboratory animals, these toxins cause epithelial damage and fluid accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract, and at high doses, they cause death. These substances have also been shown to be tumour promoters, and when injected into the brains of rodents, OA induces neuronal damage reminiscent of that seen in Alzheimer’s disease. OA and certain of its derivatives are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, which play many roles in cellular metabolism. In 1990, it was suggested that inhibition of these enzymes was responsible for the diarrhetic effect of these toxins. It is now repeatedly stated in the literature that protein phosphatase inhibition is not only responsible for the intestinal effects of OA and derivatives, but also for their acute toxic effects, their tumour promoting activity and their neuronal toxicity. In the present review, the evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. PMID:23381142

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Toxicity of Garcinia or Hydroxycitric Acid: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Li Oon; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Wan Yong; Beh, Boon Kee; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is one of the pandemic chronic diseases commonly associated with health disorders such as heart attack, high blood pressure, diabetes or even cancer. Among the current natural products for obesity and weight control, Garcinia or more specifically hydroxycitric acid (HCA) extracted from Garcinia has been widely used. The evaluation of the potential toxicity of weight control supplement is of the utmost importance as it requires long term continuous consumption in order to maintain its effects. Majority of reports demonstrated the efficacy of Garcinia/HCA without any toxicity found. However, a few clinical toxicity reports on weight-loss diet supplements of which some were combinations that included Garcinia/HCA as an active ingredient showed potential toxicity towards spermatogenesis. Nonetheless, it cannot be concluded that Garcinia/HCA is unsafe. Those products which have been reported to possess adverse effects are either polyherbal or multi-component in nature. To date, there is no case study or report showing the direct adverse effect of HCA. The structure, mechanism of action, long history of the use of Garcinia/HCA and comprehensive scientific evidence had shown “no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL)” at levels up to 2800 mg/day, suggesting its safety for use. PMID:22924054

  7. Toxicological evaluation of peroxy sulfonated oleic acid (PSOA) in subacute and developmental toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Pechacek, Nathan; Laidlaw, Karen; Clubb, Stephanie; Aulmann, Walter; Osorio, Magdalena; Caudill, Jeff

    2013-12-01

    Peroxy sulfonated oleic acid (PSOA) is a new coupler used in sanitizing solutions primarily for the food and beverage industry. The toxicity of PSOA was evaluated in a 28-day repeat dose study according to OECD 407 guidelines with a 14-day recovery period and a developmental toxicity study according to OECD 414 guidelines. In both studies, PSOA was administered once daily via gavage at 0, 5, 15 and 50 mg/kg/day to Sprague-Dawley rats. Due to its corrosive properties, the highest test concentration was restricted to 0.5%. No findings related to PSOA administration were observed for the 28-day repeat-dose study and the NOEL is 50 mg/kg/day. Additionally, no impairment of the mucous membranes of the gastrointestinal tract was observed up to 0.5%, which is considered the NOEC in terms of local toxicity. For the developmental study, an embryo-fetal NOEL of 50 mg/kg/day was identified and the maternal NOEL is considered to be 15 mg/kg/day, based on slight reductions in maternal body weight and food consumption, as well as a modest increase in the incidence of clinical observations at the high dose. These findings demonstrate that PSOA appears to have minimal potential to induce toxicity associated with repeat-dose or developmental exposures.

  8. Utilization of acetic acid-rich pyrolytic bio-oil by microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: reducing bio-oil toxicity and enhancing algal toxicity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi; Zhao, Xuefei; Chi, Zhanyou; Rover, Marjorie; Johnston, Patrick; Brown, Robert; Jarboe, Laura; Wen, Zhiyou

    2013-04-01

    This work was to utilize acetic acid contained in bio-oil for growth and lipid production of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The acetic acid-rich bio-oil fraction derived from fast pyrolysis of softwood contained 26% (w/w) acetic acid, formic acid, methanol, furfural, acetol, and phenolics as identified compounds, and 13% (w/w) unidentified compounds. Among those identified compounds, phenolics were most inhibitory to algal growth, followed by furfural and acetol. To enhance the fermentability of the bio-oil fraction, activated carbon was used to reduce the toxicity of the bio-oil, while metabolic evolution was used to enhance the toxicity tolerance of the microalgae. Combining activated carbon treatment and using evolved algal strain resulted in significant algal growth improvement. The results collectively showed that fast pyrolysis-fermentation process was a viable approach for converting biomass into fuels and chemicals.

  9. Reproductive toxicity of methomyl insecticide in male rats and protective effect of folic acid.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, M A; El Zorba, H Y; Ziada, Reem M

    2010-11-01

    The acute toxicity (LD(50)) of insecticide methomyl and its effects on male reproduction in rats were carried out. Methomyl was given orally to male rats daily for 65 successive days at two doses (0.5 and 1.0 mg kg(-1) b.wt., corresponding to 1/40 and 1/20 LD(50)) alone and in combination with folic acid (1.1 mg kg(-1) b.wt., corresponding to acceptable daily intake, ADI). Fertility index, weight of sexual organs, semen picture, serum testosterone level and histopathology of testes were the parameters used to evaluate the reproductive efficiency of treated rats. The reversibility of methomyl effects was also studied after 65 days post-administration. The oral LD(50) of methomyl was 20.0 mg kg(-1) b.wt. in male rats. Methomyl significantly decreased the fertility index, weight of testes and accessory male sexual glands, serum testosterone level and sperm motility and count, but increased sperm cell abnormality. It induced testicular lesions characterized by moderate to severe degenerative changes of seminiferous tubules and incomplete arrest of spermatogenesis. These toxic effects were not persistent (reversible). Coadministration of folic acid with methomyl decreased its reproductive toxicity. A great attention should be taken during field application of methomyl to avoid its deleterious effects in farm animals and occupationally exposed humans.

  10. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  11. Severe toxicity with a generic formulation of zoledronic Acid: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Benito

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous zoledronic acid (ZOL) is an integral component for the management of patients with bone metastases, but can be associated with transient flu-like symptoms, which generally occur only with the first infusion and are typically manageable with nonprescription analgesics. A 50-year-old woman with a bone metastasis secondary to breast cancer received radiation therapy, brand-name ZOL (Zometa(®)), and letrozole. During the first 3 cycles of Zometa (4 mg every 3-4 weeks), no acute adverse events were reported. For the next 2 cycles she was switched to generic ZOL and experienced severe toxicity (nausea, vomiting, extreme weakness, and incapacitating bone pain) that required hospitalization. Toxicity differences between generic ZOL and Zometa led the patient to pay additional costs for Zometa, and subsequent Zometa infusions were without incident. This is the first case report documenting a clinically significant difference between the safety profiles of a generic formulation of ZOL and brand-name Zometa.

  12. Manganese toxicity in the CNS: the glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining proper function and regulation of numerous biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the CNS. Increased accumulation of Mn in specific brain regions, such as the substantia nigra, globus pallidus and striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, termed manganism. Mn has been also implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurodegenerative diseases. Its toxicity is associated with disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu)-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons, thus leading to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABAergic transmission and Gln metabolism. Here we discuss the common mechanisms underlying Mn-induced neurotoxicity and their relationship to CNS pathology and GGC impairment. PMID:23360507

  13. Monochloroacetic acid toxicity in the mouse associated with blood-brain barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Berardi, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Monochloroacetic acid (MCA) damages the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of mice when administered orally at lethal doses. Damage was characterized by the finding of RBC's in the brain parenchyma of mice exhibiting neurologic dysfunction after MCA treatment, and by the entry of (/sup 14/C)inulin and (/sup 3/H)dopamine into the brain following a lethal dose of MCA. Results of acute toxicity studies, pharmacological antidote studies, and toxicokinetics studies in mice and rats are also presented. Acute toxicity of MCA in rats and mice by several routes of administration was determined. Toxicity of molten MCA by the dermal route was characterized by a small amount of surface area exposure and short application time necessary to produce death in both species. Some mice surviving an acute lethal oral dose of MCA exhibited a rigid clasping of the front paws (myotonia) with impairment of walking. Oral administration of (/sup 14/C)MCA to both mice and rats was followed by a rapid elimination of radioactivity from non-cerebral tissues and rapid appearance in the urine. As the dose was increased from a trace dose to a toxic dose, the percent of the administrated dose which was found in the tissues, including brain regions, was greatly increased. Two hours after oral administration of an LD80 of MCA to mice, and coinciding with the onset of toxic signs, entry of (/sup 14/C)inulin into brain regions was significantly increased compared to controls. Both MCA lethality and front paw dysfunction in mice appear to be associated with damage to the BBB.

  14. Abscisic acid and transpiration rate are involved in the response to boron toxicity in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Macho-Rivero, Miguel Ángel; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan José; Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2016-12-09

    Boron (B) is an essential microelement for vascular plant development, but its toxicity is a major problem affecting crop yields in arid and semi-arid areas of the world. In the literature, several genes involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and responses are upregulated in Arabidopsis roots after treatment with excess B. It is known that the AtNCED3 gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme for ABA biosynthesis, plays a key role in the plant response to drought stress. In this study, root AtNCED3 expression and shoot ABA content were rapidly increased in wild-type plants upon B-toxicity treatment. The Arabidopsis ABA-deficient nced3-2 mutant had higher transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and accumulated more B in their shoots than wild-type plants, facts that were associated with the lower levels of ABA in this mutant. However, in wild-type plants, B toxicity caused a significant reduction in stomatal conductance, resulting in a decreased transpiration rate. This response could be a mechanism to limit the transport of excess B from the roots to the leaves under B toxicity. In agreement with the higher transpiration rate of the nced3-2 mutant, this genotype showed an increased leaf B concentration and damage upon exposure to 5 mM B. Under B toxicity, ABA application decreased B accumulation in wild-type and nced3-2 plants. In summary, this work shows that excess B applied to the roots leads to rapid changes in AtNCED3 expression and gas exchange parameters that would contribute to restrain the B entry into the leaves, this effect being mediated by ABA.

  15. Toxicity of tannic acid-modified silver nanoparticles in keratinocytes: potential for immunomodulatory applications.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Piotr; Soliwoda, Katarzyna; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Bien, Karolina; Fruba, Aleksandra; Gniadek, Marianna; Labedz, Olga; Nowak, Zuzanna; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jarosław; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2016-09-01

    Hydrolyzable tannins are known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity, which can be used in combination with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for dermal uses. In this study, we investigated the effects of tannic acid-modified 13, 33, 46nm and unmodified 10-65nm AgNPs using the human-derived keratinocyte HaCaT and VK2-E6/E7 cell lines in the form of stationary and spheroids cultures. After exposition to tannic acid-modified AgNPs, VK2-E6/E7 cells showed higher toxicity, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activity of JNK stress kinase, while HaCaT cell line demonstrated less ROS production and activation of ERK kinase. AgNPs internalization was detected both in the superficial and internal layers of spheroids prepared from both cell lines. Tannic acid modified AgNPs sized above 30nm did not induce DNA breaks in comet assay performed in both cell lines. Tannic acid-modified but not unmodified AgNPs down-regulated TNF-α and LPS-triggered production of IL-8 in VK2-E6/E7 but not in HaCaT cells. In summary, tannic acid-modified AgNPs sized above 30nm show good toxicological profile both in vitro and possess immunomodulatory properties useful for potential dermal applications in humans.

  16. Cadmium Toxicity and Alleviating Effects of Exogenous Salicylic Acid in Iris hexagona.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Chen, Gang; Chen, Yahua; Shen, Zhenguo

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) toxictity and possible role of salicylic acid (SA) in alleviating Cd-induced toxicity were investigated on ornamental hydrophyte Iris hexagona. Compared to the control, treatments with 100 and 500 µM Cd for 7 days significantly decreased dry weight, the contents of chlorophyll, photosynthetic parameters, and increased the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance. Pretreatment of the roots of I. hexagona seedlings with 1 µM SA before Cd exposure may increase dry weight, photosynthetic rate, activities of antioxidant enzymes, improve the cell ultrastructure and protect plants from Cd-induced oxidative stress damage. However, SA pretreatment had no significant effect on Cd concentrations in the leaves and roots. It is suggested that SA-induced Cd tolerances in I. hexagona are likely associated with increases in antioxidant enzyme activities and vacuolar compartmentation, rather than Cd uptake.

  17. Toxicity of purified terephthalic acid manufacturing wastewater on reproductive system of male mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Sun, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Zong-Yao; Liu, Bo; Yang, Liu-Yan; Cheng, Shu-Pei

    2010-04-15

    Reproductive toxicity of purified terephthalic acid (PTA) manufacturing wastewater on the male mice (Mus musculus) was investigated after 35-day intragastric perfusion treatment with the wastewater. Fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide staining, and flow cytometry were used to assess the toxicity of PTA wastewater on spermatogenic cells. PTA wastewater induced significant variations in the relative percentages of immature haploid, diploid, tetraploid and S-phase spermatogonia. Percentage of viable spermatogenic cells was reduced from 93.1+/-2.3 in control group to 90.4+/-1.9 in the wastewater-treated group. Testicular histopathology revealed expansion of interstitial space and reduction in the number and size of Leydig cells induced by the wastewater, which was further certified by the decrease (10.6%) in relative testes weight and the increase (101.3%) in sperm shape abnormality in the wastewater-treated group. In this study, PTA wastewater was found to have reproductive toxicity on male mice, and public health problems may potentially arise from the discharge of the wastewater into the environment.

  18. Haloacetonitriles vs. regulated haloacetic acids: are nitrogen-containing DBPs more toxic?

    PubMed

    Muellner, Mark G; Wagner, Elizabeth D; McCalla, Kristin; Richardson, Susan D; Woo, Yin-Tak; Plewa, Michael J

    2007-01-15

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are toxic nitrogenous drinking water disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) and are observed with chlorine, chloramine, or chlorine dioxide disinfection. Using microplate-based Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell assays for chronic cytotoxicity and acute genotoxicity, we analyzed 7 HANs: iodoacetonitrile (IAN), bromoacetonitrile (BAN), dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN), bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN), chloroacetonitrile (CAN), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN). The cytotoxic potency (%C1/2 values) ranged from 2.8 microM (DBAN) to 0.16 mM (TCAN), with a descending rank order of DBAN > IAN approximately BAN > BCAN > DCAN > CAN > TCAN. HANs induced acute genomic DNA damage; the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) genotoxicity potency ranged from 37 microM (IAN) to 2.7 mM (DCAN). The rank order of declining genotoxicity was IAN > BAN approximately DBAN > BCAN > CAN > TCAN > DCAN. The accompanying structure-activity analysis of these HANs was in general agreement with the genotoxicity rank order. These data were incorporated into our growing quantitative comparative DBP cytotoxicity and genotoxicity databases. As a chemical class, the HANs are more toxic than regulated carbon-based DBPs, such as the haloacetic acids. The toxicity of N-DBPs may become a health concern because of the increased use of alternative disinfectants, such as chloramines, which may enhance the formation of N-DBPs, including HANs.

  19. Human environmental and occupational exposures to boric acid: reconciliation with experimental reproductive toxicity data.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Hermann M; Başaran, Nurşen; Duydu, Yalçın

    2012-01-01

    The reproductive toxicity of boric acid and borates is a matter of current regulatory concern. Based on experimental studies in rats, no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) were found to be 17.5 mg boron (B)/kg body weight (b.w.) for male fertility and 9.6 mg B/kg b.w. for developmental toxicity. Recently, occupational human field studies in highly exposed cohorts were reported from China and Turkey, with both studies showing negative results regarding male reproduction. A comparison of the conditions of these studies with the experimental NOAEL conditions are based on reported B blood levels, which is clearly superior to a scaling according to estimated B exposures. A comparison of estimated daily B exposure levels and measured B blood levels confirms the preference of biomonitoring data for a comparison of human field studies. In general, it appears that high environmental exposures to B are lower than possible high occupational exposures. The comparison reveals no contradiction between human and experimental reproductive toxicity data. It clearly appears that human B exposures, even in the highest exposed cohorts, are too low to reach the blood (and target tissue) concentrations that would be required to exert adverse effects on reproductive functions.

  20. Valproic acid developmental toxicity and pharmacokinetics in the rhesus monkey: an interspecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, A G; Nau, H; Binkerd, P; Rowland, J M; Rowland, J R; Cukierski, M J; Cukierski, M A

    1988-10-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the developmental toxicity and drug distributional and metabolic characteristics of prenatal valproic acid (VPA) exposure in rhesus monkeys. Oral administration of 20-600 mg/kg/day VPA (approximately 1-15 X human therapeutic dose) to 33 animals on variable gestational days (GD) during organogenesis resulted in dose-dependent developmental toxicity manifested as increased embryo/fetal mortality, intrauterine growth retardation, and craniofacial and skeletal defects. Biphasic plasma elimination curves were observed for total and free VPA on the first (GD 21) and last (GD 50) days of treatment in the 100- and 200-mg/kg/day dose groups. VPA exhibited dose-independent elimination kinetics at the plasma concentrations observed in this study. There was no significant change in pharmacokinetic parameters (maternal plasma elimination rate, area under the curve, peak plasma concentration) between the first and last days of treatment at either dose level. Placental transfer studies indicated that embryos were exposed to half the free VPA concentrations present in maternal plasma on GD 37. Comparisons of interspecies sensitivity to VPA-induced developmental toxicity in the mouse, rat, monkey, and man are made.

  1. Behavioral, clinical, and pathological characterization of acid metalliferous water toxicity in mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isanhart, John P.; Wu, Hongmei; Pandher, Karamjeet; MacRae, Russell K.; Cox, Stephen B.; Hooper, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    From September to November 2000, United States Fish and Wildlife Service biologists investigated incidents involving 221 bird deaths at 3 mine sites located in New Mexico and Arizona. These bird deaths primarily involved passerine and waterfowl species and were assumed to be linked to consumption of acid metalliferous water (AMW). Because all of the carcasses were found in or near pregnant leach solution ponds, tailings ponds, and associated lakes or storm water retention basins, an acute-toxicity study was undertaken using a synthetic AMW (SAMW) formulation based on the contaminant profile of a representative pond believed to be responsible for avian mortalities. An acute oral-toxicity trial was performed with a mixed-sex group of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). After a 24-h pretreatment food and water fast, gorge drinking was evident in both SAMW treatment and control groups, with water consumption rates greatest during the initial drinking periods. Seven of nine treated mallards were killed in extremis within 12 h after the initiation of dose. Total lethal doses of SAMW ranged from 69.8 to 270.1 mL/kg (mean ± SE 127.9 ± 27.1). Lethal doses of SAMW were consumed in as few as 20 to 40 min after first exposure. Clinical signs of SAMW toxicity included increased serum uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, potassium, and P levels. PCV values of SAMW-treated birds were also increased compared with control mallards. Histopathological lesions were observed in the esophagus, proventriculus, ventriculus, and duodenum of SAMW-treated mallards, with the most distinctive being erosion and ulceration of the kaolin of the ventriculus, ventricular hemorrhage and/or congestion, and duodenal hemorrhage. Clinical, pathological, and tissue-residue results from this study are consistent with literature documenting acute metal toxicosis, especially copper (Cu), in avian species and provide useful diagnostic profiles for AMW toxicity or mortality events. Blood and

  2. Behavioral, clinical, and pathological characterization of acid metalliferous water toxicity in mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isanhart, J.P.; Wu, H.; Pandher, K.; MacRae, R.K.; Cox, S.B.; Hooper, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    From September to November 2000, United States Fish and Wildlife Service biologists investigated incidents involving 221 bird deaths at 3 mine sites located in New Mexico and Arizona. These bird deaths primarily involved passerine and waterfowl species and were assumed to be linked to consumption of acid metalliferous water (AMW). Because all of the carcasses were found in or near pregnant leach solution ponds, tailings ponds, and associated lakes or storm water retention basins, an acute-toxicity study was undertaken using a synthetic AMW (SAMW) formulation based on the contaminant profile of a representative pond believed to be responsible for avian mortalities. An acute oral-toxicity trial was performed with a mixed-sex group of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). After a 24-h pretreatment food and water fast, gorge drinking was evident in both SAMW treatment and control groups, with water consumption rates greatest during the initial drinking periods. Seven of nine treated mallards were killed in extremis within 12 h after the initiation of dose. Total lethal doses of SAMW ranged from 69.8 to 270.1 mL/kg (mean ?? SE 127.9 ?? 27.1). Lethal doses of SAMW were consumed in as few as 20 to 40 min after first exposure. Clinical signs of SAMW toxicity included increased serum uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, potassium, and P levels. PCV values of SAMW-treated birds were also increased compared with control mallards. Histopathological lesions were observed in the esophagus, proventriculus, ventriculus, and duodenum of SAMW-treated mallards, with the most distinctive being erosion and ulceration of the kaolin of the ventriculus, ventricular hemorrhage and/or congestion, and duodenal hemorrhage. Clinical, pathological, and tissue-residue results from this study are consistent with literature documenting acute metal toxicosis, especially copper (Cu), in avian species and provide useful diagnostic profiles for AMW toxicity or mortality events. Blood and

  3. Behavioral, clinical, and pathological characterization of acid metalliferous water toxicity in mallards.

    PubMed

    Isanhart, John P; Wu, Hongmei; Pandher, Karamjeet; MacRae, Russell K; Cox, Stephen B; Hooper, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    From September to November 2000, United States Fish and Wildlife Service biologists investigated incidents involving 221 bird deaths at 3 mine sites located in New Mexico and Arizona. These bird deaths primarily involved passerine and waterfowl species and were assumed to be linked to consumption of acid metalliferous water (AMW). Because all of the carcasses were found in or near pregnant leach solution ponds, tailings ponds, and associated lakes or storm water retention basins, an acute-toxicity study was undertaken using a synthetic AMW (SAMW) formulation based on the contaminant profile of a representative pond believed to be responsible for avian mortalities. An acute oral-toxicity trial was performed with a mixed-sex group of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). After a 24-h pretreatment food and water fast, gorge drinking was evident in both SAMW treatment and control groups, with water consumption rates greatest during the initial drinking periods. Seven of nine treated mallards were killed in extremis within 12 h after the initiation of dose. Total lethal doses of SAMW ranged from 69.8 to 270.1 mL/kg (mean ± SE 127.9 ± 27.1). Lethal doses of SAMW were consumed in as few as 20 to 40 min after first exposure. Clinical signs of SAMW toxicity included increased serum uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, potassium, and P levels. PCV values of SAMW-treated birds were also increased compared with control mallards. Histopathological lesions were observed in the esophagus, proventriculus, ventriculus, and duodenum of SAMW-treated mallards, with the most distinctive being erosion and ulceration of the kaolin of the ventriculus, ventricular hemorrhage and/or congestion, and duodenal hemorrhage. Clinical, pathological, and tissue-residue results from this study are consistent with literature documenting acute metal toxicosis, especially copper (Cu), in avian species and provide useful diagnostic profiles for AMW toxicity or mortality events. Blood and

  4. Toxicological assessment of refined naphthenic acids in a repeated dose/developmental toxicity screening test.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; North, Colin M; Podhasky, Paula; Charlap, Jeffrey H; Kuhl, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are primarily cycloaliphatic carboxylic acids with 10 to 16 carbons. To characterize the potential of refined NAs (>70% purity) to cause reproductive and/or developmental effects, Sprague-Dawley rats (12/group) were given oral doses of 100, 300, or 900 mg/kg/d, beginning 14 days prior to mating, then an additional 14 days for males or through lactation day 3 for females (up to 53 days) in a repeated dose/reproductive toxicity test (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] 422). Potential mutagenic effects were assessed using Salmonella (OECD 471) and in in vivo micronucleus tests (OECD 474) using bone marrow taken from treated animals in the screening study described previously. Systemic effects included reduced terminal body weights, increased liver weights, and changes in a number of blood cell parameters. The overall no effect level for all target organ effects was 100 mg/kg/d. In the reproductive/developmental toxicity assessment, there were significant reductions in numbers of live born offspring in groups exposed to 300 and 900 mg/kg/d. The overall no effect level for developmental effects was 100 mg/kg/d. The data from the Salmonella and micronucleus tests provide evidence that refined NAs are not genotoxic.

  5. Possible mechanism for species difference on the toxicity of pivalic acid between dogs and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Toshiro . E-mail: toshiro.yamaguchi@shionogi.co.jp; Nakajima, Yoshitsugu; Nakamura, Yutaka

    2006-07-01

    In a high dose toxicity study of pivalic acid (PA), PA caused skeletal muscle disorder in dog, and a significant increase of pivaloyl carnitine (PC) was observed in canine muscle, but not in rat muscle. In order to understand species difference of the toxicity of PA, we compared the in vitro metabolism of PA among dog, rat and rabbit, especially focussing on the carnitine conjugate. Canine muscle showed low, but significant carnitine conjugating activity, while that of rat was negligible. Canine kidney mitochondria had significant activity in the pivaloyl CoA synthesis (7 nmol/mg protein/h), but muscle mitochondria showed only trace activity. Both kidney and muscle mitochondria displayed similar carnitine acyltransferase activity (2-3 nmol/mg protein/h) towards pivaloyl CoA. On the other hand, with respect to the activity of carnitine acyltransferase in the reverse direction using PC as substrate, canine muscle mitochondria showed higher activity than that of kidney mitochondria. This means that PC is not the final stable metabolite, but is converted easily to pivaloyl CoA in canine muscle. These results suggest one of the possible mechanisms for canine selective muscle disorder to be as follows. Only canine muscle can metabolize PA to its carnitine conjugate slowly, but significantly. In canine muscle, PC is not the final stable metabolite; it is easily converted to pivaloyl CoA. As carnitine conjugation is thought to be the only detoxification metabolic route in canine muscle, under certain circumstances such as carnitine deficiency, the risk of exposure with toxic pivaloyl CoA might increase and the CoASH pool in canine muscle might be exhausted, resulting in toxicity in canine muscle.

  6. Toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid to plants and aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2009-02-01

    Acute toxicities of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were tested on four freshwater species and three plant species. PFOS was more toxic than PFOA for all species tested in this study. Similar time-response patterns of PFOS and PFOA toxicity were observed for each tested species. Values of the 48-h LC(50) of PFOS for all test species ranged from 27 to 233 mg/L and values of the 96-h LC(50) for three of the species ranged from 10 to 178 mg/L. Values of the 48-h LC(50) of PFOA for all test species ranged from 181 to 732 mg/L and values of the 96-h LC(50) for three of the species ranged from 337 to 672 mg/L. The most sensitive freshwater species to PFOS was green neon shrimp (Neocaridina denticulate) with a 96-h LC(50) of 10 mg/L. Of the aquatic organisms tested, the aquatic snail (Physa acuta) always has the highest resistance to PFOS or PFOA toxicity over each exposure period. Both PFOS and PFOA had no obvious adverse effect on seed germination for all three plant species. Five-day EC(50) of root elongation was more sensitive to LC(50) of seed germination in this study. Based on EC(10), EC(50), and NOECs, the 5-day root elongation sensitivity of test plants to both PFOS and PFOA was in the order of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) > pakchoi (Brassica rapa chinensis) > cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Based on the results of this study and other published literature, it is suggested that current PFOS and PFOA levels in freshwater may have no acute harmful ecological impact on the aquatic environment. However, more research on the long-term ecological effects of PFOS and PFOA on aquatic fauna are needed to provide important information to adequately assess ecological risk of PFOS and PFOA.

  7. Neuroprotective Actions of Clinoptilolite and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Against Lead-induced Toxicity in Mice Mus musculus

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Mahaboob P.; Begum, Shabana; Mir, Bilal Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Oxidative stress is considered as a possible molecular mechanism involved in lead (Pb2+) neurotoxicity. Very few studies have been investigated on the occurrence of oxidative stress in developing animals due to Pb2+ exposure. Considering the vulnerability of the developing brain to Pb2+, this study was carried out to investigate the effects of Pb2+ exposure in brain regions especially on antioxidant enzyme activities along with ameliorative effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and clinoptilolite. Methods: Three-week old developing Swiss mice Mus musculus were intraperitoneally administered with Pb2+ acetate in water (w/v) (100 mg/kg body weight/day) for 21 days and control group was given distilled water. Further Pb2+-toxicated mice were made into two subgroups and separately supplemented with EDTA and clinoptilolite (100 mg/kg body weight) for 2 weeks. Results: In Pb2+-exposed mice, in addition to increased lipid peroxidation, the activity levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) found to decrease in all regions of brain indicating, existence of severe oxidative stress due to decreased antioxidant function. Treatment of Pb2+-exposed mice with EDTA and clinoptilolite lowered the lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels revealing their antioxidant potential to prevent oxidative stress. Similarly their administration led to recover the level of catalase, SOD, and GPx enzymes affected during Pb2+ toxicity in different regions of brain. Conclusions: The protection of brain tissue against Pb2+-induced toxicity by clinoptilolite and EDTA in the present experiment might be due to their ability to react faster with peroxyl radicals there by reducing the severity of biochemical variable indicative of oxidative damage. Thus, the results of present study indicate the neuroprotective potential of clinoptilolite and EDTA against Pb2+ toxicity. PMID:24403728

  8. Characterization of a degenerative cardiomyopathy associated with domoic acid toxicity in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Zabka, T S; Goldstein, T; Cross, C; Mueller, R W; Kreuder-Johnson, C; Gill, S; Gulland, F M D

    2009-01-01

    Domoic acid, produced by marine algae, can cause acute and chronic neurologic sequela in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) from acute toxicity or sublethal exposure. Eight sea lions, representing acute and chronic cases, both sexes, and all age classes, were selected to demonstrate a concurrent degenerative cardiomyopathy. Critical aspects of characterizing the cardiomyopathy by lesion distribution and morphology were the development of a heart dissection and tissue-trimming protocol and the delineation of the cardiac conducting system by histomorphology and immunohistochemistry for neuron-specific protein gene product 9.5. Histopathologic features and progression of the cardiomyopathy are described, varying from acute to chronic active and mild to severe. The cardiomyopathy is distinguished from other heart lesions in pinnipeds. Based on histopathologic features, immunopositive staining for cleaved caspase-3, and comparison with known, similar-appearing cardiomyopathies, the proposed pathogenesis for the degenerative cardiomyopathy is the primary or at least initial direct interaction of domoic acid with receptors that are suspected to exist in the heart. l-Carnitine, measured in the heart and skeletal muscle, and troponin-I, measured in serum collected at the time of death from additional animals (n = 58), were not predictive of the domoic acid-associated cardiomyopathy. This degenerative cardiomyopathy in California sea lions represents another syndrome beyond central neurologic disease associated with exposure to domoic acid and may contribute to morbidity and mortality.

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Is Involved in the Toxic Activity of Boric Acid against Saprolegnia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shimaa E.; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A. A.; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4–24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp. PMID:25354209

  10. Toxic effects of microbial phenolic acids on the functions of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fedotcheva, N I; Kazakov, R E; Kondrashova, M N; Beloborodova, N V

    2008-08-28

    Low-molecular-weight phenolic acids (PhAs) phenylacetate, phenyllactate, phenylpropionate, p-hydroxyphenyllactate, and p-hydroxyphenylacetate are essentially the products of the degradation of aromatic amino acids and polyphenols by the intestinal microflora. In sepsis, the concentrations of some of these acids in the blood increase tens of times. Assuming that these compounds can cause the mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis, we examined their effects on respiration, the induction of pore opening, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria. It was found that phenylpropionate and phenylacetate produce a more toxic effect on mitochondria than the other phenolic acids. At concentrations 0.01-0.1 mM they decreased the rate of oxidation of NAD-dependent substrates and activated the Ca2+- and menadione-induced opening of the cyclosporin A-sensitive pore and the production of ROS. The disturbances caused by these PhAs are similar to those observed in mitochondria in sepsis, and hence the rise in their level may be one of the causes of mitochondrial dysfunctions. Phenyllactate, p-hydroxyphenyllactate, and p-hydroxyphenylacetate inhibited the production of ROS and pore opening, acting as antioxidants. Thus, the ability of PhAs to affect the mitochondrial functions, as well as an increase in their concentrations in sepsis (the total concentration of these PhAs in the blood is close to 0.1 mM), suggests that PhAs can be directly involved in the development of mitochondrial failure.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaa E; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A A; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4-24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp.

  12. Racemization in Reverse: Evidence that D-Amino Acid Toxicity on Earth Is Controlled by Bacteria with Racemases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaosen; Sun, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    D-amino acids are toxic for life on Earth. Yet, they form constantly due to geochemical racemization and bacterial growth (the cell walls of which contain D-amino acids), raising the fundamental question of how they ultimately are recycled. This study provides evidence that bacteria use D-amino acids as a source of nitrogen by running enzymatic racemization in reverse. Consequently, when soils are inundated with racemic amino acids, resident bacteria consume D- as well as L-enantiomers, either simultaneously or sequentially depending on the level of their racemase activity. Bacteria thus protect life on Earth by keeping environments D-amino acid free. PMID:24647559

  13. Racemization in reverse: evidence that D-amino acid toxicity on Earth is controlled by bacteria with racemases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaosen; Sun, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    D-amino acids are toxic for life on Earth. Yet, they form constantly due to geochemical racemization and bacterial growth (the cell walls of which contain D-amino acids), raising the fundamental question of how they ultimately are recycled. This study provides evidence that bacteria use D-amino acids as a source of nitrogen by running enzymatic racemization in reverse. Consequently, when soils are inundated with racemic amino acids, resident bacteria consume D- as well as L-enantiomers, either simultaneously or sequentially depending on the level of their racemase activity. Bacteria thus protect life on Earth by keeping environments D-amino acid free.

  14. Comparative study of aluminum and copper transport and toxicity in an acid-tolerant freshwater green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, B.R.; Popescu, N.A.; Wood, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    A comparative study of the transport and toxicity of one nonessential metal (aluminum), and one essential metal (copper), has been performed with the acid-tolerant green alga Chlorella saccarophila. This organism was isolated from a naturally acidified lake and grows well in laboratory cultures at pH 3.0. Our results show that the fast-exchange ions Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Na/sup +/ offer some protection against both Al/sup 3 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity whereas K/sup +/ protects against Al/sup 3 +/ toxicity but enhances Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity. Plasma emission spectroscopy shows that complexation of Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ to cell surfaces is important in preventing toxic cytoplasmic levels of these metals, both in culture media and in acid mine water. The aqueous ion chemistry for toxic metal uptake is simplified considerably in acidic conditions, where competing hydrolysis and precipitation reactions are eliminated. Therefore, simple competitive experiments can be performed quantitatively. 12 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  15. Implications of pH manipulation methods for metal toxicity: not all acidic environments are created equal.

    PubMed

    Esbaugh, A J; Mager, E M; Brix, K V; Santore, R; Grosell, M

    2013-04-15

    The toxicity of many metals is impacted by environmental pH, through both competition and complexation by hydroxide and carbonate ions. To establish safe environmental regulation it is important to properly define the relationship between pH and metal toxicity, a process that involves manipulating the pH of test water in the lab. The current study compares the effects of the three most common pH manipulation methods (carbon dioxide, acid-base addition, and chemical buffers) on acute Pb toxicity of a model fish species, Pimephales promelas. Acidification of test water revealed that the Pb and Pb(2+) LC50 values were impacted by the pH manipulation method, with the following order of effects: HCltoxicity were observed when test pH was alkalinized using MOPS or NaOH. The different impacts of pH manipulation methods on Pb toxicity are likely due to different physiological stresses resulting from the respective methods; the physiological implications of each method are discussed. The results suggest that when studying the impacts of pH on metal toxicity it is important to properly replicate the ambient conditions of interest as artificial buffering using CO2 environments or organic buffers significantly affects the physiology of the test organisms above and beyond what is expected from pH alone. Thus, using CO2 and organic buffers overestimates the impact of acid pH on Pb toxicity.

  16. Amelioration of acidic soil increases the toxicity of the weak base carbendazim to the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kailin; Wang, Shaoyun; Luo, Kun; Liu, Xiangying; Yu, Yunlong

    2013-12-01

    Ameliorating acidic soils is a common practice and may affect the bioavailability of an ionizable organic pollutant to organisms. The toxicity of the weak base carbendazim to the earthworm (Eisenia fetida) was studied in an acidic soil (pH-H₂O, 4.6) and in the ameliorated soil (pH-H₂O, 7.5). The results indicated that the median lethal concentration of carbendazim for E. fetida decreased from 21.8 mg/kg in acidic soil to 7.35 mg/kg in the ameliorated soil. To understand why the amelioration increased carbendazim toxicity to the earthworm, the authors measured the carbendazim concentrations in the soil porewater. The authors found increased carbendazim concentrations in porewater, resulting in increased toxicity of carbendazim to earthworms. The increased pore concentrations result from decreased adsorption because of the effects of pH and calcium ions.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans utilizes dauer pheromone biosynthesis to dispose of toxic peroxisomal fatty acids for cellular homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyoe-Jin; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Jeong, Pan-Young; Jin, You-Xun; Lee, Jeong-Eui; Kim, Heekyeong; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Chitwood, David J; Paik, Young-Ki

    2009-07-29

    Caenorhabditis elegans excretes a dauer pheromone or daumone composed of ascarylose and a fatty acid side chain, the perception of which enables worms to enter the dauer state for long-term survival in an adverse environment. During the course of elucidation of the daumone biosynthetic pathway in which DHS-28 and DAF-22 are involved in peroxisomal beta-oxidation of VLCFAs (very long-chain fatty acids), we sought to investigate the physiological consequences of a deficiency in daumone biosynthesis in C. elegans. Our results revealed that two mutants, dhs-28(tm2581) and daf-22(ok693), lacked daumones and thus were dauer defective; this coincided with massive accumulation of fatty acyl-CoAs (up to 100-fold) inside worm bodies compared with levels in wild-type N2 worms. Furthermore, the deficiency in daumone biosynthesis and the massive accumulation of fatty acids and their acyl-CoAs caused severe developmental defects with reduced life spans (up to 30%), suggesting that daumone biosynthesis is be an essential part of C. elegans homoeostasis, affecting survival and maintenance of optimal physiological conditions by metabolizing some of the toxic non-permissible peroxisomal VLCFAs from the worm body in the form of readily excretable daumones.

  18. Enantiomeric deoxycholic acid: total synthesis, characterization, and preliminary toxicity toward colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Katona, Bryson W; Rath, Nigam P; Anant, Shrikant; Stenson, William F; Covey, Douglas F

    2007-11-23

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is an endogenous secondary bile acid implicated in numerous pathological conditions including colon cancer formation and progression and cholestatic liver disease. DCA involvement in these disease processes results partly from its ability to modulate signaling cascades within the cell, presumably through both direct receptor activation and general detergent mediated membrane changes. To further explore DCA induced changes in cell signaling, we completed a total synthesis of enantiomeric deoxycholic acid (ent-DCA) from achiral 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione. Using a modified method of the synthesis of ent-testosterone that proceeds through the (R)-(-)-Hajos-Parrish ketone, we have completed the successful synthesis of ent-DCA in 25 steps with a yield of 0.3% with all stereochemical assignments of the product confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Our studies toward this synthesis also uncovered the methodology for the development of a novel A,B-cis steroidal skeleton system containing a C3-C9 single bond as well as conditions to selectively ketalize the typically less reactive 12-carbonyl in poly-keto A,B-cis androgens. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) of ent-DCA, determined by a dye solubilization method, was identical to the cmc of natural DCA. Toxicity studies toward HT-29 and HCT-116 human colon cancer cell lines demonstrated that ent-DCA had similar effects on proliferation, yet showed a markedly decreased ability to induce apoptosis as compared to natural DCA.

  19. SCREENING BIOAVAILABLE HYDROPHOBIC TOXICANTS IN SURFACE WATERS WITH SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES: ROLE OF INHERENT OLEIC ACID IN TOXICITY EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed for 4 weeks in two rivers in Lithuania, The SPMD dialysates were tested in the Microtox assay and, surprisingly, the sample from the relatively clean (U) over bar la River exhibited three times more toxicity than the sample fro...

  20. In Utero Domoic Acid Toxicity: A Fetal Basis to Adult Disease in the California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Zabka, Tanja S.

    2008-01-01

    California sea lions have been a repeated subject of investigation for early life toxicity, which has been documented to occur with increasing frequency from late February through mid-May in association with organochlorine (PCB and DDT) poisoning and infectious disease in the 1970’s and domoic acid poisoning in the last decade. The mass early life mortality events result from the concentrated breeding grounds and synchronization of reproduction over a 28 day post partum estrus cycle and 11 month in utero phase. This physiological synchronization is triggered by a decreasing photoperiod of 11.48 h/day that occurs approximately 90 days after conception at the major California breeding grounds. The photoperiod trigger activates implantation of embryos to proceed with development for the next 242 days until birth. Embryonic diapause is a selectable trait thought to optimize timing for food utilization and male migratory patterns; yet from the toxicological perspective presented here also serves to synchronize developmental toxicity of pulsed environmental events such as domoic acid poisoning. Research studies in laboratory animals have defined age-dependent neurotoxic effects during development and windows of susceptibility to domoic acid exposure. This review will evaluate experimental domoic acid neurotoxicity in developing rodents and, aided by comparative allometric projections, will analyze potential prenatal toxicity and exposure susceptibility in the California sea lion. This analysis should provide a useful tool to forecast fetal toxicity and understand the impact of fetal toxicity on adult disease of the California sea lion. PMID:18728728

  1. Long-term toxicity of holmium-loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres in rats.

    PubMed

    Zielhuis, Sander W; Nijsen, J Frank W; Seppenwoolde, Jan-Henry; Bakker, Chris J G; Krijger, Gerard C; Dullens, Hub F J; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; van Rijk, Peter P; Hennink, Wim E; van het Schip, Alfred D

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to get insight into the toxic effects of holmium-166-loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres (Ho-PLLA-MS) which have very interesting features for treatment of liver malignancies. Acute, mid- and long-term effects were studied in healthy Wistar rats by evaluating clinical, biochemical and tissue response. Rats were divided into four treatment groups: sham, decayed neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS, non-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS and PLLA-MS. After implantation of the microspheres into the liver of the rats, the animals were monitored (body weight, temperature and liver enzymes) for a period of 14-18 months. Some of the rats that received previously neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS were periodically scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to see if holmium was released from the microspheres. After sacrifice, the liver tissue was histologically evaluated. Bone tissue was subjected to neutron-activation analysis in order to examine whether accumulation of released holmium in the bone had occurred. No measurable clinical and biochemical toxic effects were observed in any of the treatment groups. Furthermore, histological analyses of liver tissue samples only showed signs of a slight chronic inflammation and no significant differences in the tissue reaction between rats of the different treatment groups could be observed. The non-irradiated PLLA-MS and Ho-PLLA-MS stayed intact during the study. In contrast, 14 months after administration, the neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS was not completely spherical anymore, indicating that degradation had started. However, the holmium loading had not been released as was illustrated with MRI and affirmed by neutron-activation analysis of bone tissue. In conclusion, neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS does not provoke any toxic reaction and can be applied safely in vivo.

  2. Exogenous application of salicylic acid to alleviate the toxic effects of insecticides in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aradhana; Srivastava, Anjil Kumar; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the possible mediatory role of salicylic acid (SA) in protecting plants from insecticides toxicity. The seeds of Vicia faba var IIVR Selection-1 were treated with different concentrations (1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 ppm) of the insecticides alphamethrin (AM) and endosulfan (ES) for 6 h with and without 12 h conditioning treatment of SA (0.01 mM). Insecticides treatment caused a significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) and induction of different types of chromosomal abnormalities in the meristematic cells of broad bean roots. Pretreatment of seeds with SA resulted in increased MI and significant reduction of chromosomal abnormalities. SA application also regulated proline accumulation and carotenoid content in the leaf tissues. SA resulted in the decrement of insecticides induced increase in proline content and increased the carotenoids content. These results illustrate the ameliorating effect of SA under stress conditions and reveal that SA is more effective in alleviating the toxic effects of insecticides at higher concentrations than that at lower concentrations.

  3. Toxic interaction between acid yellow 23 and trypsin: spectroscopic methods coupled with molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Rutao; Qin, Pengfei

    2012-09-01

    Acid yellow 23 (AY23) is a pervasive azo dye used in many fields which is potentially harmful to the environment and human health. This paper studied the toxic effects of AY23 on trypsin by spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The addition of AY23 effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin via static quenching with association constants of K(290 K) = 3.67 × 10(5) L mol(-1) and K(310 K) = 1.83 × 10(5) L mol(-1). The calculated thermodynamic parameters conformed that AY23 binds to trypsin predominantly via electrostatic forces with one binding site. Conformational investigations indicated the skeletal structure of trypsin unfolded and the microenvironment of tryptophan changed with the addition of AY23. Molecular docking study showed that AY23 interacted with the His 57 and Lys 224 residue of trypsin and led to the inhibition of enzyme activity. This study offers a more comprehensive picture of AY23-trypsin interaction and indicates their interaction may perform toxic effects within the organism.

  4. FXR agonist obeticholic acid reduces hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of toxic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Len; Mannaerts, Inge; Schierwagen, Robert; Govaere, Olivier; Klein, Sabine; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Farre, Ricard; Wenes, Mathias; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Nevens, Frederik; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Trebicka, Jonel; Laleman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic inflammation drives hepatic stellate cells (HSC), resulting in liver fibrosis. The Farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) antagonizes inflammation through NF-κB inhibition. We investigated preventive and therapeutic effects of FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in toxic cirrhotic rats. Cirrhosis was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) intoxication. OCA was given during or after intoxication with vehicle-treated rats as controls. At sacrifice, fibrosis, hemodynamic and biochemical parameters were assessed. HSC activation, cell turn-over, hepatic NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines were determined. The effect of OCA was further evaluated in isolated HSC, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). OCA decreased hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during TAA-administration and reversed fibrosis in established cirrhosis. Portal pressure decreased through reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance. This was paralleled by decreased expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines (transforming growth-factor β, connective tissue growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor) as well as markers of hepatic cell turn-over, by blunting effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). In vitro, OCA inhibited both LSEC and Kupffer cell activation; while HSC remained unaffected. This related to NF-κB inhibition via up-regulated IκBα. In conclusion, OCA inhibits hepatic inflammation in toxic cirrhotic rats resulting in decreased HSC activation and fibrosis. PMID:27634375

  5. Relative sensitivity of five benthic invertebrate species to reference toxicants and resin-acid contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.W.; Martin, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    Five sediment-dwelling native New Zealand freshwater invertebrate species (amphipod, Chaetocorophium c.f. lucasi; clam, Sphaerium novaezelandiae; oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus; tanaid, Tanais standfordi; and the burrowing mayfly, Ichthybotus hudsoni) were assessed for their suitability for sediment toxicity testing by comparison of sensitivity to reference toxicants [phenol and pentachlorophenol (PCP)] and contaminated sediments. The 96-h EC50 values at 20 C showed a greater range in test sensitivity for phenol (30-fold range) from the most sensitive test, amphipod (8.1 mg/L), to the least sensitive one, clam (243 mg/L), compared with PCP (14-fold range), with amphipod the most sensitive test species (0.13 mg/L) and tanaid the least sensitive (1.8 mg/L). Clam reburial was a more sensitive end point than was lethality for phenol (by 20-fold) and PCP (by 2.4-fold). Four of the test species, excluding the tanaid, showed good 10-d survival in reference muds ({ge}87%) but lower survival in sand sediments ({ge}79%). Bleached kraft mill sediment containing high resin-acid concentrations (total 1,900 mg/kg dry weight) showed significant reductions in amphipod survival (15%), clam reburial (30%), and oligochaete survival (17%), and reproduction (49%). Amphipods, clams, and oligochaetes were the most promising species for sublethal test development.

  6. Toxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid towards earthworm and enzymatic activities in soil.

    PubMed

    He, Wenxiang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread persistent organic contaminant in the environment that has recently raised much of regulatory and public concern. Therefore, assessment of its ecological risk is a top priority research. Hence, this study investigated the toxicity of PFOA to beneficial microbial processes in the soil such as activities of dehydrogenase, urease and potential nitrification in addition to earthworm survival, weight loss and PFOA bioaccumulation in two contrasting soils. In general, PFOA caused inhibition of all the measured microbial processes in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibition was higher in Williamtown (WT) soil than Edinburgh (EB) soil. Thus, WT soil being sandy in nature with low clay content showed higher PFOA bioavailability and hence showed higher toxicity. There was no mortality in earthworms exposed up to 100 mg PFOA/kilogram soil in both the soils; however, there was a significant weight loss from 25 mg/kg onwards. This study clearly demonstrates that soil contamination of PFOA can lead to adverse effects on soil health.

  7. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Antagonists Have Variable Affect in 3-Nitropropionic Acid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W.

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-d-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment. PMID:18688711

  8. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists have variable affect in 3-nitropropionic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Payman; Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W

    2009-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-D-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment.

  9. Alpha-lipoic acid improves acute deltamethrin-induced toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Rania H; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M

    2014-09-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is a natural dithiol compound, with a free radical scavenger and biological antioxidant properties. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the protective effects of ALA on biochemical alteration and oxidative stress induced by acute deltamethrin intoxication in rats. Markers of liver and kidney injuries in serum of deltamethrin-intoxicated as well as ALA-pretreated rats were analyzed. Moreover, serum and (or) tissue lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde and antioxidant markers, reduced glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase activity, and total antioxidant capacity were evaluated. The results showed that all parameters were altered in the intoxicated group, indicating hepatorenal oxidative damage of deltamethrin. Pre-treatment with ALA reversed the changes in most of the studied parameters in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathological and biochemical findings were parallel. It can be concluded that ALA may be a promising therapeutic option for prevention and (or) treatment of deltamethin toxicity.

  10. Aristolochic Acid I Causes Testis Toxicity by Inhibiting Akt and ERK1/2 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seoul

    2016-01-19

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a natural bioactive substance found in Chinese herbs that induce toxicity during ovarian maturation of animals and humans. Apoptosis is induced by various types of damage and governs the progression of biological cell removal that controls the equilibrium between cell growth and death. However, the AA toxicity mechanism during testis maturation in mouse has not been elucidated and was thus the focus of the present study. This study used TM4 Sertoli cells and an ICR mouse model, both of which were injected with aristolochic acid I (AAI) for 4 weeks. Testis dimensions and weight were surveyed to define AAI cytotoxicity in the mice testis. The MTT assay was used to analyze the cytotoxicity of AAI in TM4 Sertoli cells. An apoptosis expression mediator was analyzed through Western blotting, while the measure of apoptosis-induced cell death of TM4 Sertoli cells and testis tissues was analyzed by the TUNEL assay. We found that AAI strongly inhibits survival in TM4 cells and that AAI significantly activated apoptosis-induced cell death in TM4 Sertoli cells and mice testis tissue. In addition, AAI suppressed the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), a factor related to anti-apoptosis. It markedly improved pro-apoptotic protein expression, including Bcl-2-associated X protein, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, we observed that AAI significantly reduced the size and weight of mouse testis. Moreover, germ cells and somatic cells in testis were markedly damaged by AAI. In addition, we found that AAI significantly inhibits ERK1/2 and Akt activation in TM4 Sertoli cells and testis tissue. The data obtained in this study indicate that AAI causes severe injury for the period of testis development by impeding apoptosis related to the Akt and ERK1/2 pathway.

  11. Toxicity of fluorotelomer carboxylic acids to the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris, and the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Myers, Anne L; Mabury, Scott A; Solomon, Keith R; Sibley, Paul K

    2011-11-01

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) have elicited significant global regulatory and scientific concern due to their persistence and global pervasiveness. A source of PFAs in the environment is through degradation of fluorotelomer carboxylic acids (FTCAs) but little is known about the toxicity of these degradation products. Previous work found that FTCAs were two to three orders of magnitude more toxic to some freshwater invertebrates than their PFA counterparts and exhibited comparable chain-length-toxicity relationships. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of the 6:2, 8:2, and 10:2 saturated (FTsCA) and unsaturated (FTuCA) fluorotelomer carboxylic acids to two species of freshwater algae, Chlorella vulgaris and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and the amphipod, Hyalella azteca. C. vulgaris was generally the most sensitive species, with EC₅₀s of 26.2, 31.8, 11.1, and 4.2 mg/L for the 6:2 FTsCA, 6:2 FTuCA, 8:2 FTuCA, and 10:2 FTsCA, respectively. H. azteca was most sensitive to the 8:2 FTsCA and 10:2 FTuCA, with LC₅₀s of 5.1 and 3.7 mg/L. The toxicity of the FTCAs generally increased with increasing carbon chain length, and with saturation for most of the species tested, with the exception of P. subcapitata, which did not exhibit any trend. These observations agree with chain-length-toxicity relationships previously reported for the PFCAs and support the greater toxicity of the FTCAs compared to PFCAs. However, the toxicity values are approximately 1000-fold above those detected in the environment indicating negligible risk to aquatic invertebrates.

  12. Genomic-wide analysis of BEAS-2B cells exposed to Trivalent Arsenicals and Dimethylthioarsinic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans by both oral and inhalation routes. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsinous acid (D...

  13. Caffeoylquinic acids in Centella asiatica protect against β-amyloid toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Nora E.; Morré, Jeff; Kelley, Jeremiah; Maier, Claudia S.; Stevens, Jan F.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Soumyanath, Amala

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is known to result in neurotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro. We previously demonstrated that treatment with the water extract of Centella asiatica (CAW) improves learning and memory deficits in Tg2576 mice, an animal model of Aβ accumulation. However the active compounds in CAW remain unknown. Here we used two in vitro models of Aβ toxicity to confirm this neuroprotective effect, and identify several active constituents of the CAW extract. CAW reduced Aβ-induced cell death and attenuated Aβ-induced changes in tau expression and phosphorylation in both the MC65 and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines. We confirmed and quantified the presence of several mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) in CAW using chromatographic separation coupled to mass spectrometry and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Multiple dicaffeoylquinic acids showed efficacy in protecting MC65 cells against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity. Isochlorogenic acid A and 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid were found to be the most abundant CQAs in CAW, and the most active in protecting MC65 cells from Aβ-induced cell death. Both compounds showed neuroprotective activity in MC65 and SH-SY5Y cells at concentrations comparable to their levels in CAW. Each compound not only mitigated Aβ-induced cell death, but was able to attenuate Aβ-induced alterations in tau expression and phosphorylation in both cell lines, as seen with CAW. These data suggest that CQAs are active neuroprotective components in CAW, and therefore are important markers for future studies on CAW standardization, bioavailability and dosing. PMID:24448790

  14. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2016-03-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to ameliorate soil acidity in rice-cropped soil. The secondary objective was to study the effects of calcium silicate amendment on soil acidity, exchangeable Al, exchangeable Ca, and Si content. The soil was treated with 0, 1, 2, and 3 Mg ha-1 of calcium silicate under submerged conditions and the soil treatments were sampled every 30 days throughout an incubation period of 120 days. Application of calcium silicate induced a positive effect on soil pH and exchangeable Al; soil pH increased from 2.9 (initial) to 3.5, while exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 (initial) to 0.82 cmolc kg-1. Furthermore, the exchangeable Ca and Si contents increased from 1.68 (initial) to 4.94 cmolc kg-1 and from 21.21 (initial) to 81.71 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it was noted that calcium silicate was effective at alleviating Al toxicity in acid sulfate, rice-cropped soil, yielding values below the critical level of 2 cmolc kg-1. In addition, application of calcium silicate showed an ameliorative effect as it increased soil pH and supplied substantial amounts of Ca and Si.

  15. Toxic synergism between quinolinic acid and organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes: Relevance for metabolic acidemias.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-11-12

    The brain of children affected by organic acidemias develop acute neurodegeneration linked to accumulation of endogenous toxic metabolites like glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids. Excitotoxic and oxidative events are involved in the toxic patterns elicited by these organic acids, although their single actions cannot explain the extent of brain damage observed in organic acidemias. The characterization of co-adjuvant factors involved in the magnification of early toxic processes evoked by these metabolites is essential to infer their actions in the human brain. Alterations in the kynurenine pathway (KP) - a metabolic route devoted to degrade tryptophan to form NAD(+) - produce increased levels of the excitotoxic metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN), which has been involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Herein we investigated the effects of subtoxic concentrations of GA, 3-OHGA, MMA and PA, either alone or in combination with QUIN, on early toxic endpoints in rat brain synaptosomes. To establish specific mechanisms, we pre-incubated synaptosomes with different protective agents, including the endogenous N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KA), the antioxidant S-allylcysteine (SAC) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). While the incubation of synaptosomes with toxic metabolites at subtoxic concentrations produced no effects, their co-incubation (QUIN+GA, +3-OHGA, +MMA or +PA) decreased the mitochondrial function and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation. For all cases, this effect was partially prevented by KA and l-NAME, and completely avoided by SAC. These findings suggest that early damaging events elicited by organic acids involved in metabolic acidemias can be magnified by toxic synergism with QUIN, and this process is mostly mediated by oxidative stress, and in a lesser extent by excitotoxicity and

  16. Domoic acid toxicity in Californian sea lions (Zalophus californianus): clinical signs, treatment and survival.

    PubMed

    Gulland, F M D; Haulena, M; Fauquier, D; Langlois, G; Lander, M E; Zabka, T; Duerr, R

    2002-04-13

    Eighty-one Californian sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with signs of domoic acid toxicity stranded along the coast of California in 1998 when there were blooms of the domoic acid-producing alga Pseudonitzschia australis off-shore. In 2000, a further 184 sea lions stranded with similar clinical signs, but the strandings occurred both during detectable algal blooms and after the blooms had subsided. The clinical signs in these 265 Californian sea lions included seizures, ataxia, head weaving, decreased responsiveness to stimuli and scratching behaviour. Affected animals had high haematocrits, and eosinophil counts, and high activities of serum creatine kinase. They were treated supportively by using fluid therapy, diazepam, lorazepam and phenobarbitone. Fifty-five of the 81 sea lions (68 per cent) affected in 1998 and 81 of the 184 (44 per cent) affected in 2000 died despite the treatment. Three of the 23 sea lions which survived in 1998 were tracked with satellite and radiotransmitters; they travelled as far south as San Miguel Island, California, and survived for at least three months. Eleven of the 129 animals which were released stranded within four months of being released.

  17. Chlorinated Phospholipids and Fatty Acids: (Patho)physiological Relevance, Potential Toxicity, and Analysis of Lipid Chlorohydrins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chlorinated phospholipids are formed by the reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), generated by the enzyme myeloperoxidase under inflammatory conditions, and the unsaturated fatty acyl residues or the head group. In the first case the generated chlorohydrins are both proinflammatory and cytotoxic, thus having a significant impact on the structures of biomembranes. The latter case leads to chloramines, the properties of which are by far less well understood. Since HOCl is also widely used as a disinfecting and antibacterial agent in medicinal, industrial, and domestic applications, it may represent an additional source of danger in the case of abuse or mishandling. This review discusses the reaction behavior of in vivo generated HOCl and biomolecules like DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates but will focus on phospholipids. Not only the beneficial and pathological (toxic) effects of chlorinated lipids but also the importance of these chlorinated species is discussed. Some selected cleavage products of (chlorinated) phospholipids and plasmalogens such as lysophospholipids, (chlorinated) free fatty acids and α-chloro fatty aldehydes, which are all well known to massively contribute to inflammatory diseases associated with oxidative stress, will be also discussed. Finally, common analytical methods to study these compounds will be reviewed with focus on mass spectrometric techniques. PMID:28090245

  18. Toxic effects of some conifer resin acids and tea tree oil on human epithelial and fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, T A; Johansson, A; Gref, R

    1996-02-22

    The present study was undertaken to assess and compare the in vitro cytotoxic effects of three resin acid analogues: dehydrobietic acid, podocarpic acid, O-methylpodocarpic acid; an essential oil from Australia (tea tree oil); and tapped oleoresin from Thailand, on human epithelial and fibroblast cells, using a quantitative neutral red spectrophotometric assay. All of the investigated compounds except for tea tree oil exhibited a cytotoxic activity which was proportional to their concentrations and time of exposure up to 24 h, i.e. higher concentrations and longer time of exposure caused increased cell death. Dehydroabietic acid and the oleoresin were the most toxic compounds followed by O-methylpodocarpic acid, whereas podocarpic acid and tea tree oil showed a lower level of toxicity. On the basis on these findings it is concluded that an isopropyl group on the aromatic C-ring is of great importance for the cytotoxicity of the tested abietane resin acids, thus indicating that the cytotoxic activity of oleoresins most probably is caused by synergistic or additive effects of resin acids. The results from this work support the view that antibacterial activity parallels cytotoxic activity which suggests a similar mode of action, most probably exerted by membrane-associated reactions.

  19. Levels of toxic arsenic species in native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities.

    PubMed

    García-Salgado, Sara; Quijano, M Ángeles

    2014-03-01

    Ten native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities (Mónica mine, NW Madrid, Spain), with high total arsenic concentration levels (up to 3500 μg g(-1)), have been studied to determine the fraction of arsenic present as toxic forms (inorganic and methylated species), which present a higher mobility and therefore the potential risk associated with their reintegration into the environment is high. Roots and aboveground parts were analyzed separately to assess possible transformations from translocation processes. Extractions were carried out with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction at a temperature of 90 °C and three extraction steps of 7.5 min each. Total extracted arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, showing extraction percentages from 9 to 39% (calculated as the ratio between total extracted arsenic (Asext) and total arsenic (AsT) concentrations in plants). Speciation studies, performed by high performance liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry, showed the main presence of arsenate (As(v)) (up to 350 μg g(-1)), followed by arsenite (As(iii)), in both plant parts. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were also found only in some plants. On the other hand, the use of 0.5 mol L(-1) acetic acid as an extractant led to higher extraction percentages (33-87%), but lower column recoveries, probably due to the extraction of arsenic compounds different to the toxic free ions studied, which may come from biotransformation mechanisms carried out by plants to reduce arsenic toxicity. However, As(v) concentrations increased up to 800 μg g(-1) in acid medium, indicating the probable release of As(v) from organoarsenic compounds and therefore a higher potential risk for the environment.

  20. Role of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in the regulation of organic acid exudation under aluminum toxicity and phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenqian; Kan, Qi; Zhang, Jiarong; Zeng, Bingjie; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity and phosphorus (P) deficiency are 2 major limiting factors for plant growth and crop production in acidic soils. Organic acids exuded from roots have been generally regarded as a major resistance mechanism to Al toxicity and P deficiency. The exudation of organic acids is mediated by membrane-localized OA transporters, such as ALMT (Al-activated malate transporter) and MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion). Beside on up-regulation expression of organic acids transporter gene, transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase are also involved in organic acid release process under Al toxicity and P deficiency. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge about this field of study on the role of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in organic acid exudation under Al toxicity and P deficiency conditions.

  1. Exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: substitution of glutamic acid 553 with aspartic acid drastically reduces toxicity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, C M; Collier, R J

    1987-01-01

    Glutamic acid 553 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA) has been identified by photoaffinity labeling as a residue within the NAD binding site (S.F. Carroll and R.J. Collier, J. Biol. Chem. 262:8707-8711, 1987). To explore the function of Glu-553 we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to replace this residue with Asp in cloned ETA and expressed the mutant gene in Escherichia coli K-12. ADP-ribosylation activity of Asp-553 ETA in cell extracts was about 1,800-fold lower and toxicity for mouse L-M929 fibroblasts was at least 10,000-fold lower than that of the wild-type toxin. Extracts containing Asp-553 ETA inhibited the cytotoxicity of authentic ETA on L-M929 fibroblasts, suggesting that the mutant toxin competes for ETA receptors. The results indicate that Glu-553 is crucial for ADP-ribosylation activity and, consequently, cytotoxicity of ETA. Substitution or deletion of this residue may be a route to new ETA vaccines. Images PMID:2889718

  2. Degradation and aquatic toxicity of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using simulated wetlands.

    PubMed

    Toor, Navdeep S; Franz, Eric D; Fedorak, Phillip M; MacKinnon, Michael D; Liber, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) produced during the extraction of bitumen at the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, are toxic to many aquatic organisms. Much of this toxicity is related to a group of dissolved organic acids known as naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are a natural component of bitumen and are released into process water during the separation of bitumen from the oil sand ore by a caustic hot water extraction process. Using laboratory microcosms as an analogue of a proposed constructed wetland reclamation strategy for OSPW, we evaluated the effectiveness of these microcosms in degrading NAs and reducing the aquatic toxicity of OSPW over a 52-week test period. Experimental manipulations included two sources of OSPW (one from Syncrude Canada Ltd. and one from Suncor Energy Inc.), two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs; 40 and 400 d), and increased nutrient availability (added nitrate and phosphate). Microcosms with a longer HRT (for both OSPWs) showed higher reductions in total NAs concentrations (64-74% NAs reduction, p<0.05) over the test period, while nutrient enrichment appeared to have little effect. A 96 h static acute rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) bioassay showed that the initial acute toxicity of Syncrude OSPW (LC50=67% v/v) was reduced (LC50>100% v/v) independent of HRT. However, EC20s from separate Microtox® bioassays were relatively unchanged when comparing the input and microcosm waters at both HRTs over the 52-week study period (p>0.05), indicating that some sub-lethal toxicity persisted under these experimental conditions. The present study demonstrated that given sufficiently long HRTs, simulated wetland microcosms containing OSPW significantly reduced total NAs concentrations and acute toxicity, but left behind a persistent component of the NAs mixture that appeared to be associated with residual chronic toxicity.

  3. Toxic effects of Al-based coagulants on Brassica chinensis and Raphanus sativus growing in acid and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaisong; Zhou, Qixing

    2005-04-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of aluminum (Al)-based coagulants are of concern because of their wide-ranging applications in wastewater treatment and water purification. As important Al-based coagulants, AlCl(3) and PAC (polyaluminum-chloride) were selected as examples to examine the toxic effects on representative vegetables including the cabbage Brassica chinensis and the radish Raphanus sativus over a range of exposure concentrations in neutral (pH 7.00) and acidic (pH 4.00) conditions, using seed germination and root elongation in the early-growth stage as indicators of toxicity. The results showed that root elongation of the two vegetables was a more sensitive indicator than was seed germination for evaluating the toxicity of Al. As a single influencing factor, H(+) had no significant direct effects on root elongation of Brassica chinensis and Raphanus sativus under the experimental conditions. The toxicity of Al played the main role in inhibiting root elongation and seed germination and was strongly related to changes in pH. There was a markedly positive relationship between the inhibitory rate of root elongation, seed germination, and the concentration of Al at pH 4.00 (p < 0.01). The toxic effect of AlCl(3) on Brassica chinensis was less with a neutral pH than at pH 4.00, but Raphanus sativus was more susceptible to AlCl(3) toxicity at a neutral pH than at pH 4.00. Both Raphanus sativus and Brassica chinensis had a more toxic response to a low concentration (<64 mg . L(-1)) of PAC in a neutral condition than in an acidic condition. Undoubtedly, the Al toxicity caused by Al-based coagulants at a neutral pH is relevant when treatment solids are used in agriculture.

  4. Perturbations in Polar Lipids, Starvation Survival and Reproduction Following Exposure to Unsaturated Fatty Acids or Environmental Toxicants in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Namrata; Gerard, Patrick D.; Baldwin, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Acclimating to toxicant stress is energy expensive. In laboratory toxicology tests dietary conditions are ideal, but not in natural environments where nutrient resources vary in quality and quantity. We compared the effects of additional lipid resources, docosahexaenoic acid (n-3; DHA) or linoleic acid (n-6; LA), or the effects of the toxicants, atrazine or triclosan on post-treatment starvation survival, reproduction, and lipid profiles. Chemical exposure prior to starvation had chemical-specific effects as DHA showed moderately beneficial effects on starvation survival and all of the other chemicals showed adverse effects on either survival or reproduction. Surprisingly, pre-exposure to triclosan inhibits adult maturation and in turn completely blocks reproduction during the starvation phase. The two HR96 activators tested, atrazine and LA adversely reduce post-reproduction survival 70% during starvation and in turn show poor fecundity. DHA and LA show distinctly different profiles as DHA primarily increases the percentage of large (>37 carbon) phosphatidylcholine (PC) species and LA primarily increases the percentage of smaller (<37 carbon) PC species. The toxicants atrazine and triclosan moderately perturb a large number of different phospholipids including several phosphatidylethanolamine species. Some of these polar lipid species may be biomarkers for diets rich in specific fatty acids or toxicant classes. Overall our data demonstrates that toxicants can perturb lipid utilization and storage in daphnids in a chemical specific manner, and different chemicals can produce distinct polar lipid profiles. In summary, biological effects caused by fatty acids and toxicants are associated with changes in the production and use of lipids. PMID:26606184

  5. Effects of dietary sulfur amino acids on lead toxicity in chicks

    SciTech Connect

    Latta, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Factorial experiments were conducted to examine the interactions of dietary methionine with cystine, choline and glycine in lead (Pb) intoxicated chicks. In Experiment 1, chicks were fed a basal diet deficient in methionine and total sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA) with 0 or 1000 ppm added Pb. Methionine or methionine plus cystine improved growth regardless of Pb level; cystine addition alone improved growth only when Pb was present. Dietary methionine appeared to counteract Pb toxicity more effectively than cystine. In Experiments 2 and 3 dietary variables were 0 or 1000 ppm Pb, adequate or inadequate methionine and marginal or excess (Experiment 2) or adequate or inadequate (Experiment 3) choline. In Experiment 2 growth depression by Pb was less with methionine-adequate compared to methionine-inadequate diets; there were no differences in growth with choline-marginal or choline-excess diets. In Experiment 3, the Pb-induced growth depression was exacerbated by adequate choline when methionine-inadequate diets were fed. It appears that Pb lowers the chick's choline requirement and that the methyl moiety of methionine does not participate directly in Pb detoxification. In Experiment 4 effects of adequate or deficient methionine, adequate or excess glycine and 0 or 1000 ppm Pb in choline-deficient chicks were studied. Methionine stimulated growth and the response was greater when excess glycine was present. Excess glycine stimulated growth only in the presence of adequate methionine suggesting glycine is limiting for growth in choline-deficient, methionine-adequate diets. These studies indicate that adequate methionine ameliorates Pb-induced growth depression in growing chicks but that the methionine effect is greater with choline-adequate than with choline-deficient diets. The amelioration of Pb toxicity by methionine may be partly related to increased excretion of Pb.

  6. Role of hepatic transporters in prevention of bile acid toxicity after partial hepatectomy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Csanaky, Iván L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    The enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids (BAs) is important in several physiological processes. Although there has been considerable research on liver regeneration after two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PHx), little is known about how the liver protects itself against BA toxicity during regeneration. In this study, various BAs in plasma and liver, the composition of micelle-forming bile constituents, as well as gene expression of the main hepatobiliary transporters were quantified in sham-operated and PHx mice 24 and 48 h after surgery. PHx did not influence the hepatic concentrations of taurine-conjugated BAs (T-BA) but increased the concentration of glycine-conjugated (G-BA) and unconjugated BAs. Total BA excretion (μg·min−1·g liver wt−1) increased 2.4-fold and was accompanied by a 55% increase in bile flow after PHx. The plasma concentrations of T-BAs (402-fold), G-BAs (17-fold), and unconjugated BAs (500-fold) increased. The mRNA and protein levels of the BA uptake transporter Ntcp were unchanged after PHx, whereas the canalicular Bsep protein increased twofold at 48 h. The basolateral efflux transporter Mrp3 was induced at the mRNA (2.6-fold) and protein (3.1-fold) levels after PHx, which may contribute to elevated plasma BA and bilirubin levels. Biliary phospholipid excretion was nearly doubled in PHx mice, most likely owing to increased mRNA expression of the phospholipid transporter, Mdr2. In conclusion, the remnant liver after PHx excretes 2.5-fold more BAs and three times more phospholipids per gram liver than the sham-operated mouse liver. Upregulation of phospholipid transport may be important in protecting the biliary tract from BA toxicity during PHx. PMID:19497955

  7. Protective effects of dietary glycine and glutamic acid toward the toxic effects of oxidized mustard oil in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Rahman, Saleem Ur

    2017-01-25

    The protective role of glycine and glutamic acid against the toxic effects of oxidized oil was studied for the first time. Mustard seed oil was thermally oxidized and characterized for quality characteristics and polyphenolic composition using reversed phase HPLC-DAD. Significant changes in the quality characteristics occurred with thermal oxidation. Fourteen polyphenolic compounds were identified and quantified in oils. Quercetin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-feruloylsophoroside, catechin, quercetin-3-rutinoside, quercetin-3,7-diglucoside, sinapic acid and vanillic acid hexoside were the major compounds in the fresh and oxidized oil. Oxidized, un-oxidized mustard oils, glycine and glutamic acid were given to rabbits alone or in combination. The biochemical responses were studied in terms of haematological and biochemical parameters and histopathology. It has been observed that biochemical and haematological parameters were adversely affected by the oxidized oil, while supplementation of both amino acids was beneficial in normalizing these parameters. Both amino acids alone have no significant effects, however, oxidized oil affected the liver by enhancing fat accumulation, causing hepatitis, reactive Kupffer cells and necrosis. The co-administration of oxidized oils with glycine or glutamic acid revealed significant recovery of the liver structure and function. In conclusion, glycine or glutamic acid is beneficial and protective against food toxicity and can be considered as an ameliorative food supplement.

  8. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  9. Potential citric acid exposure and toxicity to Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) associated with Eleutherodactylus frog control.

    PubMed

    Pitt, William C; Witmer, Gary W; Jojola, Susan M; Sin, Hans

    2014-04-01

    We examined potential exposure of Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) to citric acid, a minimum risk pesticide registered for control of invasive Eleutherodactylus frog populations. Hoary bats are nocturnal insectivores that roost solitarily in foliage, federally listed as endangered, and are endemic to Hawaii. Oral ingestion during grooming of contaminated fur appears to be the principal route by which these bats might be exposed to citric acid. We made assessments of oral toxicity, citric acid consumption, retention of material on fur, and grooming using big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) as a surrogate species. We evaluated both ground application and aerial application of 16 % solutions of citric acid during frog control operations. Absorbent bat effigies exposed to ground and aerial operational spray applications retained means of 1.54 and 0.02 g, respectively, of dry citric acid, although retention by the effigies was much higher than bat carcasses drenched in citric acid solutions. A high dose delivered orally (2,811 mg/kg) was toxic to the big brown bats and emesis occurred in 1 bat dosed as low as the 759 mg/kg level. No effect was observed with the lower doses examined (≤ 542 mg/kg). Bats sprayed with 5 ml of 16 % (w/w) citric acid solution showed no evidence of intoxication. In field situations, it is unlikely that bats would be sprayed directly or ingest much citric acid retained by fur. Based on our observations, we believe Hawaiian hoary bats to be at very low risk from harmful exposure to a toxic dose of citric acid during frog control operations.

  10. Fatty acid synthase cooperates with glyoxalase 1 to protect against sugar toxicity.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Damien; Rubin, Thomas; Poidevin, Mickael; Maroni, Brigitte; Le Rouzic, Arnaud; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Montagne, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Fatty acid (FA) metabolism is deregulated in several human diseases including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Therefore, FA-metabolic enzymes are potential targets for drug therapy, although the consequence of these treatments must be precisely evaluated at the organismal and cellular levels. In healthy organism, synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs)-composed of three FA units esterified to a glycerol backbone-is increased in response to dietary sugar. Saturation in the storage and synthesis capacity of TAGs is associated with type 2 diabetes progression. Sugar toxicity likely depends on advanced-glycation-end-products (AGEs) that form through covalent bounding between amine groups and carbonyl groups of sugar or their derivatives α-oxoaldehydes. Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive α-oxoaldehyde that is derived from glycolysis through a non-enzymatic reaction. Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) works to neutralize MG, reducing its deleterious effects. Here, we have used the power of Drosophila genetics to generate Fatty acid synthase (FASN) mutants, allowing us to investigate the consequence of this deficiency upon sugar-supplemented diets. We found that FASN mutants are lethal but can be rescued by an appropriate lipid diet. Rescued animals do not exhibit insulin resistance, are dramatically sensitive to dietary sugar and accumulate AGEs. We show that FASN and Glo1 cooperate at systemic and cell-autonomous levels to protect against sugar toxicity. We observed that the size of FASN mutant cells decreases as dietary sucrose increases. Genetic interactions at the cell-autonomous level, where glycolytic enzymes or Glo1 were manipulated in FASN mutant cells, revealed that this sugar-dependent size reduction is a direct consequence of MG-derived-AGE accumulation. In summary, our findings indicate that FASN is dispensable for cell growth if extracellular lipids are available. In contrast, FA-synthesis appears to be required to limit a cell-autonomous accumulation

  11. Fatty Acid Synthase Cooperates with Glyoxalase 1 to Protect against Sugar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Damien; Rubin, Thomas; Poidevin, Mickael; Maroni, Brigitte; Le Rouzic, Arnaud; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Montagne, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) metabolism is deregulated in several human diseases including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Therefore, FA-metabolic enzymes are potential targets for drug therapy, although the consequence of these treatments must be precisely evaluated at the organismal and cellular levels. In healthy organism, synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs)—composed of three FA units esterified to a glycerol backbone—is increased in response to dietary sugar. Saturation in the storage and synthesis capacity of TAGs is associated with type 2 diabetes progression. Sugar toxicity likely depends on advanced-glycation-end-products (AGEs) that form through covalent bounding between amine groups and carbonyl groups of sugar or their derivatives α-oxoaldehydes. Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive α-oxoaldehyde that is derived from glycolysis through a non-enzymatic reaction. Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) works to neutralize MG, reducing its deleterious effects. Here, we have used the power of Drosophila genetics to generate Fatty acid synthase (FASN) mutants, allowing us to investigate the consequence of this deficiency upon sugar-supplemented diets. We found that FASN mutants are lethal but can be rescued by an appropriate lipid diet. Rescued animals do not exhibit insulin resistance, are dramatically sensitive to dietary sugar and accumulate AGEs. We show that FASN and Glo1 cooperate at systemic and cell-autonomous levels to protect against sugar toxicity. We observed that the size of FASN mutant cells decreases as dietary sucrose increases. Genetic interactions at the cell-autonomous level, where glycolytic enzymes or Glo1 were manipulated in FASN mutant cells, revealed that this sugar-dependent size reduction is a direct consequence of MG-derived-AGE accumulation. In summary, our findings indicate that FASN is dispensable for cell growth if extracellular lipids are available. In contrast, FA-synthesis appears to be required to limit a cell

  12. The effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on copper toxicity in E. fetida in an acute exposure system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Yu, Jiaoda; Li, Ying; Liu, Aiqin

    2017-02-18

    In the present study, the effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids (OAs) on the toxicity of copper (Cu) to the earthworm Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were investigated in a simulated soil solution. We exposed E. fetida to soil solution containing Cu and a variety of OAs (acetic acid, oxalic acid, citric acid, and EDTA). We found that the addition of OAs reduced the toxicity of Cu to E. fetida, where the reduction was strongest in EDTA and weakest in acetic acid. These compounds decreased the mortality rate of E. fetida that were exposed to Cu and reduced levels of antioxidant enzymes and malondialdehyde to unexposed control levels. E. fetida were exposed to Cu with OAs had reduced Cu(2+), which were likely caused by Cu forming complexes with the OAs, reducing the availability of Cu. The presence of OAs also reduced Cu-induced damage on earthworm cellular ultrastructures and changed the subcellular distribution of Cu. These results demonstrated that OAs could reduce the toxicity, as well as the bioavailability, of heavy metals in soil solutions where both OAs and heavy metals often coexist.

  13. Recovery of Pyruvic Acid using Tri-n-butylamine Dissolved in Non-Toxic Diluent (Rice Bran Oil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Dharm; Keshav, Amit

    2016-04-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the effectiveness of the vegetable oil based biocompatible solvent for the separation of pyruvic acid from fermentation broth, by using rice bran oil as natural, non-toxic diluent. Reactive extraction of pyruvic acid (0.1-0.5 k mol/m3) from aqueous solutions has been studied using tri-n-butylamine (TBA; 10-70 %) as an extractant dissolved in non toxic rice bran oil at T = 30 ± 1 °C. Results were presented in terms of distribution coefficient (Kd), extraction efficiency (E %), loading ratio (Z), and complexation constant (\\varphi_{α β }). Extraction equilibrium was interpreted using mass action modeling approach. Based on the extent of loading (Z < 0.5) only (1:1), pyruvic acid: TBA complex was proposed. Equilibrium complexation constant was evaluated to 1.22 m3/k mol. Results obtained are useful in understanding the extraction mechanism.

  14. Cytoprotection of pyruvic acid and reduced beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide against hydrogen peroxide toxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Soliman, Karam F A

    2003-05-01

    Elevated production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the central nervous system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, ischemic reperfusion, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. Pyruvic acid has a critical role in energy metabolism and a capability to nonenzymatically decarboxylate H2O2 into H2O. This study examined the effects of glycolytic regulation of pyruvic acid on H2O2 toxicity in murine neuroblastoma cells. Glycolytic energy substrates including D-(+)-glucose, D-(-) fructose and the adenosine transport blocker dipyridamole, were not effective in providing protection against H2O2 toxicity, negating energy as a factor. On the other hand, pyruvic acid completely prevented H2O2 toxicity, restoring the loss of ATP and cell viability. H2O2 toxicity was also attenuated by D-fructose 1,6 diphosphate (FBP), phospho (enol) pyruvate (PEP), niacinamide, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD+), and reduced form (beta-NADH). Both FBP and PEP exerted positive kinetic effects on pyruvate kinase (PK) activity. Interestingly, only pyruvic acid and beta-NADH exhibited powerful stoichiometric H2O2 antioxidant properties. Further, beta-NADH may exert positive effects on PK activity. Subsequent pyruvic acid accumulation can lead to the recycling of beta-NAD+ through lactate dehydrogenase and beta-NADH through glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It was concluded from these studies that intracellular pyruvic acid and beta-NADH appear to act in concert through glycolysis, to enhance H2O2 intracellular antioxidant capacity in neuroblastoma cells. Future research will be required to examine whether similar effects are observed in primary neuronal culture or intact tissue.

  15. Diclofenac toxicity in Gyps vulture is associated with decreased uric acid excretion and not renal portal vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Swan, G E

    2009-04-01

    Diclofenac (DF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is largely regarded as one of the most devastating environmental toxicant in recent times, after accidental exposure via their food-chain lead to massive mortalities in three vulture species on the Asian subcontinent. Although the use of diclofenac was recently banned on the Indian subcontinent, following the favourable safety profile of meloxicam, its mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. In an attempt to establish this mechanism, we test three hypotheses using models established from either the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus) or the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus). We demonstrate that both DF and meloxicam are toxic to renal tubular epithelial (RTE) cells following 12 h of exposure, due to an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could be temporarily ameliorated by pre-incubation with uric acid (UA). When cultures were incubated with either drug for only 2 h, meloxicam showed no toxicity in contrast to diclofenac. In both cases no increase in ROS production was evident. In addition, diclofenac decreased the transport of uric acid, by interfering with the p-amino-hippuric acid (PAH) channel. We conclude that vulture susceptibility to diclofenac results from a combination of an increased ROS, interference with UA transport and the duration of exposure.

  16. Toxicity and SOS-response to ELF magnetic fields and nalidixic acid in E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Igor

    2011-05-18

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) have previously been shown to affect conformation of chromatin and cell proliferation. Possible genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of ELF-MF have also been discussed and tested. In this study, we analysed the effect of ELF-MF on chromatin conformation in E. coli GE499 cells by the anomalous viscosity time-dependence (AVTD) technique. Possible genotoxic effects of the specific combination of static and ELF-MF, which has been proven to affect chromatin conformation, were investigated by a clonogenic assay, by assessing cell-growth kinetics, and by analysis of the SOS-response by means of inducible recA-lacZ fusion-gene products and the β-galactosidase assay. The genotoxic agent nalidixic acid (NAL) was used as a positive control and in combination with ELF-MF. Nalidixic acid at 3-30μg/ml decreased the AVTD peaks and induced a cytotoxic effect. In contrast to NAL, ELF-MF fields increased AVTD, stimulated cell growth, and increased cloning efficiency. These effects depended on the frequency within the range of 7-11Hz. While NAL induced an SOS-response, exposure to ELF-MF did not induce the recA-lacZ fusion-gene product. Exposure to ELF-MF did not modify the genotoxic effects of NAL either. All together, the data show that ELF-MF, under specific conditions of exposure, acted as a non-toxic but cell-growth stimulating agent.

  17. The interaction of salicylic acid and Ca(2+) alleviates aluminum toxicity in soybean (Glycine max L.).

    PubMed

    Lan, Tu; You, Jiangfeng; Kong, Lingnan; Yu, Miao; Liu, Minghui; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Both calcium ion (Ca(2+)) and salicylic acid (SA) influence various stress responses in plants. In acidic soils, aluminum (Al) toxicity adversely affects crop yield. In this study, we determined the influences of Ca(2+) and SA on root elongation, Al accumulation, and citrate secretion in soybean plant. We also investigated the activity of antioxidative enzymes in Al-exposed soybean roots. Root elongation was severally inhibited when the roots were exposed to 30 μM Al. The Al-induced inhibition of root elongation was ameliorated by Ca(2+) and SA but aggravated by Ca(2+) channel inhibitor (VP), CaM antagonists (TFP), Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA), and SA biosynthesis inhibitor (PAC). Furthermore, 1.0 mM CaCl2 and 10 μM SA reduced the accumulation of Al in roots, but their inhibitors stimulated the accumulation of Al in roots. Citrate secretion from these roots increased with the addition of either 1.0 mM CaCl2 or 10 μM SA but did not increase significantly when treated with higher Ca(2+) concentration. Enzymatic analysis showed that Ca(2+) and SA stimulated the activities of superoxidase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in Al-treated roots. In addition, SA restored the inhibition of Ca(2+) inhibitors on root elongation and Al content. Thus, both Ca(2+) and SA contribute to Al tolerance in soybean. Furthermore, Ca(2+) supplements rapidly increased Al-induced accumulation of free-SA or conjugated SA (SAG), while Ca(2+) inhibitors delayed the accumulation of SA for more than 8 h. Within 4 h of treatment, SA increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in Al-treated roots, and upregulated the expression of four genes that possibly encode calmodulin-like (CML) proteins. These findings indicate that SA is involved in Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathways in Al tolerance.

  18. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  19. Predicting the acute toxicity of copper in freshwater sediments: Evaluation of the role of acid-volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Mattson, V.R.; Leonard, E.N.; West, C.W. ); Bennett, J.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) has been proposed as an important partitioning phase determining the bioavailability of cationic metals in sediments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the role of AVS in determining copper toxicity in sediments from two sites heavily contaminated with copper: Steilacoom Lake, Washington, and the Keweenaw Watershed, Michigan. Sediments from the two sites were used in 10-d toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, and results of the toxicity tests were compared to bioavailability predictions based on copper and AVS concentrations in the test sediments, as well as copper concentrations in the sediment interstitial (pore) water. Normalization of sediment copper concentrations to AVS accurately predicted sediments that were nontoxic when molar copper-to-AVS ratios were less than one; however, toxicity also was frequently not observed in samples with molar copper-to-AVS ratios significantly greater than one. In contrast, measurement of pore-water copper concentrations and subsequent comparison of these concentrations to water-only copper toxicity data for Hyalella azteca resulted in accurate predictions of the presence and extent of copper toxicity in the test sediments. These results indicate that AVS alone is not an appropriate partitioning phase for predicting copper bioavailability in freshwater sediments.

  20. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO. PMID:26611622

  1. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-27

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  2. Pathology of domoic acid toxicity in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Silvagni, P A; Lowenstine, L J; Spraker, T; Lipscomb, T P; Gulland, F M D

    2005-03-01

    Over 100 free-ranging adult California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and one Northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), predominantly adult females, were intoxicated by domoic acid (DA) during three harmful algal blooms between 1998 and 2000 in central and northern California coastal waters. The vector prey item was Northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax) and the primary DA-producing algal diatom was Psuedonitzschia australis. Postmortem examination revealed gross and histologic findings that were distinctive and aided in diagnosis. A total of 109 sea lions were examined, dying between 1 day and 10 months after admission to a marine mammal rehabilitation center. Persistent seizures with obtundation were the main clinical findings. Frequent gross findings in animals dying acutely consisted of piriform lobe malacia, myocardial pallor, bronchopneumonia, and complications related to pregnancy. Gross findings in animals dying months after intoxication included bilateral hippocampal atrophy. Histologic observations implicated limbic system seizure injury consistent with excitotoxin exposure. Peracutely, there was microvesicular hydropic degeneration within the neuropil of the hippocampus, amygdala, pyriform lobe, and other limbic structures. Acutely, there was ischemic neuronal necrosis, particularly apparent in the granular cells of the dentate gyrus and the pyramidal cells within the hippocampus cornu ammonis (CA) sectors CA4, CA3, and CA1. Dentate granular cell necrosis has not been reported in human or experimental animal DA toxicity and may be unique to sea lions. Chronically, there was gliosis, mild nonsuppurative inflammation, and loss of laminar organization in affected areas.

  3. Exogenous salicylic acid alleviates the toxicity of chlorpyrifos in wheat plants (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; Zhang, Qingming

    2017-03-01

    The role of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) in protecting wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) from contamination by the insecticide chlorpyrifos was investigated in this study. The wheat plants were grown in soils with different concentrations (5, 10, 20, and 40mgkg(-1)) of chlorpyrifos. When the third leaf emerged, the wheat leaves were sprayed with 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16mgL(-1) of SA once a day for 6 days. The results showed that wheat exposed to higher concentrations of chlorpyrifos (≥20mgkg(-1)) caused declines in growth and chlorophyll content and altered the activities of a series of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Interestingly, treatments with different concentrations of SA mitigated the stress generated by chlorpyrifos and improved the measured parameters to varying degrees. Furthermore, a reverse transcription and quantitative PCR experiment revealed that the activities of SOD and CAT can be regulated by their target gene in wheat when treated with SA. We also found that SA is able to block the accumulation of chlorpyrifos in wheat. However, the effect of SA was related to its concentration. In this study, the application of 2mgL(-1) of SA had the greatest ameliorating effect on chlorpyrifos toxicity in wheat plants.

  4. Conjugation, characterization and toxicity of lipophosphoglycan-polyacrylic acid conjugate for vaccination against leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Topuzogullari, Murat; Cakir Koc, Rabia; Dincer Isoglu, Sevil; Bagirova, Melahat; Akdeste, Zeynep; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga N; Yesilkir Baydar, Serap; Canim Ates, Sezen; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2013-06-03

    Research on the conjugates of synthetic polyelectrolytes with antigenic molecules, such as proteins, peptides, or carbohydrates, is an attractive area due to their highly immunogenic character in comparison to classical adjuvants. For example, polyacrylic acid (PAA) is a weak polyelectrolyte and has been used in several biomedical applications such as immunological studies, drug delivery, and enzyme immobilization. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies that document immune-stimulant properties of PAA in Leishmania infection. Therefore, we aimed to develop a potential vaccine candidate against leishmaniasis by covalently conjugating PAA with an immunologically vital molecule of lipophosphoglycan (LPG) found in Leishmania parasites. In the study, LPG and PAA were conjugated by a multi-step procedure, and final products were analyzed with GPC and MALDI-TOF MS techniques. In cytotoxicity experiments, LPG-PAA conjugates did not indicate toxic effects on L929 and J774 murine macrophage cells. We assume that LPG-PAA conjugate can be a potential vaccine candidate, and will be immunologically characterized in further studies to prove its potential.

  5. Conjugation, characterization and toxicity of lipophosphoglycan-polyacrylic acid conjugate for vaccination against leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Research on the conjugates of synthetic polyelectrolytes with antigenic molecules, such as proteins, peptides, or carbohydrates, is an attractive area due to their highly immunogenic character in comparison to classical adjuvants. For example, polyacrylic acid (PAA) is a weak polyelectrolyte and has been used in several biomedical applications such as immunological studies, drug delivery, and enzyme immobilization. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies that document immune-stimulant properties of PAA in Leishmania infection. Therefore, we aimed to develop a potential vaccine candidate against leishmaniasis by covalently conjugating PAA with an immunologically vital molecule of lipophosphoglycan (LPG) found in Leishmania parasites. In the study, LPG and PAA were conjugated by a multi-step procedure, and final products were analyzed with GPC and MALDI-TOF MS techniques. In cytotoxicity experiments, LPG-PAA conjugates did not indicate toxic effects on L929 and J774 murine macrophage cells. We assume that LPG-PAA conjugate can be a potential vaccine candidate, and will be immunologically characterized in further studies to prove its potential. PMID:23731716

  6. Acute oral toxicity and bacterial translocation studies on potentially probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Shu, Q; Rutherfurd, K J; Prasad, J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2000-01-01

    Three potentially probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20(TM)), Lb. acidophilus HN017 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (DR10()), have recently been identified and characterized. The present study was designed to evaluate the acute oral toxicity of these strains to mice, and also to investigate bacterial translocation and gut mucosal pathology in BALB/c mice fed HN019, HN001 or HN017 for 8 consecutive days at a high dose of 10(11)cfu/mouse/day. Results showed that these probiotic strains had no adverse effect on general health status, feed intake, body weight gain and intestinal mucosal morphology (villus height, crypt depth, epithelial cell height and mucosal thickness). No viable bacteria were recovered from blood and tissue samples (mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and spleen) of mice, and no treatment-associated illness or death was observed. According to these results, the oral LD(50) of HN019, HN001 and HN017 is more than 50g/kg/day for mice, and their acceptable daily intake (ADI) value is 35g dry bacteria per day for a 70-kg person. This suggests that the probiotic strains HN019, HN001 and HN017 are non-pathogenic and likely to be safe for human consumption.

  7. Prediction of in vivo developmental toxicity of all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro toxicity data and in silico physiologically based kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Louisse, Jochem; Bosgra, Sieto; Blaauboer, Bas J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Verwei, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    The use of laboratory animals for toxicity testing in chemical safety assessment meets increasing ethical, economic and legislative constraints. The development, validation and application of reliable alternatives for in vivo toxicity testing are therefore urgently needed. In order to use toxicity data obtained from in vitro assays for risk assessment, in vitro concentration-response data need to be translated into in vivo dose-response data that are needed to obtain points of departure for risk assessment, like a benchmark dose (BMD). In the present study, we translated in vitro concentration-response data of the retinoid all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), obtained in the differentiation assay of the embryonic stem cell test, into in vivo dose-response data using a physiologically based kinetic model for rat and human that is mainly based on kinetic model parameter values derived using in vitro techniques. The predicted in vivo dose-response data were used for BMD modeling, and the obtained BMDL10 values [lower limit of the 95 % confidence interval on the BMD at which a benchmark response equivalent to a 10 % effect size (BMR10) is reached (BMD10)] for rat were compared with BMDL10 values derived from in vivo developmental toxicity data in rats reported in the literature. The results show that the BMDL10 values from predicted dose-response data differ about sixfold from the BMDL10 values obtained from in vivo data, pointing at the feasibility of using a combined in vitro-in silico approach for defining a point of departure for toxicological risk assessment.

  8. Can Adverse Effects of Acidity and Aluminum Toxicity Be Alleviated by Appropriate Rootstock Selection in Cucumber?

    PubMed Central

    Rouphael, Youssef; Rea, Elvira; Cardarelli, Mariateresa; Bitterlich, Michael; Schwarz, Dietmar; Colla, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Low-pH and aluminum (Al) stresses are the major constraints that limit crop yield in acidic soils. Grafting vegetable elite cultivars onto appropriate rootstocks may represent an effective tool to improve crop tolerance to acidity and Al toxicity. Two greenhouse hydroponic experiments were performed to evaluate growth, yield, biomass production, chlorophyll index, electrolyte leakage, mineral composition, and assimilate partitioning in plant tissues of cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L. “Ekron”) either non-grafted or grafted onto “P360” (Cucurbita maxima Duchesne × Cucurbita moschata Duchesne; E/C) or figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia Bouché; E/F). Cucumber plants were cultured in pots and supplied with nutrient solutions having different pH and Al concentrations: pH 6, pH 3.5, pH 3.5 + 1.5 mM Al, and pH 3.5 + 3 mM Al (Experiment 1, 14 days) and pH 6, pH 3.5, and pH 3.5 + 0.75 mM Al (Experiment 2, 67 days). Significant depression in shoot and root biomass was observed in response to acidity and Al concentrations, with Al-stress being more phytotoxic than low pH treatment. Significant decrease in yield, shoot, and root biomass, leaf area, SPAD index, N, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, and B concentration in aerial parts (leaves and stems) in response to low pH with more detrimental effects at pH 3.5 + Al. Grafted E/C plants grown under low pH and Al had higher yield, shoot, and root biomass compared to E/F and non-grafted plants. This better crop performance of E/C plants in response to Al stress was related to (i) a reduced translocation of Al from roots to the shoot, (ii) a better shoot and root nutritional status in K, Ca, Mg, Mn, and Zn concentration, (iii) a higher chlorophyll synthesis, as well as (iv) the ability to maintain cell membrane stability and integrity (lower electrolyte leakage). Data provide insight into the role of grafting on Al stress tolerance in cucumber. PMID:27621740

  9. Effects of lipids and oleic acid on biomass development in anaerobic fixed-bed reactors. Part II: Oleic acid toxicity and biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Alves, M M; Vieira, J A; Pereira, R M; Pereira, M A; Mota, M

    2001-01-01

    Oleic acid toxicity and biodegradability were followed during long-term operation of two similar anaerobic fixed-bed units. When treating an oleate based effluent, the sludge from the bioreactor that was acclimated with lipids during the first operation period, showed a higher tolerance to oleic acid toxicity (IC50 = 137 mg/l) compared with the sludge fed with a non-fat substrate (IC50 = 80 mg/l). This sludge showed also the highest biodegradation capacity of oleic acid, achieving maximum methane production rates between 33 and 46 mlCH4(STP)/gVS.day and maximum percentages of methanization between 85 and 98% for the range of concentrations between 500 and 900 mg oleate/l. When oleate was the sole carbon source fed to both digesters, the biomass became encapsulated with organic matter, possibly oleate or an intermediate of its degradation, e.g. stearate that was degraded at a maximum rate of 99 mlCH4(STP)/gVS.day. This suggests the possibility of using adsorption-degradation cycles for the treatment of LCFA based effluents. Both tolerance to toxicity and biodegradability of oleic acid were improved by acclimatization with lipids or oleate below a threshold concentration.

  10. MEASUREMENT AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work was to develop an analytical method to quantify these five iodo-acids (iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3-methylbutenedioic acid) in drinking water, measure their oc...

  11. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity.

  12. Predicting the acute toxicity of copper in freshwater sediments: Evaluation of the role of acid-volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Mattson, V.R.; Leonard, E.N.; West, C.W.; Bennett, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) has been proposed as an important partitioning phase determining the bioavailability of cationic metals in sediments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the role of AVS in determining copper toxicity in sediments from two sites heavily contaminated with copper: Steilacoom Lake, Washington, and the Keweenaw Watershed, Michigan. Sediments from the two sites were used in 10-d toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and results of the toxicity tests were compared to bioavailability predictions based on copper and AVS concentrations in the test sediments, as well as copper concentrations in the sediment interstitial (pore) water. These results indicate that AVS alone is not an appropriate partitioning phase for prediting copper bioavailability in freshwater sediments.

  13. Boron-containing acids: preliminary evaluation of acute toxicity and access to the brain determined by Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; Farfán-García, Eunice D; López-Cabrera, Yessica; Querejeta, Enrique; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G

    2014-01-01

    Boron-containing compounds (BCCs), particularly boron containing acids (BCAs), have become attractive moieties or molecules in drug development. It has been suggested that when functional groups with boron atoms are added to well-known drugs, the latter are conferred with greater potency and efficacy in relation to their target receptors. However, the use of BCAs in drug development is limited due to the lack of a toxicological profile. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of boric and boronic acids. Thus, a determination was made of the lethal dose (LD50) of test compounds in male CD1 mice, as well as the effective dose required to negatively affect spontaneous motor activity and to produce notable behavioral abnormalities. After treatment of animals at different doses, macroscopic observations were made from a necropsy, and Raman scattering spectroscopic studies were carried out on brain tissue samples. In general, the results show that most of the tested BCAs have very low toxicity, evidenced by the high doses required to induce notable toxic effects (greater than 100 mg/kg of body weight for all compounds, except for 3-thyenilboronic acid). Such toxic effects, presumably mediated by action on the CNS, include eye damage, gastrointestinal effects (e.g., gastric-gut dilatation and fecal retention), sedation, hypnosis and/or trembling. This preliminary toxicological profile suggests that BCAs can be considered potential therapeutic agents or moieties to be added to other compounds in the development of new drugs. Future studies are required to explore possible chronic toxicity of BCCs.

  14. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF NORMAL HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS AND DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated, in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS2B) cells, the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsi...

  15. Enterococcus faecalis inhibits superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1-induced interleukin-8 from human vaginal epithelial cells through tetramic acids.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Ford, Bradley; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa can be colonized by many bacteria including commensal organisms and potential pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Some strains of S. aureus produce the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, which can penetrate the vaginal epithelium to cause toxic shock syndrome. We have observed that a female was mono-colonized with Enterococcus faecalis vaginally as tested in aerobic culture, even upon repeated culture for six months, suggesting this organism was negatively influencing colonization by other bacteria. In recent studies, we demonstrated an "outside-in" mechanism of cytokine signaling and consequent inflammation that facilitates the ability of potential pathogens to initiate infection from mucosal surfaces. Thus, we hypothesized that this strain of E. faecalis may make anti-inflammatory factors which block disease progression of more pathogenic organisms. E. faecalis MN1 inhibited interleukin-8 production from human vaginal epithelial cells in response to the vaginal pathogens Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, as well as to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. We further demonstrated that this organism secretes two tetramic acid compounds which appear responsible for inhibition of interleukin-8 production, as well as inhibition of T cell proliferation due to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Microbicides that include anti-inflammatory molecules, such as these tetramic acid compounds naturally produced by E. faecalis MN1, may be useful in prevention of diseases that develop from vaginal infections.

  16. Enterococcus faecalis Inhibits Superantigen Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-Induced Interleukin-8 from Human Vaginal Epithelial Cells through Tetramic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Merriman, Joseph A.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Ford, Bradley; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa can be colonized by many bacteria including commensal organisms and potential pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Some strains of S. aureus produce the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, which can penetrate the vaginal epithelium to cause toxic shock syndrome. We have observed that a female was mono-colonized with Enterococcus faecalis vaginally as tested in aerobic culture, even upon repeated culture for six months, suggesting this organism was negatively influencing colonization by other bacteria. In recent studies, we demonstrated an “outside-in” mechanism of cytokine signaling and consequent inflammation that facilitates the ability of potential pathogens to initiate infection from mucosal surfaces. Thus, we hypothesized that this strain of E. faecalis may make anti-inflammatory factors which block disease progression of more pathogenic organisms. E. faecalis MN1 inhibited interleukin-8 production from human vaginal epithelial cells in response to the vaginal pathogens Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, as well as to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. We further demonstrated that this organism secretes two tetramic acid compounds which appear responsible for inhibition of interleukin-8 production, as well as inhibition of T cell proliferation due to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Microbicides that include anti-inflammatory molecules, such as these tetramic acid compounds naturally produced by E. faecalis MN1, may be useful in prevention of diseases that develop from vaginal infections. PMID:23613823

  17. Cystamine and ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid treatment fail to prevent malonate-induced striatal toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sivananthan, Saskia N; Leavitt, Blair R

    2011-12-01

    Cystamine has demonstrated neuroprotective activity in a variety of studies, and is currently being evaluated in a human clinical trial in Huntington's disease (HD). Cystamine treatment of various genetic models of HD demonstrated protection against neurodegeneration and/or improvement in behavior. Given the need for a rapid screening tool for HD therapeutics, we assessed the potential therapeutic benefits of cystamine in a short-term acute toxicity murine model of striatal cell death. Cystamine did not provide neuroprotection against bilateral intrastriatal malonate injections in mice as measured by lesion size, loss of striatal volume, or decreased striatal neuronal counts. Similar results were obtained for treatment with another potential therapeutic agent that was protective in genetic mouse models of HD, the essential fatty acid ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid. Our findings suggest that this toxic model is not reflective or predictive of findings in genetic mouse models, and may not be useful as a preclinical screen for HD therapeutics.

  18. The efficiency of combined CaO/electrochemical treatment in removal of acid mine drainage induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Vujčić, Valerija; Cvetković, Želimira; Cvjetko, Petra; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2014-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a by-product of the mining industry that has a detrimental effect on aquatic plant and animal life due to high load of heavy metals and sulfates. In the present study, the toxic and genotoxic potential of AMD prior to and following combination of neutralization/electrocoagulation processes was evaluated using several bioassays and selected parameters. Regardless of pH correction of AMD prior to Daphnia bioassay, high acute toxicity was observed in Daphnia magna. The mine leachate also induced strong phyto-, cyto- and genotoxicity to Allium cepa roots. Short term exposure to AMD inhibited duckweed growth and chlorophyll a content and simultaneously promoted lipid peroxidation and DNA damage despite duckweed capability to upregulate antioxidative defense mechanisms. The results show that observed (geno)toxicity could be related to oxidative stress most probably induced by toxic metal action. However, influence of low pH as a contributing factor in the phytotoxicity of AMD cannot be excluded. The application of combined treatment eliminated genotoxicity and was highly efficient in reducing toxicity of AMD. Thus, the method seems to be suitable for treatment of AMD waters enabling their safe discharge to an aquatic environment.

  19. Toxicity of 50-nm polystyrene particles co-administered to mice with acetaminophen, 5-aminosalicylic acid or tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Isoda, K; Nozawa, T; Tezuka, M; Ishida, I

    2014-09-01

    We investigated whether nano-sized polystyrene particles affect drug-induced toxicity. The particles, which are widely used industrially, had diameters of 50 (NPP50), 200 (NPP200) or 1000 (NPP1000) nm. The toxic chemicals tested were acetaminophen (APAP), 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), tetracycline (TC), and sodium valproate (VPA). All treatments in the absence of the nanoparticles were non-lethal and did not result in severe toxicity. However, when mice were injected with APAP, 5-ASA or TC together with polystyrene particles, synergistic, enhanced toxicity was observed in mice injected with NPP50. These synergic effects were not observed in mice co-injected with NPP200 or NPP1000. On the other hand, co-administration of VPA and NPP50, NPP200 or NPP1000 did not elevate toxicity. The results show that NPP50 differs in hepatotoxicity depending on the drug co-administered. These findings suggest that further evaluation of the interactions between polystyrene nanoparticles and drugs is a critical prerequisite to the pharmaceutical application of nanotechnology.

  20. Salicylic acid alleviates the cadmium toxicity in Chinese cabbages (Brassica chinensis).

    PubMed

    Obono Mba, Felicite; Xiong, Zhi-Ting; Qiu, Hai-Jie

    2007-09-15

    To test the effects of Salicylic Acid (SA) on physiological changes of plants under cadmium stress one cultivar of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis) cadmium resistance, Changkenxiaobaicai (tolerance) were studied with pots cultures. Like other organisms Plants have adaptatives mechanisms whereby they are able to respond to both nutrient deficiency and toxicities. Plants materials were originated from the vegetable market in Wuhan, Hubei China. The seeds were tested on the pot cultures in the green house. The results of our experiments were quite different between the treatments. The combined treatment Cd 5 ppm + SA 500 mmol L(-1) during our experiment showed that the activity of peroxidase and superoxidase dismutase in the cabbages were induced, the total chlorophyll content increased significally by 25.38%, chl a/b about 43.01% and total biomass about 41.67%, both in comparison with the control. The soluble sugar content increased significantly to about 25.47% in comparison with the control. The electrolyte leakages were less affected. Under SA treatment only, the chlorophyll content, chl a/b content increased to about 18.85%, in comparison with the control. Plant biomass increased about 18.90% with the addition of SA in the culture. SA treatment can increase or decrease the Chinese cabbages metabolism. Plants were exposed to 5 ppm CdCl2 for 5 days under natural light. Then they were cultivated with Hoagland nutrient solution, which served as control, nutrient solution supplemented with 5 ppm CdCl2. Five days after Cd treatment, seedlings were harvested. The experiment was performed in triplicate.

  1. Evaluation of the toxicity data for peracetic acid in deriving occupational exposure limits: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Pechacek, Nathan; Osorio, Magdalena; Caudill, Jeff; Peterson, Bridget

    2015-02-17

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a peroxide-based chemistry that is highly reactive and can produce strong local effects upon direct contact with the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Given its increasing prominence in industry, attention has focused on health hazards and associated risks for PAA in the workplace. Occupational exposure limits (OEL) are one means to mitigate risks associated with chemical hazards in the workplace. A mini-review of the toxicity data for PAA was conducted in order to determine if the data were sufficient to derive health-based OELs. The available data for PAA frequently come from unpublished studies that lack sufficient study details, suffer from gaps in available information and often follow unconventional testing methodology. Despite these limitations, animal and human data suggest sensory irritation as the most sensitive endpoint associated with inhalation of PAA. Rodent RD50 data (the concentration estimated to cause a 50% depression in respiratory rate) were selected as the critical studies in deriving OELs. Based on these data, a range of 0.36-0.51mg/m(3) (0.1-0.2ppm) was calculated for a time-weighted average (TWA), and 1.2-1.7mg/m(3) (0.4-0.5ppm) as a range for a short-term exposure limit (STEL). These ranges compare favorably to other published OELs for PAA. Considering the applicable health hazards for this chemistry, a joint TWA/STEL OEL approach for PAA is deemed the most appropriate in assessing workplace exposures to PAA, and the selection of specific values within these proposed ranges represents a risk management decision.

  2. [Effect of industrial toxic pollutants on the activity and isoforms of acid DNase in the freshwater snail (Viviparus viviparus L.)].

    PubMed

    Popov, A P; Konichev, A S; Tsvetkov, I L

    2003-01-01

    The effect of various toxic compounds (phenol, gasoline, detergents, halogenated benzenes, and copper salts) on the activity and multiple forms of acid DNase was investigated in the liver of the widespread freshwater snail species Viviparus viviparus L. Characteristic variations in the specific activity and isoform pattern of the enzyme depending on pollutant concentration and exposure time were revealed. It was shown that the pattern of DNase isoforms in V. viviparus could be an index of water pollution.

  3. Plasma amino acids of wether lambs supplemented with novel feed products to reduce locoweed toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Locoweed is a toxic legume that impairs performance and may cause death in grazing livestock. Novel feed and supplement products are needed that counter or minimize the toxic effects of locoweed. The objective was to evaluate the effects of 3 proprietary feed product formulations on plasma amino aci...

  4. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity.

  5. Inhibition of Clostridium botulinum 52A toxicity and protease activity by sodium acid pyrophosphate in media systems.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M K; Busta, F F

    1985-01-01

    The effects of two pH levels (5.55 or 5.85) in combination with 0.4% sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP), NaH2PO4 X H2O, Na2HPO4 X 7H2O, or NaCl on the growth and toxicity of Clostridium botulinum 52A were studied. Absorbancy measurements at 630 nm, microscopic observations, and the mouse bioassay procedure were used to observe the effects. At pH 5.55 and 5.85 most control cultures exhibited toxicity when cell lysis began. Vegetative cell development was normal (4 micron long; 1 micron wide). SAPP-containing (0.4%) treatment cultures displayed similar growth and lysis but no or delayed (48 h) toxicity. Cells grown in the SAPP treatment culture were longer and wider (6 micron long; 1.5 micron wide) than in most other treatment cultures. Trypsinization of nontoxic supernatants from 0.4% SAPP resulted in toxicity. Addition of 0.4% SAPP to toxic C. botulinum supernatant delayed but did not prevent death of mice. The addition of various levels of SAPP to toxic supernatants resulted in a decrease in zone size with an increase in the level of SAPP (9 mm with 0.4% SAPP to 7 mm with 1.0% SAPP), using a dual substrate protease assay. A decrease in the zone size also occurred with the supernatant from cultures grown in the presence of SAPP and with Bacillus polymyxa protease dilutions containing 0.4% SAPP. Results suggest that the actual production or function of the protease responsible for toxin activation may have been inhibited by the presence of SAPP. PMID:2992374

  6. Predicting the toxicity of metal-contaminated field sediments using interstitial concentration of metals and acid-volatile sulfide normalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Berry, W.J.; Mahony, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    The authors investigated the utility of interstitial water concentrations of metals and simultaneously extracted metal/acid-volatile sulfide (SEM/AVS) ratios to explain the biological availability of sediment-associated divalent metals to benthic organisms exposed in the laboratory to sediments from five saltwater and four freshwater locations in the US, Canada, and China. The amphipod Ampelisca abdita or the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata were exposed to 70 sediments from the five saltwater locations, and the amphipod Hyalella azteca or the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to 55 sediments from four freshwater locations in 10-d lethality tests. Almost complete absence of toxicity in spiked sediments and field sediments where metals were the only known source of contamination and where interstitial water toxic units (IWTUs) were < 0.5 indicates that toxicity associated with sediments having SEM/AVS ratios < 1.0 from two saltwater locations in industrial harbors was not metals-related as these sediments contained <0.5 IWTU. Metals-associated toxicity was absent in 100% of sediments from the remaining three saltwater field locations, where metals were the only known source of contamination and SEM/AVS ratios were {le} 1.0. Two-thirds of 45 sediments from seven saltwater and freshwater field locations having both IWTUs > 0.5 (55%) were used alone. The difference between the molar concentrations of SEM and AVS (SEM-AVS) can provide important insight into the extent of additional available binding capacity, the magnitude by which AVS binding has been exceeded, and, when organism response is considered, the potential magnitude of importance of other metal binding phases. SEM-AVS should be used instead of SEM/AVS ratios as a measure of metals availability. In published experiments with both metal-spiked and field sediments, SEM-AVS and IWTUs accurately identified absence of sediment toxicity and with less accuracy identified the presence of toxicity.

  7. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DBPS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  8. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo...

  9. Toxicity of acid mine pit lake water remediated with limestone and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Neil, Luke L; McCullough, Clint D; Lund, Mark A; Evans, Louis H; Tsvetnenko, Yuri

    2009-11-01

    Pit lakes are increasingly common worldwide and have potential to provide many benefits. However, lake water toxicity may require remediation before beneficial end uses can be realised. Three treatments to remediate AMD (pH approximately 4.8) pit lake water containing elevated concentrations of Al and Zn from Collie, Western Australia were tested in mesocosms. Treatments were: (a) limestone neutralisation (L), (b) phosphorus amendment (P), and (c) combined limestone neutralisation and phosphorus amendment (L+P). Laboratory bioassays with Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia, Chlorella protothecoides and Tetrahymena thermophila assessed remediation. Limestone neutralisation increased pH and reduced heavy metal concentrations by 98% (Al) to 14% (Mg), removing toxicity to the three test species within 2 months. Phosphorus amendment removed toxicity after 6 months of treatment. However, phosphorus amendment to prior limestone neutralisation failed to reduce toxicity more than limestone neutralisation alone. Low concentrations of both phosphorus and nitrogen appear to limit phytoplankton population growth in all treatments.

  10. Toxicity of acid mine pit lake water remediated with limestone and phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, L.L.; McCullough, C.D.; Lund, M.A.; Evans, L.H.; Tsvetnenko, Y.

    2009-11-15

    Pit lakes are increasingly common worldwide and have potential to provide many benefits. However, lake water toxicity may require remediation before beneficial end uses can be realised. Three treatments to remediate AMD (pH similar to 4.8) pit lake water containing elevated concentrations of Al and Zn from Collie, Western Australia were tested in mesocosms. Treatments were: (a) limestone neutralisation (L), (b) phosphorus amendment (P), and c) combined limestone neutralisation and phosphorus amendment (L+P). Laboratory bioassays with Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia, Chlorella protothecoides and Tetrahymena thermophila assessed remediation. Limestone neutralisation increased pH and reduced heavy metal concentrations by 98% (Al) to 14% (Mg), removing toxicity to the three test species within 2 months. Phosphorus amendment removed toxicity after 6 months of treatment. However, phosphorus amendment to prior limestone neutralisation failed to reduce toxicity more than limestone neutralisation alone. Low concentrations of both phosphorus and nitrogen appear to limit phytoplankton population growth in all treatments.

  11. HALOACETONITRILES VS. REGULATED HALOACETIC ACIDS: ARE NITROGEN CONTAINING DBPS MORE TOXIC?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are toxic nitrogenous drinking water disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) and are observed with chlorine, chloramine, or chlorine dioxide disinfection. Using microplate-based Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell assays for chronic cytotoxicity and acute genotoxi...

  12. Astaxanthin and Docosahexaenoic Acid Reverse the Toxicity of the Maxi-K (BK) Channel Antagonist Mycotoxin Penitrem A

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Amira A.; Naguib, Khayria M.; Mohamed, Magdy M.; Amra, Hassan A.; Nada, Somaia A.; Abdel-Ghaffar, Abdel-Rahman B.; Gissendanner, Chris R.; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    Penitrem A (PA) is a food mycotoxin produced by several terrestrial and few marine Penicillium species. PA is a potent tremorgen through selective antagonism of the calcium-dependent potassium BK (Maxi-K) channels. Discovery of natural products that can prevent the toxic effects of PA is important for food safety. Astaxanthin (AST) is a marine natural xanthophyll carotenoid with documented antioxidant activity. Unlike other common antioxidants, AST can cross blood brain barriers (BBBs), inducing neuroprotective effects. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is polyunsaturated ω-3 fatty acid naturally occurring in fish and algae. DHA is essential for normal neurological and cellular development. This study evaluated the protective activity of AST and DHA against PA-induced toxicity, in vitro on Schwann cells CRL-2765 and in vivo in the worm Caenorhbitidis elegans and Sprague Dawley rat models. PA inhibited the viability of Schwann cells, with an IC50 of 22.6 μM. Dose-dependent treatments with 10–100 μM DHA significantly reversed the PA toxicity at its IC50 dose, and improved the survival of Schwann cells to 70.5%–98.8%. Similarly, dose-dependent treatments with 10–20 μM AST reversed the PA toxicity at its IC50 dose and raised these cells’ survival to 61.7%–70.5%. BK channel inhibition in the nematode C. elegans is associated with abnormal reversal locomotion. DHA and AST counteracted the in vivo PA BK channel antagonistic activity in the C. elegans model. Rats fed a PA-contaminated diet showed high levels of glutamate (GLU), aspartate (ASP), and gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), with observed necrosis or absence of Purkinjie neurons, typical of PA-induced neurotoxicity. Dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) levels were abnormal, Nitric Oxide (NO) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly increased, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) level in serum and brain homogenates was significantly decreased in PA-treated rats. DHA and AST

  13. Ocean acidification increases copper toxicity differentially in two key marine invertebrates with distinct acid-base responses

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ceri; Ellis, Robert P.; Vernon, Emily; Elliot, Katie; Newbatt, Sam; Wilson, Rod W.

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is expected to indirectly impact biota living in contaminated coastal environments by altering the bioavailability and potentially toxicity of many pH-sensitive metals. Here, we show that OA (pH 7.71; pCO2 1480 μatm) significantly increases the toxicity responses to a global coastal contaminant (copper ~0.1 μM) in two keystone benthic species; mussels (Mytilus edulis) and purple sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus). Mussels showed an extracellular acidosis in response to OA and copper individually which was enhanced during combined exposure. In contrast, urchins maintained extracellular fluid pH under OA by accumulating bicarbonate but exhibited a slight alkalosis in response to copper either alone or with OA. Importantly, copper-induced damage to DNA and lipids was significantly greater under OA compared to control conditions (pH 8.14; pCO2 470 μatm) for both species. However, this increase in DNA-damage was four times lower in urchins than mussels, suggesting that internal acid-base regulation in urchins may substantially moderate the magnitude of this OA-induced copper toxicity effect. Thus, changes in metal toxicity under OA may not purely be driven by metal speciation in seawater and may be far more diverse than either single-stressor or single-species studies indicate. This has important implications for future environmental management strategies. PMID:26899803

  14. Combined toxicity of cadmium and copper in Avicennia marina seedlings and the regulation of exogenous jasmonic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhongzheng; Li, Xiuzhen; Chen, Jun; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee

    2015-03-01

    Seedlings of Avicennia marina were exposed to single and combined metal treatments of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) in a factorial design, and the combined toxicity of Cu and Cd was tested. The effects of the exogenous jasmonic acid (JA) on chlorophyll concentration, lipid peroxidation, Cd and Cu uptake, antioxidative capacity, endogenous JA concentration, and type-2 metallothionein gene (AmMT2) expression in seedlings of A. marina exposed to combined metal treatments were also investigated. A binary mixture of low-dose Cd (9 µmolL(-1)) and high-dose Cu (900 µmolL(-1)) showed toxicity to the seedlings, indicated by the significant augmentation in leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduction in leaf chlorophylls. The toxicity of the combined metals was significantly alleviated by the addition of exogenous JA at 1 µmolL(-1), and the chlorophyll and MDA contents were found to be restored to levels comparable to those of the control. Compare to treatment with Cd and Cu only, 1 and 10 µmolL(-1) JA significantly enhanced the ascorbate peroxidase activity, and 10 µmolL(-1) JA significantly decreased the uptake of Cd in A. marina leaves. The relative expression of leaf AmMT2 gene was also significantly enhanced by 1 and 10 µmolL(-1) JA, which helped reduce Cd toxicity in A. marina seedlings.

  15. The protective effects of ascorbic acid, cimetidine, and nifedipine on diethyldithiocarbamate-induced hepatic toxicity in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Gaafa, Khadiga Mohammed; Badawy, Mohammed M; Hamza, Alaaeldin A

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to clarify the involvement of free radicals, cytochrome P450 toxic metabolites, and deregulation of calcium homeostasis in the mechanism of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) hepatotoxicity. This was elucidated through the preadministration of ascorbic acid (a free radical scavenger), cimetidine (an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes), or nifedipine (a calcium-blocking agent) before DDC treatment to male albino rats. DDC was administered either as a single dose [800 mg/kg body weight (b.w.), subcutaneously, s.c.] or daily repeated doses for 30 days (400 mg/kg b.w., s.c.). Oxidative stress indicators [e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD)] showed that single or repeated DDC doses induce an increase in MDA level and a decrease in SOD activity in the liver, whereas it causes depletion in hepatic GSH after a single dose and an elevation in its value after repeated doses. Severe histopathological changes were also observed in the livers of rats treated with single or repeated DDC doses. Ascorbic acid, cimetidine, and nifedipine pretreatments were found to induce highly protective effects against the evinced DDC hepatotoxicity, manifesting that free radical, cytochrome P450, and calcium-dependent processes contribute to DDC liver toxicity. Finally, although multiple mechanisms may be involved in the hepatotoxic changes induced by DDC, calcium disarrangement and free radical formation play a more critical role than cytochrome P450 in metabolic events leading to toxic effects of DDC.

  16. Toxicity on aquatic organisms exposed to secondary effluent disinfected with chlorine, peracetic acid, ozone and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Juliana Berninger; Rodgher, Suzelei; Daniel, Luiz Antonio; Espíndola, Evaldo Luiz Gaeta

    2014-11-01

    The toxic potential of four disinfectant agents (chlorine, ozone, peracetic acid and UV radiation), used in the disinfection of urban wastewater, was evaluated with respect to four aquatic organisms. Disinfection assays were carried out with wastewater from the city of Araraquara (São Paulo State, Brazil), and subsequently, toxicity bioassays were applied in order to verify possible adverse effects to the cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Daphnia similis), midge larvae Chironomus xanthus and fish (Danio rerio). Under the experimental conditions tested, all the disinfectants were capable of producing harmful effects on the test organisms, except for C. xanthus. The toxicity of the effluent to C. silvestrii was observed to increase significantly as a result of disinfection using 2.5 mg L(-1) chlorine and 29.9 mg L(-1) ozone. Ozonation and chlorination significantly affected the survival of D. similis and D. rerio, causing mortality of 60 to 100 % in comparison to the non-disinfected effluent. In experiments with effluent treated with peracetic acid (PAA) and UV radiation, a statistically significant decrease in survival was only detected for D. rerio. This investigation suggested that the study of the ideal concentrations of disinfectants is a research need for ecologically safe options for the treatment of wastewater.

  17. Oral Toxicity of Okadaic Acid in Mice: Study of Lethality, Organ Damage, Distribution and Effects on Detoxifying Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Andres C.; Rubiolo, Juan A.; López-Alonso, Henar; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Alfonso, Amparo; Bermúdez, Roberto; Otero, Paz; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Vega, Félix V.; Botana, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo, after administration by gavage to mice and rats, okadaic acid has been reported to produce lesions in liver, small intestine and forestomach. Because several reports differ in the damage detected in different organs, and on okadaic acid distribution after consumption, we determined the toxicity of this compound after oral administration to mice. After 24 hours, histopathological examination showed necrotic foci and lipid vacuoles in the livers of intoxicated animals. By immunohistochemical analysis, we detected this toxin in the liver and kidneys of intoxicated animals. Okadaic acid induces oxidative stress and can be activated in vitro into reactive compounds by the post-mitochondrial S9 fraction, so we studied the okadaic effect on the gene expression of antioxidant and phase II detoxifying enzymes in liver. We observed a downregulation in the expression of these enzymes and a reduction of protein expression of catalase and superoxide dismutase 1 in intoxicated animals. PMID:24217398

  18. Effect of 70-nm silica particles on the toxicity of acetaminophen, tetracycline, trazodone, and 5-aminosalicylic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Kondoh, M; Watari, A; Hasezaki, T; Isoda, K; Tsutsumi, Y; Yagi, K

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to nano-sized particles is increasing because they are used in a wide variety of industrial products, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Some animal studies indicate that such nanomaterials may have some toxicity, but their synergistic actions on the adverse effects of drugs are not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether 70-nm silica particles (nSP70), which are widely used in cosmetics and drug delivery, affect the toxicity of a drug for inflammatory bowel disease (5-aminosalicylic acid), an antibiotic drug (tetracycline), an antidepressant drug (trazodone), and an antipyretic drug (acetaminophen) in mice. Co-administration of nSP70 with trazodone did not increase a biochemical marker of liver injury. In contrast, co-administration increased the hepatotoxicity of the other drugs. Co-administration of nSP70 and tetracycline was lethal. These findings indicate that evaluation of synergistic adverse effects is important for the application of nano-sized materials.

  19. Sulfuric acid doped poly diaminopyridine/graphene composite to remove high concentration of toxic Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Dinda, Diptiman; Kumar Saha, Shyamal

    2015-06-30

    Sulfuric acid doped diaminopyridine polymers are synthesized in situ on graphene oxide surface via mutual oxidation-reduction technique. Exploiting large and highly porous surface, we have used this polymer composite as an adsorbent to remove high concentration of toxic Cr(VI) from water. It shows very high adsorption capacity (609.76 mg g(-1)) during removal process. The composite takes only 100 min to remove high concentration of 500 mg L(-1) Cr(VI) from water. Interesting features for this material is the enhancement of removal efficiency at lower acidic condition due to the formation of acid doped emeraldine salt during polymerization. XPS and AAS measurements reveal that our prepared material mainly follows reduction mechanism at higher acidic condition while anions exchange mechanism at lower acidic condition during the removal experiments. Good recycling ability with ∼ 92% removal efficiency after fifth cycle is also noticed for this material. Easy preparation, superior stability in acidic condition, remarkable removal efficiency and excellent recycling ability make this polymer composite an efficient material for modern filtration units in waste water purification.

  20. Transcriptome analysis highlights changes in the leaves of maize plants cultivated in acidic soil containing toxic levels of Al(3+).

    PubMed

    Mattiello, Lucia; Begcy, Kevin; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Jorge, Renato A; Menossi, Marcelo

    2014-12-01

    Soil acidity limits crop yields worldwide and is a common result of aluminum (Al) phytotoxicity, which is known to inhibit root growth. Here, we compared the transcriptome of leaves from maize seedlings grown under control conditions (soil without free Al) and under acidic soil containing toxic levels of Al. This study reports, for the first time, the complex transcriptional changes that occur in the leaves of maize plants grown in acidic soil with phytotoxic levels of Al. Our data indicate that 668 genes were differentially expressed in the leaves of plants grown in acidic soil, which is significantly greater than that observed in our previous work with roots. Genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes were upregulated, although no specific transporter of organic acids was differentially expressed in leaves. We also provide evidence for positive roles for auxin and brassinosteroids in Al tolerance, whereas gibberellin and jasmonate may have negative roles. Our data indicate that plant responses to acidic soil with high Al content are not restricted to the root; tolerance mechanisms are also displayed in the aerial parts of the plant, thus indicating that the entire plant responds to stress.

  1. Preliminary assessment of developmental toxicity of Perfluorinated Phosphonic Acid in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) are a third member of the perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) family, and are structurally similar to the perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates. These emerging chemicals have recently been detected in the environment, particularl...

  2. Extraction of ethanol with higher carboxylic acid solvents and their toxicity to yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a screening exercise for ethanol-selective extraction solvents, partitioning of ethanol and water from a 5 wt% aqueous solution into several C8 – C18 carboxylic acids was studied. Results for the acids are compared with those from alcohols of similar structure. In all cases studied, the acids exh...

  3. Protective Effect of Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Palmitic Acid-Induced Toxicity in Skeletal Muscle Cells is not Mediated by PPARδ Activation.

    PubMed

    Tumova, Jana; Malisova, Lucia; Andel, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA) are able to prevent deleterious effects of saturated FFA in skeletal muscle cells although the mechanisms involved are still not completely understood. FFA act as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of PPARδ, the most common PPAR subtype in skeletal muscle, plays a role in mediating the protective effect of unsaturated FFA on saturated FFA-induced damage in skeletal muscle cells and to examine an impact on mitochondrial respiration. Mouse C2C12 myotubes were treated for 24 h with different concentrations of saturated FFA (palmitic acid), unsaturated FFA (oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid), and their combinations. PPARδ agonist GW501516 and antagonist GSK0660 were also used. Both mono- and polyunsaturated FFA, but not GW501516, prevented palmitic acid-induced cell death. Mono- and polyunsaturated FFA proved to be effective activators of PPARδ compared to saturated palmitic acid; however, in combination with palmitic acid their effect on PPARδ activation was blocked and stayed at the levels observed for palmitic acid alone. Unsaturated FFA at moderate physiological concentrations as well as GW501516, but not palmitic acid, mildly uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Our results indicate that although unsaturated FFA are effective activators of PPARδ, their protective effect on palmitic acid-induced toxicity is not mediated by PPARδ activation and subsequent induction of lipid regulatory genes in skeletal muscle cells. Other mechanisms, such as mitochondrial uncoupling, may underlie their effect.

  4. Effectiveness and Mechanisms of Antagonism of Toxic Effects of Cyanide by Alpha-Keto Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-31

    into this system in the absence of CN. Thi pgak area of each c-keto acid was measured . Then various molar ratios of a-keto acid:CN were injected into...the HPLC system and the peak area of the c-keto acid measured . The peak areas of the c-keto acid without CN and with CN were compared. Any reduction...there ws me statistical difference botew the measured e181 f Aeq fte predneed In the animals treated with C/-U acid and OWNm tre"te WitC ad s46. It Is of

  5. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF

  6. Toxic impact of aldrin on acid and alkaline phosphatase activity of penaeid prawn, Metapenaeus monoceros: In vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.S.; Jayaprada, P.; Rao, K.V.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The increasing contamination of the aquatic environment by the indiscriminate and widespread use of different kinds of pesticides is a serious problem for environmental biologists. Organochlorine insecticides are more hazardous since they are not only more toxic but also leave residues in nature. The deleterious effects of aldrin on several crustaceans have been studied. But studies concerning the impact of aldrin on biochemical aspects of crustaceans are very much limited. The present study is aimed at probing the in vitro effects of aldrin on the acid and alkaline phosphatase activity levels in selected tissues of penaeid prawn, Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius).

  7. Arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grown in arsanilic acid-elevated paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Geng, Anjing; Wang, Xu; Wu, Lishu; Wang, Fuhua; Chen, Yan; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Zhan; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2017-03-01

    P-arsanilic acid (AsA) is a emerging but less concerned contaminant used in animal feeding operations, for it can be degraded to more toxic metabolites after being excreted by animals. Rice is the staple food in many parts of the world, and also more efficient in accumulating arsenic (As) compared to other cereals. However, the uptake and transformation of AsA by rice is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the potential risk of using AsA as a feed additive and using the AsA contaminated animal manure as a fertilizer. Five rice cultivars were grown in soil containing 100mg AsA/kg soil, after harvest, As species and their concentrations in different tissues were determined. Total As concentration of the hybrid rice cultivar was more than conventional rice cultivars for whole rice plant. For rice organs, the highest As concentration was found in roots. AsA could be absorbed by rice, partly degraded and converted to arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, arsenate. The number of As species and their concentrations in each cultivar were related to their genotypes. The soil containing 100mg AsA/kg or more is unsuitable for growing rice. The use of AsA and the disposal of animal manure requires detailed attention.

  8. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing.

  9. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  10. Partial Life-Cycle and Acute Toxicity of Perfluoroalkyl Acids to Freshwater Mussels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater mussels are among the most sensitive aquatic organisms to many contaminants and have complex life-cycles that include several distinct life stages with unique contaminant exposure pathways. Standard acute (24–96 h) and chronic (28 d) toxicity tests with free larva (glo...

  11. Algal toxicity of the alternative disinfectants performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and their by-products hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite (ClO2(-)).

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Baun, Anders; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2016-12-01

    Environmental effect evaluation of disinfection of combined sewer overflow events with alternative chemical disinfectants requires that the environmental toxicity of the disinfectants and the main by-products of their use are known. Many disinfectants degrade quickly in water which should be included in the evaluation of both their toxicity as determined in standardized tests and their possible negative effect in the water environment. Here we evaluated according to the standardized ISO 8692 test the toxicity towards the green microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, of three disinfectants: performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as well as two by-products of their use: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite. All of the five chemicals investigated showed clear toxicity to the algae with well-defined dose response curves. The EC50 values ranged from 0.16 to 2.9mg/L based on nominal concentrations leading to the labeling of the chemicals as either toxic or very toxic. The five investigated chemicals decreased in toxicity in the order chlorine dioxide, performic acid, peracetic acid, chlorite and hydrogen peroxide. The stability of the chemicals increased in the same order as the toxicity decrease. This indicates that even though ClO2 has the highest environmental hazard potential, it may still be suitable as an alternative disinfectant due to its rapid degradation in water.

  12. Decontamination of aquatic vegetable leaves by removing trace toxic metals during pickling process with acetic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbiao; Yang, Yixing

    2011-01-01

    The heavy-metal content of aquatic plants is mainly dependent upon their ecological system. This study indicated that although the toxic heavy-metal contents could be above the recommended maximum levels depending upon their concentrations in growing water, they can be decontaminated by pickling with 5% acetic acid solution. Almost all Cd, Hg, Ba, or Sb and 99.5% Pb, 96.7% Ag, or 97.1% Al were removed from Water Spinach leaves by soaking in acetic acid solution. For Water-Shield leaves, almost all Cd, Hg, Pb, Ba, or Sb and 95.0% Ag or 96.1% Al were removed. For Watercress leaves, almost all Cd, Hg, Ba, or Sb and 99.0% Pb or 99.7% Ag were removed. For Water Hyacinth leaves, almost all Cd, Ba, or Sb and 99.0% Hg, 98.5% Pb, 95.0% Ag, or 98.7% Al were removed.

  13. Gibberellic acid alleviates cadmium toxicity by reducing nitric oxide accumulation and expression of IRT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Zhi Wei; Lei, Gui Jie; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Li, Gui Xin; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-11-15

    Gibberellic acid (GA) is involved in not only plant growth and development but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here it was found that treating the plants with GA concentrations from 0.1 to 5 μM for 24 h had no obvious effect on root elongation in the absence of cadmium (Cd), whereas in the presence of Cd2+, GA at 5 μM improved root growth, reduced Cd content and lipid peroxidation in the roots, indicating that GA can partially alleviate Cd toxicity. Cd2+ increased nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in the roots, but GA remarkably reduced it, and suppressed the up-regulation of the expression of IRT1. In contrary, the beneficial effect of GA on alleviating Cd toxicity was not observed in an IRT1 knock-out mutant irt1, suggesting the involvement of IRT1 in Cd2+ absorption. Furthermore, the GA-induced reduction of NO and Cd content can also be partially reversed by the application of a NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione [GSNO]). Taken all these together, the results showed that GA-alleviated Cd toxicity is mediated through the reduction of the Cd-dependent NO accumulation and expression of Cd2+ uptake related gene-IRT1 in Arabidopsis.

  14. γ-Aminobutyric acid addition alleviates ammonium toxicity by limiting ammonium accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoling; Zhu, Changhua; Yang, Na; Gan, Lijun; Xia, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Excessive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer has increased ammonium (NH4(+) ) accumulation in many paddy soils to levels that reduce rice vegetative biomass and yield. Based on studies of NH4(+) toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa, Nanjing 44) seedlings cultured in agar medium, we found that NH4(+) concentrations above 0.75 mM inhibited the growth of rice and caused NH4(+) accumulation in both shoots and roots. Use of excessive NH4(+) also induced rhizosphere acidification and inhibited the absorption of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn in rice seedlings. Under excessive NH4(+) conditions, exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment limited NH4(+) accumulation in rice seedlings, reduced NH4(+) toxicity symptoms and promoted plant growth. GABA addition also reduced rhizosphere acidification and alleviated the inhibition of Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn absorption caused by excessive NH4(+) . Furthermore, we found that the activity of glutamine synthetase/NADH-glutamate synthase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2/NADH-GOGAT; EC1.4.1.14) in root increased gradually as the NH4(+) concentration increased. However, when the concentration of NH4(+) is more than 3 mM, GABA treatment inhibited NH4(+) -induced increases in GS/NADH-GOGAT activity. The inhibition of ammonium assimilation may restore the elongation of seminal rice roots repressed by high NH4(+) . These results suggest that mitigation of ammonium accumulation and assimilation is essential for GABA-dependent alleviation of ammonium toxicity in rice seedlings.

  15. Could humic acid relieve the biochemical toxicities and DNA damage caused by nickel and deltamethrin in earthworms (Eisenia foetida)?

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen-Chao; Shen, Dong-Sheng; Shentu, Jia-Li; Wang, Mei-Zhen; Wan, Ming-Yang

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether humic acid (HA) prevented gene and biochemical toxic effects in earthworms (Eisenia foetida) exposed to nickel and deltamethrin (at 100 and 1 mg kg(-1), respectively) in soil. Cellular- and molecular-level toxic effects of nickel and deltamethrin in earthworms were evaluated by measuring damage to lipid membranes and DNA and the production of protein carbonyls over 42 days of exposure. Nickel and deltamethrin induced significant levels of oxidative stress in earthworms, increasing the production of peroxidation products (malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls) and increasing the comet assay tail DNA% (determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis). DNA damage was the most sensitive of the three indices because it gave a higher sample/control ratio than did the other indices. The presence of HA alleviated (in decreasing order of effectiveness) damage to DNA, proteins, and lipid membranes caused by nickel and deltamethrin. A low HA dose (0.5-1% HA in soil) prevented a great deal of lipid membrane damage, but the highest HA dose (3% HA in soil) prevented still more DNA damage. However, the malondialdehyde concentrations in earthworms were higher at the highest HA dose than at the lower HA doses. The amounts of protein carbonyls produced at different HA doses were not significantly different. The toxic effects to earthworms caused by increased oxidizable nickel concentrations could be relieved by adding HA.

  16. The toxicity of rifampicin polylactic acid nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and human macrophage THP-1 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, M.; Rybalkina, E.; Barsegyan, G.; Onishchenko, G.; Lepekha, L.

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis is rapidly becoming a major health problem. The rise in tuberculosis incidence stimulates efforts to develop more effective delivery systems for the existing antituberculous drugs while decreasing the side effects. The nanotechnology may provide novel drug delivery tools allowing controlled drug release. Rifampicin is one of the main antituberculous drugs, characterized by high toxicity, and Poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer used for the preparation of encapsulated drugs. The aim of our work was to evaluate the toxicity of rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG using human macrophage THP-1 cell line. Our data demonstrate that rifampicin-PLLA is effective against M. bovis BCG in the infected macrophages. The drug is inducing the dysfunction of mitochondria and apoptosis in the macrophages and is acting as a potential substrate of Pgp thereby modulating cell chemosensitivity. The severity of the toxic effects of the rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles is increasing in a dose-dependent manner. We suggest that free rifampicin induces death of M. bovis BCG after PLLA degradation and diffusion from phago-lysosomes to cytoplasm causing mitochondria dysfunction and affecting the Pgp activity.

  17. Efficacy of N-Acetylcysteine, Glutathione, and Ascorbic Acid in Acute Toxicity of Paraoxon to Wistar Rats: Survival Study

    PubMed Central

    Nurulain, Syed M.; Ojha, Shreesh; Tekes, Kornelia; Shafiullah, Mohammad; Kalasz, Huba; Adem, Abdu

    2015-01-01

    There are a great number of reports with assertions that oxidative stress is produced by organophosphorus compound (OPC) poisoning and is a cofactor of mortality and morbidity in OPC toxicity. In addition, antioxidants have been suggested as adjuncts to standard therapy. However, there is no substantial evidence for the benefit of the use of antioxidants in survival after acute intoxication of OPCs. The present study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of three non-enzymatic antioxidants (NEAOs), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), glutathione (GSH), and ascorbic acid (AA), in acute intoxication of adult male Wister rats with paraoxon. The efficacy of the antioxidants was estimated as both a pretreatment and a concurrent application along with the standard oxime, pralidoxime (2-PAM). Relative risk of death after 48 hours of application was estimated by Cox regression analysis. The results revealed no benefit of either tested NEAO to the improvement in survival of experimental rats. The application of these antioxidants was found to be deleterious when administered along with pralidoxime compared to the treatment with pralidoxime alone. It has been concluded that the tested non-enzymatic antioxidants are not useful in acute toxicity for improving survival rates. However, the individual toxic dynamics of diversified OPCs should not be overlooked and further studies with different OPCs are suggested. PMID:26167240

  18. Preparation of five 3-MCPD fatty acid esters and the effects of their chemical structures on acute oral toxicity in Swiss mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid esters of 3-monochloro-1, 2-propanediol (3-MCPDEs), including 1-stearic, 1-oleic, 1-linoleic, 1-linoleic-2-palmitic and 1-palmitic-2-linoleic acid esters, were synthetized and examined for their acute oral toxicities in Swiss mice. 3-MCPDEs were obtained through the reaction of 3-MCPD and...

  19. Toxic fluorine compounds. The use of the ω-fluorine atom in the study of the metabolism of fatty acids containing ethyl, n-propyl and isopropyl branches

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, F. L. M.; Peters, D. A. V.

    1966-01-01

    1. Some ω-fluoroalkanoic acids containing a branched ethyl, n-propyl or isopropyl group in the α- or β-position have been prepared. 2. A study of the toxicity of these acids revealed that the ethyl group partially inhibited, and the n-propyl and isopropyl groups completely inhibited, the normal processes of oxidative degradation. PMID:5911518

  20. Salicylic Acid and Sodium Salicylate Alleviate Cadmium Toxicity to Different Extents in Maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Gondor, Orsolya Kinga; Pál, Magda; Darkó, Éva; Janda, Tibor; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The role of salicylic acid in Cd tolerance has attracted more attention recently but no information is available on the efficiency of different forms of salicylic acid. The aim was thus to investigate whether both the acid and salt forms of salicylic acid provide protection against Cd stress and to compare their mode of action. Young maize plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions. One group of 10-day-old seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM SA or NaSA for 1 day then half of the pants were treated with 0.5 mM Cd for 1 day. Another group of seedlings was treated with 0.5 mM CdSO4 for 1 day without pre-treatment with SA or NaSA, while a third group was treated simultaneously with Cd and either SA or NaSA. Both salicylic acid forms reduced the Cd accumulation in the roots. Treatment with the acidic form meliorated the Cd accumulation in the leaves, while Na-salicylate increased the phytochelatin level in the roots and the amount of salicylic acid in the leaves. Furthermore, increased antioxidant enzyme activity was mainly induced by the acid form, while glutathione-related redox changes were influenced mostly by the salt form. The acidic and salt forms of salicylic acid affected the two antioxidant systems in different ways, and the influence of these two forms on the distribution and detoxification of Cd also differed. The present results also draw attention to the fact that generalisations about the stress protective mechanisms induced by salicylic acid are misleading since different forms of SA may exert different effects on the plants via separate mechanisms.

  1. Salicylic Acid and Sodium Salicylate Alleviate Cadmium Toxicity to Different Extents in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gondor, Orsolya Kinga; Pál, Magda; Darkó, Éva; Janda, Tibor; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The role of salicylic acid in Cd tolerance has attracted more attention recently but no information is available on the efficiency of different forms of salicylic acid. The aim was thus to investigate whether both the acid and salt forms of salicylic acid provide protection against Cd stress and to compare their mode of action. Young maize plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions. One group of 10-day-old seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM SA or NaSA for 1 day then half of the pants were treated with 0.5 mM Cd for 1 day. Another group of seedlings was treated with 0.5 mM CdSO4 for 1 day without pre-treatment with SA or NaSA, while a third group was treated simultaneously with Cd and either SA or NaSA. Both salicylic acid forms reduced the Cd accumulation in the roots. Treatment with the acidic form meliorated the Cd accumulation in the leaves, while Na-salicylate increased the phytochelatin level in the roots and the amount of salicylic acid in the leaves. Furthermore, increased antioxidant enzyme activity was mainly induced by the acid form, while glutathione-related redox changes were influenced mostly by the salt form. The acidic and salt forms of salicylic acid affected the two antioxidant systems in different ways, and the influence of these two forms on the distribution and detoxification of Cd also differed. The present results also draw attention to the fact that generalisations about the stress protective mechanisms induced by salicylic acid are misleading since different forms of SA may exert different effects on the plants via separate mechanisms. PMID:27490102

  2. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  3. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  4. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis linking reactive oxygen species to the toxicity of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Pals, Justin; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Xia, Menghang; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts has been linked to adverse health risks. The monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are generated as byproducts during the disinfection of drinking water and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. Iodoacetic acid toxicity was mitigated by antioxidants, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. Other monoHAAs may share a similar mode of action. Each monoHAA generated a significant concentration-response increase in the expression of a β-lactamase reporter under the control of the antioxidant response element (ARE). The monoHAAs generated oxidative stress with a rank order of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) ≫ chloroacetic acid (CAA); this rank order was observed with other toxicological end points. Toxicogenomic analysis was conducted with a nontransformed human intestinal epithelial cell line (FHs 74 Int). Exposure to the monoHAAs altered the transcription levels of multiple oxidative stress responsive genes, indicating that each exposure generated oxidative stress. The transcriptome profiles showed an increase in thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1) and sulfiredoxin (SRXN1), suggesting peroxiredoxin proteins had been oxidized during monoHAA exposures. Three possible sources of reactive oxygen species were identified, the hypohalous acid generating peroxidase enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent oxidase 5 (NOX5), and PTGS2 (COX-2) mediated arachidonic acid metabolism. Each monoHAA exposure caused an increase in COX-2 mRNA levels. These data provide a functional association between monoHAA exposure and adverse health outcomes such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and cancer.

  5. A CONCISE REVIEW OF THE TOXICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) has been used as an herbicide (cacodylic acid) and is the major metabolite formed after exposure to tri- (arsenite) or pentavalent (arsenate) inorganic arsenic (iAs) via ingestion or inhalation in both humans and rodents. Once viewed simply as a detoxi...

  6. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  7. Amino acid-dependent transformations of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles: impact on morphology, stability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junpeng; Sun, Xia; Zou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongwu

    2014-08-17

    Humans face the risk of exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) due to their extensive application in consumer products. AgNPs can interact with many substances in the human body due to their chemically unstable nature and high activity properties, which might result in unknown hazards and even some serious diseases for humans. As the basic constituent element of human bodies, amino acids (AAs) differ in concentration and variety in different cells and tissues. Thus, understanding the transformation of citrate-coated AgNPs in the presence of AAs is crucial for determining their fate and toxicity in the human body. Our study focused on the transformation of the morphology, dissolution behavior and reaction product of AgNPs in different AA-containing systems and then evaluated the effect of these transformations on the cytotoxicity of AgNPs. The obtained results indicated that the addition of glycine with the lowest Ag(+) binding energy had little effect on the transformations and toxicity of AgNPs. While in the presence of histidine with higher Ag(+) binding energy, the Ag(+) release and particle size of AgNPs obviously increased. These transformations resulted in a decrease in the cytotoxicity of AgNPs due to the formation of Ag-His complex and the growth of AgNPs. Furthermore, l-cysteine with the highest Ag(+) binding energy could easily interact with AgNPs, transforming them completely to form [Ag(Cys)n](+) and Ag2S precipitates, which induced the largest decrease in AgNP toxicity. In summary, our results may provide useful information to understand the fate, transformation, and toxicity of citrate-coated AgNPs in the human body.

  8. Acute toxicity and histopathology of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis, mitchill) exposed to aluminum in acid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tandjung, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    Fingerling brook trout were exposed to different concentrations of Al at pH 5.6. The Basic Static Acute Toxicity Test was used to determine the 96-hr LC50. The toxicity of Al varied inversely with water hardness. The 96-hr LC/sub 50/ at a hardness of 2, 18, and 40 mg/l (CaCO/sub 3/) was 0.37, 3.4, and 6.53 mg/l Al respectively. Darkening of skin color was possible due to an increase in Na ions in the water as a result of body ion loss, activating the hormone MSH which causes melanin granules to spread within the melanocytes. Histology of all tissues of surviving fish appeared normal 3 months after transfer to uncontaminated water. The lateral line canal was regenerated by the end of the second month of the recovery period. In conclusion, we found that histology was essential to the interpretation of the toxicological effects of Al. The mortality of brook trout was attributed to Al toxicity that increased cell membrane permeability and mucification. Increased permeability resulted in the loss of body salt and an influx of Al and H ions. Mucus on gill surfaces caused anoxia leading to cell degeneration. Death was due to disturbances in osmoregulation, breakdown in enzyme activity, and disruption of O/sub 2/ transport.

  9. Assessment of the role of in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-valproic acid in the toxicity of valproic acid and (E)-2-ene-valproic acid in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Surendradoss, Jayakumar; Chang, Thomas K.H.; Abbott, Frank S.

    2012-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) undergoes cytochrome P450-mediated desaturation to form 4-ene-VPA, which subsequently yields (E)-2,4-diene-VPA by β-oxidation. Another biotransformation pathway involves β-oxidation of VPA to form (E)-2-ene-VPA, which also generates (E)-2,4-diene-VPA by cytochrome P450-mediated desaturation. Although the synthetic form of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA is more hepatotoxic than VPA as shown in various experimental models, there is no conclusive evidence to implicate the in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-VPA in VPA hepatotoxicity. The present study investigated the effects of modulating the in situ formation of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA on markers of oxidative stress (formation of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein; DCF), steatosis (accumulation of BODIPY 558/568 C{sub 12}), necrosis (release of lactate dehydrogenase; LDH), and on cellular total glutathione (GSH) levels in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes treated with VPA or (E)-2-ene-VPA. Treatment with either of these chemicals alone increased each of the toxicity endpoints. In VPA-treated hepatocytes, (E)-2,4-diene-VPA was detected only at trace levels, even after phenobarbital (PB) pretreatment and there was no effect on the toxicity of VPA. Furthermore, pretreatment with a cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT), did not influence the extent of VPA toxicity in both PB-pretreated and vehicle-pretreated hepatocytes. However, in (E)-2-ene-VPA-treated hepatocytes, PB pretreatment greatly enhanced the levels of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA and this was accompanied by a further enhancement of the effects of (E)-2-ene-VPA on DCF formation, BODIPY accumulation, LDH release, and GSH depletion. Pretreatment with 1-ABT reduced the concentrations of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA and the extent of (E)-2-ene-VPA toxicity; however, this occurred in PB-pretreated hepatocytes, but not in control hepatocytes. In conclusion, in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-VPA is not responsible for the hepatocyte toxicity of VPA, whereas it

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID (PFOA) AFTER CROSS FOSTER AND RESTRICTED GESTATIONAL EXPOSURES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a compound which persists and is found ubiquitously in the environment, wildlife and humans. PFOA affects growth, development and viability of offspring of mice exposed during pregnancy. This study segregates the contributions of gestational and...

  11. Protective effect of bile acid derivatives in phalloidin-induced rat liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Hierro, Carlos; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Phalloidin causes severe liver damage characterized by marked cholestasis, which is due in part to irreversible polymerization of actin filaments. Liver uptake of this toxin through the transporter OATP1B1 is inhibited by the bile acid derivative BALU-1, which does not inhibit the sodium-dependent bile acid transporter NTCP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BALU-1 prevents liver uptake of phalloidin without impairing endogenous bile acid handling and hence may have protective effects against the hepatotoxicity induced by this toxin. In anaesthetized rats, i.v. administration of BALU-1 increased bile flow more than taurocholic acid (TCA). Phalloidin administration decreased basal (- 60%) and TCA-stimulated bile flow (- 55%) without impairing bile acid output. Phalloidin-induced cholestasis was accompanied by liver necrosis, nephrotoxicity and haematuria. In BALU-1-treated animals, phalloidin-induced cholestasis was partially prevented. Moreover haematuria was not observed, which was consistent with histological evidences of BALU-1-prevented injury of liver and kidney tissue. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that BALU-1 was secreted in bile mainly in non-conjugated form, although a small proportion (< 5%) of tauro-BALU-1 was detected. BALU-1 did not inhibit the biliary secretion of endogenous bile acids. When highly choleretic bile acids, - ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) and dehydrocholic acid (DHCA) - were administered, they were found less efficient than BALU-1 in preventing phalloidin-induced cholestasis. Biliary phalloidin elimination was low but it was increased by BALU-1 > TCA > DHCA > UDCA. In conclusion, BALU-1 is able to protect against phalloidin-induced hepatotoxicity, probably due to an inhibition of the liver uptake and an enhanced biliary secretion of this toxin.

  12. Potential toxicity of presumably insoluble aluminum salts in presence of common dietary acids.

    PubMed

    Dayde, S; Berthon, G

    1990-01-01

    It has recently been shown that aluminum absorption may occur following the administration of oral aluminium-containing phosphate-binders and antacids. Computer simulations based on relevant aluminium complex equilibria have been used in the present work to investigate the potential influence of the simultaneous ingestion of common dietary acids on this phenomenon. It results from these studies that aluminium absorption may be favoured to various extents in the presence of citric, malic, oxalic, succinic and tartric acids.

  13. Toxicity of oil sands acid-extractable organic fractions to freshwater fish: Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) and Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Anthony E; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Farwell, Andrea J; Dixon, D George

    2017-03-01

    The Alberta oil sands are one of the largest global petroleum deposits and, due to non-release practices for oil sands process-affected waters, produced tailings are stored in large ponds. The acid extractable organic (AEO) compounds in oil sands process-affected water are of greatest concern due to their persistence and toxicity to a variety of aquatic biota. The present study evaluated the toxicity of the five AEO fractions to two fish species: Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka) and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow). The fractions (F1-F5) were comprised of AEO with increasing mean molecular weight and subsequent increases in cyclicity, aromaticity, degree of oxygenation, and heteroatom content. The lowest molecular weight fraction, F1, displayed the lowest acute toxicity to both fish species. For fathead minnow, F5 displayed the greatest toxic potency, while F2 to F4 displayed intermediate toxicities. For Japanese medaka, F2 and F3 displayed the greatest acute toxicities and F1, F4 and F5 were significantly less potent. Overall, fathead minnow were more acutely sensitive to AEO than Japanese medaka. The present study indicates that AEO toxicity may not be solely driven by a narcotic mode of action, but chemical composition such as aromaticity and heteroatom content and their relation to toxicity suggest other drivers indicative of additional modes of toxic action.

  14. Kinetics and toxic effects of repeated intravenous dosage of formic acid in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Liesivuori, J.; Kosma, V. M.; Naukkarinen, A.; Savolainen, H.

    1987-01-01

    Adult male rabbits were injected i.v. with 100 mg buffered formic acid per kg body weight daily for 5 days with 24 h between the doses. The fifth dose was labelled with 14C-formic acid. Rabbits were killed 1, 2 and 20 h after the last injection. The highest formic acid concentrations were found one hour after the fifth dose. Total formic acid concentrations were always higher than radiometrically measured. The maximum concentrations of formic acid in brain, heart, kidney and liver were roughly similar to the concentration which inhibits half of the cytochrome oxidase activity in vitro. Histological studies clearly demonstrated the histotoxic changes at cellular level. Calcium deposits were detected in all organs of the injected rabbits. They were absent in control animals. It seems that the formic acid metabolism is slow and that it may cause sufficient hypoxic acidosis to allow the calcium influx and cellular damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3426949

  15. Toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of boric acid in male and female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Dieter, M P

    1994-11-01

    Toxicity and potential carcinogenicity studies of boric acid were investigated in mice to verify in a second rodent species that this was a noncarcinogenic chemical. Earlier chronic studies in rats indicated boric acid was not a carcinogen. The chemical is nominated for testing because over 200 tons are produced annually, there are multiple uses for the product, and there is potential for widespread human exposure, both orally and dermally. Both sexes of B6C3F1 mice were offered diets mixed with boric acid for 14 days, 13 weeks, or 2 years. Dietary doses used in the acute, 14-day study were 0, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5, 5, and 10%; those in the subchronic, 13-week study were 0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.50, 1, and 2%; and doses in the 2-year, chronic study were 0, 0.25, and 0.50% in the diet. Mortality, clinical signs of toxicity, estimates of food consumption, body weight gain, and histopathologic examination of selected tissues constituted the variables measured. In the 14-day study mortality was proportional to dose and time of exposure in both sexes, occurring in dose groups as low as 2.5% and as early as 7 days of exposure. Body weights were depressed more than 10% below controls in the higher dose groups of both sexes. Mortality in the 13-week study was confined to the two highest dose groups in male mice and to the 2%-dose group in females. Body weight depression from 8 to 23% below those of controls occurred in the 0.50% and higher dose groups of both sexes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of boric acid in male and female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dieter, M P

    1994-01-01

    Toxicity and potential carcinogenicity studies of boric acid were investigated in mice to verify in a second rodent species that this was a noncarcinogenic chemical. Earlier chronic studies in rats indicated boric acid was not a carcinogen. The chemical is nominated for testing because over 200 tons are produced annually, there are multiple uses for the product, and there is potential for widespread human exposure, both orally and dermally. Both sexes of B6C3F1 mice were offered diets mixed with boric acid for 14 days, 13 weeks, or 2 years. Dietary doses used in the acute, 14-day study were 0, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5, 5, and 10%; those in the subchronic, 13-week study were 0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.50, 1, and 2%; and doses in the 2-year, chronic study were 0, 0.25, and 0.50% in the diet. Mortality, clinical signs of toxicity, estimates of food consumption, body weight gain, and histopathologic examination of selected tissues constituted the variables measured. In the 14-day study mortality was proportional to dose and time of exposure in both sexes, occurring in dose groups as low as 2.5% and as early as 7 days of exposure. Body weights were depressed more than 10% below controls in the higher dose groups of both sexes. Mortality in the 13-week study was confined to the two highest dose groups in male mice and to the 2%-dose group in females. Body weight depression from 8 to 23% below those of controls occurred in the 0.50% and higher dose groups of both sexes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889889

  17. Predicting the toxicity of sediment-associated trace metals with simultaneously extracted trace metal: Acid-volatile sulfide concentrations and dry weight-normalized concentrations: A critical comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.R.; MacDonald, D.D.; Cubbage, J.C.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    The relative abilities of sediment concentrations of simultaneously extracted trace metal: acid-volatile sulfide (SEM:AVS) and dry weight- normalized trace metals to correctly predict both toxicity and nontoxicity were compared by analysis of 77 field-collected samples. Relative to the SEM:AVS concentrations, sediment guidelines based upon dry weight-normalized concentrations were equally or slightly more accurate in predicting both nontoxic and toxic results in laboratory tests.

  18. Hepatoprotective effects of pantothenic acid on carbon tetrachloride-induced toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Eidi, Akram; Mortazavi, Pejman; Tehrani, Masoud Ebrahim; Rohani, Ali Haeri; Safi, Shahabaldin

    2012-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of pantothenic acid on CCl4-induced liver damage. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with pantothenic acid (0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 g/kg) daily, with administration of CCl4 (1 mL/kg, 50 % CCl4 in olive oil) twice a week for 28 days. The effect of pantothenic acid on serum markers (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyltransferase) was measured in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rat. Further, the effects on enzymatic antioxidant (superoxide dismutase) were estimated in the liver samples. CCl4 challenge not only elevated the serum marker enzyme activities but also suppressed hepatic antioxidative defense system including superoxide dismutase. The biochemical observations were supplemented with histopathological examination of rat liver sections. Histopathological examination of livers showed that pantothenic acid reduced fatty degeneration, cytoplasmic vacuolization and necrosis in CCl4-treated rats. Therefore, pantothenic acid may be an effective hepatoprotective agent and viable candidate for treating hepatic disorders and other oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:27847457

  19. Arsenic-induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo Im; Jin, Bohwan; Youn, Pilju; Park, Changbo; Park, Jung-Duck; Ryu, Doug-Young . E-mail: dyryu@snu.ac.kr

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a major cause of male reproductive failure. Here, we investigated whether arsenic, which impairs male reproductive functions in rodent models, acts by inducing oxidative stress. Male 8-week-old ICR mice were given drinking water containing 20 or 40 mg/l sodium arsenite with or without 0.75 or 1.5 g/l of the antioxidant ascorbic acid for 5 weeks. The arsenic-treated mice showed decreased epididymidal sperm counts and testicular weights compared to untreated mice. These effects were reversed in mice that were co-treated with ascorbic acid. Similarly, arsenic treatment lowered the activities of testicular 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17{beta}-HSD, which play important roles in steroidogenesis, and this was reversed by co-treatment with ascorbic acid. The testicles of arsenic-treated mice had decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (which correlate inversely with the degree of cellular oxidative stress) and elevated levels of protein carbonyl (a marker of oxidative damage to tissue proteins). Ascorbic acid co-treatment reversed both of these effects. Thus, ascorbic acid blocks both the adverse effects of arsenic on male reproductive functions and the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative changes. These observations support the notion that arsenic impairs male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress.

  20. Ascorbic acid modifies the surface of asbestos: possible implications in the molecular mechanisms of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Martra, Gianmario; Tomatis, Maura; Fenoglio, Ivana; Coluccia, Salvatore; Fubini, Bice

    2003-03-01

    Ascorbic acid is one of the major components of the antioxidants defenses of the lung lining layer where inhaled asbestos fibers are deposited. Crocidolite fibers were incubated at 37 degrees C in a 0.01 M aqueous solution of ascorbic acid for 25 days in order to investigate modifications in surface reactivity. Iron (820 nmol/mg) and monomeric silica (470 nmol/mg) were released in the supernatant, while ascorbic acid was consumed. The amount of iron and silicon released, respectively, 17 and 6% (in atoms) of the total fiber content, exceeded what was expected at the surface, suggesting a partial disgregation of crocidolite promoted by ascorbic acid. In the absence of ascorbic acid but at the same pH, the release of iron and monomeric silica was minimal. At time intervals, aliquots of fibers were withdrawn to evidence chemical modifications progressively taking place. Three families of Fe(II) centers, differing in coordinative unsaturation and progressively removed during incubation, have been evidenced from the FTIR spectra of NO adsorbed onto the fibers. The most uncoordinated ones are removed first. New highly uncoordinated iron sites are exposed at the fiber surface as a consequence of the erosion of the outmost layers while hydration of silica tetrahedra yields new silanol groups. The activity in the Fenton-like reaction (*OH from H(2)O(2)) decreases following surface iron depauperation. Conversely, the homolytic cleavage of the C-H bond (CO(2)*-) from the formate ion) appears related to the small fraction of iron ions always present but easily quenched by the adsorption of ascorbic acid or its oxidation products.

  1. Non-toxic agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system containing gallic acid for antifungal application.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Gambari, R; Kok, S H-L; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Bian, Z-X; Lee, K K-H; Chui, C-H

    2015-02-01

    Aspergillus niger (A. niger) is a common species of Aspergillus molds. Cutaneous aspergillosis usually occurs in skin sites near intravenous injection and approximately 6% of cutaneous aspergillosis cases which do not involve burn or HIV-infected patients are caused by A. niger. Biomaterials and biopharmaceuticals produced from microparticle-based drug delivery systems have received much attention as microencapsulated drugs offer an improvement in therapeutic efficacy due to better human absorption. The frequently used crosslinker, glutaraldehyde, in gelatin-based microencapsulation systems is considered harmful to human beings. In order to tackle the potential risks, agarose has become an alternative polymer to be used with gelatin as wall matrix materials of microcapsules. In the present study, we report the eco-friendly use of an agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system to enhance the antifungal activity of gallic acid and reduce its potential cytotoxic effects towards human skin keratinocytes. We used optimal parameter combinations, such as an agarose/gelatin ratio of 1:1, a polymer/oil ratio of 1:60, a surfactant volume of 1% w/w and a stirring speed of 900 rpm. The minimum inhibitory concentration of microencapsulated gallic acid (62.5 µg/ml) was significantly improved when compared with that of the original drug (>750 µg/ml). The anti-A. niger activity of gallic acid -containing microcapsules was much stronger than that of the original drug. Following 48 h of treatment, skin cell survival was approximately 90% with agarose/gelatin microcapsules containing gallic acid, whereas cell viability was only 25-35% with free gallic acid. Our results demonstrate that agarose/gelatin-based microcapsules containing gallic acid may prove to be helpful in the treatment of A. niger-induced skin infections near intravenous injection sites.

  2. EDTA and HCl leaching of calcareous and acidic soils polluted with potentially toxic metals: remediation efficiency and soil impact.

    PubMed

    Udovic, Metka; Lestan, Domen

    2012-07-01

    The environmental risk of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) in soil can be diminished by their removal. Among the available remediation techniques, soil leaching with various solutions is one of the most effective but data about the impact on soil chemical and biological properties are still scarce. We studied the effect of two common leaching agents, hydrochloric acid (HCl) and a chelating agent (EDTA) on Pb, Zn, Cd removal and accessibility and on physico-chemical and biological properties in one calcareous, pH neutral soil and one non-calcareous acidic soil. EDTA was a more efficient leachant compared to HCl: up to 133-times lower chelant concentration was needed for the same percentage (35%) of Pb removal. EDTA and HCl concentrations with similar PTM removal efficiency decreased PTM accessibility in both soils but had different impacts on soil properties. As expected, HCl significantly dissolved carbonates from calcareous soil, while EDTA leaching increased the pH of the acidic soil. Enzyme activity assays showed that leaching with HCl had a distinctly negative impact on soil microbial and enzyme activity, while leaching with EDTA had less impact. Our results emphasize the importance of considering the ecological impact of remediation processes on soil in addition to the capacity for PTM removal.

  3. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  4. In vitro toxicity of carbon nanotubes, nano-graphite and carbon black, similar impacts of acid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Figarol, Agathe; Pourchez, Jérémie; Boudard, Delphine; Forest, Valérie; Akono, Céline; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Jean-Pierre; Cottier, Michèle; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Grosseau, Philippe

    2015-12-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nano-graphite (NG) are graphene-based nanomaterials which share exceptional physicochemical properties, but whose health impacts are unfortunately still not well understood. On the other hand, carbon black (CB) is a conventional and widely studied material. The comparison of these three carbon-based nanomaterials is thus of great interest to improve our understanding of their toxicity. An acid functionalization was carried out on CNT, NG and CB so that, after a thorough characterization, their impacts on RAW 264.7 macrophages could be compared for a similar surface chemistry (15 to 120 μg·mL(-1) nanomaterials, 90-min to 24-h contact). Functionalized nanomaterials triggered a weak cytotoxicity similar to the pristine nanomaterials. Acid functionalization increased the pro-inflammatory response except for CB which did not trigger any TNF-α production before or after functionalization, and seemed to strongly decrease the oxidative stress. The toxicological impact of acid functionalization appeared thus to follow a similar trend whatever the carbon-based nanomaterial. At equivalent dose expressed in surface and equivalent surface chemistry, the toxicological responses from murine macrophages to NG were higher than for CNT and CB. It seemed to correspond to the hypothesis of a platelet and fiber paradigm.

  5. Effects of acid-volatile sulfide on metal bioavailability and toxicity to midge (Chironomus tentans) larvae in black shale sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogendi, G.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Hannigan, R.E.; Farris, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Metal bioavailability and toxicity to aquatic organisms are greatly affected by variables such as pH, hardness, organic matter, and sediment acid-volatile sulfide (AVS). Sediment AVS, which reduces metal bioavailability and toxicity by binding and immobilizing metals as insoluble sulfides, has been studied intensely in recent years. Few studies, however, have determined the spatial variability of AVS and its interaction with simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediments containing elevated concentrations of metals resulting from natural geochemical processes, such as weathering of black shales. We collected four sediment samples from each of four headwater bedrock streams in northcentral Arkansa (USA; three black shale-draining streams and one limestone-draining stream). We conducted 10-d acute whole-sediment toxicity tests using the midge Chironomus tentans and performed analyses for AVS, total metals, SEMs, and organic carbon. Most of the sediments from shale-draining streams had similar total metal and SEM concentrations but considerable differences in organic carbon and AVS. Zinc was the leading contributor to the SEM molar sum, averaging between 68 and 74%, whereas lead and cadmium contributed less than 3%. The AVS concentration was very low in all but two samples from one of the shale streams, and the sum of the SEM concentrations was in molar excess of AVS for all shale stream sediments. No significant differences in mean AVS concentrations between sediments collected from shale-draining or limestone-draining sites were noted (p > 0.05). Midge survival and growth in black shale-derived sediments were significantly less (p < 0.001) than that of limestone-derived sediments. On the whole, either SEM alone or SEM-AVS explained the total variation in midge survival and growth about equally well. However, survival and growth were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the two sediment samples that contained measurable AVS compared with the two sediments from the

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans utilizes dauer pheromone biosynthesis to dispose of toxic peroxisomal fatty acids for cellular homoeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caenorhabditis elegans secretes a dauer pheromone or daumone composed of ascarylose and a fatty acid side chain, perception of which enables worms to gauge depletion of food or a high worm population density. As a result, worms enter the dauer state, a specific developmental stage capable of surviv...

  7. Metal mobility and toxicity to microalgae associated with acidification of sediments: CO2 and acid comparison.

    PubMed

    De Orte, M R; Lombardi, A T; Sarmiento, A M; Basallote, M D; Rodriguez-Romero, A; Riba, I; Del Valls, A

    2014-05-01

    The injection and storage of CO2 into marine geological formations has been suggested as a mitigation measure to prevent global warming. However, storage leaks are possible resulting in several effects in the ecosystem. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of CO2 leakage on the fate of metals and on the growth of the microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Metal contaminated sediments were collected and submitted to acidification by means of CO2 injection or by adding HCl. Sediments elutriate were prepared to perform toxicity tests. The results showed that sediment acidification enhanced the release of metals to elutriates. Iron and zinc were the metals most influenced by this process and their concentration increased greatly with pH decreases. Diatom growth was inhibited by both processes: acidification and the presence of metals. Data obtained is this study is useful to calculate the potential risk of CCS activities to the marine environment.

  8. Salicylic acid modulates arsenic toxicity by reducing its root to shoot translocation in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit P; Dixit, Garima; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Tiwari, Manish; Mallick, Shekhar; Pandey, Vivek; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Tripathi, Rudra D

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is posing serious health concerns in South East Asia where rice, an efficient accumulator of As, is prominent crop. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important signaling molecule and plays a crucial role in resistance against biotic and abiotic stress in plants. In present study, ameliorative effect of SA against arsenate (As(V)) toxicity has been investigated in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Arsenate stress hampered the plant growth in terms of root, shoots length, and biomass as well as it enhanced the level of H2O2 and MDA in dose dependent manner in shoot. Exogenous application of SA, reverted the growth, and oxidative stress caused by As(V) and significantly decreased As translocation to the shoots. Level of As in shoot was positively correlated with the expression of OsLsi2, efflux transporter responsible for root to shoot translocation of As in the form of arsenite (As(III)). SA also overcame As(V) induced oxidative stress and modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes in a differential manner in shoots. As treatment hampered the translocation of Fe in the shoot which was compensated by the SA treatment. The level of Fe in root and shoot was positively correlated with the transcript level of transporters responsible for the accumulation of Fe, OsNRAMP5, and OsFRDL1, in the root and shoot, respectively. Co-application of SA was more effective than pre-treatment for reducing As accumulation as well as imposed toxicity.

  9. Exogenous malic acid alleviates cadmium toxicity in Miscanthus sacchariflorus through enhancing photosynthetic capacity and restraining ROS accumulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haipeng; Chen, Houming; Hong, Chuntao; Jiang, Dean; Zheng, Bingsong

    2017-03-18

    Malic acid (MA) plays an important role in the regulation of plant growth, stomatal aperture, nutrition elements homeostasis and toxic metals tolerance. However, little is known about the effects of exogenous MA on physiological and biochemical responses to toxic metals in plants. To measure the alleviation roles of exogenous MA against cadmium (Cd), we determined the effects of MA on plant growth, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes in the leaves of Miscanthus sacchariflorus (M. sacchariflorus) under Cd stress. The Cd exposure alone significantly inhibited plant growth and Pn, but increased the accumulation of ROS even though the anti-oxidant enzymes were markedly activated in the leaves of M. sacchariflorus. Treatment with MA significantly enhanced plant growth and decreased Cd accumulation accompanied by increasing Pn under Cd stress as compared to Cd stress alone, especially when treatment with high concentration of MA (200μM) was used. In addition, Cd and MA indicated synergistic effects by further increasing the activities and genes expression of partial anti-oxidant enzymes, thus resulting in higher glutathione accumulation and reduction of ROS production. The results showed that application of MA alleviated Cd-induced phytotoxicity and oxidant damage through the regulation of both enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidants under Cd stress in M. sacchariflorus.

  10. Effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing activity of usnic acid in ascitic tumor-bearing mice treated with bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-Qing; Liu, Yu-Hong; Guo, Hui-Zhen; Sun, Chao-Yue; Xie, Jian-Hui; Li, Yu-Cui; Chen, Jian-Nan; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Su, Zi-Ren; Chen, Hai-Ming

    2017-03-08

    Usnic acid (UA) can be found in certain lichen species. Growing evidence suggests that UA possesses antitumoral, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. Bleomycin (BLM) is widely used in the treatment of malignant ascites, however, it unexpectedly causes pulmonary fibrosis (PF). Researches show that excessive inflammatory response and oxidative stress in lung tissue is conspicuous causes of BLM-induced PF. Here we investigated mechanism underlying the effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing activity of UA on H22-bearing mice treated with BLM. UA combined with BLM was significantly more effective than BLM alone in inhibiting the tumor growth, arresting the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, and promoting the cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-8 activities to induce cancer cellular apoptosis. The mechanism may be associated with the transcriptional regulation of p53/p21/Cyclin pathway. Furthermore, UA effectively moderated the histopathological changes, reduced the content of MDA, HYP, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1, and increased the level of SOD when combined with BLM in lung tissues of H22-bearing mice, which was believed to be related to the inhibition on the protein level of p-Smad2/3 and enhancement of Smad7 expression. These findings suggested that UA might be a potential effect-enhancing and toxicity-reducing candidate for BLM in the treatment of malignant ascites.

  11. Short-term intra-nasal erythropoietin administration with low sialic acid content is without toxicity or erythropoietic effects.

    PubMed

    Lagarto, Alicia; Bueno, Viviana; Sanchez, Jose A; Couret, Micaela; Valdes, Odalys; Barzaga, Pedro; Lopez, Raisell; Guerra, Isbel; Gabilondo, Tatiana; Vega, Yamile; Beausoleil, Irene

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this investigation was to assess the toxicological potential of nasal formulation of erythropoietin with low sialic acid content (Neuro EPO) after 28 days of intra-nasal dosing in rats besides to evaluate the immunogenicity and erythropoietic effect of the test substance. Healthy Wistar rats of both sexes were used for 28 days subacute toxicity and immunogenicity assays. Doses evaluated were 3450, 4830 and 6900 UI/kg/day. The toxicological endpoints examined included animal body weight, food consumption, hematological and biochemical patterns, antibodies determination, selected tissue weights and histopathological examination. Reversibility of toxic effects was evaluated at high dose 14 days after treatment period. Female B6D2F1 mice were used for evaluated erythropoietic effect of the nasal formulation. Hematological endpoints were examined every week during 28 days of intra-nasal dosing of 6900 UI/kg/day. Variations of hematological patterns were not observed after 28 days of intranasal dosing. A slight increase in glucose level of treated animals within the normal range was observed. This effect was not dose related and was reversible. Antibody formation was not observed in any of the test doses. Histopathological examination of organs and tissues did not reveal treatment induced changes. The administration of Neuro EPO in normocythaemic mice did not produce erythropoietic effect. These results suggest that Neuro EPO could be used as a neuroprotective agent, without significant systemic haematological side effects.

  12. Arsenic induced toxicity in broiler chicks and its alleviation with ascorbic acid: a toxico-patho-biochemical study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khan, Ahrar; Sharaf, Rabia; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Saleemi, Muhammad Kashif; Mahmood, Fazal

    2013-01-01

    To find out toxico-pathological effects of arsenic (As) and ameliorating effect of ascorbic acid (Vit C), broilers birds were administered 50 and 250 mg/kg arsenic and Vit C, respectively alone/in combination. As-treated birds exhibited severe signs of toxicity such as dullness, depression, increased thirst, open mouth breathing and watery diarrhea. All these signs were partially ameliorated with the treatment of Vit C. As-treated birds showed a significant decrease in serum total proteins while serum enzymes, urea and creatinine were significantly increased. Alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase completely whereas proteins, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea and creatinine were partial ameliorated in birds treated with As+Vit C as compared to As-treated and control birds. Pale and hemorrhagic liver and swollen kidneys were observed in As-treated birds. Histopathologically, liver exhibited congestion and cytoplasmic vacuolation while in kidneys, condensation of tubular epithelium nuclei, epithelial necrosis, increased urinary spaces, sloughing of tubules from basement membrane and cast deposition were observed in As-treated birds. Pathological lesions were partially ameliorated with the treatment of Vit C. It can be concluded that arsenic induces biochemical and histopathological alterations in broiler birds; however, these toxic effects can be partially attenuated by Vit C.

  13. The effect of fulvic acids on the toxicity of lead and manganese to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Malcová, R; Gryndler, M; Hrselová, H; Vosátka, M

    2002-01-01

    The effect of fulvic acids (FA) on arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and on the toxicity of lead and manganese toward these symbionts were demonstrated in vitro. Incubation of root segments colonized with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices in undiluted fraction of FA (813 mg/L carbon) decreased an outgrowth of intraradical hyphae. Diluted FA solutions (< 271 mg/L C) did not influence the proportion of root segments bearing proliferating hyphae; solution containing 27.1 mg/L C even increased the proliferation. A decrease of heavy metal toxicity toward the fungus was observed when FA (81.3 mg/L C) were added to the solutions containing higher concentrations (< or = 100 mumol/L) of Mn and Pb; the positive effect of FA was not significant at higher concentrations of metals (0.5 mmol/L). A short-term cultivation of six different saprophytic microorganisms--three actinomycetes and three filamentous fungi--on the FA media (81.3 mg/L C) did not result in a modification of hyphal proliferation from the root segments subsequently incubated in these media.

  14. Effect of omega-3 fatty acid oxidation products on the cellular and mitochondrial toxicity of BDE 47.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Andrew; Kruse, Shane E; Marcinek, David J; Gallagher, Evan P

    2015-06-01

    High levels of the flame retardant 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) have been detected in Pacific salmon sampled near urban areas, raising concern over the safety of salmon consumption. However, salmon fillets also contain the antioxidants eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), whose oxidation products induce cellular antioxidant responses. Because oxidative stress is a mechanism of BDE 47 toxicity, we hypothesized that oxidized EPA and DHA can ameliorate the cellular and mitochondrial toxicity of BDE 47. HepG2 cells were treated with a mixture of oxidized EPA and DHA (oxEPA/oxDHA) at a ratio relevant to salmon consumption (1.5/1 oxEPA/oxDHA) followed by exposure to 100 μM BDE 47. Pretreatment with oxEPA/oxDHA for 12 h prior to BDE 47 exposure prevented BDE 47-mediated depletion of glutathione, and increased expression of antioxidant response genes. oxEPA/oxDHA also reduced the level of reactive oxygen species production by BDE 47. The oxEPA/oxDHA antioxidant responses were associated with partial protection against BDE 47-induced loss of viability and also mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial electron transport system functional analysis revealed extensive inhibition of State 3 respiration and maximum respiratory capacity by BDE 47 were partially reversed by oxEPA/oxDHA. Our findings indicate that the antioxidant effects of oxEPA/oxDHA protect against short exposures to BDE 47, including a protective role of these compounds on maintaining cellular and mitochondrial function.

  15. Novel long chain fatty acid derivatives of quercetin-3-O-glucoside reduce cytotoxicity induced by cigarette smoke toxicants in human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Warnakulasuriya, Sumudu N; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-06-15

    Smoking has become a global health concern due to its association with many disease conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and cancer. Flavonoids are plant polyphenolic compounds, studied extensively for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) is a flavonoid which is widely found in plants. Six novel long chain fatty acid [stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] derivatives of Q3G were evaluated for their potential in protecting human lung fibroblasts against cytotoxicity induced by selected cigarette smoke toxicants: 4-(methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone (NNK), benzo-α-pyrene (BaP), nicotine and chromium (Cr[VI]). Nicotine and Cr[VI] induced toxicity in fibroblasts and reduced the percentage of viable cells, while BaP and NNK did not affect cell viability. The fatty acid derivatives of Q3G provided protection against nicotine- and Cr[VI]-induced cell death and membrane lipid peroxidation. Based on the evaluation of inflammatory markers of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the fatty acid derivatives of Q3G were found to be effective in lowering the inflammatory response. Overall, these novel fatty acid esters of Q3G warrant further investigation as potential cytoprotective agents.

  16. A polymorphism in the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase gene may modify the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of lead.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C M; Wang, X; Hu, H; Kelsey, K T

    1995-01-01

    Associations between the presence of a constitutional variant of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD-2) and lead concentrations in blood and bone, as well as between this allele and indices of kidney function, were investigated among 691 members of a construction trade union. The average blood lead level in this group was 7.78 micrograms/dl. No significant difference was observed in blood lead concentration in ALAD-2 carriers compared to those homozygous for the more common ALAD-1 allele (7.78 +/- 3.62 micrograms Pb/dl vs. 7.73 ( +/- 3.48 micrograms Pb/dl, respectively; p = 0.73). Bone lead was measured in a subset of 122 of the study subjects. Patella minus tibia lead concentrations for each individual averaged 3.35 +/- 11.99 micrograms Pb/g bone mineral in ALAD-1 homozygotes and 8.62 +/- 9.47 micrograms Pb/g bone mineral in ALAD-2 carriers (p = 0.06). Comparisons of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and uric acid by genotype indicated elevated levels among ALAD-2 individuals (p = 0.03 and 0.07, respectively). In logistic regression models accounting for other variables potentially associated with BUN and uric acid levels, BUN was significantly associated with blood lead levels (p = 0.01). Associations of BUN and uric acid levels with ALAD-2 were of borderline statistical significance in these models (p = 0.06 and 0.07). Taken together, these results suggest that the ALAD-2 genotype may influence the pharmacokinetic distribution and chronic renal toxicity of lead, perhaps due to differential binding of lead to the variant protein. Images p248-a Figure 1. PMID:7768225

  17. Biochar enhances Aspergillus niger rock phosphate solubilization by increasing organic acid production and alleviating fluoride toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Zafra, David Lopez; Vassilev, Nikolay Bojkov; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Ribeiro, José Ivo; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-05-01

    During fungal rock phosphate (RP) solubilization, a significant quantity of fluoride (F(-)) is released together with phosphorus (P), strongly inhibiting the process. In the present study, the effect of two F(-) adsorbents [activated alumina (Al2O3) and biochar] on RP solubilization by Aspergillus niger was examined. Al2O3 adsorbed part of the F(-) released but also adsorbed soluble P, which makes it inappropriate for microbial RP solubilization systems. In contrast, biochar adsorbed only F(-) while enhancing phosphate solubilization 3-fold, leading to the accumulation of up to 160 mg of P per liter. By comparing the values of F(-) measured in solution at the end of incubation and those from a predictive model, it was estimated that up to 19 mg of F(-) per liter can be removed from solution by biochar when added at 3 g liter(-1) to the culture medium. Thus, biochar acted as an F(-) sink during RP solubilization and led to an F(-) concentration in solution that was less inhibitory to the process. In the presence of biochar, A. niger produced larger amounts of citric, gluconic, and oxalic acids, whether RP was present or not. Our results show that biochar enhances RP solubilization through two interrelated processes: partial removal of the released F(-) and increased organic acid production. Given the importance of organic acids for P solubilization and that most of the RPs contain high concentrations of F(-), the proposed solubilization system offers an important technological improvement for the microbial production of soluble P fertilizers from RP.

  18. In Vivo Determination of Mitochondrial Function Using Luciferase-Expressing Caenorhabditis elegans: Contribution of Oxidative Phosphorylation, Glycolysis, and Fatty Acid Oxidation to Toxicant-Induced Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Lagido, Cristina; Hirschey, Matthew D; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are a target of many drugs and environmental toxicants; however, how toxicant-induced mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the progression of human disease remains poorly understood. To address this issue, in vivo assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial function need to be developed. Here, using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, we describe how to rapidly assess the in vivo role of the electron transport chain, glycolysis, or fatty acid oxidation in energy metabolism following toxicant exposure, using a luciferase-expressing ATP reporter strain. Alterations in mitochondrial function subsequent to toxicant exposure are detected by depleting steady-state ATP levels with inhibitors of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, glycolysis, or fatty acid oxidation. Differential changes in ATP following short-term inhibitor exposure indicate toxicant-induced alterations at the site of inhibition. Because a microplate reader is the only major piece of equipment required, this is a highly accessible method for studying toxicant-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Effect of humic acid on the toxicity of bare and capped ZnO nanoparticles on bacteria, algal and crustacean systems.

    PubMed

    Akhil, K; Sudheer Khan, S

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles are one of the most extensively used nanoparticles in various commercial products. Depending on the purpose, the particles are coated with various agents including poly vinyl pyrrolidone, poly vinyl alcohol, ethylene glycol etc. As the particles are heavily used, the chance of the particles to get run off into the environment is very high. The study explains the difference in toxicity of bare and capped zinc oxide nanoparticles under various environmental conditions including humic acid and visible light against bacterial, algal and crustacean system. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used as model system for bacterial toxicity testing. Plate counting assay was employed for assessing the toxicity against bacteria. Chlorella pyrenoidsa was used for studying toxicity against algal system, which was evaluated using the chlorophyll estimation assay. Daphnia sp. was used for studying the toxicity in crustacean system. The particles had the ability to adsorb humic acid which further affected the stability of the particle. The study concludes that the presence of environmental factors including humic acid affects the toxicological nature of ZnO NPs.

  20. Protective role of ascorbic acid against asbestos induced toxicity in rat lung: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Khan, S G; Ali, S; Rahman, Q

    1990-01-01

    Asbestos fibers adsorb cytochrome P-450 and P-448 proteins from rat lung micosomal fractions and liberate heme from cytochrome P-448 on prolonged incubation in vitro. further, fibers, decrease the activities of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase and glutathione-S-transferase in microsomal and cytosolic fractions respectively. Mineral fibers also stimulate both the enzymatic (NADPH-induced) and non-enzymatic (Fe2(+)-induced) lipid peroxidation in microsomal fractions. Preincubation of microsomal and cytosolic fractions with a physiological concentration of ascorbic acid ameliorates, to a large extent, the changes induced by asbestos fibers.

  1. Salicylic acid alleviates aluminum toxicity in rice seedlings better than magnesium and calcium by reducing aluminum uptake, suppressing oxidative damage and increasing antioxidative defense.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Poonam; Srivastava, Rajneesh Kumar; Dubey, R S

    2013-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity is a major constraint to crop production in acid soils. The present study was undertaken to examine the comparative ameliorating effects of salicylic acid, Ca and Mg on Al toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings grown in hydroponics. Al treatment (0.5 mM AlCl3) caused decrease in plant vigour, loss of root plasma membrane integrity, increased contents of O 2 (∙-) , H2O2, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls and decline in the level of protein thiol. Al treatment caused significant changes in activity of antioxidative enzymes in rice seedlings. Exogenously added salicylic acid (60 μM), Ca (1 mM) and Mg (0.25 mM) significantly alleviated Al toxicity effects in the seedlings marked by restoration of growth, suppression of Al uptake, restoration of root plasma membrane integrity and decline in O 2 (∙-) , H2O2, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl contents. Salicylic acid, Ca and Mg suppressed Al-induced increase in SOD, GPX and APX activities while it elevated Al-induced decline in CAT activity. By histochemical staining of O 2 (∙-) using NBT and H2O2 using DAB, it was further confirmed that added salicylic acid, Ca or Mg decreased Al-induced accumulation of O 2 (∙-) and H2O2 in the leaf tissues. Results indicate that exogenously added salicylic acid, Ca or Mg alleviates Al toxicity in rice seedlings by suppressing Al uptake, restoring root membrane integrity, reducing ROS level and ROS induced oxidative damage and regulating the level of antioxidative enzyme activities. Further salicylic appears to be superior to Mg and Ca in alleviating Al toxicity effects in rice plants.

  2. Toxicity and SOS response to ELF magnetic field and nalidixic acid in E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Igor

    2011-05-18

    Extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields have previously been shown to affect conformation of chromatin and cell proliferation. Possible genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of ELF have also been discussed and tested. In this study, we analyzed the effect of ELF on chromatin conformation in E. coli GE499 cells by the anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD) technique. Possible genotoxic ELF effects at the specific combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, that has been proven to have effects on chromatin conformation, were investigated by clonogenic assay, cell growth kinetics, and analysis of SOS-response using inducible recA-lacZ fusion and the β-galactosidase assay. Genotoxic agent nalidixic acid (NAL) was used as positive control and in combination with ELF. Nalidixic acid at 3-30μg/ml decreased the AVTD peaks and induced cytotoxic effect. In contrast to NAL, ELF increased AVTD, stimulated cell growth, and increased cloning efficiency. These effects depended on frequency within the frequency range of 7-11Hz. While NAL induced SOS response, ELF exposure did not induce the recA-lacZ fusion. Exposure to ELF did not modify the genotoxic effects of NAL either. All together, the data show that ELF, under specific conditions of exposure, acted as nontoxic but cell growth stimulating agent.

  3. Synthesis of Non-Toxic Silica Particles Stabilized by Molecular Complex Oleic-Acid/Sodium Oleate

    PubMed Central

    Spataru, Catalin Ilie; Ianchis, Raluca; Petcu, Cristian; Nistor, Cristina Lavinia; Purcar, Violeta; Trica, Bogdan; Nitu, Sabina Georgiana; Somoghi, Raluca; Alexandrescu, Elvira; Oancea, Florin; Donescu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The present work is focused on the preparation of biocompatible silica particles from sodium silicate, stabilized by a vesicular system containing oleic acid (OLA) and its alkaline salt (OLANa). Silica nanoparticles were generated by the partial neutralization of oleic acid (OLA), with the sodium cation present in the aqueous solutions of sodium silicate. At the molar ratio OLA/Na+ = 2:1, the molar ratio (OLA/OLANa = 1:1) required to form vesicles, in which the carboxyl and carboxylate groups have equal concentrations, was achieved. In order to obtain hydrophobically modified silica particles, octadecyltriethoxysilane (ODTES) was added in a sodium silicate sol–gel mixture at different molar ratios. The interactions between the octadecyl groups from the modified silica and the oleyl chains from the OLA/OLANa stabilizing system were investigated via simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) (TG-DSC) analyses.A significant decrease in vaporization enthalpy and an increase in amount of ODTES were observed. Additionally, that the hydrophobic interaction between OLA and ODTES has a strong impact on the hybrids’ final morphology and on their textural characteristics was revealed. The highest hydrodynamic average diameter and the most negative ζ potential were recorded for the hybrid in which the ODTES/sodium silicate molar ratio was 1:5. The obtained mesoporous silica particles, stabilized by the OLA/OLANa vesicular system, may find application as carriers for hydrophobic bioactive molecules. PMID:27869768

  4. Toxicants target cell junctions in the testis: Insights from the indazole-carboxylic acid model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous types of junctions in the seminiferous epithelium which are integrated with, and critically dependent on the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. These include the basal tight junctions between Sertoli cells that form the main component of the blood–testis barrier, the basal ectoplasmic specializations (basal ES) and basal tubulobulbar complexes (basal TBC) between Sertoli cells; as well as apical ES and apical TBC between Sertoli cells and the developing spermatids that orchestrate spermiogenesis and spermiation. These junctions, namely TJ, ES, and TBC interact with actin microfilament-based cytoskeleton, which together with the desmosomal junctions that interact with the intermediate filament-based cytoskeleton plus the highly polarized microtubule-based cytoskeleton are working in concert to move spermatocytes and spermatids between the basal and luminal aspect of the seminiferous epithelium. In short, these various junctions are structurally complexed with the actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeleton or intermediate filaments of the Sertoli cell. Studies have shown toxicants (e.g., cadmium, bisphenol A (BPA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), phthalates, and glycerol), and some male contraceptives under development (e.g., adjudin, gamendazole), exert their effects, at least in part, by targeting cell junctions in the testis. The disruption of Sertoli–Sertoli cell and Sertoli–germ cell junctions, results in the loss of germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. Adjudin, a potential male contraceptive under investigation in our laboratory, produces loss of spermatids from the seminiferous tubules through disruption of the Sertoli cell spermatid junctions and disruption of the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. The molecular and structural changes associated with adjudin administration are described, to provide an example of the profile of changes caused by disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell and also Sertoli cell-cell junctions. PMID:26413399

  5. Upregulation of N-acetylaspartic acid resulting nitric oxide toxicity induces aspartoacylase mutations and protein interaction to cause pathophysiology seen in Canavan disease.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Sankar

    2010-12-01

    Aspartoacylase (ASPA) converts N-acetylaspartic acid into aspartate and acetate. In Canavan disease (CD), N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) is found to be increased and over 65 mutations including IVS4+1 G → T, deletion of introns and exons have been reported in the ASPA gene. These changes lead to severe form or mild form of CD. The present study was aimed to understand mechanism in the cause of mutations in ASPA and pathophysiology seen in patients with CD. We have reported that elevated levels of NAA induce inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) to produce nitric oxide toxicity in CD. Nitric oxide toxicity has been shown to induce several mutations including base change G → T and deletion and enhances protein interaction in several genes. Therefore we hypothesize that upregulation of NAA stimulates NOS and the resulting nitric oxide toxicity induces ASPA mutations and protein interaction to result pathophysiological abnormalities seen in patients with CD.

  6. Toxicity of synthetic herbicides containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties towards Pseudomonas putida mt-2 and its response at the level of membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-02-01

    One of the attempts to create more effective herbicidal compounds includes the use of ionic liquids. Herbicidal ionic liquids have more effective biological activity, they are less volatile, more thermally stable, and exhibit superior efficiency in comparison to typically employed herbicides, allowing the reduction of the herbicide dose applied per hectare. However, studies on the environmental toxicity of this group of compounds are very rarely available. Environmental toxicity is an important factor, showing the concentration of compounds that has negative effects on soil bacteria including those responsible for biodegradation processes. Therefore, potential toxicity of four herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) precursors containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties was tested with the well investigated model organism for toxicity and adaptation, Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Results were compared to those obtained for commercial 2,4-D and MCPA herbicides. Next to growth inhibition, given as EC50, changes in the isomerisation of cis to trans unsaturated fatty acids were applied as proxy for cellular stress adaptation to toxic substances. The results revealed that all investigated precursors of HILs showed lower toxicity compared to commercialized synthetic herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA. The collected data on toxicity of HILs together with their physico-chemical properties might be useful for assessing the potential risk of the environmental pollution as well as guidelines for setting the legislation for their future use.

  7. Changes in pH and organic acids in mucilage of Eriophorum angustifolium roots after exposure to elevated concentrations of toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Javed, M Tariq; Stoltz, Eva; Lindberg, Sylvia; Greger, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The presence of Eriophorum angustifolium in mine tailings of pyrite maintains a neutral pH, despite weathering, thus lowering the release of toxic elements into acid mine drainage water. We investigated if the presence of slightly elevated levels of free toxic elements triggers the plant rhizosphere to change the pH towards neutral by increasing organic acid contents. Plants were treated with a combination of As, Pb, Cu, Cd, and Zn at different concentrations in nutrient medium and in soil in a rhizobox-like system for 48-120 h. The pH and organic acids were detected in the mucilage dissolved from root surface, reflecting the rhizospheric solution. Also the pH of root-cell apoplasm was investigated. Both apoplasmic and mucilage pH increased and the concentrations of organic acids enhanced in the mucilage with slightly elevated levels of toxic elements. When organic acids concentration was high, also the pH was high. Thus, efflux of organic acids from the roots of E. angustifolium may induce rhizosphere basification.

  8. Acetylated H4K16 by MYST1 protects UROtsa cells from arsenic toxicity and is decreased following chronic arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, William Jaime; Ren, Xuefeng; Chu, Feixia; Aleshin, Maria; Wintz, Henri; Burlingame, Alma; Smith, Martyn Thomas; Vulpe, Chris Dillon; Zhang Luoping

    2009-12-15

    Arsenic, a human carcinogen that is associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer, is commonly found in drinking water. An important mechanism by which arsenic is thought to be carcinogenic is through the induction of epigenetic changes that lead to aberrant gene expression. Previously, we reported that the SAS2 gene is required for optimal growth of yeast in the presence of arsenite (As{sup III}). Yeast Sas2p is orthologous to human MYST1, a histone 4 lysine 16 (H4K16) acetyltransferase. Here, we show that H4K16 acetylation is necessary for the resistance of yeast to As{sup III} through the modulation of chromatin state. We further explored the role of MYST1 and H4K16 acetylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis in human bladder epithelial cells. The expression of MYST1 was knocked down in UROtsa cells, a model of bladder epithelium that has been used to study arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. Silencing of MYST1 reduced acetylation of H4K16 and induced sensitivity to As{sup III} and to its more toxic metabolite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) at doses relevant to high environmental human exposures. In addition, both As{sup III} and MMA{sup III} treatments decreased global H4K16 acetylation levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This indicates that acetylated H4K16 is required for resistance to arsenic and that a reduction in its levels as a consequence of arsenic exposure may contribute to toxicity in UROtsa cells. Based on these findings, we propose a novel role for the MYST1 gene in human sensitivity to arsenic.

  9. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  10. Adsorption of toxic mercury(II) by an extracellular biopolymer poly(gamma-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Inbaraj, B Stephen; Wang, J S; Lu, J F; Siao, F Y; Chen, B H

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption of mercury(II) by an extracellular biopolymer, poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA), was studied as a function of pH, temperature, agitation time, ionic strength, light and heavy metal ions. An appreciable adsorption occurred at pH>3 and reached a maximum at pH 6. Isotherms were well predicted by Redlich-Peterson model with a dominating Freundlich behavior, implying the heterogeneous nature of mercury(II) adsorption. The adsorption followed an exothermic and spontaneous process with increased orderliness at solid/solution interface. The adsorption was rapid with 90% being attained within 5 min for a 80 mg/L mercury(II) solution, and the kinetic data were precisely described by pseudo second order model. Ionic strength due to added sodium salts reduced the mercury(II) binding with the coordinating ligands following the order: Cl(-) >SO(4)(2-) >NO(3)(-). Both light and heavy metal ions decreased mercury(II) binding by gamma-PGA, with calcium(II) ions showing a more pronounced effect than monovalent sodium and potassium ions, while the interfering heavy metal ions followed the order: Cu(2+) > Cd(2+) > Zn(2+). Distilled water adjusted to pH 2 using hydrochloric acid recovered 98.8% of mercury(II), and gamma-PGA reuse for five cycles of operation showed a loss of only 6.5%. IR spectra of gamma-PGA and Hg(II)-gamma-PGA revealed binding of mercury(II) with carboxylate and amide groups on gamma-PGA.

  11. A chronic toxicity study of diphenylarsinic acid in F344 rats in drinking water for 52 weeks.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Gi, Min; Yamano, Shotarou; Fujioka, Masaki; Tatsumi, Kumiko; Kawachi, Satoko; Ishii, Naomi; Doi, Kenichiro; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-10-28

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of DPAA when administered to rats in their drinking water for 52 weeks. DPAA was administered to groups 1-4 at concentrations of 0, 5, 10, and 20ppm in their drinking water for 52 weeks. There were no significant differences in the final body weights between the control groups and the treatment groups in male or female rats. In serum biochemistry, in females 20ppm DPAA significantly increased alkaline phosphatase and γ-glitamyl transferase compared to controls, and 10 and 20ppm DPAA significantly increased total cholesterol compared to controls. Absolute and relative liver weights were significantly increased in females treated with 20ppm DPAA compared to the control group. Dilation of the common bile duct outside the papilla of Vater and stenosis of the papilla of Vater was observed in all male and female rats administered 20ppm DPAA. The incidence of intrahepatic bile duct hyperplasia was significantly increased in male and female rats treated with 20ppm DPAA compared to the control groups. These results suggest that DPAA is toxic to the bile duct epithelium in rats. The no-observed adverse effect levels of DPAA were estimated to be 10ppm (0.48mg/kg b.w./day) for males and 5ppm (0.35mg/kg b.w./day) for females under the conditions of this study.

  12. Salicylic acid mediates antioxidant defense system and ABA pathway related gene expression in Oryza sativa against quinclorac toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lv, Mengting; Islam, Faisal; Gill, Rafaqat A; Yang, Chong; Ali, Basharat; Yan, Guijun; Zhou, Weijun

    2016-11-01

    The auxin herbicide quinclorac is widely used for controlling weeds in transplanted and direct-seeded rice fields. However, its phytotoxic responses on rice are still unknown. Therefore, in the present investigation we studied the effects of different concentrations (0, 0.1 and 0.5g/L) of quinclorac herbicide on the physiological and biochemical changes of two rice cultivars (XS 134 and ZJ 88) and further analyzed the ameliorating role of salicylic acid (SA) on quinclorac toxicity in rice plants. The results revealed that exogenous application of SA significantly increased plant biomass and total chlorophyll contents in herbicide stressed plants. The lipid peroxidation and ROS (H2O2, O2(-.), (-)OH) production were significantly increased in roots and leaves of both rice cultivars under quinclorac stress, demonstrating an oxidative burst in rice plants. Whereas, application of SA significantly lowered ROS contents under quinclorac stress. Further, exogenous SA treatment significantly modulated antioxidant enzymes and enhanced GSH concentration in stress plants. Anatomical observations of leaf and root revealed that herbicide affected internal structures, while SA played a vital role in protection from toxic effects. Expression analysis of stress hormone ABA genes (OsABA8oxs, OsNCEDs) revealed that quinclorac application enhanced stress condition in cultivar ZJ 88, while SA treatment downregulated ABA genes more in cultivar XS 134, which correlated with the enhanced tolerance to quinclorac induced oxidative stress in this cultivar. The present study delineated that SA played a critical role under quinclorac stress in both rice cultivars by regulating antioxidant defense system, reducing ROS formation and preventing the degradation of internal cell organelles.

  13. Effects of Nigella sativa oil and ascorbic acid against oxytetracycline-induced hepato-renal toxicity in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M.; Ghazy, Emad W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a broad spectrum antibiotic widely used for treatment of a wide range of infections. However, its improper human and animal use leads to toxic effects, including hepatonephrotoxicity. Our objective was to evaluate protective effects of Nigella sativa oil (NSO) and/or ascorbic acid (AA), against OTC-induced hepatonephrotoxicity in rabbits. Materials and Methods: Forty male white New Zealand rabbits were divided into 5 groups of eight each. The 1st group (control) was given saline. The 2nd group was given OTC (200 mg/kg, orally). The 3rd and 4th groups were orally administered NSO and AA (2 ml/kg and 200 mg/kg respectively) 1 hr before OTC administration at the same dose regimen used for the 2nd group. Both NSO and AA were given in combination for the 5th group along with OTC administration. Serum biochemical parameters related to liver and kidney injury were evaluated, and lipid peroxidation as well as antioxidant markers in hepatic and renal tissues were examined. Results: OTC-treated animals revealed significant alterations in serum biochemical hepato-renal injury markers, and showed a markedly increase in hepato-renal lipid peroxidation and inhibition in tissue antioxidant biomarkers. NSO and AA protect against OTC-induced serum and tissue biochemical alterations when each of them is used alone or in combination along with OTC treatment. Furthermore, both NSO and AA produced synergetic hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties. Conclusion: The present study revealed the preventive role of NSO and/or AA against the toxic effects of OTC through their free radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activities. PMID:25945233

  14. Salicylic acid modulates arsenic toxicity by reducing its root to shoot translocation in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit P.; Dixit, Garima; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Tiwari, Manish; Mallick, Shekhar; Pandey, Vivek; Trivedi, Prabodh K.; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Tripathi, Rudra D.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is posing serious health concerns in South East Asia where rice, an efficient accumulator of As, is prominent crop. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important signaling molecule and plays a crucial role in resistance against biotic and abiotic stress in plants. In present study, ameliorative effect of SA against arsenate (AsV) toxicity has been investigated in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Arsenate stress hampered the plant growth in terms of root, shoots length, and biomass as well as it enhanced the level of H2O2 and MDA in dose dependent manner in shoot. Exogenous application of SA, reverted the growth, and oxidative stress caused by AsV and significantly decreased As translocation to the shoots. Level of As in shoot was positively correlated with the expression of OsLsi2, efflux transporter responsible for root to shoot translocation of As in the form of arsenite (AsIII). SA also overcame AsV induced oxidative stress and modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes in a differential manner in shoots. As treatment hampered the translocation of Fe in the shoot which was compensated by the SA treatment. The level of Fe in root and shoot was positively correlated with the transcript level of transporters responsible for the accumulation of Fe, OsNRAMP5, and OsFRDL1, in the root and shoot, respectively. Co-application of SA was more effective than pre-treatment for reducing As accumulation as well as imposed toxicity. PMID:26042132

  15. TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES AND PERFLUOROALKYL ACIDS IN RAT LIVERS ACCURATELY CATEGORIZES CHEMICALS AND IDENTIFIES MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomic analysis of five environmental chemicals was performed to investigate the ability of genomics to predict toxicity, categorize chemicals, and elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Three triazole antifungals (myclobutanil, propiconazole, and triadimefon) and two perfluori...

  16. A comparative study of the sub-chronic toxic effects of three organic arsenical compounds on the urothelium in F344 rats; gender-based differences in response

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jun; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Waalkes, Michael P.; Salim, Elsayed I.; Kinoshita, Anna; Yoshida, Kaoru; Endo, Ginji; Fukushima, Shoji . E-mail: fukuchan@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2006-02-01

    Epidemiological studies indicated that human arsenic exposure can induce urinary bladder cancer. Methylation of inorganic arsenic can generate more reactive and toxic organic arsenical species. In this regard, it was recently reported that the methylated arsenical metabolite, dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)], induced urinary bladder tumors in rats. However, other methylated metabolites, like monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were not carcinogenic to the urinary bladder. In order to compare the early effects of DMA(V), MMA(V), and TMAO on the urinary bladder transitional cell epithelium at the scanning electron microscope (SEM) level, we investigated the sub-chronic (13 weeks) toxicological effects of MMA(V) (187 ppm), DMA(V) (184 ppm), TMAO (182 ppm) given in the drinking water to male and female F344 rats with a focus on the urinary bladder in this study. Obvious pathological changes, including ropy microridges, pitting, increased separation of epithelial cells, exfoliation, and necrosis, were found in the urinary bladders of both sexes, but particularly in females receiving carcinogenic doses of DMA(V). Urine arsenical metabolic differences were found between males and females, with levels of MMA(III), a potential genotoxic form, higher in females treated with DMA(V) than in males. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that DMA(V) is more toxic to the female urinary bladder, in accord with sensitivity to carcinogenesis. Important gender-related metabolic differences including enhanced presentation of MMA(III) to the urothelial cells might possibly account for heightened sensitivity in females. However, the potential carcinogenic effects of MMA(III) need to be further elucidated.

  17. Toxic effect of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on germination and seedling growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lina; Xia, Mengjie; Wang, Li; Mao, Hui

    2016-09-01

    As a persistent organic pollutant in the environment, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been extensively investigated. It can accumulate in food chains and in the human body. This work investigated the effect of PFOA on wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germination and seedling growth by conducting a germination trial and a pot trial. A stimulatory effect of PFOA on seedling growth and root length of wheat was found at <0.2 mg kg(-1), while >800 mg kg(-1) PFOA inhibited germination rate, index, and root and shoot growth. In the pot trial, PFOA concentration in root was double that in the shoot. Soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) and plant height of wheat seedling were inhibited by adding 200 mg kg(-1) PFOA. Proline content and POD activity in wheat seedlings increased as PFOA increased, while CAT activity decreased. Using logarithmic equations, proline content was selected as the most sensitive index by concentration for 50% of maximal effect (EC50). Hence, the tolerance of wheat seedlings to PFOA levels could be evaluated on the basis of the physiological index.

  18. An evaluation of anti-tumor effect and toxicity of PEGylated ursolic acid liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianqian; Zhao, Tingting; Liu, Yanping; Xing, Shanshan; Li, Lei; Gao, Dawei

    2016-02-01

    Therapy of solid tumors mediated by nano-drug delivery has attracted considerable interest. In our previous study, ursolic acid (UA) was successfully encapsulated into PEGylated liposomes. The study aimed to evaluate the tumor inhibition effect and cytotoxicity of the PEGylated UA liposomes by U14 cervical carcinoma-bearing mice. The liposomes were spherical particles with mean particle diameters of 127.2 nm. The tumor inhibition rate of PEGylated UA liposomes was 53.60 % on U14 cervical carcinoma-bearing mice, which was greater than those of the UA solution (18.25 %) and traditional UA liposome groups (40.75 %). The tumor cells apoptosis rate of PEGylated UA liposomes was 25.81 %, which was significantly higher than that of the traditional UA liposomes (13.37 %). Moreover, the kidney and liver did not emerge the pathological changes in UA therapeutic mice by histopathological analysis, while there were significant differences on tumor tissues among three UA formulation groups. The PEGylated UA liposomes exhibited higher anti-tumor activity and lower cytotoxicity, and the main reason was that the coating PEG layer improved UA liposome properties, such as enhancing the stability of liposomes, promoting the effect of slow release, and prolonging the time of blood circulation. This may shed light on the development of PEGylated nano-vehicles.

  19. Evaluation of the factors governing metal biosorption and metal toxicity in acidic soil isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, A.A.

    1992-06-09

    This research project was designed to determine the feasibility of microbial biosorption processes for removing metal ions from aqueous systems. A culture of acidic soil actinomycetes, grown in an aerobic environment in a completely mixed, semibatch culture reactor, was used for the study. The experiments were based on removal of copper and lead from test solutions. The anionic systems tested were nitrate, sulfate, and chloride. To determine the factors influencing biosorption and to characterize metal uptake by cellular and extracellular components of the microbial system, a dialysis testing procedure was developed. The effectiveness of biosorption was influenced by pH, initial concentration of metals, type of anionic system, and organic content of the system. respirometric runs were carried out to identify potential inhibitory effects of metal accumulation on microbial activities. In general, metal accumulation resulted in a decrease in the microbial oxygen uptake rate. Also, a lag phase was observed before the onset of the respiratory activity particularly at concentrations of copper and lead greater than 100 ppM.

  20. Triethylenetetramine Synergizes with Pharmacologic Ascorbic Acid in Hydrogen Peroxide Mediated Selective Toxicity to Breast Cancer Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lianlian; Luo, Xiaofang; Li, Cong; Huang, Yubing; Xu, Ping; Lloyd-Davies, Laetitia H.; Delplancke, Thibaut; Peng, Chuan; Qi, Hongbo; Baker, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and downregulation of catalase and more resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than normal cells. Thus, relatively high H2O2 promotes breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. However, excessive intracellular H2O2 leads to death of breast cancer cells. In cancer cells, high level ascorbic acid (Asc) is able to be autoxidized and thus provides an electron to oxygen to generate H2O2. In the present study, we demonstrated that triethylenetetramine (TETA) enhances Asc autoxidation and thus elevates H2O2 production in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, Asc/TETA combination significantly impaired cancer cell viability, while having much milder effects on normal cells, indicating Asc/TETA could be a promising therapy for breast cancer. Moreover, SOD1 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine failed to improve MCF-7 cells viability in the presence of Asc/TETA, while catalase significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to breast cancer cells, strongly suggesting that the selective cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to cancer cells is H2O2-dependent. In addition, Asc/TETA induces RAS/ERK downregulation in breast cancer cells. Animal studies confirmed that Asc/TETA effectively suppressed tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, TETA synergizes pharmacologic Asc autoxidation and H2O2 overproduction in breast cancer cells, which suppresses RAS/ERK pathway and results in apoptosis. PMID:28280522

  1. Dynamics and thermodynamics of toxic metals adsorption onto soil-extracted humic acid.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Medhat A; albishri, Hassan M

    2014-09-01

    Humic acids, HA represent a large portion of natural organic matter in soils, sediments and waters. They are environmentally important materials due to their extensive ubiquity and strong complexation ability, which can influence heavy metal removal and transportation in waters. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the adsorption of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) onto solid soil-derived HA have been investigated at optimum conditions of pH (5.5±0.1), metal concentration (10-100mmolL(-1)) and different temperatures (293-323K). The suitability of adsorption models such as Freundlich and Langmuir to equilibrium data was investigated. The adsorption was well described by Langmuir isotherm model in multi-detectable steps. Adsorption sites, i (i=A, B, C) with different capacities, νi are characterized. The stoichiometric site capacity is independent of temperature and equilibrium constant, Ki. Adsorption sites A and B are selectively occupied by Cr(VI) cations while sites A and C are selectively occupied by Cd(II) cations. The thermodynamic parameters of adsorption systems are correlated for each adsorption step. The adsorption is endothermic, spontaneous and favorable. Different kinetic models are applied and the adsorption of these heavy metals onto HA follows pseudo-second-order kinetics and equilibrium is achieved within 24h. The adsorption reaction is controlled by diffusion processes and the type of the adsorption is physical.

  2. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific.

    PubMed

    Silver, Mary W; Bargu, Sibel; Coale, Susan L; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R; Garcia, Ana C; Roberts, Kathryn J; Sekula-Wood, Emily; Bruland, Kenneth W; Coale, Kenneth H

    2010-11-30

    Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14 of the 26 stations analyzed for DA. Toxin ranged from 0.3 fg·cell(-1) to 2 pg·cell(-1), comparable with levels found in similar-sized cells from coastal waters. In the western subarctic, descent of intact Pseudo-nitzschia likely delivered significant amounts of toxin (up to 4 μg of DA·m(-2)·d(-1)) to underlying mesopelagic waters (150-500 m). By reexamining phytoplankton samples from SOFeX and IronEx II, we found substantial amounts of DA associated with Pseudo-nitzschia. Indeed, at SOFeX in the Antarctic Pacific, DA reached 220 ng·L(-1), levels at which animal mortalities have occurred on continental shelves. Iron ocean fertilization also occurs naturally and may have promoted blooms of these ubiquitous algae over previous glacial cycles during deposition of iron-rich aerosols. Thus, the neurotoxin DA occurs both in coastal and oceanic waters, and its concentration, associated with changes in Pseudo-nitzschia abundance, likely varies naturally with climate cycles, as well as with artificial iron fertilization. Given that iron fertilization in iron-depleted regions of the sea has been proposed to enhance phytoplankton growth and, thereby, both reduce atmospheric CO(2) and moderate ocean acidification in surface waters, consideration of the potentially serious ecosystem impacts associated with DA is prudent.

  3. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Mary W.; Bargu, Sibel; Coale, Susan L.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Garcia, Ana C.; Roberts, Kathryn J.; Sekula-Wood, Emily; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14 of the 26 stations analyzed for DA. Toxin ranged from 0.3 fg·cell−1 to 2 pg·cell−1, comparable with levels found in similar-sized cells from coastal waters. In the western subarctic, descent of intact Pseudo-nitzschia likely delivered significant amounts of toxin (up to 4 μg of DA·m−2·d−1) to underlying mesopelagic waters (150–500 m). By reexamining phytoplankton samples from SOFeX and IronEx II, we found substantial amounts of DA associated with Pseudo-nitzschia. Indeed, at SOFeX in the Antarctic Pacific, DA reached 220 ng·L−1, levels at which animal mortalities have occurred on continental shelves. Iron ocean fertilization also occurs naturally and may have promoted blooms of these ubiquitous algae over previous glacial cycles during deposition of iron-rich aerosols. Thus, the neurotoxin DA occurs both in coastal and oceanic waters, and its concentration, associated with changes in Pseudo-nitzschia abundance, likely varies naturally with climate cycles, as well as with artificial iron fertilization. Given that iron fertilization in iron-depleted regions of the sea has been proposed to enhance phytoplankton growth and, thereby, both reduce atmospheric CO2 and moderate ocean acidification in surface waters, consideration of the potentially serious ecosystem impacts associated with DA is prudent. PMID:21068374

  4. Manganese Toxicity in Sugarcane Plantlets Grown on Acidic Soils of Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu Lan; Yang, Shu; Long, Guang Xia; Zhao, Zun Kang; Li, Xiao Feng; Gu, Ming Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ratoon sugarcane plantlets in southern China have suffered a serious chlorosis problem in recent years. To reveal the causes of chlorosis, plant nutrition in chlorotic sugarcane plantlets and the role of manganese (Mn) in this condition were investigated. The study results showed that the pH of soils growing chlorotic plantlets ranged from 3.74 to 4.84. The symptoms of chlorosis were similar to those of iron (Fe) deficiency while the chlorotic and non-chlorotic plantlets contained similar amount of Fe. Chlorotic plantlets had 6.4-times more Mn in their leaf tissues compared to the control plants. There was a significantly positive correlation between Mn concentration in the leaves and the exchangeable Mn concentration in the soils. Moreover, leaf Mn concentration was related to both seasonal changes in leaf chlorophyll concentration and to the occurrence of chlorosis. Basal stalks of mature sugarcanes contained up to 564.36 mg·kg-1 DW Mn. Excess Mn in the parent stalks resulted in a depress of chlorophyll concentration in the leaves of sugarcanes as indicated by lower chlorophyll concentration in the leaves of plantlets emerged from basal stalks. Ratoon sugarcane plantlets were susceptible to chlorosis due to high Mn accumulation in their leaves (456.90–1626.95 mg·kg-1 DW), while in planted canes chlorosis did not occur because of low Mn accumulation (94.64–313.41mg·kg-1 DW). On the other hand, active Fe content in chlorotic plantlets (3.39 mg kg-1 FW) was only equivalent to 28.2% of the concentration found in the control. These results indicate that chlorosis in ratoon sugarcane plantlets results from excessive Mn accumulated in parent stalks of planted cane sugarcanes grown on excessive Mn acidic soils, while active Fe deficiency in plantlets may play a secondary role in the chlorosis. PMID:27023702

  5. The Ability of PAS, Acetylsalicylic Acid and Calcium Disodium EDTA to Protect Against the Toxic Effects of Manganese on Mitochondrial Respiration in Gill of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Sherine; Davis, Kiyya; Saddler, Claudette; Joseph, Jevaun; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal that at excessive levels in brain causes Manganism, a condition similar to Parkinson's disease. Previously we showed that Mn had a neurotoxic effect on the dopaminergic, but not serotonergic, innervation of the lateral ciliated cells in the gill of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica. While the mechanism of action of Mn toxicity is not completely understood, studies suggest that Mn toxicity may involve mitochondrial damage and resulting neural dysfunction in the brain’s dopaminergic system. In this study we utilized micro-batch chambers and oxygen probes to measure oyster gill mitochondrial respiration in the presence of Mn and potential Mn blockers. The addition of Mn to respiring mitochondria caused a dose dependent decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption. Pretreating mitochondria with calcium disodium EDTA (caEDTA), p aminosalicylic acid (PAS) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) before Mn additions, provided full protection against the toxic effects of Mn. While mitochondrial pretreatment with any of the 3 drugs effectively blocked Mn toxicity, none of the drugs tested was able to reverse the decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption seen in Mn treated mitochondria. The study found that high levels of Mn had a toxic effect on gill mitochondrial O2 consumption and that this effect could be blocked by the drugs caEDTA, PAS and ASA. C. virginica continues to be a good model with which to investigate the mechanism that underlies manganese neurotoxcity and in the pharmacological study of drugs to treat or prevent Manganism. PMID:21977482

  6. Cr (VI) induced oxidative stress and toxicity in cultured cerebellar granule neurons at different stages of development and protective effect of Rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Abolfazl; Soodi, Maliheh; Amani, Nahid

    2016-03-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a widespread metal ion in the workplace, industrial effluent, and water. The toxicity of chromium (VI) on various organs including the liver, kidneys, and lung were studied, but little is known about neurotoxicity. In this study, neurotoxic effects of Cr (VI) have been investigated by cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Immature and mature neurons were exposed to different concentrations of potassium dichromate for 24 h and cytotoxicity was measured by MTT assay. In addition, immature neurons were exposed for 5 days as regards cytotoxic effect in development stages. The reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the protective effect of Rosmarinic acid on mature and immature neurons exposed to potassium dichromate, were measured. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and acetylcholinesterase activity in mature neurons were assessed following exposure to potassium dichromate. The results indicate that toxicity of Cr (VI) dependent on maturation steps. Cr (VI) was less toxic for immature neurons. Also, Cr (VI) induced MMP reduction and ROS production in both immature and mature neurons. In Cr (VI) treated neurons, increased lipid peroxidation and GPx activity but not acetylcholinesterase activity was observed. Interestingly, Rosmarinic acid, as a natural antioxidant, could protect mature but not immature neurons against Cr (VI) induced toxicity. Our findings revealed vulnerability of mature neurons to Cr (VI) induced toxicity and oxidative stress.

  7. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidative injury and cellular abnormalities in doxorubicin induced cardiac toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sameer N; Mahajan, Umesh B; Chandrayan, Govind; Kumawat, Vivek S; Kamble, Sarika; Patil, Pradip; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Patil, Chandragouda R; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of doxorubicin (Dox) induced cardiotoxicity may be co-operative to recover future Dox treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the cardioprotective effects of oleanolic acid (OA), an antioxidant agent, on Dox induced cardiotoxicity. OA is a triterpenoid compound, which exist widely in plant kingdom in free acid form or as a glycosidic triterpenoids saponins. Cardiotoxicity was induced in Wistar rats with single intravenous injection of doxorubicin at dose of 67.75 mg/kg i.v for 48 hrs. At 12 hrs of interval following Dox administration the cardioprotective effect of OA (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and Amifostine (AMF) (90 mg/kg i.v., single dose prior 30 min) were evaluated. Induction of cardiotoxicity was confirmed by increase in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures, maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dtmax, an indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dtmax, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load). Cardiac markers in such as CK-MB, LDH and alterations in ECG. Dox administration showed alteration in Biochemical parameters and endogenous antioxidants. Administration of OA Showed maximal protection against Dox induced cardiac toxicity as observed by reduction in blood pressure, prevention of left ventricular function and attenuation of biochemical and antioxidant parameters. Based on the findings, its concluded that OA can be used as an adjuvant with Dox therapy in treating cancers. PMID:27069540

  8. A Segment of 97 Amino Acids within the Translocation Domain of Clostridium difficile Toxin B Is Essential for Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongrong; Shi, Lianfa; Li, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Standley, Clive; Yang, Zhong; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Savidge, Tor; Wang, Xiaoning; Feng, Hanping

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB) intoxicates target cells by glucosylating Rho GTPases. TcdB (269 kDa) consists of at least 4 functional domains including a glucosyltransferase domain (GTD), a cysteine protease domain (CPD), a translocation domain (TD), and a receptor binding domain (RBD). The function and molecular mode of action of the TD, which is the largest segment of TcdB and comprises nearly 50% of the protein, remain largely unknown. Here we show that a 97-amino-acid segment (AA1756 – 1852, designated as ?97 or D97), located in the C-terminus of the TD and adjacent to the RBD, is essential for the cellular activity of TcdB. Deletion of this segment in TcdB (designated as TxB-D97), did not adversely alter toxin enzymatic activities or its cellular binding and uptake capacity. TxB-D97 bound to and entered cells in a manner similar to TcdB holotoxin. Both wild type and mutant toxins released their GTDs similarly in the presence of inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6), and showed a similar glucosyltransferase activity in a cell-free glucosylating assay. Despite these similarities, the cytotoxic activity of TxB-D97 was reduced by more than 5 logs compared to wild type toxin, supported by the inability of TxB-D97 to glucosylate Rac1 of target cells. Moreover, the mutant toxin failed to elicit tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in macrophages, a process dependent on the glucosyltransferase activity of the toxin. Cellular fractionation of toxin-exposed cells revealed that TxB-D97 was unable to efficiently release the GTD into cytosol. Thereby, we conclude the 97-amino-acid region of the TD C-terminus of TcdB adjacent to the RBD, is essential for the toxicity of TcdB. PMID:23484044

  9. [Acid phosphatase of leukocytes in patients with diffuse toxic goiter in evaluating the stage of the disease].

    PubMed

    Vaiuta, N P; Livshits, A Kh; Mendeleev, I M

    1987-01-01

    Acid phosphatase (AP) of lymphocytes and neutrophils was examined cytochemically in 23 patients with associated diffuse toxic goiter (DTG) and thyrotoxicosis during thiamazol treatment, in 20 persons with a DTG remission, and in 5 patients with postradiation and postoperative hypothyroses. AP activity with multiple-granule distribution of the enzyme was high in the majority of the patients with thyrotoxicosis, decreasing with thiamazol treatment. Thyrotoxicosis recurred in 4 out of 11 patients whose lymphocytes had an increased amount of AP during a DTG remission. In 9 patients with normal AP content, no relapses were noted during a DTG remission. Two patients with iatrogenic hypothyroses associated with high lymphocytic AP activity manifested elevated titres of antithyroglobulin immunoglobulins (ATI). In 3 patients with normal content of cellular AP, the ATI titre was low. Cellular AP, a non-specific marker of immunogenesis activity, makes it possible to presumably differentiate the stages of DTG and to evaluate to a definite degree the character of a remission. The preserved high activity of lymphocytic AP in patients with a DTG remission is a prognostically unfavourable factor as regards thyrotoxicosis relapses. The high titre of ATI and activity of lymphocytic AP attest to the predominant autoimmune component of such hypothyroses in part of DTG patients. The authors stress that such patients should receive combined thyroid and glucocorticoid therapy.

  10. Alfa-lipoic acid protects testosterone secretion pathway and sperm quality against 4-tert-octylphenol induced reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Othman, Azza I; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Koriem, Khaled M; El-Sayed, Aml A

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of α-lipoic acid (LA) (50 mg/kg bw) against 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) (50 mg/kg bw) induced reproductive toxicity in male rats was studied. LA was injected 1h prior to OP administration three times a week. OP caused significant increase in oxidative stress in hypothalamus and epididymal sperm, disturbed hormonal levels in serum, decreased sperm quality, increased DNA fragmentation and loss of 35 and 95 kDa proteins in sperm, as well as elevated proliferating index in testis. LA protected against oxidative stress through promoting the levels of glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase in hypothalamus and sperm. In addition, LA prevented the decrease in testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and inhibited the elevations in sex-hormone-binding globulin levels and showed normal sperm quality. LA modulated proliferation of germ cell, protected against DNA fragmentation and maintained membrane protein organization in the sperm. In conclusion, LA normalized oxidative stress and protected testosterone synthesis pathway across hypothalamus-testicular axis and sperm quality indicating its defensive influence against OP-induced oxidative reproductive dysfunction in male rats.

  11. Ferulic Acid against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Heart Toxicity in Mice by Inhibiting NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yafan; Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Congxia; Zhao, Ling; Wang, Zheng; Dai, Zhijun; Lin, Shuai; Kang, Huafeng; Ma, Xiaobin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the protective effects of ferulic acid (FA) against cyclophosphamide- (CTX-) induced changes in mice. Forty-eight male ICR mice were divided into four groups. Control group was intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with 200 μL of phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Model group was intraperitoneally injected with a single dose of CTX (200 mg/kg). FA (50 mg/kg) and FA (100 mg/kg) groups were intraperitoneally injected with a single dose of CTX (200 mg/kg) followed by the intragastric treatment with FA (50, 100 mg/kg) for 7 consecutive days. After 12 d, the mice were sacrificed to analyze the hematological, biochemical, histological parameters and mechanism research. The results indicated that FA significantly decreased the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in CTX-injected mice. In addition, FA effectively reduced the total numbers of white blood cells (WBCs), red blood cells, platelets, and hemoglobin content. FA also obviously attenuated the histological changes of the heart tissues caused by CTX. Moreover, Western blot demonstrated that FA inhibited the phosphorylations of NF-κB signaling pathway in CTX-stimulated cardiac tissues. In conclusion, FA might be considered as an effective agent in the amelioration of the heart toxicity resulting from CTX treatment. PMID:26881001

  12. Ellagic acid protects against arsenic toxicity in isolated rat mitochondria possibly through the maintaining of complex II.

    PubMed

    Keshtzar, E; Khodayar, M J; Javadipour, M; Ghaffari, M A; Bolduc, D L; Rezaei, M

    2016-10-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to many health problems including diabetes and cancer. In the present study, we assessed the protective effect of ellagic acid (EA) against toxicity induced by arsenic in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential decline were assayed using dichlorofluorescein diacetate and rhodamine 123, respectively, and dehydrogenase activity obtained by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide conversion assay. Arsenic increased ROS levels and mitochondrial dysfunction, which led to a reduction in mitochondrial total dehydrogenase activity. Mitochondria pretreated with EA exposed to arsenic at various concentrations led to a reversal of ROS production and mitochondrial damage. Our results showed that mitochondria were significantly affected when exposed to arsenic, which resulted in excessive ROS production and mitochondrial membrane disruption. Pretreatment with EA, reduced ROS amounts, mitochondrial damage, and restored total dehydrogenase activity specifically associated with mitochondrial complex II. EA protective characteristics may be accomplished particularly throughout the mitochondrial maintenance either directly by its antioxidant property or indirectly through its maintaining of complex II. These findings also suggest a potential role for EA in treating or preventing mitochondria associated disorders.

  13. Science review: Carnitine in the treatment of valproic acid-induced toxicity – what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Philippe ER; Penaloza, Andrea; Zahir, Soheil; Gris, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug and is usually well tolerated, but rare serious complications may occur in some patients receiving VPA chronically, including haemorrhagic pancreatitis, bone marrow suppression, VPA-induced hepatotoxicity (VHT) and VPA-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy (VHE). Some data suggest that VHT and VHE may be promoted by carnitine deficiency. Acute VPA intoxication also occurs as a consequence of intentional or accidental overdose and its incidence is increasing, because of use of VPA in psychiatric disorders. Although it usually results in mild central nervous system depression, serious toxicity and even fatal cases have been reported. Several studies or isolated clinical observations have suggested the potential value of oral L-carnitine in reversing carnitine deficiency or preventing its development as well as some adverse effects due to VPA. Carnitine supplementation during VPA therapy in high-risk patients is now recommended by some scientific committees and textbooks, especially paediatricians. L-carnitine therapy could also be valuable in those patients who develop VHT or VHE. A few isolated observations also suggest that L-carnitine may be useful in patients with coma or in preventing hepatic dysfunction after acute VPA overdose. However, these issues deserve further investigation in controlled, randomized and probably multicentre trials to evaluate the clinical value and the appropriate dosage of L-carnitine in each of these conditions. PMID:16277730

  14. Can behavioural responses of Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) assess sediment toxicity? A case study with sediments exposed to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Sardo, A M; Soares, A M V M

    2010-02-01

    The São Domingos mine (Portugal) is, potentially, a good site for ecotoxicological studies, due to a pH and metal gradient of acid mine drainage. In this study, the toxicity of several mine sediments was evaluated using the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus as a test organism. Our hypothesis was that exposure to contaminated sediments would cause behavioural early warning responses in L. variegatus. Five sites, with pH ranging from 2.5 to 6.5, and with associated metals, were investigated. The results showed poor sediment quality in most of the collected sediments and Fe, S and As were the dominant elements in the samples. High mortalities were observed, ranging from 32.6 to 100%, indicating severe contamination. The collected sediments did not support good L. variegatus growth and significantly changed its behaviour. Early warning responses consisted of decreased locomotion and decreased peristaltic movements. A behaviour inhibition will affect the ecosystem balance by limiting the organisms' ability to avoid capture, which leads to a higher risk of predation.

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies chromosome 10q24.32 variants associated with arsenic metabolism and toxicity phenotypes in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Argos, Maria; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Rahaman, Ronald; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Quasem, Iftekhar; Hore, Samar K; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Gamble, Mary V; Yunus, Md; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Baron, John A; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a major public health issue in many countries, increasing risk for a wide array of diseases, including cancer. There is inter-individual variation in arsenic metabolism efficiency and susceptibility to arsenic toxicity; however, the basis of this variation is not well understood. Here, we have performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of arsenic-related metabolism and toxicity phenotypes to improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which arsenic affects health. Using data on urinary arsenic metabolite concentrations and approximately 300,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 1,313 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we identified genome-wide significant association signals (P<5×10(-8)) for percentages of both monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) near the AS3MT gene (arsenite methyltransferase; 10q24.32), with five genetic variants showing independent associations. In a follow-up analysis of 1,085 individuals with arsenic-induced premalignant skin lesions (the classical sign of arsenic toxicity) and 1,794 controls, we show that one of these five variants (rs9527) is also associated with skin lesion risk (P = 0.0005). Using a subset of individuals with prospectively measured arsenic (n = 769), we show that rs9527 interacts with arsenic to influence incident skin lesion risk (P = 0.01). Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses of genome-wide expression data from 950 individual's lymphocyte RNA suggest that several of our lead SNPs represent cis-eQTLs for AS3MT (P = 10(-12)) and neighboring gene C10orf32 (P = 10(-44)), which are involved in C10orf32-AS3MT read-through transcription. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic investigation of arsenic metabolism and toxicity to date, the only GWAS of any arsenic-related trait, and the first study to implicate 10q24.32 variants in both arsenic metabolism and arsenical skin

  16. Pretreatment by low-dose fibrates protects against acute free fatty acid-induced renal tubule toxicity by counteracting PPAR{alpha} deterioration

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kyoko; Kamijo, Yuji; Hora, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Higuchi, Makoto; Nakajima, Takero; Ehara, Takashi; Shigematsu, Hidekazu; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2011-05-01

    Development of a preventive strategy against tubular damage associated with proteinuria is of great importance. Recently, free fatty acid (FFA) toxicities accompanying proteinuria were found to be a main cause of tubular damage, which was aggravated by insufficiency of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), suggesting the benefit of PPAR{alpha} activation. However, an earlier study using a murine acute tubular injury model, FFA-overload nephropathy, demonstrated that high-dose treatment of PPAR{alpha} agonist (0.5% clofibrate diet) aggravated the tubular damage as a consequence of excess serum accumulation of clofibrate metabolites due to decreased kidney elimination. To induce the renoprotective effects of PPAR{alpha} agonists without drug accumulation, we tried a pretreatment study using low-dose clofibrate (0.1% clofibrate diet) using the same murine model. Low-dose clofibrate pretreatment prevented acute tubular injuries without accumulation of its metabolites. The tubular protective effects appeared to be associated with the counteraction of PPAR{alpha} deterioration, resulting in the decrease of FFAs influx to the kidney, maintenance of fatty acid oxidation, diminution of intracellular accumulation of undigested FFAs, and attenuation of disease developmental factors including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and NF{kappa}B activation. These effects are common to other fibrates and dependent on PPAR{alpha} function. Interestingly, however, clofibrate pretreatment also exerted PPAR{alpha}-independent tubular toxicities in PPAR{alpha}-null mice with FFA-overload nephropathy. The favorable properties of fibrates are evident when PPAR{alpha}-dependent tubular protective effects outweigh their PPAR{alpha}-independent tubular toxicities. This delicate balance seems to be easily affected by the drug dose. It will be important to establish the appropriate dosage of fibrates for treatment against kidney disease and to develop a novel PPAR

  17. L-methionine-dl-sulfoxide metabolism and toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: gender differences and inhibition with aminooxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dever, Joseph T; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2008-11-01

    L-methionine-dl-sulfoxide (MetO) is an L-methionine (Met) metabolite, but its role in Met metabolism and toxicity is not clear. In this study, MetO uptake, metabolism to Met, cytotoxicity, and glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) status were characterized in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes incubated at 37 degrees C with 0 to 30 mM MetO for 0 to 5 h. In male hepatocytes, dose-dependent cytotoxicity concomitant with GSH depletion without GSSG formation occurred after exposure to 20 or 30 mM MetO but not after exposure to 10 mM MetO. Interestingly, female hepatocytes exposed to 30 mM MetO showed no cytotoxicity and exhibited increased intracellular GSH levels compared with control hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes had approximately 2-fold higher levels of intracellular Met-d-O or Met-l-O after MetO (30 mM) exposure for 0 to 1.5 h compared with female hepatocytes. In hepatocytes of both genders, Met-l-O was detected at nearly 5-fold higher levels than Met-d-O, and no significant increase in cellular Met levels was detected. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of transamination reactions, to MetO-exposed male hepatocytes resulted in higher cellular Met-d-O and Met-l-O levels and decreased the cytotoxicity of MetO. Interestingly, exposure of control male hepatocytes to AOAA selectively increased cellular Met-d-O levels to levels similar to those observed after exposure to MetO (30 mM). Analysis of MetO transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K in mouse liver cytosol revealed similar rates of MetO transamination in cytosol of both genders. Taken together, these results provide evidence for stereoselective oxidation of Met to Met-d-O under physiological conditions and suggest a major role for MetO transamination in MetO metabolism and toxicity.

  18. Transformations of Toxic Metals and Metalloids by Pseudomonas stutzeri Strain KC and its Siderophore Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzka, Anna M.; Paszczynski, Andrzej J.; Crawford, Ronald L.

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid)Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid) (pdtc)(pdtc) is a siderophore produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri KCPseudomonas stutzeri KC that plays a role in conditioning the bacterial environment. It serves as a siderophore in solubilizing ferric iron and other micronutrient metals, and as a thiol-containing compound, it reacts with toxic heavy metals and metalloids, reducing metals like Cr(VI), Se(IV), and Te(IV) and precipitating metals as sulfides (e.g., Hg(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and As(III)), rendering them insoluble and less toxic. Understanding the mechanism by which bacteria use pdtc to interact with metals may contribute to our understanding of metal cycling in the biosphere, and may have potential for use in bioremediationbioremediation of heavy metals.

  19. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  20. Biodistribution of polyacrylic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles is associated with proinflammatory activation and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Couto, Diana; Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera Marisa; Chisté, Renan Campos; Almeida, Agostinho; Lopez-Quintela, M Arturo; Rivas, José; Freitas, Paulo; Silva, Paula; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) have physical and chemical properties that render them useful for several new biomedical applications. Still, so far, in vivo safety studies of IONs with coatings of biomedical interest are still scarce. The aim of this study, therefore, was to clarify the acute biological effects of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated IONs, by determining their biodistribution and their potential proinflammatory and toxic effects in CD-1 mice. The biodistribution of PAA-coated IONs in several organs (liver, spleen, kidneys, brain, heart, testes and lungs), the plasma cytokines, chemokine and aminotransferases levels, white blood cell count, oxidative stress parameters, adenosine triphosphate and histologic features of liver, spleen and kidneys were evaluated 24 h after a single acute (8, 20 or 50 mg kg(-1) ) intravenous administration of PAA-coated IONs in magnetite form. The obtained results showed that these IONs accumulate mainly in the liver and spleen and, to a lesser extent, in the lungs. Although our data showed that PAA-coated IONs do not cause severe organ damage, an inflammatory process was triggered in vivo, as evidenced by as evidenced by increased neutrophils and large lymphocytes in the differential blood count. Moreover, an accumulation of iron in macrophages of the liver and spleen was observed and hepatic lipid peroxidation was elicited, showing that the IONs are able to induce oxidative stress. The effects of these nanoparticles need to be further investigated regarding the mechanisms involved and the long-term consequences of intravenous administration of PAA-coated IONs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Halogenated ligands and their interactions with amino acids: implications for structure-activity and structure-toxicity relationships.

    PubMed

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Ekins, Sean; Welsh, William J

    2008-09-01

    The properties of chemicals are rooted in their molecular structure. It follows that structural analysis of specific interactions between ligands and biomolecules at the molecular level is invaluable for defining structure-activity relationships (SARs) and structure-toxicity relationships (STRs). This study has elucidated the structural and molecular basis of interactions of biomolecules with alkyl and aryl halides that are extensively used as components in many commercial pesticides, disinfectants, and drugs. We analyzed the protein structures deposited in Protein Data Bank (PDB) for structural information associated with interactions between halogenated ligands and proteins. This analysis revealed distinct patterns with respect to the nature and structural characteristics of halogen interactions with specific types of atoms and groups in proteins. Fluorine had the highest propensity of interactions for glycine, while chlorine for leucine, bromine for arginine, and iodine for lysine. Chlorine, bromine and iodine had the lowest propensity of interactions for cysteine, while fluorine had a lowest propensity for proline. These trends for highest propensity shifted towards the hydrophobic residues for all the halogens when only interactions with the side chain were considered. Halogens had equal propensities of interaction for the halogen bonding partners (nitrogen and oxygen atoms), albeit with different geometries. The optimal angle for interactions with halogens was approximately 120 degrees for oxygen atoms, and approximately 96 degrees for nitrogen atoms. The distance distributions of halogens with various amino acids were mostly bimodal, and the angle distributions were unimodal. Insights gained from this study have implications for the rational design of safer drugs and commercially important chemicals.

  2. Oral (Gavage) Combined Developmental and Perinatal/Postnatal Reproduction Toxicity Study of Ammonium Salt of Perfluorinated Hexanoic Acid in Mice.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Hoberman, Alan M

    2014-05-01

    The reproductive toxicity potential of Ammonium Salt of Perfluorinated Hexanoic Acid (PFHxA Ammonium Salt) in pregnant Crl: CD1(ICR) mice was investigated. Twenty females/group were administered the test substance or vehicle once daily from gestation day 6 through 18. Phase 1 doses: 0, 100, 350, and 500 mg/kg/d; phase 2: 0, 7, 35, and 175 mg/kg/d. Parameters evaluated include mortality, viability, body weights, clinical signs, abortions, premature deliveries, pregnancy and fertility, litter observations, maternal behavior, and sexual maturity in the F1 generation. The level of PFHxA Ammonium Salt was measured in the liver of F0 and F1 mice. At doses of 350 and 500 mg/kg/d maternal mortalities, excess salivation and changes in body weight gains occurred. Pup body weights were reduced on postpartum day (PPD) 0 in all the dosage groups, but persisted only in the 350 and 500 mg/kg/d groups. Additional effects at 300 and 500 mg/kg/d included stillbirths, reductions in viability indices, and delays in physical development. Levels of PFHxA Ammonium Salt in the livers of the 100 mg/kg/d dams were all below the lower limit of quantization (0.02 µg/mL); in the 350 mg/kg/d group, 3 of the 8 samples had quantifiable analytical results. In phase 2 no PFHxA Ammonium Salt was found in the liver. Adverse effects occurred only in the 175 mg/kg/d group and consisted of increased stillborn pups, pups dying on PPD 1, and reduced pup weights on PPD 1. Based on these data, the maternal and reproductive no observable adverse effect level of PFHxA Ammonium Salt is 100 mg/kg/d.

  3. Predictability of idiosyncratic drug toxicity risk for carboxylic acid-containing drugs based on the chemical stability of acyl glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Ryoko; Okudaira, Noriko; Watanabe, Kengo; Murai, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Tachibana, Masaya; Ohnuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kayoko; Honma, Hidehito; Kurihara, Atsushi; Okazaki, Osamu

    2010-10-01

    Acyl glucuronides (AGs) formed from carboxylic acid-containing drugs have been considered to be a cause of idiosyncratic drug toxicity (IDT). Chemical stability of AGs is supposed to relate to their reactivity. In this study, the half-lives of 21 AGs of carboxylic drugs in potassium phosphate buffer (KPB), human serum albumin (HSA) solution, and human fresh plasma were analyzed in relation to the IDT risk derived from these drugs. The carboxylic drugs were classified into three safety categories of "safe," "warning," and "withdrawn" in terms of their IDT risk. As for the results, the half-lives of AGs in KPB correlated with the IDT risk better than those in HSA solution or in human fresh plasma with regard to the separation of the safe drugs from the warning drugs or the withdrawn drugs. In KPB, whereas the half-lives in the safe category were 7.2 h or longer, those in the withdrawn category were 1.7 h or shorter. The classification value of the half-life in KPB, which separated the safe drugs from the withdrawn drugs was calculated to be 3.6 h by regression analysis. In conclusion, this is the first report that clearly shows the relationship between the IDT risk and chemical stability of AGs in several in vitro systems. The KPB system was considered to be the best for evaluating the stability of AGs, and the classification value of the half-life in KPB serves as a useful key predictor for the IDT risk.

  4. Impacts of low-molecular-weight organic acids on aquatic behavior of graphene nanoplatelets and their induced algal toxicity and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuang; Gao, Yucheng; Wang, Se; Fang, Hao; Xu, Defu; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the interaction between graphene-based materials and low-molecular-weight organic acids (LOAs) is essential to understand fate and effects of graphene-based materials in the aquatic environment, but this interaction remains poorly elucidated. In this study, the effects of LOAs on the physicochemical properties of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in an aqueous medium and on the GNP toxicity to algae were studied. The unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus was exposed to GNP suspensions in the presence of benzoic acid or gallic acid at various concentrations. The GNPs had smaller hydrodynamic sizes and the GNP suspensions were more stable and had higher or lower surface zeta potentials in the presence of LOAs than when LOAs were not present. The toxic effects in S. obliquus cultures incubated with GNP suspensions containing LOAs were related to the LOA concentration, and the presence of LOAs caused three effects: stimulation, alleviation, and synergistic inhibition. The intensities of the effects mainly correlated with the LOA concentration, the extent of agglomeration, and particle-induced oxidative stress. The results indicate that the environmental fates and toxicities of GNPs are strongly affected by the binding of GNPs to LOAs.

  5. An experimental study to investigate the impact of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol, on cadmium chloride-induced renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Dhanalakshmi; Rasool, Mahaboob Khan

    2014-10-01

    Cadmium, a well-known environmental pollutant and a toxic transitional metal causes severe damage to many organs, such as liver, kidney, lungs, heart, etc. The current study has been designed to assess the impact of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol on cadmium chloride-induced renal toxicity in rats. Therefore, the activities of membrane bound ATPases, mitochondrial TCA cycle and electron transport chain enzymes, gluconeogenic and glycolytic enzymes, and glycogen content were estimated in kidney tissue homogenates of control and experimental rats. In addition, the serum levels of glucose and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β were also estimated. The cadmium chloride administered rats (3 mg per kg per b. wt per s.c.) showed significant decrease in the levels of membrane bound ATPases, mitochondrial TCA cycle and electron transport chain enzymes, glycolytic enzymes, and glycogen content as compared with controls. Conversely, the levels of glucose, gluconeogenic enzymes and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, and IL-1β) were found to be increased. However, the administration of p-coumaric acid (100 mg per kg per b. wt per s.c.) along with the cadmium chloride significantly modulated these biochemical and immunological changes to near normal, as compared to cadmium chloride treated rats. Thus, the results provide strong evidence that p-coumaric acid has a protective action against cadmium-induced renal toxicity in rats.

  6. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of various carbonyl compounds against cyanide toxicity with particular reference to alpha-ketoglutaric acid.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rahul; Tulsawani, Rajkumar

    2008-01-01

    Cyanide is a rapidly acting neurotoxin that necessitates immediate, vigorous therapy. The commonly used treatment regimen for cyanide includes the intravenous administration of sodium nitrite (SN) and sodium thiosulphate (STS). Due to many limitations of these antidotes, a search for more effective, safer molecules continues. Cyanide is known to react with carbonyl compounds to form the cyanohydrin complex. The present study addresses the efficacy of several carbonyl compounds and their metabolites or nutrients with alpha-ketoglutaric acid (A-KG), citric acid, succinic acid, maleic acid, malic acid, fumaric and oxaloacetic acid, glucose, sucrose, fructose, mannitol, sorbitol, dihydroxyacetone, and glyoxal (5 or 10 mM; -10 min) against toxicity of potassium cyanide (KCN; 10 mM) in rat thymocytes in vitro. Six hours after KCN, cell viability measured by MTT assay and crystal violet dye exclusion revealed maximum cytoprotection by A-KG, followed by oxaloacetic acid. A-KG also resolved the leakage of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase, loss in nuclear integrity (propidium iodide staining), and altered mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123 assay) as a result of cyanide toxicity. Protection Index (ratio of LD(50) of KCN in protected and unprotected animals; PI) of all the compounds (oral; 1.0 g/kg; -10 min) determined in male mice, revealed that maximum protection was afforded by A-KG (7.6 PI), followed by oxaloacetic acid (6.4 PI). Comparative evaluation of various salts of A-KG alone or with STS (intraperitoneal; 1.0 g/kg; -15 min) showed that maximum protection was conferred by disodium anhydrous salt of A-KG, which also significantly prevented the inhibition of brain cytochrome oxidase caused by 0.75 LD(50) KCN. This study indicates the potential of A-KG as alternative cyanide antidote.

  7. Comparison of the toxicity of the peracetic acid formulations Wofasteril(c) E400, E250 and Lspez to Daphnia magna with emphasis on the effect of hydrogen peroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial peracetic acid (PAA) formulations are acidic mixtures of PAA, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), acetic acid (AA), H2O and stabilizers to maintain equilibrium of the concentrations. Different PAA formulations show diverse PAA/H2O2 ratios, leading to potentially different toxicities at the same con...

  8. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardio-pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups o...

  9. Nitric oxide donors prevent while the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME increases arachidonic acid plus CYP2E1-dependent toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Defeng; Cederbaum, Arthur . E-mail: arthur.cederbaum@mssm.edu

    2006-10-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) play an important role in alcohol-induced liver injury. AA promotes toxicity in rat hepatocytes with high levels of cytochrome P4502E1 and in HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1. Nitric oxide (NO) participates in the regulation of various cell activities as well as in cytotoxic events. NO may act as a protectant against cytotoxic stress or may enhance cytotoxicity when produced at elevated concentrations. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effect of endogenously or exogenously produced NO on AA toxicity in liver cells with high expression of CYP2E1 and assess possible mechanisms for its actions. Pyrazole-induced rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells expressing CYP2E1 were treated with AA in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase L-N {sup G}-Nitroarginine Methylester (L-NAME) or the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), and (Z)-1-[-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-aminoethyl)]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA-NONO). AA decreased cell viability from 100% to 48 {+-} 6% after treatment for 48 h. In the presence of L-NAME, viability was further lowered to 23 {+-} 5%, while, SNAP or DETA-NONO increased viability to 66 {+-} 8 or 71 {+-} 6%. The L-NAME potentiated toxicity was primarily necrotic in nature. L-NAME did not affect CYP2E1 activity or CYP2E1 content. SNAP significantly lowered CYP2E1 activity but not protein. AA treatment increased lipid peroxidation and lowered GSH levels. L-NAME potentiated while SNAP prevented these changes. Thus, L-NAME increased, while NO donors decreased AA-induced oxidative stress. Antioxidants prevented the L-NAME potentiation of AA toxicity. Damage to mitochondria by AA was shown by a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). L-NAME potentiated this decline in MMP in association with its increase in AA-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. NO donors decreased this decline in MMP in association with their decrease in AA

  10. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  11. All-trans retinoic acid protects against arsenic-induced uterine toxicity in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Chatterji, U.

    2011-12-15

    Background and purpose: Arsenic exposure frequently leads to reproductive failures by disrupting the rat uterine histology, hormonal integrity and estrogen signaling components of the rat uterus, possibly by generating reactive oxygen species. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) was assessed as a prospective therapeutic agent for reversing reproductive disorders. Experimental approach: Rats exposed to arsenic for 28 days were allowed to either recover naturally or were treated simultaneously with ATRA for 28 days or treatment continued up to 56 days. Hematoxylin-eosin double staining was used to evaluate changes in the uterine histology. Serum gonadotropins and estradiol were assayed by ELISA. Expression of the estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}), an estrogen responsive gene vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, was assessed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Key results: ATRA ameliorated sodium arsenite-induced decrease in circulating estradiol and gonadotropin levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner, along with recovery of luminal epithelial cells and endometrial glands. Concomitant up regulation of ER{alpha}, VEGF, cyclin D1, CDK4 and Ki-67 was also observed to be more prominent for ATRA-treated rats as compared to the rats that were allowed to recover naturally for 56 days. Conclusions and implications: Collectively, the results reveal that ATRA reverses arsenic-induced disruption of the circulating levels of gonadotropins and estradiol, and degeneration of luminal epithelial cells and endometrial glands of the rat uterus, indicating resumption of their functional status. Since structural and functional maintenance of the pubertal uterus is under the influence of estradiol, ATRA consequently up regulated the estrogen receptor and resumed cellular proliferation, possibly by an antioxidant therapeutic approach against arsenic toxicity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic

  12. Toxic megacolon

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - toxic megacolon; Crohn disease - toxic megacolon; Ulcerative colitis - toxic megacolon ... people with an inflamed colon due to: Ulcerative colitis , or Crohn disease that is not well controlled ...

  13. Subchronic toxicity and immunotoxicity of MeO-PEG-poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-PEG-OMe triblock copolymer nanoparticles delivered intravenously into rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Longfei; Zhang, Mengtian; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xuanmiao; Xie, Zhaolu; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2014-06-01

    Although monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol)-poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-monomethoxy (PELGE) nanoparticles have been widely studied as a drug delivery system, little is known about their toxicity in vivo. Here we examined the subchronic toxicity and immunotoxicity of different doses of PELGE nanoparticles with diameters of 50 and 200 nm (PELGE50 and PELGE200) in rats. Neither size of PELGE nanoparticles showed obvious subchronic toxic effects during 28 d of continuous intravenous administration based on clinical observation, body weight, hematology parameters and histopathology analysis. PELGE200 nanoparticles showed no overt signs of immunotoxicity based on organ coefficients, histopathology analysis, immunoglobulin levels, blood lymphocyte subpopulations and splenocyte cytokines. Conversely, PELGE50 nanoparticles were associated with an increased organ coefficient and histopathological changes in the spleen, increased serum IgM and IgG levels, alterations in blood lymphocyte subpopulations and enhanced expression of spleen interferon-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that PELGE nanoparticles show low subchronic toxicity but substantial immunotoxicity, which depends strongly on particle size. These findings will be useful for safe application of PELGE nanoparticles in drug delivery systems.

  14. In vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for intranasal delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingfeng; Shao, Xiayan; Chen, Jie; Shen, Yehong; Feng, Chengcheng; Gao, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yue; Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2011-02-15

    Biodegradable polymer-based nanoparticles have been widely studied to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain after intranasal administration. However, knowledge as to the side effects of nanoparticle delivery system to the brain is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles (WGA-NP) after intranasal instillation. Sprague-Dawley rats were intranasally given WGA-NP for 7 continuous days. Amino acid neurotransmitters, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH), acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase activity, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in rat olfactory bulb (OB) and brain were measured to estimate the in vivo toxicity of WGA-NP. Balb/C mice were intranasally immunized by WGA-NP and then WGA-specific antibodies in serum and nasal wash were detected by indirect ELISA. WGA-NP showed slight toxicity to brain tissue, as evidenced by increased glutamate level in rat brain and enhanced LDH activity in rat OB. No significant changes in acetylcholine level, acetylcholinesterase activity, GSH level, TNF-α level and IL-8 level were observed in rat OB and brain for the WGA-NP group. WGA-specific antibodies in mice serum and nasal wash were not increased after two intranasal immunizations of WGA-NP. These results demonstrate that WGA-NP is a safe carrier system for intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain.

  15. In vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for intranasal delivery to the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qingfeng; Shao Xiayan; Chen Jie; Shen Yehong; Feng Chengcheng; Gao Xiaoling; Zhao Yue; Li Jingwei; Zhang Qizhi Jiang, Xinguo

    2011-02-15

    Biodegradable polymer-based nanoparticles have been widely studied to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain after intranasal administration. However, knowledge as to the side effects of nanoparticle delivery system to the brain is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles (WGA-NP) after intranasal instillation. Sprague-Dawley rats were intranasally given WGA-NP for 7 continuous days. Amino acid neurotransmitters, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH), acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase activity, tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in rat olfactory bulb (OB) and brain were measured to estimate the in vivo toxicity of WGA-NP. Balb/C mice were intranasally immunized by WGA-NP and then WGA-specific antibodies in serum and nasal wash were detected by indirect ELISA. WGA-NP showed slight toxicity to brain tissue, as evidenced by increased glutamate level in rat brain and enhanced LDH activity in rat OB. No significant changes in acetylcholine level, acetylcholinesterase activity, GSH level, TNF-{alpha} level and IL-8 level were observed in rat OB and brain for the WGA-NP group. WGA-specific antibodies in mice serum and nasal wash were not increased after two intranasal immunizations of WGA-NP. These results demonstrate that WGA-NP is a safe carrier system for intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain.

  16. In vivo assessment of toxicity and pharmacokinetics of methylglyoxal. Augmentation of the curative effect of methylglyoxal on cancer-bearing mice by ascorbic acid and creatine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manju; Talukdar, Dipa; Ghosh, Swapna; Bhattacharyya, Nivedita; Ray, Manju; Ray, Subhankar

    2006-04-01

    Previous in vivo studies from several laboratories had shown remarkable curative effect of methylglyoxal on cancer-bearing animals. In contrast, most of the recent in vitro studies have assigned a toxic role for methylglyoxal. The present study was initiated with the objective to resolve whether methylglyoxal is truly toxic in vivo and to reassess its therapeutic potential. Four species of animals, both rodent and non-rodent, were treated with different doses of methylglyoxal through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes. Acute (treatment for only 1 day) toxicity tests had been done with mouse and rat. These animals received 2, 1 and 0.3 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. Chronic (treatment for around a month) toxicity test had been done with mouse, rat, rabbit and dog. Mouse, rat and dog received 1, 0.3 and 0.1 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. Rabbit received 0.55, 0.3 and 0.1 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. It had been observed that methylglyoxal had no deleterious effect on the physical and behavioral pattern of the treated animals. Fertility and teratogenecity studies were done with rats that were subjected to chronic toxicity tests. It had been observed that these animals produced healthy litters indicating no damage of the reproductive systems as well as no deleterious effect on the offspring. Studies on several biochemical and hematological parameters of methylglyoxal-treated rats and dogs and histological studies of several organs of methylglyoxal-treated mouse were performed. These studies indicated that methylglyoxal had no apparent deleterious effect on some vital organs of these animals. A detailed pharmacokinetic study was done with mouse after oral administration of methylglyoxal. The effect of methylglyoxal alone and in

  17. Selenate mitigates arsenite toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by reducing arsenic uptake and ameliorates amino acid content and thiol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Mishra, Kumkum; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic element with the potential to cause health effects in humans. Besides rice is a source of both amino acids (AAs) and mineral nutrients, it is undesired source of As for billions of people consuming rice as the staple food. Selenium (Se) is an essential metalloid, which can regulate As toxicity by strengthening antioxidant potential. The present study was designed to investigate As(III) stress mitigating effect of Se(VI) in rice. The level of As, thiolic ligands and AAs was analyzed in rice seedlings after exposure to As(III)/Se(VI) alone and As(III)+Se(VI) treatments. Selenate supplementation (As(III) 25μM+Se(VI) 25μM) decreased total As accumulation in both root and shoot (179 & 144%) as compared to As(III) alone treatment. The As(III)+Se(VI) treatment also induced the levels of non-protein thiols (NPTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs) as compared to As(III) alone treatment and also modulated the activity of enzymes of thiol metabolism. The content of amino acids (AAs) was significantly altered with Se(VI) supplementation. Importantly, essential amino acids (EAAs) were enhanced in As(III)+Se(VI) treatment as compared to As(III) alone treatment. In contrast, stress related non-essential amino acids (NEAAs) like GABA, Glu, Gly, Pro and Cys showed enhanced levels in As(III) alone treatment. In conclusion, rice supplemented with Se(VI) tolerated As toxicity with reduced As accumulation and increased the nutrition quality by increasing EAAs.

  18. Seasonal variation in abiotic factors and ferulic acid toxicity in snail-attractant pellets against the intermediate host snail Lymnaea acuminata.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, P; Singh, D K

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory evaluation was made to access the seasonal variations in abiotic environmental factors temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, electrical conductivity and ferulic acid toxicity in snail-attractant pellets (SAP) against the intermediate host snail Lymnaea acuminata in each month of the years 2010 and 2011. On the basis of a 24-h toxicity assay, it was noted that lethal concentration values of 4.03, 3.73% and 4.45% in SAP containing starch and 4.16, 4.23% and 4.29% in SAP containing proline during the months of May, June and September, respectively, were most effective in killing the snails, while SAP containing starch/proline + ferulic acid was least effective in the month of January/February (24-h lethal concentration value was 7.67%/7.63% in SAP). There was a significant positive correlation between lethal concentration value of ferulic acid containing SAP and levels of dissolved O2 /pH of water in corresponding months. On the contrary, a negative correlation was observed between lethal concentration value and dissolved CO2 /temperature of test water in the same months. To ascertain that such a relationship between toxicity and abiotic factors is not co-incidental, the nervous tissue of treated (40% and 80% of 24-h lethal concentration value) and control group of snails was assayed for the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in each of the 12 months of the same year. There was a maximum inhibition of 58.43% of AChE, in snails exposed to 80% of the 24-h lethal concentration value of ferulic acid + starch in the month of May. This work shows conclusively that the best time to control snail population with SAP containing ferulic acid is during the months of May, June and September.

  19. Toxic Synovitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxic Synovitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxic Synovitis A A A ... and causes no long-term problems. About Toxic Synovitis Toxic synovitis (also known as transient synovitis ) is ...

  20. Analysis of certain fatty acids and toxic metal bioaccumulation in various tissues of three fish species that are consumed by Turkish people.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Gökçe; Türkoğlu, Semra

    2017-02-25

    Concentrations of toxic metals (Mn, Ni, Hg, Cd, Pb, Cr) in the muscle, skin, and liver of Mugil cephalus, Mullus barbatus, and Pagellus erythrinus which were purchased in large supermarkets of Elazig, and Mullus barbatus, which were caught on the sea of İskenderun Bay, Turkey, were analyzed. Fundamental analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after samples were prepared by microwave digestion. Mean metal concentrations in different tissues were varied in the ranges of Cd 4-426, Cr 116-4458, Mn 141-24774, Hg 9-471, Pb 96-695, and Ni 68-6581 μg kg(-1), for wet weight. The investigated metal bioaccumulation in the muscles of fish species, in general, was lower than those in the liver and skin. This method was verified by NCS ZC73016 chicken trace element-certified reference material analysis. In addition, fatty acids in the muscles of three fish species were analyzed. According to the gas chromatography (GC) results of fatty acids, the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were found to be between 23.76 and 31.97%. The fatty acids' polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) ratio was found to be between 13.67 and 30.71% and saturated fatty acids ratios were determined in the range of 24.06-32.30%. In all fish species, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ratio, which increase the value of these fish species, were high. These results show that these three fish species are good sources of fatty acids.

  1. The influence of mechanochemical modification on prevention of toxic ability of humic acids towards phenanthrene in aquatic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsova, N. S.; Maltseva, E. V.; Glyzina, T. S.; Ovchinnikova, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the research work is to quantify interaction between phenanthrene with modified humic acids in aquatic environment. The changes in the structure and properties of humic acids after modifications were studied with 1H NMR spectroscopy and potentiometric titration methods. Our research demonstrates that the application of thiourea as a modified agent increases the binding capacity of humic acids towards phenanthrene.

  2. Surfactants, Aromatic and Isoprenoid Compounds, and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Suppress Staphylococcus aureus Production of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1▿

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Peter J.; Syverson, Rae Ellen; Milligan-Myhre, Kathy; Frolova, Olga; Schroeder, Sarah; Kidder, Joshua; Hoang, Thanh; Proctor, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness manifest through the actions of Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Previous studies have shown that tampon additives can influence staphylococcal TSST-1 production. We report here on the TSST-1-suppressing activity of 34 compounds that are commonly used additives in the pharmaceutical, food, and perfume industries. Many of the tested chemicals had a minimal impact on the growth of S. aureus and yet were potent inhibitors of TSST-1 production. The TSST-1-reducing compounds included surfactants with an ether, amide, or amine linkage to their fatty acid moiety (e.g., myreth-3-myristate, Laureth-3, disodium lauroamphodiacetate, disodium lauramido monoethanolamido, sodium lauriminodipropionic acid, and triethanolamine laureth sulfate); aromatic compounds (e.g. phenylethyl and benzyl alcohols); and several isoprenoids and related compounds (e.g., terpineol and menthol). The membrane-targeting and -altering effects of the TSST-1-suppressing compounds led us to assess the activity of molecules that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., cerulenin, triclosan, and hexachlorophene). These compounds also reduced S. aureus TSST-1 production. This study suggests that more additives than previously recognized inhibit the production of TSST-1. PMID:19223628

  3. Toxicity of acid-sulphate soil leachate and aluminium to the embryos and larvae of Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata) in estuarine water.

    PubMed

    Hyne, R V; Wilson, S P

    1997-01-01

    The toxicity of leachate water from acid-sulphate soil to the early life stages of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, incubated in seawater was evaluated. Acid-sulphate soil leachate water (pH> or =6.8) delayed the hatching of fertilised eggs, but after 48 h the per cent hatching was normal. In comparison, acidic saline water (25 per thousand salinity) at pH 4.0 or less prevented embryos from hatching. The survival of yolk-sac larvae exposed to acid-sulphate soil leachate water at a concentration of 32% in seawater and an initial pH of 7.2, was significantly different to controls after 96 hours. In corresponding tests with only acidified saline water (20 per thousand salinity), pH levels equal to or below 5.0 killed yolk-sac larvae after 96 h exposure. Aluminum showed a pH dependent toxicity to yolk-sac larvae, with added aluminium as low as 200 microg litre(-1) having a significant effect on larval survival at pH 5.5, and concentrations of 600-800 microg litre(-1) having a significant effect on larval survival at an initial pH range of 6.0 < pH < 6.8. It was concluded that significant mortality of the early life stages of Australian bass would occur if they are exposed to acid-sulphate soil leachate that results in a pH in the receiving estuarine water below 5.5, or when the pH is below 6.8 and aluminium is present at a total concentration of 800 microg litre(-1) or greater.

  4. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-05

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer.

  5. Life-Stage-, Sex-, and Dose-Dependent Dietary Toxicokinetics and Relationship to Toxicity of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid (2,4-D) in Rats: Implications for Toxicity Test Dose Selection, Design, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Mary S.

    2013-01-01

    Life-stage-dependent toxicity and dose-dependent toxicokinetics (TK) were evaluated in Sprague Dawley rats following dietary exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). 2,4-D renal clearance is impacted by dose-dependent saturation of the renal organic anion transporter; thus, this study focused on identifying inflection points of onset of dietary nonlinear TK to inform dose selection decisions for toxicity studies. Male and female rats were fed 2,4-D-fortified diets at doses to 1600 ppm for 4-weeks premating, <2 weeks during mating, and to test day (TD) 71 to parental (P1) males and to P1 females through gestation/lactation to TD 96. F1 offspring were exposed via milk with continuing diet exposure until postnatal day (PND) 35. As assessed by plasma area under the curve for the time-course plasma concentration, nonlinear TK was observed ≥1200 ppm (63mg/kg/day) for P1 males and between 200 and 400 ppm (14–27mg/kg/day) for P1 females. Dam milk and pup plasma levels were higher on lactation day (LD) 14 than LD 4. Relative to P1 adults, 2,4-D levels were higher in dams during late gestation/lactation and postweaning pups (PND 21–35) and coincided with elevated intake of diet/kg body weight. Using conventional maximum tolerated dose (MTD) criteria based on body weight changes for dose selection would have resulted in excessive top doses approximately 2-fold higher than those identified incorporating critical TK data. These data indicate that demonstration of nonlinear TK, if present at dose levels substantially above real-world human exposures, is a key dose selection consideration for improving the human relevance of toxicity studies compared with studies employing conventional MTD dose selection strategies. PMID:24105888

  6. Effects of boiling on chlorogenic acid and the liver protective effects of its main products against CCl₄-induced toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shidong; Cheung, Matt Wan Man; Zhou, Yanling; Ho, Wing Shing

    2014-02-01

    Chlorogenic acid (3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, CA) is the active component in several botanical beverage, vegetables, fruits, and herbal drugs. The effect of water boiling on the bioactivity of CA was studied. CA could be isomerized to 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4-O-CA) and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-O-CA) in decoctive extraction, and each of the isomers occupied about one-third of the total caffeoylquinic acids. A novel method, using water elution of microsphere resin, was used to purify CA and its 2 isomers. The yield of CA, 4-O-CA, and 5-O-CA was 82%, 5.6%, and 50%, with the purity of 98%, 97%, and 99%, respectively. The DPPH radical scavenging assay showed that 4-O-CA, 5-O-CA, and CA exhibited similar activity. However, there was no significant difference between 4-O-CA and 5-O-CA when used against CCl₄-induced toxicity in hepG2 cells. Our studies show that isomerization is the main transformation of CA in boiling, and the decoction could not decrease the anti-oxidant activity of CA.

  7. Multiple functions of the crustacean gill: osmotic/ionic regulation, acid-base balance, ammonia excretion, and bioaccumulation of toxic metals.

    PubMed

    Henry, Raymond P; Lucu, Cedomil; Onken, Horst; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean gill is a multi-functional organ, and it is the site of a number of physiological processes, including ion transport, which is the basis for hemolymph osmoregulation; acid-base balance; and ammonia excretion. The gill is also the site by which many toxic metals are taken up by aquatic crustaceans, and thus it plays an important role in the toxicology of these species. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the ecology, physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of the mechanisms of osmotic and ionic regulation performed by the gill. The current concepts of the mechanisms of ion transport, the structural, biochemical, and molecular bases of systemic physiology, and the history of their development are discussed. The relationship between branchial ion transport and hemolymph acid-base regulation is also treated. In addition, the mechanisms of ammonia transport and excretion across the gill are discussed. And finally, the toxicology of heavy metal accumulation via the gill is reviewed in detail.

  8. Using S and Pb isotope ratios to trace leaching of toxic substances from an acid-impacted industrial-waste landfill (Pozdatky, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Novak, Martin; Pacherova, Petra; Erbanova, Lucie; Veron, Alain J; Buzek, Frantisek; Jackova, Ivana; Paces, Tomas; Rukavickova, Lenka; Blaha, Vladimir; Holecek, Jan

    2012-10-15

    Slightly elevated concentrations of toxic species in waters sampled in the surroundings of a leaky landfill may be both a sign of an approaching contaminant plume, or a result of water-rock interaction. Isotopes can be instrumental in distinguishing between anthropogenic and geogenic species in groundwater. We studied sulfur and lead isotope ratios at an abandoned industrial-waste landfill, located in a densely populated part of Central Europe. Stable isotope variability in space and time was used to follow the movement of a groundwater plume, contaminated with toxic metals (Cd, Cr, Be), in fractured granitoids. Toxic metals had been mobilized from industrial waste by a strong pulse of sulfuric acid, also deposited in the landfill. Both tracers exhibited a wide range of values (δ(34)S between +2.6 and +18.9‰; (206)Pb/(207)Pb between 1.16 and 1.39), which facilitated identification of mixing end-members, and made it possible to assess the sources of the studied species. In situ fractionations did not hinder source apportionment. Influx of contaminated groundwater was observed neither in irrigation wells in a nearby village, nor at distances greater than 300 m from the landfill. Combination of stable isotope tracers can be used as part of an early-warning system in landscapes affected by landfills.

  9. 2-Pyrrolidone synthesis from γ-aminobutyric acid produced by Lactobacillus brevis under solid-state fermentation utilizing toxic deoiled cottonseed cake.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jasneet; Khare, S K

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as drug and food additive, as well as feedstock to produce 2-pyrrolidone, a precursor for the synthesis of nylon 4. 2-Pyrrolidone is a petrochemical and depleting reserve which raises concern for its bio-based production. The study herein describes bio-based economical GABA production from Lactobacillus brevis by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using toxic deoiled cottonseed cake (CSC) as substrate. In general, the use of cottonseed cake remains restricted due to the presence of toxic gossypols. Thus, simultaneous detoxification observed during fermentation also widens the scope of utilization of this residual seedcake for feed use vis-a-vis production of other value added chemicals. The SSF conditions were optimized for maximum GABA production, viz., 19.7 mg/g, CSC of GABA was obtained at 6th day of fermentation with 70 % degradation of gossypols simultaneously. The potential of this bio-based GABA as a platform chemical is demonstrated in the synthesis of 2-pyrrolidone. Thus, a simple and cost-effective strategy for utilizing toxic biomass has been developed as an alternate to chemical synthetic route.

  10. Physiological evidence for the presence of a cis-trans isomerase of unsaturated fatty acids in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath to adapt to the presence of toxic organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Claudia; Eberlein, Christian; Mäusezahl, Ines; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2010-07-01

    The physiology of the response in the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus Bath towards thermal and solvent stress was studied. A systematic investigation of the toxic effects of organic compounds (chlorinated phenols and alkanols) on the growth of this bacterium was carried out. The sensitivity to the tested alkanols correlated with their chain length and hydrophobicity; methanol was shown to be an exception to which the cells showed a very high tolerance. This can be explained by the adaptation of these bacteria to growth on C1 compounds. On the other hand, M. capsulatus Bath was very sensitive towards the tested chlorinated phenols. The high toxic effect of phenolic compounds on methanotrophic bacteria might be explained by the occurrence of toxic reactive oxygen species. In addition, a physiological proof of the presence of cis-trans isomerization as a membrane-adaptive response mechanism in M. capsulatus was provided. This is the first report on physiological evidence for the presence of the unique postsynthetic membrane-adaptive response mechanism of the cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids in a bacterium that does not belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Vibrio where this mechanism was already reported and described extensively.

  11. Synergistic ameliorative effects of sesame oil and alpha-lipoic acid against subacute diazinon toxicity in rats: hematological, biochemical, and antioxidant studies.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Taha, Ramadan; Ghazy, Emad W; El-Sayed, Yasser S

    2016-01-01

    Diazinon (DZN) is a common organophosphorus insecticide extensively used for agriculture and veterinary purposes. DZN toxicity is not limited to insects; it also induces harmful effects in mammals and birds. Our experiment evaluated the protective and antioxidant potential of sesame oil (SO) and (or) alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) against DZN toxicity in male Wistar albino rats. DZN-treated animals exhibited macrocytic hypochromic anemia and significant increases in serum biochemical parameters related to liver injury, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), γ-glutamyl transferase (γGT), cholesterol, and triglycerides. They also had elevated levels of markers related to cardiac injury, such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and increased biomarkers of renal injury, urea and creatinine. DZN also increased hepatic, renal, and cardiac lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidant biomarker levels. SO and (or) ALA supplementation ameliorated the deleterious effects of DZN intoxication. Treatment improved hematology and serum parameters, enhanced endogenous antioxidant status, and reduced lipid peroxidation. Importantly, they exerted synergistic hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, and cardioprotective effects. Our findings demonstrate that SO and (or) ALA supplementation can alleviate the toxic effects of DZN via their potent antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activities.

  12. Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

  13. The delivery of poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) nanoparticles loaded with non-toxic drug to overcome drug resistance for the treatment of neuroblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhulekar, Jhilmil

    Neuroblastoma is a rare cancer of the sympathetic nervous system. A neuroblastoma tumor develops in the nerve tissue and is diagnosed in infants and children. Approximately 10.2 per million children under the age of 15 are affected in the United States and is slightly more common in boys. Neuroblastoma constitutes 6% of all childhood cancers and has a long-term survival rate of only 15%. There are approximately 700 new cases of neuroblastoma each year in the United States. With such a low rate of survival, the development of more effective treatment methods is necessary. A number of therapies are available for the treatment of these tumors; however, clinicians and their patients face the challenges of systemic side effects and drug resistance of the tumor cells. The application of nanoparticles has the potential to provide a safer and more effective method of delivery drugs to tumors. The advantage of using nanoparticles for drug delivery is the ability to specifically or passively target tumors while reducing the harmful side effects of chemotherapeutics. Drug delivery via nanoparticles can also allow for lower dosage requirements with controlled release of the drugs, which can further reduce systemic toxicity. The aim of this research was to develop a polymeric nanoparticle drug delivery system for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma. Nanoparticles composed of a poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer were formulated to deliver a non-toxic drug in combination with Temozolomide, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of neuroblastoma. The non-toxic drug acts as an inhibitor to the DNA-repair protein present in neuroblastoma cells that is responsible for inducing drug resistance in the cells, which would potentially allow for enhanced temozolomide activity. A variety of studies were completed to prove the nanoparticles' low toxicity, loading abilities, and uptake into cells. Additionally, studies were performed to determine the

  14. Assessment of boric acid and borax using the IEHR evaluative process for assessing human developmental and reproductive toxicity of agents

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    This document presents an evaluation of the reproductive and developmental effects of boric acid, H3BO3 (CAS Registry No. 10043-35-3) and disodium tetraborate decahydrate or borax, Na2B4O2O(CAS Registry No. 1303-96-4). The element, boron, does not exist naturally. In dilute aqueous solution and at physiological pH (7.4), the predominant species in undissociated boric acid (greater than 98%), irrespective of whether the initial material was boric acid of borax. Therefore, it is both useful and correct to compare exposures and dosages to boric acid and borax in terms of `boron equivalents`, since both materials form equivalent species in dilute aqueous solution with similar systemic effects. In order to be clear in this document, the term `boron` will refer to `boron equivalents` or percent boron in boric acid and borax.

  15. Protective Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid against Lead Acetate-Induced Toxicity in Liver and Kidney of Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Heba M.; Hassan, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the protective role of Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids against lead acetate-induced toxicity in liver and kidney of female rats. Animals were divided into four equal groups; group 1 served as control while groups 2 and 3 were treated orally with Omega-3 fatty acids at doses of 125 and 260 mg/kg body weight, respectively, for 10 days. These groups were also injected with lead acetate (25 mg/kg body weight) during the last 5 days. Group 4 was treated only with lead acetate for 5 days and served as positive control group. Lead acetate increased oxidative stress through an elevation in MDA associated with depletion in antioxidant enzymes activities in the tissues. Moreover, the elevation of serum enzymes activities (ALT, AST, ALP, and LDH) and the levels of urea and creatinine were estimated but total proteins were decreased. Also, lead acetate-treatment induced hyperlipidemia via increasing of lipid profiles associated with decline in HDL-c level. Significant changes of Hb, PCV, RBCs, PLT, and WBCs in group 4 were recorded. The biochemical alterations of lead acetate were confirmed by histopathological changes and DNA damage. The administration of Omega-3 provided significant protection against lead acetate toxicity. PMID:25045676

  16. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Wang, Chao; Napoli, Joseph L

    2010-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) supports embryonic development, central nervous system function, and the immune response. atRA initiates neurogenesis and dendritic growth in the hippocampus and is required for spatial memory; superphysiological atRA inhibits neurogenesis, causes teratology and/or embryo toxicity, and alters cognitive function and behavior. Because abnormal atRA shares pathological conditions with alcoholism, inhibition of retinol (vitamin A) activation into atRA has been credited widely as a mechanism of ethanol toxicity. Here, we analyze the effects of ethanol on retinoid concentrations in vivo during normal vitamin A nutriture, using sensitive and analytically robust assays. Ethanol either increased or had no effect on atRA, regardless of changes in retinol and retinyl esters. Acute ethanol (3.5 g/kg) increased atRA in adult hippocampus (1.6-fold), liver (2.4-fold), and testis (1.5-fold). Feeding dams a liquid diet with 6.5% ethanol from embryonic day 13 (e13) to e19 increased atRA in fetal hippocampus (up to 20-fold) and cortex (up to 50-fold), depending on blood alcohol content. One-month feeding of the 6.5% ethanol diet increased atRA in adult hippocampus (20-fold), cortex (2-fold), testis (2-fold), and serum (10-fold). Tissue-specific increases in retinoid dehydrogenase mRNAs and activities, extrahepatic retinol concentrations, and atRA catabolism combined to produce site-specific effects. Because a sustained increase in atRA has deleterious effects on the central nervous system and embryo development, these data suggest that superphysiological atRA contributes to ethanol pathological conditions, including cognitive dysfunction and fetal alcohol syndrome.-Kane, M. A., Folias, A. E., Wang, C., Napoli, J. L. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity.

  17. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Folias, Alexandra E.; Wang, Chao; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) supports embryonic development, central nervous system function, and the immune response. atRA initiates neurogenesis and dendritic growth in the hippocampus and is required for spatial memory; superphysiological atRA inhibits neurogenesis, causes teratology and/or embryo toxicity, and alters cognitive function and behavior. Because abnormal atRA shares pathological conditions with alcoholism, inhibition of retinol (vitamin A) activation into atRA has been credited widely as a mechanism of ethanol toxicity. Here, we analyze the effects of ethanol on retinoid concentrations in vivo during normal vitamin A nutriture, using sensitive and analytically robust assays. Ethanol either increased or had no effect on atRA, regardless of changes in retinol and retinyl esters. Acute ethanol (3.5 g/kg) increased atRA in adult hippocampus (1.6-fold), liver (2.4-fold), and testis (1.5-fold). Feeding dams a liquid diet with 6.5% ethanol from embryonic day 13 (e13) to e19 increased atRA in fetal hippocampus (up to 20-fold) and cortex (up to 50-fold), depending on blood alcohol content. One-month feeding of the 6.5% ethanol diet increased atRA in adult hippocampus (20-fold), cortex (2-fold), testis (2-fold), and serum (10-fold). Tissue-specific increases in retinoid dehydrogenase mRNAs and activities, extrahepatic retinol concentrations, and atRA catabolism combined to produce site-specific effects. Because a sustained increase in atRA has deleterious effects on the central nervous system and embryo development, these data suggest that superphysiological atRA contributes to ethanol pathological conditions, including cognitive dysfunction and fetal alcohol syndrome.—Kane, M. A., Folias, A. E., Wang, C., Napoli, J. L. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity. PMID:19890016

  18. Fatty Acid Transport Protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC50 8–11μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC50 58μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of 13C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. PMID:26284975

  19. Simultaneously targeting tissue transglutaminase and kidney type glutaminase sensitizes cancer cells to acid toxicity and offers new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Katt, William P; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2015-01-05

    Most cancer cells undergo characteristic metabolic changes that are commonly referred to as the Warburg effect, with one of the hallmarks being a dramatic increase in the rate of lactic acid fermentation. This leads to the production of protons, which in turn acidifies the microenvironment surrounding tumors. Cancer cells have acquired resistance to acid toxicity, allowing them to survive and grow under these detrimental conditions. Kidney type glutaminase (GLS1), which is responsible for the conversion of glutamine to glutamate, produces ammonia as part of its catalytic activities and has been shown to modulate cellular acidity. In this study, we show that tissue, or type 2, transglutaminase (TG2), a γ-glutamyl transferase that is highly expressed in metastatic cancers and produces ammonia as a byproduct of its catalytic activity, is up-regulated by decreases in cellular pH and helps protect cells from acid-induced cell death. Since both TG2 and GLS1 can similarly function to protect cancer cells, we then proceeded to demonstrate that treatment of a variety of cancer cell types with inhibitors of each of these proteins results in synthetic lethality. The combination doses of the inhibitors induce cell death, while individual treatment with each compound shows little or no ability to kill cells. These results suggest that combination drug treatments that simultaneously target TG2 and GLS1 might provide an effective strategy for killing cancer cells.

  20. Valorization of aluminum scrap via an acid-washing treatment for reductive removal of toxic bromate from water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Lin, Jia-Yin; Lien, Hsing-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Aluminum scrap (AS) is adopted for the first time as a readily available aluminum source to prepare zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) for removing bromate from water via a reductive reaction. Since aluminum is easily oxidized to aluminum oxide (Al2O3) on exposure to air, an acid-washing pretreatment on AS is developed to remove the layer of Al2O3. HCl is found as the most effective acid to pretreat AS and the HCl-pretreated or acid-washed AS (AWAS) is able to remove bromate from water and convert it to bromide. Factors, such as temperature, pH, co-existing anions, and particle size, which influence the bromate removal using AWAS are also investigated. The mechanism of bromate removal by AWAS can be attributed to both reduction and adsorption. The elevated temperature also significantly improves bromate removal capacity of AWAS as well as the reaction kinetics. The bromate removal capacity of AWAS is substantially improved under acidic conditions. However, the basic conditions and co-existing anions suppress or interfere with the interaction between bromate and AWAS, leading to much lower removal capacities. The recyclability of AWAS is also evaluated and the acid-washing regeneration is necessary to restore its capacity. However, the mass of AWAS can gradually decrease due to multi-cycle acid-washing regeneration. Through this study, the valorization of AS via acid-washing is demonstrated and optimization of acid-washing parameters is presented. Our findings reveal that the acid-washing is a useful technique to utilize AS as an inexpensive and efficient material for removing bromate from water.

  1. Evaluation of buffers toxicity in tobacco cells: Homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid) is a suitable buffer for plant cells studies at low pH.

    PubMed

    Borgo, Lucélia

    2017-03-19

    Low pH is an important environmental stressor of plant root cells. Understanding the mechanisms of stress and tolerance to acidity is critical; however, there is no widely accepted pH buffer for studies of plant cells at low pH. Such a buffer might also benefit studies of Al toxicity, in which buffering at low pH is also important. The challenge is to find a buffer with minimal cellular effects. We examined the cytotoxicity and possible metabolic disturbances of four buffers that have adequate pKa values and potential use for studies in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. These were homopipes (homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid); pKa1 4.4), 3,3-dimethylglutaric acid (pKa1 3.73), β-alanine (pKa1 3.70) and potassium biphthalate (pKa1 2.95; pKa2 5.41). First, tobacco BY-2 cells were grown in a rich medium containing 10 mM of each buffer or MES (2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid) as a control, with the pH initially adjusted to 5.7. β-alanine was clearly toxic and dimethylgluturate and biphthalate were found to be cytostatic, in which no culture growth occurred but cell viability was either unaffected or decreased only after 5 days. Only homopipes allowed normal culture growth and cell viability. Homopipes (10 mM) was then tested in cell cultures with an initial pH of 4.3 ± 0.17 in minimal medium to examine whether its undissociated species (H2A) displayed any cellular effects and no cytotoxic effects were observed. It is possible to conclude that among tested buffers, homopipes is the most suitable for studies at low pH, and may be especially useful for aluminum toxicity experiments.

  2. Fact Sheet - Final Air Toxics Rule for Steel Pickling and HCI Process Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact Sheet summarizing the main points of the national emssions standard for hazaradous air pollutants (NESHAP) for Steel Pickling— HCl Process Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants as promulgated on June 22, 1999.

  3. Toxic Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Toxic hepatitis is an inflammation of your liver in reaction to certain substances to which you're exposed. Toxic hepatitis can be caused by alcohol, chemicals, drugs or ...

  4. Fatty acid transport protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-09-25

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC{sub 50} 8–11 μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC{sub 50} 58 μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of {sup 13}C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • Grassofermata is a small compound inhibitor of FATP2. • Uptake inhibition is specific for long chain fatty acids. • Uptake kinetics shows low specificity for adipocytes compared to other cell types. • Inhibition is by a non-competitive mechanism. • Atypical antipsychotics do not inhibit FA uptake by comparison with Grassofermata.

  5. Folic acid-functionalized up-conversion nanoparticles: toxicity studies in vivo and in vitro and targeted imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lining; Wei, Zuwu; Chen, Haige; Liu, Jinliang; Guo, Jianjian; Cao, Ming; Wen, Tieqiao; Shi, Liyi

    2014-07-01

    Folate receptors (FRs) are overexpressed on a variety of human cancer cells and tissues, including cancers of the breast, ovaries, endometrium, and brain. This over-expression of FRs can be used to target folate-linked imaging specifically to FR-expressing tumors. Fluorescence is emerging as a powerful new modality for molecular imaging in both the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, we prepared three kinds of folate-targeted up-conversion nanoparticles as imaging agents (UCNC-FA: UCNC-Er-FA, UCNC-Tm-FA, and UCNC-Er,Tm-FA). In vivo and in vitro toxicity studies showed that these nanoparticles have both good biocompatibility and low toxicity. Moreover, the up-conversion luminescence imaging indicated that they have good targeting to HeLa cells and can therefore serve as potential fluorescent contrast agents.Folate receptors (FRs) are overexpressed on a variety of human cancer cells and tissues, including cancers of the breast, ovaries, endometrium, and brain. This over-expression of FRs can be used to target folate-linked imaging specifically to FR-expressing tumors. Fluorescence is emerging as a powerful new modality for molecular imaging in both the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, we prepared three kinds of folate-targeted up-conversion nanoparticles as imaging agents (UCNC-FA: UCNC-Er-FA, UCNC-Tm-FA, and UCNC-Er,Tm-FA). In vivo and in vitro toxicity studies showed that these nanoparticles have both good biocompatibility and low toxicity. Moreover, the up-conversion luminescence imaging indicated that they have good targeting to HeLa cells and can therefore serve as potential fluorescent contrast agents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Up-conversion luminescence spectra of UCNC-Er and UCNC-Er-FA, UCNC-Tm and UCNC-Tm-FA. Confocal luminescence imaging data collected as a series along the Z optical axis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02312a

  6. Oral co-administration of α-lipoic acid, quercetin and captopril prevents gallium arsenide toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Kapil; Flora, S J S

    2009-07-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), an inter-metallic semiconductor, known to exhibit superior optical and electronic properties compared to silicon, promotes its use in semiconductor industries. Extensive use of GaAs will inevitably lead to an increase in the exposure of workers manufacturing these products. Antioxidants are exogenous or endogenous compounds acting in several ways, including scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) or their precursors, inhibiting ROS formation, and binding metal ions needed for the catalysis of ROS generation. In the present study we investigated the protective efficacy of α-lipoic acid, quercetin and captopril individually against gallium arsenide exposure. Co-administration of α-lipoic acid with GaAs was most effective in reducing GaAs induced inhibition of blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity, liver, kidney and brain reduced glutathione (GSH) level and elevation of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Captopril, on the other hand was effective in reducing thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels, while quercetin reduced ROS in liver and kidney. The results suggest comparatively better preventive efficacy of concomitant α-lipoic acid administration during Gallium arsenide exposure compared to quercetin and captopril in preventing GaAs induced oxidative stress.

  7. The potential usage of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against chemotherapy-induced and radiotherapy-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ginis, Zeynep; Armutcu, Ferah; Ozturk, Gulfer; Yigitoglu, M Ramazan; Akyol, Omer

    2012-07-01

    Protection of the patients against the side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens has attracted increasing interest of clinicians and practitioners. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is extracted from the propolis of honeybee hives as an active component, specifically inhibits nuclear factor κB at micromolar concentrations and show ability to stop 5-lipoxygenase-catalysed oxygenation of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. CAPE has antiinflammatory, antiproliferative, antioxidant, cytostatic, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and antineoplastic properties. The purpose of this review is to summarize in vivo and in vitro usage of CAPE to prevent the chemotherapy-induced and radiotherapy-induced damages and side effects in experimental animals and to develop a new approach for the potential usage of CAPE in clinical trial as a protective agent during chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens.

  8. Toxic terror

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of toxic materials in the environment explores the evolution of public awareness of the problem, public and governmental reaction, the effort to establish standards of safe levels and danger thresholds, and the struggle to implement and enforce environmental policy. Separate chapters deal with environmental premises and scientific realities, the DDT debate and birth of environmentalism, the disaster of Love Canal, pesticides, PCBs, PBBs, formaldehyde, dioxin, air pollution, water pollution, nuclear energy and radioactive materials, acid rain, and the status of American health. The book concludes with a chapter on the need for scientific research and hard evidence to either prove or disprove the pessimism of those who warn of a threat to human health and survival.

  9. The occurrence of domoic acid linked to a toxic diatom bloom in a new potential vector: the tunicate Pyura chilensis (piure).

    PubMed

    López-Rivera, Américo; Pinto, Maricela; Insinilla, Andrea; Suárez Isla, Benjamín; Uribe, Eduardo; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Lehane, Mary; Furey, Ambrose; James, Kevin J

    2009-11-01

    The tunicate Pyura chilensis (Molina, 1782); Phylum Chordata; Subphylum Urochordata; Class Ascidiacea, common local name "piure" or sea squirt; a filter-feeder (plankton and suspended particles) sessile species; may play an important role in monitoring domoic acid (DA) the principal toxic component of Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP). Significant DA concentrations have been determined in tunicate samples, collected during a recent ASP outbreak in Bahía Inglesa, an important scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) farming area. Several infaunal species were tested for the presence of DA, in addition to the usual scallop monitoring programme. DA was found at sub-toxic levels in filtering bivalves such as mussels (Mytilus chilensis), large mussels (Aulacomya ater) and clams (Protothaca thaca) (6.4, 5.4 and 4.7 microg DA/g tissue respectively). Of particular interest was the observation of significant accumulations of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. diatoms in the internal siphon and atrium spaces of the tunicate. Toxin distribution within major tunicate organs was heterogeneous with 8.7-15.5 microg DA/g in edible tissues, 14.9-17.9 microg DA/g in the fecal material and 13.6-32.7 microg DA/g in the gut content. DA was determined by HPLC-UV and confirmed by diode-array detection and LC-MS/MS analysis. This is the first report of the presence of DA in a tunicate that is regularly consumed by coastal populations. These results confirm the need to include these organisms in sanitation programs for marine toxins.

  10. Modeling of Toxicity-Relevant Electrophilic Reactivity for Guanine with Epoxides: Estimating the Hard and Soft Acids and Bases (HSAB) Parameter as a Predictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Chenchen; Ji, Li; Liu, Weiping

    2016-05-16

    According to the electrophilic theory in toxicology, many chemical carcinogens in the environment and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that exert their effects by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic DNA centers. The theory of hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB), which states that a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with a biological macromolecule that has a similar hardness or softness, clarifies the underlying chemistry involved in this critical event. Epoxides are hard electrophiles that are produced endogenously by the enzymatic oxidation of parent chemicals (e.g., alkenes and PAHs). Epoxide ring opening proceeds through a SN2-type mechanism with hard nucleophile DNA sites as the major facilitators of toxic effects. Thus, the quantitative prediction of chemical reactivity would enable a predictive assessment of the molecular potential to exert electrophile-mediated toxicity. In this study, we calculated the activation energies for reactions between epoxides and the guanine N7 site for a diverse set of epoxides, including aliphatic epoxides, substituted styrene oxides, and PAH epoxides, using a state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) method. It is worth noting that these activation energies for diverse epoxides can be further predicted by quantum chemically calculated nucleophilic indices from HSAB theory, which is a less computationally demanding method than the exacting procedure for locating the transition state. More importantly, the good qualitative/quantitative correlations between the chemical reactivity of epoxides and their bioactivity suggest that the developed model based on HSAB theory may aid in the predictive hazard evaluation of epoxides, enabling the early identification of mutagenicity/carcinogenicity-relevant SN2 reactivity.

  11. Alleviation of Lead Toxicity by 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Is Related to Elevated Growth, Photosynthesis, and Suppressed Ultrastructural Damages in Oilseed Rape

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Qin, Yebo; Gill, Rafaqat A.; Ali, Shafaqat

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a widely spread pollutant and leads to diverse morphological and structural changes in the plants. In this study, alleviating role of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was investigated with or without foliar application of ALA (25 mg L−1) in hydroponic environment under different Pb levels (0, 100, and 400 µM). Outcomes stated that plant morphology and photosynthetic attributes were reduced under the application of Pb alone. However, ALA application significantly increased the plant growth and photosynthetic parameters under Pb toxicity. Moreover, ALA also lowered the Pb concentration in shoots and roots under Pb toxicity. The microscopic studies depicted that exogenously applied ALA ameliorated the Pb stress and significantly improved the cell ultrastructures. After application of ALA under Pb stress, mesophyll cell had well-developed nucleus and chloroplast having a number of starch granules. Moreover, micrographs illustrated that root tip cell contained well-developed nucleus, a number of mitochondria, and golgi bodies. These results proposed that under 15-day Pb-induced stress, ALA improved the plant growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic parameters, and ultrastructural modifications in leaf mesophyll and root tip cells of the B. napus plants. PMID:24683549

  12. Alleviation of lead toxicity by 5-aminolevulinic acid is related to elevated growth, photosynthesis, and suppressed ultrastructural damages in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Ali, Basharat; Qin, Yebo; Malik, Zaffar; Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Shafaqat; Zhou, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a widely spread pollutant and leads to diverse morphological and structural changes in the plants. In this study, alleviating role of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was investigated with or without foliar application of ALA (25 mg L(-1)) in hydroponic environment under different Pb levels (0, 100, and 400 µM). Outcomes stated that plant morphology and photosynthetic attributes were reduced under the application of Pb alone. However, ALA application significantly increased the plant growth and photosynthetic parameters under Pb toxicity. Moreover, ALA also lowered the Pb concentration in shoots and roots under Pb toxicity. The microscopic studies depicted that exogenously applied ALA ameliorated the Pb stress and significantly improved the cell ultrastructures. After application of ALA under Pb stress, mesophyll cell had well-developed nucleus and chloroplast having a number of starch granules. Moreover, micrographs illustrated that root tip cell contained well-developed nucleus, a number of mitochondria, and golgi bodies. These results proposed that under 15-day Pb-induced stress, ALA improved the plant growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic parameters, and ultrastructural modifications in leaf mesophyll and root tip cells of the B. napus plants.

  13. Methyl mercury toxicity in plant cultures: modification of resistance and demethylation by light and/or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M.

    1987-04-01

    Cultures of Daucus carota, Ca-68-10, and Lactuca sativa, Le-67, were grown at increasing methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations ranging from initial doses of 0.05 to 5.0 micrograms/ml per day for 4 days with or without 0.15 microgram/ml 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in the presence or absence of light. The presence of 2,4-D interacted with light synergistically in the expression of MeHg toxicity within the whole range of concentrations. Demethylation patterns increased or decreased depending on the species, the 2,4-D concentration in the medium, and methyl mercury concentration used in the treatment. Lettuce was more sensitive to this interaction than carrot. In lettuce, the presence of 2,4-D in the light lowered the concentration of total Hg (or MeHg) required to reduce growth by 50%, about 13 times relative to that in the dark (i.e., it sensitized the cells). In the absence of 2,4-D the pattern was reversed. In carrot the pattern was similar but less pronounced. This suggests that, in these cell populations, MeHg toxicity is partly a hormone-mediated and light-sensitive event.

  14. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated paclitaxel micelles: antitumor activity and toxicity studies following oral administration in a murine orthotopic colon cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Parayath, Neha N; Nehoff, Hayley; Norton, Samuel E; Highton, Andrew J; Taurin, Sebastien; Kemp, Roslyn A; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Oral administration of paclitaxel (PTX), a broad spectrum anticancer agent, is challenged by its low uptake due to its poor bioavailability, efflux through P-glycoprotein, and gastrointestinal toxicity. We synthesized PTX nanomicelles using poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA). Oral administration of SMA-PTX micelles doubled the maximum tolerated dose (60 mg/kg vs 30 mg/kg) compared to the commercially available PTX formulation (PTX [Ebewe]). In a murine orthotopic colon cancer model, oral administration of SMA-PTX micelles at doses 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg reduced tumor weight by 54% and 69%, respectively, as compared to the control group, while no significant reduction in tumor weight was observed with 30 mg/kg of PTX (Ebewe). In addition, toxicity of PTX was largely reduced by its encapsulation into SMA. Furthermore, examination of the tumors demonstrated a decrease in the number of blood vessels. Thus, oral delivery of SMA-PTX micelles may provide a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27574427

  15. Citric acid modifies surface properties of commercial CeO2 nanoparticles reducing their toxicity and cerium uptake in radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Majumdar, S; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2013-12-15

    Little is known about the mobility, reactivity, and toxicity to plants of coated engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). Surface modification may change the interaction of ENPs with living organisms. This report describes surface changes in commercial CeO2 NPs coated with citric acid (CA) at molar ratios of 1:2, 1:3, 1:7, and 1:10 CeO2:CA, and their effects on radish (Raphanus sativus) seed germination, cerium and nutrients uptake. All CeO2 NPs and their absorption by radish plants were characterized by TEM, DLS, and ICP-OES. Radish seeds were germinated in pristine and CA coated CeO2 NPs suspensions at 50mg/L, 100mg/L, and 200mg/L. Deionized water and CA at 100mg/L were used as controls. Results showed ζ potential values of 21.6 mV and -56 mV for the pristine and CA coated CeO2 NPs, respectively. TEM images showed denser layers surrounding the CeO2 NPs at higher CA concentrations, as well as better distribution and smaller particle sizes. None of the treatments affected seed germination. However, at 200mg/L the CA coated NPs at 1:7 ratio produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more root biomass, increased water content and reduced by 94% the Ce uptake, compared to bare NPs. This suggests that CA coating decrease CeO2 NPs toxicity to plants.

  16. Acetaminophen toxicity and 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid): a tale of two cycles, one an ATP-depleting futile cycle and the other a useful cycle.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The acquired form of 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) metabolic acidosis was first described in 1989 and its relationship to chronic acetaminophen ingestion was proposed the next year. Since then, this cause of chronic anion gap metabolic acidosis has been increasingly recognized. Many cases go unrecognized because an assay for 5-oxoproline is not widely available. Most cases occur in malnourished, chronically ill women with a history of chronic acetaminophen ingestion. Acetaminophen levels are very rarely in the toxic range; rather, they are usually therapeutic or low. The disorder generally resolves with cessation of acetaminophen and administration of intravenous fluids. Methionine or N-acetyl cysteine may accelerate resolution and methionine is protective in a rodent model. The disorder has been attributed to glutathione depletion and activation of a key enzyme in the γ-glutamyl cycle. However, the specific metabolic derangements that cause the 5-oxoproline accumulation remain unclear. An ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle can explain the accumulation of 5-oxoproline after chronic acetaminophen ingestion. This cycle is activated by the depletion of both glutathione and cysteine. This explanation contributes to our understanding of acetaminophen-induced 5-oxoproline metabolic acidosis and the beneficial role of N-acetyl cysteine therapy. The ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle may also play a role in the energy depletions that occur in other acetaminophen-related toxic syndromes.

  17. Horizon-specific oxidation of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) in relation to the toxicity of cadmium spiked into a freshwater sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, E.N.; Mattson, V.R.; Ankley, G.T.

    1994-12-31

    To evaluate the effects of oxidative processes on acid volatile sulfide concentrations in various horizons of whole sediment cores, in relation to the toxicity of a metal (cadmium), the authors used an artificial system to ``age`` Cd-spiked sediment samples under a constant flow of fresh Lake Superior water. Sediments from Pequaywan Lake, MN (ca. 12 umol AVS/g) were spiked so as to achieve (nominal) cadmium: AVS molar ratios of 0.02 (control), 0.2, 0.8, 1.2 and 3.0. At 0, 24 and 48 days post-spiking, sediment cores were removed from the aging system and tested for toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca. At the same time, horizons from replicate sediment cores were prepared for analysis by freezing, and then cutting them into 10--20 mm increments. The sediment horizons were analyzed for AVS and simultaneously extracted cadmium concentrations, and pore water concentrations of cadmium. Relatively little oxidation of surficial AVS concentrations was observed, even at aging times up to 48 d. By 48 d, pore water concentrations of cadmium were slightly elevated at all spiking concentrations, but were increased greatly at cadmium:AVS ratios greater than one. Hyalella azteca mortality was generally predictable based on surficial cadmium:AVS ratios or pore water cadmium concentrations.

  18. Toxicity of the pyrethroid pesticide fenvalerate to freshwater catfish Clarias gariepinus: lethality, biochemical effects and role of dietary ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Madhuban; Kaviraj, Anilava

    2009-08-01

    Static bioassays were made in the laboratory to determine lethal concentration of the pyrethroid pesticide fenvalerate [(RS)-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (RS)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methylbutyrate] for the freshwater catfish Clarias gariepinus and effects of sublethal concentrations of the pesticide on some biochemical parameters of the fish. For exposure periods of 24 to 96 h, LC(50) values of fenvalerate ranged from 5.83-4.76 micro g/L and 4.24-2.94 micro g/L, respectively for water and acetone soluble fenvalerate. Two sublethal concentrations of fenvalerate were used in the bioassays for biochemical parameters: 2.1 micro g/L for 24 h and 1.4 micro g/L for 96 h exposure, both concentrations representing 50% of LC(50) value of acetone soluble fenvalerate for the respective exposure period. Hepatosomatic index, liver glycogen, alkaline phosphatase of liver and ascorbic acid of blood, liver, and kidney decreased while haemoglobin (Hb) %, plasma glucose levels and acid phosphatase level of liver increased after 24 h exposure to 2.1 micro g/L fenvalerate. Longer exposure (96 h) to even a lower concentration (1.4 micro g/L) of fenvalerate resulted in reduction of all the parameters (except Hb %) tested as compared with control. Fish previously fed for 60 days with a diet supplemented by a high level of ascorbic acid (100 mg/100 g diet) could reverse most of the effects caused by 24 h exposure to 2.1 micro g/L fenvalerate. A lower level of ascorbic acid (50 mg/ 100 g diet) supplement could not influence these effects of fenvalerate. Even the higher dose of ascorbic acid supplementation (100 mg/100 g diet) could not relieve the stress parameters, except for Hb% and HSI, when the pesticide was applied at 1.4 micro g/L for a longer time period (96 h).

  19. 2,3-trans-3,4-trans-3,4-Dihydroxy-L-proline: An amino acid in toxic peptides of Amanita virosa mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Buku, A.; Faulstich, H.; Wieland, T.; Dabrowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    Among the four possible stereoisomers of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-proline,2,3-trans-3,4-trans-3,4-dihydroxy-L-proline (IV) had not been found in nature previously. It has now been detected as a component of virotoxins, toxic peptides of Amanita virosa mushrooms. Because periodate failed to effect an oxidative glycol splitting reaction, the two hydroxyl groups in positions 3 and 4 were expected to be in a trans configuration. Furthermore, the formation of a 4-lactone on treatment with acids pointed to the carboxyl group and the hydroxyl group at position 4 being in a cis configuration. These results are in agreement with structure IV only. Final proof for structure IV was given by NMR spectroscopy and direct comparison with the 2,3-cis-3,4-trans-3,4-dihydroxy-L-proline isomer. PMID:16592813

  20. Glutathione depletion by valproic acid in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes: Role of biotransformation and temporal relationship with onset of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kiang, Tony K.L.; Teng Xiaowei; Surendradoss, Jayakumar; Karagiozov, Stoyan; Abbott, Frank S.; Chang, Thomas K.H.

    2011-05-01

    The present study was conducted in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes to investigate the chemical basis of glutathione (GSH) depletion by valproic acid (VPA) and evaluate the role of GSH depletion in VPA toxicity. Among the synthetic metabolites of VPA investigated, 4-ene-VPA and (E)-2,4-diene-VPA decreased cellular levels of total GSH, but only (E)-2,4-diene-VPA was more effective and more potent than the parent drug. The in situ generated, cytochrome P450-dependent 4-ene-VPA did not contribute to GSH depletion by VPA, as suggested by the experiment with a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole, to decrease the formation of this metabolite. In support of a role for metabolites, alpha-F-VPA and octanoic acid, which do not undergo biotransformation to form a 2,4-diene metabolite, CoA ester, or glucuronide, did not deplete GSH. A time course experiment showed that GSH depletion did not occur prior to the increase in 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (a marker of oxidative stress), the decrease in [2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] (WST-1) product formation (a marker of cell viability), or the increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (a marker of necrosis) in VPA-treated hepatocytes. In conclusion, the cytochrome P450-mediated 4-ene-VPA pathway does not play a role in the in situ depletion of GSH by VPA, and GSH depletion is not an initiating event in VPA toxicity in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes.

  1. Sources, fates, toxicity, and risks of trifluoroacetic acid and its salts: Relevance to substances regulated under the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Keith R; Velders, Guus J M; Wilson, Stephen R; Madronich, Sasha; Longstreth, Janice; Aucamp, Pieter J; Bornman, Janet F

    2016-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is a breakdown product of several hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC), regulated under the Montreal Protocol (MP), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) used mainly as refrigerants. Trifluoroacetic acid is (1) produced naturally and synthetically, (2) used in the chemical industry, and (3) a potential environmental breakdown product of a large number (>1 million) chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and polymers. The contribution of these chemicals to global amounts of TFA is uncertain, in contrast to that from HCFC and HFC regulated under the MP. TFA salts are stable in the environment and accumulate in terminal sinks such as playas, salt lakes, and oceans, where the only process for loss of water is evaporation. Total contribution to existing amounts of TFA in the oceans as a result of the continued use of HCFCs, HFCs, and hydrofluoroolefines (HFOs) up to 2050 is estimated to be a small fraction (<7.5%) of the approximately 0.2 μg acid equivalents/L estimated to be present at the start of the millennium. As an acid or as a salt TFA is low to moderately toxic to a range of organisms. Based on current projections of future use of HCFCs and HFCs, the amount of TFA formed in the troposphere from substances regulated under the MP is too small to be a risk to the health of humans and environment. However, the formation of TFA derived from degradation of HCFC and HFC warrants continued attention, in part because of a long environmental lifetime and due many other potential but highly uncertain sources.

  2. A role for lipid rafts in the protection afforded by docosahexaenoic acid against ethanol toxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aliche-Djoudi, Fatiha; Podechard, Normand; Collin, Aurore; Chevanne, Martine; Provost, Emilie; Poul, Martine; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid enhanced ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes via an increase in membrane fluidity and lipid raft clustering. In this context, another n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), was tested with a special emphasis on physical and chemical alteration of lipid rafts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with DHA reduced significantly ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death. DHA protection could be related to an alteration of lipid rafts. Indeed, rafts exhibited a marked increase in membrane fluidity and packing defects leading to the exclusion of a raft protein marker, flotillin. Furthermore, DHA strongly inhibited disulfide bridge formation, even in control cells, thus suggesting a disruption of protein-protein interactions inside lipid rafts. This particular spatial organization of lipid rafts due to DHA subsequently prevented the ethanol-induced lipid raft clustering. Such a prevention was then responsible for the inhibition of phospholipase C-γ translocation into rafts, and consequently of both lysosome accumulation and elevation in cellular low-molecular-weight iron content, a prooxidant factor. In total, the present study suggests that DHA supplementation could represent a new preventive approach for patients with alcoholic liver disease based upon modulation of the membrane structures.

  3. ROLE OF INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM AND PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 IN ARACHIDONIC ACID-INDUCED TOXICITY IN LIVER CELLS OVEREXPRESSING CYP2E1*

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andres A.; Cederbaum, Arthur I.

    2007-01-01

    Liver cells (HepG2 and primary hepatocytes) overexpressing CYP2E1 and exposed to arachidonic acid (AA) were previously shown to lose viability together with enhanced lipid peroxidation. These events were blocked in cells pre-incubated with antioxidants (α -tocopherol, glutathione ethyl ester), or in HepG2 cells not expressing CYP2E1. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the role of calcium and calcium-activated hydrolases in these CYP2E1-AA interactions. CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells treated with AA showed an early increase in cytosolic calcium and partial depletion of ionomycin-sensitive calcium stores. These changes in calcium were blocked by α -tocopherol. AA activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in CYP2E1-expressing liver cells, and this was inhibited by PLA2 inhibitors or α -tocopherol. PLA2 inhibitors prevented the cell death caused by AA, without affecting CYP2E1 activity or lipid peroxidation. AA toxicity and PLA2 activation were inhibited in calcium-depleted cells, but not by removal of extracellular calcium alone. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the early increase in cytosolic calcium caused by AA. CYP2E1 overexpressing HepG2 cells exposed to AA showed a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, which was prevented by the PLA2 inhibitors. These results suggest that AA-induced toxicity to CYPE1-expressing cells: (i) is associated with release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores that depends mainly on oxidative membrane damage; (ii) is associated with activation of PLA2 that depends on intracellular calcium and lipid peroxidation; iii) does not depend on increased influx of extracellular calcium, and iv) depends on the effect of converging events (lipid peroxidation, intracellular calcium, activation of PLA2) on mitochondria to induce bioenergetic failure and necrosis. These interactions may play a role in alcohol liver toxicity, which requires polyunsaturated fatty acids, and involves induction of CYP2E1. PMID:17118330

  4. Element accumulation patterns of deciduous and evergreen tree seedlings on acid soils: implications for sensitivity to manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    St Clair, Samuel B; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2005-01-01

    Foliar nutrient imbalances, including the hyperaccumulation of manganese (Mn), are correlated with symptoms of declining health in sensitive tree species growing on acidic forest soils. The objectives of this study were to: (1) compare foliar nutrient accumulation patterns of six deciduous (sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), red oak (Quercus rubra L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) and white ash (Fraxinus americana L.)) and three evergreen (eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L.), white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss.)) tree species growing on acidic forest soils; and (2) examine how leaf phenology and other traits that distinguish evergreen and deciduous tree species influence foliar Mn accumulation rates and sensitivity to excess Mn. For the first objective, leaf samples of seedlings from five acidic, non-glaciated field sites on Pennsylvania's Allegheny Plateau were collected and analyzed for leaf element concentrations. In a second study, we examined growth and photosynthetic responses of seedlings exposed to excess Mn in sand culture. In field samples, Mn in deciduous foliage hyperaccumulated to concentrations more than twice as high as those found in evergreen needles. Among species, sugar maple was the most sensitive to excess Mn based on growth and photosynthetic measurements. Photosynthesis in red maple and red oak was also sensitive to excess Mn, whereas white oak, black cherry, white ash and the three evergreen species were tolerant of excess Mn. Among the nine species, relative rates of photosynthesis were negatively correlated with foliar Mn concentrations, suggesting that photosynthetic sensitivity to Mn is a function of its rate of accumulation in seedling foliage.

  5. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:28094778

  6. Multiple functions of the crustacean gill: osmotic/ionic regulation, acid-base balance, ammonia excretion, and bioaccumulation of toxic metals

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Raymond P.; Lucu, Čedomil; Onken, Horst; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean gill is a multi-functional organ, and it is the site of a number of physiological processes, including ion transport, which is the basis for hemolymph osmoregulation; acid-base balance; and ammonia excretion. The gill is also the site by which many toxic metals are taken up by aquatic crustaceans, and thus it plays an important role in the toxicology of these species. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the ecology, physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of the mechanisms of osmotic and ionic regulation performed by the gill. The current concepts of the mechanisms of ion transport, the structural, biochemical, and molecular bases of systemic physiology, and the history of their development are discussed. The relationship between branchial ion transport and hemolymph acid-base regulation is also treated. In addition, the mechanisms of ammonia transport and excretion across the gill are discussed. And finally, the toxicology of heavy metal accumulation via the gill is reviewed in detail. PMID:23162474

  7. Presence of UV filters in surface water and the effects of phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following a chronic toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Grabicova, Katerina; Fedorova, Ganna; Burkina, Viktoriia; Steinbach, Christoph; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Zlabek, Vladimir; Kocour Kroupova, Hana; Grabic, Roman; Randak, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    UV filters belong to a group of compounds that are used by humans and are present in municipal waste-waters, effluents from sewage treatment plants and surface waters. Current information regarding UV filters and their effects on fish is limited. In this study, the occurrence of three commonly used UV filters - 2-phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid (PBSA), 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (benzophenone-3, BP-3) and 5-benzoyl-4-hydroxy-2-methoxy-benzenesulfonic acid (benzophenone-4, BP-4) - in South Bohemia (Czech Republic) surface waters is presented. PBSA concentrations (up to 13μgL(-1)) were significantly greater than BP-3 or BP-4 concentrations (up to 620 and 390ngL(-1), respectively). On the basis of these results, PBSA was selected for use in a toxicity test utilizing the common model organism rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were exposed to three concentrations of PBSA (1, 10 and 1000µgL(-1)) for 21 and 42 days. The PBSA concentrations in the fish plasma, liver and kidneys were elevated after 21 and 42 days of exposure. PBSA increased activity of certain P450 cytochromes. Exposure to PBSA also changed various biochemical parameters and enzyme activities in the fish plasma. However, no pathological changes were obvious in the liver or gonads.

  8. Remediation of textile azo dye acid red 114 by hairy roots of Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and assessment of degraded dye toxicity with human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, N S

    2016-07-05

    Bioremediation has proven to be the most desirable and cost effective method to counter textile dye pollution. Hairy roots (HRs) of Ipomoea carnea J. were tested for decolourization of 25 textile azo dyes, out of which >90% decolourization was observed in 15 dyes. A diazo dye, Acid Red 114 was decolourized to >98% and hence, was chosen as the model dye. A significant increase in the activities of oxidoreductive enzymes was observed during decolourization of AR114. The phytodegradation of AR114 was confirmed by HPLC, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The possible metabolites were identified by GCMS as 4- aminobenzene sulfonic acid 2-methylaniline and 4- aminophenyl 4-ethyl benzene sulfonate and a probable pathway for the biodegradation of AR114 has been proposed. The nontoxic nature of the metabolites and toxicity of AR114 was confirmed by cytotoxicity tests on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). When HaCaT cells were treated separately with 150 μg mL(-1) of AR114 and metabolites, MTT assay showed 50% and ≈100% viability respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometry data showed that, as compared to control, the cells in G2-M and death phase increased by 2.4 and 3.6 folds respectively on treatment with AR114 but remained unaltered in cells treated with metabolites.

  9. S-allylcysteine scavenges singlet oxygen and hypochlorous acid and protects LLC-PK(1) cells of potassium dichromate-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Barrera, Diana; Segoviano-Murillo, Sabina; Rocha, Diana; Maldonado, Perla D; Mendoza-Patiño, Nicandro; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2007-10-01

    It has been found that S-allylcysteine (SAC), a garlic-derived compound, has in vivo and in vitro antioxidant properties. In addition, it is known that SAC is able to scavenge different reactive oxygen or nitrogen species including superoxide anion (O(2)(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydroxyl radical (OH()), and peroxynitrite anion (ONOO(-)) although the IC(5O) values for each reactive species has not been calculated and the potential ability of SAC to scavenge singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) has not been explored. The purposes of this work was (a) to explore the potential ability of SAC to scavenge (1)O(2) and HOCl, (b) to further characterize the O(2)(-), H(2)O(2), OH(), and ONOO(-) scavenging ability of SAC by measuring the IC(50) values using in vitro assays, and (c) to explore the potential ability of SAC to ameliorate the potassium dichromate (K(2)Cr(2)O(7))-induced cytotoxicity in LLC-PK1 cells in which oxidative stress is involved. The scavenging activity was compared against the following reference compounds: N-acetylcysteine for O(2)(-), sodium pyruvate for H(2)O(2), dimethylthiourea for OH(), lipoic acid and glutathione for (1)O(2), lipoic acid for HOCl, and penicillamine for ONOO(-). It was found that SAC was able to scavenge concentration-dependently all the species assayed with the following IC(5O) (mean+/-SEM, mM): O(2)(-) (14.49+/-1.67), H(2)O(2) (68+/-1.92), OH() (0.68+/-0.06), (1)O(2) (1.93+/-0.27), HOCl (2.86+/-0.15), and ONOO(-) (0.80+/-0.05). When the ability of SAC to scavenge these species was compared to those of the reference compounds it was found that the efficacy of SAC (a) to scavenge O(2)(-), H(2)O(2), OH(), and ONOO(-) was lower, (b) to scavenge HOCl was similar, and (c) to scavenge (1)O(2) was higher. In addition, it was found that SAC was able to prevent K(2)Cr(2)O(7)-induced toxicity in LLC-PK1 cells in culture. It was showed for the first time that SAC is able to scavenge (1)O(2) and HOCl and to

  10. Toxic effects on bioaccumulation and hematological parameters of juvenile rockfish Sebastes schlegelii exposed to dietary lead (Pb) and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2017-02-20

    Juvenile rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii (mean length 11.3 ± 1.2 cm, and mean weight 32.5 ± 4.1 g) were exposed for four weeks to dietary lead (Pb(2+)) at 0, 120, and 240 mg/L and ascorbic acid (AsA) at 100, 200, and 400 mg/L. The exposure concentrations and duration of significant Pb-induced accumulations in specific tissues of S. schlegelii were assessed. High levels of ascorbic acid significantly attenuated accumulations following exposure to dietary Pb. Dietary Pb exposure caused a significant increase in blood Pb concentrations, whereas red blood cell (RBC) count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were significantly decreased. Notable changes were also observed in plasma calcium, magnesium, glucose, cholesterol, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), and glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT). The growth performance of S. schlegelii was significantly decreased. High doses AsA supplemention were effective in attenuating the changes brought about by dietary Pb exposure.

  11. Changes in mobility of toxic elements during the production of phosphoric acid in the fertilizer industry of Huelva (SW Spain) and environmental impact of phosphogypsum wastes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Alvarez-Valero, Antonio M; Nieto, José Miguel

    2007-09-30

    Presently, about 3 million tonnes of phosphogypsum are being generated annually in Spain as by-product from phosphoric acid in a fertilizer factory located in Huelva (southwestern Iberian Peninsula). Phosphate rock from Morocco is used as raw material in this process. Phosphogypsum wastes are stored in a stack containing 100Mt (approximately 1200ha of surface) over salt marshes of an estuary formed by the confluence of the Tinto and Odiel rivers, less than 1km away from the city centre. A very low proportion of this waste is used to improve fertility of agricultural soils in the area of the Guadalquivir river valley (Seville, SW Spain). The chemical speciation of potentially toxic elements (Ba, Cd, Cu, Ni, Sr, U and Zn) in phosphogypsum and phosphate rock was performed using the modified BCR-sequential extraction procedure, as described by the European Community Bureau of Reference (1999). This study has been done with the main of: (1) evaluate changes in the mobility of metals during the production of phosphoric acid; (2) estimate the amount of mobile metals that can affect the environmental surrounding; and (3) verify the environmentally safe use of phosphogypsum as an amendment to agricultural soils. The main environmental concern associated to phosphoric acid production is that Uranium, a radiotoxic element, is transferred from the non-mobile fraction in the phosphate rock to the bioavailable fraction in phosphogypsum in a rate of 23%. Around 21% of Ba, 6% of Cu and Sr, 5% of Cd and Ni, and 2% of Zn are also contained in the water-soluble phase of the final waste. Considering the total mass of phosphogypsum, the amount of metals easily soluble in water is approximately 6178, 3089, 1931, 579, 232, 193 and 77t for Sr, U, Ba, Zn, Ni, Cu and Cd, respectively. This gives an idea of the pollution potential of this waste.

  12. PPAR involvement in PFAA developmental toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are found in the environment and in serum of wildlife and humans. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are developmentally toxic in rodents. The effects of in utero exposure include increas...

  13. Evaluation of the chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Klaunig, James E; Shinohara, Motoki; Iwai, Hiroyuki; Chengelis, Christopher P; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie B; Wang, Zemin; Bruner, Richard H

    2015-02-01

    Perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), a 6-carbon perfluoroalkyl (C6; CAS # 307-24-4), has been proposed as a replacement for the commonly used 8-carbon perfluoroalkyls: perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate. PFHxA is not currently a commercial product but rather the ultimate degradation product of C6 fluorotelomer used to make C6 fluorotelomer acrylate polymers. It can be expected that, to a greater or lesser extent, the environmental loading of PFHxA will increase, as C6 fluorotelomer acrylate treatments are used and waste is generated. This article reports on a chronic study (duration 104 weeks) that was performed to evaluate the possible toxicologic and carcinogenic effects of PFHxA in gavage (daily gavage, 7 days per week) treated male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In the current study, dosage levels of 0, 2.5, 15, and 100 mg/kg/day of PFHxA (males) and 5, 30, and 200 mg/kg/day of PFHxA (females) were selected based on a previous subchronic investigation. No effects on body weights, food consumption, a functional observational battery, or motor activity were observed after exposure to PFHxA. While no difference in survival rates in males was seen, a dose-dependent decrease in survival in PFHxA-treated female rats was observed. Hematology and serum chemistry were unaffected by PFHxA. PFHxA-related histologic changes were noted in the kidneys of the 200-mg/kg/day group females. Finally, there was no evidence that PFHxA was tumorigenic in male or female SD rats at any of the dosage levels examined.

  14. The aflatoxin B1 -fumonisin B1 toxicity in BRL-3A hepatocytes is associated to induction of cytochrome P450 activity and arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mary, Verónica S; Arias, Silvina L; Otaiza, Santiago N; Velez, Pilar A; Rubinstein, Héctor R; Theumer, Martín G

    2017-02-09

    Human oral exposure to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ) and fumonisin B1 (FB1 ) is associated with increased hepatocellular carcinoma. Although evidence suggested interactive AFB1 -FB1 hepatotoxicity, the underlying mechanisms remain mostly unidentified. This work was aimed at evaluating the possible AFB1 -FB1 interplay to induce genetic and cell cycle toxicities in BRL-3A rat hepatocytes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) involvement, and the AFB1 metabolizing pathways cytochrome P450 (CYP) and arachidonic acid (ArAc) metabolism as ROS contributors. Flow cytometry of stained BRL-3A hepatocytes was used to study the cell cycle (propidium iodide), ROS intracellular production (DCFH-DA, HE, DAF-2 DA), and phospholipase A activity (staining with bis-BODIPY FL C11-PC). The CYP1A activity was assessed by the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay. Despite a 48-h exposure to FB1 (30 μM) not being genotoxic, the AFB1 (20 μM)-induced micronucleus frequency was overcome by the AFB1 -FB1 mixture (MIX), presumably showing toxin interaction. The mycotoxins blocked G1/S-phase, but only MIX caused cell death. Overall, the oxidative stress led these alterations as the pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine reduced such toxic effects. While AFB1 had a major input to the MIX pro-oxidant activity, with CYP and ArAc metabolism being ROS contributors, these pathways were not involved in the FB1 -elicited weak oxidative stress. The MIX-induced micronucleus frequency in N-acetyl-l-cysteine pretreated cells was greater than that caused by AFB1 without antioxidants, suggesting enhanced AFB1 direct genotoxicity probably owing to the higher CYP activity and ArAc metabolism found in MIX. The metabolic pathways modulation by AFB1 -FB1 mixtures could raise its hepatocarcinogenic properties.

  15. Oxidation of acid-volatile sulfide in surface sediments increases the release and toxicity of copper to the benthic amphipod Melita plumulosa.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stuart L; Ward, Daniel; Strom, David; Jolley, Dianne F

    2012-08-01

    Acid-volatile sulfides (AVS) are an important metal-binding phase in sediments. For sediments that contain an excess of AVS over simultaneously extracted metal (SEM) concentrations, acute or chronic effects should not result from the metals Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. While AVS phases may exist in surface sediments, the exposure to dissolved oxygen may oxidize the AVS and release metals to more bioavailable forms. We investigated the role of oxidation of AVS, and specifically copper sulfide phases, in surface sediments, in the toxicity to juveniles of the epibenthic amphipod, Melita plumulosa. Sediments containing known amounts of copper sulfide were prepared either in situ by reacting dissolved copper with AVS that had formed in field sediments or created in sediments within the laboratory, or by addition of synthesised CuS to sediments. Regardless of the form of the copper sulfide, considerable oxidation of AVS occurred during the 10-d tests. Sediments that had a molar excess of AVS compared to SEM at the start of the tests, did not always have an excess at the end of the tests. Consistent with the AVS-SEM model, no toxicity was observed for sediments with an excess of AVS throughout the tests. However, the study highlights the need to carefully consider the changes in AVS concentrations during tests, and that measurements of AVS and SEM concentrations should carefully target the materials to which the organisms are being exposed throughout tests, which in the case of juvenile M. plumulosa is the top few mm of the sediments.

  16. Bioavailability assessment of toxic metals using the technique "acid-volatile sulfide (AVS)-simultaneously extracted metals (SEM)" in marine sediments collected in Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jucelino B; Nascimento, Rodrigo A; de Oliva, Sergio T; de Oliveira, Olívia M C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the bioavailability of the metals (cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel) in sediment samples collected in seven stations from the São Paulo Estuary, Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil. The bioavailability was determined by employing the technique "acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metal (SEM)". The elements cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc were determined using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV), while nickel was quantified utilizing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The accuracy of these methods was confirmed using a certified reference material of estuarine sediment (NIST 1646). The sulfide was quantified using potentiometry with selective electrode and the organic matter determination employing an indirect volumetric method using potassium dichromate and iron(II) sulfate solutions. The bioavailability of the metals was estimated by relationship between the concentration of AVS and the sum of the concentrations of the simultaneously extracted metals (ΣSEM), considering a significant toxicity when (ΣSEM)/(AVS) is higher than 1. The bioavailability values in the seven stations studied varied from 0.93 to 1.31 (June, 2014) and from 0.34 to 0.58 (September, 2014). These results demonstrated a critical condition of toxicity (bioavailability >1) in six of the seven sediment samples collected during the rainy season (June, 2014). In the other period (September, 2014), the bioavailability was always lower than 1 for all sediment samples collected in the seven stations. The individual values of the concentrations of the five metals were compared with the parameters PEL (probable effects level) and TEL (threshold effects level), which are commonly employed for characterization of ecological risk in environmental systems. This comparison revealed that all metals have concentrations lower than the PEL and only zinc and lead in some stations have contents higher than the TEL. The

  17. Contribution of post-harvest agricultural paddy residue fires in the N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain to ambient carcinogenic benzenoids, toxic isocyanic acid and carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praphulla Chandra, Boggarapu; Sinha, Vinayak

    2016-04-01

    In the North West Indo-Gangetic Plain (N.W.IGP), large scale post-harvest paddy residue fires occur every year during the months of October-November. This anthropogenic perturbation causes contamination of the atmospheric environment with adverse impacts on regional air quality posing health risks for the population exposed to high concentrations of carcinogens such as benzene and toxic VOCs such as isocyanic acid. These gases and carbon monoxide are known to be emitted from biomass fires along with acetonitrile. Yet no long-term in-situ measurements quantifying the impact of this activity have been carried out in the N.W. IGP. Using high quality continuous online in-situ measurements of these gases at a strategic downwind site over a three year period from 2012 to 2014, we demonstrate the strong impact of this anthropogenic emission activity on ambient concentrations of these gases. In contrast to the pre-paddy harvest period, excellent correlation of benzenoids, isocyanic acid and CO with acetonitrile (a biomass burning chemical tracer); (r ≥ 0.82) and distinct VOC/acetonitrile emission ratios were observed for the post-paddy harvest period which was also characterized by high ambient concentrations of these species. The average concentrations of acetonitrile (1.62 ± 0.18 ppb), benzene (2.51 ± 0.28 ppb), toluene (3.72 ± 0.41 ppb), C8-aromatics (2.88 ± 0.30 ppb), C9-aromatics (1.55 ± 0.19 ppb) and CO (552 ± 113 ppb) in the post-paddy harvest periods were about 1.5 times higher than the annual average concentrations. For isocyanic acid, a compound with both primary and secondary sources, the concentration in the post-paddy harvest period was 0.97 ± 0.17 ppb. The annual average concentrations of benzene, a class A carcinogen, exceeded the annual exposure limit of 1.6 ppb at NTP mandated by the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of India (NAAQS). We show that mitigating the post-harvest paddy residue fires can lower the annual average concentration of

  18. Acute and late vaginal toxicity after adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy in patients with intermediate risk endometrial cancer: is local therapy with hyaluronic acid of clinical benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Delishaj, Durim; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Gonnelli, Alessandra; Morganti, Riccardo; Perrone, Franco; Tana, Roberta; Paiar, Fabiola; Gadducci, Angiolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the prevention of acute and late vaginal toxicities after high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal brachytherapy (BT). Material and methods Between January 2011 and January 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 126 patients with endometrial cancer who underwent extrafascial hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy and adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT +/– adjuvant chemotherapy. The total dose prescription was 21 Gy in 3 fractions (one fraction for week). Vaginal ovules containing 5 mg of HA were given for whole duration of vaginal BT and for the two following weeks. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE vs 4.02. Results According to the revised FIGO 2009 classification, most tumors were in stage IA (30.9%) and in stage IB (57.9%). Thirty-three patients (26.2%) received adjuvant chemotherapy before vaginal BT. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and five-year overall survival (OS) were 88% and 93%, respectively. The most common grade 1-2 acute toxicities were vaginal inflammation (18 patients, 14.3%) and dyspareunia (7 patients, 5.5%). Two patients (1.6%) had more than one toxicity. Late toxicity occurred in 20 patients (15.9%). Grade 1-2 late toxicities were fibrosis (14 patients, 11.1%) and telangiectasias (7 patients, 5.5%). Six patients (4.8%) had more than one late toxicity. No grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities were observed. Conclusions These results appear to suggest that the local therapy with HA is of clinical benefit for intermediate risk endometrial cancer patients who receive adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT after surgery. A randomized trial comparing HA treatment vs. no local treatment in this clinical setting is warranted to further evaluate the efficacy of HA in preventing vaginal BT-related vaginal toxicity. PMID:28115957

  19. In vivo toxicity evaluation of the migration extract of an organomodified clay-poly(lactic) acid nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Puerto, María; Llana-Ruiz-Cabello, María; Pichardo, Silvia; Moyano, Rosario; Blanco, Alfonso; Jordá-Beneyto, María; Jos, Angeles

    2014-01-01

    The food packaging industry is in continuous development in order to obtain more secure and stable food and beverages. The incorporation of inorganic and organic materials with plastic polymers leads to polymer composites. Among the inorganic compounds, clays such as montmorillonite (MTT) and its derivatives are of great interest due to their advantageous properties. The Technological Institute of Packaging, Transport,and Logistics (ITENE) developed a novel nanocomposite based on a poly(lactic) acid (PLA) polymer using an MMT derivative, named Clay1, as filler, to be used in the beverage industry. The improvement of the technological properties of this new material was demonstrated, but safety issues are also of concern. In the present study, a histopathological examination by optical and electron microscopy of organs from Wistar rats exposed for 90 d to a migration extract of PLA-Clay1 nanocomposite was carried out. Moreover, different clinical biochemistry, inflammation,and oxidative stress biomarkers were determined. Results showed no apparent evidence of damage, indicating that this nanocomposite has a good profile to be used in the food packaging industry, although further research is still needed.

  20. Potential use of lactic acid bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides as a probiotic for the removal of Pb(II) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young-Joo; Lim, Jeong-Muk; Gu, Suna; Lee, Wan-Kyu; Oh, Eunyoung; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2017-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can sequester metal ions by binding them to their surfaces. In the present study, lead (Pb)-resistant LAB were isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented food. A total of 96 different LAB strains were isolated, and 52 strains showed lead resistance. Among them, an LAB strain-96 (L-96) identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides showed remarkable Pb resistance and removal capacity. The maximum adsorption capacity of this strain calculated using the Langmuir isotherm was 60.6 mg Pb/g. In an in vivo experiment, young male mice were provided with water (A), Pb-water (B), or Pb-water+ L-96 (C) during puberty. Lower glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels in Pb-exposed male mice that received strain L-96 as a probiotic were suggestive of reduced hepatotoxicity. Moreover, feces from mice treated with L-96 contained more Pb than feces from untreated mice. Increased Pb elimination likely reduced internal accumulation, and this hypothesis was supported by significantly lower Pb concentrations in kidneys and testes of the mice treated with strain L-96. The motility and ATP content of epididymal spermatozoa were partially restored if strain L-96 was administered. In conclusion, isolated L-96 LAB had lead-biosorption activity and efficiently detoxified lead-poisoned male mice, resulting in recovering male reproductive function. These results suggest the potential use of LAB as a probiotic to protect humans from the adverse effects of Pb exposure.

  1. Sulfur alleviates arsenic toxicity by reducing its accumulation and modulating proteome, amino acids and thiol metabolism in rice leaves

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Deeba, Farah; Kumar, Smita; Suman, Shankar; Adhikari, Bijan; Shukla, Yogeshwar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of water is a global concern and rice consumption is the biggest dietary exposure to human posing carcinogenic risks, predominantly in Asia. Sulfur (S) is involved in di-sulfide linkage in many proteins and plays crucial role in As detoxification. Present study explores role of variable S supply on rice leaf proteome, its inclination towards amino acids (AA) profile and non protein thiols under arsenite exposure. Analysis of 282 detected proteins on 2-DE gel revealed 113 differentially expressed proteins, out of which 80 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF. The identified proteins were mostly involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, AA biosynthesis, photosynthesis, protein metabolism, stress and energy metabolism. Among these, glycolytic enzymes play a major role in AA biosynthesis that leads to change in AAs profiling. Proteins of glycolytic pathway, photosynthesis and energy metabolism were also validated by western blot analysis. Conclusively S supplementation reduced the As accumulation in shoot positively skewed thiol metabolism and glycolysis towards AA accumulation under AsIII stress. PMID:26552588

  2. Sulfur alleviates arsenic toxicity by reducing its accumulation and modulating proteome, amino acids and thiol metabolism in rice leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Deeba, Farah; Kumar, Smita; Suman, Shankar; Adhikari, Bijan; Shukla, Yogeshwar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of water is a global concern and rice consumption is the biggest dietary exposure to human posing carcinogenic risks, predominantly in Asia. Sulfur (S) is involved in di-sulfide linkage in many proteins and plays crucial role in As detoxification. Present study explores role of variable S supply on rice leaf proteome, its inclination towards amino acids (AA) profile and non protein thiols under arsenite exposure. Analysis of 282 detected proteins on 2-DE gel revealed 113 differentially expressed proteins, out of which 80 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF. The identified proteins were mostly involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, AA biosynthesis, photosynthesis, protein metabolism, stress and energy metabolism. Among these, glycolytic enzymes play a major role in AA biosynthesis that leads to change in AAs profiling. Proteins of glycolytic pathway, photosynthesis and energy metabolism were also validated by western blot analysis. Conclusively S supplementation reduced the As accumulation in shoot positively skewed thiol metabolism and glycolysis towards AA accumulation under AsIII stress.

  3. Tolfenamic acid degradation by direct photolysis and the UV-ABC/H2O2 process: factorial design, kinetics, identification of intermediates, and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Melo da Silva, Lucas; Pereira Cavalcante, Rodrigo; Fabbro Cunha, Rebeca; Gozzi, Fábio; Falcao Dantas, Renato; de Oliveira, Silvio Cesar; Machulek, Amilcar

    2016-12-15

    This study employed direct UV-ABC photolysis and the UV-ABC/H2O2 process to investigate the degradation of tolfenamic acid (TA), a common anti-inflammatory drug used in both human and veterinary medicine. A 2(3) factorial design with added center point was used to evaluate the effect of three independent variables-namely, H2O2 concentration ([H2O2]), TA concentration ([TA]), and experiment time (time)-on TA degradation and H2O2 photolysis during UV-ABC/H2O2 treatment using a high-pressure mercury vapor lamp (photon flux of 2.6307 × 10(4) J s(-1)) as the UV irradiation source. The responses yielded similar values, revealing a linear behavior, with correlation coefficients R = 0.9968 and Radj = 0.9921 for TA degradation and R = 0.9828 and Radj = 0.9570 for H2O2 photolysis. The most efficient combination of variables was [H2O2] = 255 mg L(-1) and [TA] = 25 mg L(-1), resulting in 100% TA degradation and 98.87% H2O2 photolysis by 90 min of treatment. Additionally, the second-order kinetic constant of the reaction between TA and HO(●) was determined using a competitive kinetic model, employing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D) as the reference compound. The kinetic constant was 1.9 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) in alkaline medium. TA degradation by direct photolysis generated quinone imines as by-products, responsible for the formation of a dark red "internal filter" that increased the value of acute toxicity to Artemia salina. The UV-ABC/H2O2 process did not promote formation of quinone imines by 90 min of treatment and therefore did not increase acute toxicity values. Several by-products generated during TA degradation were identified and possible degradation pathways for the UV-ABC and UV-ABC/H2O2 processes were proposed.

  4. Evaluation of effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on acute potassium dichromate toxicity and genotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Mujgan; Alansal, Nurnisa Oya; Tuncdemir, Matem; Tanriverdi, Gamze; Bayoglu, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the possible protective effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on potassium dichromate (K2 Cr2O7)-induced nephrotoxicity and genotoxicity. Methods: A total of 40 Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: control, K2Cr2O7(K2Cr2O715 mg/kg, one dose, i.p.), K2Cr2O7 + melatonin, K2Cr2O7 + CAPE, and K2Cr2O7 + melatonin + CAPE. Urine and blood samples were collected from rats before scarification. One kidney was collected for histopathological studies, and the other was stored at −80°C for further determination of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) levels with spectrophotometric method. Comet assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity. Results: We observed a significant amelioration in genotoxicity by melatonin and simultaneous melatonin + CAPE treatment compared to K2Cr2O7 group (p1, p2< 0.05). SOD, CAT, GSH, GST, and MDA levels did not change when compared with controls. When K2Cr2O7 applied group was treated with melatonin and CAPE, neither melatonin nor CAPE made any changes in kidney GSH, GST, SOD, and MDA levels (P > 0.05). We noted that treatment with CAPE and melatonin + CAPE together caused a significant decrease in renal tissue damage, an upregulation in the kidney CAT levels (P < 0.05) and a slight healing at GR levels when compared with the K2Cr2O7 group. Conclusion: Our results revealed, CAPE and melatonin may have protective effects on K2Cr2O7 induced nephrotoxicity and cellular damage in rats. PMID:27756952

  5. The effect of WIN 55,212-2 suggests a cannabinoid-sensitive component in the early toxicity induced by organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in related disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I N; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-12-03

    Several physiological processes in the CNS are regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists have been involved in the modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation. Glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids are endogenous metabolites produced and accumulated in the brain of children affected by severe organic acidemias (OAs) with neurodegeneration. Oxidative stress and excitotoxicity have been involved in the toxic pattern exerted by these organic acids. Studying the early pattern of toxicity exerted by these metabolites is crucial to explain the extent of damage that they can produce in the brain. Herein, we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) on early markers of GA-, 3-OHGA-, MMA- and PA-induced toxicity in brain synaptosomes from adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (30-day-old) rats. As pre-treatment, WIN exerted protective effects on the GA- and MMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation induced by all metabolites. Our findings support a protective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by toxic metabolites involved in OAs.

  6. Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid toxicity induced by the radiopharmaceutical 99mTechnetium-Methylenediphosphonic acid and by stannous chloride in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mattos, José Carlos Pelielo De; Matos, Vanessa Coutinho de; Rodrigues, Michelle Pinheiro; Oliveira, Marcia Betânia Nunes de; Dantas, Flavio José S; Santos-Filho, Sebastião David; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Caldeira-de-Araujo, Adriano

    2012-11-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are employed in patient diagnostics and disease treatments. Concerning the diagnosis aspect, technetium-99m (99mTc) is utilized to label radiopharmaceuticals for single photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) due to its physical and chemical characteristics. 99mTc fixation on pharmaceuticals depends on a reducing agent, stannous chloride (SnCl(2)) being the most widely-utilized. The genotoxic, clastogenic and anegenic properties of the 99mTc-MDP(methylene diphosphonate used for bone SPECT) and SnCl(2) were evaluated in Wistar rat blood cells using the Comet assay and micronucleus test. The experimental approach was to endovenously administer NaCl 0.9% (negative control), cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg b.w. (positive control), SnCl(2) 500 μg/mL or 99mTc-MDP to animals and blood samples taken immediately before the injection, 3, and 24 h after (in the Comet assay) and 36 h after, for micronucleus test. The data showed that both SnCl(2) and 99mTc-MDP-induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks in rat total blood cells, suggesting genotoxic potential. The 99mTc-MDP was not able to induce a significant DNA strand breaks increase in in vivo assays. Taken together, the data presented here points to the formation of a complex between SnCl(2) in the radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-MDP, responsible for the decrease in cell damage, compared to both isolated chemical agents. These findings are important for the practice of nuclear medicine.

  7. In vitro removal of toxic heavy metals by poly(γ-glutamic acid)-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chelation therapy involving organic chelators for treatment of heavy metal intoxication can cause cardiac arrest, kidney overload, mineral deficiency, and anemia. Methods: In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) modified with an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) were synthesized by coprecipitation method, characterized and evaluated for their removal efficiency of heavy metals from a metal solution, and simulated gastrointestinal fluid (SGIF). Results: Instrumental characterization of bare- and PGA-SPIONs revealed 7% coating of PGA on SPIONs with a spherical shape and an iron oxide spinel structure belonging to magnetite. The particle sizes as determined from transmission electron microscopy images were 8.5 and 11.7 nm for bare- and PGA-SPIONs, respectively, while the magnetization values were 70.3 and 61.5 emu/g. Upon coating with PGA, the zeta potentials were shifted from positive to negative at most of the environmental pH (3–8) and biological pH (1–8), implying good dispersion in aqueous suspension and favorable conditions for heavy metal removal. Batch studies showed rapid removal of lead and cadmium with the kinetic rates estimated by pseudo-second-order model being 0.212 and 0.424 g/mg·min, respectively. A maximum removal occurred in the pH range 4–8 in deionized water and 5–8 in SGIF corresponding to most gastrointestinal pH except for the stomach. Addition of different ionic strengths (0.001–1 M sodium acetate) and essential metals (Cu, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and K) did not show any marked influence on lead removal by PGA-SPIONs, but significantly reduced the binding of cadmium. Compared to deionized water, the lead removal from SGIF was high at all pH with the Langmuir monolayer removal capacity being 98.70 mg/g for the former and 147.71 mg/g for the latter. However, a lower cadmium removal capacity was shown for SGIF (23.15 mg/g) than for deionized water (31.13 mg/g). Conclusion: These results

  8. Mercapturic Acids Derived from the Toxicants Acrolein and Crotonaldehyde in the Urine of Cigarette Smokers from Five Ethnic Groups with Differing Risks for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungshim L.; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Patel, Yesha; Stram, Daniel O.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    The Multiethnic Cohort epidemiology study has clearly demonstrated that, compared to Whites and for the same number of cigarettes smoked, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher risk for lung cancer whereas Latinos and Japanese Americans have a lower risk. Acrolein and crotonaldehyde are two important constituents of cigarette smoke which have well documented toxic effects and could play a role in lung cancer etiology. Their urinary metabolites 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (3-HPMA) and 3-hydroxy-1-methylpropylmercapturic acid (HMPMA), respectively, are validated biomarkers of acrolein and crotonaldehyde exposure. We quantified levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA in the urine of more than 2200 smokers from these five ethnic groups, and also carried out a genome wide association study using blood samples from these subjects. After adjusting for age, sex, creatinine, and total nicotine equivalents, geometric mean levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA were significantly different in the five groups (P<0.0001). Native Hawaiians had the highest and Latinos the lowest geometric mean levels of both 3-HPMA and HMPMA. Levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA were 3787 and 2759 pmol/ml urine, respectively, in Native Hawaiians and 1720 and 2210 pmol/ml urine in Latinos. These results suggest that acrolein and crotonaldehyde may be involved in lung cancer etiology, and that their divergent levels may partially explain the differing risks of Native Hawaiian and Latino smokers. No strong signals were associated with 3-HPMA in the genome wide association study, suggesting that formation of the glutathione conjugate of acrolein is mainly non-enzymatic, while the top significant association with HMPMA was located on chromosome 12 near the TBX3 gene, but its relationship to HMPMA excretion is not clear. PMID:26053186

  9. p-Coumaric acid and ursolic acid from Corni fructus attenuated β-amyloid(25-35)-induced toxicity through regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Youn, Kumju; Ho, Chi-Tang; Karwe, Mukund V; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-05-28

    Neuroinflammatory responses induced by amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) are important causes in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Blockade of Aβ has emerged as a possible therapeutic approach to control the onset of AD. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects and molecular mechanisms of p-coumaric acid (p-CA) and ursolic acid (UA) from Corni fructus against Aβ(25-35)-induced toxicity in PC12 cells. p-CA and UA significantly inhibited the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in Aβ(25-35)-injured PC12 cells. Blockade of nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and phosphorylation of IκB-α was also observed after p-CA and UA treatment. For the upstream kinases, UA exclusively reduced ERK1/2, p-38, and JNK phosphorylation, but p-CA suppressed ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation. Both compounds comprehensively inhibited NF-κB activity, but possibly with different upstream pathways. The results provide new insight into the pharmacological modes of p-CA and UA and their potential therapeutic application to AD.

  10. Thiomonas sp. CB2 is able to degrade urea and promote toxic metal precipitation in acid mine drainage waters supplemented with urea

    PubMed Central

    Farasin, Julien; Andres, Jérémy; Casiot, Corinne; Barbe, Valérie; Faerber, Jacques; Halter, David; Heintz, Dimitri; Koechler, Sandrine; Lièvremont, Didier; Lugan, Raphael; Marchal, Marie; Plewniak, Frédéric; Seby, Fabienne; Bertin, Philippe N.; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) in Carnoulès (France) is characterized by the presence of toxic metals such as arsenic. Several bacterial strains belonging to the Thiomonas genus, which were isolated from this AMD, are able to withstand these conditions. Their genomes carry several genomic islands (GEIs), which are known to be potentially advantageous in some particular ecological niches. This study focused on the role of the “urea island” present in the Thiomonas CB2 strain, which carry the genes involved in urea degradation processes. First, genomic comparisons showed that the genome of Thiomonas sp. CB2, which is able to degrade urea, contains a urea genomic island which is incomplete in the genome of other strains showing no urease activity. The urease activity of Thiomonas sp. CB2 enabled this bacterium to maintain a neutral pH in cell cultures in vitro and prevented the occurrence of cell death during the growth of the bacterium in a chemically defined medium. In AMD water supplemented with urea, the degradation of urea promotes iron, aluminum and arsenic precipitation. Our data show that ureC was expressed in situ, which suggests that the ability to degrade urea may be expressed in some Thiomonas strains in AMD, and that this urease activity may contribute to their survival in contaminated environments. PMID:26441922

  11. A 90-day repeated dose oral (gavage) toxicity study of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) in rats (with functional observational battery and motor activity determinations).

    PubMed

    Chengelis, Christopher P; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie B; Radovsky, Ann; Shinohara, Motoki

    2009-06-01

    Possible toxic effects of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) were evaluated when administered orally by gavage to rats at levels up to 200mg/kg/day for 90 days. Lower body weight gains were noted in the 10, 50 and 200mg/kg/day group males (not dose-responsive) throughout dosing. Other changes included lower red blood cell parameters, higher reticulocyte counts and lower globulin in the 200mg/kg/day group males and females, higher liver enzymes in males at 50 and 200mg/kg/day, lower total protein and higher albumin/globulin ratio, and lower cholesterol, calcium in males at 200mg/kg/day. Minimal centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy was present in 200mg/kg/day group males and correlated with higher liver weights and slightly higher peroxisome beta oxidation activity at the end of the dosing period. Based on liver histopathology and liver weight changes, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for oral administration was 50mg/kg/day for males and 200mg/kg/day for females.

  12. Activation and attenuation of apoptosis of CD4+ T cells following in vivo exposure to two common environmental toxicants, trichloroacetaldehyde hydrate and trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Blossom, Sarah J; Pumford, Neil R; Gilbert, Kathleen M

    2004-11-01

    Exposure to occupationally relevant concentrations of the environmental pollutant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice has been shown to promote the generation of lupus and autoimmune hepatitis in association with the activation of Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-producing CD4+ T cells. Since blocking TCE metabolism suppressed the TCE-induced alteration in immune function, the present study was initiated to determine whether the major metabolites of TCE, trichloroacetaldehyde hydrate (TCAH) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) could also mediate these immunoregulatory affects in vivo. TCAH and TCA were administered to the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice for 4 weeks. CD4+ T cells from TCAH and TCA-treated MRL+/+ mice, unlike CD4+ T cells from control mice, demonstrated functional and phenotypic signs of activation, as evidenced by increased IFN-gamma production in association with the increased percentage of CD62L(lo) CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, it was also found that the CD4+ T cells from the TCAH and TCA-treated mice showed a decreased susceptibility to the activation-induced cell death (AICD) form of apoptosis following re-stimulation in vitro. By demonstrating that TCAH and TCA can activate CD4+ T cells and inhibit their apoptosis following in vivo exposure represents a mechanism by which environmental toxicants may induce or accelerate the development of autoimmune disease.

  13. Effect of poly-α, γ, L-glutamic acid as a capping agent on morphology and oxidative stress-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Stevanović, Magdalena; Kovačević, Branimir; Petković, Jana; Filipič, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan

    2011-01-01

    Highly stable dispersions of nanosized silver particles were synthesized using a straightforward, cost-effective, and ecofriendly method. Nontoxic glucose was utilized as a reducing agent and poly-α, γ, L-glutamic acid (PGA), a naturally occurring anionic polymer, was used as a capping agent to protect the silver nanoparticles from agglomeration and render them biocompatible. Use of ammonia during synthesis was avoided. Our study clearly demonstrates how the concentration of the capping agent plays a major role in determining the dimensions, morphology, and stability, as well as toxicity of a silver colloidal solution. Hence, proper optimization is